The East Carolinian, October 14, 1993






� �
��"� �
Alcohol Awareness
Coach Steve Lager
on page 2.
time forT&
1
Otfc
f
Lifestyle
Tor Love or Money'
New flick with Michael J. Fox
and Gabrielle Anwar sees its
ups and downs, but may be a
another weak one for Fox.
See review on page 15.
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 58
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, October 14,1993
ECU ranks in top ten
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Not only is ECU one of the
best party schools in the south,
it is also one of the best buys in
the South.
According to U.S. News and
World Report, ECU ranks in the
top 10 of best buys in the South.
The study, published in the Oct.
11 issue, was based on "sticker
price
To determine what schools
were the best sticker price, the
magazine ranked the schools
academically in their Oct. 4 is-
sue.
The U.S. News quality
rank was divided by the total
tuition, fees and room and board
for the 1993-94 academic year.
The higher the ratio of quality
to price, the better the value.
To qualify as a top ten in
monetary value, the school had
to rank near the top of their
category in academic quality.
Weekend
commemorates
first win
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Three North Carolina
schools were included in the top
10 of the best sticker value
schools in the region. They are
ECU, Appalachian State Univer-
sity, University of North Caro-
lina at Asheville.
The best value sticker price
rank measures the cost of tu-
ition, fees and room and board
while considering the academic
value.
Several other North Caro-
lina schools ranked as best val-
ues in other categories. Duke
University and UNC-Chapel
Hill were in the top 25 "dis-
counted price best value" na-
tional universities. N.C. State
and UNC-Chapel Hill were
among the top 25 "sticker price
best value" national universi-
ties.
The discounted price best
value takes into consideration
tuition price, room and board,
fees, books and estimated per-
sonal expenses. Then, the aver-
age of its need-based grants in
aid are subtracted from the
costs.
According to U.S. News and
World Report, as many as three
out of four freshmen at some
schools receive financial aid.
Therefore, the discounted price
is becoming very relevant.
Based on U.S. News and
World Report's figures, the av-
erage ECU student spends
59,564 per academic year on
tuition, fees and room and
board.
ASU ranked slightly
higher at $10,064. Universities
in the West ranked the highest,
or most expensive. Students at
Santa Clara University in Cali-
fornia were estimated to spend
$18,783 per academic year on
tuition, fees and room and
board.
The cheapest schools,
listed, in the "sticker price best
value" category, were found in
the south.
28 Pages
HELP
Well, it's mid-
semester guys and
with our
wonderfully
equipped library,
expect to have to
ask for lots of help.
Here, Michael
Brooks assists a
student in
reserves. Don't
forget to vote for
the bond Nov. 2.
Photo by
Cedric
Van Buren
UN
Homecoming
The candidates and the anx-
ious onlookers at this year's
Homecoming ceremony will soon
"Live the Magic" of the annual
festivity, and the people who work
behind the scenes to make Home-
coming happen have made sure
they have blended the best of old
and new to make this year's event
successful.
The ECU Homecoming
Committee works diligently ev-
ery year to make sure that the
time-honored traditions sur-
rounding the ceremony do not go
unheeded. Faced with the pros-
pect of heightened media cover-
age and subsequent greater vis-
ibility, the members of this group
must weigh the factors of holding
onto these traditions while they
See TRADITIONS page 6
Nurse grad
named top
By Lisa Dawson
Staff Write
Robin Morreale, a staff nurse
in the Coronary intensive care unit
at Pitt County Memorial Hospital,
has been named as one of 100 out-
standing nurses from more than
63,800 registered nurses in North
Carolina.
Morreale graduated from
Roy C. Ketcham High School in
Wappinger Falls, N.Y. in 1973. Af-
ter earning an advanced degree in
nursing iom Dutchess Commu-
nityColIogein 1983, Morreale went
to Barton College in Wilson, where
he earned a bachelor of science
degree innursing. He is currently a
graduate student at ECU.
Morreale is a certified critical
care nurse through the American
Association for Critical Care
Nurses. He is also certified as an
advanced cardiac life support in-
structor. With his wife Linda, who
is also a registered nurse, Morreale
has three children: Lyndi, 13; Daniel,
9; and Nickolas, 7.
According to the Office of
InformationandPublicationsatPitt
County Memorial Hospital, the
"Great 100" program, which is in
parties!
By Maureen Rich
Assistant News Editor
Who does more partying,
ECU students or ECU alumni?
After Homecoming weekend,
many former students will un-
doubtedly be found recuperating
from a hectic weekend of golfing,
tennis, dancing, eating, drinking
and celebrating. Not necessarily
in that order, of course.
Meanwhile, current stu-
dents will probably enjoy only
the latter of these activities.
Another difference between
the celebrating that takes place
during Homecoming is that all
alumni parties are sponsored by
ECU, while current students are
expected to maintain the tradi-
tional " Bring Your Own motif.
ECU offers alumni many
opportunities to reunite as well as
many chances to have a grea t time
while they visit the ECU commu-
nity.
"Homecoming is always an
exciting and festive time on the
ECU campus said Donald Y.
Leggett, associate vice chancellor
for alumni relations. "We look
forward to having large numbers
of alumni return to the campus,
so we can reacquaint them with
the University, as well as express
our thanks for their support of
ECU
Before the Pirates conquer
Louisiana Tech, several other face-
offs will take place with a little
less pressure on the players.
Alumni tee-off for ECU's First
Annual Homecoming Alumni
Golf Classic takes flight at 12:30
p.m. Friday, Oct. 15 at the Green-
ville Country Club. But that's just
the beginning.
The First Annual Alumni
Tennis Classic, on Friday at 1:30
See HOMECOMING page 7
UNITED NATIONS (AP)
� After the debacle in Somalia,
the U.S. administration is shy-
ing away from multilateral ac-
tion. Instead of entertaining the
idea of GIs in blue berets in hot
spots, the new U.S. new motto
for U.N. peacekeeping seems
borrowed from the Reagan anti-
drug slogan: just say no.
Senior U.N. officials are
deeply worried about the U.S.
decision to forgo its earlier com-
mitment to
disarma-
ment in So-
malia and to
pull all
forces out by
March 31,
whether So-
malia is
stable or not.
They fear it
could mean
an unravel-
ing of U.N.
peacekeep-
ing and dis- mhmmhmmm
courage other nations from con-
tributing troops in Somalia and
elsewhere.
The U.S. delay Monday in
deploying a non-combat mis-
sion in Haiti was cited by U.N.
officials as an example of what
they see as U.S. pussyfooting
about peacekeeping.
U.N. officials are afraid
u The United
Nations simply
cannot become
engaged in every
one of the
world's conflicts.
that if the formidable U.S. mili-
tary will not venture forth be-
cause of possible bloodshed,
warlords and bullies worldwide
can rejoice and be assured that
no credible force will challenge
them.
After 17 U.S. soldiers died
in a furious clash with Somali
clan militiamen this month, the
Clinton people decided they
would pour in 5,000 more
troops, focus on reconciliation
instead of
military
action to
capture
warlord
Mohamed
F a r r a h
Aidid,
and clear
out by
March 31.
U.N.
officials
and
peace-
n
Bill Clinton
�������i keeping
planners shuddered. They
feared that the entire operation
would collapse without the
American linchpin, and Soma-
lia, a region without a govern-
ment, would once again face
starvation and chaos.
Secretary-General Boutros
Boutros-Ghali's main aim in go-
ing next week to Addis Ababa,
Ethiopia, is to shore up re-
gional support and troop con-
tributors so others will take
up the slack when the Ameri-
cans go home for good.
Boutros-Ghali acknowl-
edged on Monday that the
Americans have no stomach
to be "the sheriff of the world"
and want to solve their prob-
lems at home. France, Ger-
many and other nations feel
the same way, he said. But he
urged them to reconsider.
"For the time being, this
is the only forum he told
reporters. "If member-states
do not want to play by them-
selves the role of policeman
of the world, sheriff of the
world, then they must assist
the United Nations. Other-
wise they will get involved
He sought to play down
differences with Washington
over the goals of the Somalia
operation and how it has been
managed. U.N. officials un-
derline they cannot afford a
confrontation with the United
States. But they made it clear
that the United States, which
now criticizes the United Na-
tions, had ardently supported
every Somalian resolution
about disarmament, nation-
building and the need to cap-
See UN page 7
ECU team to explore civil war shipwrecks
Photo courtesy of ECU News Bureau
Robin Morreale, a graduate student at ECU and a staff nurse at PCMH
was chosen in the top 100 of 63,800 N.C. nurses.
its fifth year, honors 100 of North
Carolina's registered nurses for
their commitment to their profes-
sion and for making significant con-
tributions to improving the health
care services in their communities.
In addition to recognizing outstand-
ing nurses, this annual event also
raises money to support nursing
scholarships in North Carolina.
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer-
"Damn the torpedoes! Go
ahead These famous words spo-
ken by Admiral David Farragut in
the famous Civil War battle of
Mobile Bay inspired an underwa-
ter survey team from ECU to head
to the site of the battle.
Five students, two ECU
graduates, and team leader, ar-
chaeologist Gordon P. Watts, all
from the graduate program in
Maritime History and Nautical
Archaeology, plan to examine
three battleships that sank more
than a century ago. They left on
Oct. 5 and will return around Oct.
31.
While in Mobile, the divers
will explore and survey three
ships; the C.S.S. Gaines, the U.S.S.
Philippi and the U.S.S. Tecumseh.
The five-student team mem-
bers, led by Watts, recently re-
turned from practicing mapping
and surveying techniques on an
18th century British shipwreck in
Bermuda. Their latest expedition
will be based at Fort Morgan, a
park site near the entrance to Mo-
bile Bay.
The team will assess the
wreck sites for the U.S. Depart-
ment of Interior, National Park
Service and for the U.S. Navy,
funded by a $20,000 grant. The
study may improve the way the
Park Service manages its battle-
field protection program.
The Park Service presently
protects historic battlefields, but
the protection only applies to battle
sites on land. According to Gor-
don P. Watts, the work performed
by the diving team could lead to
the protection and management
plans for historic nautical battle
sites. These sites would include
Mobile Bay; Fort Fisher, N.C; and
Yorktown, Va.
The most famous of the three,
the Tecumseh, struck a torpedo or a
mine at the beginning of the battle
and sank in 25 seconds, killing 93
men. Stunned by the hit, the Union
fleet momentarily failed in its
progress until Admiral Farragut
climbed to the upper deck of the
flagship Hartford, lashed himself
to the rigging and allegedly yelled
the words so many people remem-
ber today.
Now,most of the Tecumseh's
hull is hidden by mud and silt. Jeff
Morris, Tim Hastings, Ted Dunlap,
and Lex Turner, all ECU students,
will note the exposed area and
determine the deterioration of
the ship, and hopefully feel the
spiritofthewarthathelpedmold
our country.
The Gaines, one of the other
two ships to be surveyed by the
team, was an armor-clad ship
and was one of very few used by
the Confederacy. Its com-
mander, under the threat of de-
feat, ran his vessel aground in an
attempt to save the guns.
The Philippi, once owned
by a Confederate blockade run-
ner and named the Ella, was con-
verted into a gunboat by the
Union forces. The Confederate
artillery sank it during the battle.
The team's leader, Watts,
is one of North Carolina's most
experienced underwater ar-
chaeologists. He was part of
the team that discovered the
Lf.S.S. Monitor off North
Carolina's coast in the early
1970s.
Over the summer, Watts
worked with an international
research team in France to help
excavate the C.S.S. Alabama, a
Confederate raider that was
sunk in the English Channel by
the Lf.S.S. Kearsarge in 1864.






October 14, 1993
ECU recognizes outstanding alumni
Study warns against drinking games
Chug-a-lug and other drinking games ore not as harmless as
college students maj think, warn two researchers in a recently
published study. Nearly 4,000 alcohol-consuming students from
58 American colleges and universities were surveyed about the
games they play when drinking. While students who identified
themselves as "light" or "moderate" drinkers experienced few
alcohol-related problems, those who played a drinking game
within the preceding year significant! v increased the probability of
negative consequences in 15 of 17drinking-related behaviors, the
report said. While the researchers said more emphasis should be
placed on drinking games in campus alcohol prevention programs
and messages, the messages that stress abstinence from drinking
have proved to not be effective among college students.
Miami professor fired for sexual harassment
Ahigh-profile University of Miami professor from the Gradu-
ate School of International Studies (GSIS) was fired for sexual
harassment and other charges in late September, following an
investigation which began in 1992. Professor Jiri Valenta was
terminated by a unanimous vote of the Executive Committee of the
UM Board of Trustees after professor Vandulka Kubalkova filed a
formal complaint against Valenta for sexual harassment, abuse of
power and financial improprieties. The charges were substanti-
ated through the testimonies of 53 witnesses over a 15-day period,
which generated more than 3,500 pages of transcript. Charges
surrounding Valenta's dismissal include physically touching seven
women, including grabbing their breasts and buttocks, inviting
women to bear his children and threatening retaliation when his
advances were rebuffed.
Students arrested in prostitution ring
Three University of Arizona students were arrested for alleg-
edly running a prostitution ring near the campus and employing
college-age women, according to the Daily Wildcat. It was undeter-
mined whether the women involved in the ring were U A students,
the campus newspaper reported. According to police reports, a 19-
year-old woman who was employed by Elite Escort Service agreed
to have sex for money with an undercover police officer at a hotel
near the Tucson International Airport. The arrests took place after
police investigated an advertisement reading, "Elite Escort Service
i featuring Lauren, Nicky & Victoria. Noon-3 a.m. Large selection.
Reas. rates that was published in The Arizona Daily Star.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Graduating from ECU does
not mean that one loses all iden-
tity as an ECU student. No matter
what you do, ECU will find out
about it. One plus is that only the
wonderful achievements are pub-
licized! ECU will honor four
alumni for their outstanding ac-
complishments at the annual
Chancellor's Awards Luncheon
Saturday.
Named as Outstanding
Alumni for 1993 are William Vance
Arnold of Raleigh, Maria Castillo
Clay of Greenville, Janice
Hardison Faulkner of Greenville,
and Bobby Scot Ober of Carmel,
Ind.
According to an ECU News
Bureau press release, Arnold, a
1959 East Carolina graduate, is
director of the North Carolina Film
Office in Raleigh. Under his lead-
ership, the film industry in North
Carolina has come to be ranked
third in the United States � be-
hind California and New York.
Arnold has helped to build the
state's film industry from four
films and $65 million in media
spending in 1981 to 17 films and
$426 million in media spending in
1990.
He also has been director of
the North Carolina Division of
Travel and Tourism, and worked
with the Virginia State Travel and
Tourism Service where he created
the popular "Virginia is for Lov-
ers" campaign. His wife, Dorothy,
is a 1958 graduate of ECU.
Clay is an educational spe-
cialist in the ECU School of
Medicine's Department of Family
Medicine. Clay graduated from
ECU in 1972 with a B.A. degree in
political science, and in 1976
earned a master's degree in coun-
seling. She was the first woman to
receive ECU's Outstanding
Graduating Senior Award. Clay
also holds a doctorate degree in
adult education from UNC-
Chapel Hill.
She has received such hon-
ors as the 1986Governor's Award
for Excellence, the Greater D.C.
Metro Catholic Youth
Organization's Volunteer Award,
the Chapel Hill United Way Ser-
vice Award and the American
Society for Training and Develop-
ment Service Award.
Clay serves on the national
board of directors for the Ameri-
can Society for Training and De-
velopment and on the editorial
advisory board for that
organization's professional jour-
nal. She is past president of Ronald
McDonald House of Chapel Hill
and a former coach for Girls Catho-
lic Youth Organization Basketball
in Washington, D.C.
Faulkner is currently the
N.C. Secretary of Revenue. She
received a bachelor's degree in
English and social studies in 1956,
followed by a master's degree in
English education in 1957. In ad-
d ition to being an alumna of ECU,
she is a veteran of its faculty and
administration.
For 25 years, Faulkner taught
English at ECU. She went on to
serve in a number of administra-
tive posts, the last of which was as
associate vice chancellor and di-
rector of the Regional Develop-
ment Institute. She was appointed
by Gov. Hunt in January of this
year to serve in his executive cabi-
net as Secretary of Revenue.
Faulkner has served as ex-
ecutive director of the Democratic
Party of North Ca rolina, president
of the North Carolina World Trade
Association and treasurer and
member of the board of directors
of the N.C. Ballet Company. Cur-
rently she is president of Friends
of Hope Historic Foundation,
member of the Pitt County Indus-
trial Development Commission,
chairperson of the board of direc-
tors for REAL Enterprises, chair-
person of the N.C. Board of Advi-
sors to the U.S. Small Business
Administration, and a member of
the board of directors of the N.C.
Institute of Political Leadership.
Faulkner is the author of two
English textbooks and numerous
freelance articles on folklore, local
history, historic preservation and
economic development.
Ober is a professor of busi-
ness education at Ball State Uni-
versity. He holds bachelor's and
master's degrees in business
education from ECU ad a doc-
torate degree from Ohio State
University.
Ober has published more
than 50 articles in national jour-
nals and was senior author of
GreggCollege Typing, the nation's
best-selling post-secondary text.
As national president of Delta Pi
Epsilon he was instrumental in
establishing the ECU chapter of
that organization. He has been
national chair of the Policies
Commission for Business and
Economic Education.
Twice Ober has been rec-
ognized nationally as one of the
10 leading researchers in busi-
ness education. He has spoken
at workshops in 41 states in the
U.S and in Puerto Rico and
Canada, and Is a frequent busi-
ness writing consultant to Mid-
western businesses.
The board of directors of
the East Carolina University
Alumni Association select Out-
standing Alumni annually. Their
selections are based on nomina-
tions submitted by alumni, fac-
ulty and staff. Each honoree will
receive an engraved pewterpla tp
at the annual Chancellor's
Awards Luncheon on Saturday
and will be introduced at half-
time of the homecoming foot-
ball game against Louisiana.
MTV says it will review 'Beavis and Butthead'
MORAINE, Ohio (AP) �
MTV said it will take another look
atitsshow "Beavisand Butt-head"
after a woman whose 5-year-old
son set a fatal house fire, blamed
the cartoon for promoting burn-
ing as fun.
Austin Messner, whose 2-
year-old sister died in the fire,
watched an episode in which the
cartoon characters said fire is fun,
said Moraine Fire Chief Harold
Sigler.
"According to the mother,
right after that she caught him
playing with ma tches Sigler said.
Austin; his mother, Darcy
Burk; and her boyfriend, Steve
Sears, escaped.
His 2-year-old sister, Jessica
Matthews, died in the fire Wednes-
day.
"Beavis and Butt-head" fea-
tures two animated teen-agers
who comment on rock videos and
spend time burning and destroy-
ing things.
Carole Robinson, a spokes-
woman for MTV, said Friday that
the cable network would "re-ex-
amine issues regarding 'Beavis
and Butt-head "
"Responsibly programming
MTV has always been and will
continue to be our top priority
she said.
Sigler said he wants MTV
to eliminate any shows that
might encourage playing with
fire and would like to see vio-
lence on the program reduced.
"When you take a child in
the formative years and you get
these cartoon characters saying
it's fun to play with fire this is
going to stick in that kid's mind
and it's going to be with him for
a long time Sigler said.
Chapter 7
. EBU hadn't changed much.
- As I drove up Case Hill Drive
and passed the dorms, I soon found
out that the coach was definitely the
Tight person to talk to. Banners were
up everywhere, the campus news-
paper was plastered with photos of
young women and I could even see
I a few footballs being thrown around.
Homecoming had arrived and
I Coach Steve Lager was the man I
I needed to see.
I It was even more apparent
�vhen I pulled to a stop next to
lister's Stadium. The stadium
L-tooked in mint condition and you
. could barely tell that the students
had trashed it last week. The athlet-
ics department at EBU had gone to
a lot of trouble to make sure that this
weekend went well. Too bad I might
i have to brew up something
I found Lager in the locker
loom, surrounded by football hel-
mets and dwarfed by a chalkboard
filled with X's and O's. He looked
up from his playbook and shot me a
! look. Man didn't seem to like me �
he'll get over it soon enough.
"You'd more than likely be
�Mick Hammered. What can I do for
' you, besides show you the door?" It
seemed like the administration
didn't take too well to me nosing
around. They'd have to live with it,
though, until I found what I came
fpr.
r. "Well, Lager, you can tell me
about Al Cohol. Don't cop an atti-
tude, either, because I've just about
; had it with bureaucrats I brushed
aside the flap of my trenchcoat, let-
ting Lager get a good look at Betsy.
She seemed to change his attitude.
She had that effect on people.
"Okay, Hammered, but onlv
for a minute. I got a game to get
ready for I put my foot on a bench
and waited for him tocontinue. "You
picked a good time, though. Home-
coming is definitely the time when
you'll see Cohol here. The students
here just don't seem to listen when
we tell them what the truth actually
Is about him
"What would that be exactly,
Lager?" I felt the hairs on the back of
The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one hand on your wallet
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
where a man can forget his troubles and drown his
sorrows for a while.
Mick Hammered had sworn never to set foot
in the Brewery again. Setting out to find his old
friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
j. in the seedy and fermented world of the Brewery.
Every Thursday in The East Carolinian, Mick
will meet a character who will expose Al in a whole new light. When it's finally
over and done with, Mick�and the reader�ivill be faced with one of the most
important questions either has ever faced.
What place does Al Cohol have in my life?
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tough, comparable to
Spillane's Hammer and Hammett's Spade
foel Keggsy, The Beersborough Gazette
EAST
CAROLINIAN
my neck rise. Maybe now I would
get something I could use.
"Let me show you Lager
moved to the chalkboard and
erased the crazy tic-tac-toe game.
"It's like this � the more time stu-
dents spend with Cohol, the more
their behavior changes. When he's
in their blood at a .02 or .03 level,
they start relaxing and become
more outgoing. At .05 to .12, they
start to lose control and can hurt
themselves. Not that they would
ever admit that, though Lager
shook his head in disgust and con-
tinued.
"If the level gets as high up as
.25, they start losing their coordi-
nation. You know, spilling drinks
and falling down on everyone and
everything. If they go over .35
Lager shuddered, "Well, there's not
a whole lot you can do. A person
may fall into a coma or even die
I gritted my teeth and vowed
to get to Cohol, no matter what it
took. Someone had to show him
what was going on. "What about
after they drink, Lager?"
"Well, about the only thing
they can do to stop feeling like crap
the next morning is drink some
water, take some aspirin or eat
something. And that might not even
help. What burns me is that some
think that more time with this guy
will help. All that leads to is more
problems
"Gotcha. What about helping
someone who's gone too far?"
"Leave it to the professionals,
Hammered. Emergency rescue
teams are trained for that kind of
thing. About the only thing you
should do is turn the person over
on their side so they don't choke on
any vomit. Other than that, keep
them safe until the paramedics get
there
"Thanks, Lager. For adminis-
tration, you're alright
Lost in thought as I stepped
out of the Sports Mill Building, 1
failed to notice the limousine
parked nearby. Until the two thugs
grabbed me and pulled mer inside.
"The Director wants vou
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�MMHIIWI1' -
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October 14, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
ummerce club marks 10 years
w ith his immar
school ! vennow,whethei you're
ss ou re a Ik k poli-
tk i(ui ou lin not have a birthday
party and invite your 1,000 friends.
Ill sC ommerceClub, however,
has done jus! that.
Marking its 10th inniver-
sary, members sent at le.ist 1,000
invitations out with the mail for a
gathering in the General Class-
room building for a third-floor ex-
travaganza, aimed primarily at
alumni.
That's quite a few stamps to
lick�perhaps it pays to maintain
only a few close friendships.
The Commerce Club, spon-
sored by the ECU School of Busi-
ness, is the largest and most active
professional society on campus,
according to Betty Wilson, associ-
ate dean of the business program,
and is comprised of business
graduates, staff and friends of the
school.
"Our intention is to main-
tain strong ties with our former
u ilson said. "It's air
tunit) for a Little interac-
rhe celebration is also an
o portunity to say "th.ink-vou" to
art) alumni who have do-
nated monej to the club over the
years, Wilson said.
" I heir donations provide a
better school of business for our
students she said. "Funds gen-
erated through the Commerce
Club supplement our state funds,
and help us provide a greater
margin of excellence that goes
above and beyond most profes-
sional societies
The club began in 1983 with
only 25 members, and very little
money.
Today, over 1,000 members
contribute to the rapidly expand-
ing program.
Dean of the School of Busi-
ness Dr. Ernest Uhr and 31 of the
school's friends and alumni orga-
nized the club's first meeting. At-
tendance has flourished since,
Wilson said.
The club works hard to in-
crease student awareness of the
club, Wilson said. Every business
graduate receives a complimen-
tary one-year membership, Wil-
son said, with the opportunity to
maintain that membership for a
small fee.
Last year's membership
dues paid for their twice-yearly
newsletter, and an annual report.
"We've become a very sig-
nificant influence to our students
now, and when they graduate
Wilson said. "We have about 250
people sitting in our reserved sea ts
for the game Saturday, we've
never had this before
In the past three years, two
winners of the Commerce Club's
Teaching Excellence Award have
gone on to receive an ECU Uni-
versity Teaching Award, Wilson
said.
Club members will gather at
9 a.m. Saturday morning on the
third floor of the General Class-
room building. One attraction is a
"Time Tunnel" created by mem-
bers. Beginning with the '50s and
covering right through to the '90s,
the club has devoted a separate
classroom for each decade. Inside,
memorabilia illustrating that time
period will be on display.
Other activities include an
anniversary cake-cutting, class
reunions and a special recogni-
tion of the club's 1,000th member.
Judge dismisses juror, orders new deliberations
LOS ANGELES (AP) � Af-
ter eight tumultuous days of delib-
erations, the jury in the Reginald
Denny bearing trial is starting alJ
over again without a juror who the
others complained couldn't grasp
the issues.
Superior Court Judge John
Ouderkirk removed the juror on
Monday after receiving a note
about her from the forewoman.
The woman "cannot compre-
hend anything that we'vebeen try-
ing toaccomplish the forewoman
wrote. She added: "This has noth-
ing to do with her views on issues
or her personality. She doesn't use
common sense
The anonymous, sequestered
jury is deciding the fate of two
black men accused of attacking
Denny, a white truck driver.
Deliberations were to resume
today.
After receiving complaints
earlier about a problem juror, the
judge on Saturday gave jurors the
rest of the weekend to cool off.
Damian Williams, 20, and
Henry Watson, 29, are charged with
attempting to murder Denny in
1992 during the riots that broke out
after four white policemen were
acquitted in state court in the heat-
ing of black motorist Rodney King.
The defendants could get life in
prison.
Meanwhile, the two police-
men convicted in federal court of
violating King's civil rights, Of-
ficer Laurence Powell and Sgt.
Stacey Koon, were scheduled to
report to prison today to begin their
2 1 2-year sentences.
The dismissed juror, who is
black, was replaced by a young
Asian- American womandrawnby
lottery from among the alternates.
The jury in the racially vola tile case
now consists of three blacks, two
Asian-Americans, three whites and
four Hispanics.
Defense lawyers objected to
the juror's removal, which was re-
quested by the prosecution, and
asked the judge to declare a mis-
trial. He refused.
. XX-�'�.
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and Alumni!
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October 14, 1993
HOMECOMING 1993
Renita Danielle
Allen
ABLE
Debbie Garner
Alpha Delta Pi
Holly Leann
Fleming
Alpha Omicron Pi
Angela Michelle
Porter
Alpha Phi
I
Rolanda Kittrell
Alpha Phi Alpha
Krista Anne Roth
Alpha Sigma Phi
Scarlett Ginn
Parks
Alpha Xi Delta
Carolyn M. Green Robbyn Shulman Victoria T. Moore
Ambassadors Chi Omega ECU College
Republicans
Erica McFarland
Dance Expressions
Laura Ecklin
Cotten Hall
Machella Phillips
Delta Sigma Theta
Carrie Elizabeth
Oleson
EC Dance
Association
Nancia Michelle Robin Waldron
Nettles Fleming Hall
ECU Gospel Choir
COM� VOT�!
Musk have a Valid Student I.D.
Thursday, October 14, 1993
Voting booths:
Student Stores � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Bottom of College Hill � 8 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Allied Health � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mendenhall � 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
School of Medicine � 8 o.m. to 5 p.m.
Pictures published courtesy of The East Carolinian.
All photos taken by Cedric van Bur en.
A

Brooke Hunter
Greene Hall
Claudine
Nicholson
GAMMA
Shannon
Swicegood
Jones Hall
Jennice Glander
Kappa Sigma
Jill Auerbach Paris Dinwiddie
Panhellenic Peer Health
Educators
Kristen Oliver
Jarvis Hall
Becky Caldwell
PUSH
Jennifer Anne
Carboni
Pi Delta
Rhonda P.
Cummings
RHA
Marci Christine
Blake
Scott Hall
Caroline
Donbroski
Sigma INu
Jennifer Evelyn
Heath
Pi Omega Pi
Toy a Sanders
Tyler Hall
Annie Dudley
Visual Arts Forum
Rene Salameh
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Dionne Denise
Evans
White Hall
Deva Waugh
Zeta Phi B�la
Anna L. Harrington
Sigma Sigma Sigma
HOMECOMING 1993
Jennifer Coxe
Zeta Tau Alpha
�-







r to U.N. officials
Man on death row subject to life
� � :
8-year-old loses scalp and ear in dog attack
WE PRINT
OUR RESUME ON
EVERY CAN.
IB
Budweisecl
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fikmaJ �n, $in and �
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What
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C nmt ecu brat v.
ECU's favorite HALLOdav!
act paintim
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Hilliftrds nowiin( tabu tennu
f .ill!) r�. ad rs
Horror fS
id i � i k. anol?(
Movi,
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P

AT MENDENHALL
HALLOWEEN 93
Saturday, October 30
9:00 p. m. - 2:00 a. m.
SPONSORED BY ECU MAJOR EVENTS COMMITTEE
1 tu annual Midnight Madness Meal
A Dootiiul Breakfast fromam pus !
I hi Blizzard f Bucks
A BACCHUS .�ht at tm Ra
I lort Racing k 1 )oij Racing l'r prizes
,I,� valid EC1 I!) )j
READMISSN N NO NE ! V i �
INFI.I ENCE Will, BE ADMI I R.
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October 14, 1993
RADITIONS
Continued from page 1
hai.
Preston said. "There
he Piratefest celebra-
tion, the parade, the football game
, and of course, the halftime show.
Vie are concentrating hard to hold
'��ito those rich traditions
Preston said that although
Je has done extensive research on
rfhe history of theceremony at East
tarolina, poor record keeping
' made gaining information on the
"early days of Homecoming diffi-
; cult'
"The Homecoming history
; is kind of sketchy Preston said.
' "No one is quite sure when it
startedsome people think it was
early as 1907 when the college
opened, but we can't be sure. We
that it was going in the
ml we can't be su re exactly
the tirt one was
ton said that the cer-
emony originally was held in the
spring But when East Carolina
reaching College (ECTC) started
competing in football in 1932, the
ceremony migrated to the fall.
Preston said that this year's cer-
emonv is one that should be very
important to Pirate football fans.
"This year's ceremony marks
the 60th anniversary of our foot-
ball program's first victory, a 6-0
win over Campbell
According to Jeffery
Marshall, Assistant director of
University Unions, this year's
"Live the Magic" theme is one of
the best he has seen.
"The theme was developed
in our steering committee last
year Marshall said. "It was sug-
gested by Tony Cox, the former
director of the Marching Pirates.
After the committee sent in all of
their ideas, we found that to be the
best one
Local residents and ECU stu-
dents alike will be able to see the
Homecoming magic firsthand at
many activities which the Univer-
sity has planned. This year's pa-
rade will be broadcast live on
WITN-TV. And according to
Preston, the annual Piratefest will
be "bigger and better" this year.
In an attempt to add a
multicultural flair to theevent, the
university will feature a "step
show" followed by a performance
by comedian Derek Fox III, known
for his appearance on the hit show
"Def Comedy jam Preston said
he hopes that these attractions help
to start a new tradition at ECU.
"There will be a lot of height-
ened excitementsurrounding this
year's ceremony Preston said.
"We hope that these attractions
we have planned will draw all
races, colors and creeds to our ac-
tivities
Wal-Mart guilty of price war tactics
CONWAY, Ark. (AP) �
The nation's largest retailer sold
merchandise below cost in an
effort to drive competitors out
of business, a judge ruled to-
day. Chancery Judge David
Reynolds ordered Wal-Mart
Stores Inc. to stop selling drugs
and health and beauty aids be-
low cost at its store in Conway.
The ruling was in a lawsuit
filed by three logical pharma-
cies which accused Wal-Mart of
"predatory pricing" to drive
them out of business.
The judge said the local
Wal-Mart store violated the
state's Unfair Practices Act by
advertising and selling pharma-
ceuticals and health and beauty
aids below cost "for the pur-
pose of injuring competitors and
destroying competition
The suit was brought by
Dwayne Goode, owner of
American Drugs Inc. of Conway;
Jim Hendrickson, owner of
Baker Drug Store of Conway;
and Tim Benton of Mayflower
Family Pharmacy. Reynolds
said he based his ruling in part
on Wal-Mart's stated pricing
policy to "meet or beat the com-
petition without regard to cost
An appeal to the state Su-
preme Court is likely, since the
case involves the first test of the
Unfair Practices Act. At the trial,
company officials said Wal-
Mart's pricing policy was de-
signed to make a profit, not to
injure competitors.
A news writer's meeting to assign stories, provide
direction, guidance and a path to follow will be
held today at 5:45 p.m. Excuses for not
attending must he submitted 3 days in advance.
HOMECOMING VALUES
with THIS WEEKS SPECIALS!
FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES
Call NOW for a CHARGE ACCOUNT
and Plan ahead for your Big Events
STUDENTS
Enjoy the convenience of our Check Cashing
Card at all locations
Apply today
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October 14. 1993
The East Carolinian 7
UN
Continued from page 1
rescui
lap!
in their ti a ks
Lilians.
a no
" p;ii llL2, that
i omba t-ready
� uld be "stand-
II ie borders of coun-
ted b) aggression,
ng mass violence
isl civilian populations,
providing humanitarian relief
and combating terrorism
But ,i president, Clinton
inscribed a much more limited
HOMECOMING
vision of U.N. and U.S. action in
his speech to the General As-
sembly on Sept. 27.
"The United Nations sim-
ply cannot become engaged in
every one of the world's con-
flicts. If the American people
are to say 'yes' to U.N. peace-
keeping, the United Nations
must know when to say 'no
he said.
Continued from page 1
p.m otters prizes to top finishers
in a Round Robin format, and a
chance to challenge old college
rivals to a brisk game of tennis.
Winners from both events
receive their prizes Friday night at
the ECU Alumni Roundup, a
country and western get-together
at the Rock Springs Equestrian
Center. Attending guests will en-
joy music provided by The Nicky
Harris Band, as well as food, drinks
and dancing.
Current students might en-
jov the Elbo or Bogies � minus
the free food, and with a slightly-
different musical environment.
ECU invites all alumni to an
Alumni Coffee Hour and Open
House prior to Saturday's football
game at Taylor-Slaughter Alumni
Center, and immediately after-
ward is the Homecoming Parade
down Fifth Street, at 10 a.m.
The alumni association will
honor 1993 Outstanding Alumni
at the annual Chancellor's Awards
Luncheonat i 1 a.m. inMendenhall
Student Center. This year's recipi-
ents are: William Vance Arnold,
class of '59; Maria Castillo Clav,
classes of '72 and '76; Janice
Hardison Faulkner, classes of '53
and '57; and Bobby Scot Ober,
classes of '68 and '72.
The Pirates take on the Loui-
siana Bulldogs at 2 p.m. at Ficklen
Stadium, one event that all ECU
students, former and current, can
attend and enjoy. Current students
can smile, knowing that their tick-
ets were free.
For reservations and ticket
information for Homecoming
Weekend events, call the Taylor-
Slaughter Alumni Center at 757-
6072.
Germany accepts Maastricht Treaty
BONN, Germany (AP) �
Germany's highest court ruled
today that the Maastricht Treaty
on European union doesn't vio-
late this country's constitution,
clearing the way for implemen-
tation of the historic accord.
The Constitutional Court
said it had struck down legal
challenges to the treaty, which
already has been ratified by the
12 EC nations' parliaments or
voters.
Final implementation
hinged on the German court's
approval.
The treaty calls for open-
ing a European Monetary Insti-
tute on Jan. 1 as the precursor to
a Europe-wide central bank,
which is to be in place no later
than Jan. 1, 1999. The indepen-
dent central bank will eventu-
ally issue a single currency, re-
placing existing national curren-
cies.
Under the accord, the EC
nations will work to forge com-
mon foreign, security and even-
tually defense policies.
The EC will have more
powers in education, public
health, culture, consumer pro-
tection, industry, research and
the environment.
A negative ruling today
would have created a crisis for
the EC, which has staked its fu-
ture on turning the community
into a world power through eco-
nomic, political and monetary
union.
The court said it wants as-
surances that Germany's parlia-
mentary bodies won't lower
substantial powers to European
institutions.
But reservations expressed
by the court won't require EC
nations to renegotiate the treaty.
The pact, negotiated by EC
leaders in December 1991 in the
Dutch town of Maastricht, was
challenged in the Constitutional
Court by a mix of groups, in-
cluding both rightists and left-
ists.
They argued, among other
things, that it violates the
nation's constitution by trans-
ferring too many national pow-
ers to EC headquarters in Brus-
sels, Belgium.
get on the
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757-6597
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October 14, 1993
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page �
ffl Help Wanted I EM Help Wanted
For Sale
n
Personals
BE Greek
PRIVATE PARKING: Private
spaces fur rent I block from ECU
campus on i l' is Street. Call 756-
9864.
FURNISHEDROOM FOR RENT
Utilities included. Across the street
from campus. 758-2585.
LARGE BEDROOM with private
bath. Non-smoker, female student.
Near ECU. 752-2636.
Ringgold Towers
Unit 601 ,2 Bdrm
New Carpel 6 Freshly Painted
Watei 6 Sewer Included. 2 Student Limit.
at S290momh per student
CONTACT MR 1RNIGAN M (919! 3?3W15
El Help Wanted
ADULTENTERTAINMENT,Mod-
eling, dancing. Part-time or full-time.
$300.00 to $400.00 per week. Call
746-6762.
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING
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you go free! Best trips & prices! Ba-
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$10-$400 WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
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hours! Rush stamped envelope: Pub-
lishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham NC 27705.
GREEKS & CLUBS: Raise up to
$1000 in JUST ONE WEEK! Foryour
fraternity,sororityorclub. Plus$1000
for yourself! And a free T-shirt just
for calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext 75.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions. Great benefits. Call
l-�00-4364365 Ext. P-3712.
ROADWAY PACKAGE SYSTEM
needs package handlers to load vans
and unload trailers for the AM shift
hours 3-7 AM, $6.00 hour, tuition
assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities in op-
erations and management possible.
Applications can be filled out at the
ECU co-op office.
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY Indi-
viduals and student organizations
wanted to promote me hottest Spring
Break destinations, call the nation's
leader. Inter-campus programs 1-
800-327-6013.
TRAVEL FREE! SPRING BREAK!
Sell quality vacations ! The hottest
destinations! Jamaica, Cancun, Ba-
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CARPET BARGAIN CENTER:
Help wanted. Apply in person 1009
Dickinson Ave.
HELP WANTED: Part-time ware-
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Apply in person at Larry's
Carpetland 3010 E. 10th St.
Greenville.
FREE TRIPS & CASHCall us
and find out how hundreds of stu-
dents are already earning free trips
and lots of cash with America's 1
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PART-TIME SALES: Tuesdays,
Thursdays, some Saturdays - bridal
sales consultant. Energetic, enthusi-
astic applicants only. Apply in per-
son, MWF or call Brides Choice 355-
5505; ask for Marydale.
PART TIME RETAIL POSITION
OPEN - some computer work, some
physical labor. Male preferred to lift
heavy objects. Apply in person: Tired
and True Consignment shop, 924
Dickinson Ave.
ATTENTION LADIES: Earn $90-
125hr escorting in the Greenville
area. You must be 18 years old, have
own phone and transportation. Es-
corts and exotic dancers needed. For
more information call Diamond Es-
corts at 758-08.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -
Earn up to $2000 month world
travel. Summer and career employ-
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ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn
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COMPANION NEEDED for lady
with Parkinson 'sdisease. Must have
auto. Hours, flexible. Pay negotiable.
Call 756-2463 after 6 pm.
GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPTj Youth basket-
ball coaches. The Greenville Recre-
ation and Parks Department is re-
cruiting 12-16 part-time youth bas-
ketball coaches for the winter youth
basketball program. Applicants must
posses some knowledge of the bas-
ketball skills and have the ability
and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 9-18 in basketball
fundamentals. Hours are from 3pm
to 7 pm with some night and week-
end coaching.Thisprogram will run
from the end of November to mid-
February. Salary rates start at $4.25
per hour. For more information, call
Ben Jones or Michael Daly at 830-
4550 or 830567.
For Sale
FOR SALE: Timesharing week 24
June: Outerbanks Beach Club, Kill
Devil Hills, 3 Bedroom Penthouse,
Ocean-front! $7500.00. Call 830-
0121.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED cars,
trucks, boats, 4-wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available in your area now! Call 1-
800-136-4363 Ext. C-5999.
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
AND WATCHERS: Sports supple-
ments at major discount prices:
Cybergenics, Hot Stuff, Wt. Gain
900, Vanady 1 Sulfate, Tri-
Chromelene, Mega-mass and much
more! For info call Charles at 321-
2158.
SOLOFLEX - weight machine for
sale. Excellent condition, new
weight straps, no butterfly attach-
ment, but can be bought from fac-
tory. $575 neg. 756-9864 anytime.
SPRING BREAK - Plan early, save
$50 and get best rooms! Prices in-
crease 1115! Bahamas Cruise 6
days includes 12 meals, $279!
PanamaCity room wkitchen,$129!
Cancun from Raleigh, $339, Jamaica
from Raleigh, $419, Key West, $239,
Daytona Room wkitchen,$149! 1-
800-678-6386.
STEREO FOR SALE - Technics
turntable and receiver; Sharp dual
cassette deck; Lafayette speakers
(Large 10"); Gusdorf rack. $85 or
best offer. 321-2272.
FREE 4 adorable kitt is need good
homes. Call 756-8606.
$ STOP DON'T READ THIS $
Help Wanted: Fraternities, Sorori-
ties, Clubs! Raise money for your
group. Make 100 profit! Easy. Sell
2020's Binocularsportsglasses for
under $5 at all sportinggroup
events! 800-924-8433.
Services Offered
ATTENTION TENNIS PLAYERS:
Tired of paying high prices to have
your tennis racket strung? Call Greg at
758-3313 for prices.
NEED WORD PROCESSTYPING?
Lowest rates on campus. Incl. proof-
reading, spelling, gram corrections.
Over 15 yrs. exp. Call Cindy 355-3611
anytime.
HEY MR. DJ Please play my favor-
ite song! Mobile Music Productions
plays only what YOU want to hear
when YOU want to hear it. Widest
variety of music, years of experience,
best D.Js, most popular service with
ECU Greeks. Will travel. Call Lee at
758-4644 for bookings.
HEY GIRLIES! Need a date?
We have lots of Dean Martin
and Ted Knight look-alikes to
choose from. Call Kemple at 757-
6366 for info.
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19.278 TOPICS ALL SUBJECTS
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I
Personals
DO YOU HAVE A TASTE FOR
TRUTH? Bible Study every Tues-
day and Wednesday. 7:30 PM,
Mendenhall room 242. Drop in on
us anytime. Apostolic Campus Min-
istry.
WRITERMUSICIAN and Poetic
soul seeks like-minded lady for
friendship and fun. Send photos
and correspondence to: KANE, PO
Box 8663, Greenville, NC 27835.
A SPECIAL THANKS goes out to
this year's Homecoming Commit-
tee for making "Live the Magic:
Homecoming 93" the best home-
coming in ECU history. Amanda
Nixon - Candidates, Noland Mat-
tocks and Tim Campbell - Parade,
Freda Allen - PIRATE FEST, Brian
Burns - Bands, Shelia Boswell - Half-
time, Deana Cale - Floats and Deco-
rations, Mike Preston - Entertain-
ment, Scarlett Gardner - Secretary,
Candy Hudspeth - Chairman, and
J. Marshall - Advisor.
IQ
Greek
TO LAMBDA CHI: The polar
bear social was a blast! Let's do it
again soon. Love, alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI - We can't
wait for Saturday's breakfast and
getting together again! See you
guys soon! Love, the sisters and
pledges of Pi Delta.
SIGMA TAU GAMMA - Thurs-
day night was unforgettable -
people were "laying" every-
where! Thanks for having us and
hope to see you guys again soon!
Love, the sisters and pledges of
Pi Delta.
TO THE PLEDG ES OF PI DELT A
- Hope the wait was worth it, and
the hunt was successful! Have
fun "Littles Love, your "Bigs
CONGRATULATIONS to Pi
Delta's Sister of the Month, Miss
Susie "S007" Roupp! All your
hard work has really paid off! We
love you! The sisters and pledges
of Pi Delta.
PIKA - We want to send a very
"belated" thank you for the little
"get-together" you had. We had
a great time and hope to see you
guys again soon! We're behind
you guys all the way Love, the
Sisters and pledges of Pi Delta
PI DELTA hopes everyone his
a great homecoming and wants
to welcome back all alumni! (o
Pirates!
GOOD LUCK to our home-
coming representatives, JiJI
Auerbach, Laura Ecklin, Jenni&
Glandner, Claudine Nicholson
and Angie Porter. Love, theSig-
ters and Pledges.
ALL ALPHA PHIs and their
dates: Get ready for homecom-
ing cocktail and good luck tjp
the Pirates!
ZETA TAU ALPHA: We hopfe
you're excited for the float to-
morrow. Hope to see all of you
tonight for the finishing
touches. Can't wait to see yofc!
Phi Kappa Psi.
E
GOOD LUCK ROBBYN
SHULMAN on homecoming.
We love you! Love, Chi O.
LAMBDA CHI: Thanks for the
GREAT tailgate on Saturday
and the pre-downtown. Hope
to do it again. Love,Chi-Omega.
PHI SIGMA PI Brothers, get
ready for an excellent home-
coming weekend. ECU Pirate
beat Louisiana Tech, Pig-Pickin
and Alumni Softball gamje
Look forward to a weekend fUlj
of fun i
TEXAS2STEP TEXAS 2 STEP TEXAS-2-STEP TEXAS-2-ST- i
TEXAS'
The
Club
Two Great Clubs - 25.000 sq. ft.
Country Western and Rock 'N Roll (Dance) - One Cover!
Be a part of Greenville's largest and most exciting
nightclub opening October 20! Now accepting
applications for bartenders, cocktail waitresses,
bar backs, in-house security, valet parking
attendants staff at 507 North Greene Street.
Please no phone calls!
Application Hours:
Sat. Sun - Oct 9.10 �1 pm to 9 pm
Monday - Sunday - Oct 11-17 � 10 am to 9 pm
-A�k lor Brenda or Frank. Bring photo and valid driver's license with you.
Membership Applications Accepted Same Hours
5 � Both Clubs � One Year � Private Clubs
Require Advance Membership and a 3 day activation
bf North Carolina State Law � Get Yours Today �
TEXAS-2-STEP TEXAS 2 STEP TEXAS-2-STEP TEXAS-2STEP
Announcements
�I:
3
EC1LEQJUESTRIAN TEAM
Horse Lovers! Come to a
meeting on October 19 at 5
PM in room 212 of
Mendenhall. Everyone who
likes to ride horses or wants
to learn more or share what
they know is welcome. Rock
Springs Equestrian Center
and its school horses are
available for club activities.
Intercollegiate competition
is also possible.
STUDY INAUSTRAUA
It is possible to pay ECU tu-
ition and study in Brisbane,
Australia for a semester or
academic year! To meet the
International Relations
student exchange coordina-
tor who will be visiting the
Queensland University of
thechnology in Brisbane,
come to the International
Programs office on Ninth
Street, behind McDonald's,
on either Tuesday, Oct. 19 or
Wednesday, Oct. 20 at 3:30
PM. She will be here to dis-
cuss the exchange program
and will be able to answer
many of your questions
about studying and living
in Australia. If you cannot
make it at either of these
times, contact Stephanie
Evancho at 757-6769 to set
up a time to meet. Don't miss
this opportunity.
STUDENT EXCHANGE
Australia, Netherlands,
California, Colorado, these
are a few places some of
your peers will be going in
the Spring because they
came by the office in Sep-
tember! It's not too late to
consider a student ex-
change or study abroad ex-
perience for Spring semes-
ter! If you are interested in
study sites available, please
contact Stephanie Evancho,
International Programs,
757-6769 for details on how
you can pay ECU tuition and
study at another location!
You have until mid-October
so don't delay!
UNIVERSITY EfiLK AND
CQUNIRYDANCR CLUB
Come to the first contra and
square dance of the season!
Live string band playing
old time music Election of
officers for 199394. Come
alone or bring a friend.
Free Ladonia Wright Build-
ing, Tuesday, Oct. 19.7-9PM.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Center invites
Alumni to visit and relax at
the Newman Center during
Homecoming Weekend. Join
us for Sunday Eucharist at
the Center (953 E. 10th St.)
Times: 11:30 am and 8:30 pm.
For more info call 757-1991.
THEORY. COLLOQUIUM
LECTURE
Rei Tuada: English, Univ, of
Michigan. "Being Particu-
lar: de Man and
Contempoary Aesthetics
Thursday, October 14, 1993.
4 PM GCB 2014. Each lecture
will be followed by a short
question and answer pe-
riod, and adjourn to English
faculty lounge for more dis-
cussion and refreshments.
DEPARTMENT Of
LEISURE SYSTEMS
STUDIES
If you are planning to de-
clare a major in LSS Fall
semester 1993, you must
pick up an application and
information packet for ad-
mission in the LSS Office
(Minges Coliseum 174).
Completed applications are
due no later than WEDNES-
DAY, OCTOBER 20, 1993. For
further information come
by the office or call 757-
4640.
WALK FOR THE
HUNGRY
People in Pitt County are
getting ready to walk for
the hungry. Greenville is
hosting one of North
Carolina's sixty hunger
walk-a-thons, called CROP
walks, on Sunday, October
17 at 2 PM. The 6.2 mile walk
will begin and end on the
Town Commons. Area
churches are organizing
the event. Walkers are be-
ing asked to find sponsors
to donate money per mile
walked, to raise funds for
this cause. Most of the
money raised goes to relief
and development projects
in seventy countries, in-
cluding the United States.
Twenty-five percent of the
funds raised will be used to
help hungry people in Pitt
County. For more info, con-
tact Tom Banks, 756-3138,
or Randy Maynard, 752-
6154.
AMERICAN
MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
Adopt-a-Highway is sched-
uled for TODAY - Thursday
October 14. Anyone inter-
ested in volunteering
should meet at the Carolina
East Center (Across from
Red Lobster) in front off
the Wachovia Teller at 4:
PM. Ea.rn 15 points to
wards a chance for a free
trip to New Orleans.
DELTA SIGMA THETA
SORORITY, INC.
Congratulations to the
Kappa Sigma Chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Soror-
ity, Inc. as they com-
memorate their 20th An-
niversary. This chapter
was the first Black soror-
ity chapter on ECU'S cam-
pus. Again, congratula-
tions.

EAST
CAROLINIAN
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'ny organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge. Duetotnelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
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information
call 757-6366





The East Carolinian
Opinion
October 14,1993
sdayOpinion
Fg -w�i � g ir� � g
ire! "ire! Fire!
By Alex Ferguson
Dental visits: getting to the 'root' of the problem
Beavis and Butthead" blamed for
death of child, MTV considers re-
examining programming
belie able.
An Ohio mother is actually blaming a cartoon tor
the death of her child. A cartoon! You know, those
two-dimensional, fantastical, kid-loved characters that
made Saturday mornings super-duper great.
Well, okay, this is "Beavis and Butthead two
deranged, pathetic, clueless teenagers with a pen-
chant tor the words "suck" and "shut-up Yep,
ivisand Butthead an MTV cartoon that until last
u eek 1 had ne er entirely sat through. "Loony Toons"
is one thing, but "Beavis and Butthead" is just plain
stupid.
The situation goes something like this: a 5-year-
old boy started a tire that killed his younger sister.
This boy's mother is convinced that the idiot cartoon
is the cause of the young boy's actions. Now, please
understand that every svmpathv is extended to the
mother as far as the loss oi her 2-vear-old daughter is
concerned, but to take the blame this far is, in fact,
loony.
The question has to be asked: why is a 5-year-old
child allowed to watch MTV in the first place? As a
kid, I remember being locked out of my parents'
bedroom after school, simply because the cable TV
was there and they felt it within my best interests to
prohibit me from viewing that new-fangled cable
channel called MTV. They cared, and were watching
out for my well-being, don't you see? Why on earth
would you let a child in his developing, formative
years watch a show that very obviously is geared
toward a more mature (or immature) audience?
And another thing � this 5-year-old had access
to a cigarette lighter, with which he started said fire.
This is grave mistake number two. Never leave a
lighter or matches somewhere that a child (that is, one
not vet readv to decide these things on hisher own)
can find it, take it, touch it or see it. Never, never,
never!
Kids generallv find fire fascinating. And that has
nothing to do with "Beavis and Butthead Fire has
been cool even before the word "cool" was used in
everyday speech to indicate the acceptance of some-
thing. To kids, fire is something pretty and scary and
dangerous, all rolled into one. Who's going to deny
that? Kids tend to like the dangerous, walk-the-line
stuff. Hell, who are we kidding, adults are just as
fascinated with fire and danger as kids are! But we're
not going to go out and randomly set fire to things
because we're adults and we don't do things like that!
At least, we're not supposed to
O.K obviously this Ohio mother loves her son
and does the best she can at raising him, but she
related to firefighters on the scene that she was so
concerned with his behavior since he started watch-
ing the show that she took the boy's bedroojn door off the
hinges in order to watch him more closely. Hello!
lady, if you can carry a thought process as far as
removing a door from its hinges, you certainly can see
that a television show is maybe not quite suitable for
your wee tot?!
To all the parents out there �please don't blame
MTV, "Beavis and Butthead cable television, the
anvils that fall on Wile E. Coyote's head, HBO or
anvthing else if you can't see it within yourself to get
off your butt and cancel your cable subscription (who
needs it, ever hear of reading?), scramble the chan-
nels that offend you or simply have enough insight to
protect your impressionable child from things that s
he'll learn soon enough.
Fire is cool, but so is good parenting, huh-huh-
huh-huh.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
7 � xct utive
Wes Tinkham,
Kelly kellis, Accm
Brandon Perrv,
a h

Karen Hassell, V� i Editor
Maureen Rich. sst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, .r Editor
Brian Olson. Assl Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Ongue. � Editor
Jessica Slanlev i op I Jit
Tonya Heath, At ounl Executive
Jennifer Jenkins, At � otmt Exei utive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, I'hoto Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving ihc ECU community hill' 1925. The East Carolinian
publishes 12.0(H) copies ever Tuesda) and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition ts ihe opinion of (he Editorial Board. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which ma) be edited tor
decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the riL'hi to edit or reject letter tor
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Bkhj ECU ireenville, N ( 27Ksx 4 �5 i For mote informa-
tion, call (919) 6366
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
Well, after last week's ar-
ticle on keeping opinions, to our-
selves, 1 wasn't too sure whether or
not I'd have a job after Fall Break
Seeing as how that's the bass of our
job, giving opinions (be they dis-
agreeable or not) wasn't sure how
to respond to someone telling me to
shut up. But after all, we're all en-
titled toour opinion. So, here we are,
me writing, you reading, mv editor
correcting my grammatical night-
mares. Ah, it's good to be home!
And while we're on thesub-
ject of home, I'd like to welcome
everybody back. Hopeeveryone had
a restful and peaceful Fall Break. For
those whospent it here inGreenville
(likecertiinopinion writers whoshall
remain anonvmous), mv heart trulv
bleeds for you.
Of course, Fall break isn't
really Fall break unless it includes a
trip to the dentist. I'm not sure how
it worksout, hut it's probably a pack-
age deal you sign up for when vou' re
filling out the60gazillion formsdur-
ing registration. Part of some con-
tract the sch(Xl has with the Ameri-
can Dental Association, something
to do with getting a daily quota of
mental at iguish and gum prodding.
At any rate, there I was,
trapped in the office, trving to get
into the latest jssueofHgrJrs. You
know, that children's magazine
where vou trv to find the hidden
soup ladle in the drawings and
where vou read about the on-go-
ing battle between Goofus and Gal-
lant.
But, to tell you the truth, my
heart just wasn't into it. All I could
think about was what lurked be-
yond that waiting room door and if
1 could squeeze in one more brush-
ing before meeting�dum-da-DUM-
DUM�the DENTIST!
Oneofthemostfrightening
things from childhood for me was
the dentist. It didn't matter how
gentle, or understanding they were,
I knew that every time I opened my
mouth, it would be bombarded by
medieval-Clive-Barker-I'm-your-
worst-nightmare-stainless-steel
thingamabobs capable of ripping
flesh right off the bone. Every X-ray
was a blueprint of dental destruc-
tion, every "hmm" from the dentist
a sure sign he'd found the mother of
all cavities and the only way to deal
with it was to cut my head off and
pray my brother took after the father's
side of tlit? family.
Not that I've ever had a bad
experience. I've been blessed with a
gtxxl set of choppers. My dentist
should win humanitarian of theyear
awards .I've never even had my wis-
dom teeth pulled,oneof theprimarv
goals I hear dentists aim for. I'm
fairly good with my dental hygiene
techniques. It's the thought of hav-
ing that man poke around my mouth
and find something that sets my teeth
chattering.
It's funny to see how mudt
anxietv is brought forth from one's
profession. I guess the same goes for
taxauditors. I feel sorry forpeoplein
these positions. They're not out to
getanyone. They'redoingwhatthey
do, because they chose their career
and they enjoy it. Yet, mention a
visit with a purveyor of less-than-
acceptabfe services and vou can
almost see the horror as tt shud-
ders through your friends.
I don't know if anyone
watched Northern Exposure last
week, but they brought up a good
point concerning dentist-patient
rela tionships. There's a verbal con-
tract between dentists and pa-
tientsanditcanbeapplied tomany
facets of 1 ife, perha ps even sum up
what I've been trying to say. Take
care of vour business, be it your
teeth, checkbook, infamous cor-
rupted corporation, and the worst
you'll get is the occasional check
up. Slack off, and you could end up
getting get d rilled, grilled or killed.
Novocaine optional.
As for me, everything
checked out fine(huge, cherry fluo-
ride-tinted sigh of relief)- Ieven got
to wear a little "Nocavities"sticker.
God, 1 love my dentistthat
is, at least until my next appoint-
ment.
LIKE TO WRITE?
Then perhaps The East
Carolinian is the place
for youThe Opinion
Page (that's this one
here) needs enthusias-
tic people who've
something to say. If
interested, drop by our
offices on the 2nd floor
of the Student Pubs,
building. Or call 757-
6366 and ask for the
Opinion Editor.
Remember, we're look-
ing for people who
have strong beliefs,
want to be heard and
can successfully put a
sentence together!
Letters to the Editor
Abortion editorial fails to benefit an already 'screwed up world'
To the Editor:
I am writing in response to
the article by Alex Ferguson on
the Opinion page this Tuesday.
What the hell kind of stand is that?
I am so glad there are not more
people out there like Mr.
Ferguson�-people that are so in-
nocent and naive and take no re-
sponsibility for the decay of soci-
ety. "I don't care if ten year old's
own submachine guns and take
them to school, we don't know
what kind of neighborhood they
were born in This statement
would just as easily fit right in
with his vvav of thinking in the
article. This article really disgusted
me. I have never written any news-
paper in response to an article be-
fore. I've also never written to a
Congressman either. But some-
thing in this article reallv did it. It
really triggered something.
Here is someone who doesn't
give a damn about anyone else
and clearly makes a mockery of
any man who chooses to express
his constitutional right as an
American citizen to protest abor-
tion. I'm not talking about force-
fully blocking an entrance to a
clinic or tossing a couple grenades
in these clinics; those are extreme
radicals and another topic alto-
gether.
But Mr. Ferguson wasn't tar-
geting these radicals, which would
have made more sense. Instead he
chooses to criticize any man who
has an opinion on abortion and is
not pro-choice. He goes on by say-
ing, "does it ever occur to them
that maybe the women don't need
the opinion of a man to complicate
things?" Complicate things?!
What a cop-out! Oh, it is too com-
plicated, shut up don't voice your
opinion, you're a man. We as a
society need to be concerned with
the actions of others, whether they
are men or women.
The topic here isn't abortion.
Although I'm sure, by the tone of
this letter, I am going to be labeled
as a "pro-lifer" by those who
choose to read it. And I'm also
sure that many wiil be quick to
attack me verbally, either in per-
son or in a future edition of this
paper because I am pro-life, and a
young college male. I must obvi-
ously be a male pig with a screwed
up head. If this letter is printed, I
guarantee that I will be better
known for my pro-life stance than
for any other aspect about me. 1
must obviously kill abortion doc-
tors and blow up clinics.
And it seems that in some
screwy irony, those who are "pro-
lifers" are made out to be a bunch
of radical old men who must be
evil, because they believe in sav-
ing the child's life. You would
think that, in any other context,
they would almost be heroes. In
this con text, however, they are the
evil ones and those out there de-
fending mass murder of this
country'syoutharethebraveones.
What a screwed up world
we live in. People like Mr.
Ferguson sure aren't helping any.
If I were his friend, and I had been
drinking heavily and had decided
to drive us somewhere, I sure
couldn't trust him with stopping
me. "Why complicate things? Let
him make his own decisions is
what he would probably say.
The point I'm trying to make
here is this, and it is really quite
simple, and it extends to almost
anv subject, not just abortion: if
you believe in something strong
enough, you have the moral re-
sponsibility to protest it in some
form or another. By saying that
voicing an opinion is complicat-
ing things too much, Mr.
Ferguson has done a great injus-
tice. Many things would not be
the way they are today if some-
one didn't have the guts to stand
up and speak their mind, male or
female.
In response to the comment,
"after all, I certainly would prefer
if they stay out of my prostate
cancer I wonder what he would
think if the person treating his
prostate cancer was a woman.
Would he want her to interfere or
to complicate things? Yeah, right.
Don't ever run for office.
Norm Viano
Accounting
Transfer Student
Comparing prostate cancer to pregnancy unjustified, in poor taste
To the Editor:
This letter is in response to
the article appearing in the Oc-
tober 5 issue of The East Carolin-
ian, "Man's position in abortion
questioned I completely see
that Mr. Ferguson is entitled to
his own opinion, and I respect
that. In fact, everyone is entitled
to their opinion. This is true
whether the man feels he should
be included in the decision mak-
ing, or it the woman feels it is no
business to the man.
The only thing I had a ma-
jor problem with was the last
paragraph in the whole article.
It stated, "After all, I certainly
prefer it they stav out of my
prostate cancer It is under-
standable that a man may want
a woman to stav out of an issue
such as prostate cancer. This
feeling may be the same for a
woman, if, for example, she has
breast cancer or cervical cancer.
Pregnancy and prostate cancer
cannot, and should not, be used
in the same sentence. Are we
saving that an unborn baby is a
form tit cancer for a woman1
Certainly not!
Cancer is an attacker on
the human body and needs to be
quickly destroyed. If it is not
destroyed, it will cause havoc
over a person's body. A baby is
a gift. A gift that is best when it
is shared between two people.
What makes pregnancy a strictly
feminine issue? Better yet, what
makes it comparable to prostate
cancer. As the years have gone
by, it has been proven that a
man's involvement in a preg-
nancy and birth are beneficial to
the child and the relationship.
For vears, men have com-
plained that women are getting
too manv rights. They are right
in saving that: women are al-
lowed to abort babies without
even consulting the fathers�
even though it took the father
just as much to create the baby.
After all, women cannot do it
alone. Maybe I have over-
stepped mv bounds, but being
a female, I guess I have that
choice, right?
! atricia Lafuente
Occupational therapy
Freshman





October 14. 1993
The East Carolinian
l 1
By Gregory Dickens
P.C problems percolate;
pencil-pusher p.od,
ponders predicament
I blame it all on Alan Alda.
Remember when Hawkeye was the symbol for men's
behavior in the 80s? He was so disarming and funny. And he
cried and broke away from the machismo of the likes of
television's Vinnie Babarino and Dwavne F. Schneider. The
man was something men were not supposed to be at that time:
sensitive. It became the rage. Men who wept or hugged their
best male friend in public were suddenly in almost as much
demand as Cabbage Patch Kids. Almost, now.
Anyway, sensitivity became popular. People began to get
in touch with themselves; therapy groups popped up for every-
thing from family alcoholism to subconscious childhood trauma
to slight acquaintances of pyromaniacs and the women who
love them. Talk shows sprang up from the depths of Social Hell
to exploit the cause du jour and to expose people who like
nothing better than to talk about their love lives and eating
habits. Therapy led to resolution, and resolution led to a need
to confront. But these confrontations were not aimed at specific
individuals but at society as a whole.
Movements then cropped up, telling us what not to listen
to, who not to sleep with and where not to go for personal
growth (We had a men's movement, for God's sake. Most men
I know won't even move to change the television channel. And
what did this movement encourage men to do? Strip, run
around and bang on drums. Hell, I thought that was what
Woodstock and Lollapalooza were for). Sensitivity thus led to
well-intentioned and emotionally timid people becoming im-
mense pains in the ass.
I have heaps of trouble with this political correctness thing.
No longer are we allowed to offer critical opinions on other
people. No�not without having to battle a vague and ever-
changing set of guidelines. Either we refer to people positively,
or in such an ambiguous way that the tone of our statement can't
be discerned. Political correctness tells us that fat people aren't
fat (they are "remarkably obese" and "unfashionably unsvelte");
handicapped people aren't at a disadvantage even if stairs
become as impassable as a Tolkein mountain. And of course,
there is the thorny issue of what to call people. This just eludes
me.
Let me preface the rest of my comments by saying that
nomenclature reflects the times, and I surely won't stand in the
way of anything as impressive-sounding as "modern nomen-
clature even when I look up the definition. Simply put, what
we call ourselves and others is now more important than how
we treat ourselves and others.
Can someone please print a translation text for those of us
too busy to rationalize proper ethnic designation�among A fri-
can- American, American-Indian and other such hyphenated
labels like wall-eyed-rouge-headed-horizontally-allergic-splen-
didly-myopic-thoroughly-left-handed-Bulgarian-on-the-left-
no-no-I-said-the-left-yeah-that's-him-in-the-blue-sweater-eat-
ing-the-Kit-Kat?
Allow me to ask a simple question. If the fashionable i.d.
for black people is "African-American" (and using the word
"colored" is on par with drop-kicking infants), why is the
leading organization for the rights of black people called the
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People?
Is it all right to say (you know, that phrase) if you're black?
And why is the KKK allowed by law to scream the word
"nigger" up and down the main street of small towns, and if I
yelled it out my window I could be thrown out of ECU for
speech infringement? I don't want to call anyone anything but
words now are like property, with rightful owners and users?
Who says what word is right or wrong? Can a word be right or
wrong? Didn't Shakespeare say nothing is bad or good, but is
defined by how we see it? I mean we are talking about a couple
of syllables, whenever slurs or other nasty comments are used.
Are we so thin-skinned that we sue or (y'ikes!) kill over some-
thing as small as a word? Were we told to say "sticks and stones
can break my bones, but call me so-and-so and I'll own your
house or stomp on your privates, bub" No, we were told to be
better than those Cro-Magnons calling us "nerd "weirdo
"cootie" or "fairy Did I j ust insult any Cro-Magnons out there?
Names can never hurt me Anyone remember that?
It's now necessary to know one's entire genetic lineage in
order to both correctly label him (I refuse to say himher,
because if we can say "mankind" to refer to him and her, then
"him" can reflect both as well) and not offend him (nope, won't
do it; him, him, him) in even the most remote circumstance. So,
we, the writers, who for whatever reason must conform with the
fashion of the day, must be aware of who people are linked to
by political, religious or ethnic means. For practice, the prudent
writer should examine his (okay, okay: hisher. geez) own
heritage for such exposition.
I happen to be one of those lucky people whose genetic
background could constitute the Security Counsel of the United
Nations. I can claim Irish, German, English, Cherokee and (if
Dad's right about the in-laws) Martian. But I can live with
"writer It fits. "What is he, anyway?" A writer. Not Caucasian
Overlord or Oppressor of Pencil Leads or Destroyer of Trees. "A
writer" will suffice, thank you.
Before the torrent of letters arrive demanding my head, I
do not believe in the right of people to be mean and offensive
with racial slurs, so save a stamp and relax. If we can mature
past the point of using "bad words can't we get past being hurt
by them? I always thought that words that insulted were used �
out of frustration or anger, not because they magically reduced
someone in stature or deed. If we are trying to prove that 30
years of desegregation weren't for nothing, we have to start on
the most basic level. Self-image defines a person, not preconcep-
tion or suggestion. Words, for ail their connotations and emo-
tional weight, are merely words. They cannot defeat us. We are
better than that. All of us. Even Alan Alda.
By Laura Wright
Pet peeves: animal injustice hidden by seeming love
I once know a guy named
Fred, and Fred owned a beauti-
ful dog named Mariam. Fred
lived in Boone where he attended
college, went to church every
Sunday and played his Chris-
tian rock music a little too loudly.
Doug, who lived below him, was
often tempted to jab the ceiling
with a broom handle. Fred al-
ways got the hint and turned
down the tunes.
Fred went out of town ev-
ery weekend so Doug could re-
lax in silence. But one thing both-
ered Doug: Fred left Mariam tied
in the backyard with a bowl of
water (frozen in the winter);
some food; and a shabby,
wooden dog house. The rope that
was attached to Mariam's collar
was about six feet long. This
treatment seemed very unfair to
Doug, but he was not surprised
by it�Fred left Mariam on that
rope 24 hours a day, even when
he was in town.
But to give Fred the benefit
of the doubt, as we should try to
do, he probably didn't consider
how his status as a college stu-
dentwould affecthispet. Like so
many students here at ECU, Fred
thought of his pet as his prop-
erty, and he was therefore al-
lowed to do whatever he wanted
to do with it. If you have a pet, or
you're thinking about getting
one, keep a few things in mind.
College students are tran-
sients. Our stay here is tempo-
rary, and we don't know where
we may be after we graduate. If
you get a pet when you're a
sophomore, chances are you'll
still have it when you're ready to
move on. If you were lucky
enough to live in an apartment
or a house where you could have
a pet, you may not be so lucky
when you move.
Sharing your space can be
difficult and most apartments are
small. Keeping a pet cramped
up is almost as bad as keeping
her or him outside on a rope.
Animals need to be outside some
of the time; they need to get exer-
cise and they need fresh air. At
the other end of the spectrum, if
you can't have a pet inside where
you live, then, by gum, don't get
one. No animal deserves to be
tied down or caged in.
If you already have a pet
and you have to keep it outside,
make sure that you spend time
with it. Animals are very forgiv-
ing; they stick by you no matter
how badly you treat them. They
love unconditionally, and they
suffer in silence in the hopes that
you'll snap out of your self-serv-
ing denial of their needs.
Animals aren't objects.
Don't give puppies and kittens
as Christmas presents if you are
too unoriginal to come up with a
better, more practical idea. Babv
animals grow up and become less
cute. If they are unwanted, they
may be abandoned. Pets are still
around (atleastfora while),even
when their owners have forgot-
ten about them�just visit the
animal shelter. Or just ask Doug.
I tell you all of this, because
I end up feeding the cats that eat
out of thedumpsters.Iget barked
at by the dogs tied in the yards
around my neighborhood, and
sometimes, I think that if I weren't
afraid of being bitten, I'd liber-
ate those pooches.
Doug knew that pets
weren't allowed in the apart-
ments where he and Fred lived,
but he did all that he could to
save Mariam from her fate.
Doug, kind soul that he is, gave
Mariam water when hers froze,
he put a blanket in her house
and he spent some time with
her when he could. He called
the Humane Society and was
told that unless there was physi-
cal abuse, unless Miriam wasn't
being fed, or unless she had no
shelter from the cold, there was
nothing that could be done.
Doug sent Fred an anony-
mous letter. Nothing happened.
Doug contemplated stealing
Mariam, but he had no where to
take her, no home to give her,
and he couldn't justify stealing
someone else's property. But we
shouldn't think of animals as
property. Property is the junk
that we leave on the curb when
we move. Pets should accom-
pany us as we drive from col-
lege into thegreatbeyond. They
make the ride bearable.
By T. Scott Batchelor
Bizarre districts drawn, citing injustice
Perverse. Absolutely-
perverse.
That's what I thought
standing before the multi-
colored map of North
Carolina's 12 congressional
districts. The map looked like
a painter's brush cloth, with
the First and 12th districts as
red and yellow paint spills,
rambling aimlessly and
inanely across the
posterboard like the Missis-
sippi River.
These misbegotten
shapes were born out of a
well-intentioned yet delete-
rious notion: since, for what-
ever reason, North Carolina
lacked black representatives
in Congress, we should cre-
ate majority-minoritv dis-
tricts to help ensure that
blacks get elected to the
House of Representatives.
Underpinning this idea
are two assumptions which
have been passed off as
truths, both erroneous. The
first is that the reason North
Carolina had no blacks in the
House of Representatives is
due to the racial prejudice of
a majority white electorate�
an invidious and wholly in-
defensible theory.
And the state's answer
to this perceived injustice
presents an interesting quasi-
corollary to this idea of ra-
cial preference: those who re-
drew the districts must have
been confident that a major-
ity black district would elect
a black candidate. In other
words, the belief that black
North Carolinians are ra-
cially prejudiced drove the
redistricting plan. A bitter
irony considering the con-
tinual charges by black lead-
ers that election outcomes
are decided by a candidate's
skin color.
The second erroneous
assumption that helped cre-
ate North Carolina's bizarre
districts is that only a mem-
ber of a certain racial or eth-
nic group is qualified to ef-
fectively represent that
group in Congress. Balder-
dash! Under this philosophy,
we would have to create ex-
tra seats and districts to ac-
commodate the representa-
tives of different races, eth-
nic groups, religions, occu-
pations, ages, etc.
One need not be black
to represent blacks nor
whites to represent whites.
This concept simply lacks
any intellectual substance
and is dangerously divisive
besides.
Fortunately for us
right-thinking individuals,
we have men like Robinson
O. Everett to challenge these
misguided actions. Everett
is a professor of law at Duke
University and served as
Chief judge of the U.S. Court
of Military Appeals from
1980-1990. Heandfourother
Durham voters attacked the
redistricting plans on
grounds of racial gerryman-
dering. Everett argued the
case of Shaw v. Reno before
the U.S. Supreme Court on
April 20, 1993.
The case was decided
on June 28,1993, and in Jus-
tice O' Connor's opinion of
the Court (joined by Chief
Justice Rehnquist and Jus-
tices Scalia, Kennedy and
Thomas) "emphasized in
strong terms that 'bizarre'
congressional districts are
suspect when it is clear that
they are drawn to assure
the election of persons of a
particular race according
to Everett.
"Moreover writes
Everett Justice
O'Connor concluded that
the five plaintiffs�even
though they are white�had
rights under the equal pro-
tection clause of the 14th
Amendment and could
claim injury
This ruling has most
assuredly upset the two
Congressmen who owe
their seats to the racial ger-
rymandering, Clayton and
Watt.
But for the rest of us
who still believe in Martin
Luther King, Jrs statement
that people should "not be
judged"�and elected�"by
the color of their skin, but
by the content of their char-
acter this decision has
taken us a giant step toward
that goal.
By Joseph Horst
World changes
begin with
personal growth
Let me ask you a question.
How is it that a person can tell you one
thing and six months later act total! v different?
How is it that someone can tell you � and
make you believe � that they feel a certain
way and then act in a very extreme opposite
manner? Does it not occur to them that if a
person is exposed to this hypocrisy often
enough, more than likely they'll just give up on
the person all together?
Granted, I am taking these questions
from a personal experience of mine that hap-
pened recently. However, this column is not
meant as a vent for my personal frustrations.
Rather, I have to wonder how some people
maintain friends and relationships when they
don't follow up their words with actions.
Look at it this way: a politician running
for election says that he is vehemently against
spending taxpayers' money for personal trips.
After he is in office for a few years, someone
discovers that he has been writing off trips to
the Bahamas as "business-related No one's
very surprised when this happens � hell, all
politicians are liars, right? What does this do
thatperson'sstatusinthepubliceye,however?
Let me bring this a li ttle closer to home for
Joe Average Student. The person you're going
out with says that they don't want to have sex
because it would ruin the friendship. They say
that the friendship is too important to them to
risk losing it. You respect that decision and
admire the person for thinking so much of you.
Later, however, that person lies to you or just
decides that it's time to move on. What mes-
sage does this give you?
I'll tell you what message it gives me. For
all that talk about how important that friend-
ship was, that's all it ever was � just talk. If a
person can't back up their statements with
concrete examples, why should you believe
anyofitforasecond?Any man orwoman can
look you straight in the face and lie their ass off.
The only way you can tell what the truth really
is, is by looking at how those people act.
This touches on a previous topic of mine.
People moan and complain about how bad
and terrible our society is nowadays. If they
would only start to look at their own lives and
live them the way they think others should,
maybe, just maybe, this world would be a
better place to live in. Clean your own house
before you start commenting on the terrible
condition of your neighbor's.
How will people be able to know what
you think life should be like? Bv your actions,
and nothing else. If you think work ethics are
important in life, show your co-workers with
your own work if family values are impor-
tant, give some attention and love to your
children and spouse. It might surprise you
how quickly people come to respect and emu-
late you when you show thern what you feel
the good things in life are.
Wanttochange the world?Great. Noble
concept. The problem comes up when you ask
yourself hoivcan you change the world. Allow
me to give you my own personal solution, if
you would. Change your little comer first.
Show people � by your actions, not your
words�whatyou think Utopia is. Create your
own personal pa rad ise and let others view i t so
that they might eventually achieve their own.
"Talk is cheap "Actions speak louder
man words Cliches are only cliches unless
they're true.
r





Awww, put a box around it and you got a comic Sp� �d
Adventures Of Kemple Boy
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By Kemple Seigfreid and Barth
by Murphy and Davis
Attention Ya Cartoonist Bums!
That's right, my little everlasting gobstoppers, it's time for
another newly renovated crystal-clear cartoonist meetings. All
presently employed cartoonists must come to the offices of The
East Carolinian next Monday, Oct. 18, at 6:00pm. Attendance
is mandatory. If you don't show up, don't expect to see your
strip on this page. Just because we don't deal with the Real
World doesn't mean we can slack off! If there is a scheduling
conflict, call Chris Kemple or leave a message at 758-8824.
But I know you'll all be there; it'll be more fun than a Russian
Coup! And you might just learn something!
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mm
Defense of a little Virginity
The federal
government has
spent billions of
our tax dollars
since 1970
to promote
contraceptives
and "safe sex"
among our
teenagers. Isn't it
time we asked,
What have we
gottenfor
our money?
These are the facts:
� The federal Centers for Disease
Control estimate that there are now 1
million cases of HIV infection nation-
wide. 2
� I in 100 students coming to the
University of Texas health center now
carries the deadly virus
� The rate of heterosexual HIV trans
mission has increased 44 since
September 1989.4
� Sexually transmitted diseases
(STDs) infect 3 million teenagers annu-
ally
� 63 of all STD cases occur among
persons less than 25 years of age.6
� 1 million new cases of pelvic
inflammatory disease occur annually.7
� 1.3 million new cases of gonorrhea
occur annually8; strains of gonorrhea have
developed that are resistant to penicillin.
� Syphilis is at a 40-year high, with
134,000 new infections per year.9
� 500,000 new cases of herpes occur
annually10; it is estimated that 16.4 of
the U.S. population ages 15-74 is
infected, totaling more than 25 million
Americans � among certain groups, the
infection rate is as high as 60
� 4 million cases of chlamydia occur
annually 10-30 of 15- tol9-year-
olds are infected
� There are now 24 million cases of
human papilloma virus (HPV), with a
higher prevalence among teens.14
To date, over 20 different and
dangerous sexually transmitted diseases
are rampant among the young. Add to
that the problems associated with
promiscuous behavior: infertility, abor-
tions and infected newboms. The cost of
this epidemic is staggering, both in
human suffering and in expense to soci-
ety; yet epidemiologists tell us we've
only seen the beginning.
Incredibly, the "safe-sex"gurus and
condom promoters who got us into this
mess are still determining our policy
regarding adolescent sexuality. Their
ideas have failed, and it is time to rethink
their bankrupt policies.
How long has it been since you've
heard anyone tell teenagers why it is to
their advantage to remain virgins until
married? The facts are being withheld
from them, with tragic consequences.
Unless we come to terms with the sick-
ness that stalks a generation of
Americans, teen promiscuity will
continue, and millions of kids think-
ing they are protected will suffer for
the rest of their lives. Many will die of
AIDS.
There is only one safe way to remain
healthy in the midst of a sexual revolu-
tion. It is to abstain from intercourse
until marriage, and then wed and be
faithful to an uninfected partner. It is a
concept that was widely endorsed in
society until the 1960s. Since then, a
"better idea" has come along one
that now threatens the entire human
family.
Inevitable questions are raised when-
ever abstinence is proposed. It's time we
gave some clear answers:
message from Focus on the Family
Why, apart from moral coasid
erations, do you think teenagers
should r taught to abstain from
sex until marriage?
No other approach to the epidemic of
sexually transmitted diseases will work.
The so-called "safe-sex" solution is a
disaster in the making. Condoms can fail
at least 15.7 percent of the time annually
in preventing pregnancy They fail
36.3 percent of the time annually in
preventing pregnancy among young,
unmarried minority women In a study
of homosexual men. the British Medical
Journal reported the failure rate due to
slippage and breakage to be 26 percent
Given these findings, it is obvious why
we have a word for people who rely
on condoms as a means of birth
control. We call them
"parents
Remembering that
a woman can conceive
only one or two days
per month, we know
the failure rate for
condoms must be
much higher when it
comes to preventing
disease, which can be
transmitted 365 days
per year! If the devices
are not used properly,
or if they slip just
once, viruses and
bacteria are exchanged
and the disease process begins. One
mistake after 500 "protected" episodes is
all it takes to contract a sexually trans-
mitted disease. The damage is done in a
single moment when rational thought is
overridden by passion.
Those who would depend on so inse-
cure a method must use it properly on
every occasion, and even then a high
failure rate is brought about by factors
beyond their control. The young victim
who is told by his elders that this little
latex device is "safe" may not know he
is risking lifelong pain and even death
for so brief a window of pleasure. What
a burden to place on an immature mind
and body!
In fact, the University of Texas
Medical Branch recently found that
condoms are only 69 percent effective in
preventing the transmission of the human
immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in hetero-
sexual couples. Dr. Susan Welter of
UTMB conducted a meta-analysis of 11
independent HIV transmission studies.
Her conclusion: "When it comes to the
sexual transmission of HIV, the only
real prevention is not to have sex with
someone who has or might have HIV18
This surely explains why not one of
800 sexologists at a conference a few
years ago raised a hand when asked if
they would trust a thin rubber sheath to
protect them during intercourse with a
known HIV-infected person9 Who
could blame them? They're not crazy,
after all. And yet they're perfectly will-
ing to tell our kids that "safe sex" is
within reach and that they can sleep
around with impunity.
There is only one way to protect
ourselves from the deadly diseases that
lie in wait. It is abstinence before
marriage, then marriage and mutual
fidelity for life to an uninfected partner.
Anything less is potentially suicidal.
That position is simply NOT
realistic today. It's an unwork-
able solution: Kids will NOT
implement it.
Some will. Some won't. It's still the
only answer. But let's talk about an
"unworkable solution" of the first order.
Since 1970, the federal government has
spent billions of our tax dollars to
promote contraception and "safe sex
This year alone, hundreds of millions
of your tax dollars will go down that
drain! (Compared with less than $8
million for abstinence programs, which
Sen. Teddy Kennedy and company have
sought repeatedly to eliminate alto-
gether.) Isn't it time we ask what we've
gotten for our money? After 22 years
and billions of dollars, some 58 percent
of teenage girls under 18 still did not use
contraception during their first inter
course.2" Furthermore, teenagers tend to
ratio of the experts who call abstinence
'unrealistic" and "unworkable
Even if we spent another $50 billion
to promote condom usage, most
teenagers would still not use them
consistently and properly. The nature of
human beings and the passion of the act
simply do not lend themselves to a disci-
plined response in young romantics.
But if you knew a teenager was
going to have intercourse,
wouldn't you teach him or her
about proper condom usage?
No, because that approach has an
unintended consequence. The process of
recommending condom usage to
teenagers inevitably conveys five
dangerous ideas: (1) that "safe sex" is
achievable; (2) that everybody is doing
it; (3) that responsible adults expect
them to do it; (4) that it's a good
thing; and (5) that their peers
know they know these things,
breeding promiscuity, Those'
are very destructive messages
to give our kids.
Furthermore, Planned
Parenthood's own data
show that the number
one reason teenagers
engage in inter-
course is peer pres-
sure Therefore,
anything we do
to imply that
"everybody is
doing it" results
tn more not fewer people who
give the game a try. Condom distribu-
tion programs do not reduce the number
of kids exposed to disease they radi-
cally increase it!
Since the federal government began
its major contraception program in 1970,
unwed pregnancies have increased 87
percent among 15-to -year-olds.2'
Likewise, abortions among teens rose 67
percent;24 unwed births went up 83.8
percent.25 And venereal disease has
infected a generation of young people.
Nice job, sex counselors. Good thinking,
senators and congressmen. Nice nap,
America.
Having made a blunder that now
threatens the human family, one would
think the designers would be back
tracking and apologizing for their
miscalculations. Instead, they
continue to lobby Congress
and corporate America for
more money. Given the
misinformation extant on this
subject, they'll probably get
it.
But if you were a
parent and knew that
your son or daughter
was having sex,
wouldn't you rather
he or she used a
condom?
How much risk is accept
able when you're talking about your
teenager's life? One study of married
couples in which one partner was
infected with HIV found that 17 of the
partners using condoms for protection
still caught the virus within a year and a
half.26 Telling our teens to "reduce their
risk" to one in six (17) is not much
better than advocating Russian roulette.
Both are fatal, eventually. The difference
is that with a gun, death is quicker.
Suppose your son or daughter were join-
ing an 18-month skydiving club of six
members. If you knew that one of their
parachutes would definitely fail, would
you recommend that they simply buckle
the chutes tighter? Certainly not. You
would say, "Please don't jump. Your life
is at stake How could a loving parent
do less?
Kids won't listen to the absti-
nence message. You're just wasting
your breath to try to sell them a
notion like that
It is a popular myth that teenagers are
incapable of understanding that it is
in their best interest to save them-
selves until marriage. Almost 65
percent of all high school females
under 18 are virgins.27
groups�just an ex-convict named
Harold Morris talking about abstinence,
among other subjects. The coliseum
seated 18,(XX) people, but 26,000
teenagers showed up! Eventually, more
than 2,000 stood outside the packed
auditorium and listened over a hastily
prepared public address system. Who
says kids won't listen to this time-
honored message?
Even teens who have been
sexually active can choose to
stop. This is often called
"secondary virginity a good
concept that conveys the idea
that kids can start over. One
young girl recently wrote
Ann Landers to say she
wished she had kept her
virginity, signing the letter,
'Sorry I didn't and wish I
could take it back As
responsible adults we
need to tell her that even
though she can't go back, she
can go forward. She can regain her
self-respect and protect her health,
because it's never too late to start
saying "no" to premarital sex.
Even though the safe-sex advo-
cates predominate in educational
circles, are there no positive exam-
ples of abstinence-based programs
for kids?
Thankfully, some excellent programs
have been developed. Spokane-based
Teen-Aid and Chicago's Southwest
Parents Committee are good examples.
So are Next Generation in Maryland,
Choices in California and Respect Inc. in
Illinois. Other curricula such as Facing
Reality; Sex Respect; Me. My World, My
Future; Reasonable Reasons to Wait;
Sex. Love & Choices; F.A.C.T.S etc
are all abstinence-themed programs to
help kids make good sexual decisions.
A good curriculum for inner-city
youth is Elayne Bennett's Best Friends
Program. This successful "mentoring"
project helps adolescents in Washington,
DC. graduate from high school and
remain abstinent. In five years, not one
female has become pregnant while in the
Best Friends Program.
Establishing and nurturing absti-
nence ideas with kids, however,
in be like spitting into the
wind. Not because they
won't listen, because most
will. But pro-abstinence
messages are drowned out
in a sea of toxic teen-sex-
is-inevitable-use-
a-condom
propaganda
from "safe-sex"
professionals.
You place
major responsi-
bility on those
who have told
adolescents that
sexual expression is their
right as long as they do it
"properly Who else has
contributed to the epidemic?
The entertainment industry must
certainly share the blame, including tele-
vision producers. It is interesting in this
context that all four networks and the
cable television entities are wringing
their hands about this terrible epidemic
of AIDS. They profess to be very
concerned about those who are infected
with sexually transmitted diseases, and
perhaps they are sincere. However, TV
executives and movie moguls have
contributed mightily to the existence of
this plague. For decades, they have
depicted teens and young adults climb-
ing in and out of each other's beds like
so many sexual robots. Only the nerds
were shown to be chaste, and they were
too stupid or ugly to find partners.
Of course, the beautiful young actors
in those steamy dramas never faced any
consequences for their sexual indul-
gence. No one ever came down with
herpes, or syphilis, or chlamydia or
pelvic inflammatory disease, or infertil-
ity, or AIDS, or genital warts, or cervical
cancer. No patients were ever told by a
physician that there was no cure for their
disease or that they would have to deal
with the pain for the rest of their lives.
No one ever heard that genital
cancers associated with the
human papilloma virus (HPV)
kill more women than AIDS,28
or that strains of gonorrhea are
now resistant to penicillin.29
No, there was no
downside. It all looked like so
much fun. But what a price we
are paying now for the lies we
have been told.
The government
, has also
contributed to
this crisis and
continues to exac-
erbate the problem.
For example, a current
brochure from the federal
Centers for Disease Control and the
City of New York is entitled, 'Teens
Have the Right and is apparently
intended to free adolescents from adult
authority. Inside are the six declarations
that make up a 'Teenager's Bill of
Rights as follows:
� I have the right to think for myself.
� I have the right to decide, whether to
have sex and whofm to have'it with.
� I have the right to use protection
when I have sex.
� I have the right to buy and use
condoms.
� I have the right to express myself.
� I have the right to ask for help if I
need it.
Under this final item (the right to ask
for help) is a list of organizations and
phone numbers that readers are encour-
aged to call. The philosophy that
governs several of the organizations
includes presenting homosexuality as
an acceptable life style and vigorous
promotion of a teen's right to sexual
expression.
Your tax dollars at work!
Surely there are other Americans
who recognize the danger now threaten-
ing a generation of our best and bright-
est. It is time to speak up for an old-fash-
ioned value called virginity. Now, more
than ever, virtue is a necessity.
If you agree with Focus on the
Family that it is time for a new approach
to adolescent sexuality, tear out this ad
and save it. Take it to your next school
board meeting. Send it to your congress-
man or senator. Distribute copies to the
PTA. And by all means, share it with
your teenagers. Begin to promote absti-
nence before marriage as the only
healthy way to survive this worldwide
epidemic.
Please use the coupon below to
obtain a valuable booklet on abstinence.
There is no charge for it. However, your
support is requested for an upcoming TV
program for teenagers on this important
topic. Your comments are also solicited
� Copyright 1993, Focus on the Family
r, i "(Jygni im�j, i-ecus on the Family
� � � ��i 1MB HMI MM �� ��� Hi H a
VPQl hnct0 suPP�rt a national television broadcast on abstinence and I
WO! help Focus on the Family reach out to America's kids I
� i�i .
A few years ago in Lexington,
Ky a youth event was held that
featured no sports contest, no rock
keep having unprotected intercourse for a
full year, on average, before starting any
Data Sources kd �f contracePHon-2' That is the success
Ga-Rulf,0.ATrc�ulRcs
I
I
I
I
I
L
D Please send me
copies of the booklet.
How to Help Your Kids Say 'No' to Sex"
(Up to 5: FREE � More than 10: 35c each') LF213
U Please send mecopies of this ad.
(Up to 5: FREE � More than 10: 25c each) FX273
Your Name
Address
City
State.
-Zip.
Phone
P'e1Lmdae1h,CpkHPaya,ble !� FL�CUS �" the Family' Cli? mis reP'y �� and send it along with your
tax-deductible donation to: Focus on the Family. Colorado Spnngs, CO USA 80995 0001
Orcall1-800-A-FAMILY.
suggested donation
3SMJNC2
J
����
�ivipii �i





October 14, 1993
The East Carolinian �
Lifestyle
Page 15
Modern dance troupe visits
Photo courtesy of Student Union
On Friday Oct. 15 this modern dance company will swing through
Greenville. Take a break from the ordinary and see these dancers.
Today: Tuberculosis
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
If you're looking for some-
thing different to do this Home-
coming Weekend, and you're in-
terested in modern dance, then
the Lar Lubovitch Dance Com-
pany will be right up your alley.
On Friday, Oct. 15, the dance
company will appear at Wright
Auditorium as part of the annual
weekend activities. The program
is scheduled for 8 p.m. and is just
one of the many season's offer-
ings of ECU's 1993-94 University
Unions Performing Arts Series.
Scheduled are four ragtime
dances, performed by four
couples. These will be set to mu-
sic by Charles Ives.
There will also be a solo dance
set to the Cole Porter song, "It's
All Right with Me a 10-dancer
work set to music by Steve Reich,
and a two-part work set to music
first by Les Paul and Mary Ford,
and secondly by Johnny Puleo
and his Harmonica Gang.
Among the songs featured in
the two-part work, "Waiting for
the Sunrise are "Tennessee
Waltz "Vaya con Dios and
"There'll Never Be Another You
Lar Lubovitch established the
company 26 years ago and has
since created more than 50 dances,
with a wide variety or movement,
music and sets. Lubovitch uses
music from both Eastern and
Western influences.
Critics have praised
Lubovitch's work for its rhap-
sodic style, sophisticated formal
structures and "joyous musical-
ity
He has also received many
awards and grants from the Na-
tional Endowment for the Arts,
the New York State Council on
the Arts and various private foun-
dations.
During the past three years,
the company has traveled to four
continents and has performed in
China, France, Canada, Japan,
Brazil and North America.
Admission to the presenta-
tion is by Performing Arts Series
ticket or by single ticket.
Tickets are on sale now at
$20 each for the general public,
$16 for ECU staff and faculty and
$10 for students and youth.
Tickets may be purchased
from the ECU Central Ticket Of-
fice or by phone with a major
credit card at 757-4788 or 1-800-
ECU-ARTS.
'Why Does the
Sun Shine?'
By Mark Brett
Question: What is TB?
Answer: TB is a chronic, re-
current infection most common
in the 1l s, but it also attacks
other areas of the body. The germ
can be present in the body and
not cause a person to feel sick.
However, the germ can become
active at any time, causing illness
and making the person conta-
Answered by Dr. Shirley Williamson
Student Health Services
gious.
Question: How is TB spread?
Answer: It is usually spread
by infected droplets that are in
the air after an infected person
coughs or sneezes.
Question: How do you test
for TB?
Answer: A small amount of
material called tuberculin is in-
Tor Love or Money'
takes off weakly
By Ike Shibley
jected under the skin on the fore-
arm. This area is examined for a
reaction within 48 to 72 hours. If
nothing happens, you probably
have not had any contact with the
. TB germ. If there is a reaction,
your health care provider will
decide if it is "positive" by mea-
suring the size of the reaction.
Question: What does a posi-
tive TB skin test mean?
Answer: A positive TB test
means that at some time in your
life you were in contact with
someone who had active infec-
tious tuberculosis. You were in-
fected with the germ but you did
not become sick with it. If for any
See TB page 21
Staff Writer
Why does the sun shine? I've
asked myself that more times than I
can remember, and I know I'm not
alone. Well, for all us stumped sci-
ence buffs down here on Mother
Earth, They Might Be Giants has
kindly released a new EP thatboldly
asks (and answers) that very ques-
tion. Appropriately titled WIiyDoes
the Sun Shine? (The Sun is a Mass of
Incandescent Gas), this new disc from
the men who brought us such scien-
tific blockbusters as "Particle Man"
faces one of the burning questions of
our day head-on.
The title track is delivered
with a lovely sing-song quality that
lingers in your mind for hours after
just one listen. Handy for those
impromtu physics quizzes! This
song provides a flurry of essential
background information on our sun
"The sun is hot, the sun is large, the
sunisfaraway'croonsvocalistjohn
Hansburghinoneofthesong'smore
revealing passages.
Aside from offering this cor-
nucopia ofvitalinformation(another
mind-blowing tidbit: "The sun is
93 million miles away, and that's
why it looks so small Wow! It's
science!), "WhyDoestheSunShine?"
finallyanswersitsownquestion. The
sun shines, we are told, because it is
in reality "a huge, atom-smashing
machine
What a bold statement! This
is likely to ruffleafew feathers among
theorists following the "Raming
Chariotof the Gods" school of phys-
ics. Thegroupmightsoftentheblow
with the gentle arrangement in true
They Might Be Giants fashion, but
their dedication to scientific truth
remains adamant. If people are
worried that there's a huge, uncon-
trollable atomic reactor our there
just waiting to blow us all to King-
dom Come, then so be it. It's about
time we faced the truth.
But They Might Be Giants
aren't justa bunch of sciencegeeks!
As the rest of this EP proves, this
band has its fingers on the pulse of
the music industry, too. Following
"Why Does the Sun Shine?" is a
rollicking cover of the Allman
Brothers' "Jessica delivered with
the full power of a They Might Be
Giants all-out accordion-and-
glockenspiel attack.
Next is a cover of the Meat
Puppets' poignant "Whirlpool
the touching story of a "swirling
massof water" thatwantstogoout
and see the world. A slight return
to the scientific motif, "Whirlpool"
is nevertheless a gentle, heart-
warming piece of music. Listen to
it with somebody you love.
The disc is rounded out with
"Spy an homage to spy movie
themes and improvisational jazz.
Good for those romantic evenings
in your secret under-ground head-
quarters, or even when you're just
feeling a little sneaky.
They Might Be Giants has
done it again, with a collection of
music that's both educational and
entertaining, in a tone every bit as
sarcastic as my own. Why Does the
Sun Shine? is a fine addition to the
band's catalogue of goofy weird-
ness; music that sounds like a sur-
realist Disney cartoon soundtrack.
Pick it up for a taste of the strange.
Scholarship opportunities everywhere
Staff Writer
Michael J. Fox presents an
image on the silver screen that is
hard not to like. Starting with his
Back to the Future roles, he has
consistently portrayed likable
characters If they are not likable
for the entire film, then they are at
least likable by the final reel.
Fox's latest film, For Love or
Money, once again finds Fox in a
clunker of a vehicle that gets pro-
pelled mostly by Fox's warm per-
sonality.
J
For Love or Money tells the tale
of Doug Ireland (Fox), a hotel
concierge who can make every
customer happy every time. He
produces Yankee tickets with the
greatest of ease, hands out Miss
Saigon front seats with nary an
effort and smoothes out entangle-
ments for many of the hotel's
guests. Doug can truly work
magic, but he wants the magic of
owning his own hotel most of all.
Early in the film Doug gets
his wish. A friend introduces
Doug to Christian Hanover (An-
thony Higgins), an entrepreneur
who agrees to finance Doug's
hotel in return for favors. One of
the favors involves Christian's
girlfriend Andy Hart (Gabrielle
Anwar�last seen doing a tango
with Al Pacino in Scent of a
Woman). Christian asks Doug to
entertain Andy with discretion.
Christian wants Andv to believe
thatheisgoingtoleavehiswifeso
thathecan stay with heronlonely
nights.
As the story progresses Doug
and Andy begin to fall in love and
Doug must decide whether love
or money is his true desire.
Though cliched,theending elicits
smiles from the audience.
The love theme provides the
main story line in For Love or Money
but the subplots prove more en-
joyable. For Love or Money could
have been really great had it con-
centrated solely on Doug's
maneuverings to please the cus-
tomers.
Watching Doug deal with a
rich eccentric who wants Doug to
by diamonds and stuffed giraffes
and who always wants his two
dogs taken for a walk provides
some of the best laughs in the
film. Observing Doug hustling for
various tickets also proves enjoy-
able. Doug also helps a couple
trying to rekindle a romance by
giving them tickets to a Broad-
way show, recommending a hair-
stylist and reserving a limousine.
Barry Sonnefeld fares no bet-
ter as a director this time than he
did with his first film, TlicAddams
See LOVE page 21
By Laura Jackman
Staff Writer
Sebastian International is hop-
ing to start a chain reaction. To-
gether wi th Follett (America's larg-
est operator and wholesaler of col-
lege book stores) and Hogan Com-
munications (an entertainment-
based marketing and media com-
pany specializing in colleges), they
hope to raise HTVAIDS awareness
among college students.
Starting this fall and lasting for
atleastthree semesters, HTVAIDS
awareness scholarships will be
available to college students, in any
major. A total of 30, $1000 scholar-
ships�10 a semester�will be
awarded to the entries that best
address HIVAIDS issues.
To be eligible, you must be en-
rolled as a full-time student, regis-
tered for at least 12 credit hours this
fall and have served as a volunteer
in a community or non-profit orga-
nization within the last 24 months.
If you meetthese requirements,
then you need to visit an exclusive
Sebastian College Salon. As of now,
there are no involved salons in
Greenville, but there are two in the
RDU area. They are Lsquirr Hair,
(919) 821259, in Raleigh and A
Cut Above, (919) 286-5664, in
Durham. Then, pick up a three-
This 3-pack of
shampoo,
conditioner and gel
can be purchased
for $5. From each
purchase there will
be a1 donation to
the National
Community AIDS
Partnership.
Photo courtesy of
Hogan
Communications
pack of Celloshampoo, Sheer Con-
ditioner and Wet gel that is spe-
cially priced at $5. Each purchase
includes a $1 donation to the Na-
tional Community AIDS Partner-
ship (NCAP) and an official appli-
cation.
Students are encouraged to use
their creativity. You can design a
logo, create a monologue, or write a
song, just as long as it incorporates
ideas about what individuals, com-
munities andor corporations can
Gill releases 'Provocative'
Photo courtesy of universal Pictures
In order to get financing for his dream hotel, Doug(Michael j. Fox)
agrees to entertain Andy (Gabrielle Anwar), and a romance develops.
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Let's talk funk, shall we? Or is it
soul? I don't know. James Brown is
soul. But then, he's funk too. Any-
way, Johnny Gill's Provocative, on
the Motown label, is a swell release.
I'm not really into dance-pop-funk-
soul whatever, but Gill is good.
Hisvocalsaresmooth and gritty,
lending themselves to both the hop-
ping funk of "Provocative" and the
mellow groove of "Quiet Time to
Play. "Overall, there's an abundance
of thatelectronic rhythm sound, that
dance thing that permeates so much
of today's contemporary music. If
Gill redid this r.lbum with a jazzier
approach, I'd love it. But I don't
listen to much dance stuff.
And yet, as I sit here banging at
the computer, I'm rocking in my
chair to the beat of "The Floor a
thumping number about, whatelse,
hitting the dance floor. Point being,
folks, the music's got a contagious
beat. Like it or not, it'll make you
want to dance.
Gill's good. And that's it. If you
want to shake that thang, you '11 like
"A Cute, Sweet, Love Addiction
the CD bonus track�"lip-smackin'
finger-lickin' good he sings�and
"I Got You If you like it slow and
grinding you'll like " Long Way From
Home" and "QuietTimeToPlayIf
you fall in between, "Where No Man
Has Gone Before" is the track for
you
So there. If this is the type of
music you like, you'll like this al-
bum. If you're into that weird stuff
or Black Sabbath, stay away.
do to help prevent the spread of
HIV and AIDS. Other possibilities
include designing a board game,
writing an essay or painting a pic-
ture. Explore the topics of aware-
ness, prevention and education and
provide Sebastian International
with your visions.
"We wanted to get students
more actively involved in AIDS pre-
vention and awareness through
education said Pamela Mignone,
Associate Public Relations Manager
for Sebastian International. Money
raised from the $1 NCAP dona-
tions will help to fund a musical
AIDS awareness college campus
tour called "Heart Strings 101
All entries must be accompa-
nied by a completed application
form and received no later than
Dec. 15,1993. The first 10 scholar-
ship recipients will be notified via
mail by Jan. 15,1994. For further
information or a complete appli-
cation, call 1-800-829-7322.
ECU natural team explores
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
ECU is sending a nautical sur-
vey team to Mobile, Alabama to
examine ships that sank during
the Civil War Battle of Mobile
Bay. ECU archeologists Gordan
P. Watts heads the group which
will be surveying the three ships.
The Tecumseh is the most fa-
mous of the three vessels. It was
struck by a torpedo. Ninety-three
men died as the ship sank in a
mere25 seconds. It took the Union
fleet totally by surprise and briefly
suspended its progress.
The documentation of The
Tecumseh and the other two ships,
The C.S.S. Gaines and The U.S.S.
Philippi is being funded by a
$20,000 grant.
Watt notes that an impor-
tant aspect of this research is
that the Parks Service considers
Mobile Bay a battlefield. He
said, "Park Service protects his-
toric battlefields but that pro-
tection, until now, has extended
to battle sites on land. Thiscouid
lead to protection and manage-
ment plans for historic nautical
battle sites at Mobile Bay, Fort
Fisher, North Carolina and
Yorktown, Virginia
The ECU team includes stu-
dents and faculty from the
graduate program in Maritime
History and Nautical Archeol-
ogy. A couple of weeks ago.
Watts brought five of the team
members to Bermuda where
See TEAM page 21
��?��





-
�-
October 14, 1993
Mickey Mouse Club Sings
fh
i.
pht up and
ted b Debbie
ion, cheer up!
Gibson
MMC is
here tor ou!
MMC is the cleverly devised
w ay of marketing the Mickey Mouse
Club.
And look here, there is abso-
lutely no reference to the Mickey
Mouse Club in the package! But it's
them! From the Disnev Channel
show! Singing and rapping! Well,
well, well.
These are not the clean cut kids
like Annette, Cubby, Darlajermaine
and Tito. These kids wear the baggies,
the retro-threads, the complete con-
temporary youth package. And
check 'emout: Josh, Lindsey, Rhona,
Nita, JC, Dale, Tony, Ricky, Jennifer,
Dana, Matt, Keri and Marc. Sounds
like"Savedby the Bell" meets "90210
doesn't it?
But look, I could mock 'em all
day. The truthis, thisisaslickalbum.
Production-wise, this album has
drawn immense professional tech-
nical support from people associ-
ated with the likes of Paula Abdul,
Photo courtesy of MMC
If you are looking for a change of music, you have found the group.
Disney has devised a way to market the MMC in the music industry.
Bobby Brown, Whitney Houston
and Eddie Murphy. Can you stand
it?Sure,it'snothingbutdancemusic
with stupid lyrics and titles like
"Flava "Gimme Back My Groove
"Step to the Rhythm" and "Let's Get
together But it's not bad.
If you like dance music with
that pop edge, you'll like MMC. If
you liked Milli Vanilli, you'll love
MMC. A lot of effort went into
making this stuff sound good, and it
does.
Give credit to Walt Disney
records for that. And give thanks to
the original Mouseketeers for start-
ing something: Annette, Jimmie,
Cubby,Sharon,Kukla,Franand011ie.
Look, it's cheese-eating dance
pop stuff, but it's good cheese-eating
dance pop stuff.
James Hall's release worth a listen
:Andy Suss
: Staff Writer
"Deception of Light the sev-
I enthtrackon James Hall'sMy Love,
I Sex and Spirit, is the best number
Ion the album. Maybe it's the
- melanchloy�yet unobtrusive�
j horn solo. Maybe it's the heavy
J guitar riffs and the way the axe
: fades at the end with a little feed-
T back. Or maybe it's the only track
Hike. I don't know. He's cool.
The album has some diverse
; elements on it and some good
"music, but despite some of the
! promising openings to the songs,
- Hall's vocals are an enigma, a mar-
� vel of the modern era. He's been
j likened to an early David Bowie,
: but I see more of Alice Cooper, ala
; 1973's "Black Juju mixed with
" every other alternative singer in
the nation and a little of that
Metallica trash like that stupid song
that was on the radio and MTV
every other hour.
But the heck with the vocals,
the music does some swell stuff.
"Criminal Hero" is a lively num-
ber with somber overtones reflect-
ing the age we live in and its effect
orj the individual. "Trouble in
Paradise" is a wailing little ditty
wuth some down to earth
James Hall's
new album, My
Love, Sex and
Spirit, is full of
passion that
Hall
successfully
brings over to
his audience.
heartwrenchingvocalizationabout
stuff.
And "Feeling of Hope" is re-
ally inspired. It's a cross between
the Stray Cats, Fleetwood Mac and
a mellow Billy Idol. "Don't sacri-
fice your dreamDon't sacrifice
your dreams Hall sings. It's fabu-
lous. A really hot solo towards the
end of it, too.
Hall feels the music. And lis-
tening to it, you'll feel his passion.
Photo cotirtMy ot
Daemon Record
I don't like it too much, but a lot of
people will. I mean, the music and
stuff is swell, but his vocals are
nutty or something.
And what's cool is that, out of
nowhere, the listener is hit with
some piano or homs; it's an unset-
tling listening session. Look, it's
good, but I know I just wouldn't
listen to it a lot. But there are those
out there who will love it. So go
buy it!
B I S (ill GARDENS Y 1 L L I A M S B I R (J
AtDrnoNS
Jhe
he Performance
1o(penmceof
aUfetime!
When you hear the thunder of applause, you know
you're where you want to beand Busch Gardens
in Williamsburg, Virginia is ready to make it all
come true.
No other place can offer you a package like this:
eight high performance mainstage shows; a tremen-
dous variety of st; lling entertainment; a dedicated
staff that cares about developing your talent; plus
FREE classes in dance, voice and drama. There's also
housing coordination available as well as a new
sports medicine program. All of this plus free access
to one of the most beautiful theme parks in
the world.
More than 250 positions are now available for:
� Singers, Dancers, Musicians, Actors,
Variety Artists
� Technicians (stage managers, audio engineers,
lighting and follow spot operators, and wardrobe
dressers with sewing experience)
Sound exciting? It is! Plan on starting your experience
of a lifetime at Busch GaroensWilliamsburg Auditions
'94. Bring your best 1 12 minute act to the audition
location nearest you.
University of
North Carolina-Greensboro
Friday, October 29th
2:00 - 5:00 pm
Elliott Center, Cone Ballroom
Forest Street, Greensboro, NC
If chosen, you can begin working weekends
from February through April '94 and full time
from May through October '94.
If unable to attend the auditions, send your
resume and photo, along with a video tape
(dancers, actors, variety artists) or cassette tape
(musicians, singers), to: Auditions, co Busch
Gardens Entertainment, One Busch Gardens
Boulevard, WflBamsburg, VA 23187-8785- Or
call 1-800-253-3302 for more information. An
equal opportunity employer.
�BllSCH
Gardens.
WILLIAMSBURG, VA.
r i c i p 1.1: s oj s o in n k i ik i: ,i i; x i
I S I I X (,
�' ltd
Z7S�
IRONICALLY, THE TIME TO START
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October 14, 1993
The East Carolinian 17
Conan O'Brien fights late
night television battle
Fine but( J'Brien presumably
the wit looking to be Charlie Rose.
i ate Night" is supposed to be
rien remains the sum- funny, too. Trouble is, after a
intern ol the I ate Night modest, yet promising start,
Conan's comic learning curve
seems to have gone flat. His show
has seldom been otherwise.
Meanwhile, Conan's ratings
are headed south. The nightly
two million TV households he
scored his first week on the air
had shrunk to 1.65 million for the
week ending Oct. 1, according to
'since arriving Sept. 13. the
30-year-old trainee-host has
earned passing grades as an in-
terviewer. On his show (which
airsweeknightsat 12:35a.m. HSF
on ' BC) he displays gen nine cu-
riosity and a willingness to listen
to his guests.
Nielsen Media Research. That
compare with former "Late
Night" host David Letterman,
who this time last year was reach-
ing 2.3 million TV homes.
O'Brien edited the Harvard
Lampoon and he wrote for "Sat-
urday Night Live" and the in-
comparable "Simpsons but
with virtually no on-camera ex-
perience to draw upon, he has
proved all thumbs at thinking
funny on his feet. (And he gets
minimal assistance from sidekick
Alex Chilton working on new album
If you thought Big Star was the end, think again.
NASHVILLE, Tcnn (AP) �
Alex Chilton is a rock 'n' roll leg-
end who doesn't like to look back.
His admirers do it for him.
Chilton was the leader of the
1970s band Big Star, which makes
him rock 'n' roll royalty to some
people � the Replacements, REM,
the Bangles and the Posies among
them � and unknown to many-
more.
Until Rykodisc Records reis-
sued the three-album Big Star
catalogue last year (plus a live
album), their mix of British Inva-
sion pop and Velvet Underground
irony was known only to the faith-
ful few around at the beginning
and to those lucky enough to get
their hands on bootlegs.
"Big Star is kind of like passed
on with the same reverence that
fathers teach their sons to throw a
baseball is how Ken Stringfellow
of the Posies puts it.
A short history lesson:
Big Star, named after a South-
ern chain of supermarkets, was
formed in 1971 by Chris Bell,
Andy Hummel and Jody
Stephens. All were Memphis teen-
agers who wanted to imitate the
Beatles � they also liked the
Byrds, the Kinks, the Raspberries
and Todd Rundgren.
They were joined by Chilton,
a former teen sensation who had
had a string of hit records as lead
singer of The Box Tops, starting
with "The Letter He added a
tough, progressively darker edge
to Big Star.
"There was a kind of Lennon-
McCartney relationship between
them (Chilton and Bell) said
Stephens, Big Star's drummer.
"As evidenced by the first al-
bum, Chris was kind of a sweeter,
potpier kind of guy. Alex's per-
formance has always been a bit
grittier
There were three lavishly ac-
claimed albums, about 20 live
shows, and tepid distribution and
promotion by Ardent Records, a
subsidiary of Stax. Bell left after
thefirstalbum 7 Recor'(hediedin
a 1978 car wreck). Two more
records, Radio City and Third fol-
lowed before the dispirited band
broke up.
And as far as Big Star was
concerned � that was that.
But some people wanted them
back. Last spring, Missouri Uni-
versity students took a chance and
asked Chilton and Stephens to
play at their Springiest. With
Stringfellow and John Auer of the
Posies filling out the band, Big
Star returned and now has a new
album, Columbia: Live at Missouri
University 4-25-93.
"It wasn't proposed to me as
a Big Star reunion at all Chilton
said in a phone interview from
New Orleans.
'So the next thing I knew,
people were talking all about it as
a Big Star reunion, and I said
'WHAT?
Chilton has spent his time
since Big Star putting out eclectic,
erratic solo albums (his next is of
jazz standards), touring clubs
with his solo material and mak-
ing the oldies circuit with the Box
Tops hits.
He also has a habit of putting
a damper on Big Star disciples.
He says he truly likes only about
five of the band's songs, and
would have skipped the reunion
for any better-paving offer.
"Then the next thing I knew
after that, a big record company
(Zoo) was saying they wanted to
record it and that it would be
pretty decent money if I wanted
to do it. So at that point I said, 'A
paying gig
The new record grunges up
the band's harder-edged material,
and adds versions of the oft-boot-
legged Chris Bell solo song "I Am
the Cosmos and raucous rendi-
tions of Rundgren's "Slut" and
Mark Bolan's "Baby Strange
Andy Richter, who plavs Lumpy
Rutherford to Conan's Beaver
Cleaver.)
Worse, O'Brien reveals little
skill at performing prepared ma-
terial. He may be likeable, pleas-
ant, earnest and he knows how
to follow the cue cards, but he
just isn't funny to watch.
What to do? Conan's plan is
to win over his audience by con-
fessing his sins.That nervous
whinny of a laugh and puppy-
eager manner say it loud and
clear: if I apologize enough, you'll
love me � or at least indulge me.
So Conan's name, gangly ap-
pearance, rust-colored pompa-
dour, squeaky voice, inability at
singing and lame monologues all
are regular targets of his own
jibes.
He also kids himself about
the pressure he is under to suc-
ceed, pressure that in truth is
maybe starting to wear on him.
Anyway, his face is breaking out.
(Can pimple jokes be far off?)
Even in the animated "Late
Night" opening, a cartoon Conan
steps from behind the curtain,
then gulps and flings off a few
beads of flop sweat.
Excuses, excuses! However
endearing his pre-emptive strikes
may have been at first, O'Brien's
ongoing effort to laugh off his
shortcomings has ceased to be a
laughing matter.
"Late .jght" executive pro-
ducer Lome Michaels, whose TV
creations have stood for 18 years
and counting ("Saturday Night
Live") and crumbled after three
months ("The New Show" in
1984), should exceed the latter
milestone with his latest dis-
covery. (Who would NBC re-
place Conan with, anyway?
Katie Couric can't do EVERY-
THING.)
That doesn't mean
Michaels made a wise choice
insinuating this rookie into the
late-night scene. Memory fails,
but HIS excuse must have had
something to do with freshness
and innovation. Unfortunately,
the show that resulted is an
exercise in rank amateurism
and plodding sameness that
makes you wonder if Conan
even remembers how to write.
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tmmm
October 14, 1993
Ted Danson stirs trouble at Friars Club
oast,
cted
tast
, uigar humor.
"We were not trying to be
politically correct. We were trv-
ing to be funny for ourselves
she said at a news conference Sun-
day.
Danson wore blackface
makeup and huge white lips at
Friday's closed-door roast in New
York.
The "Cheers" television star
also used the word "nigger" sev-
eral times and joked about his sex
life with Miss Goldberg.
The actress attacked talk show
I Monte Williams for lashing
out U Danson.
She said Williams should
have been familiar with the pri-
vate club's 89-year history- of rib-
ald roasts and expected jokes to
focus on sex, gender, bodilv func-
tions, religion and race.
"Perhaps Montel's show is
not doing as well as it could be
and this was his way of drawing
attention Miss Goldberg said.
She said if Williams were a real
man he would have talked to her
before going public with his criti-
cism.
A spokesman for Williams or
his syndicated series could not be
reached for comment Sunday.
In a telegram announcing his
resignation from the exclusive
male-only club, Williams wrote:
"I was confused as to whether or
not I was at a Friars event or at a
rally for the KKK and Aryan Na-
tion.
"When Ted made the jokes
about the racially-mixed kids, and
everyone knows my wife is white
and just gave birth to our child, I
could see my wife start to cry. If
that's what Whoopi and Ted find
funny in their bedroom, it's not
funny to the outside world he
said.
Goldberg said Williams left
shortly after Danson started
speaking and didn't hear the off-
color presentations by others such
as comic Robin Williams.
Miss Goldberg i.ad a state-
ment from Danson in which he
said he did not intend to appear
racist.
Miss Goldberg said she her-
self had written much of the ma-
terial for Danson and even found
him the makeup artist who ap-
plied the blackface.
She said the actor was hurt by
the criticism.
"Ted Danson is not a racist
Goldberg said, pointing to their
highly publicized relationship.
She is black, he is white. They
appeared together in the movie
"Made in America about a ra-
cially-mixed couple who have a
daughter.
Apartments built for failed American musicians
LENOX, Mass. (AP)�For all its
soul-stirring rapture, music can be a
heartless business. Just ask Joey Dee.
Who's he?$You know, Joey Dee
and the Starliters. Still hazy? Does the
1962 hit "Peppermint Twist" tweak
your memory?
Now you know why Dee con-
ceived tl ie idea 20 years ago of found-
ing a retirement home for down-on-
their-luck musicians. His dream has
finally found its future home on a 63-
acre proterty in Lenox, where old
bards could hum a forgotten air be-
sideaquietpondorevenfashionnew
strains to perform in a 1,200-seat the-
ater.
"You're only as good as your last
hit recording, and that's kind of sad
Dee said during a recent tour stot in
Chicago. "We're talking about some
very, very artistic and proud people
who would not want to go around
with a hat in their hand, looking fov
handouts. I think they deserve a bet-
ter fate
In the dappled light of an ever-
green grove in this western Massa-
chusetts town, organizers hope to
build about 150 apartments as a re-
treatforagingAmericanmusiciansof
all styles�rock 'n' roll, jazz, popular,
American-Indian, classical. Thehous-
ingwillinclude some subsidized space
for musicians who, like band leader
Woody Herman or Supremes singer
Florence Ballard, fell on hard times.
Dee's initial efforts have
crescendoed over the years into the
National Music Foundation, which
moveditsofficesanct $575,000 annual
budget from St Petersburg, Fla to
Lenox in June.
Its ambitious plan for a National
Music Center now encompasses the
retirement home for musicians and
others in the recording or broadcast
irdustries,liveperfovmancesby those
who are still able, a recording studio,
a music library and archive, mentor
programs for young musicians, a
children's division led by entertainer
Shari Lewis and even a museum of
American music.
Organizers bill it as probably the
only place on earth where metal
meister Axl Rose and someone like
the late, mild-mannered Lawrence
Welk could mesh.
"Usually people like one type of
music said Gloria Pennington,
project director. "When you come
here, you'll have an idea of what the
scope of music is
The project has won the financial
support of the recording industry and
some of its luminaries. The
foundation's board of directors, be-
sides Dee, includes country stars
Johnny Cash and Reba McEntire,
trumpeter Herb Alpert, Motown
hitmaker Smokey Robinson, rapper
Hammer and opera singer Jessye
Norman.
"Most everybody says, 'I won-
derwhyittoosolongIguessmostof
us have been too busy making a liv-
ing said Dick Clark, the 63-year-old
entertainer who was the host of the
"American Bandstand" television
show. He acts as board chairman for
the foundation.
There is a precedent for enter-
tainment professionals banding to-
gether to take care of their own. The
Actors'Fundof America, forexample,
runs a retirement home for en tertain-
ersofmeagermeans,indudingactors
and musicians, in Englewood, N.J.
Themusicfoundationpurchased
the Lenox tract, assessed at $4.4 mil-
lion, for $21 millionin June. The prop-
erty already housed 20 buildings, in-
cluding the big theater, a smaller 500-
seat hall, classroom buildings and
dormitories, a Victoriancottage and a
palatial estate fitformemostsybaritic
headmaster.
The foundation quickly began
refurbishing and planning concerts.
oyM
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Promoters would like to complete
construction of the retirement home
in 1995.
The property has had a long and
colorfulhistory. Oncehome toa boy's
school, it was sold to$the foundation
by Jonas and Elizabeth Dovydenas,
whogaineditduringbankruptcypro-
ceedings of a fundamentalist Bible
groupthatranareligjouscollegehere.
Mrs. Dovydenas, heiress to the Day-
ton-Hudson department store for-
tune, won a lawsuit against the Bible
Speaks group, showing it inveigled
her into making $6 million in dona-
tions.
The challenge for foundation
backers now is to secure contribu-
tions frommusiclovers;thecostof the
project hasn't been made public yet.
Highlights Perms Cuts Coloring
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Halloween film takes off
AP�Do you know where holi-
days come from?
Well, you see, there are these
towns
Thanksgjvingtown, Eastertown,
Chris tmastown.
And Halloweentown. A scary,
uglyplacewherecreaturesdriftabout
in misty grays and depressing blacks.
Tim Burton takes us to this cheer-
less but magical burg in his delight-
fully original and extraovdinarally
entertaining "The Nightmare Befove
Christmas
This artistic gem from Walt
Disney's Touchstone Pictures should
become a seasonal classic.
Our hero is Jack Skellington, the
Pumpkin King, who directs the town
in its annual scare fest of ghoulish
delights for Halloween.
But jack is tired of being the
master of fright.
He wanders through the forest
at night and finds a circle of trees
each with a name and door. He's
attracted to the one that says
Christmastown and tumbles into a
snowy wonderland ofbright colovs
and festive joy.
He returns to dreary Hallow-
een town loaded with gifts and
Christmas thoughts and decides
that the next Halloween should be
different: he's going to give his ver-
sion of Christmas, dispensing toys
to all the little boys and girls in the
outside world. Only problem: no
one, including Jack, has the slight-
est notion what Christmas is really
See HALLOWEEN page 20
They must also oftain building
approvals from Lenox, a summer re-
sorttownwithtwinpassionsformusic
and money that it indulges at its cel-
ebrated Tanglewood music festival
and numerous upper-crust inns,
shops and estates.
No Nashville glitter, Las Vegas
neon or Low Angeles high way traffic
for this elite New England commu-
nity, with a permanent population of
5,643 who are a touch wary of what
the music center may bring.
' We're for it because it's going to
bring more tourists to the town resi-
dent Jonas Cabilles said. Then he
added, witharistocratic aplomb, "On
the other hand, touristscanbe annoy-
ing
Sit (Bacl etm
We 're J-Cere!
East Carolina
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October 14, 1993
Affordable camera options
orates
w
City streets
skinn)
t i traffic islands up the avenue
and over to Central Park, Fernando
Botero's chubby bronze sculptures
have arrived.
The 'Botero InNewYorks" how
begins on 54th Street with "Mater-
nity, ' a bis, boulder-like woman hold-
ingacruMonherample lap.She looks
to the left, at the Banco Industrial de
Venezuela Her child stretches his
arms wide, seemingly in embrace of
the MetLife building ahead. The rear
view of "Maternity" is an ample eve-
ful: new mom has a bumper tha t doth
overflow.
All the way up the street, over-
size limbs and solid curvature pre-
vail. Botero's 16 sculptures come to
New York straight from Paris where
they adorned the Champs Erysees.
They are weighty masterpieces, no
doubt aboutit. The work has a mythi-
cal feel to it, suggesting a world that is
beyond ordinary dimensions.
Because Botero's world is over-
flowing wi th fa t people and creatures,
their appearance in this weight-con-
scious country gives them a whimsi-
cal quality, and prompts some to
chuckle.
Don't chuckle too loudlv in the
artist's presence.
You might not associate him right
away with his work. Botero has fierce,
small eyes, a stem little mustache and
bristling gray hair that forms a crown
around an oblong, dark face. He wears
a blue shirt, a red tie and a grav suit
that is definitely size "regular
"At many parties, people have
said, 'Oh, I thoughtyou would bea fat
man the artist says and smiles
briefly.
He is sea ted in a conference room
at the Marlborough Gallerv on East
57th Street. Concurrent with the Park
Avenue exhibit, the gallery is show-
ing more Botero sculptures and an
accompanying show of the artist's
pencil-and-watercolor drawings.
Here, more of the same world is ren-
dered on canvases depicting even-
thing from voluptuous women and
men to a voluptuous pineapple.
"My work is not a social com-
mentary he says, effectivelv silenc-
ing further Waif Questions.
"Yet, yes, there is sometimes a
touch of humor in it. But I think of this
as a little door in an artist's work that
invites the spectator in. It's a way for
the artist to start a dialogue with his
public. Nowadays, there is so little
communication between the two
The plump womenand men that
people Botero's works are not based
on any particular person, he says. "I
don't work with models. Everything
you see comes from my imagination.
Ever since I was little, I have been
preoccupied with volume
Botero was bom 61 years ago in
Medellin, Colombia, and grew up, he
says, "a skinny kid But even in his
earliest paintings, which Botero
showed publicly for the first time at
age 16, his work had an obvious ap-
preciation for voluptuous figures.
Today, Botero says, his apprecia-
tion for econo-size extends into his
personal life only in the sense that "I
haveenormousstudiosin Paris,New
York and Italy. I don't have big furni-
ture, nothing like that he adds with
a laugh "I have a normal wife, nor-
mal kids
Botero says that from conception
to finished project, each of his sculp-
tures takes more than a year to ex-
ecute. A miniature of each is made,
followed by larger-than-life versions
in day, plaster, wax, bronze.
When Botero's world collides
with the Big Apple, starHj
happen. "Adam" and '
for example, stanc
Central Park.
Hotel, Ukey
stare-down i?i;
horse-drawn caf
"Reclining Vef
on Park Avenue wifrt
toward a Mercedes- BenN(
Unfortunately, all but
on "Cat" (1984) have been stolen.
Despite his good humor in ad-
dressing the most obviously whimsi-
cal aspectsofhismasterworks, Botero
adds solemnly: "The work is not
meant to amuse people. I take it very
seriously
ildlife
have a
i photo
b ectsat
Hen ! most amateur
ispiring pros, a camera bag
: costly lenses is probably
out of the question. But there's
hope- AFSI R teleconverters.
1 hese compact accessories,
which usually range in price from
$90 to $250, tit between the cam-
era body and the lens. They in-
crease the focal length of a tele-
photo lens or the zoom range of a
zoom lens � giving you in effect
two lenses in one. For example,
with a 2 teleconverter. a 70-
210mm zoom becomes a 140-
420mm zoom. With a 1.5
teleconverter, a 100mm lens be-
comes a 150mm lens.
Although teleconverters are
not as pricey as telephoto lenses,
there's a price to pay for using
them.
First, you lose f-stops. You
lose one stop with a 1.5X
teleconverter, two stops with a 2X
converter, and four stops with a
3X converter.
As one example, when using
a 2X converter, a 70-210mm f4.5
5.6 zoom becomes a f8-11.2 zoom.
This reduction in light entering
the camera not only produces a
darker viewfinder image but may,
in subdued lighting conditions,
hinder autofocusing � because
most AF SLR cameras are not de-
signed to autofocus with lenses
that have a maximum aperture of
f5.6 or smaller.
So, when using a 2X
teleconverter with a relatively
slow zoom or telephoto lens, vou
may have to focus manually.
What's more, unless you purchase
i known name, you will lose sub
stanrial image quality.
For the highest quality results
look tor a teleconverter with from
five to seven elements. Note that
teleconverters work best on fixed-
focal length lenses because they
!) are traditionally sharper and 2)
have wider apertures than zoom
lenses.
However, name-brand
teleconverters can be used on
zooms with acceptable results. In
addition, you'll probably get the
best image quality with a
teleconverter made specifically
for use with one focal length lens
� as opposed to a teleconverter
that can be used on a variety of
lenses.
Teleconverters are useful ac-
cessories for wildlife, portrait and
sports photography.
They are great for those who
like to travel light as well as for
those on a tight budget. In slide
shows, pictures iaken with a good
teleconverter and good lens will
be hard to tell apart from a picture
taken with a fixed-focal length
lens or zoom lens with the same
effective focal length. The same
holds true for enlargements up to
11x14 inches.
When shooting with a
teleconverter, you may, due to
the reduction in maximum f-stop,
need a faster speed film for a hand-
held exposure.
For example, if you are used
to shooting with ISO 100 film,
you may have to switch to ISO
200, which will give you a faster
shutter speed than ISO film in the
same lighting conditions.
In any case, it is a good idea to
pack a few extra rolls of medium
and fast film just in case the clouds
roll in and it gets a bit darker.
1
The East
Carolinian
is still
accepting
applications
for a book
reviewer-
Fill out an
application
this week
in the
Student
Publications
Building
(across
from
Joyner!)
The East Carolinian19
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October 14, 1993
master explored
eves
varice the . .
daughter: teaching ai
But attcr seven and a nalt years,
Gbrrigan is ready to return to her
old life and with the publication of
"A.Journal tor Christa" (Univer-
sity of Nebraska Press,$22.50),she
sdid she's closing that chapter for
herself.
. "It's tying up the ends for me
he said recently at her home.
Corrigan, a native of Water-
bi)ry, Conn is a handsome, sil-
ver-haired woman.
She won't d isclose her age and
her dignified bearing discourages
a reporter from pressing the issue.
Her walls are filled with photo-
graphs of her five children, seven
grandchildren and her husband,
Ed, who died in 1990.
Ask her a bout the schools built
in McAuliffe's memory, the
Christa McAuliffe Center at
Framingham State College, about
20 miles west of Boston, or her
' � 'i - role in
sion and she
re the subject,
feel comfortable
: lw� Uing on it and
make any state-
: she said. "But I
- � � � al feel that it could have
�.ided
I he book is effectively a fam-
il scrapbook, a mother's collec-
tion of verbal snapshots of
McAuliffe's life and the tributes
she received posthumously.
There's Christa as a Girl Scout.
Here she is lovingly tending her
four younger siblings. There are
some letters she wrote from camp.
Here she is marrying her child-
hood sweetheart. The book could
make "Ozzie and Harriet" seem
like "Dynasty'Corrigan said she
wrote it because McAuliffe always
wished her mother had kept a jour-
nal. Some of the book's proceeds
would be used for improving edu-
cation, she said.
"I see it as my doing for Christa
what I think she would like me to
do and that would be the end of
it Corrigan said. "I kind of feel
I've done the job that she would
have wanted me to have completed
for her
There will
be a very
important
editorial
board
meeting
today.
Please be
thereat
4:50. Love,
your
Managing
Editor.
HALLOWEEN
about.
Thewhole town tumsoutto help
make their "Christmas
There'sthemayor,acrearurevvho
wears two faces and is given such
lines as "I'm only an elected official; I
can't make decisions by myself
There's also Sally, a rag doll cre-
ated by a mad scientist who's con-
fined to a wheelchair.
Sally, sensitive and caring, is in
love with Jack. She also has a ten-
dency to see into the future and she
doesn't like what she sees for
Halloweentown's Christmas.
Tilings really begin to fall apart
when the local ghouls make their own
version of toys, and Santa Claus is
kidnapped.
Burtonhas created some unusual
characters, and a multi-racial world.
It is rare in animated features that
blacks, Asians and Indians are ac-
knowledged.
Hispuppetcharactersmovevvith
a range that's almost lifelike. Jack
might be a skeleton, but he has ail the
graceofFredAstaire,andSally'sgams
could make her a pin-up girl. The evil
Oogje Boogme is an incredible cre-
ation who does an ultraviolet song
sequence and unravels to reveal a
nest of maggots.
FJfman provides. Jack's singing
voice, while Chris Sarandon does the
speaking voice. Catherine O'Hara is
Sail v as well as a ghoul named Shock;
Broadway's Ken Page is Oogie
Boogme; Paul Reubens (Pee-wee
Continued from page 18
Herman) is Lock; and Wiliiam
Hiekey provides the voice fov the
mad scientist.Henry Selick, a former
Disney animator, makes his fea-
ture film directing debut.
The Nightmare BeforeChrist-
mas' is rated PG but might be too
scary for children four and under.
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October 14, 1993
The East Carolinian 21
Continued from page 15
ft"
u;
Answer: A positive TB test
does not mean that you are conta-
gious. You have to have an active
infection to spread the germs to
others.
Question: What happens if a
� f you have a posi-
( hest x-ray will be
-1 sure that you do not
.i tuberculosis. If vou
ider the age of 35 and have
a positive IB skin test, a drug
called (soniazid (1NH) may be pre-
scribed as a preventative measure
for six to 12 months.
A positive TB test remains
positive for the rest of your life
unless vou develop an illness that
would depress your immunity-
Question: Is it important to
LOVE
be tested for TB7
Answer: It is important to be
tested for TB, especially if you
live in Pitt County. Pitt had the
third highest number of TB cases
in North Carolina in 1992. Active
TB is potentially fatal.
Question: What are the symp-
toms of active TB?
Answer: Usually people with
an active TB infection experience
one or more of the following
symptoms:
- Productive cough lasting
more than one month that does
Continued from page 15
not respond to antibiotics
- Bloody sputum
- Loss of appetite
- Weight loss
- Night sweats
- Unusual fatigue
- Fever lasting more than one
month
- Localized swelling
ECU Student Health Service
will be sponsoring a free screen-
ing for TB on Friday, Oct. 5 from
10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. in the
Student Store area.
in Patch at Green Market
also New
Crop Apples
Indian Corn
and Gourds
1534 L 14th St 757-3311
located Behind the Amoco Station
3am-6:30pm
Mon-Sat
Family. Sonnefeld started out in Hol-
lywood as a cinematographer and
proves again in For Love or Money
that he has an eye for interesting
shots. Bestknown as thecinema tog-
rapher for the Coen brother's first
three films, Blood Simple, Raising
Arizona, and Miller's Crossing,
Sonnefeld knows how to catch the
viewer's eye. Whether he shoots the
city from high above it or winds the
camera through the narrow, dark
passageways of the hotel, Sonnefeld
constantlv angles thecamera tocatch
interesting nuances of the people
and scenery.
Unfortunately Sonnefeld tells a
disjointed tale in For Love or Money,
just as he did in The Addams Family.
The latter film seemed more like a
compilation of short skits than a
cohesive motion picture. Perhaps
Sonnefeld will learn to be a story-
teller and will thus a ugment his abil-
ity with the camera. If he does, he
could become a first-rate director.
TEAM
Besides Fox, the one bright spot
in this cast is Gabrielle Anwar. Her
Andy is disarmingly sweet with
plenty of spunk.
As much as I want to like
Michael J. Fox's pictures, something
always sabotages them. It's usually
the script. Both Life with Mikey, Fox's
summer film, and For Lave or Money
provide simple but fleeting plea-
sures.
On a scale of one to 10, For Love
or Money rates a six.
Continued from page 15
georges
hair designs
they were drilled on surveying
and mapping techniques on a 18th
century British shipwreck.
Watts is considered one of
North Carolina's most experi-
enced underwater archeologists.
In the 1970s he was on the team
which discovered The U.S.S. Moni-
tor off the coast of North Caro-
lina.
This summer Watts worked
in France with an international
research team that aided in exca-
vating The C.S.S. Alabama. This
Confederatebattleship sank in the
English Channel in 1864 after a
heated battle with The U.S.S.
Kearsarge.
But pertaining to the current
study, Watts said, "The team will
survey the famous Tecumseh. Most
of its hull is hidden by mud and
silt. The divers will record the
exposed area and determine the
amount of deterioration
Jeff Morris of Columbia, MD
Tim Hastings of Wilson, Ted
Dunlap of Greenville, Steve Giv-
Breed
13!
Friday night
Brad, Clay,
Lee, and Jason,
will play
O'Rocks with
81 Mulberry.
Come support
local talent!
Great picture
guys (freshman
year!)
Photo courtesy of
Jill Cherry
Indian Trails
Golf&
Country Club
ECU Student Rate
play all day $10.��
Weekday Rates
Monday - Friday Green Fee & $18.d0
Saturday - Sunday
Cart
Weekend Rates
Green Fee &
Cart
s23
00
Open' To The Public
Jam Until Dusk
Call For Tee Times
Saturday & Sunday
919-524-5485
ECU Student Discount With ID
$1.00 OffWeekday
$2.00 Off Weekends
IS Halts To Qualify For Discount.
ens of Lynchburg, Va. and Lex
Turner of Raleigh are the five stu-
dents involved in the study.
Jon Morris of the University
of Florida, and Bob Holcombe of
the Confederate Naval Museum
in Columbus, Ga. are also in-
volved in the project.
They are graduates from
ECU's Maritime History and Nau-
tical Archaeology program.
r
Get Ready For Homecoming
Treat yourself to lots of great
looks this fall with:
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Saturday 9am-6pm
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Mon-Fri 9am-8pm
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$2.00 OFF j $5.00 OFF
All Services
expires Oct. 28,1993
Perms, Highlights, or Tanning Package
expires Oct. 28, 1993
BIG SPLASH
"N
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IHAMSHank's Homemade Ice Cream 316 East 10th Street within walking distance from ECU 758-0000 BUY ONE-GET ONE FREE Mini-Sundae Expires 101593 Limit 1 per customer. Not mid with any other promotion.

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After the game enjoy only the best for dinner!
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vr- &&� ��' y;gwtM-ww:





The East Carolinian
mm
Sports
October 14. 1993
What's On Tap
Thursday, Oct. 14
Soccer, home
Methodist Col i m.
Friday, Oct. 15
Volleyball, home
Virginia Commonwealth, 7 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 16
FOOTBALL. HOMECOMING
Louisiana Tech 2 p.m.
Cross Country, away
at N.C. Collegiate Champion-
ships, Cullowhee, N.C. TBA
Monday, Oct. 18
Soccer, home
Elon College, 4 p.m.
The 411
Friday, Oct. 8
Volleyball. ECU Inv. Tourn.
lost to Charlston 9-15,15-9,11-15,
3-15. Beat TennChattanooga 16-
14,15-3,15-4
Saturday, Oct. 9
Football, away
lost to South Carolina 27-3
Volleyball. ECU Inv. Toum .(8-
151
Beat Campbell 15-13,15-6,15-7.
beat Loyola 15-11,15-17,15-9,15-
13. Placed second overall.
Soccer, away
lost to Campbell 5-2,20T
Please .No Wagering
Robert Todd, 25 points
TEC Sports Editor
ECU3, 13-10
"Chad Holcomb puts two
through and Junior Smith finds
theendzoneonce. Lef sgoPhils
Brian Olson, 31 points
TEC Assistant Sports Editor
ECU10,20-10
"ECUsdefensecontinues to
mature under new defensive
coordinator, Larry Coyer. The
offense picks up a little behind
Junior Smith
Kevin Hall, 25 points
WZMB Sports Director
ECU17,24-7
"This game could not come
at a better time for ECU. The
Pirates should roll
Brian Bailey, 20 points
WNCT-TV Sports Director
ECU7,24-17
"Pirates winitwith defense.
A late Morris Foreman fumble
recovery sets up the game win-
ner
Chris Justice, 31 points
WCTI-TV Sports Director
ECU5,20-15
"Junior Smith has to play
big to take pressure off Perez
Mattison
Brad Zaruba, 23 points
WITN-TV Sports Director
ECU7,21-14
"Surging defense motivates
offense to success
Demetrius Carter, 15
points
ABLE President
ECU7,35-28
"Hopefully ECU can gain
some redemption and watch out
for No. 25, Derrick Batson
Mo' Rich, suest picker
Assistant News Editor
Tech 3,67-64
"Blah, blah, blah, blah
Five points are awarded for
choosing the winner and an
additional three points are
given to the person closest to
the spread (the person clos-
est to the combined score of
both teams settles ties).
Compiled by Brian Olson
Bucs prepare for 'Dogs
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
This year's homecomingcould
not have come at more opportune
time for ECU � a win may help
savage a potentially dismal season.
The rest of this season's schedule
only gets harder and the Bucs will
sail into Ficklen Stadium Saturday
with a 1-4 mark. The struggling
offense has been locked up and has
not passed 'GO' since the loss of
starting quarterback Marcus
Crandell. Lastweek the Pirates saw
their two-game win streak over
South Carolina snapped, 27-3.
The bright spot for ECU is the
improved defense under new de-
fensive coordinator Larry Coyer.
The defense has shown a much-
improved ability to stop the run.
Five games into this season, the
defense has only allowed 134.4
yards per game on the ground, a
vast improvement on last year's
total of 253.4 per game. ECU's de-
fense has not had such success
stopping opposing runners since
1983 and Tech's offense is nothing
to write home to mom about.
The Bulldogs have used three
quarterbacks this year and none
have thrown for a TD. Jason Martin
has been their best signal caller,
going26of55 for 334 yards. Aaron
Ferguson has continued to search
for success after last season's disap-
pointment and will likely share
some time with Martin.
Tech departed with 18
lettermen from the offense last sea-
son, including offensive lineman
Willie Roaf. He was selected eighth
overall by the New Orleans Saints.
Techalsolosttheiroffensivecoordi-
nator,PatTilley.
The weak offensive line for
Bulldogs has not cleared the big
holes Roaf made last season for the
running game. LTU's main running
back to watch is Jason Cooper. He is
averaging 3.8 yards a carry and has
a total of 211 yards through four
games.
Defensive troubles are every-
where for Louisiana Tech. Oppo-
nents have barreled through the
young defense gaining 781 yards
over four games. They are allowing
an average of 4.6 yards per carry.
This could be the ingredient the
Pirates are looking for to take pres-
sure off the struggling passing of-
fense. The Bulldogs lost eight start-
ers from a defense that held oppo-
nents under 17 points nine times in
'92. National Champion Alabama
managed only 13 points against the
Bulldogs.
ECU runningbackjunior Smith
is running well for the Bucs. He has
gained 627 yards rushing and is
averaging 4.86 yards per carry. He
also has five TDs. Look for him to
have another big day against the
Bulldogs.
This week i t appears that Perez
Mattison will get the starting call
from coach Steve Logan at quarter-
back. The freshman has struggled
sofar,going8ofl7for67yardswith
four interceptions and no TDs. Last
week's starter Chris Hester will sit
because of reported injuries. The
offensive line must give Mattison a
chance to throw the ball and protect
him from injury.
The offensive line will miss
Derrick Leaphart and Terry
Tilgham, who have been out since
the Washington game and will re-
main out for the year. Linebacker
Mark Libiano,defensive back Hank
Cooper and half-back Greg Hoyd
are day-to-day.
The last time ECU played Loui-
siana Tech (1990), the Pirates won
27-17. The previous season Tech
forced a tie, 29-29, on a field goal
withl6secondsleft.Later,thegame
was forfeited by Louisiana Tech for
using an ineligible player.
Also, both teams faced off in the
1978 Independence Bowl in Shreve-
port, La. The Bucs won 35-13 and
held the Bulldogs to 12 yards rush-
ing.
File Photo
East Carolina's swim teams are looking forward to another banner year. Head Coach Rick Kobe
expects to improve on last season's 10-2 record.
Swim teams set for season
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
One of the most successful athletic pro-
grams here at East Carolina is swimming. Rick
Kobe, entering his 12th season as head coach
of the swimming teams, is looking to continue
that success in the upcoming 1993-1994 sea-
son.
The Pirates are coming into this season off
a 10-2 record from last year. Both the men's
and women's teams finished in third place at
the CAA championships
held in Wilmington. ECU
combined to break 21 var-
sity and freshman records
as a team.
"We have a better team
mis year than last and we
are definitely looking to
break more records Kobe
said. "We want to move up
in the championship meet
and I feel like we have the
team to do it. Our strong
point is depth, along with
specialized talent. That's
what it takes to win meets
and championships
Winning the CAA
won't be easy for Kobe and
his swimmers. ECU brings
in a team with only two se-
nior girls and five senior
guys. The rest of the team is
made up of mostly very
young swimmers. Don't
worry though, because Kobe has recruited a
very talented group of first year swimmers.
The talentof the freshman swimmerscame
through on Oct. 5, when ECU held its annual
Pentathlon meet. The meet consists of all the
Pirate swimmers-competing in five different
events, scoring points for their overall perfor-
mance on the day. And what a day it was.
Sophomore Jackie Schieder set a new point
total record for the women and also set a Pentathlon
meet record in the 200 individual medley with a
2:15.08 time. Other records broken from the meet
were freshmen Melissa Phillips 100 Fly time 1:01.73
and Lesley Hawleys 100 backstroke time of 1:02.27.
Other strong performances from the women were
put out by freshmen Christy Winn, Ellen Howard,
Beth Browne, Elizabeth Bradnor and Meg Watson.
Sophomores Beth Humphrey and Rachel Atkinson
also turned out good scores.
On the guys side, it was sophomore David
Benson leading the way. Freshman Chris Bembenek
also had a good out-
ing, breaking a pen-
tathlon record with
a 54.73 time in the
100 backstroke. Se-
niors Carlos Ochoa
and Ben Soltz, came
in third and fourth
place, respectively.
Freshmen Brian
Wall, Alan Pritchett,
Ryan Barlow and
Erik Griffin also ac-
cumulated impres-
sive scores on the
day.
The Pirates obvi-
ously have a tough
road infrontof them.
The men are looking
to win their third
conference champi-
onship, while the
women are still
working on winning
their first. The Dukes of James Madison University
are going to be tough in defending their CAA crown,
but the tradition of ECU swimming is a strong
motivator in continuing future success.
East Carolina will hold the Purple-Gold meet
on Tuesday, Oct. 19. The team will be divided
equally and will compete against each other at the
Minges Aquatic Center. The Pirates first opponent
will be Virginia Tech on Oct. 30.
Rick Kobe
Q and A with
Tech's Joe Peace
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Louisiana Tech coach Joe
Raymond Peace is a perfect ex-
ample of someone who is carry-
ing the weight of the world on
his shoulders. After completion
of a 5-6 record in his fifth year as
head coach of the Bulldogs, Peace
is faced with the task of bringing
his program past
the .500 mark
this year despite
returning only
five starters
from a decep-
tively good unit.
The Bulldogs
may have had
more losses than
wins last year,
but those defeats
came at the
hands of some of
the nation's elite
program The
unit fell to na-
tional champion
Alabama by
only 13 points
and lost to pow-
erful Southern
Mississippi by
only a field goal.
Now as this season begins,
Peace finds himself in a rebuild-
ing process once again. As he
prepares to make a trip to Ficklen
stadium to face the struggling
Pirates, he talked about what his
job was like.
Q: What is the most frustrat-
ing aspect 6f your job?
A: I'd have to say that all the
Joe Peace
things you are looking at in the
future of Division I football,
the cuts that will be made on
programs and such. It's really a
tough league to play in.
Q: As a nineteen year vet-
eran of college coaching, you
have seen a great many players
come and go. How do the play-
ers of the 90s differ from those
you coached at the beginning
of your ca-
reer?
A: It's a
lot different
today. I think
that these
players are a
reflection of
our society in
general. I
think the so-
ciety plays a
big part in
how they do.
You have a lot
more kids
from broken
homes today.
When I
started, about
all you had to
do was be a
football
coach. These days, you have to
be a coach, a father, a discipli-
narian and a psychologist. You
have to be all of these things all
wrapped up in one.
Q: Coach, last year your
team was plagued by a number
of close losses, where you just
couldn't seem to win the game.
See PEACE page 27
Location: Ruston, La.T
Enrollment: 10308
Conference: Big WestTE?
Stadium: Joe Aillet (30,200)IB
Surface:Natural Grass
1992 record: 5-6c
Primaryoff: Multiple, Pro-I
Primarydef: 4-3H
Colors: Blue and Red
Nickname: Bulldogs
1993 Schedule (1-3)
Sept 4lost to Tennessee, 0-50
Sept 18lost to So. Carolina, 3-341
Sept 25lost to Alabama, 3-56
Oct. 2def. Arkansas St 17-3N
Oct23at San Jose St.
Oct30NORTHERN ILL.
Nov. 6UNLVp?
Nov. 13at Utah Str
Nov. 20CENTRAL FLORIDA�
Nov. 27at SW Louisiana
Graphic by Brian Olson
Hadelman holds high hopes
By Ashley Neal
Staff Writer
Unity and a good coach are
important characteristics for a
team to possess. Accord ing to Lisa
Hadelman, ECU's women's ten-
nis team has both. Hadelman, a
sophomore, is beginning her sec-
ond season with
the Lady Pirates
this year.
"He's
Coach Farfour
such a good
player
Hadelman said.
"Last year he
took us from a
losing record in
the fall to a win-
ning record in
the spring
A Roswell,
Georgia native,
Hadelman is a
long way from
home. She de-
cided to attend
ECU because of
her brother and the medical school.
Hadelman's brother came to ECU
on a golf scholarship and said he
loved it in Greenville. The medi-
cal school contributed to
Hadelman's decision because she
Lisa Hadelman
is a nursing major.
In high school, a fractured
ankle forced her to sit out for a
year and a half. She has made up
for lost time since then by teach-
ing lessons during the summer
months.Onceshehascompleted
her education and is a registered
nurse, Hadelman says she wou Id
enjoy teaching
private lessons
at a club.
For
Hadelman,
finding time to
study last year
was the biggest
adjustment she
had to make as
a freshman. Be-
cause she bal-
anced academ-
ics and athlet-
ics in high
school,
Hadelman
thought the
routine would
be similar in
college.
"In college you have tostudy
so much more and people al-
ways want you to go out
HadelmansaidIwasn'tready
See HADELMAN page 27

����1J urn
- �





October 14, 1993
The East Carolinian 23
Prep
4-A
I Pirates pounded by 'Cocks
J Durham (6-0) defeated
Durham Jordan 40-7
2. W. Charlotte (6-0) defeated
Charlotte Myers Park 34-7
3. Scotland (7-0) defeated
Lumberton 46-22
4. Greensboro Page (7-0) de-
feated Greensboro Smith 41-0
5. Durham Hillside (6-0) de-
feated Chapel Hill 38-33
6. Gamer (5-1) defeated Apex
35-7
7. E. Wake (6-0) defeated Tri-
ton 10-8
8.Winston-SalemReynolds(7-
0) defeated W. Forsyth 13-7
9. Kinston (6-0) defeated N.
Nash 20-17
10. Triton (5-1) lost to E. Wake
10-8
3-A
1. Reidsville (6-0) defeated NE
Guilford 1443
2. Hertford Co. (6-0) defeated
5. Nash 63-14
3. High Point Andrews (5-1)
did not play
4. E. Rutherford (6-1) lost to
Bums 21-0
5.Tarboro(5-l)defeated Bertie
35-7
6. Kannapolis Brown (5-1) de-
feated E. Rowan 42-0
7. South Point (6-1) defeated
Kings Mountain 34-0
8. Wilson Hunt (5-1) defeated
Wilson Fike 27-7
9. W. Iredell (643) defeated N.
Iredeli 10-7
10. Asheville (4-1) defeated
Enkal3-9
2-A
1. Burlington Cumrnings (6-0)
defeated E. Guilford 40-12
2.Ayden-Grifton(6-0)defeated
Northside 28-12
3. Clinton (6-0)defeated James
Kenan 21-0
4. Farmville Central (6-0) de-
feated Greene Central 14-13
5. Warren Co. (7-0) defeated
No.9Louisburg36-0
6. Randleman (6-0) defeated
Pittsboro Northwood 54-20
7. Bunn (6-0) defeated Clayton
28-21
8. Maiden (4-1) defeated Bun-
ker Hill 49-14
9. Louisburg (5-2) lost to No. 5
Warren Co. 36-0
10. (tie) Mooresville (6-0) de-
feated St. Stephens 31-13
10. (tie) Lincolnton (4-2) de-
feated Char Catholic 49-28
1-A
1. Robbinsville (6-0) defeated
Murphy 1443
2. Roanoke (6-0) defeated
Mattamuskeet63-0
3. SW Onslow (6-0) defeated
Topsail 28-0
4. N. Edgecombe (6-0) defeated
Creswell 46-8
5. Hobbton (6-0) did not play
6. Lakewood (7-0) defeated N.
Duplin 48-15
7. Rosman (5-1) defeated
Andrews 38-27
8. Mt Airy (5-1) defeated Surry
Central 34-6
9. Swain Co. (3-3) lost to No. 10
Hayesville35-7
10. Hayesville (5-1) defeated
No. 9 Swain Co. 35-7
Graphic by Brian Olson
Soccer
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) �
Sou th Carolina reservequarterback
Flake Williamson couldn't figure
out why he wasn't playing much
k r the Gamecocks.
Once he got in, though, East
Carolina couldn't figure out a way
to stop him.
Wil liamson, who relieved Steve
Taneyhill in bth halves Saturday,
threw a touchdown pass and led a
second scoring drive in the Game-
cocks'27-3ictoryagainstEastCaro-
lina.
The redshirt sophomore
learned Thursday that he'd play.
Before Saturday, he hadn't spent
much time on the field for South
Carolina (3-3), although he com-
pleted the only two passes he threw
this season.
But when he came on with 8:27
left in the half and South Carolina
up 7-0,62307 fans roared with ap-
proval.
He quickly justified their faith,
hittingTerrell Harriswitha 17-yard
TD pass in the right comer of the
end zone.
"I don't know, for some reason
they like mea lot said Williamson,
whoalso guided a seven-play drive
in the fourth quarter that ended on
ReedMorton's20-yardfieldgoall
welcome that and certainly the
cheers get louder if you play well
Williamson has heard those
cheers a lot, but from the sidelines,
watching Taneyhill restore life to a
team that began the 1992 season 0-5.
The backup is certain he too can be
partoftheGamecocks'revitalization.
Tmalwaysdisappointed when
1 don't play because I know 1 can do
something when I get in there
Williamson said. "I try not to let that
get to me
The two quarterbacks comple-
ment each other well, said running
back Brandon Bennett, who gained
102 yards rushing to go past the 100-
yard mark for the fourth time this
season.
"Steve is move of a big-play guy,
while Blakecan picka teamaparthe
said. "I feel comfortable with both of
them in the game
Williamson finished 4 of 7 for 90
yards. Taneyhill, who threw a 6-yard
touchdown pass to Chris Alford in
the third quarter, was 9 of 16 for 69
yards and got sacked twice.
ButSouth Carolina coachSparky
Woodsqukklymadeitclear Taneyhill
� who didn't stick around to com-
ment after the game � would keep
the starting job he's held the last 12
games.
"Steve's our quarterback he
said. "I'd been disappointed we
hadn'tbeenabletogetBlake in before
and demonstrate he is a good quar-
terback
South Carolina'sdefense, which
had failed to demonstrate its skills
effectively this season, limited East
Carolina to 236 total yards and a 25-
yard field goal by Chad Holcomb in
the second quarter.
Junior Smii gained 135 yards
rushing for the Pirates (1-4), who've
been outscored 137-32 in their four
losses.
"I've never been in a coaching
situation like this before East Caro-
lina coach Steve Logan said. 'Teach,
teach, teach, that's all we're doing.
We have the talent on this team to
play better,it'sjustamatter of putting
it all together
The Gamecocks, who lost 20-18
to the Pirates a year ago when Marty
Simpson missed a pair of field goals
in the final seconds, took advantage
of East Carolina's poor punting to
build a 14-7 half-time lead.
Comerback Frank Adams got a
piece of Bill Wilson's punt in the first
quarter. Joe Troupe caught the ball
overhisbackand returned it40yards
for a touchdown.
"It was planned all week said
Adams,whocameinuntouched from
Wilson's left side. "What they were
doingisjustlettingtheguy run. When
I saw that on film, I said 'Yeah, I'm
going to block a punt
In the second quarter, Toby
Cates returned another short punt
20 yards to East Carolina's 19, lead-
ing to Williamson's touchdown
throw
Linebacker Mike Landry set up
South Carolina's third touchdown,
intercepng�passby freshman Chris
Hester and retumingit 12yardstothe
Pirates'11.
RALEIGH (AP) �
Following are the North
Carolina Soccer
Coaches Association
high school polls for
North Carolina:
4-A
1. GreensboroGrimsley
2. N. Durham
3. Raleigh Millbrook
4. Raleigh Athens
5. Apex
6. New Bern
7. Greensboro Page
8. Raleigh Broughton
9. Charlotte
Myers Park
10. Raleigh Enloe
3-A, 2-A, 1-A, Ind.
1. Burlington Williams
2. Charlotte Providence
Day
S.Jamestown Ragsdale
4. Harnett Central
5.WakeForest-Rolesville
6. Hickory
7. SE Guilford
8.SouthernPines O'Neal
9. South Point
10. Wilkes Central
Graphic by Brian Olson
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1
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October 14, 1993
an guarding lives and line
chcx
i two-sport
,eamingone
I
�Kill
and two in base-
balmanningfirst
vise for the Pan-
thers' diamond
squad. Coleman
Ixis East Caro-
lina over Olefvliss
! iecaushealvva's
waited to attend
.liege in North
Carolina and
East Carolina has
great aimpus
Coleman
aimesfrornavery
athletic family;his
father played bas-
ketballfortheUni-
versity of Con-
necticut and his
sister plays fast-pitch softball ata Mi-
ami-area college.
Coleman spent the 1989 season
as a redshirt freshman, then spent
199(1 backing up the offensive tackle
position, although he did not see any
action because of injuries that he
sustained in spring practice.
During the Peach Bowl season of
1991, Coleman switched from offen-
sive tackle to offensive guard and
started three games, including the
tCU-Illinoismatchup,theonlygame
thatstood in thewayofaPirate unde-
feated season.
Last season Coleman backed up
man at left guard and
. games, starting one,
u isasStateonSeniorDa),
)ntj 111 ns e LineCoach
Klzinski described Coleman
as a h nigh bl ue-colla r oerachieer
w no would rune been a three-year
sUtrter for us ifhe had stayed healthy
and avoided injury.
HehasaUthetolentintheworld,
he just needs to stay consistent with
his play
Coleman
won the Eric
AndolsekAward
this year, given to
theoffensiveline-
manwiththebest
performancedur-
ing spring prac-
tice. The award is
given in memory
of the late Detroit
Lions offensive
lineman, whom
Jagodzinski
coached in high
school.
Coleman
said that he bases
his game play on
Andolsek's, say-
ing that the way that he played
motivates me. We watch a highlight
fil m of his career during practice and
that always gets me up
Coleman spent lastyear backing
upTilghman,butsaid itwasworthit.
"I got to watch the way he
workedatleftguard,aposition where
you have to use your strengths to
combat your weaknesses, especially
whenyou areundersized,compared
to me defensive 1 ineman ratingyou
he said.
Coleman said that his strengths
arehavingquickfeetand beingquick
off the ball. "I can use my speed toget
Tom Coleman
in the right spot quickly and easily
take away my opponent's size ad-
vantage.
Off the field, Coleman spends
his time on the salty decks of fishing
and dive boats. He is also a certified
lifeguaai and he recalled a time when
these two hobbies took a part in the
duration of one boat trip.
"We were out on a dive from
Morehead City and had abouta two
and-a-halfhourboatrideColeman
said. "About two hours out a man
started convulsingand then stopped
moving.Thecaptain called theCoast
Guard while I and another woman
on the boat administered CPR to the
man and revived him. It was a scary
situation. Wehad to turnaround and
go back, so wedidn'tgettodive that
day
During his younger days while
living in Florida, Coleman assisted
in the rescue of two young swim-
mers swept out while playing at the
beach.
After graduation, where he will
receive a degree in Health Fitness,
Coleman wants to return to Miami
and get a job asan assistant physical
therapistandeventuallyownhisown
fishingboat. He said that it would be
great to receive attention from a pro-
fessional team but realistically
I'm looking at all my options
Coleman has a few rituals that
he and teammates follow. During
the 1991 season, the Pirates would
keep the list of plays in Mike
McCalop'slockerbeforegamesWe
kept winning, so we kept doing it
said Coleman.
Last season whenever the Pi-
rates were playing away games, he
and roommate Terry Tilghman
would always split a bag of Sun
Chipsand Kool-Aid thenightbefore
at the hotel.
Barkley hurts back during practice
Last year's MVP may need
surgery at some point
Hound Dogs named
mascot in Memphis
MEMPHIS, Term. (AP) � If
NFL fansin Memphis get torootfor
a hometown team, they'll be shout-
ing for the "Hound Dogs
William B.Dunavant, leader of
a Memphis group seeking to buy a
National Football League expan-
sion franchise, announced the name
for his hoped-for team Monday
night.
Business groups in Charlotte,
baltimore, St. Louis and Jackson-
ville, Fla also are in the competi-
tion for two expansion franchises.
Dunavant also said the Hound
Dogs would be coached by Pepper
Rodgers, former coach of the Mem-
phisShowboatsof the now-defunct
United States Football League.
"We're going to be bloodhound
dogs Dunavant told a sports
booster club. "We're going to be
mean, ugly, dirty, nasty, blood-
hound hound dogs
Dunavant said Steve Ehrhart,
former president of the Showboats,
would hold thatsame position with
the Hound Dogs.
Rodgers coached the Show-
boats for their two seasons in Mem-
phis, 1984 and 1985. Dunavant, a
Memphis cotton merchant, owned
the team.
AftertheUSFLfolded,Rodgers
went to work for Federal Express
founder Frederick W. Smith, who
was trying to buy an NFL franchise.
Dunavant took over as leader
of that effort in 1991. Smith is an
investor in Dunavant's group.
The Elvis Presley estate also is
an investor and Dunavant said the
team's name would link the fran-
chise to Presley to aid in promo-
tions and souvenir sales.
One of Presley biggest early
hits relied on the refrain "you ain't
nothing but a hound dog
Presley died at his Memphis
residence, Graceland, in 1977.
Rodgers, who serves as a
spokesman and adviser for
Dunavant, isa former head coachat
the University of Kansas, UCLA
and Georgia Tech, his alma mater.
The NFL is expected to decide
by the end of the month where it
will put two expansion teams.
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FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) -
Despite a medical finding that fa-
tigue caused his collapse the sec-
ond day of training camp, Charles
Barkley is convinced he'll need
back surgery someday.
Barkley, who plans to play two
more seasons, said team physician
Richard Emerson approved his
plan to put off the operation until
retirement.
"I don't think I could take a
year out of my life � not at 30
Barkley said Monday after the 140-
mile drive from Phoenix to Flag-
staff.
"I look at how it affected Larry
Bird, who's a friend of mine and I
can't close it like that Barkley
continued.
Bird had back surgery in June
1991 and his production for the
Boston Celticsdropped sharply the
final year of his career.
Earlier Monday, Emerson in-
jected radioactive ink into Barkley
in the last of a cluster of diagnostic
techniques. Then he cleared
Barkley's return to the team.
On Sunday, the tests included
magnetic resonance imaging, a
CAT-scan and neurological proce-
dures.
Barkley restricted himself
Monday night to rid ing an exercise
bicycle, stretching, running and
shooting baskets. He said he would
not scrimmage or participate in
drills "for a couple of days
However, Suns trainer Joe
Proski and coach Paul Westphal
wouldn't rule out Barkley's par-
ticipation Friday night in the team's
first exhibition game, at home
against Golden State.
"It will be interesting to see
how he feels tomorrow after what
he did tonight Proski said.
Westphal said Barkley might
play a few minutes against the
Warriors.
"I'm just trying to get him
ready for the first game and if he's
not ready for the first game, I just
want him ready for the playoffs
Westphal said. "I'm not going to
rush him back into things at all
Westphal joked about the
value of Barkley, who helped him
set a first-year coaching record wi th
62 victories.
"I was kind of looking for-
ward to coaching without him on
the team Westphal said. "The
guy's a pain. You know, he doesn't
practice very hard and he talks too
much. I'm not sure he's an asset
The examinations were or-
dered after Barkley experienced
numbness in his left leg and
sprawled full-length following a
spirited scrimmage and wind
sprints Saturday night. He spent
30 minutes on the floor, partly
because Emerson had left the
Northern Arizona University cam-
pus.
A bulging disk in Barkley's
back � first detected in August�
was suspected, but Emerson said
the numbness wascaused by "mus-
cular and respiratory fatigue
"The tests reveal the disk is
notherniated and there isnonerve
injury Emerson said in a state-
ment.
Headdedthaf'thickeningof
the soft tissue and ligament
around the nerve canal of the
lower left lumbar nerve" occa-
sionally puts pressure on the
nerve, causing pain.
But Barkley said Emerson
told him surgery wasn't needed
as long as he could play through
the pain. Treatment will bea vari-
ety of stretching exercises, soft
tissue treatments, occasional anti-
inflammatory medication and a
controlled practice schedule.
Olsoift Trivial Quiz
Q: How long has it
been since the Phil.
Phillies won the
World Series?
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October 14. 1993
The East Carolinian 25
Gill is no fish out of water in Seattle
ing the
freshest fao
Kendall Gill, who comes to
after a brief and
unful filling ten ure with the Char-
lotte Hornets, is looking to be one
of the Sonics' key players. But the
25-year-old Gill won't say why
he left the up-and-coming Hor-
nets.
In Charlotte, Gill was charac-
terized as a malcontent who
didn't want to play second fiddle
to Larry Johnson or Alonzo
Mourning. There was also talk
that he was unhappy playing for
coach Allan Bristow.
Gil I a lso wanted more money
in Charlotte. He had an option to
become a restricted free agent af-
ter last season and was interested
in testing his market value.
But Gill's lips are sealed on
the exact reasons for his depar-
ture. The Sonics are his team now
and, as far as he's concerned, it's
all working out pretty well in Se-
attle.
"Don't I look happy?" he
asked.
And why shouldn't he? Gill
signed a seven-year guaranteed
$26.6 million contract that was
orchestrated by the Sonics to fit
under their salary cap.
The Sonics sent Eddie
Johnson and Dana Barrow, two
players who didn't fit their plans,
I "hariotte in exchange for him.
I he Sonics also gave the Hornets
the right to switch first-round
picks in the 1994 NBA draft.
The Sonics think the trade
puts them closer to supplanting
three-time NBA champion Chi-
cago.
Gill knows he won't be the
main man with the Sonics.
All-Star Shawn Kemp is the
No. 1 player in Seattle. And there
area lot of other key men such as
Gary Payton, Derrick McKey,
Ricky Pierce and Sam Perkins.
But that's not an issue, Gill
says. He just wants to do every-
thing he can to help the Sonics
win an NBA championship.
"I want to be here he said.
"I want to finish my career here
The Sonics have created a
starting job for Gill by moving
Pierce into a sixth-man role. It
wasa role Pierce filled effectively
in Milwaukee before coming to
Seattle.
So the 6-foot-5 Gill will start
in Seattle's backcourt at of f guard
opposite point guard Gary
Payton.
Sonics coach George Karl
doesn't think he'll ha veany prob-
lems coaching Gill.
"I like Kendall Karl said. "I
think he's a good person and I
thinkhe'sa helluva player. I think
he's going to be special
The Sonics know it's going to
take a while for Gill to blend in
10th Street
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with Payton. But they're going to
be patient.
"We're not in any panic or
any rush Sonics president Bob
Whitsittsaid. "Westill have Ricky
Pierce sitting there
The Sonics won 55 games and
reached the Western Conference
Finals last season. Gill doesn't
feel pressure but he wants to hel p
get his new team to the NBA Fi-
nals this season.
"I think that all Ihavetodois
work hard and help this team
win he said. "If we can win,
then that will be my justification.
I don't want to be a superstar
here. AH 1 want to do is contrib-
ute and help this team win
Gill was the fifth player
picked in the 1990 draft. In three
seasons in Charlotte, he averaged
16.1 points, with last season's
average being 16.9. In the Hor-
nets' first trip to the playoffs last
season, he averaged 17.3 points.
Although he led the Big Ten
in scoring in his senior season
with 20 points per game for Illi-
nois in 1990, he may be a better
defensive player in the NBA. He's
averaging 1.5 steals per game in
his career.
"I love to play defense he
said.
If there's a question about
Gill's game, it's his shooting
range. He has a .457career shoot-
ing averageand his outside shoot-
ing has been questioned.
"1 think I got the rap that I
couldn'tshootincollege'hesaid.
"But I can shoot the ball
The Sonics opened their train-
ing camp last Friday. They'II open
an eight-game exhibition sched-
ule Friday night against the Bulls
in Chicago and will meet them
again Saturday night in Cincin-
nati.
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October 14, 1993
ihort on
stars to replace vets
IStemdi lesn'tthink
muchol it, either. Butnovva does
he get the league back on its feei as
quickl) ,s Barkle).
I wo years ago, pro basketball
enjoyed 3 4 an embarrassment t
riches. It had the odd couple of
megastars, Magic and Larry, work-
ing either coast and an equally daz-
zling conjurer named Michael work-
ingthemiddle. Ithad seamless mar-
keting, a healthy bottom line and a
pipeline,collegebasketball, that pro-
vided potential stars with proven
Nielsen ratings.
It had peace at the bargaining
bible, peace in Kith the teams' and
the league's front offices and a very
substantial piece of the most demo-
graphically desirable pies.
In every way but one, not much
has changed. The NBA still boasts
big money, a big audience and big
thinkers. But as the panic set off by
Barkley'sthankfully brief, verv scary
stay in a Phoenix hospital proved,
the league's supply of real marquee
names suddenly seems very small.
And for a league so dependent on
stars to sell, that could spell big
trouble.
Since Magic Johnson made his
first, stunning announcement of re-
tirement in November 1991, Larry
Bird and now Michael Jordan have
repaired to the sidelines along with
him. AlsoslippingoutwastheNBA's
mad-comic genius, Kevin McHale,
who left so quietly it seemed he
wanted to be underappreciated to
the very end.
In the last four months, also lost
were twoother bright and engaging
about-to-stars: Reggie Lewis, who
was growing in the role as Celtic
captain until hisheart betrayed him.
ill hum ins
-
: in ai i autoaccj-
NBA sMostValu-
able Player last season, collapsed
while running wind sprints after an
hour-long scrimmage Saturday
night at the Phoenix Suns' training
site in Flagstaff, Ariz.
By Sunday night, Suns presi-
dent lerrv Colangelo reported that
tests seemed to confirm initial suspi-
cions thatabulgingdisk in Barkley's
hack was the source of the problem.
And that by simply reducing the
length and fury of his practicing,
BarkJey could go back to work with-
out limitations.
Of course, at Jordan's farewell
news conference, Stem kxiked any-
thing but tired. He was his upbeat,
assured self.
When asked about the effect of
losing the trifecta of Johnson, Bird
and Jordan, hedead panned, "We're
still planning to open the seastm on
Nov. 5 And later, when someone
else asked whether losing Michael
was a tragedy, Stern quickly re-
minded the questioner that lowing
LewisandPetrovicwastheonlvreal
tragedy to befall the NBA.
Give him points for perspec-
tive, but reserve the grade for perfor-
mance.
The season will begin on time
and playerslikeOrlando'sShaquille
O'Neal and Charlotte's Larry
Johnson and perhaps newcomers
like Chris Webber, Anfernee
Hardaway and even Shawn Brad-
ley will make it worth tuning in
opening week.
But right now none of them is
going tosteal yourbreath night after
night or guarantee a full house on
the road in the dead of February.
Barkley can. And he can still make
people's blood boil from coast to
coast. But a few somebodies had
better step forward and soon, to hel p
with the kindling.
QB's hard to come by in NFL
(AP) - ITie Achilles tendon in-
jury to the seemingly unbreakable
1 un Marino once aga
in points out
hovs fragile quarterbacks are in the
i I statistic Ever) NFLteamhas
pla) ed fivei if its l6games,yetonly 10
(it the2S teamshav ei i tbeen forced to
switchquarterbacks eitherthrough
injury or ineffectiveness.
The most shocking, of course, b
Marino's ruptured right Achilles ten-
don Sunday in Cleveland that
knocked him outfor the season.Ev'en
as quarterbacks went down weekly
even, season, Marino was the one
constant � Sunday's start was his
145th straightdating hick to theopen-
ing game of the 1W4 season.
His injury came a week after
another marquee quarterback
Randall Cunningham of the Eagles,
was lost for most of the remainder erf
the season with a broken leg.
The irony is that the lOquarter-
backswhohavestayed healthy aren't
the ones you'd expect, particularly
the big names.
Phil Simms of the Giants is 37
and has been hurt in both of the past
two years; Dallas' Troy Aikman un-
derwent back surgery in June;
Buffalo'sjimKelly hashad bad knees
for five years and now has a bad
elbow and San Francisco's Steve
Youngbroke the thu mbon his throw-
ing hand in an exhibition and just
made it back for opening day.
lnaimecaseb,therevolvingquar-
terbacks may help.
Joe Montana his now missed 2
12 of his five games with Kansas
City � he satout the too-narrow 17-
15 win over Cincinnati on Sunday
with a pulled hamstring. Given the
fragile state of his right elbow, which
caused him to miss two seasons with
the 49ers, it may keep him fresh for
the end of the season.
But in most cases, it simply
muddles things. Miami (4-1) had con-
trol of the AFC East with Marino, but
will thatcontinuewithScott Mitchell?
After throwing an interception that
was returned 97 yards for a touch-
down onhisfirstplay,Mitchell threw
twoTDpassestolead the Dolphins to
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a 24-14 win over the Browns.
But when teams hue time to
prepare for backups, Itxik out
Bubby Blister led the Fxi�les to a
comebaokwin over thejetstwoweeks
ag i, but was awful in the 17-6 loss to
the Bears, who sacked him seven
times, intercepted him twice and
forced him to fumble twice.
But Blister is new to the Eagles
and Mitchell's been with Miami for
fouryears(although he's thrown only
eight passes). Still, coach Din Shula
got to a Super Bowl in 1982 with
David Wood ley playing quarterback.
"We think Scottie will be all
right'said Shula. "He'sbeen with us
forawhile.heknowstheplayersand
tlie players know him
The Eagles were 4-1) with
Cunningham, but Brister was awful
Sunday. They figure to slide behind
the Cowboys and Giants in the NFC
East and maybe out of the playoff
picture,esperially since Fred Barnett,
their best receiver, is out for the sea-
son.
Some of the other quarterbacks
in troublearen'texactly small-timers.
WithMinnesota'sjimMcMahon
pul led forSean Salisbury in thefourth
quarter of thepunchlessVikingsl5-0
win over Tampa Bav Sunday, an-
other one-time Super Bowl starter
was added to the mix of missiniz
quarterbacks.
Including McMahon, who
started the 1986 game for the Bears,
quarterbacks who have missed time
include startersineight Super Bow Is:
Marino; McMahon; Montana (four
with the 49ers); Jeff Hostetler of the
Raiders (Giants, 1991) and
Washington's Mark Rypen.
And itincludesMontana'sthree
Super Bowl MVPs and three league
MVPs (Montana twice and Marino).
And, of course, there's Bemie
Kosarjifted forthe third straight week
in favor of Vinny Testaverde and
now demoted � Bill Belichick an-
nounced after thegame that Vinny's
now the starter.
That makes Kosar, who just
signed a $27 million, 7-year contract,
the world's highest paid backup.
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October 14, 1993
The East Carolinian 27
�M
'r4�
Continued from page 22
pr
"I'm willing to si
the court longer than last year'
Hadelman said.
Although her volley and
doubles game is solid, Hadelman
is constantly trying to improve her
consistency and mental game. A
positiveattitudeand concentration
is enabling her to better prepare
before each match. "To calm her
sthatwhat-
her game was weak
he thinks back
isions when she has
his tactic gives her
ifid( in-to go out and do her
"She Lisa puts forth the ef-
fort and she'll get the rewards
Coach Farfour said. "She just has
to be patient
Teammate Ashley Knott, a
sophomore, describes Hadelman
ashaving "a good personality" and
someone who "works hard" to do
their best. Both players agree that
an easy going atmosphere and
dedication helps them perform
during practice and matches.
Afterattendingclassand prac-
tice, Lisa comes homeand jogs with
her roomma te, an aerobics instruc-
tor. Sheadmitsthattheyearround
season istimeconsuming,butwell
worth it because of the friends she
has made and the team's unity.
"If you don't want to win for
yourself, you want to win for them
her teammates Hadelman said.
"We're willing to stay out there
and watch each other even if were
losing
Cont'd
from
pg.22
Marshall looking for upset
HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP)
� Marshall coach im Donnart has
one word to sum up the hoopla that
surrounded his last trip to Raleigh,
N.Cwherehewasquarterbackfor
North Carolina State 26 years ago.
"Unbelievable Donnan said.
Donnan takes the Thundering
Herd (4-1), ranked No. 3 in NCAA
Division I-AA, to play Division I-A
North Carolina State (3-2) on Satur-
dayatCarter-RnleyStadium, where
he helped lead the 1967 Wolfpack
to the Liberty Bowl.
Two seasons ago, Marshall
played at North Carolina State and
led the llth-ranked Wolfpack late
into the fourth quarter before fall-
ing 15-14.
Donnan said he received at least
95 requests for interviews before
that trip and spent about 11 hours
giving interviews.
"I counted it he said.
This time, the Herd coach is
having Marshall's sports informa-
tion office screen all his calls and
arrangea teleconference in the week
leading up to the game.
Besides Donnan's background
at North Carolina State, there is ex-
tra interest because Donnan's son,
Todd, will start at quarterback in
the same stadium where his father
played.
"I think it's going to be neat
said Todd Donnan, who threw for
258 yardsand a touchdown in a 51-
0 rout of VMI last weekend.
For some members of the Herd
who remain from the 1991 squad,
Saturday represents a chance for
revenge.
"Everybody still talks about
that (1991) game s?id senior tight
end Casey Hill. "In our minds, we
won that game. We just didn't win
on the scoreboard
The Wolfpack is coming off a
36-34 comeback victory over Texas
Tech. It won on an 11-yard touch-
down pass as time expired.
Still, the Herd knows it's in for
a tough game against a Division I-A
foe. Last season, in Marshall's last
game against a higher-division op-
ponent, it was routed 44-21 at Mis-
souri.
"We're going to have to play
the best game of our lives, all 22
players, lights outfor 60 minutes, to
have a shot at winning said offen-
sive tackle Chris Deaton.
The 1991 game is the only pre-
vious time Marshall and North
Carolina State have played.
TEC is now
hiring
typesetters,
(typing
experience
necessary)
What, if anything, will you do
differently this season to help
reverse this trend?
A: Well, nothing really. In
last year's schedule we played
four teams in the Top 25 and all
of them went to play in bowl
games and they all won. It is
extremely difficult to win when,
you have seven road games,
even though we came out on
top against Baylor. Its always
tough when you go to places
like West Virginia and Alabama
to play. We had 28 seniors last
year and went into some of the
toughest arenas in college foot-
ball to play, but those games
would be tough on anyone.
Q: Coach, as your program
is in a rebuilding stage, you are
set to make a trip to Greenville
to play another rebuilding pro-
gram at ECU. What concerns
you about playing the Pirates?
A: I'd have to say what con-
cerns me the most about play-
ing ECU is their defensive
speed. They are known as a team
that plays hard on both sides of
the ball, they have a great tight
end and very talented receiv-
ers. They could be extremely
tough.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Your Link to the
ECU Community
For advertising information
call on:
Wes Tinkham
Kelly Kellis
Jennifer Jenkins
Brandon Perry
Tonya Heath
at 757-6366 for assistance
Across from Joyner
Library 2nd floor Student
Pubs buildin"
Rest assured it will
wake you up.
technoiogciUy
advanced
the security
system that will blast an ear piercing
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even operates during power outages.
Only our products give you that
kind of technology and security.
Price: $29X00
� � � � Contact � � � �
Guardian
Surveillance
Systems
(919) 758-4868
(mm
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Right now, you can get substantial savings on these Macintosh"
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Student Stores
Wright Building � 757-6731
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OctO&� 15
Voting for
Homecoming Candidates
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Allied Health
Bottom College Hill
Student Store
Brody Medical School
(Support Services Office, 2JN45)
9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
� Bring valid ECU LD.
� Vote for 8 candidates
(no more, no less)
Check this issue of The East
Carolinian for a full-page visual
listing of all candidates.
rdb
� 5 - 6:30 p.m.
PIRATEFEST @ Central Campus
Mall (Rainsite: MSC Social Room)
� Featured: ECU Marching
Pirates, Golden Girls,
Cheerleaders, Pure Gold Dancers,
Dance Expressions, Gospel Choir,
Jeff Charles and 1993
Homecoming Candidates
� Floats line up for judging at
4:30 p.m.
� Organizations bring canned
goods for Spirit Cup points.
� Mark canned goods with
organization's name.
� Piratechest drawing
� 8 a.m. Line up for parade @ CM. Eppes Middle School on Elm St.
� 10 a.m. Parade begins � rain or shine
� Cellular phones for parade provided by U.S. Cellular Phone Co.
�Parade will be televised on WITN-7
� Parade will travel down Elm St. to 5th St. and turn left.
From 5th St it will travel to Washington St. and turn right.
The parade will end at the Willis Building parking lot on 2nd St.
� 2p.m. ECUv. Louisiana Tech @ Ficklen Stadium
� Includes announcement of Homecoming candidates and contest winners.
o
7 p.m. October 16, 1993
NPHC & Student Union Minority Arts Step Show
and Del Comedy Jam Comedian Derrick Fox III
@ Minges Coliseum
Admission prices @ Central
Student � $8
General � $io
Door � $12
Office:
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 14, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 14, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.967
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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