The East Carolinian, October 21, 1993







Alcohol Awareness
The Director
to the
hat possible
have to Al
lapter 8 on
What's up with NAFTA? �
Tune in to The East Carolinian's
masthead on page 5 for an update
on all the fuss brewing over
The North American Free
Trade Agreement.
$
$
"Tllii��Imi�
Today
N
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 60
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, October 21,1993
14 Pages
Another ECU student robbed at gunpoint
By Maureen Rich
Assistant News Editor
Guns, robbery and violence
continue to threaten students
walking on campus late at night,
either by themselves or in pairs,
while the assailants remain at
large. With each incident the level
of violence has escalated,
prompting campus police to in-
crease security and student
awareness across campus.
While two incidents oc-
curred around 3 a.m. on Oct. 14
and 16, the third armed robbery
and assault with a deadly
weapon took place Tuesday
morning, Oct. 19, at 12:35 a.m. on
the ECU campus once again.
Three black males accosted
an ECU student after he with-
drew cash from the ATM ma-
chine at Mendenhall Student
Center. It is believed that the
assailants followed him from the
downtown area onto campus.
After confronting the stu-
dent, one of the three assailants
brandished a "military-style
semi-automatic handgun ac-
cording to police reports.
"Freeze one assailant told
the victim. "Give me your money
or I'll kill you At this point, the
victim attempted to run.
The assailant struck the vic-
tim several times in the back,
knocking him to the ground. The
assailants then robbed him of his
wallet, which contained approxi-
mately $56 in cash.
The three suspects were de -
scribed as black males, all wear-
ing shorts and T-shirts. No fur-
ther identifying characteristics
are available.
"We are concerned for the
health and safety of our stu-
dents said Dr. Alfred T.
Ma tthews, vice chancellor for Stu-
dent Life. Matthews said every
effort will be made to inform stu-
dents of the existing campus
crime situation, and ECU police
plan to visit residence halls to
speak to students directly.
Lt. Keith Knox, crime pre-
vention officer for ECU police,
provided several crime preven-
tion tips, as well as advice to fol-
low in the event of a robbery or
assault.
Do not walk alone at night.
Walk in groups of three or more.
Knox reminded students of sev-
eral transportation availabilities.
"Escorts are available from
Public Safety per request of two
So, here
they
are!
Just when you
thought you
might never find
that one book
you need for that
big paper, you
find out that the
reason you can't
find it on the
shelf is because
i! is in a
WAREHOUSE!
Photo by
Tony Rumple of
ECU News Bureai
Beavis and
Butthead
get burned
MTV restructures
and reprosrams
popular adult
cartoon
NEW YORK (AP) � Beavis
and Butt-head, the fire-loving,
doltish cartoon characters
blamed by a mother for the
death of her 2-year-old child,
will no longer be spewing their
brand of humor early in the
evening.
MTV said Monday it is
moving the callous pair from 7
p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Eastern time.
The cult cartoon was criti-
cized earlier this month after an
Ohio mother of a 5-year-old who
started a fire that killed his
younger sister accused the show
of turning her son into a fire-
bug.
Beavis and Butt-head,
nightmare caricatures of teen-
age boys, like to light fires and
and chant "fire is good MTV
said last week it would delete
any reference to fire in the fu-
ture.
As for the moving of the 7
p.m. show, "B&B" creator Mike
judge and MTV "want to come
up with a different concept for
new episodes of the series that
could be on earlier said MTV
spokeswoman Tina Exarhos.
Fans will be able to watch
their heroes back-to-back, since
they're also on at 11 p.m.
ECU disputes
historic district
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
It has all the makings of a
nasty political fight. On one side
stand the City of Greenville and
the Historic Preservation Com-
mission. Opposing them are sev-
eral property owners on Fifth
Street and, potentially, the ECU
Administration.
The dispute stems from a
project of Greenville's Depart-
ment of Planni g and Commu-
nity Developnru nt that would
designate an area of downtown a
local historic district. The district
encompasses the residences and
buildings between First and Fifth
Streets on the north and south,
and Lewis and Eastern Streets on
the east and west. Much of it
borders on the ECU campus, and
the district includes five univer-
sity properties.
Actually, this area, called
the College View Historic Dis-
trict, has already been officially
recognized as an historic district.
It was placed on the National
Register of Historic Places March
19,1992.
Greenville Environmental
Planner Donald Belk explained
the designation. "These buildings
must undergo various processes
of review when any proposed
renovation is brought forth. It
See HISTORY page 4
Hope
you
enjoy it
This great
weather won't
be around for
long. Take
advantage!
Photo by
Cedric
Van Buren
or less individuals Knox said.
"Call 757-6787 or use a Blue Light
Emergency Phone
The SGA Pirate Ride escort
service is also available, servic-
ing many areas. Students can pick
up an SGA Transit Brochure for
further information.
"Use common sense to
avoid putting yourself in dan-
geroussituations Knox advised.
"Although you have the right to
go any place at any time, you
simply cannot afford to take that
chance today
Students should always tell
someone their plans for the
evening (roommates, friends,
etc.) and what time they may ex-
pect the students to return home.
"Always be alert to your
surroundings Knox said. "If
something seems suspicious, go
to a Blue Light Emergency Phone
and call campus police Trust
your instincts. If something does
not seem right, it usually is not
right
Students should remember
tha t alcohol and or drug use can
cloud judgments and place them
in danger, Knox said.
If a confrontation should
take place, ECU police advise stu-
dents to obey the assailant's de-
mands and orders, and remain
calm. Police advise that sudden
moves may bring a student im-
mediate harm.
Don't argue. Keep it short
and simple, police said. Give the
assailants all the cash and prop-
erty they demand. ECU police
urge students to remember that
no property is worth risking a
life.
Students should not fight
or flee. Violence will only in-
crease personal risk, police
said.
If an attack should take
place, students need to pay
close attention to the assailant's
identifying characteristics:
face, clothes, weapon, vehicle
and direction of travel.
Anyone assaulted or
robbed should contact police
immediately, Knox said, and
remain on the phone until all
information is reported.
"Avoid late night and
early morning activities as
much as possible " Knox said.
The third attack took
place much earlier than the
previous two. Each incident has
become more violent, and guns
have been present in each case.
CRIME PREVENTION TIPS
Three on-campus robberies and assaults have taken place since last Wednesday.
ECU police are urging students to follow these precautionary measures to prevent
further attacks. In all incidents the assailants used a semi-automatic handgun.
� Do NOT walk alone at night. Walk in groups of three or more.
� Be aware of your surroundings.
� Use common sense � avoid late-night and early-morning activities.
� Trust your instincts. If someone appears suspicious, call ECU
police from Blue Light Emergency Phones, which are located throughout campus.
� Be aware that drugs andor alcohol put you at greater risk.
In the event of a robbery andor assault, ECU police advise
these violence-prevention strategies:
� OBEY the robber's demands and orders.
� REMAIN CALM and let the assailant(s) know you intend to cooperate.
� SUDDEN MOVES may bring you immediate harm.
� DON'T ARGUE � keep it short and simple.
GIVE all the cash and merchandise they ask for. No property is worth your life.
� DON'T FIGHT or FLEE, because violence will only increase
the risk that you will be hurt. Do not use your own weapon.
� OBSERVE. Be able to tell police identifying characteristics such
as the robber's face, clothes, weapon, vehicle, and direction of travel.
� REPORT the robbery immediately to pohce and DO NOT hang up.
Anyone with information regarding the three robberies in the past week
are asked to contact Crime Stoppers at 758-7777 or ECU police at 757-6787.
Rehab program receives fed grant
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
The Department of Reha-
bilitation Studies in the ECU
School of Allied Health Sciences
recently received a five-year
grant for rehabilitation counsel-
ing.
The federal grant was
awarded for long-term training
and will be given to 12 of the
approximately 20students in the
rehabilitation counseling pro-
gram.
The grant originated from
the Department of Education's
Rehabilitation Services Admin-
istration. Each year for five years,
$90,493 will be awarded to total
$452,465.
According to Dr. Paul
Alston, chair of the ECU Depart-
ment of RehabilitationStudies, the
grants will be awarded primarily
based on financial need and then
given to minority students, stu-
dents with multi-cultural back-
grounds and disabled students.
"Persons from multi-cul-
tural backgrounds or persons wi th
disabilities will be given special
consideration for grant awards
Alston said.
Students in the rehabilita-
tion counseling program, which
offers a Master of Science de-
gree, can expect to spend two
years completing their degree.
"One of the purposes of
the grant is to increase the num-
ber of minority and multi-cul-
tural professionals in the field
Alston said.
The program, which be-
gan in 1967, has graduated over
500 professionals who are
trained to work with disabled
persons in assisting them to be-
come more independent.
"Graduates of the program
are in high demand in a variety
of rehabilitation settings
Alston said.
Wear your seatbelt or pay the consequences
By Lisa Dawson
Staff Writer
"To date, over 85 citations
have been given to persons on
the ECU campus for seatbelt vio-
lations� this month alone said
Lt. Keith Knox, Crime Preven-
tion Officer for the ECU cam-
pus.
On Oct. 4, campus po-
lice began random seatbelt
"checks" throughout the cam-
pus, as part of the Governor's
Highway Safety Initiative pro-
gram called the "Click It or
Ticket" program. This program
runs for the complete month of
October, and will be conducted
state-wide, with the help of local
police.
In the first week of this
campaign (running from Mon-
day, Oct. 4 to Sunday, Oct.10)
444 citations were given to per-
sons in Pitt County from 36
checkpoints located throughout
the county. Added to this num-
ber were 34 citations given to
persons for child safety-seat vio-
lations, bringing the total num-
ber to 478 citations total.
According to John Ennis
of the Greenville Police Depart-
ment, from Oct. 4th to Oct.
10th, 173 seatbelt citations and
14 child restraint citations were
issued in Greenville. From
Oct.11th to Oct. 17th, 98
seatbelt citations and four child
restraint citations were issued
in Greenville.
Persons who are found
wearing their seatbelts are
given incentives for their sup-
port of the "Click It or Ticket"
program. Those who are not
wearing their seatbelts will be
ticketed and fined 25 dollars.
See TICKET page 4
�WWWI ���!�
.
���





October 21, 1993
arerami
Lying, cheating and stealing: it's the campus way
If you've ever wondered who commits crime on campus,
look around. It could bo the woman sitting next to you in class,
or the guy who lives upstairs in the residence hall. Then again,
it could be you. A series of surveys conducted by a University
of Nebraska criminal justice professor indicates that a majority
of American students � more than 50 percent � candidly
admit to various crimes. In the surveys, 3,417 students at the
University of Nebraska-Omaha were queried over an eight-
year period (1984-91) about whether they ever had committed
any of 22 criminal acts. Some interesting results: 74 percent
admitted driving drunk, 81 percent admitted cheating on a test,
and 53 percent smoked marijuana. Twenty percent of female
students said they had been raped, but only 6.4 percent of the
men said they had forced a woman to have sex against her will.
Films chronicle drinking
"If I see something that needs to be changed, I try to
change it said Trevor Burgess, a senior at Dartmouth College.
He got his chance when, for a sociology course called "Alcohol
and Community he made a music video about drinking on
campus. The result, "Vita Sine Amicitia Mors" � "Life Without
Friends is Death" � examines what it's like to be the only non-
drinker in a crowd of party-goers. The video's ultimate ques-
tion, explains Burgess, is: "Are they really your friends or are
they just drunken people?" Last year his video was shown in a
freshman seminar and in the "Alcohol and Community" class,
and this year more classes will see it.
Clinton approves professorship
Surprisingly, President Clinton has approved the creation
of an endowed professorship in politics at Arkansas College
that is named in his honor. How many people would not
approve something named in their honor, anyway? A contribu-
tion of $500,000 from an anonymous donor made the William
Jefferson Clinton Professorship in international politics pos-
sible, campus officials said. The search has begun for a scholar
in international relations and comparative government to fill
the position. Hillary Rodham Clinton received an honorary
doctorate from the college in 1988. "In agreeing to have his
name associated with it, I think he is showing his confidence
and faith in what we are accomplishing here said John V.
Griffith, the president of Arkansas College.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
WASHINGTON (AP) �
Even top high school students
display a "startling lack of re-
sponsibility" about pregnancy,
AIDS and drunken driving, ac-
cording to a survey that also
revealed rampant cheating in
the nation's schools.
The survey of 1,957 jun-
iors and seniors � all with at
least a B average � by Who's
Who Among American High
School Students found that prin-
cipals and teachers have a lot
more to worry about than aca-
demic skills.
For example, one in three
of the students su rveyed knows
someone who brought a gun or
knife to school. One in five of
the girls was sexually assaulted;
in one-third of the cases the as-
sailant was another student.
More than half the stu-
dents reported frequent fights
among students, and nearly 17
percent of them said a teacher
in their schools had been at-
tacked. Gangs were reported in
suburban, as well as urban
schools.
Twenty percent of boys
said they either owned or had
access to a handgun.
"High school is a very dan-
gerous place today said Paul
Krouse, publisher of the Who's
Who Among American High School
Students reference book.
Nevertheless, only 12 per-
cent of the students said they
felt unsafe at school � which
Krouse said was "surprising
considering the level of fire-
power and mayhem around
them
The 24th annual Survey of
High Achievers, which was re-
leased Tuesday, indicated that
top students were no different
than other teens in being will-
ing to take risks.
Nineteen percent of the
boys surveyed and 27 percent
of the girls reported that they
had sex.
Sixty percent said they
were concerned about contract-
ing AIDS when having sex, but
52 percent of the boys and 40
percent of the girls said they
would engage in sex even if a
condom were not available.
Eleven percent of the stu-
dents admitted to having driven
a car after drinking, and two in
five have ridden in a car even
though the driver had been
drinking.
"They show a startling lack
of responsibility about their
physical welfare the reference
book publisher said in a state-
ment. "AIDS doesn't scare
them. Pregnancy does, but not
enough to make them take pre-
cautions consistently. And
drinking is a way of life, even
behind the wheel
Krouse said there is a sense
of invincibility during the teen
years, the belief that "it can't
happen to me
When asked about cheat-
ing:
�80 percent said cheating
was common at their schools,
and 78 percent said they had
done some cheating themselves.
�67 percent said they had
copied someone else's home-
work.
�40 percent said they had
cheated on a test or quiz.
�25 percent said they had
used summarized versions of
books to avoid reading the full
book.
�14 percent said they had
plagiarized part of an essay.
Lew Armistead, spokes-
man for the National Associa-
tion of Secondary School Prin-
cipals, said students today bring
all their problems through the
school door, and parents have
to start taking more responsi-
bility.
"Adults need to stop
thinking the can demonstrate
unethical behavior and at the
same time tell kids to be honest
and expect the kids will demon-
strate ethical behavior he said.
"Kids are seeing all around
them that elected officials, busi-
ness leaders, all of us are taking
shortcuts in life, and we need to
understand thatthey're going to
follow our examples
Suicide is also an issue
among the students, with one-
third saying they had consid-
ered taking their own life, and
six students actually attempt-
ing it.
Reasons cited included
general depression, 77 percent;
school pressures, 46 percent; a
fight with parents, 44 percent;
and the breakup of a relation-
ship, 27 percent.
The survey was sent last
spring to 5,000 of the nearly
700,000 high achievers featured
in the 1993 edition of Who's Who
Among American High School Stu-
dcnts.The results were based on
the 1,957 completed question-
naires that were returned.
Tupperware will pay for
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Is your mother in the busi-
ness of home tupperware? Does
your dad grow cranberries in Mas-
sachusetts? Are you interested in
spending a summer at the Wash-
ington, D.C. zoo? Ifso there may be
a scholarship waiting for you. The
Scholarship Book, written by Daniel
J. Cassidy, has completed its fourth
edition of private scholarship list-
ings across the U.S.
The Scholarship Book, which
claims to be America's number one
guide to private sector scholarships,
saysthatoutofthe$700billionavail-
able in financial assistance, only $400
million is used. The number of pri-
vate scholarships available is sur-
prising; WalMart, for example, of-
fers one scholarship a year for a
resident in the advertising area of
every store in operation. Do your
parents work for Midas, Sarah Lee
or the shoe industry? Check it out.
The book offers valuable in-
formation on receiving scholarships
in the areas of business administra-
tion, education, engineering, archi-
tecture, agriculture, marine science,
social sciences, the medical field and
many more. Even if you are uncer-
tain of a field, half of the book gives
listings of "general" scholarships
available. Some of these include
awards for being on your college
bowling team, delivering newspa-
pers or being a caddy for more than
two years.
The book is easy to read and
gives detailed information on who
to write about obtaining such schol-
arships. Therearealsomany draw-
backs. Most of the listings in the
"general" half of the book are for
high school seniors. Many of the
specialized scholarships are only
offered to members of organiza-
tions, minorities or upperclass-
men. The price is $19.95 with no
guarantees. Ask for it for Christ-
mas.
EAST .
CAROLINIAN
Chapter 8
The Director's limousine drove
down Miller Street, the main drag
of the Brewery. All the nightlife had
gone to ground long ago, leaving
the streets empty and dusty with
the refuse of a night of drinking and
drowning � of sorrows, that is.
The limousine pulled up to a
nondescript building set on thecor-
ner of Miller and Busch. The two
thugs escorted me into thebuilding
� each one with a firm grip on my
arms. The inside of the place didn't
exactly mirror the outside. 1 he place
was plush � deep carpets under
pictures that took at least five min-
utes to figure out. I didn't get a
chance to see much else as my es-
corts dragged me through a door-
way.
The doorway opened up into a
room the size of a warehouse. In
one comer sat a group of four people
smoking cigarettes and shooting the
breeze. The blind black guy in the
middle struck a chord with me that
tugged until it finally came loose
from my memory. Ray Chuggers�
that's who it was. The three gor-
geous women around him could
only be his Pintsi Girls. My atten-
tion was drawn away, however, by
a British voice calling my name.
That voice belonged to the
portly man sitting in the middle of
the room facing me. With his ring of
white hair surrounding his head
and his charcoal suit almost sur-
rounding his belly, it was his chair
that gave him away. For on the back
was the name of the man who
wanted to see me � the Director.
"Hammered, we have things
to discuss His soft voice carried
through the room easily as he waved
my two escorts away. I brushed off
my suit, readjusted my fedora and
stood my ground.
"Like what, Director? I don't
take too kindly to being grabbed
from a job
"That's exactly why I appro-
priated you. Your job. I've been hav-
ing too many complaints about a
Mr. Cohol lately. He detracts from
my profits and must be illuminated
on the subject The Director tossed
me a folded paper, obviously in-
tending me to read it.
The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one hand on your wallet
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
here a man can forget his troubles and drown his
sorrows for a while.
Mick Hammered had sworn never to set foot
� in the Bravery again. Setting out to find his old
' friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
in the seedy and fermented world of the Brewery.
Every Thursday in The East Carolinian, Mick
will meet a character who will expose Al in a ivholc new light. When it's finally
overanddonewith.Mick�andthereader�willbefacedwithoneofthemost
important questions either has ever faced.
What place does Al Cohol have in my life?
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tough, comparable to
Spillane's Hammer and Hammett's Spade
foel Keggsy, The Beersborough Gazette
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The letter was from a 18-year
old kid who watched a lot of foot-
ball games on theT.V. He was won-
dering why there were so many
commercial breaks centering on
beer when kids were being told
about the dangers of Cohol.
"Somewhere along the line
young people are receiving mixed
messages the kid wrote. "Theteen-
age drinking problem in this coun-
try continues to grow and people
wonder why! So where does the
responsibility begin?" Good ques-
tion, kid.
"I am receiving a bad reputa-
tion from Mr. Cohol, Hammered
The Director laced his fingers to-
gether under his chin, looking ex-
actly like a overweight Thinker.
"Cohol is promoting himself
through three ideas � sex, stress
relieving and good times. By com-
bining himself and these ideas,
Cohol confuses the public into
thinking he is necessary for any of
these things to happen. In order for
me to be a good director, I need
someone to ensure that my work is
not misunderstood. I am hoping
you can provide that
"I don't promise anything, Di-
rector. When I do find Cohol, be
sure this will be one more thing on
our list to discuss. Now, if that's
all?" I turned around only to be
stopped by my two escorts. I looked
back at the Director.
"All right, Mister Hammered.
But I am not a man who takes fail-
ure lightly. Get me results He
waved at his two thugs, who broke
apart to let me pass through. "Let
my men take you back to your ve-
hicle
"Thanks, but no thanks. I'd
rather walk I stepped between the
thugs and walked out, never look-
ing back. As I walked down Miller
Street, smoking a cigarette, I de-
cided I would have to see the kid
again. The one who had started me
on this chase.
Johnny "Red" Cohol, if you
believed his story.
Information provided for last
week's chapter taken from study done
by oe Boehman.
IT'S BACK !
THE 3rd SEMI-ANNUAL WRESTLING
TOURNAMENT
SUNDAY, November 7
REGISTER:
October 18 to November 3
Sign up at
204
Christenbury
Gymnasium
or call 757-
6387.
SPONSORED BY:
BELK HALL COUNCIL
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
BLOWOUT
OF THE 1
WEEK
Lemonheads
"Come on Feel"
$1298CD
$898 Cassette
�Nr�w WUl-M. .�
BITS
Z04 E. 5TH ST.
752-6953
OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT EVERY NIGHT

�ii�"





October 21, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
What about the economy?
iomy
is he finds
. i ilicy
the oft-quoted sign in the Clinton
campaign headquarters in Little
Rock, Ark. And soon after his elec-
tion, Clinton vowed to concentrate
like a laser beam" on the economy.
But over the past few months,
Clinton has found his attention dis-
tracted by developments in Russia.
Ixisnia, Somalia and now Haiti.
And he is spending time on
these world crises while also press-
ing for major legislative initiatives
on heal Ih care, cri me, welfare reform
and the North American Free Trade
Agreement.
By an v account, he'sgota lot of
balls in the air at once. So whatever
happened to the economy? Or that
presidential laser beam?
True, health care reform can
help health costs that are a drag on
theeconomv. And NAFTA can help
boost exports � if you subscribe to
the administration view and not the
labor view that it will cost U.S. jobs.
One reason the president
hasn't focused as much on the
economy as he once did is that it
appears to be improving. Slowly but
unmistakably. And that's one of the
best things Clinton's got going for
him.
If the economy wasn't in an
upturn, he could easily find himself
in a real fix � given the other chal-
- lacing him at home and
�ad.
I bus, he has a luxury that
i ieorge Bush didn't 1 le can spend
some political capita! dealing with
ioreignpolicvwithoutitcomingback
to haunt him.
Interest ratesand inflation have
remained at their lowest levels in
decades. Economic growth appears
to he returning after two sluggish
quarters.
(i Tuesday, the government
reported that construction of new-
homes and apartments jumped to
the highest level in more than 312
years in September. Business invest-
ment is also on the upswing.
Thenumbers"indicatethat the
economy is picking up Clinton said
Tuesday. "And I'm encouraged by
that
Predictably, opinion is divided
on whether he had anything to do
with the improvements.
"Our reading of the economy
suggests a path of low inflation, low
interest rates and a steady recovery
that is consistent with the
administration's objectives of a bal-
anced recover) boasted Laura
Tyson, head of the White House
Council of Economic Advisers.
"I think he's going to continue
to be fortunate on that front for a
while'saidCynthia La tta,an econo-
mist with DRI-McGraw-Hill, a fore-
casting service based in Lexington,
Mass. She said no recession is envi-
sioned any time soon, right through
the next presidential election. "It
certainly can't be hurting him she
said.
Breast screenings questioned for women under 50
WASHINGTON (AP) � As
National Mammographv Day
was being officially observed, a
published report reemphasized
how strongly many researchers
feel that most women under 50
do not need X-ray screening for
breast cancer.
Tuesday was so designated
by PresidentClinton tocall atten-
tion to the breast X-rays that of-
ten detect cancer in its early
stages.
But as his health care plan
takes shape, one of the political
arguments will be over whether
women of any age should be cov-
ered for mammograms or just
those over 50, who are at greatest
risk.
Clinton proposes that over-
50 women would be eligible for
free breast X-rays everv two years
and that women at particular risk
would be tested more frequently.
Some organizations recommend
frequent mammograms for
women over 40.
At an international work-
shop at the National Cancer Insti-
tute last February, researchers
decided that mammograms are
of no benefit for women aged 40-
49.
The Journal of the National
Cancer Institute, out today, sum-
marizes that workshop and con-
cludes that for women under 50,
"randomized controlled trials
consistently demonstrated no
benefit from screening in the first
5-7 years
Further, it said, after 10-12
years of follow-up "none of four
trials have found a significant
benefit in mortality
It was a different matter in
women aged 50-69, the article
said: "Screening reduces breast
cancer mortality by about a
third
Dr. Russell Harris, breast
cancer expert at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill's
Lineberger Com prehensi ve Ca n-
cer Center, was one of the ana-
lysts. Leading the study was Dr.
Suzanne Fletcher, former profes-
sor of medicine at UNC-Chapel
Hill.
The main conclusion, that
regular mammographv examina-
tions are not necessary for women
under 50, was reported at the
time.
"The risk of developing
breast cancer increases markedly
with age; more than 75 percent of
breast cancers occur in women
who are older than 50 said the
journal. "The annual risk of de-
veloping breast cancer is ap-
proximately one in 3,700 for a
woman 30-34 years old, but it is
one in 235 for a woman 70-74.
"Therefore, although the
lifetime risk of breast cancer Is
high, one in eight, most women
are not at high risk of developing
the disease while they are
young
The American Cancer Soci-
ety recommends annual
mammograms for women over
50 and every one or two years for
women 40 to 50.
The Cancer Institute's
workshop included discussions
of eight randomized controlled
trials of screening in women 40
to 74. These trials alone have in-
cluded nearly 500,000 women.
Reported incidences of
breast cancer have been rising
steadily since the 1940s in the
United States. But many doc-
tors believe more widespread
use of mammographv, rather
than a true increase in inci-
dence, is the cause.
An issue among experts
concerns frequency of examina-
tion. Swedish studies suggest a
mammogram as infrequently as
every 33 months reduces breast
cancer deaths in the 50-69 group.
That raises the possibility,
the article says, "that a screening
interval of 12 months may notbe
necessary" in that age group. It
said further studies would be
useful.
Another major question is
the most effective way of screen-
ing. A Canadian study suggests
that ca reful clinical breast exami-
nation may be as effective in re-
ducing cancer deaths as X-rays.
And which is better, a
single-v iew mammogram or one
that gives two views for the
women aged 50-69? "Further
research should be carried out
says the article.
BOO!
GET YOUR HALLOWEEN SUPPLIES
& GOODIES AT
BELLS FORK SQUARE
HWY 43 .SOUTH
GRtENVILLH 355-6212
Anything
Paper
758-3188
Thursday- $1.50 nachos
$2.50 pitchers
Friday- 32oz draft $2.00
Sunday- GRAND OPENING
3:00-5:00
Monday- Monday Night Football Specials
$2.50 wings $2.50 pitchers
Tuesday- All the hotdogs you can eat $5.00
3:00-6:00
Wednesday-12 price appetizers 3:00-6:00
hrs
M-W n-til
Thurs, Fri, Sat 11-2 ECU
Sunday 11-8 CAMPUS
706 South Evans
Greenville, NC "��St
10th St
8th St .

WAUotVEfc
M COSTUME SUPPLIES
Wi NOW OPEN
(A MfJ at 642 Arlington Blvd.
MJS Arlington Village
M-F 10-6, Sat 10-5
FEATURING:
Costumes, Wigs, Make-up, Hats, Ears,
Masks, Whips, Spray-On Hair Colorsm v
"u plus Much, Much More
FOR MORE INFORMATION
A Division Of AT BARRE, LTD.
era
STUDENTS
Enjoy the convenience of
our Check Cashing
Card at ail locations
Apply today
I THIS WEEK'S SPECIALS!
FRESH GROUND
ROUND
$1-88 ib- jlils
GROUND FRESH DAILY
CAMPBELL'S
CHICKEN
NOODLE
SOUP
Chicken
Noodle
10OZ
4S2.00
BUDWEISER,
BUD LIGHT
or BUD DRY
6 pack of 12oz cans
ES8 IP FH
ir KT3 y-vi
tl IM 3 i BUD '�'
iJcn Ugmt:
QUAKER
INSLANT
GRLTS
11oz INDIVIDUAL SERVINGS
$1.29
CRINKLE CUT
FRENCH FRIES
21b
2S1.00
I z
FRATERNITIES &
SORORITIES
Call NOW for a
CHARGE ACCOUNT
and Plan ahead for
your Big Events
FRESH GRADE A
FRYER
BREAST
980 ib.
ENGLISH
MUFFINS
PLAIN OR CINNAMON
& RAISIN
BUY ONE
GET ONE OF
EQUAL VALUE
FREE
BREYERS
PREMIUM ICE CREAM
OR ICE MILK
12 gal.
$2.99
2 LITER
COCA-COLAS
PLANTER'S
DRY ROAST
PEANUTS
lOoz JAR
BUY ONE
GET ONE
FREE
iUMJERi
v Say T-s
LAUNDRY
DETERGENT
WITH BLEACH
NOW ACCEPTED AT BELL'S FORK
& IOTH ST. LOCATIONS
2512 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE
1112 N.GREENE STREET
1204 N. MEMORIAL DRIVE
BELL'S FORK SQUARE
2520 E.10th STREET
756-0110
752-4111
758-2501
765-6105
757-1880
GOOD OCTOBER 20 THRU OCTOBER 24
32oz BOX





October 21, 1993
HISTORY
Continued from page 1
supports it.
"The chancellor has tx
i to do what he can to main-
tain the historical integrity of the
buildings on campus
In addition to the College
lew area, other campus build-
ings have received this designa-
tion. Included in this first round
of buildings deemed historically
or architecturally significant are
Jarvis, Fleming and Cotten
Dorms, Spilman, Ragsdale, Gra-
ham and Flanagan Buildings,
Wright Auditorium, Messick The-
atre Arts Center and the Mamie
Jenkins Building. These struc-
tures are not under consideration
for the local historic district.
iev Historic
those ar-
i Street and
tingstan-
hancellor s residence,
�. side nt -louse, the Tav-
lumni House, the
Ward guest house and the
ard I louse are the univer-
sit) -owned properties that would
be affected bv this designation.
If designated an historic dis-
trict, any proposed changes to
these buildings would also entail
a local review bv the Historic Pres-
ervation Com mission. "This com-
mission would review the action,
making comments, and issue a
Certificate of Appropriateness if
the changes are in keeping with
the architectural integrity of the
building Belk said.
Examples of actions that re-
quire a Certificate of Appropri-
ateness include the addition of
anv structure, the construction of
porches, patios or decks, the in-
stallation of fences and any
change to the exterior of the struc-
ture other than painting.
Belk said unlike the current
designation, comments bv this lo-
cal commission will be binding.
If the property owner is not satis-
fied by this decision, he or she
may appeal to the North Carolina
Historical Commission for fur-
ther review.
"A great majority of the
households in this area support
it. I don't think the local commis-
sion is going to be overzealous in
these concerns Belk said.
Assistant University Attor-
ney Greg Hassler said the univer-
sity is not opposing the idea, and
the Board of Trustees recently
formed a committee to review it.
"It would mean, among other
things, if the university wanted
to change a structure, they would
have to seek a Certificate of Ap-
Clinton faces challenge on
use of troops in Haiti, Bosnia
. WASHINGTON (AP) �
Ha ng fought off a Republican
attempt to prevent U.S. troops
from serving under foreign com-
mand, President Clinton faces a
sterner Senate challenge to his
authority to send forces to Haiti
and Bosnia.
The Senate turned aside a
measure Tuesday night that
would have barred the use of
funds on any United Nations
operations in which U.S. soldiers
were under the operational com-
mand of a foreign officer.
The vote was 65-33, with
11 Republicans joining 54 Demo-
crats in opposing the amend-
ment to the fiscal 1994 defense
spending bill.
Instead, the Senate re-
soundingly approved a non-
binding resolution calling on the
president to consult Congress
before placing any troops under
foreign command and asking for
a report within 48 hours.
.The measure expressed the
sense of the Senate that U.S.
troops "must be under the op-
erational control of qualified
commanders and must have
clear, effective and robust com-
mand and control arrange-
ments
The vote was 96-2, with
Sens. Malcolm Wallop, R-Wyo
and Charles Grassley, R-Iowa,
in opposition.
Congressional discontent
and outright anger with the
administration's foreign policy
has erupted in a series of con-
gressional challenges to
Clinton's power as commander
in chief.
"I think the administration
has been given a warning light
Senate Armed Services Commit-
tee Chairman Sam Nunn, D-Ga
said of the two days of debate
and subsequent votes.
Frustration with Clinton
and his foreign agenda crosses
party lines. Democratic Sen.
Robert Byrd of West Virginia
objected to the White House's
Somalia policy last week. Re-
publican Sen. Don Nickles of
Oklahoma sponsored the troop-
under-foreign control measure.
But the most severe test
will come from Senate Minority
Leader Bob Dole, R-Kan who
has prepared two amendments
requiring congressional autho-
rization before Clinton can com-
mit troops to Haiti and Bosnia.
While fending off the
Nickles amendment, the White
House continued to negotiate
with Dole on Tuesday on his
amendment that would restrict
spending for American forces
in Haiti unless Congress ap-
proves.
"I want to give the presi-
dent the benefit of the doubt,
particularly in foreign policy
the Senate Republican leader
said. "If not, we'll just have the
debate and have a vote up or
down on the amendments as
they're presently drafted
The U.S. Navy stopped and
boarded a Belizian ship off the
coast of Haiti on Tuesday after-
noon, the first such action since
the reimposition of a U.N. oil
and weapons embargo against
the Caribbean nation at mid-
night Monday.
The master of the boarded
ship, who said he was carrying
cement, cooperated with the
Navy and was allowed to pro-
ceed to the Turks and Caicos
Islands.
During the Senate debate,
both Republicans and Demo-
crats warned that curbing presi-
dential authority would set a
dangerous precedent and un-
dermine U.N. operations.
There also were attacks on
the administration's foreign
policy, and few lawmakers came
to the White House's defense.
' There is a real danger that
the Senate, the Congress, may
be going too far in the passions
of the moment Sen. Arlen
Specter, R-Pa told his col-
leagues.
But Specter accused the ad-
ministration of creating a situa-
tion that provoked the amend-
ments.
"The problem is materially
compounded by a president
who regrettably has been inde-
cisive, vacillating which
makes the presidency a weak
institution Specter said.
Wallop was more blunt in
his assessment of the
administration's Somalia plan:
"A failed policy delivered by
incompetent people
On the other side of the
Capitol, Democratic Rep. Frank
McCloskey of Indiana de-
manded the resignation of Sec-
retary of State Warren Christo-
pher, asserting that he had
botched foreign policy in Bosnia,
Somalia, Russia and Haiti.
HALLOWEEN
IS
COMING
DAPPER DAN S
- IS READY!
HOW ABOUT YOU?
VINTAGE
CLOTHING
; JEWELRY
COSTUME ACCESSORIES
417 Evans St Mall
Downtown Greenville
Across from the Elbo
752-1750
Premium Draft Beer
All Day - Everyday
99C
12 Price Appetizers
in the lounge
Mon - Fri ifrom 4-7 pm only
752-1907 � 800 East 10th Street
EatlnOrTakeOut
7 Days A Week
Monday - flmrsday 11 -11
Friday & Saturday 11 - Midnite
Sunday 11 -10
propriateness. I understand that
it is quite a long process Hassler
said.
"We have already been
placed on the National Register.
We're not sure we want to go the
extra mile and inherit further re-
strictions Smith said.
If ECU decides to oppose
the district, it will have to argue
its case before the Greenville City
Council, who will make the final
decision on the plan after a series
of public hearings beginning in
December. Belk said the North
Carolina General Statutes give
municipal governments the
power to designate state-owned
buildings as historic places.
Though hopeful for the
administration's support, Belk is
anticipating the worst. "ECU is
Greenville. ECU's opposition
would weigh heavily in the minds
of some members of the City
Council
Cont'd
from
P9-1
10th Street
Ernie Carattini
State Inspections
� Brakes � Tires
� Tune-Ups � Batteries
� Major & Minor Engine Repairs
752-0531
2704 E. 10th St. �Greenville
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
TICKET
This campaign is spon-
sored by the Governor's High-
way Safety Program, the NC De-
partment of Insurance, the Na-
tional Highway Traffic Safety
Administration, the UNC High-
way Research Center and the In-
surance Institute for Highway
Safety.
As Joe Parker, Director
of the North Carolina Governor's
Highway Safety Program said,
"When the number-one killer of
North Carolinians aged 1-34 is
traffic crashes, something has to
be done � "Click It or Ticket" is
going to make a big difference in
improving these odds
Sit (Bacl, eia
We 're Oierel
East Carolina
TYPING
�Papers �Lesson Plans
�Case Studies �Senior Papers
etc
For Fast, Accurate,
Dependable Typing
Call:
355-TYPE
Days, Nights, Weekends
Service
WESLEY COMMONS NORTH
Starting at $54,000.
� New in the University area
� 2 Bedrooms, 2 baths
� Cathedral ceiling
� Flush mounted fireplace
� Range, Refrigerator, Dishwasher
� WasherDryer hookups
� Heat pump system
� Private patio with storage room
� Special financing available to
ECU Students with parents residing
50 miles from Greenville; payments
like rent but with tax benefits!
3
�io� , . j
KS9
-
JSD
(H
Marketed Exclusively By:
COLDUieU.
W,G. BLOUNT &
ASSOC, REALTORS
201 E. Arlington Blvd. (919)756-3000 Greenville, NC 27858
(A TRADITION SINCE LATE SEPTEMBER)
752-5855 1 1 0 E. 4th St Downtown
Thursday
MOMTW Of imWfC (HARD TO CLASSIFY)
(REAL GOOD, NEW .MUSIC, YEP, REAL GOOD)
HEADSTONE CIRCUS (HEAD MUSIC)
(THEY'RE BACK AND THEY'RE GREAT)
Saturday
FLYING MICE
(HEAD MUSIC)
BRIM; VOl'R NETS; LOTS OF CHEESE, MAYBE YOU'LL CATCH SOMETHING
Sunday
05v IVlOiSCn (and other generous specials)
Monday
MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL ON OUR SMALL SCREEN TV
(THE BIG ONE EXPLODED LAST WEEK AND YOU MISSED IT.)
SPECIAL NOTE: THE KINGS MEN THANK YOU FOR RETURNING THE
JESTER HAT. WE CANCELLED THE DELUXE THUMBSCREW ORDER.
ONCE AGAIN "GREAT DRINK SPECIALS EVERY DAY" S
We open at 4:30 EVERY TUES-FRI





The East Carolinian
October 21. 1993
Opinion
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez Manager
Gregor) Dickens, Editor
Matthew A. Hege, denising Director
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Karen Hassell,
Maureen Rich, - Sews Editor
Julie Totten, LifestyU Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd. Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asst. Spans Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia V'ongue, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Printed on
100 recycled paper
Wes I inkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kclliv Account Executive
Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executm
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Serving the ECL' community since 1925. The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited
tor decency or brevity. Tite East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to: Opinion
Editor. The East Carolinian. Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call t9l9) 757-6366.
NAFTA misguided in its focus
When the North American Free Trade
Agreement (NAFTA) was first introduced,
there seemed to be an unlimited amount of
praise surrounding it. Then Ross Perot shoved
his weird little nose into it (not to mention his
rather sizable ears), and suddenly people were
questioning the validity of such a pact. Actu-
ally, the idea of a fair, free trade is long over-
due; what NAFTA has become is a messy,
unclear glob of misdirected goodwill and in-
sight. Maybe Ross is on to something this time
(we can only muse).
To put it simply, NAFTA opens the trade
borders with Mexico and Canada. In theory, it
aims at developing a plausible set of rules for
bridging the economic gap between the U.S.
and two completely dissimilar countries (in
relation to each other and the U.S.). Techni-
cally, NAFTA would phase out most U.S. tar-
iffs on Mexican goods and ease restrictions
that Mexico imposes on American producers.
But what Washington doesn't realize is
that this move will extend the boundaries of
the maquiladora zone, an area of Mexico just
inside the borders that is home to numerous
U.S. plants. These plants have perpetuated an
unbelievable pollution problem, labor exploi-
tation and industrial slums. But, hey, cheap
labor!
The reality of locating U.S. factories in
Mexico is this: a third of our "foreign" trade is
actually American companies producing in-
termediate products destined for return to the
U.S. This cheap labor results in equally cheap,
foreign-made products that find their way back
into the U.S. What we need is not an increase in
foreign trade, but anti-trust, labor and trade
policies that put community well-being first in
America. Maybe then we can see an end to
maquiladora zones in Mexico and variations of
them in the U.S.
Second on the NAFTA gripe list is the
Clinton administration's plan to replace federal
money lost under NAFTA with increased fees
on international airline and cruise ticket and
higher rail and truck fees. This tax increase will
average a smart $2.5 billion.
Now come on. Tariff reductions would
deprive the U.S. government of about $400 mil-
lion a year over the next five years (Isn't that
about how much the proposed student rec cen-
ter will cost each of us?). Seriously, though, how
else do organized labor officials, congressional
Democrats and conservative House Republi-
cans opposed to the tax increase think we'll
make up for the loss? What better way to pay for
it than through an unnecessary international
luxury expenditure?
Basically, the administration wants to
double the fee charged on rail transport across
international lines to $15 per crossing. The $5 fee
on airline and ocean liner tickets and on com-
mercial trucking movements across the Mexi-
can and Canadian borders would be doubled to
$10.
� Now how many of you out there regularly
cross international borders by air, land or sea? It
seems that those high-ranking U.S. officials are
looking out for their own interests, not the needs
of the global community or U.S. workers, even.
And if anyone can afford a tax increase of $5 on
an airline ticket, it's people getting paid five to
six digit salaries.
In any case, a vote in the House has been set
for Nov. 17. The way we see it, a more focused
approach to free trade could benefit American
workers and the future of America's working
families. That can only be done if local citizens
first set their own standards for incorporating
social justice, respect for the environment and
the enrichment of local communities into daily
life. Then we'll talk free trade.
By Alex Ferguson
Grandparents provide living history
I'm sure you've heard the
phrase "Be careful what you
wish for, you just might get it
Oh, my friends, how true, how
true! For those of you who read
my article last week (both of
you), I was lamenting over my
inability to leave Greenville for
Fall Break. Lady Luck, in her
infinite wisdom, chose to bless
me and grant me the circum-
stances with which to leave our
blessed city. This weekend, I was
in the Home of the Hillbillies,
the Depot
oh, so, professional.
But I didn't travel 12 hours
simply to pick up poor grammar
or make fun of the backward ways
of our neighboring state. For
Kingston, Tennessee is also the
home town of my father and his
parents. Word had reached our
family that my grandfather was
deathly ill and was not expected
to live. Dad, alarmed by the news,
thought it best for us to make one
last journey to sav our good-bves.
Luckily,
.one day we too
will be stooped and
gray, with our
fading senses and
our philosophies of
a day long gone.
of Dim-
wits, the
one, the
only
Kingston,
Tennes-
see!
T o
fully un-
derstand
just how ��
minuscule this town is, quickly
draw a sketch of Tennessee. Pour
a spoonful of sugar on the east-
em tip of the state. Wipe away
all of the grains except for one,
leaving it in the center of the
eastern section. Now, wipe that
grain off the map. What's left?
Nothing! Same size as Kingston!
And just as meaningless!
I really shouldn't joke
about the town, seeing as one
day they might get their hands
on this paper and, once they
learn to read, might be offended.
Besides, I should thank them for
this wonderful "kuntree" twang
that I've picked up. It amuses
my friends to hear me slaughter
the English language and it's
reports ot
grandfather's im-
minent death
were severely ex-
aggerated. True,
he was weak and
dazed, and his
memory
waswellshot,
but for a man of
93, I thought he
was doing ex-
mmmm tremely well. Af-
ter the initial scare was over, my
father and his dad settled down
for a dysfunctional yet heartwarm-
ing chat. Grandfather asking ques-
tions, dad shouting responses, the
old man nodding his head in com-
pliance before asking the same
question again. Truly a Norman
Rockwell moment.
As I watched the conversa-
tion unfold between two genera-
tions of the Ferguson clan, I found
myself growing sad and thought-
ful. As obvious as it sounds, it
must be extremely frustrating and
frightening to get old. To many of
the elderly today, life must be ter-
rifying, the way it flies by. I com-
mend those who have kept up
with the times, as it's hard enough
for us young whippersnappers to
keep up with the radical changes.
Because of our age differ-
ence, it's hard to see eye to eye. To
most of us (i.e. college students,
youth in general), our elderly may
seem slow and difficult, many with
their eyes fixed on the past. Some
may even be considered a burden.
We've all been exasperated with
the little old lady (from Pasadena?)
driving in front of us, head barely
clearing thedashboard, her speed-
ometer quivering on 25 in the 45
speed zone. But we've no right to
denounce them or treat them any
less than we would our cohorts
and friends. No matter their age
and condition, they're still human
and, more importantly, they're our
moms and dads.
Let's not forget that one day
we too will be stooped and gray,
with our fading senses and our
philosophies of a day long gone.
We'll fish for dates and names
that have escaped us or talk of
days when prices were lower and
movies were better. We'll certainly
expect civil treatment from our
youth, having nursed them
through life till they could stand
on their own two feet. At the least,
we'll want them just to listen to us.
Shouldn't we then extend to our
parents and grandparents the
same courtesy?
Next time you've got a
minute, call the grandparents. Tell
them what's going on with your
life and show an interest in theirs.
Chances are they'll talk of old
times, but you might learn some-
tiling. Even if it's nothing more
than how to make grape jelly, or
how to freeze rolls properly.
FtKEAKMS IN AM IPCflL MQftl
By Laura Wright
Gun wieldin' folks just miss the mark
Well, the parking sticker
people may get my money yet; I am
too afraid not to park as close as
possible to the buildings where I
spend my time. Despite the fact that
it's been nice out lately, especially in
the evenings, despite the fact that I
have been walking to and from my
car without much thought for my
ownsafety,therearepeopleoutthere,
lurking in the dark. And they have
guns.
This column was going to be
about discrimination against left
handers�roll your eyes if you will,
but if s a more serious than you might
think�a subject I hope to tackle at a
later date, but I've been walking
around in utter fear for the past few
days and so those lefties out there
screaming for equality will have to
wait.
Let's examine what happens
when crimes occur: the general pub-
lic gets warnings from newscasters
and police officers about what they,
as victims and would-be victims,
should do to keep violent crimes
from happening to them. After a
date rape, we hear comments like,
"Why wasshe alone with thatguy in
the first place? She was just asking
for it Or after the armed robbery
behind Rawl on Saturday night, "If
he was walking alone at 3:00 a.m
then it's his fault
Blaming the victim doesn't
solve anything. Of course we have to
be careful andlookoutfor ourselves,
but even if I decided to traipse
through campus in the nude at 3:00
a.m I still would not be at fault if I
was attacked. Now, let me clarify
what I mean It would be really stu-
pid for me to walk through campus
in the nude at 3:00 a.m. (not to men-
tionextremelyembarrassing)butmy
attacker would be to blame, not me.
All of the advice�don't go to
the bank machine at night, don't
wear expensive jewelry, don't walk
unescorted after dark�is given with
the best of intentions but it really
sucks to have to look over my shoul-
der all of the time. Incidentally, all of
the caution in the world won't help
one bit if the attacker has a gun.
Knowledge of karate and posses-
sion of mace don't mean anything.
Guns render any other form of self-
defense useless.
When I first moved to
Greenville, my father wanted to get
me a gun. I told him that I didn't
want one. Since then, I've thought
about getting one but, ironically, the
on-campus assaults have made me
even more opposed to owning one.
Furthermore, I don't want anyone
else tohaveaguneither because if no
one owned fire arms, then at least
victims would stand a chance.
I mean no guns whatsoever;
hunters aren't an exception as far as
I'm concerned. Anyway, it really -
doesn't prove anything to kill afi 1
animalthatrunsawaywhenitsees "
you.There'snorealchallengethere, L
so what's the point? If anyone can
provide an incident where a deer � ,
held up a hunter at a bank machine
with a semi-automatic hand gun, ,
then I will gladly eat my words. - r,
Iworrymostaboutwhatwill �
happenwhenweallgetfedupwith i
the situation and take matters into
our own hands. I see signs of in-
creasing irritation all of the time - 5
and I wonder, if something isn't
done to reverse the process, what
will happen when we reach our
breaking points. If there aren't
stricter gun control laws and if no
one does anything except warn vic-
tims, victims are going to get sick of
the warnings, but vigilante justice
isn't the answer. Unfortunately, it-1
doesn't appear that there is anyone ' ,
else looking out for us. I mink about
themovieFmgDoawaruilcringe
Violencebreedsviolenceand
if we are all forced to own guns in
order to feel safe, then we are also
more likely to use guns to defend 1 .
ourselves. The process becomes a � - 1,
vicious cycle. The assailants in the
recentrobberieshavehadgunsand 1
justbecause they haven'tused them
yet doesn't reassure me all that
much. They have them and mat is
the problem.
Letters to the Editor
To the Editor:
Another issue, another slander. When will the
people writing editorials and more importantly, mem-
bers of The East Carolinian staff, stop writing articles
about people that they have not even had a conversa-
tion with, let alone interviewed.
I'm writing in response to Mark Brett's article in
Tuesday's "Lies to the Editor"�excuse me, "Letters
to the Editor
First of all Mr. Brett is (and by the time you read
this "was") an employee of WZMB. Him being a
WZMB staff member means that if he feels that the
station needs improvement or change, he is in the
position to make these suggestions to the executive
staff of WZMB rather than slander them in Vie East
Carolinian.
As for the slander that I refer to, Mr. Brett wrote
in Tuesday's paper that "Beth Arthur and I Lee
Judge have both expressed a personal dislike for
alternative music Mr. Brett, if you want to know
what we listen to, you can inspect our own personal
music collections. I'm sure you'll find several Alterna-
tive artists. This is at least the fourth time someone has
written in 77k East Carolinian things about WZMB
that were either here-say or simply not true at all.
Mr. Brett's article simply and uselessly re-
hashed rumors that had been printed as fact and
thoughts printed as actions. If he and other potential
"letter writers" would take time to do their research
and interview who they are writing about they may
realize that many of the questions that they publicly
ask have already been answered.
As for the person who plans to draw this dead
story outinnextweek'sEflscCflroiitfl?i,Isuggestmat
before you ask the general public a question about
WZMB, maybe you should ask WZMB, I think that
"we" know what "we" are thinking better than
"you
As for WZMB, as Mr. Brett put it, being "de-
signed to mirror the taste of the public" I don't
think that ECU students would have a problem with
WZMB attempting to play music that they wanted to
hear.
A.Lee Judge
WZMB Program Manager
Editor's note: Letters to the Editor are just that � letters, not articles. Those letters sent in are done so by the
students' oiun initiative. The East Carolinian welcomes all opinions on all s'ubjects, as Letters to the Editor is an open
forum. Also, to date, The East Carolinian has run only one article and one masthead concerning WZMB and any
possible format changes. We stand behind these.
To the Editor:
I am writing in response to the commentary that
appeared in last week's paper by Laura Wright, "Pet
peeves: animal injustice hidden by seeming love It
discussed how pet owners should be more considerate
to their pets and what the consequences are of neglecting
pets. I applaud this and hope that all those who read this
got the idea. As a pet owner, I wouldn't dream of leaving
my dog out in the rain, heat or cold. I especially would
not abandon my dog or leave her alone for a long time
without adequate food and water.
My dog was adopted from the Humane Society
and her former owner abused her. She was found by
them wandering along a dirt road. I only hope her
former owner got a life and changed hisher ways.
Every time I see a dog or cat wandering campus
without a collartags, I want to scream. I also don't think
it's fair to bring your pet to campus and let it wander
around, especially without proper food or water. If you
let your pet wander around your neighborhood or
campus while you are in class, you are neglecting the
needs of your pet, just as much as you would be
neglecting your pet if you left it altogether!
If you are a college student and a pet owner, it is
obvious thatyouhavealotofresponsibilities.Ifyoucan
accept all of these responsibilities and are good to your
pet, then don't read any further. However, if you have
ever letyourpetwander around your neighborhood or
campus, left your pet alone for long periods of time
wi thout adequate food or water, or left your pet outside
exposed to the rain, extreme heatorcold(withoutgood
shelter), then you need to CHANGE YOUR ATTI-
TUDE! Your pet should be a friend during these stress-
ful college years, not your victim!
Natalie Volk
Senior
Music Therapy
- v
�:







TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
October 21. 1993
Help Wanted I E Help Wanted
For Sale
IflJ
Greek
HE Greek
LARGEBEDROOM'vithprivatebath.
moker, female student i K
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
lor next semester or ASAP to share
bedroom ma new duplex.$173 month
1 3utilitios.Call75S-1753,leave mes-
sage.
ROOM AVAILABLE after Oct. 30 in 3
bedroom townhouse at Sheraton Vil-
lagti. It's a MUST SEE! FNS only.
S23Q13 of bills. For information call
756-18459.
Rinygold Towers
Llral 601 .2 Bdmi
New Carpet 6 F'esh'y Panted
Water & Sewet Included 2 Sliidtn; Linn:
at $290month per student
UINTACT MR JERNIGAN AT 1919' '373-0415
Roommate Wanted
MALE OR FEMALE ROOMMATE
WAlNTED to share 2 story house, 2
blocks from campus. Private room,
fenced in back yaard, pets accepted, 1
car garage. $200 per month & 1 3 utili-
ties. Call 758-9967. Available Nov 1.
ROOMMATE WANTED Female to
share apaartment. 190month & 12
utilities. Please call 752-2013 for details.
ROOMMATES NEEDED. Two room-
mates needed to share four bedroom
house. Rent SI 50 plus 14 bills. If inter-
ested call 756-6725 and leave name and
number.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY must be mature, responsible
adult $80 a month 1 5 utilities 503 West
4th street 757-6947.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTEDto
share three bedroom house spring se-
mester. Two blocks from campus. Low
rentutilities. Call 752-7069
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for spring semester. Non-smoker, fur-
nished, 2 bedroom, 212 bath, central
air, bus service. Move in 1215 -115.
Call Traci 830-4972.
Z'l Help Wanted
ADLTLT ENTERTAINMENT, Mod-
eling, dancing. Part-time or full-time.
$300.00 to $400.00 per week. Call 746-
6762.
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY Indi-
viduals and student organizations
warited to promote the hottest Spring
Brek destinations, call the nation's
leader. Inter-campus programs 1-800-
3276013.
TRAVEL FREE! SPRING BREAK! Sell
quafity vacations! The hottest destina-
tion! Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas,South
Padjre, Florida. "Professional" Tour
corrfpany, Easiest Way Towards Free
Trip! Best Combinations! Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710.
CARPET BARGAIN CENTER: Help
wanted. Apply in person 1009
Dickinson Ave.
"?FREE TRIPS & CASH" Call us
and find out how hundreds of students
ready earning Free trips and lots
with America's 1 companv!
se Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica,
Panama. Daytona or Padre! CALL
A i akeaBreakStudenttravel(800)
528-SA E or (hi 7) 424-222.ext. 11.
COMPANION NEEDED for lady with
Parkinson's disease. Must have auto.
Hours, flexible. Pav negotiable. Call
76-2463 after 6 pm.
GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPT: Youth basketball
coaches.TheGreenville Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting 12-16
part-rime youth basketball coaches for
the winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the basketball skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able tocoach
young people ages 9-18 in basketball
fundamentals. Hours are from 3pm to
7 pm. with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run from
the end of November to mid-February.
Salary rates start at4.25 per hour. For
more information, call Ben Jones or
Michael Daly at 830-4550 or 830-4567.
THE PLAYGROUND OF
GOLDSBORO is looking for enthusi-
astic entertainers. Excellent hours,easy
$$ and carpools available. Ask for Erin
at 355-4792 or (919) 7334-3777.
HELP WANTED several different po-
sitionsavailable. Part-time andortem-
porary. Male or Female- some posi-
tions require a professional appearance.
Call Rick or Brandon 355-1234.
STOCKSALES PERSONpart time.
Heavy lifting required. Apply at the
Youth Shop Boutique Arlington Vil-
lage.
BREAKERS! BOOK EARLY & SAVE!
Panama city from $99, Jamaica Cancun
from $439 Padre $239, Daytona $79.
Sell trips , Earn cash, Party Free. Call
EST 1-800-234-7007.
PART-TIME SALES: Tuesdays, Thurs-
days, some Saturdays - bridal sales
consultant. Energetic, enthusiastic ap-
plicants only. Apply in person, MWF
or call Brides Choice 355-5505; ask for
Marydale.
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn $90-125
hr escorting in the Greenville area. You
must be 18 years old, have own phone
and transportation. Escorts and exotic
dancers needed. For more information
call Diamond Escorts at 758-0896.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn
up to $2000month world travel.
Summer and careerempioymentavail-
able. Noexperience necessary. Formore
information call 1-206-634-0468 ext.
C5362.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Mid-
west Mailers PO Box 395, Olathe K,
66051. Immediate response.
AA CRUISE AND TRAVEL JOBS
Earn $2500MO travel the world
free! (Caribbean, Europe, Hawaii, Asia!)
Cruise lines now hiring for busy holi-
day,Spring and Summer seasons. Guar-
anteed Employment! Call 919-929-4398
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
Fraternities, Sororities, Campus Orga-
nizations, highly motivated individu-
als-Travel FREE plus earn up to THOU-
SANDSOFDOLLARSsellingSPRING
BREAK trips to Cancun-Bahamas
Cruise-South Padre Island-Florida
Beaches: CALL K!RK 1-800-2588-9191.
EARN UP TO10 HOUR Motivated
students needed for PT marketing
positionsatyourschool. Flexible hours.
CALL TODAY! l-800-950-1039,ext.
3065.
GREEKS AND CLUBS Raise up to
$1,000 In JUST ONE WEEK! For your
fraternity,sorority and club. Plus$l,000
for vourself! And a FREE T-shirt just
for calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 75.
For Sale
front fork stabilizer. Includes helmet.
$2,300 firm. A must see. Call Chris 752-
3552.
DAY BED white with brass knobs.
Includes Marts with springs $100 OBO
Call 757-1736 for more inf.
ED Services Offered
SPRING BREAK -Plan early, save $50
and get best rooms! Prices increase 11
15! Bahamas Cruise 6 days includes 12
meals, $279! Panama City room w
kitchen, $129! Cancun from Raleigh,
$339, Jamaica from Raleigh, $419, Key
West, $239, Daytona Room wkitchen,
$149! 1-800-678-6386.
$ STOP DON'T RE AD THISHelp
Wanted: Fratemities,Sororities,Clubs!
Raise money for your group. Make
100 profit! Easy. Sell 2020's Binocu-
larsportsglasses for under $5 at all
sportinggroup events! 800-924-8433.
FOR SALE 24 K gold necklace form
India. 18" length and 12 grams in
weight. Unique Design. $300. Call 355-
0642 if interested.
ROCKFORD FOSG ATE PUNCH 150
$200, punch 15" subs $150, punch 12"
subs $125, Sony EQ wcrossover $150,
Sony 4" speakers $35. Chad 321-6722.
1993 TREK 820 Mountain bike. Many
cool accessories $200 or best offer. Call
752-2248 or 757-1640 for more info.
CAR STEREO-KENWOOD Krc 310-
autoreverse-pullout$150 or best offer.
Call 321-8406.
FOR SALE: Fusbal Table. Good condi-
tion. One owner. 752-6730. Leave mes-
sage.
FOR SALE moped, Garelli Super
Sport, onlv 2,000 miles, includes hel-
met, up to 30 MPH and 100MPG, $400
Call 756-9133.
TREK 820 for sale. In excellent condi-
tion, rides great. $275 Ask for Wes 752-
7158.
DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME! work
ing out without proper supplements,
your body needs them to GROW.
Amino acids, protein powders, vanadyl
sulfate, wt. gain, tri-chromelene, hot
stuff, grainers fuel, cybergenics and
many more Call Charles today for
tremendous discount pricesat 321 -2158.
'93 HONDACBR 600 F2 BLKSL Rd
6200 miles. Completly Stock $5150.
AGV Helmet BLKRd wt $110. Bell
Helmet Solid Blk $60. Call Keith or
Kevin 931-9041 (Leave message).
'78 CIVIC wagon runs good, must
drive. $1000. BIEFE KB8 classic gray
motorcycle helmet, gray. $185 value at
1988 HAWK GT blue, 12,000 miles;
New back tire, super trap muffler, and
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19.27S TOPICS - ALL SUBJECTS
Oder Catalog Tofla, Kffli Iftsa MC r� COD
ES800 3510222
Or rush $2 00 !o ReseanAtaformation
11322 Idaho Ave ?06-A. Los Mpes CA 90025
NEED WORD PROCESSTYPING?
Lowest rates on campus. Incl. proofread-
ing, spelling, gram corrections. Over 15
yrs. exp. Call Cindy 355-3611 anytime.
HEYMR.D.J Please play my favorite
song! Mobile Music Productions plays
only what YOU want to hear when YOU
want to hear it. Widest variety of music,
yearsofexperience,bestD.Js,mostpopu-
lar service with ECU Greeks. Will travel.
Call Lee at 75&4644 for bookings.
�ZEE
Personals
NEED A DATE TONIGHT? Call the
Singles Dateline at 1-900-787-6673 Ext.
196 to meet men and women in your
area, only $2min 18 or older Avalon
Comm. Ft. Laud, Fl 305-525-0800.
WRITERMUSICIAN and poetic
soul seeks like minded lady for friend-
ship and fun. Send photos and corre-
spondence to: KANE, PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
CASH REWARD for information
about suspect automobile involved in
hit and run accident in South Elm St
Sat 1:00AM Call 757-0230.
BUTTHE AD You are the greatest thing
that ever happened to me. I love you
more than you'll ever know! Pookie
THE CREW thank you so much for the
surprise party! I love the charm! You
guys are the greatest! love Rie
1Q
Greek
ALL THE NEW MEMBERS of Al-
pha Omicron Pi get psyched for Fri-
day! Only a couple more days! Love,
the Sisters.
THETA CHI We had a great time
working on the float. Congratula-
tions. Let's get together again soon!
Love Alpha Omicron Pi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI It all began
on a warm Friday night, It was off to
Elm St. oh what a sight! The girls all
in dresses, and guys in their suits.
We all knew it was destined to be a
hoot! Muff and her cleavage pro-
vided quite a view. Hey, Nan did
you enjoy that Dew? And little did
we know the night was far from
through the Holiday Inn in Kinston
provided lots to do! The new mem-
bers amazed us with their line danc-
ing skill what a shame Jugs and
Tommy felt so ill. Gut all things con-
sidered there's just one thing to say,
thanks to Paige, you can plan our
cocktail anyday!
CHI OMEGA Good Luck to our "Sis-
ters of Sou See you Thursday night.
We love you, Chi Omega.
CONGRATULATIONS to our 1993
Homecoming Queen Robbyn
Shulman. We love you, Chi Omega.
KAPPA ALPHA: We really enjoyed
working on the float with you. Love,
Chi Omega
CONGRATULATIONS Tricia
Crotts on getting into Nursing School.
Love Chi Omega
SIGMA PI Thanks for the Pre-down-
town. We really enjoyed it. Love, Chi
Omega.
DELTA CHI This year's homecom-
ing will sure be remember, at least
what we can remember. I know Brian
V. will never forget his date from
Friday night. She has definitely taken
a walk on the "Wild Side" at some
point in time. Richie and I started
early Saturday morning with two
pitchers of "Grippe or was it Mad
Dog? Nikki just though the orange
juice had gone bad. Our bar opened
earlier than legally allowed but not
one of us was afraid to start mixing
the drinks as soon as was possible.
After a few helpful hints, even Steve
Gallo was pouring them like a pro.
John fell in love with those "Limon"
drop Citron shots while it was all I
could do to keep up with Nikki a nd
the bottle of Rumple Mintz. It finally
caught up with her about (:00 that
night when she went 'down for the
count By the way Clay, have you
seen my date anywhere? I know she's
close by because I can here that whip
snap'n. Ha! Ha! I don't know if any-
one saw me, but by my "cookies"
were tossed that day after one of those
"limon" drop shots. So it any of you
ever walked by Doug's truck, you
might want to check the tread of your
shoes before you track my Ramada
Inn breakfast all over your house.
Your public relations chair.
TIM AND DREW Thanks for an-
other winning season! Love, Alpha
Pi
CONGRATULATIONS flag football
champions. Three years and. many
more to go. Love, Sisters and Pledges
of Alpha Pi.
ATTENTION ALL GREEKS! Don't
forget about Alpha Phi Drink-Out on
Tues. Oct. 26 form 4-6 at the bottom
of College Hill.
ALPHA Pi-Getting ready for cock-
tail was quite a sight. We were all
rushing to get ready for that special
night. Some started out at the Camelot
Inn, while others were partying on
Ash Street with all their men. So on to
the holidome we all went, but Tanga
came in with quite a scent. As the
night went on we danced to some
funk, Andy and Monica sure have
some spunk. Homecoming '93 was a
blast, too bad it is in the past!
ALPHA OMICRON PI New mem-
bers love the Sisters and are very
excited to become a part of your spe-
cial sisterhood. We can't wait until
Friday!
ALPHA SIGMA PHI-The breakfast
was wonderful and it was great get-
ting to see some familiar faces, as
well as some new! Thanks for having
us and hope to see you again soon!
Love the Sisters and Pledges of Pi
Delta
PI DELTA and their "Strange"
Dates- Saturday is coming but we
have nor fear, for the "night of the
unknown" will bring lots of cheer.
There will be laughing and danc-
ing and, Oh! lots of fun, but it'll be
sad when it's over and done, so
get ready girls, and get Psyched
Dates, cause stranger Mixer is
Soon! and We can't WAIT
PI DELTA wants to congratulate
Alpha Phi on the Flag Football
Championship! You guys were
tough and played a great game!
And to the Pi Delta Players- al-
though you guys did not win this
game you are still our "Football
Heroes We love guys and you
made us all proud! The sisters and
pledges of Pi Delta.
JENNIFER AND CAROLINE
even though you weren't crowned,
we are proud of you both! Love
the Sisters and Pledges of Pi Delta.
TO ASHLEE BARNES: For all
your hard work, advice, and guid-
ance on this path to Sisterhood, we
thank you from thp bottom of our
hearts! We love our P.E Love,
your Beta Taus.
TO THE SISTERS of Alpha Xi
Delta: Thank you all so much for
your support and encouragement.
It really means a lot! We love you!
The Beta Taus.
TO ALL SIGMA LAMDA
PLEDGES Welcome to the fam-
ily. I'm looking forward to the si-
lent retreat with you. To my little
sisters; Kelli- we're finally free
from those Md men! Susan- how's
that "basic training" coming with
your new Marine? Love ya both!
Your big sister! Mo
ALPHA PHI OMEGA Good luck
to Shannon and Heather. I'm look-
ing forward to doing all those Big-
Brother kind of things Love Marc
CONGRATULATIONS, to the
Turtles, Phi sigma Pi's Co-rec bas-
ketball team for winning the intra-
mural championships.
PI KAPPA ALPHA Hopes every-
one had a great homecoming this
year!
THANKS Douglas, Josh, and
Darin for coaching our flag foot-
ball team. You guys did a great
job! The Sisters and Pledges of
Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETAs Get ready for
Pounders Day Grab-A-Date! "Still
going strong after all these years
TO MICHAEL BAKER Thanks for
coaching our flag football team an-
other year. We appreciate all your
hard work! We'll miss you next
year! Love Alpha Xi Delta.
Lost & Found
LOST-Orange Tabby, neutered
male; Lost in vicinity of Tar River
area. If found Please call 752-0226.
Probably went for a ride, if found in
your cars, please call.

Announcements
; WOMEN'S STUDY
ALLIANCE
Airstudents are invited to
attend a get together on
Thursday, Oct 21 at 4:00 in
GCB 2014. Learn the true
meaning of feminist think-
ing) Join us in discussions
corfCerning men, women,
racism and other humani-
tarian issues.
RETURNING ADULT
STUDENTS
We will be meeting in 212
Mendenhall at 5:00 on
Thursday, Oct 21st. All stu-
dents 25 yrs and older are
encouraged to attend.
iiCAL
THERAPY CLUB
We will be having a meet-
ing Thurs. Oct. 21 at 5:30 in
Mendenhall, Room 221. All
are velcome. If you have
questions, call Dawn (757-
0573).
ECU STUDENT
ADVLSQRY
COMMITTEE
You are what you eat! The
student Foodservice Advi-
sory Committe meets once
each month during the
school year to evaluate the
quality of dining services
at ECU and provide input on
new products and projects.
All ECU students are invited
to join the committee. Meal
plan participation is not re-
quired. Freshmen are en-
couraged to apply. If inter-
ested please contact David
Bailey at 757-4755.
LITTLE MILLIE CENTER
The first Annual Kiddie
Banquet: Saturday, October
23, 1993 6:3010:00 pm at
J.H. Rose High School Caf-
eteria. This banquet is be-
ing sponsored by WOOW Joy
Radio and the "M" Voice
Newspaper. Tickets are
$3.00. Proceeds will benefit
the Little Willie Center.
Tickets may be purchased
by calling 752-9083 or 758-
7066. Special guests include
The Living Proof Ministries
drama troupe, Okeora Flynn
of "Jo-Jo Time" The LWC
Ensemble and Foundation
for the Future chorus.
Barney could not come, so
he is sending his brother,
BURNEY. Absolutely no one
over 18 admitted unless ac-
companied by a child.
AMERICAN
MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
Meet the marketing faculty
Thursday, October 21st at
the annual Wine and Cheese
Social at 5:00 in the GC 3rd
floor lobby. Please bring
your ID if you plan to drink
wine. Non-alcoholic bever-
ages will also be served and
business attire is appropri-
ate. Members, non members
and faculty are welcome.
PHI SIGMA PI PLEDGE
CLASS CAR WASH
The Alpha Omicron Pledge
Class of Phi Sigma Pi will
hold a FREE car wash on Sat-
urday, October 23 from 8:00
am to 5:00 pm. Donations are
accepted. All donations are
going to the Dr. Jack W.
Thornton Scholarship. The
car wash will be held at the
Fuel Doc on the corner of
10th and Greenville Blvd.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Take a break and an adven-
ture! Join the Outdoor Rec-
reation program at Recre-
ational Services on a Swamp
Thing Canoe Excursion. Get
in the mood for Halloween
with this day trip through
the swampy areas near
Goose Creek, NC on Satur-
day, October 30. Be sure to
register now in 204
Christenbury Gymnasium
and attend a Pre-trip meet-
ing on Wednesday, October
27 at 5:00 PM in Brewster D-
101. The cost will be $10
student and $12faculty,
staff, guests and will entitle
you to a day filled with ad-
venture. For more informa-
tion, call Recreational Ser-
vices at 757-6377.
RECREATLQNAL
SERVICES
What's your hi-q? come to
the Trivia Bowl registration
meeting on Wednesday, Oc-
tober 27 at 5 PM in BIO
103. Come have some
trivia fun and test your
knowledge. For more in-
formation, call Recre-
ational Services at 757-
6387.
STUDY1ARRQAD
Interested in spending
time away from ECU?
Come to either of two
meetings to learn about
the many study abroad
and exchange programs
available. Former par-
ticipants will also be
there to answer ques-
tions you may have.
Meeting Oct. 21, 7:30 PM
in Mendenhall Great
Room section 2! If you
can't rake the meeting
call or come by the Office
of International Pro-
grams!
V





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
Art professor wins Japanese award
Photo courtesy of ECU News Bureau
East Carolina University artist Carl Billingsley puts the finishing touches to a casting of his sculpture, Bell of
the Earth, that won a $20,000 prize in Japan. Do you think he read TEC before he began touching it up?
ByQuentin Pickup
Staff Writer
Japan may have us beat in elec-
tronics, but Karly Billingsley of the
ECU art department ust showed
them a tiling or two.
Billingsley, a Greensboro, N.C.
native, created a sculpture at his
home in Greensboro and submi ttedit
in a major art competition in
Tomayura, Japan. All artists work
towards recognition, but
Billingsley's work received much
more than that.
Billingsely's work, 'Bell of The
Earth won the semi-grand prize at
the 1993 Toyamura International
Sculpture Biennete. Alongwith great
recognition, Billingsley received an
award of two million yen ($20,000)
and an all-expense-paid trip for two
to Japan to attend the exhibition
where he willreceive his prize. "Hav-
ing my sculpture selected for this
international exhibition is the type of
critical recognition all artists strive
for said Billingsley.
Most people do not realize that
the Japanese have a very strong and
supportive interest in contemporary
sculpture. The Japanese also spon-
sor the most prestigious and lucra-
tive international sculpture compe-
NC Museum of Art Upcoming Events
The North Carolina Artist Exhibition runs from Oct. 2
through Dec. 5. A triennial survey exhibition is organized by the
Museum and open to all artists in the state. The 125 works by 26
artists include paintings, drawings, prints, collages, photographs,
sculptures and installations.
Yoruba Art A Living Tradition, will take place from Oct. 23,
1993 throughjune 12,1994. This will be an educational exhibition
focusing on the traditional arts of the Voruba-speaking people of
Nigeria and Benin. Thirty-three works of art with maps, photo
murals and a video program will be featured.
Films
Gene Kelly
October 22-23 On the Town
October 29-30 Singin'm the Ruin
Lectures
Pyramids to Postmodern
Thursdays at 11 a.m. Series tickets $29
Oct. 28 Earlv Renaissance in Italy
Nov. 4 The Italian High Renaissance
Nov. 11 No lecture
Nov. 18 The Renaissance of the North Alps
Soundtrack will delight
titions in the world.
"Bell of the Earth" is a bronze
castingcreated through a sand mold.
It has a downward bell shape with a
squared-off bottom. The piece is
eight inches wide and 16 inches tall.
The total weight of the piece is 55
pounds. Billingsley says the sculp-
ture invites viewers to touch the
rough texture of the sides and the
smooth polished finish on the top.
Six judges from different Japa-
nese museums and universities se-
lected the entries from a field of more
than 540 sculptures submitted from
36 different countries. The winner
was from Japan.
The village where the competi-
tion was held is Toyamura, a small
village of only 2,000 people on the
northern island of Hokkaido. Lake
Ioya is located right beside
Toyamura. Ioya is scenic and a well-
known attraction and national park.
The sculpture competition is held
even' other year and is regarded asa
major event.
Billingsley taught art at UNC-G
for six years and at the University of
Wisconsin's Milwaukee School of
Architecture and Urban Planning
for 19 years. Billingsley joined the
ECU Art Department last year. He
has already proven himself to be a
valuable asset.
British organist to perform
By Staff Reports
The East Carolina
Noted British organist James
Parsons will be presented in the East
Carolina University guest recital
scheduled forSundav,Oct.24,atFirst
Presbyterian Church on the comer of
14th and South Elm Streets.
The recital is sponsored by the
church as well as the ECU School of
Music and the EastCarolina Chapter
of the American Guild of Organists.
Free and open to the public, the recital
will begin at 4 p.m.
Parsons will present a variety of
organ compositions from the past
threecenturies.His program consists
of the Toccata and Fugue in � Majorby
J.L. Krebs; William Mathias' Berceuse;
Tliree Organ Voluntaries by Sir Peter
Maxwell-Da vies; the J.S. Bach Trio-
So)wta No. 6 in G Major, B WV530;and
Franz Liszt'sFantasiaandFugueontlie
Name BACH.
Parsons is director of music at a
leading English school, Oundle
School in Cambridgeshire, as well as
an active recitalist, both in the United
Kingdom and abroad.
According tojanette Fishell, pro-
fessor of organ at the ECU School of
Music, Parsons founded an interna-
tionally recognized summer school
which is noted as "one of the fore-
most events of its kind
I
Who Will
Visit on
Health
Career Day?
What Should
1 Wear?
Career Day!
Health Career Day will be held at the Allied Health
Building on November4, 1993, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Don't Miss this Opportunity
to Meet Reps Face-to-Face
If you are graduating Human Services, SPED, Allied
Health, Biology or Chemistry major, or even considering
a career in the healthcare field, don't miss this
opportunity to visit personally with health care
employers. They will happily discuss career options that
may be available to you.
Typically, employers from across N.C, and
sometimes from out-of-state visit ECU. Just a
sampling of the visiting representatives and
some majors they recruit includes:
Easter Seal Society of N.C. (CDFR, Soc. Wk.)
UNC Employment Office (BiolChem.)
N.C. Divisions of Mental and Environmental
Health (Psyc, SPED, Comm. illth.)
Charlotte Mecklenburg Hospital Authority
(All Allied Health majors)
Please dress in business attire. Men should
wear coat or sweater and tie, and women
should wear suits or business dresses.
Choose conservative colors, minimal jewelry
and appropriate, well-maintained shoes.
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
"Nothing bad ever happens to
me Darin v Elfman probably didn't
know of the future and what it held
for him when he sang these lyrics as
the lead singer of Oingo Boingo.
Elfman began his career in The
Mystical Knights, a somewhat
twisted musical and theatrical
group. Then he took his light-
hearted sense of the macabre into
the realm of rock with Oingo Boingo.
From these roots he brought his
talent to the motion picture indus-
try.
Elfman's composition career
begins with the musical score for
Pee Wee's Big Adventure, where he
also met Tim Burton for the first
time. The two were destined to be-
come a team. Their collaboration
continued with Tim directing and
Dannv writing the scores for such
films as Bat ma n,�for which Elfman
received a Grammy for Best Origi-
nal Score�Bectlejuice, Edward
Scissorliands and Batman Returns.
Now we have Tim Burton's The
Nightmare Before Christmas, his fiftn
See BURTON page 9
The motion picture
soundtrack to the
movie Nightmare
Before Christmas is
a definite buy.
Graphic courtesy of
Walt Disney
Studios
By Daniel Willis
f A 1R P PT R Il's lhe Healthy Thing to DO
r rDon't Forget Health
R
N
E
R
Staff Writer
Juliana Hatfield's new album,
Become What You Are, is a unique
and refreshing release.
This album is an interesting
contrast to her last album, Hey Babe
which featured a more intimate dic-
tation of the personal feelings that
she encountered. Though very mov-
ing, Hatfield wasn't happy with
Hey Babe. "It wasn't confident at
all Hatfield said in a Rolling Stone
interview, "1 let it all out, and it was
embarrassing. 1 said all these things
other people were too embarrassed
to say
Hey Babe is limited to love songs
that dealt mostly with heartbreak.
Many fans think the entire album
was a reflection of Hatfield's obses-
sion with Lemonheads' front man,
Evan Dando. On Become Wlmt You
Are, Hatfield makes a point to swal-
low some of her tears and to make a
less revealing album; no love songs
are featured. This album is a lot
See HATFIELD page 9
Juliana Hatfield
Danny Elfman,
former lead singer
of Oingo Boingo,
has worked his way
into the motion
picture industry and
has created another
unforgettable score.
Adventure
series
takes off
By Jimmy Rostar
Staff Writer
The six states that make
up New England have served
as rich cultural and historical
entities since the colonial days.
This Monday evening'the
Department of Student
Unions will sponsor a field
trip of sorts that will take you
to the northeastern reaches of
the country�and you won't
even have to leave campus.
"A New England Sam-
pler" marks the first of the
seven Travel-Adventure Din-
ners and Films that the Stu-
dent Unions department will
feature this season. The event
will combine an array of food
items that are popular in the
region with a film that will be
narrated by its creators,
Woody and Merrillan Tho-
mas.
The dinner will include
such goodies as Rhode Island
clam chowder, New London
baked fish, Nantucket-style
roast chicken, veggies, muf-
fins and dessert. The dinner,
like the film, will take place in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Once you've gotten a taste
of what New England has to
offer, you can check out the
film in Hendrix Theater.
Woody and Merrillan Tho-
mas, who have been putting
together travelogues since
1984, will be on hand to walk
you through the region. From
Cape Cod to Boston, the Green
Mountains of Vermont to the
Mystic Seaport in Connecti-
cut, the film covers the region
and its history.
The film will include por-
traits of New England per-
sonalities as well. From the
most famous of the region's
Revolutionary War figures to
the basket weavers in New
Hampshire whose craft has
been practiced for genera-
tions, the film will offer
glimpses into the lives of the
people that have shaped New
England.
The film will run twice a
matinee at 4:00 p.m. and an
evening screening at 8:00.
ECU students get in free with
an ID, and the cost for campus
acuity and staff, children and
the general public is $4. Group
rates are available.
You can attend the din-

Juliana Hatfield confident about album
ner for $12.50, and it begins at
6:15. Stop by the Central Ticket
Office at Mendenhall to make
reservations, or you can
charge tickets by phone by
calling the office at 757-4788.
Season tickets for all seven
dinners are available for $70.
Go ahead and start plan-
ning your "trip" to New En-
gland. Not only will you re-
ceive a lesson in culture and
history, but you can sit down
to a unique dining experience,
too.
Today: The pitfalls of academic pressure
Answered by
Dr. Steve J. Dauer
Student Health Service
As academic pressures begin
to mount, this may be a good time to
identify campus resources available
to students who are feeling over-
whelmed, anxious, depressed or
who are experiencing other types of
emotional problems. Listed below
are some of the most common is-
sues faced by college students and
the facilities at ECU where they can
access help free of charge.
Alcohol and drug abuse. Sub-
stance abuse evaluation can be per-
formed at either the Counseling
Center or Mental Health Sen-ices.
After an initial assessment, treat-
ment may be initiated and or stu-
dents may be referre 1 toother cam
pus or community resources, such
as the AA noon meeting or the
ACOA support group.
Anxiety and Depression. Both
the Counseling Center and Men-
tal Health Services offer in-
dividual and groupcoun-
seling or therapy for dif-
ficulties involving
symptoms of anxiety
and depression. Stu-
dents requiring longer
term treatment may be
referred to private practitio
ners in the community.
Eating Disorders. Students
struggling with anorexia or bulimia
can be treated at the Counseling
Center or Mental Health Services
through individual and group ap-
proaches. Additionally, private re-
ferrals, including nutritional edu-
cation, can be facilitated.
Sexual Assault and
Abuse. In the event of
sexual assault or rape,
students should im-
mediately contact
Public Safety (757-
6787), who will notify
the Counseling Center,
Mental Health Services or the coun-
selor on call if the incident occurs
after hours. Crisis intervention and
ongoing counseling or therapy will
also be provided to help victims
deal with issues arising in the af-
termath of a sexual assault or rape.
Likewise, students who are re-
covering from past experiences of
sexual abuse or incest can receive
individual services through the
Counseling Center or Mental
Health Services.
Suicidal Crises. Students
with suicidal thoughts or those
aware of suicidal thoughts in a
friend or acquaintance should also
contact Public Safety if there is an
imminent danger of self-harm.
Intensive help in resolving the cri-
See HEALTH page 9





October 21, 1993
iket has first American release
and.
hard-
nit man Dave Sardy.
album'sproducer, also
i guitar and sings. Bassist
John Novviin and drummer Rick
Savage accompany Sardy.
One of the more refreshing
things about the album is its com-
plexity, rare in current music. In
onGimmickSs
lies and titles.
pect that has changed
� (market's first album is
listener can tell the band
� tter and more appro-
e equipment.
Although the album is good,
it has its downfalls. Some of the
lesser songs become very repeti-
tive. Some tracks reach the point
u here they sound like the band is
covering up weaknesses in its mu-
sic with distortion and noise.
The best tracks of the album
are "Redundant" and
"DumbjanDumbjan"isavery
hard-hitting song that holds a
strong, steady and feverish beat.
Gimmick compares well with the
melancholy, yet upbeat Nine Inch
Nails. Sardy's voice, at times,
sounds like a warped clone of
Trent Reznor's. If you don't like
Ministry or N.I.N you would be
wasting your money by investing
in this album.
Gimmick will get notice and has
already received early air play on
college radio stations. Maybe after
this album, the band can cut an
even better one and finally make it.
While this album is not going to
stop the world, it does keep the
listener interested and awake. If
vou've got some spare cash, buy it,
but its not worth getting excited
over. As quickly as it grows on
you, it will also do just the oppo-
site�and become a nice coaster.
Legendary Brecker Brothers return to jazz
NEW YORK (AT) � It's the
"Return of the Brecker Brothers" �
trumpeter Randy and saxophonist
Michael starring in the long-delayed
sequel to the hard-driving fusion
band that took the jazz world by
storm in the 1970s.
After 10 years in which they
drifted apart to pursue successful
solo careers, the Breckers are back
together with a new band formed
last vear. Since then, they've toured
the world, released an album which
garnered three Grammy nomina-
tions and come out with a video
recorded at a jazz festival in
Barcelona, Spain.
"The 10 years that we were
apart went on much longer than we
ever had planned said Michael,
"but we had more to bring to the
group as a result of all the experi-
ences we had playing apart
Fortunately, this return is not
like most Hollywood sequels � an
uninspired imitation of the origi-
nal. Nor is it some musical nostalgia
trip in which musicians re-create
their old hits.
The Breckers have gone back to
the future. They've taken the tight
hom lines, funky grooves and bebop
influences of their past, and up-
dated them with an infusion of hip
hop, Afro-pop and the latest in
musical technology � synth and
percussion programming, samples,
digital mixing.
What links the old and new
bands, said the 47-year-old Randy,
is "our love of rhythm" and the
desire "to remain on the cutting
edge of what's happening
"We wanted to connect with
the old band in various ways � to
have that as a springboard to build
on � but the emphasis for us has
really been to strike out into new
areas and new technology said
Michael, 43, interviewed with his
brother at Randy's apartment here.
Randy � with his black beret,
stringy black hair, beard and mous-
tache � has a Bohemian look.
Michael, who lives in suburban
Westchester with his family, re-
sembles a hip investment banker
wi th his thinning hair and wire-rim
glasses.
Their comeback album, "Re-
turn of the Brecker Brothers offers
what Randy describes as "a broad
menu" in 11 new tunes written by
the brothers.
Some of the tunes directly con-
nect with the old band � Randy's
funky "Roppongi named after
Tokyo's night-club district, and the
Grammy-nominated (best jazz in-
strumental solo) "Above and Below"
with its virtuoso solo chops, or
Michael's " King of the Lobby with
See BRECKER page 9
Aon
805 Johnston St.
"Come and experience sorority life for yourself
October 25,26,27
9:30 pm
For More Information:
Call us at 757-0769 by 6:00,
Oct.25. Rides will be provided.
r
IF HE HAP A BRAIN
HE'PCOTOCHICO'S
CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN SUN. OCT 31 ST!
HEMLOCK .95C
SLIME SHOTS $1.00
PITCHER OF
BEER & BAT WINGS $7.99
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
757-1666
OPEN UNTIL
1:00AM SUN 31st
Ghouled Evening!
AT MENDENHALL
HALLOWEEN 93

LX
L'
,v'
TheFdrst Annual
Lr im v ��� rrtT(
t
H�
RJ?� '�? ����� i
Saturday, OctoW 30
rtTti
Fa
, 9 00 P i
. SlW a ��
W-
fl-30 p m P m
10:00 pm. i �� m
11.30 p m
� 11:30 pm ���
12:30 a.m
GMOLT��Ii
reEEW.v,�s.wanurJuU
�A BACCHUS ���
Palm Rodmfc-
H��.�rF�P�"tm6
Wi�rJ.mClllKKtK
Vidro Kan�W i-nJ"
n �;il. 01 YAOM1
C n�tiw" l-iaW1
FREE BREAKFAST
M�nJ�r Ml"
uocxnoN
Game, R'�m�
Great Rnnm
G.lUvOUV;Jc.Rm
oU v;J�� Rm
AuJitnriuro 24
Hmir� TUatr
Multipuf R"1
Html" TU
DminS Hall
HoJri. TW�
HlUTara m
NO READM1SSION.
-t,
(jet R.I.P. (Really Ingenious Prizes)
Creative Competition in
Observance'of Human ii
Rights and4fVorla Peace �$ ��
I L I i U ��-�
Avs&Xi
CATEGORIES
Student creative works will be accepted
in two categories:
Essays
Works that can be
exhibited�
drawing, painting, photography,
and sculpture
rra
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
GUIDELINES
Essays should express the theme of
the annual MLK observance�A
Commitment to Human Rights and
World Peace. Essavs should be no
longer than 1,000 words and
submitted in a typed, 8 12 x 11-
inch double-spaced format. Submis-
sion indicates the author's consent
for the work, in whole or in part, to
be published in the East Carolinian
or other campus media.
Exhibited works should reflect the
theme of the annual MLK obser-
vance�A Commitment to 1 luman
Rights and World Peace. Submis-
sion indicates the artist's consent for
the work to be exhibited. Drawings
and paintings should not exceed a
diameter of 60 inches. Photographs
should measure at least 8 12 inches
x 11 inches and be matted. Sculp-
tures should not exceed a height of 6
feet. All work should be profession-
allv presented.
Eligibility extends to any full- or
part-time student enrolled in the
university during fall semester 1993.
Deadline for submissions is
5:00 p.m November 15, 1993. All
works should be delivered between
November 11 and 15 to 244
Mendenhall Student Center.
First and second place winners will
be selected in each category.
Winners will be announced by
December 5, 1993. First place
winners will be awarded a prize of
S100, and second place winners, a
prize of S50.
Selected submissions in this
competition will be shared with the
university community during the
week of January 17 through
publication of the essavs or portions
thereof in the East Carolinian and
exhibition of drawings, paintings,
photographs, and sculptures at
Mendenhall Student Center and
other campus locations. All submit-
ted works will be returned to
entrants.
Ip. 94-042
����. 'm�giaarv





October 21, 1993
Continued from page 7
a ith friends One of her
� high school. Dean
the bassist Todd Philips
lei Lavolta i on drums
I is the lead guitarist
(inesong "PresidentGarneki
deals ith her perception of Henry
Rollins She said, "The song's a
iticized interpretation of his
publu persona,and I think it'scool
HEALTH
"My Sister the most popular
track, dictates a girl's lovehate re-
lationship with her sister. Another
track, "Supermodel makes fun of
the public's outrageous perception
of the seemingly exotic lives that
models lead. "For the Birds" por-
trays how people tend to neglect
other animals. It's a very unusual
album, and it features a diverse mix-
ture of social topics.
Continued from page 7
The East Carolinian 9
sis and its underlying causes is pro-
vided through Mental Health Ser-
vices.
Both theCounselingCenter and
Mental 1 lealthSen kresoffermainly
short-term treatment and theassur-
an v otconfidentiali ty. The primary
distinction between the two facili-
ties relates to the student s level of
functioning.
For students who are function-
ing fairly adequately ina majority of
BRECKER
lite areas (academic, interpersonal,
social, occupational landareexperi-
encing problems in the mild to mod-
erate range, the Counseling Center
is the most appropriate setting to
get help.
If a student's functioning is more
seriously impaired and hisher
problems are moderate to severe,
Mental Health Services is the best
place to go for help.
The Counseling Center also of-
fers academic support and growth
groups, while Mental Health Ser-
vices is able to prescribe medication
if needed.
The Counseling Center (757-
6661) is located on the second floor
of Wright Building (next to the Stu-
dent Store); Mental Health Services
(757-6795) is in the Student Health
Service building.
You may call for an appoint-
ment or walk in on an urgent basis.
Continued from page 8
alto saxophonist David Sanborn
guesting to re-create the original
Brecker Brothers horn section.
The Breckers break into new
territory by fusing hip hop with
jazz.
The Breckers' new tunes also
rerlect the varied paths the brothers
have followed since thev disbanded
their old group in 1982.
Michael's "Wakaria" ("What's
up?" in the Ewondo language of
Cameroon) has a 12-8 groove based
on thebikoutsi music of Cameroon's
capital, Yaounde.
"Song for Barry dedicated to
the late trombonist Barry Rogers,
adapts a Guinean tribal theme.
Rogers, Michael's mentor in the
seminal jazz-rock band Dreams in
theearly 1970s, introduced thesaxo-
phonist to African music.
He got a master's course when
he spent 1991-92 on Paul Simon's
Rhythm of the Saints tour.
Where can I park?
When will a new library be built?
How much will it all cost me?
Get your questions answered at the
ECU Campus Master Plan
&
Student Recreation Center
Cont'd
BURTON g
collaboration with Hitman. Work-
ing from scratch with Burton, Llfman
composed allot the musk and lyrics
for the film's 10 songs and finale
reprise. On top of all that, he sup-
plied the singing voice for lead
character lack Skellington, a minor
character. Barrel, and functioned as
associate producer.
With this soundtrack, Pitman
creates a haunting and beautiful
landscape of sound that is nothing
short of brilliance. He takes on the
traditional musical structure of 10
songs and the underscore, and fash-
ions one of the best musical
soundtracks since The Sound of Mu-
sk.
It's tempting to put this in the
realm of Gershwin or Rodgers and
Hammersfien, but there is the old
warningaboutcountingvourchick-
ens before thev hatch.
The movie itself is a slightly left
of center but upbeat story of ghoul-
ish good-humor and tenderness.
Nightmare brings meticulously
crafted miniature sets and puppets
together to make a three-dimen-
sional world through stop-motion
animation and technology.
The story in a nutshell goes like
this. The Pumpkin King of
Halloweentown, John Skellington,
stumbles uponChristmastown. He
decides his town needs something
like Cnnstmastown w here ne lives
and brings the holiday back home.
Unfortunately, every thing soon goes
awn.
The movie soundsbrilliant,and
if it is anywhere near the quality of
the soundtrack, it promises to be
good. Even i f you are not a big fan of
musicals, this film puts such a twist
on that medium so that even the
hard-hearted may come around.
Maybe it would be wise to wait and
view the movie, but the soundtrack
is definitely worth the price.
AVAILABLE NOW!
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS
LOCATED NEAR CAMPUS. NEW. REASONABLE
RENT, INCLUDING FREE WATERSEWER, MINI-
BLINDS, LAUNDRY FACILITY & ECU BUS SERVICE
CALL 752-8320 FROM 9am-5pm
SHE

Need to get
Out of towh?
We specialize in student travel!
Amtrak Tickets Holiday Travels
Spring Break Specials Hosteling International
Council of International Student Exchange
J A T 3219 Landmark street
f YOUR Greenville, N.C. 27834
y SERVICE 91 9)355-5060
Thursday, October 21 at 5:00pm
General Classroom Building room 1028
You'll see the future of ECU plus get a chance to ask
questions to facility and campus master planners.
LOSE UP TO
10 lbs
IN 3 DAYS!
With The T-Lite Diet Plan
Try it! It Works!
Nature's Goodness
Health Food
Greenville Square 355-0556
� �����
FALL
VALUES
Off Our
EVERYDAY
LOW PRICES
on
Shoes & Handbags
(Some brands excl.)
OR
Off All
YELLOW
DOT
Sale Shoes
& Handbags
"Not vaHO witn any otrier promotional on�'
RACK ROOM
SHOES
BRANDED FOOTWEAR
BUYERS MARKET � MEMORIAL DRIVE � 355-2519
KcsoMdftXMMHMMMMIHMMMMIMMIMm
' "m r�rM ��� to
Who . -v i is ok t. a r, vt i �- ?-
� - v j� v. Btl -vj. X w
�kill not Unid tut your primer ,im.
8"�s�v
VISA
With Visa you'll be accepted at more than 10 million
places, nearly three times more than American Express.
And that's not a misprint.
Visa. It's Everywhere You Want To Be
��M��US� Hr 1fl(0-J





Adventures Of Kemple Boy
By Kemple WANG TV
By Manning & Ferguson
TSaJWT "0 FSBTEST OF W�
urwsr oftiflWAMZAircws �
VbHBMAC� HMt STAteoAfJ
offiwsive JTHes�u7n.e
Colombo, l�T5 60uuG.
Pfl� fMUM6 THIMSUVl S IJ
T5 OKftiT.
SOAPED 7Wf SJ7R� SaEfVUMfc
OF ouTEE 5Wc�
Seigfreid and Barth
COMIC CONVENTION CONFIDENTIAL
Attention you comic-reading freaks o' nature
Greenville's very own Nostalgia Newstand is hosting a comic convention
at the Ramada Inn on Greenville Blvd. this Sunday, October 24, from
9:00 am to 5:00 pVn. There will be boo-koodles of comic books, toys,
. cards, and collectables and real living, breathing comics professionals!
Craig Gilmore, artist for DC Comics, and ECUPirate Comics alumnus,
Jeff Parker, who has worked on Harris Comics' Vampirella, and who is
now also working for DC. Also I, Chris Kemple, master of the undead
(and also cartoonist on the side), will be there too. So you better be there
unless you're dead, or in jail. And if you're in jail, break out!





The East Carolinian
October 21. 1993
What's On Tap
Thursday, Oct. 21
W. Tennis, away
at Barton College, Wilson, NC
TBA
Friday, Oct. 22
Volleyball, away
at American, Washington, DC
7:30
M. Tennis, away
at South Carolina Invit Colum-
bia, SC, through Sunday TBA
W. Tennis, away
at Old Dominion Invit Norfolk,
V A, through Sunday TBA
Saturday, Oct. 23
FOOTBALL. AWAY
at Southern Miss Hattiesburg,
MS 6:00
Volleyball, away
at George Mason, Fairfax, VA
1:30
at Old Dominion, Norfolk, VA
7:30
Sunday, Oct. 24
W. Soccer, away
at N.C. State, Raleigh, NC 1:00
The 411
Tuesday, Oct. 19
M. &c W. Swimming
Gold beat Purple 105-92
Phase. . . o Wagering
Robert Todd, 33 points
TEC Sports Editor
SM7, 31-24
"Turnovers will hurt the
Birds (expect the Buc defense to
score). If Perez Mattison can
handle theblitz, ECU could win
Brian Olson, 36 points
TEC Assistant. Sports Editor
SM20,30-10
"Injuries have built a hole
too deep to climb out of. Surpris-
ingly enough, CoachSteve Logan
has not ripped all the hair out of
his head
Kevin Hall, 30 points
WZMB Sports Director
SM16,33-17
"Perez Mattison will be
tested by the constantly blitzing
defense of Southern Miss
Brian Bailey, 25 points
WNCT-TV Sports Director
SM8,21-13
"Golden Eagles blitz Perez
Mattison into oblivion. Mattison
survives another crash course in
QB 101, but the Pirates soil fall
Chris Justice, 36 points
WCTI-TV Sports Director
SM10,27-17
"Southern Miss defense too
aggressive for an offense that is
still learning
Brad Zaruba, 28 points
WITN-TV Sports Director
SM10,24-14
"Pirate offense not strong
enough to win on the road
Demetrius Carter,20 points
ABLE President
SM14,28-14
"Good luck to the Pirates
against a tough opponent. Be-
ware of No. 25, Derrick Batson
Mo' Rich, guest picker
Assistant News Editor
ECU20,6040
"Bah, humbug
Five points are awarded for
choosing the winner and an
additional three points are
given to the person closest to
the spread (the person clos-
est to the combined score of
both teams settles ties).
Sports
Page 11
Pirates hope to shoot down Eagles
Photo by Cedrlc Van Buren
The injured ECU squad will travel to Southern Mississippi this Saturday looking to win two in a row. The team
will miss stand-out wide receiver Morris Letcher. Freshman Perez Mattison starts again at QB for the Pirates.
High hopes for Southern
Miss have dwindled
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
Revenge for last year's loss
will be on the minds of the Pi-
rates this Saturday when they
travel to Hattiesburg, Mississippi
to take on Southern Miss.
Last season, Southern Mis-
sissippi embarrassed the Pirates
on the first nationally televised
game from Ficklen Stadium, 38-
21. Five interceptions and two
fumbles helped the lowly USM
offense to reach such a high total.
The Pirates are 2-4 on the
year and four of the next five
remaining games will be played
on the road. The Golden Eagles
are only 1-5 and the Pirates
should have a good shot at pull-
ing this one off.
ECU freshman quarterback
Perez Mattison will be getting
his second start this week, re-
placing the injured Chris Hester.
He had a great start last week
against Louisiana Tech. He set a
freshman record for 246 yards
By Sean Murphy
Guest Columnist
"It was the best of times, it was
the worst of times
At USM, with apologies to
Charles Dickens.itisthebestofhalves,
it is the worst of halves.
USM is living the novel "A Tale
of Two Halves
In the first half of their games,
the Eagles look almost invincible.
The second half Eagles look almost
invisible.
Another second-half debacle
against Louisville by the Eagles
showed how they can grab defeat
from the jaws of victory.
USM blew a 24-9 halftime ad-
vantage to lose the game 35-27.
In every game this season, USM
has either been leading or been close
to the lead at halftime.
And every game the Eagleshave
squandered a chance for a victory to
go home disappointed.
The Northeast Louisiana game,
the only USM victory, was a blow-
out. But then came the second half
nightmares, namely blowing a 34-9
halftime lead and makinga gameout
of a blowout.
USM luckily won that game 44-
37, but the tone was set for the two
sides of USM.
The Eagles have five games re-
maining. If this year lias taught any-
thing, there should be five good
halves and five bad halves.
If Dickens will please excuse
me.Wewill havea far, far better day
when we learn to play two halves
together.
Sean P. Murphy is thesportseditor
of Southern Mississippi's school news
paper. He is a sophomore journalism
major from New York.
Fayetteville women strike back
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
The East Carolina women's
soccer team was defeated on Sun-
day when they traveled to
Fayetteville in a rematch of their
opening game. In that first match,
ECU won 2-1, so Fayetteville was
ready to avenge that loss. The Pi-
rates opened the scoring when
Kellie Troy received a pass from
Maureen Corcoran in the goal
mouth at the 20-minute mark in
the first half. She put the ball in
the back of the net for a 1-0 ECU
lead. 10 minutes later, the Pirates
had a free kick from 30 yards out
when Maureen Corcoran passed
the ball to Stephanie Aicher, who
passed it back to Corcoran for a
shot. The ball fell just inches un-
der the crossbar and ECU led 2-0.
Fayetteville stormed back just
two minutes later to trim the lead
to 2-1. Then, at the 36-minute
mark, a Fayetteville forward
placed a perfect shot into the cor-
ner of the goal to tie the game.
Three minutes later a Fayetteville
forward broke through the Pirate
defense and scored on a
breakaway goal to make it a 3-2
game at the half.
In the second half, ECU was
able to mount a few attacks, but
unable to penetrate the goal.
Fayetteville began to solve the
Pirates' trapping defense and se-
nior goalkeeper Jaime Pierce
stopped no less than six
breakaways to keep the Pirates
close in the match. With just three
minutes left in the game, as ECU
was pushed up into the offensive
end of the field trying to tie the
game, another breakaway re-
sulted in a goal for Fayetteville,
and the game ended with
Fayetteville ahead 4-2.
Following the game, ECU
coach Chip Hudson said, "This
was a good effort for us. Of course
we're disappointed with the loss,
but when we work the kinks out
of our game, we could easily win
the rest of our matches
The women's soccer club goes
to Raleigh on Sunday to take on
N.C. State at 1 p.m.
Freshman Crane makes early impact
By Dave Pond
Staff Writer
For any student, coming to a
large university can be a difficult
adjustment from high school life.
Throw in the de-
mands of athlet-
ics and making
a successful
transition be-
comes even
more trying.
For B.J.
Crane, how-
ever, being a
true freshman
as well as a start-
ing linebacker
for the Pirates'
pigskin squad is
an everyday
walk in the
park
Born Nov.
9,1974, B.J. grew
up in the At-
lanta area,
where he found a love for athlet-
ics and for God. He comes from a
family with many diverse talents.
He and his two younger brothers
are all exceptionally talented in
various sports and in different as-
pects of music.
At Lovett High School in At-
lanta, B.J. was a tri-letterman,
earning letters in football, basket-
ball and baseball. In 1992, during
his senior sea-
son of football,
Ciane, due to
team injuries,
played
ironman-style
football. He
starred both as
a running back,
carrying the
ball 92 times for
622 yards and
as a strong
safety, where
he snatched
two intercep-
tions, caused
three fumbles
and blocked a
punt and a field
goal.
"Although
I played strong safety in high
school, the media portrayed me
as a linebacker, because somehow
I always ended up in the middle
of every play Crane said.
B.J. Crane
and went 18 of 26. His mobility
in the pocket could spell trouble
for Southern Miss.
With the loss of wide re-
ceiver Morris Letcher, knee in-
jury last week, the Buc offense
will have to look for passes to
half back Jerris McPhail and
tight end Carlester Crumpler.
Letcher, a senior, might be avail-
able for the last couple of games,
but could have played his last
game of his college career last
Saturday.
The Golden Eagles had high
hopes entering this '93 season,
but those have dwindled away
� injuries have not only
plagued the Pirates this season.
USM quarterback Tommy
Waters is suffering from a
shoulder separation and their
passing game is nothing to be
proud of. Sophomore Kevin
Bently has taken over the spot
and has only completed 44 per-
cent of his passes and has 11
Sue GAME page 13
Coach Bob Babich, who re-
cruited B.J. out of Lovett High,
said, "In him I saw an explosive
athlete one who could have a
very successful career with us in
Greenville. B.Js a hard worker
on and off the field. He has shown
big-play ability in the short time
he has been with us
B.J. chose East Carolina over
Southern Methodist University
simply because, it felt right. I
was all set to attend SMU until I
visited here. I knew that (ECU
was.for me
Playing against a nationally-
ranked squad such as Syracuse in
his first collegiate game was also
very exciting.
"It is an awesome feeling. Last
year I watched Marvin Graves on
television and now I'm on the
other side of the ball, eye to eye
with him Crane said.
Crane attributes his desire to
be the best football player that he
can to his father, Benny. "My dad
put a fierceness in my heart that
made me want to be in on every
play he said. "My dad motivates
me a lot. I am also motivated by
See CRANE page 12
Swimmers dive
into new season
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
The EastCarolina Swimming
and Diving teams had their last
pre-season event Tuesday after-
noon before kicking off the 1993-
94 season. The annual Purple-
Gold event held at Minges
Aquatic Center divided the team
into two separate units which
competed against each other as if
it were an actual meet.
"I was pleased with most of
the swims said Rick Kobe, head
coach of the swim team. "It's still
extremely early. I'm happy about
where we are up to this point. I'm
looking forward to our first meet
against Virginia Tech
Four Purple-Gold meet
records were broken by the
women. Sophomore Jackie
Schmieder continued herpre-sea-
son tear by swimming a time of
5:13.4 in the 500-meter freestyle.
Leslie Ha wley set a record as well,
with a 2:11.6 time in the 200-meter
backstroke. Ironically, the second
place time of 2:13.8 by freshman
Elizabeth Bradner would have
alsobroken the previous record
in the 200-meter back. Sopho-
more Beth Humphrey set a 200-
meter freestyle record with a
time of 2:57.8. The 400-meter
freestyle relay made up of
Schmieder,Humphrey,Christy
Winn and Annemarie Vogt
swam a Purple-Gold record
time of 3:43.70.
In other events for the
women, the 400-meter medley
relay waswon by the team made
up of Hawley, Brooke
Deretchin, Trade Garrett and
Joy Sturgis. In the 1000-meter
freestyle, it was Schmieder win-
ning with a time of 10:40. Hilary
Stokes won in the 50-meter
freestyle with a time of 25.89
seconds. In the 200-meter indi-
vidual medley freshman Eliza-
beth Browne edged out
Deretchin with a time of 2:18.3.
In the 200-meter fly, Melissa
Phillips won the event with a
2:13.9 time. Coming in a frac-
See SWIM page 13
Photo by C�drlc Van duran
The Swimming and Diving teams are ready to start the season after
setting new school records at their annual Purple-Gold meet
NCAA denies coach money
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) � A
judge has denied a request by Duke
associate basketball coach Pete
Gaudet to block the NCAA from
enforcing new rules that he says
are unfair and have cost him nearly
$60,000 a year.
SuperiorCourt JudgeJ.B. Allen
said Tuesday that Gaudet and his
attorney, Kenneth Kirkman, did not
meet the legal burden for a prelimi-
nary injunction against the NCAA.
Kirkman sought the measure
last week to prevent the NCAA
from enforcing its new regulations,
which limit the earnings of part-
time basketball assistants, until
Gaudet's lawsuit is decided.
The judge's decision was the
first action in the lawsuit Gaudet
filed in Durham Superior Court
last month challenging the NCAA
rules, which he contends have
threatened his coaching career
and hurt him financially.
Gaudet's suit asks the NCAA
to instruct Duke and Deblin Inc
a private organization set up to
run Duke's summer basketball
camp, to pay him the full amount
owed under his currentcontracts.
The university and Deblin
Inc owned by Duke coach Mike
Krzyzewski and his family, are
named as defendants in the suit.
Krzyzewski would like to pay
Gaudet $50,000 for running the
summer camp, but cannot be-
cause of the NCAA rules.
The NCAA limits the earn-
ings of part-time basketball assis-
tant to $16,000 per year, almost
$60,000 less than Gaudet made in
1991.





October 21.1993
R
ack coaches fight discrimination
CRANE
Continued from page 11
sday to support
-mh lationinits
to rest( ire recent cuts in ath-
tn scholarships and gain a bigger
n le for minorities in NCAA deci-
sion-making.
Hut the Congressional Blat.k
c aucus stopped short of endorsing
legislation to address NCAA rules
hat the coaches say restrict their
roles as mentors in troubled ghettos
and discriminate against black ath-
letes.
"At this time, we haven't talked
about any legislative ideas said
Rep. Cardiss Collins, D-Ill a cau-
cus member who also chairs the
Souse Energy and Commerce sub-
committee that has been a frequent
thorn in the side of the National
Collegiate Athletic Association.
Instead, the caucus appointed
a task force headed by Collins to
question the NCAA on scholarship
merits, re-
� proportionof
ith the assot ia-
About 30membersol theBlack
c oaches ssociation met with the
i au us .w part of a boycott of the
inaugural National Association of
Basketball Coaches Forum inChar-
lottcN.C
Tlie forum has many of the
same issueson its agenda this week,
fhe black coaches, however, chose
to go to the nation's lawmakers be-
cause of "countless meetings with
the NCAA" with little result, said
Georgetown basketball coach John
Thompson.
The black coaches are upset the
most with new NCAA rules that
dropped thenumberof scholarships
that Division Ischoolscanoffer from
15 to 14 last season, and to 13 this
season.
"Blackstudentathletesaredis-
proportionately affected by these
regulations Raveling said. "They
represent about 64 percent of the
plavers playing Division I basket-
ball
"Over a 10-year period, that
represents about3,000 scholarships,
lost opportunities tor Atrican-
Americans'hesaid. "Ninety-nine
percent of the NCAA's funding
u mies In m rwosports, football and
basketball
Thompson said hardly any of
his fellow black coaches at Division
I schools would have ever gone to
college or gotten the jobs they have
now it the current system had ex-
isted when they were players
"We can't do what was done
for us to get there he said. "The
intent of the rules was toadminister
competition, but we're a little
broader than just competition.
"Athletic people have been a
tremendous influence on out kids
becoming doctors, lawyers and en-
gineers
"We can't cure society's prob-
lems, but we don't want to be hin-
dered from making a minor contri-
bution that we think wecan make
Congress is just the first stop
on theway to make improvements.
the fanfare and recognition that
comes trom playing the game.
"Another reason that I want
to do well is to prove wrong the
people that don't respect the Pi-
rate defense. I want people to be
worried about coming into Ficklen
and lining up against us
Crane knows that he is young
and will make mistakes, but he
has shown a great attitude com-
ing into the Pirate program.
"I try to improve my play
within the team aspect with every
down Crane said. "Starting is
great but if me playing on the
scout team is best for the team,
men 111 play scout have no prob-
lem with that.
"I just thank Cod for the op-
portunity. Without Him I have
nothing, but with Him I have ev-
erything.
"I've never considered my-
self a good player, but a good
athlete. A good athlete can be-
come a good player, but someone
who is just a good player is not a
good athlete
In the classroom, B.J. is double
majoring in political science and
finance, hoping to pursue a career
in politics.
"Football gets my name out
there, so people will know who I
am he said. "That will help out a
lot in politics. Also, I want to be
momentarily! successful in life so
that I can help out those who are
less fortunate than 1 am
Time demands of ten put great
pressure on athletes and B.J. is no
exception.
"I'm just starting to relax he
said. "I think I've finally found
the balance between my classes
and football that I needed to so I
can succeed in the classroom as
well as on the field
When he is not drilling quar-
terbacks, recovering loose fumbles
or studying, Crane said that he
especially enjoys spending free
rime with his girlfriend, Tracy. He
also enjoys writing lyrics and col-
laborating with his younger
brother on musical aspects.
"I'm not a me-type person �
I'm real laid-back Crane said. "I
enjoy making people happy. I
don't care if I'm in a good mood or
not, if I can make you happy, then
that in turn will make me happy
With his future bright and
wide-open, many important
choices lay ahead. One thing about
B.J. Crane is etched in stone.
"I'm going to change the
world he said smiling.
Remember, when you're done reading, please recycle,
ENGME WORLD, INC.
RECONDITIONED ENGINES
COMPLETELY INSTALLED
ONLY $895
REBUILT
TRANSMISSIONS
COMPLETELY
INSTALLED
5495 and up
Installation includes new ENGINES
radiator hoses, fan belts, starting at
spark plugs, thermostat, $350
air filter, oil filter, oil and TRANSMISSIONS
coolant. $50 and up
Breakfast
� You flmst register for Success at Sunrise.
Call SLDP at 757-4796 no later than 4:00 pm, Friday,
to hear Ron Kimble's leadership and success secrets.
Receive wake-up call, local ride to MSC, and breakfast!
ALL PRODUCTS AND LABOR GUARANTEED!
AYDEN
GVILLl
AYDEN
GRIFTON
HS STOCKYARD
Free for
students!
KlMBLE
Greenville City Manager
KINSTON
Tuesday, October
746-4001
1-800-776-40011
Sponsored by Student Leadership
ograms
ALCOHOL AWARENESS WEEK
OCTOBER 25-30,1993
"FEEL THE POWER OF POSITIVE CHOICES"
WE'RE MORE THAN BAREFOOT
PATE AND TIME
MONDAY
102593
TUESDAY
102693
WEDNESDAY
102793
THURSDAY
102893
SATURDAY
103093
PROGRAM
All Day Dead for a Day
Wrecks on the Mall
(continues to Friday)
11 am-2pm Belly Up to Bacchus
5pm Alpha Phi Drink Out
(Non-alcoholic Social)
Everyone Welcome
10am-2pm "Sip Don't Drip" Info Booth
The Wall
10am-2pm Belly Up to Bacchus
"Sip Don't Drip" Info Booth
The Wall
3pm Gamma Walk
Everyone Welcome
LOCATION
Campus Wide Mall
Student Store
Bottom of the Hill
Student Store
Mendenhall Student
Center
Begins: Mall
Ends: Allied Health
Belk Bldg.
S ATTENDANCE
AS OF
101793 4,073
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU
For more information
about these events,
call our ECU Student
Union Hotline
at 757-6004.
SATURDAY
203093 MIDNIGHT MADNESS
Mendenhall Student Cnter
9:00pm-2:00am
- BARRY DRAKE - 70's Rock Music,
"THE GOOD, THE BAD, & THE UGLY
TUESDAY.OCTOBER 19th, 8:00 P.M.
HENDRIX THEATRE MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION
FREE AND OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC.
BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FORUM COMMITTEE.
LAST LECTURE SERIES
DR. HAL DANIEL
"THE AMERICAN BURIAL RITUAL"
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26TH, 8:00 P.M.
MENDENHALL, ROOM 244
BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FORUM COMMITTEE
(FREE TO ECU STUDENTS AND GENERAL PUBLIC)
Bacchus Night at the Mendenhall Student Center
Races 9pm-11 pm and 11:30pm-1:30am
Sponsored by:
Ultra Flab Fast
WATCH FOR "MIDNIGHT MADNESS"
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 30,
9:00 P.M. -2:00 A.M.
MENDENHALL
All films start at 8:00 and are FREE with
valid ECU I.D. for students, staff, and faculty.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21-
& SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 23
"ADVENTURES OF
BUCKAROO BONZAi"
"SLIVER"
"Give us a drink and
well put on the weight7
Special Notice; Madrigal Tickets on Sale NOW at Central Ticket Office,
"ECU STUDENT UNION IS COOL
AS CHEESE WHIZ - kenneth olson





October 21. 1993
The East Carolinian 13
GAME
Continued from page 11
�"un is
carrv. I lovvard k"t .��
Buckhalter and Ronald ones
havecollected a combined for491
yards on the ground. The Pirate
defense has been successful this
year at stopping the run, and they
must prove themselves again. If
they stop the run it will force
USM to go to a weak passing
attack.
' they only allowed
. ainst the run on 35
� ugh six games the
have onh given up 130.5
:e on the ground.
I SM's 7-4 record last season
is credited to the defense. Last
season they were ranked 27th in
scoring defense and eighth
against the pass. This vear the
defense has been put to the test
over and over due to the offen-
sive turnovers. Sound familiar?
ECU has been very similar to that
situation.
Perez Mattison will be throw-
ing into a satisfactory secondary.
The Birds have allowed 256 yards
per game through the air. This
should open the way for the ECU
running game led bv Junior
Smith. He has gained bc)6 yards
through onlv six games this vear
and has an average of 4.58 per
carry with six TD. Smith racked
up 150 last season against USM.
The Golden Eagles carry a
nice package of linebackers.
Tyrone Nix and Albert McRae
lead the team in tackles. Nix has
57and McRae, 52. This could spell
trouble for the scrambling
Mattison.
The key this week for the Pi-
rates will be to get good produc-
tion from Mattison and be able to
handle all the blitzes the Birds will
throw at them. The offense must
also not turn the ball over if they
expect to pull the upset.
SWIM
Continued from page 11
tionofasecond later was Humphrey
at2:14.0. In the 100-meter freestyle,
freshman Ellen Howard came in
first place with a time of 56.35 sec-
onds. The 200-meter breaststroke
was won by Deretchin with a time
of 2:35.7. The Gold women's team
outscored the Purple bv a score of
105-92.
In the men's meet, Brian Soltz
edged out Pat Cassidy in the 50-
meter freestyle with a time of 22.49
seconds. Sophomore McGee
Moody won the 200-meter freestyle
with a time of 1:48.7. In the 1000-
meter freestyle, Jason "Fezzman"
Farr went the distance to take the
event with a time of 10:13.4. In the
200-meter individual medlev,John
Donovan nipped David Benson
with a time of 2:02.84. Freshman
Erik Griffin won the 200-meter fly
with a 2:06.8 time. Moodv won the
100-meter freestyle in 49.5 seconds.
In the 200-meter backstroke, fresh-
man Chris Bembenek won with a
time of 2:02.0. Farr won the 500
freestyle with a time of 4:57.4. In the
200-meter breast stroke, it was
sophomore Mark Teske beating
Sean Brown with a time of 2:17.0. In
the 400-meter freestyle relay, the
team of Griffin, Cassidy, Moody
and Jay Noles won with a time of
3:20.2. In the 400-meter medley re-
lav, the team of Bembenek, Lance
Tate, Adam Ciarla and Alex Vitier
won with a time of 3:40.1. The final
score for the men was identical to
the women's. It was Gold winning
105-92.
As for the divers, it was captain
junior Scott Kupec leading the way
for the men, accumulating 354
points in the three meter and 362
points in the one meter. Coming in
second was Chris Barella, followed
by Billy Galleher.
"This season is going to be full
of new challenges. We are a very
young team, but there is a lot of
potential here, " Kupec said. "Div-
ing is everything to me. It's what I
live for. I'm putting everything I've
got into this season to reach success
for both my teammates and my-
self
For the women, it was fresh-
man Beth Hanna winning both the
one and three meter competition.
Coming in at second place was Lisa
Frederick and third place went to
Bridget Kruse.
The Pirates travel to Virginia
Tech on Oct. 30 for their first meet of
the season. The first home meet is
on Nov. 13, when ECU will host
Old Dominion and Georgia South-
ern.
Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: ECU running back Junior Smith has 696 yards rushing so far this season. On this pace
he will reach 1,276 yards for this year. Where would he stand in school history for most rushing
yardage in a single season?
�iiofsni ooips w puoods. pwjs pjnoca tgrng: y
A
A
A
A
I
ATiTIC
AIM
752-7303 I :
a
209 E. 5th St.
Greenville, NC
Ttie Undefeated, Undisputed!
OQN4rGCiY Thanks For Voting Us
' Z50ME The "Best Place To Hear Live Music"
� 1987�1988�1989�1990�1991.19921993
ever we�nksia GREENVILLETIMES READERS' POLL
U MILLEY CUT
�fe & shxtiih:
w?S3
free

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
i
4
4
4
4
4
4
ONLY $4 admission for members
WcHiballs � 99c MEMBERSHIPS 99c 3?oz DRAFT
Fri Oct 22
Sex Police
Special Guest BUS STOP
$2.00 32oz DRAFT
Sat Oct 23
Mr. CrowSey
EXCITING SPECIAL EFFECTS
a tribute to
Osbome
Only $5.00 for members � $2.00 32oz DRAFT
Tue Oct 26
An evening with
MERLSAl
I 9S'
and the
Rain Forest Band
ONLY $6.00 ADMISSION FOR MEMBERS
$1.50 Imports
27 WED. WRQR COMEDY ZONE -(the madhatterd. malagon)
28 THUR.FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH (99� 32oz draft 99� hiballsj
29 FRI CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD ($2.00 32oz draft
30 SATEVERYTHING ($2.00 32oz draft
31 SUNPURPLE SCHOOL BUS ($2.00 32oz draft
?
?
?
?
?
?
?
Harris Teeter
MAM 101V PRICES
QUALITY AND VARIETY
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
EYE OF ROUND
R0ASI
U.S.D.A. CHOICE
bottom mm
ROAST
LIMIT 2 .WITH
ADDTIONAL
PURCHASE
ALL VARIETIES
APPLES
DIET COKE OR
COCA COLA
2 LTR.
HARRIS TEETER LOW PRICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
99
MORE VALUE
APPLE
JUICE
64 OZ.
omilie
REDENBACHER'S
POPCORN
SELECTED
VARIETIES
21 OZ.
WHITE OR PRINT
ANGEL SOFT
BATH TISSUE
.157.5 SQ.FT.
THREE-WAY
LIGHT BULB 1 count
IN THE DELI-BAKERY
TURKEY
BREAST
SLICED
TO ORDER
IB
1
.79
129
4
99
shkied mums
WISE
POTATO CHIPS
6 01.
DEC0NGES1ANT
SUDAFED
TABLETS
24 a
PILLSBURY
MICROWAVE
PANCAKES
16.4 OZ.
HIGHLAND CREST
ICE
CREAM
12 GAL
Prices Effective Through October 26, 1993
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday, October 20 Through Tuesday, October 26,1993. in Greenville Stores Only.
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.






eOW$&rf7ll&F7KWS!
East Carolina
University
31
? ?
Louisiana
Tech
28
wrwn&ESii
j& 1ST
Zeta Tau 5UPba S001
1993 gpirit cgup
(810 otal joints)
FLOATSHOUSEHALLBANNER
Visual ArtsThe AmbassadorsFleming HallVisual Arts
Alpha Omicron PiZeta Tau AlphaWhite Hall
Pi Omega Pi School of EducationAlpha Delta PiCotten Hall
�g High School Band Competition j3j
Large (79 Members) Small (1-78 Members)
J.H. Rose High School D.H. Conley High School

White Oak High School
South West High School
Eastern Wayne High School Swansboro High School
Special Thanks To:
ECU Student Homecoming Committee:
Candy Hudspeth, Chair
Scarlett Gardner, Secretary
Brian Burns, Bands
Amanda Nixon, Candidates
Deana Cale, Decorations
Mike Preston, Entertainment
Sheila Boswell, Half-time
lioland Mattocks & Tim
Campbell, Parade
Freda Allen, PIRATEFEST
WMW" B�W�1�ILJ.mjiLIJM.JJ 1LX.I�����
ECU Homecoming Steering Committee
The ECU Ambassadors
Mike Costen, ECU Student Stores
United States Cellular Phone
Doug Caldwell, ECU Building Sf Grounds
Ed Gibson, ECU Moving Services
Ron Avery, ECU Public Safety
Pat Gertz, ECU Traffic
� . i�b�"�S'i9hs





Title
The East Carolinian, October 21, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 21, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.969
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy