The East Carolinian, October 7, 1993






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Vol. 68 No. 57
The East Carolinian
Greenville, North Carolina
1��-�-�mmm�mmm,mmii�iii October 7,199316 Pages
WZMB general manager responds to rumors
ByMaureen Rich
Assistant News Editor
WZMB, 91.3 FM, is your col-
lege radiostarion,butdoyou think
it's playing what you want to hear?
Beth Arthur, general manager of
ECU's WZMB, plans to address
this issue soon by finding out ex-
actly what ECU students want to
hear from their student station.
If things go according to plan,
a survey will target as many ECU
studentsas possible. Arthurhopes
the results will enable the station
to provide a format that caters to a
variety of interests.
"We're here to serve the EC U
students as a whole Arthur said.
"My overall goal is to provide a
service for students I don't think
we'ie doing that
Urban Contemporary, de
fined by Arthur as "Kiss 102-type
music and Country are two for-
mats Arthur suggested as options
to the Media Board. Botharepopu-
lar formats, often fluctuating in
Arbitron polls as the number one
format on college campuses.
Arbitron is a company that polls
many different subjects, including
music.
Last week, the Opinion Page
of The East Carolinian reported that
while WZMB was possibly look-
ing at a format change, Arthur had
not consulted any of her co-work-
ers.
"I have not discussed this
with the staff at WZMB because I
have not finished researching the
subject Arthur responded, in a
letter to the editor published in
Tuesday's paper.
In a separate interview
Arthur said she spoke with the
program director of WZMB, Lee
Judge,atthe very beginning of her
proposal for a format change. The
program director has control over
the music played at the station,
Arthur said.
"We've made no major deci-
sions, we've just discussed
Arthur said, "because it's going to
be a big step to make a gradual
change to accommodate the stu-
dents on this campus
Plans for a possible format
change to take place in November
were mentioned at several Media
Board meetingsasearlyasjune24,
1993. This prompted rumors that
Arthur planned to change the for-
mat regardless of survey results or
WZMB staff opinions. A rumor
also sproad that Arthur was telling
the Media Board that WZMB was
changing their format.
In order to make a format
change, Arthuris required to make
a formal motion for the board to
consider a change, said Yvonne
Moye, Media Board secretary.
Arthur was merely mentioning a
possibility of change, Moye said,
and a motion was not made.
"Changing the format
doesn't mean wiping out every-
thing we have on the air as of
now Arthur said. "That's what a
lot of paple have a misconception
about. They think there's going
to be no more alternative, and no
more reggae.
"What it really means is to
tighten up the programming
SEXFest offers free information
getting rid of some music that's
been played several times that no-
body particularly likes, nobody's
ever heard of Arthur said.
The radio station was cre-
ated to make a niche for alterna-
tive music, Arthur said, because
there was no other station in the
market playing alternative.
"My feeling is that the radio
station is here to serve the majority
of students on campus Arthur
said. "It's a student radio station,
and it's funded by East Carolina
Any formatchange depends
on the results of an extensive sur-
vey, she said.
Arthur said in the past many
people have expressed their dis-
satisfaction with the station, and
this needs to be addressed. She
said that reggae, a style found to be
second in popularity next to
PopTop 40, may get more air
play, as well as main-stream
rock. Arthur emphasized that
these are only possibilities.
Arthurpointed outthaton
campus bus shuttles, the radio
dialis often setateither KISS 102
or VVHTE 103.7, not WZMB.
"That tells me something she
said.
"A lot of people don't like
change, but you have to change
to keep up with the times
Arthur said.
Inthespringofl993,ECU's
American Marketing Associa-
tion issued a findings report en-
titled "The Student Media Pub-
lications Survey The survey
See WZMB page 4
ByAnsje DeRosia
Staff Writer
As part of the Sex Week
activities, RHA and Student
Health presented "SEXFest III"
Tuesday in front of Mendenhall.
Free information on everything
from how to use a condom prop-
erly to avoiding STDs was avai I-
able.
Dining Services provided
free food, and Pepsi provided
drinks. Lee Cherrv, a DJ from
WHTE 103.7, kept the music and
the party atmosphere going.
Games were sponsored by REC
Services, and RHA gave'away
colored condoms, cups and T-
shirts. Captain Condom (Brian
Burns) wandered around hand-
ing out free condoms.
Various aspects of sex edu-
cation were represented. Cam-
pus Ministries gave information
on abstinence; Lt. Knox of ECU
Public Safety spoke on sexual
See SEX page 4
Tougher law cracks
down on offenders
By Jason Williams
r-ii.c fj Photo by Scott Pop�
Financial Aid office offers several options
By Stephanie Lassiter
For those of you who thought
you could not receive financial aid,
you were wrong. There is financial
aid for everyone.
Many students have often
thought that if they were depen-
dents of their parents and theirpar-
ents had a substantial income, thev
could not receive aid to help pay for
college. According to Rose Mary
Stelma, director of Student Finan-
cial Aid, there is an option for ev-
eryone.
While some forms of aid are
based on need, there are several
types that are not. For instance, stu-
dents can become part of work
study programs, on and off cam-
pus. Stelma believes that work
studyisagreatwaytonotonlyeam
money to help with expenses, but
also a great way to become familiar
with people and happenings
around the campus.
"We find that a lot of work
study students feel a part of the
university she said.
Stelma also said that despite
rumor, work study students do not
have to have a minimal GPA to be
considered for the programs.
The first step in getting finan-
cial aid is actually fillingout the free
Rape play hits
home for many
By Ansie DeRosia
Staff Writer
"But I Said No a play
on acquaintance rape, was
performed in Mendenhall
Tuesday night as part of the
Sex Week activities. The ac-
tors are a tra eling company
from Virginia who have been
doing this play for three
years.
"But I Said No" was
written by Margaret Baldwin
and Doug Grissom in the fall
See RAPE page 4
application for federal student aid
available at the Financial Aid office.
"A lot of students take pride
in being self-sufficient and don't
apply for financial aid, because they
don't want to be in debt Stelma
said.
Questions on the application
focus on family income, assets and
other family characteristics. If you
are 24 years of age or older, mar-
ried, a graduate student, a veteran
of the armed services, have depen-
dents of your own, have dead par-
ents or have been removed by the
courtfromyourparents'home,you
have to declare yourself indepen-
dent. If none of the characteristics
�OickltorTickef'introduced
Staff Reports
apply to you, you can declareyour-
self dependent on your parents.
Students who are eligible for
grants are considered first. Grants,
such as the Pell Grant, are consid-
ered "gift aid In other words,
grants do not have to' e repaid.
The Pell Grant is given only
to the "neediest" students. The
maximumamountofaPellGrantis
$2,300 per year. There are a variety
of other small grants including the
Supplemental Grant, N.C, Need-
based Grant and an ECU Grant.
Next, students are considered
for work-study programs.
See AID page 4
Staff Writer
"Drive drunk in North
Carolina and it's the end of the
road That's the motto of the
State Department of
Transportation's campaign
against drunk driving. On Oct.
1, however, the definition of
"drunk"changed.
Oct. 1 was the day that
many new state laws went into
effect, including one of the
toughest drunk driving laws in
the nation. The state lowered the
legal Blood Alcohol Concentra-
tion (BAC) to .08. Previously, the
BAC threshold had been .10.
North Carolina became the
10th state in the nation to adopt
the .08 BAC level.
"This is a major victory in
our fight to make North Caro-
lina highways safer. Drunk driv-
ers are a threat not only to them-
selves but to all motorists. This
new lower threshold is a strong
message that we are serious
about reducing the threat posed
by drunk drivers Governor Jim
Hunt said.
The Department of Trans-
portation estimates that most
people will have to drink one
drink less to remain under the
.08 threshold. The average 160-
pound adult male registers about
.02 BAC from each drink con-
sumed an hour. Females and
teenagers register higher BAC
levels for the same amount of
alcohol consumed.
There were 75,999 DWI ar-
rests in North Carolina last year
and the NC Highway Patrol is
predicting more in the future as
a result of the new law and a
The Governor's Highway
Safety Initiative campaign
stepped-up enforcement of seat
belt and child restraint law cam-
paign has begun on the ECU cam-
pus and in the community. On
Oct. 4, ECU campus police began
a month-long program of conduct-
ing seat belt "checks" throughout
campus.
The Governor's Highway
Safety Program, the NC Depart-
ment of Insurance, the National
Highway Traffic Safety Adminu
tration, the UNC Highway Re
search Center and the Insurance
Institute for Highway Safety are
working together to promote this
safety campaign. But a key ele-
ment in the success of this project
is local community leaders' sup-
port of the local law enforcement
efforts in our country.
Persons wearing their seat
belts will be given incentives for
their support to promote safety
on the highways. Those who are
not buckled-up will be ticketed
and fined.
Without your encourage-
ment, "Click It or Ticket" will not
work. With yourcooperation, stu-
dents can make great strides in
making our roadways safer.
"Click It or Ticket" � it's the
law, it saves money by prevent-
ing injury, and it is the right thing
to do to protect our people.
greater emphasis on drunk
driving. "We will increase our
efforts to arrest impaired driv-
ers Commander of the NC
Highway Patrol Colonel R.A.
Barefoot said.
"Initially, the new law
will probably result in more
arrests because some border-
line offenders have gotten off
in the past. In the future, we
hope the new law will reduce
the number of offenses and
result in safer North Carolina
highways Barefoot said.
In the past a .09 or .10
BAC was not always sufficient
to convict a driver for a DWI
without additional evidence
from a patrolman that the
driver was impaired. The new
law means that a .08 BAC alone
could Le sufficient evidence
for a conviction.
"This is the tool we've
needed to mount an aggres-
sive campaign to get drunk
drivers off North Carolina
roads said Joe Parker, Direc-
tor of the Governor's High-
way Safety Program.
"Too many drivers who
registered close to or at .10
BAC escaped conviction un-
der the old law. Now, with the
�08 threshold as the limit at
which one is legally impaired,
we'll have more convictions.
This will also serve as a pow-
erful deterrent to drinking and
driving
Parker hopes to reduce
the number of alcohol-related
crashes and save lives at the
same time. In 1992 a total of
534 people lost their lives in
See DRUNK page 4
Captain
Condom!
Students
attending SEXFest
at Mendenhall
had the
opportunity to
meet everyone's
friend, Captain
Condom. The
caped crusader
handed out free
condoms for all.
Photo by
Scott Pope
. ��� �
mm mm





mmm
October 7, 1993
V A 11 fl
iSmms
- i
Slain Fulbright Scholar never played by the rules
Bvall accounts, Arm Biehl was dedicated,enthusiastic
and fearless in her nearly year-long effort to help blacks get
their fair share of political power in South Africa. But one
thing the 26-vear-old Fulbright scholar wouldn't do was
plav bv the rules of apartheid, and that was what led to her
death Aug. 25, ironically art the hands of the people she was
trying to aid, friends and colleagues said. Biehl was stabbed
to death by black youths, believed to belong to the Pan
Africanist Congress (PAC), in what authorities believe was
a racially motivated attack after she drove some fellow
students to their home in Guguletu, a dangerous township in
Cape Town. She was killed just two days before she planned
to return to the United States. In early September, her par-
ents, Peter and Linda Biehl of Newport Beach, Calif estab-
lished a fund at Stanford University to honor thei r daughter's
efforts. The fund will have a two-fold purpose: to provide
fellowships in Africa for Stanford students to learn about
southern Africa, and to provide scholarship assistance at
Stanford for students from the University of the Western
Cape, where Biehl was based as a Fulbright scholar.
Fraternity defies ban at FSU
A fraternity that was banned from Florida State Uni-
versity five years ago for refusing to cooperate in the inves-
tigation of a gang rape say they are defying the ban and
setting up an oft-campus colony. The Pi Kappa Alpha frater-
nity has announced that it will form a colony, which is the
precursor to an of ficial chapter, by mid-October and wants to
persuade FSU officials to allow the group on campus by
behaving in an exemplary fashion, according to university
spokesperson Annette Lee. The fraternity was banned from
campus in 1988 for not cooperating in a police investigation
of an incident in which a female student was raped in the Pi
Kappa Alpha house, then dumped unconscious at another
fraternity house. The fraternity applied for reinstatement
this year, but it was denied when university officials discov-
ered that, with the support of local alumni, the fraternity had
gone underground and had continued to meet secretly.
A
Forum focuses on information systems
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Tammy Carter
Stiff Writer
The ECL School of Business
department of decision sciences
will sponsor a public forum on
computers and information sys-
tems on Tuesday, Oct. 12.
The forum will begin at 2
p.m. in Room 12(H) of the General
Classroom Building and will last
until approximately 4:30 p.m.
It is free and open to the
public, but interested persons
should register in advance.
Sessions are geared prima-
rily toward professionals in the
business community who work
with computers, people who teach
computer classes on the high
school and community college
level and to East Carolina Univer-
sity alumni.
Students who are interested
in meeting professionals in the
computer field are more than wel-
come to attend.
According to Dr. Robert
Schellenberger, chairman of the
ECU decision sciences depart-
ment, the forum sessions will in-
clude information about computer
tools and practices.
PowerBuilder software will
be demonstrated and people in-
volved with the forum will dis-
cuss quality in information sys-
tems and classrooms.
Guest speakers include Den-
nisCrawford of Washington, D.C,
vice-president of Computer Data
Systems, Inc. Crawford will dis-
cuss his ideas about how to pro-
mote the quality' in information
systems.
Ron Mueller of Kinston and
Douglas L. Lively of Research Tri-
angle Tark are also featured at the
forum.
Mueller is vice-president of
Information Systems at Hampton
Industries. He will present his
ideas on total quality management
and its impacton information sys-
tems.
Lively, a systems analyst
with Glaxo, Inc will demonstrate
PowerBuilder, a new software
package for system development.
Dr. Henry Peel of the ECU
School of Education will discuss
the use of information systems
to enhance the quality of educa-
tion in the classroom.
This session is intended for
high school teachers.
"The forum is part of
ECU's commitment to the uni-
versity-business community
partnership to enhance eco-
nomic and educational develop-
ment ineastern North Carolina
Schellenberger said.
The forum is provided by
donations from faculty, alumni
and industry.
For more information and
to regi ster for the foru m sessions,
call the ECU Department of De-
cision Sciences at (919) 757-6893.
Armed resistance collapses in capital
MOSCOW (AP) � Soldiers
disarmed and arrested several
groups of gunmen today as vio-
lent resistance to President Boris
Yeltsin collapsed and the govern-
ment took full control of the capi-
tal. Isolated attacks by snipers
were reported overnight, but
there were no casualties.
Yeltsin's government con-
tinued to crack down on the op-
position. Several mainstream
Moscow newspapers appeared
today with blank spots on their
pages where articles had been
censored and removed. But the
government later today ended
censorship, saying it was a tem-
porary emergency step.
Government troops and
tanks stormed the parliament
building Monday and crushed
armed resistance by some 1,500
lawmakers and their supporters.
Hard-liners were holed up in the
building for almost two weeks
after refusing Yeltsin's order to
disband and hold new elections.
Fighting began after hard-
liners rioted Sunday in central
Moscow. The battles left more
than lOOdead and hundreds more
wounded. Yeltsin had been
locked in a power struggle with
an informal alliance of Commu-
nists, fascists and ultra-national-
ists opposed to the scale and pace
of his political and economic re-
forms. Both sides had tried to oust
each other during an 18-month
power struggle that crippled the
government.
Life was returning to nor-
mal in Moscow today with heavy
commuter traffic headed to the
city center. Tanks were pulled
back from around the blackened
parliament building and fewer
troops were seen on the streets.
Officials were considering
what charges would be filed
against the parliament leaders,
former vice president Alexander
Rutskoi and parliament speaker
Ruslan Khasbulatov. The two
men and other top leaders were
being held in high-security pris-
ons.
Yeltsin continued to tighten
his grip on the government. He
dismissed Russia's chief prosecu-
tor Valentin Stepankov, appar-
ently hoping to avoid a repeat of
Stepankov's botched prosecution
of the plotters of the 1991 coup
attempt. He also fired two pro-
vincial leaders who opposed him
during the crisis.
The government says the
crackdown on opposition is nec-
essary to end the threat of vio-
lence. But some Russians are con-
cerned about what it could mean
for the future of democracy in
Russia, fearing Yeltsin may be
tempted to impose his will rather
than seek consensus.
The Cabinet, led by Defense
Minister Pavel Grachev, formally
thanked some 1,300 soldiers and
commandos who had pummeled
the marble parliament building
for 10 hours on Monday, igniting
fires that blackened the top third
of the building, known as the
White House.
"A wave of hatred and
death was stopped in Moscow.
The bloody rebellion was sup-
pressed the Cabinet said Tues-
day in a statement. Tie seeds of
a political split in Russia have
been uprooted. Now, creative
work is needed
Yeltsin's "creative work"
could include living up to prom-
ises to improve the economy,
holding elections and convict-
ing the parliament leaders who
sought for more than a year to
hinder him.
The president, who had
sped up his economic reforms
even before Monday's clash,
was expected to accelerate them
in hopes of reviving Russia's
economy, which is likely to be
the key to winning future elec-
tions.
Yeltsin also is beholden to
those who helped him, notably
the military and Russia's 89 re-
gions and republics, most of
which backed him in the crisis
and may now demand greater
economic autonomy in return.
Still, Yeltsin's opponents
are not likely to fade. Hundreds
rallied in St. Petersburg to sup-
port a Russian nationalist TV
commentator whose program
was canceled Tuesday. "Yeltsin
is a murderer the crowd
chanted.
EAST
CAROLINIAN

Chapter 6
Me and the cops didn't get
along too well, especially Lt. Walker.
Walker and I had had a lot of
run-ins in the old days. He didn't
like my attitude towards what he
called "proper police procedure"
and 1 didn't like what I called his
"bureaucratic baby-kissing and
hand-shaking So I wasn't too
popular with the boys in blue.
One of them hadn't given me a
bad shake, though. He'd helped me
out on a few cases and kept me from
punching Walker's lights out even
more times than that. I figured he
was the only cop who would give
me a straight answer about Al.
So I saw Sergeant O'Dool.
As I walked into the Brewery's
police station, more commonly
known as "The Tank O'Dool was
sitting at the front desk. He looked
the same as I remembered � an
unruly shock of red hair sprouting
from under his cap to match an
equal bushel of red hair under his
nose. Irish, through and through.
"Mick, me boyo, what are you
doing here? I haven't seen your ugly
mug since we brought Jimmy the
Beam in He grabbed my hand and
shook it like he was pumping wa-
ter. I couldn't help but smile at his
enthusiasm and his thick accent.
"I need some help, O'Dool.
Know anything about a guy named
Al Cohol?" The second I mentioned
Al's name, O'Dool clammed up
quicker than lightning and mo-
tioned me to follow him. As I walked
into an empty office, I silently won-
dered what the whole secrecy deal
was about.
O'Dool shut the door and sat
on the edge of the desk. "Mick, you
don't want to be going around talk-
ing about Cohol out in public like
that. Walker's got a bug up his craw
ever since Cohol slipped away from
him two months ago
"Screw Walker. Guy couldn't
find a hole in the ground unless you
pointed it out to him. And then he'd
probably fall in it. Besides, what
would he want with Al
"Walker pulled him over one
night,swearsCohol switched places
with the passenger. Both of them
swear up and down that the pas-
w
The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
dozen and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one hand on your wallet
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
where a man can forget his troubles and drozvn his
sorroivs for a zvhile.
Mick Hammered had sivorn never to set foot
in the Bravery again. Setting out to find his old
friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
in the seedy and fermented world of Ike Brewery.
Every Thursday in The East Carolinian, Mick
will meet a character who will expose Al in a whole new light. When it s finally
over and done with, Mick�and the reader�will be faced with one of the most
important questions either has ever faced.
What place does Al Cohol have in my life?
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in touh. comparable to
Spillane's Hammer and Hammett's Spade
Joel Keggsy, The Beersborouh Gactte
EAST
CAROLINIAN
senger was driving. Told the judge
he was a designated driver, if you
can believe that
"Designated driver, what the
hell is that?" I was getting really-
tired of feeling surprised about Al.
It ticked me off knowing I had been
in the dark all this time.
"Supposed to be a person who
stays sober when all of his friends
get drunk so he can drive them
home and take care of them. Works
most of the time, until a bloke like
Cohol misuses it
"That college, EBU, it did a
survey on students who actually
were desigrated drivers. Last I
heard, something like three-quar-
ters of the survey had been a desig-
nated driver at least once. They take
care of their passengers and either
drink real little or not at all
1 didn't understand it. If what
ProfessorShotglasshad told mewas
true, Cohol was number one among
the students. "Why so many of
them?" I asked.
"They said it made them feel
safe and respected by the others.
Some of 'em even get paid, if you
can believe it. They all suggest that
designated drivershould know their
passengers, set a plan before driv-
ing and be designated before an
event. I think it does 'em good to
see their friends when they're
drunk. Might even wake a few of
'em up
"Maybe I wasat another dead
end. I thought O'Dool could help
me, but it wasn't looking good. I
gave it one last shot. "So who do
you suggest I talk to, O'Dool? al-
ready hit the Professor
"Not that one, Mick. He thinks
he knows, but he's got a long way to
go. You want my advice, you need
to talk to the coach. He's the one
who reall v talks with the kids. He'll
know more than me
"Thanks, O'Dool. I appreciate
the help. As I walked out of the
station, a cold wind hit me. Hunch-
ing into mv trenchcoat, I wondered
if this was an omen. What would I
find out back at EBU?
Statistics ami information pro-
vuicd by study done by $. Knight, M. A.
Glascoffand G.L. Richard.
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October 7, 1993
The East Carolinian
iresses options for U.S. troops in Somalia
told
�r re-
rr. fo-
ment
irdles the stomach of
e that, be-
cause we went there tor no pur-
pose other than to keep those
people alive Clinton said Tues-
day in an interview with Copley
News Sen ice.
It really makes me angry
he said, adding that he is increa
ingly reluctant to operate under a
Lnited Nations structure that he
said no longer provides "the help
we need to protect our people
With congressional opposi-
tion to the U.S. presence mount-
ing, Clinton planned a second
meeting todav with his top na-
tional security aides, including
Secretary of State Warren Christo-
pher, Defense Secretary Ues Aspin
and Marine Gen. Joseph P. Hoar,
the commander for the region.
Communications Director
Mark Gearan said he did not know
if Clinton would reach a decision
today, but said the U.S. goal has
not changed: Establish a political
structure that will prevent the
country from descending into
chaos and starvation when U.S.
troops pull out.
"He met with his advisers
last night and asked for options
for how to best meet that objec-
tive. He's reviewing those options
up met 1 uesday
nton returned from
( alifornia.
isions and
said he wanted to meet with the
same group again today to dis-
cuss the next steps, presidential
ach iser David Gergen said.
A senior official, who asked
not to be identified by name, sug-
gested that Clinton was not about
to order an abrupt withdrawal of
troops from Somalia and that the
basic goal remained "to draw
down American troops as the se-
curity situation allow s
He said efforts will continue
to rebuild police forces through-
out the country and to reestablish
judicial and penal systems.
In the interview Tuesday in
California shortly before he de-
parted for Washington, Clinton
said the specter of Somalis cheer-
ing the death of U.S. servicemen
"makes me sick and it's reprehen-
sible since all the Americans ever
did was go there and try to save
children from starving, reopen the
hospitals and the schools, and give
people a safe place to sleep at
night
Contending that "most So-
malis appreciate that, he added
that "the crowd around Somali
warlord Mohamed Farrah Aidid
have sort of a short memory.
They've forgotten what it was like
before the United Nations, led bv
the Americans, showed up
Saying in the Copley inter-
Mew that he wanted to be as
biunt as I could" with top U.N.
iffk iais Clinton referred to the
deterioration of the Somalia op-
eration -ince the world body took
it over from the United States.
'This didn't happen to us
when we had 28,000 people there
and we could control the situa-
tion he said.
While saving "the people
who have come in to replace the
United States forces are doing the
best they can, I'm sure Clinton
suggested that too many of them
areafraid to venture bevond "their
own area and don't exactly follow
the orders" of the Turkish general
now in charge of the U.N. forces.
Twelve Americans were
killed, 78 were wounded and oth-
ers were missing in fighting in
Mogadishu late Sunday and early
Monday. The Pentagon declined
to comment on reports that as
many as eight Americans were
being held hostage by supporters
of Aidid, but one U.S. pilot was
shown on a videotape being inter-
rogated by his captors.
It was several hours before
rescue forces, which included U.S.
troops, could reach soldiers
pinned down and outnumbered
by Somali gunmen, and there is
concern that the delay � attrib-
uted in part to difficulty in coordi-
nating forces � could have con-
tributed to American losses.
Against that backdrop, more
than 600 U.S. troops armed with
specialized weapons and tanks
were beginning to move toward
Somalia. That videotape and pic-
tures of dead U.S. soldiers being
dragged through the streets of
Mogadishu have set off intense
reaction not only with Clinton,
but in Congress and across the
country.
Aspin, Christopher and
Gergen briefed more than 150
House and Senate members on
Tuesday, bu t failed to padfy manv
of them.
"1 cannot support U .S. troops
being in the situation of hostilities
without an authorization of Con-
gress said Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-
Vt, chairman of the Senate Ap-
propriations foreign operations
subcommittee.

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October 7, 1993
ued from page 1
ilvzer
SEX
JO
ffice of
r im-
ation.
bination ol a
tougher law and better testing
mentis a powerful one-two
h in our assault on the drunk
� i Parker said.
Continued from page 1
ider-
he Perkins
inded low-in-
me from
hoarerepa's -
i he Perkins is a
� 'in. or gi en only to
its who financially need the
the most.
he Federal Stafford Loan is
ased loan provided bv
ernment which pavs
t while the student is in
There is also a Federal
bsidized Stafford Loan which
� r based on need. It is open to
regardless of family in-
rheborrower ha-�an option
the interet while in-chool or
� � t to the principal of
m. IhatisknownasCapitali-
of Loan.
If you hae received other
t loan- you are eligible for
e Federal Supplemental Loan for
nts.
Students aregivenasix month
period after studies end to
gin paying back their loan. They
'ivelOyearstocompletepayments.
Evenyour parents can receive
1'iancial aid. But, there are limits
based on how manv credits you
haveeamed and how much aid yi hi
are already receiving. This type of
aid is not based on need.
Stelma said that a student's
academic records makeadifference
in determining whether thev can
receive financial aid.
"We do look at academic
re ords she said. "You have to be
makingprogresswithyour degree
This week Scholarship Direc-
tories are being distributed across
campus. Various departmental
scholarships are available. The aca-
demic deans, the library, the Finan-
cial Aid officeand Minorirv.Affairs,
as well as other campus offices will
have the directories.
According to Stelma, 38 of
ECU students are receiving finan-
cial aid. Since last spring, ECU has
funded oer $30 million in aid.
Stelma says the process takes a mini-
mum of 12 weeks from application
10 notification of approval. Finan-
cial Aid will be taking applications
for the '9394 schtxvl year through
March '94.
"We encourage students to
apply early for financial aid she
said.
assault; and Rick'Neal from
PittC ount) A IPService Orga-
nization il'lc ASO) gave more
information on living with
AIDS. The Peer Health Educa-
tors had a game called "What
Do You Know About Tic Tac
loe7" where students tested
their knowledge about sex and
STDs.
David Wagner, an ECU
student with AIDS, answered
student questions and displayed
a sample of the medication he
mu-t take every day. He spends
$310,494.12 yearly for pills, doc-
tor and hospital bills, injections
and other things necessarv to
keep him alive.
Wagner is currently en-
rolled and takes "whatever
courses seem interesting He
was diagnosed with AIDS in
Sept 1990, when he contracted
RAPE
linton offers promotional
MEW YORK (AD � How
:ht he was, the late Sen. Ev erett
�en, when he remarked that a
illion here, a billion there even-
illy adds up to real money.
Added or .subtracted, the
v is indeed very real, as in
es It has enormous consc-
iences for individuals, compa-
the government and, there-
Mi e, the entire national economy.
This being so, you might
Link that when huge programs
re offered for public consider-
the numbers would be mea-
ured with acute precision.
It's the way most people
leal with spending: The higher
the amount, the more careful. If
pennies aren't important to them,
dollars and tens of dollars are.
That's not always the way it
!s in Washington, where it now
appears the much publicized $91
billion saving claimed for the
Clinton health plan may turn out
to be many billions less than that.
Big and important as it is,
that multi-billion dollar amount
may be a mere echo of the highly
pr 'moted budget plan, publicized
�or weeks as being capable of re-
lucing federal budget deficits by
I billion in five years.
On examination, the "sav-
ings" turned out to include $60
billion to $70 billion in assumed
interest savings and $100 billion
in future defense cuts.
The Congressional Budget
Office estimate lowered the total
to S328 billion.
Promotional promises, sales
pitches later seen to be at variance
with the facts, are not an invention
of the present administration or of
one party but not the other. Thev
are an accepted form of political
behavior.
And it persists, although it
still shocks Americans to realize
that elected officials, from whom
they have a right to expect the
highest standards, indulge in be-
havior that sometimes is meant to
deceive rather than inform.
of 1990. Francine Sackett is the
Director. The actors were Savitri
Durkee, Joel Jones, Kristin M.
Kepler, Laura Kollar, Thadd
McQuade and Radha Metro.
Six actors with only six
chairs as props recited accounts
taken from actual assault vic-
tims. The language was intense
but realistic. The actors moved
around on stage, shifting from
character to character while
throwing out statistics between
situations.
Several students were in
tears during particularly
graphic accounts. Other aspects
were mentioned such as male
rape, the useabuse of alcohol
in rape and the feelingsreac-
tions from the victim's lovers,
friends, parents and other fam-
ily members. One scene depicted
the reporting of "good" rape
(stranger with a weapon and a
lot of evidence) versus "bad"
rape (victim invited attacker
over and often gets the "heshe
asked for it" attitude from oth-
ers).
Students were shocked to
hear some of the lesser-known
statistics. Of women who are
raped, 42 will have sex with
theirattacker again. Of all rapes,
25 involve more than one at-
tacker. In over 27 states, women
cannot charge their husbands
with rape if they are living to-
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Continued from page 1
hi first opportunistic disease
He said he had no idea he was
even HIV-positive until it had
progrei-ed to full-blown AIDS.
Because October is also
AIDS Awareness Month,
PICASOV'CAN MDS" project
fit well into Sex Fest. Students
donated canned goods tor All IS
patients in Pittount) Hiis
project will continue through-
out the month with various
drop-oft spots across campus.
The residence hall contributing
the most will win a pizza party.
RH A co-chairs. Vice Presi-
dent jim Capps and Secretary
Michelle Reece, said bv provid-
ing the necessarv information
and making it fun. thev hoped
students would come a way with
the knowledge needed to make
educated choices about st.
WZMB
Continued from page 1
reached 1,000 EC U students, but
only 637surveys were "usable
I hesurvey reported "87 per-
cent of the respondents indicated
th.tt thev were more likely (32.4
pen ent) or much more likely (54.6
percent) to listen to WZMB if it
played more of their favorite mu-
sic
A more extensive survey
aimed at reaching a larger number
of ECU students is needed, Arthur
said. Initially, she hoped to have
completed another survey by No-
vember. So far, plansareat a stand-
still until someone agrees to con-
duct the survey.
"WZMB could do the sur-
vey, but I don't think that would
be ethical Arthur said.
Arthur approached a profes-
sor from ECU'S statistics depart-
ment about leading the project, but
nothing has been decided vet she
said.
"I'm trying to work out a
new survey with either a class,
or a grad student to perform a
random sampling Arthur said.
Becauseof time constraints,
the November proposal has been
moved up indefinitely until a
survey isconducted, Arthur said.
RespondingtoWZMB staff
opposition to a format change,
Arthur said: I have an open-
door policy I've always had
this policy. I 'm really upset the
Staff didn't come talk to me
about the rumors
Personnel atthestation will
not change because of a format
change, she said. "I see us as
growing more than anything,
and trying to improve, and bv
improving we have more listen-
ers, and by having more listen-
ers, that equals finding out what
they want to listen to, and I guess
that's what I'm trying to do
Continued from page 1
gether. One in ten men are as-
saulted by the age of 18. (ne in
four women are victims of rape
or attempted rape.
After the performance, the
actors engaged the students in
an open discussion. Several stu-
dents emotionally voiced their
own experiences Counselors
from the Counseling Center at-
tended to help students cope
with any trauma that mav have
been caused by the plav or just
to provide more information on
where to go should students
need help.
"It was intense. I couldn't
stop crying when I heard other
students, people I know, had
gone through this one student
said.
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October 7. 1993
The East Carolinian 5
HOMECOMINGi 1 993
Debbie Garner
Alpha Delta Pi
Senior in Therapeutic
Recreation
Active in: LSS
Society.
Renita Danielle Allen
ABLE
Senior in Marketing
Active in: Greene Hall, Dance
Expressions, Resident
Education, Legislators School.
Carolyn M. Green
ECU Ambassadors
Sophomore in Marketing
& Advertising
Active in: Greene HaH,
Parent Club.
Victoria T. Moore
ECU College
Republicans
Junior in PhilosophyPrelaw
Active in: Zeta Tau Alpha
Law Society, SGA, Junior
Panhellenic, Phi Beta
Lambda.
Laura Elizabeth
Ecklin
Cotten Hall
Sophomore in Business
Marketing
Active in: Alpha Phi.
Latricia
Machella
Phillips
Delta Sigma
Theta
Junior in Accounting
Active in: Accounting
Society, Pure Gold
Dancers.
COM� VOT�!
Must hove ci Valid Student I.D.
Thursday, October 14, 1993
Voting booths:
Student Stores � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Bottom of College Hill � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Allied Health � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mendenhall � 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
School of Medicine � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Carrie
Elizabeth
Oleson
ECU Dance
Association
Sophomore in Dance
Active in: Alpha
Delta Pi, ECU
Playhouse, Phi Eta
Sigma.
Robin Waldron
Fleming Hall Council
Senior in English Education
Active in: ECHO, Golden
Key, Sigma Lambda, NC
Teaching Fellows.
Jennice Glander
Kappa Sigma
Senior in Lesiure
Systems Studies
Active in: Alpha Phi,
S.A.M Lesiure Systems
Studies Society.
Student Homecoming Committee
chose all photos randomly to be
printed in a three-part series.
Paris Dinwiddie
Peer Health
Educators
Sophomore in
Communications
Active in: Red Cross,
community services,
Peer Health.
Jennifer Evelyn
Heath
Pi Omega Pi
Senior in Business &
Marketing Education
Active in: Delta Epsilon
Chi, Phi Beta Lambda.
Rene Salameh
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Senior in Occupation
Therapy
Active in: Alpha Delta Pi,
Gamma Beta Phi.
HOMECOMING 1993
MHMHnMffiHMHMMKHQIiHMHHflMHn NHMNM1
I





The East Carolinian
Paqe 6
Opinion
ThursdayOpinion
Somalia: defining our role
Following recent unrest in
Mogadishu, U.S. officials scramble
to determine a clear-cut strategy
What a mess.
It began as a humanitarian relief effort and has
culminated in bloodshed and barbarism. Tuesday's
news photo of a U.S. soldier's corpse being dragged
through the streets of Mogadishu, Somalia has
heightened the tension and concern of many Ameri-
cans and those on Capital Hill. And yet, the politi-
cians are wary of pulling U.S. troops just vet.
There are basically four options: stav the cur-
rent course; use overpowering force to find Mohamed
Farrah Aidid, capture him and destroy his well-
armed militia; retreat from a military role as quickly
as possible and ignore problems that might follow;
or step back militarily but remain in Somalia and
allow U.N. negotiators to work toward political
solutions.
Many are leaning towards Clinton giving com-
manders in Somalia all the forces they need to carry
out the job of capturing Aidid. Unfortunately, even
if they rid themselves of Aidid, many others can
(and will) take up the reins. There are a thousand
more just like him.
And isn't is amazing that the former diplomat
who became a Mogadishu gangster has eluded the
28,235 troops who have stalked him since June and
yet, the press comes in contact with him daily? (Just
a thought.)
The simple fact is that the U.S. will not pull its
troops out of Somalia as long as there are American
captives held there. Soldiers are literally being used
as human shields for this warlord bent on power.
When MIA and POW cards start to be dealt, you can
bet on the U.S. staying in the game until the bitter
end.
So recently, more than 609 fresh troops,
equipped with heavy weapons and a fleet of seven
helicopters, were moved in to Somalia Tuesday,
with plans for up to 2,000 more. But the Pentagon is
stressing that the move is not an escalation of troops.
Rather it is being called a response "to an immediate
need
Yeah, right. Why not just call it what it is � a
desperate action caused by the inability to define
what exactly the Somalia policy is.
The original objective � to bring food to the
starving � remains as honorable as it was the first
day troops arrived in December. And Americans
must realize that the price of going over there was
high to begin with. That's easy to forget when the
initial ideal was to feed starving, innocent women
and children.
The question must be asked: why is Somalia's
civil war a threat to international order or U.S. inter-
ests? And with that posed, the UN. forces face two
major problems. First they must define the terms of
the mission, and secondly, they must proceed with
a goal that may take years to reach � restoring order
to a country that no longer wants foreign interven-
tion.
According to the latest AP, in an interview
Tuesday with Copley newspapers, Clinton said: "It
curdles the stomach of every American to see that
the American soldier being drug through the
itreets, because we went there for no purpose other
than to keep those people alive Clinton also stressed
that he is increasingly reluctant to operate under a
United Nations structure that he thinks no longer
provides "the help we need to protect our people
At least he honestly has our troops best interests
at heart. A congressional vote is set for Nov. 15; we can
only hope and pray that he's holding the trump card.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kcllis, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, Mm Editor
Maureen Rich, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Pane Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley Copy Editor
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Cm ulatum Manager
Burt Aycock, Diyoul Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asa. Ijayuut Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst. Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacOonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Seiretan
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian
publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition it the opinion of the Editorial Board The East
Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for
decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters tor
publication Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The Eastai oilman.
Publications Bldg . ECT. Greenville, N.C 27858-415? for more nitorma-
tion, call (919)77-6366.
Printed on
pjpt
October 7, 1993
By Laura Wright
Women capable of deciding their reproductive needs
I am reall) glad that the
ii s health issues class is
now open to men. I'm sure that
they'll be breaking down the
door to get in there. Women, on
the other hand (and as the case
with so many other things in
life), don't have a choice in the
matter if they w?nt to get birth
control pills.
1 would like to tell you a
story about a friend of mine. I'll
call her Laer, Kate. Kate is a
graduate student and has been
on the pill for six years. When
her prescription from her un-
dergraduate institution�where
there was no mandatory health
issues class and where the doc-
tors made sure to explain and
answer questions about the
pill�ran out, Kate strolled into
Student Health under the false
impression that getting a refill
would be a piece of cake.
But alas. When will Kate
learn that if she wants cake, she
will have to go to the cafeteria?
Kate had to sit in a health
issues class and (re)learn about
the pill. But that's not all; the
class also covered information
about sexually- transmitted dis-
eases and there was even a dem-
onstration on how to applv a
condom. Now I ask you, are
these women's health issues?
Unfortunatelv, dropping the
"women's" from the title of the
class and opening the class to
men are very token gestures. The
policy remains the same: women
have to sit through a lecture
about issues that affect both
sexes.
The overall picture seems
to be that it's a woman's respon-
sibility to provide the birth con-
trol (even condoms) and to pre-
vent the diseases because the
guy ain't gonna do it. Why won't
he do it? Because he doesn't have
to! NO ONE is making him be
responsible.
Sure, heterosexual women
are more at risk than anyone
when it comes to getting a dis-
easeorgetting pregnant, butdis-
eases and babies don't drop out
of the blue. Hopefully, by the
time we get to college, we real-
ize that sex usually takes place
between two people and (with
any luck) both of those people
are willing participants. How-
ever, if women are the only ones
that are made to be responsible,
then women are also the ones
that are called irresponsible
when birth control doesn't work.
Women get to take the blame
and deal with the guilt simply
because they are the "at- risk
sex" and the gender that gets
the lectures.
The issue of responsibility
goes beyond ECU's health ser-
vices. If we look at non-surgical
methods of birth control, nearly
all of them�with the exception
of condoms�are used, in some
way, on the female body. More
importantly, the pill, sponge,
foam, diaphragm and IUDpose
var; us health risks to their us-
ers out in order to be respon-
sible, women feel that they
should be willing to take these
risks.
In general, issues concern-
ing responsibility need to be re-
thought. Maybe someday, a pill
that men can take will be made
available in this country. We
all have hormones, after all.
Since we know how to manipu-
late women's hormones, why
not figure out a way to ma-
nipulate men's? In the mean-
time, maybe ECU could dis-
pense with the health issues
class. If not, how about mak-
ing the class mandatory for the
men whose "mates" are re-
quired to attend it.
So, in the immortal words
of Kate (who gave up on her
dreams of cake), "let them eat
pills
Let's let women decide
what their needs are. During
regular appointments, health
care proyiders usually answer
questions and explain proce-
dures about birth control pills
and since a pap smear is re-
quired, women have the op-
portunity to ask questions and
to find out about their health
status.
Give women the same op-
tion that is available to men
and give us some credit. We
can take care of ourselves.
Letters to the Editor
Low SGA election turn-out prompts response
To the Editor:
We are always hearing
about the apathetic view that
college students have towards
our political system. I believe
that this is perpetuated by the
collegiate class representative
elections. This process seems
totally asinine. We, the college
body, have no idea of who these
people are, what their job is, or
how their decisions affect our
lives.
Do these persons have any
power at all? What is their job
description? Is it just another
activity that they list on their
job application to impress a
possible future employer? I
believe that if these questions
were answered, more people
would take an interest in the
system.
If our representatives are
more than just figure heads then
they should have some sort of
platform, some goals and am-
bitions. This should not be just
some popularity contest. Hell,
it is not even that. We, the vast
majority, have never even seen
or heard of the persons run-
ning, all we get is a ballot with
some faceless names printed
on it. At UNC they take the
positions so seriously that they
actually hold political debates
open to the public to allow the
candidates to give the student
body an opportunity to make
an informed decision on their
future voices. Maybe if the
SGA were as strong here as it is
at UNC then maybe we could
institute some changes that
would allow ECU to be held
with the same esteem as other
universities.
Do you realize thatoutof
nea rly 18,000 studentsnot even
700 voted in the election? That
equates to less than 4. Col-
lege students are supposed to
be the learned, the hope for a
better tomorrow, but we are
being lead blindly around by
persons whom we know noth-
ing about. What ever hap-
pened to the consciousness of
the 60s and 70s? Are we so
desensitized and sloven that
we are going to sit id ly by and
allow this travesty to con-
tinue?
You are always hearing
people gripe about the prob-
lems at the university, but the
way I see it if you are not
willing to take steps to allevi-
ate the problems, then you
should have no right to com-
plain.
Our student govern-
ment representativesare sup-
posed to be our voice to the
institution. They should state
our positions on such impor-
tantissuesas: shouldwehave
the right to have overnight
guests of the opposite sex in
our dorms, the ban on kegs at
tail-gaiting parties, even our
views on money being used
on a new recreational center
instead of the library. 1 won-
der what they have been say-
ing for us and even if they are
saying it loud enough for any-
one to hear them.
B. J. Coggins
Freshman
Nursing
All letters must be signed and accompanied with a phone
number. Students must also provide class rank and major.
All Letters to the Editor should he addressed to: Ttie East
Carolinian, Attn Opinion Editor, Students Pubs. Building,
Second Floor, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
By Joseph Horst
Sounds like a
personal
problem to me
I'm a writer, in case you hadn't
guessed.
Just by those three words, the
smarter-than-the-average bear will know
that 1 deal with a lot of B.S. in my job.
Heck, it's what I do for a living, right?
However, I'm here today to tell you that
even writers have a point where the B.S.
just becomes a little too thick, even for
them.
Case in point: the recent rash of
letters and columns dealing with how
pageants exploit and degrade women.
Excuse me, but aren't there just a few
more important things we could be talk-
ing a bou t? To the best of my knowledge,
the women who participate in these pag-
eants do so of their own free will. In
other words, they want to! If that's their
decision, who has the right to say that it
was a wrong one? Better yet, why waste
your time even worrying about the whole
thing?
Pageants, in the grand scheme of
things, are so small and unimportant
that it boggles my mind when I see how
many people are concerned about them.
Are our lives so dull that we have to
stretch so far to vent an emotion? You
want to get up in arms about something,
try this campus. Better yet, try your own
life. Wakeup and start concerning your-
self with your own actions instead of
getting all hot and bothered about some-
one else's.
Definition time, people. Matterus
interruptus: the action of sticking your
nose where it doesn't belong. Penicillin
won't cure it, and neither will Advil. As
a matter of fact, the only thing that will
make it go away is a strong dose of
common sense. Imagine that, something
you're supposed to have anyway!
How about we try something new,
hmmm? I don't know how 'bout we
stop worrying about all these general
ideals and start just living our lives the
best way we know how? You can talk til
you're blue in the face, but if you have to
back it up with actions.
Pissed you off yet? Nope? J ust wait.
Women, men, blacks, whites�you
name it, I've got a catch-all solution to all
of these problems. Mind your own busi-
ness! Live your own life and deal with
your own problems � if you've got
enough time to worry about someone
else, get a hobby. Get a clue. More im-
portantly, get a life.
I'm tired of hearing how someone
is so upset about some problem or an-
other. Do they thinking bitching and
moaning is going to solve it? Get off
yourass and do something about it. Show
the others, by your actions, what you
think the answer is and how the problem
should be dealt with. If enough people
would focus their lives on living them
correctly, we might be surprised how
quickly society wii! turn around.
Put your rose back where it be-
longs, Pinocchio. Right back on your
own face.





� �I M-nmn,m,i
TheEastCarolinian
October 7, 1993
For Rent
i-BI DR KMTOWNHOUSEtoshare,
I furnished room Near hospital Stu-
dentpreferred Washeranddryer .$225
per month, including utilities 75
PRIVATE PARKING: Private spaces
tor rent 1 block from ECU campus on
Lewis Street. Call 756-9864.
Classifieds
Page 7
Ringgold Towers
Unit 601 ,2 Bdrm
New Carpel 6 Freshly PainitJ
Water 6 Sewer Included. 2 Student Limit
at $290month per student
CONTACT MR JEHMGAN AI (31'Ji 323-04 lb
Roommate Wanted
RESPONSIBLE MALE non-smokerto
share 2-bedroom 2 bath apartment
(washer, dryer and cable included)
$237.50 rent & 12 utilities. UPPER
CLASSMAN PREFERRED. Call 758-
8567 and leavemessage. Available Janu-
ary 1st.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Non-smoker, social drinker, 13 rent,
13 utilities, Eastbrook Apts. Call 752-
4630. Ask for Angeline or Kristie or
leave message.
65 Help Wanted
ADULT ENTERTAINMENT, Mod-
eling, dancing. Part-time or full-time.
$300.00 to $400.00 per week. Call 746-
6762.
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell only 8 trips and you go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City! Great
Resume Experience! 1-800-678-6386!
$10-$400 WEEKLY. Mailingbrochures!
Sparefull-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (G1) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705.
GREEKS & CLUBS: Raise up to $1000
in JUST ONE WEEK! For your frater-
nity, sorority or club. Plus $1000 for
yourself! And a free T-shirt just tor
calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 75.
BRODY'S and Brody's for Men are
now accepting applications for addi-
tional part-time sales associates. We
seek individuals who have an interest
in retail and genuinely like helping
people. Flexible schedulesalarydis-
count. Interview at Customer Service
Brody's the Plaza Monday and Thurs-
day l-4pm.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
Make up to $2000-4,000 month teach-
ing basic conversational English
abroad. Japan, Taiwan and S. Korea.
Many provide room and board other
benefits. No previous trainingor teach-
ing certificate required. For more in-
formation call: (206) 632-1146ext.J5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 Ext. P-3712.
ROADWAY PACKAGE SYSTEM
needs package handlers to load vans
and unload trailers for the AM shift
hours 3-7 AM, $6.00 hour, tuition assis-
tance available after 30 days. Future
career opportunities in operations and
management possible. Applications
can be filled out at the ECU co-op of-
fice.
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY Indi-
viduals and student organizations
wanted to promote the hottest Spring
Break destinations, call the nation's
leader. Inter-campus programs 1-800-
327-6013
TRAVELFREE! SPRING BREAKiSeU
quality vacations! The hottest destina-
tions! Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas,South
Padre, Florida. "Professional" Tour
company, Easiest Way Towards Free
Trip! Best Combinations! Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710.
AGRICULTURAL RETAIL STORE:
Has opening for part-time stocker and
sales. Person needs to have stocking
experience andor farm background.
Must be able to work afternoons and
every other Saturday consisting of
approx. 30 hours per week. P;ck up
application at Agri Supply Co. No
phone calls.
CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESEN-
TATIVES - Brody's is accepting appli-
cations for part-time customer service
representatives. Assist customers with
inquiriesmerchandise returns. Flex-
ible schedulesalarydiscount. Inter-
view at Customer Service, Brody's, the "
Plaza, Monday And Thursday 1-4 PM.
FREE ROOM AND BOARD for fe-
male student in exchange for minimal
assistance to elderly lady. 15 minute
drive from campus. Call 355-3400 or
757-1798.
SEARS JEWELRY DEPARTMENT is
now hiring part-time sales associates.
Experiencepreferred. Apply atthe jew-
elry counter between the hours of 12-3
PM. No phone calls please.
CARPET BARGAIN CENTER: Help
wanted. Apply in person 1009
Dickinson Ave.
HELP WANTED: College Girl wanted
part-time for receptionist and light pa-
perwork. Flexible hours, ask for Brent
756-6905.
HELP WANTED: Part-time warehouse
and delivery. License required. Apply
in person at Larry's Carpetland 3010 E.
10th St. Greenville.
FREE TRIPS & CASH Call us
and find out 1 iow hundreds of students
are alreday earning free trips and lots
of cash with America's 1 company!
Choose Cancun, Bahamas, Jamaica,
Panama, Daytona or Padre! CALL
NOW! Takea BreakStudent travel (800)
328-SAVE or (617) 424-8222.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST using Word
Perfect and Windows, with filing, or-
ganizational skills for 20 hours a week.
$5.00 an hour. Calll 830-0521.
For Sale
FOR SALE: Timesharing week 24 June:
Outerbanks Beach Club, Kill Devil Hills,
3 Bedroom Penthouse, Ocean-front!
$7500.00. Call 830-0121.
SLEEPER SOFA for sale. $50. Day 355-
0411, night 321-6514. Leave message.
1988 HAWK GT blue, 12,000 miles;
new back tire, Supertrap muffler and
front fork stabilizer. Includes helmet.
$2300 firm. A must see. Call Chris at
752-3552.
GOVERNMENT SEIZEDcars, trucks,
boa ts, 4-wheelers, motorhomes,by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available in your area now!
Call 1-800-436-4363 Ext. C-5999.
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS
AND WATCHERS: Sports supple-
ments at major discount prices:
Cybergenics, Hot Stuff, Wt. Gain 900,
Vanady 1 Sulfate, Tri-Chromelene,
Mega-mass and much more! For info
call Charles at 321-2158.
MEMBERSHIP: Club for Women
Only. Low monthly payments. Save
$59 starting fee! Call Angie 931-9768.
SEARS KENMORE PORTABLE
DRYER - Excellent condition. $150. Has
cotton sturdy, touch-up, permanent
press, air-oniy cycles. 756-9642.
BICYCLE-88Trekl40062cm,Shimano
150 comp. Avocet mod. 30 computer,
MUST SELL. Never wrecked, well-
maintained, near perfect condition.
$375 neg. Call 758-7041.
FERRET FOR SALE - 7 months old,
greybrown for $100. Includes cage,
water bottle, litter box, dish and food.
For Sale
Call 752-4627 - leave message.
SOLOFLEX - weight machine for sale.
Excellentcondition, new weightstraps,
no butterfly attachment, but can be
bought from factory . $575 neg. 756-
9864 anytime.
SPRING BREAK - Plan early, save $50
and get best rooms! Prices increase 11
15! Bahamas Cruise 6 davs includes 12
meals, $279! Panama city room w
kitchen, $129! Cancun from Raleigh,
$339, Jamaica from Raleigh, $419, Key
West, $239, Daytona Room wkitchen,
$149! 1-800-678-6386.
FOR SALE: 4 Walnut Creek Grass
Passes for the remaining 1993 concert
season. 2 for $28.50 or all for $57.00.
Call 756-2592 or 752-3865 and leave
message.
TREK 820, '92 $250 neg. Hardly used,
830-6290, excellent condition.
I
i i
s
Personals
room 242. Drop in on us anytime. Ap-
ostolic Campus Ministry.
Lost & Found
LOST: FemaleGolden Retriever, lyr &
4mos old. Navy collar & silver choke
chain. Last seen off Woodlawn park
area on 9-13-93. Answers to the name
of Jazmine. Reward offered. Please call
758-0915.
LOST - Orange Tabby, neutered male.
Lost in vicinity of Tar River area. If
found, please call 752-0226. Probably
went for a ride, if found in your car,
please call.
FOUND: Man's ring on Softball fields.
Call Recreational Services 757-6387.
US Greek
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
19,271 TOPICS - ALL SUBJECTS
Oder Catalog Today with Visa MC or COD
H 800-3510222
Or. rush $2.00 to: Research information
1132? Idaho Ave 206-A. Los Angeles. CA 90025
PARTY OVER HERE! Only if you
have a Mobile Music Productions Disc
Jockey. MMP is the most popular
choice in disc jockey services. Wide
music selection. Professionalism. Fall
dates filling fast. Call Lee at 758-4644
for booking.
ATTENTION TENNIS PLAYERS:
Tired of paying high prices to have
your tennis racket strung? Call Greg
at 758-3313 for prices.
WHOOT! HERE IT IS - World Music
Productions Disc Jockey Service.
Bringing you the biggest variety of
music,bestratesand most experienced
DJ's. Go with Greek's No. 1 choice.
Call Vic at 752-6164 for early booking.
NEED WORD PROCESSTYPING?
Lowest rates on campus. Incl. proof-
reading, spelling, gram corrections.
Over 15 yrs. exp. Call Cindy 355-3611
anytime.
BBS Personals
DO YOU HAVE A TASTE FOR
TRUTH? Bible Study every Tuesday
and Wednesday. 7:30 PM, Mendenhall
DELTA CHI: Hey Dave, I think you've
been hanging arour d the Stowers kid a
little too much! Maybe you two should
make a new foreign language together.
It would make things a whole lot easier
for you. Ha! Sean, the next time you
decide to try out for ECU's Slip n' Slide
team, don't practice in the middle of the
road. You mightgethurt. Nexttimeyou
ought to try jumping out of a jeep going
60.1 had loads of fun when it happened
to me. Ha Ha! -Your Public Relations
Man.
ALPHA PHI, we had a blast last Thurs-
day night at Kelly's. Hope you did also.
We've got to get together again soon!
Thanks for joining us! The Brothers and
AM's of DELTA CHI.
PI DELTA-Everythingturnedoutokay
last Saturday for the game. At least ev-
erything but the game. We will see you
again soon. - The Brothers and AM's of
DELTA CHI.
ZET A T AU ALPHA vr hes everyone a
safe and happy Fall Break!
PI DELTA - Last Friday was definitely
HEAVEN, but our pledges had a better
teapot. Let's do it again. Brothers and
Pledges of PI Lam.
THANK YOU Deana, Krista, Hillery
and Jen C. for the awesome pledge lock-
in! We love all the Zeta Sisters! Love -
the Pledges of Zeta Tau Alpha.
CHI O and Chi O Pledges, We had a
great time at pre-downtown Friday
night. Saturday was also a blast You
have somebeautifulpledges to go along
with your lovely sisters. Love, the Broth-
ers of Lambda Chi Alpha.
Announcements
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
SCHOLARSHIPS
AVAILABLE
Approximately2 2,3 00 will be
awarded in scholarships to
School of Business majors (those
students already in the School
of Business). Students inter-
ested in making application for
these scholarships should se-
cure forms from one of the fol-
lowing department offices: Ac-
counting - GCB 3208; Decision
Sciences - 3418; Finance - 3420;
Management - 3106; Marketing
- 3414. All applications must
be submitted to Ruth Jones (GCB
3210), Chairman of the School
of Business Scholarship Com-
mittee, by October 18, 1993.
Students may apply for one or
more of the scholarships. Final
selection will be made by the
ECU Student Scholarships, Fel-
lowships and Financial Aid
Committee upon recommenda-
tion of the Dean of the School of
Business. The Dean's recom-
mendation will be made from
candidates selected by the
School of Business Scholarship
Committee.
council of student
c�SaMional
LEADERS
Student Leaders! HOMECOMING,
HALLOWEEN, the UNITED WAY,
and the upcoming BOND REF-
ERENDUM What do these have
to do with you? If you hold an
office or leadership position
with an ECU organization, find
out on Thursday, October 7. The
council of Student Organiza-
tion Leaders (COSOL) will meet
at 4 PM in the MSC multi-pur-
pose Room. For more info, call
757-4796.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Get in shape this semester! Reg-
istration for the October 18-
December 3rd fitness class will
be October 13-19 in 204
Christenbury Gymnasium. The
cost per session is $10stu-
dents and S20faculty, staff,
spouse. Drop-in tickets can also
be purchased anytime in 204
Christenbury for $5student
and $10faculty, staff, spouse
and will be valid for five classes.
Choose from aerobics, step, low
impact, Hi-Lo, funk, Belly Bust-
ers, aquaerobics, Hi-Lo step,
power step, and toning. For more
information, call Recreational
Services at 757-6387.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Get a grip! The Outdoor Recre-
ation Program at Recreational
Services will host a climbing
workshop at the Hard Roc Tower
on Thursday, Oct. 21 from 3-5
PM. This workshop will intro-
duce participants to the basics
of climbing including safety,
equipment and utilization, knot
tying, belaying, and climbing
technique. For more informa-
tion, call Recreational Services
at 757-6387. See you at the
Hard Roc Climbing Tower!
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
Adopt-A-Highway is scheduled
for Thursday October 14. Any-
one interested in volunteering
should meet at the Carolina East
Center (Across from Red Lob-
ster) in front of the Wachovia
Teller at 4 PM. Earn 15 points
towards a chance for a free trip
to New Orleans.
ECU POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum will meet
October 7 at 8 PM in 241
Mendenhall SC. Those wanting
feedback on their poems should
bring8-10 copies of each poem.
ECU STUDENTS FOR THE
i ETHICAL TREATMENT QF
ANIMALS
ECU SETA Club will hold its
first meeting Thursday, Octo-
ber 7 at 6:30 PM in General
Classroom Building room 1005.
STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICES
In October, the Student Health
Service will be offering the FLU
VACCINE for the 93-94 school
year. It is recommended that
all high risk individuals be im-
munized. High risk includes in-
fants, elderly, immunosup-
pressed individuals and per-
sons with chronic illness. If
you are at high risk or would
just like to be immunized, the
vaccine will be given beginning
October 11 through Nov. 19th.
There is a nominal fee for the
vaccine. For more info, call SHS
At 757-6841.
COMMUNICATING TO
ASSERT YOURSELF
The counseling Center is offer-
ing a two-session workshop for
students designed to identify
effective communication tech-
niques for achieving
assertiveness in your life. Em-
phasis will be placed on the
relationship between self-es-
teem and assertiveness behav-
ior. Members are expected to
attend both meetings. The meet-
ings will be Wednesday Octo-
ber 13 and Friday October 15
from 9-10 AM. Call 757-6661
to sign up.
RELATIONSHIPS GROUP
The Counseling Center is offer-
ing a therapy group for male
and female students who wish
to understand the challenges
and confusion's experienced in
relationships with others. The
group will meet Wednesdays,
3:30-5:00 PM. Please call 757-
6661 for more information. The
group begins October 13.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS FOR OCTOBER
5-OCTOBER11
WED OCT. 6 - ECU SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA, Robert Hause, con-
ductor (Wright Auditorium, 8
PM, free). THUR OCT. 7 - ECU
FACULTY RECITAL: "Saxophone
in Chamber Music Brad Foley,
saxophone; Coastal Winds Quin-
tet; East Carolina Brass; Mark
Ford, marimba; John B. O'brien,
piano; A. Louise Toppin, so-
prano; Nathan Williams, clari-
net (A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 PM, free). FRI OCT. 8 -
RUSSELL SMITH, trumpet, in
Senior Recital (A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall, (9:00 PM, free).
For additional information, call
757-6851 or the 24-hour at
757-4370.
GREENVILLE FRIENDS
MEETING
Greenville Friends Meeting
(Quakers) welcomes students to
weekly meeting for worship.
Open to all. St. Paul's Episcopal
Church. 4th St & Reade. 4 PM
Sundays. For info: 758-6789 or
355-7335.
ECU BUDDHIST
MEDITATION SOCIETY
Zen, Meditation workshop Sun-
day, Oct. 9th, 1993. Taitaku Pat
Phelan, Zen Priest from San
Francisco Zen Center. Ledonia
Wright Building, ECU Campus.
11 AM-3 PM Bring bag lunch.
Call 355-3536 to register. No
charge.
ECNAO
Meeting Oct. 13, 1993 in
Mendenhall, room 14, from 7
PM -8 PM.
ECU DEPARTMENT OF
PHYSICS AND STUDENT
PHYSICAL SOCIETY
Joint Seminar. Topic: Eddy Cur-
rent Nondestructive Testing.
Dr. Shridhar Nath, Analytical
Surfaces and Materials, Inc. 107
Research Drive, Hampton VA.
23666. Friday, October 8,1993,
3 PM. Howell Science Complex
Seminar Room, BN 109. Coffee
Time - 2:45 PM.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Make it official! There will be a
soccer officials clinic on Thurs-
day, October 14 at 5 PM in
Brewster D-105. For more in-
formation, call Rec Services at
757-6387.
ECU EQUESTRIAN TEAM
Horse Lovers! Come to a meeting
on October 19 at 5 PM in room
212 of Mendenhall. Everyone
who likes to ride horses or wants
to learn more or share what
they know is welcome. Rock
Springs Equestrian Center and
its school horses are available
for club activities. Intercolle-
giate competition is also pos-
sible.
COUNSELING CENTER
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND A
CAREER: That is it. No more
p ograms will be offered before
early registration. If you want
help in choosing a major, this is
your LAST CHANCE! Programs
rOTfl Greek
PI DELTA - We have been to hell and
back. Hope we can do it again some
time soon. Love Pi Lambda Phi.
PI DELTA hopes everyone has a great
Fall break!
CONGRATULATIONS to our "Offi-
cial" Nursing students! We are proud
of you guys! Keep up your hard work!
Love, the Sisters and Pledges of Pi
Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Pi
Delta Flag Football Team! You guys
are awesome! Good Luck! Love, your
Sisters and Pledges.
TO PHI KAPPA TAU: Thanks for a
great time Saturday. We all had a blast!
Love, the Sisters and pledges of Alpha
Xi Delta.

THE SISTERS OF ALPHA DELTA PI
would like to wish everyone a great
Fall break!
KAPPA ALPHA: We had a great tim
going from "Rags to Riches Thank$
foreverything! Havea great Fall breakj
Love, Alpha Delta PL
TO THE LOVELY LADIES Of
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: Thank you
for a wonderful night last Thursday!
We all had a great time. We are looking
forward to having you push our bub-
tons again soon. With love and antici-
pation, the pledges of Theta Chi.
GREG AND BRYAN: We can't wait
for our burgers on Thursday. Love,
Mrs. Parti, Momma and the girls.
BROTHERS AND PLEDGES OF
THETA CHI: Thank you for a woiv
derful tailgate brunch on Saturday
morning. Although it was early, w�
made it through the night. Can't waif:
for Stop light next month. Love, the
Sisters and Pledges of Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS Lisa Berting
onSenior class President Weloveyou!
Love, your sisters and new members
of Alpha Omicron Pi.
ALPHA SIG, we had a great time
helpingoutwiththecarwashLet'sget
togetheragain soon. Love, Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
DELTA SIGMA PHI would like to
wish a belated congratulations to their
Beta Pi Pledge class officers: President
Dave, Vice-president Roy Bateman,
Secretary Jonathon Ewart, and Trear
surer Chuck White, and to all the rest of
the pledge class: Andy Barfield, Jason
Haralson, Mike Davis, Eric Hall, Roy
Knaut, Wes Crawford, Bryan Taylor
and Kevin Felton. Sorry if s so late yoii
guys! ;
begin Wednesday October 13
Thursday October 14 and Fri-
day October 15. You must reg
ister in the counseling center
before the program. That's alt
before Fall break!
STUDY IN AUSTRALIA
It is possible to pay ECU tu
ition and study in Brisbane
Australia for a semester or
academic year! To meet the:
International Relations stu
dent exchange coordinator whoj
will be visiting thej
Queensland University of
technology in Brisbane, come
to the International Programs
office on 9th Street, behind"
McDonald's, on either Tues-j
day, Oct. 19 or Wednesday!
Oct. 20 at 3:30 PM. She will be
here to discuss the exchange
program and will be able to
answer many of your ques
tions about studying and liv-I
ing in Australia. If you cannot!
make it at either of these times
contact Stephanie Evancho at!
757-6769 to set up a time to!
meet. Don't miss this oppor-l
tunity. ;
STUDENT EXCHANGE
Australia, Netherlands, Cali
fornia, Colorado, these are aj
few places some of your peers;
will be going in the Spring;
because they came by the of
fice in September! It's not too-
late to consider a student ex
change or study abroad expe
rience for Spring semester! If
you are interested in study!
sites available, please contact!
Stephanie Evancho, Interna
tional Programs, 757-6769 for!
details on how you can pay!
ECU tuition and study at an
other location! You ha �-�;
mid-October
!






.T. iTmimtiik.i
���
77ze �&s� Carolinian
ge 8
Lifestyle
October 7, 1993
BLFS offers students first legalized 'trip'
By jimmy Rostar
Staff Writer
It's no secret that downtown
Greenv ille is known for providing
a good time via a plethora of spirits
that can leave you in various states
of mind by the end of the exerting.
About two weeks ago, one of
the area's shops�that's right, it's
not a bar�became the first down-
town spot to feature a unique and
safe way to take your mind on a
long, strange trip.
BLT'S, operated by Bill and
Denise Overman, is the place to go
to check out the "electronic mind
trip What looks like an innocent
little contra ption attached to a com-
pact disc player in the back corner
of the store is actually a device that
allows you to explore your imagi-
nation with your eyes closed on a
couch.
Bill Overman said that he
picked up on the trip machine dur-
ing the Lollapolooza tour. He pur-
chased the machine about a month
ago and said that, since he put it in
the store, it has been popular with
customers.
Overman said that the "trip" is
"light-and-sound enhanced. You
can listen to whatever music you
want, and there's thirty-five differ-
ent programs. Once you get more
and more invoked with it, you
can run a program that goesalong
with whatever music vou choose
The machine combines fre-
quencies and pitches that provide
the aural effect, and Overman said
that even though they may not be
detectable by theear, these factors
"make the music and the light go
together that much better
Where the sound and light,
leave off, however, your brain
takes over. The light penetrates
your eyelids from a pair of spe-
cially-rigged glasses that have
lights embedded in the lenses. You
slip on a set of headphones after
choosing the music (the Grateful
Dead's "Infrared Roses" is one
popular example, Overman said),
and then you allow the lights to
form wild patterns, flashes and de-
signs.
At times, it's difficult to tell
what's real or imagined during the
program. In addition to the music, a
pulse keeps in rhythm with the fre-
quency of the lights, providing a
range of effects that can both relax
and excite you within moments.
Programs cost $4, and they run
between 10 to 15 minutes.
Keep in mind that BLT'S fea-
tures locally designed t-shirts, which
Denise Overman said are the main-
stay of the store. Designs include
political, environmental, musical
and local-interest messages and im-
ages.
Bill Overman also owns a t-
shirt screening shop across the
street from the boutique. Along
with co-owner Les Franck,
Overman said that in addition to
putting out the shirts that are sold
in the shop, BLT'S can fill special
group orders. "We do anything
from three dozen to three thou-
sand he said of the number of
shirts they can produce.
The shop also stocks a variety
of baja pull-overs and other ap-
parel, as well as Birkenstock san-
dals, sunglasses, candles, incense,
beaded curtains and other eclec-
tic items.
BLT'S isopen from 11:00a.m.
to 6:00 p.m Sunday through
Thursday, and on Friday and Sat-
urday, the shop is open until 9:00
p.m.
The shop's phone number is
757-1007, and BLT'S is located at
205 East Fifth Street. Bill
Overman's screening store is di-
rectly across the street, and the
number there is 752-6953.
So stop on in and say hi to the
crew at BLT'S. From mind trips
to "Air Jerry" (Garcia, that is)
shirts, BLT'S offers a different
slant for lovers of the unusual.
Meiher Nature
Attic celebrates 22nd birthday
Photo courtesy of Mother Nature
This Thursday night Mother Nature (pictured above) will help the Attic celebrate its 22nd birthday. Come
out for a night of drink specials, door prizes and good ol' American classic rock tunes. See you there!
By Julie Totten
Lifestyle Editor
As long as this school has been
on the map, there's been a nightclub
near the comer of Fifth Street.
This Thursday night, owner Joe
Tronto w ill be celebrating the Attic's
22nd birthday with Mother Nature
and drink specials a 11 weekend long.
WSFL radio will be at the festivities
along with numerous door prizes
and free admission to the first 22
people.
Mother Na ture, which has been
known in the Greenville area and
statewide as a classic-rock cover
band, will take the stage around
10:30. Although the majority of this
band's music is classic rock, the
band has also began to explore their
own sounds in original songs.
"We wanted to gain a strong
following using covers that every-
one knows and loves. A lot of times
when people are in clubs they want
to here something they know said
Warren Sumner, the band's bass-
ist.
The quintet is composed of:
Todd Proctor, drums; Mark Will-
iams, guitar and vocals; Robert
Swain, percussion and vocals; Jon
Matthews, guitar and vocals; and
Warren Sumner, bass.
The band made a different ap-
proach to finding their audience�
through music people can sing
along with or at least reflect back
on past memories that these songs
surface. Often times a person's step
into music occurred in junior high
school, listening to the rebellious
runes of the 60s and 70s.
Sunshine Alternative, which
also promotes Greenville-based
Purple School, represents Mother
Nature in all of N.C S.C. and VA
"As far as cover runes we're com-
petitive with any band in the na-
tion Sumner said.
Each member of the band has
been playing at least six years,
and each play from a diverse
school of musical thought. Vo-
cals are reminiscent of Crosby,
Stills and Nash, but the drum-
mer, Todd Proctor, leans heavily
on his jazz background.
"Our vocals are done a lot of
the time in three-part harmonies.
These days you don't hear many
good voices with the bands, so
we have a talent that has been
overlooked lately said Proctor.
Thursday night will be the
night we can all roll back into the
past 22 years and praise the mu-
sic Mother Nature keeps alive
and celebrate the club that pro-
motes music in our area.
Doors will open at 9:30, and
don' t forget the first 22 people get
in free.
Happy 22nd, Joe
'Malice' considered true
thriller of fall season
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The tag line for the new thriller,
Malice, reads: "Some things you
never see coming Believe the tag
line.
Malice begins with a murder
mystery and evolves into some-
thingmuch more intriguing. Andy
(Bill Pullman) and his wife Tracy
(Nicole Kidman) have just bought
a house near Westerly College, a
fictitious New England school.
Andy is the Associate Dean of Stu-
dents, and his wife volunteers at
the hospital affiliated with West-
erly. The couple is short on money
but long on love. Because of their
pecuniary problems they decide to
rent their third floor as an apart-
ment.
The tenant they take on is Dr.
Jed Hill (Alec Baldwin), a young
surgeon who recently started work
at the school hospital. Dr. Hill ex-
udes confidence, and this turns
Tracy off. Andy and Dr. Hill meet
when a rape victim is saved by Dr.
Hill. Coincidentally, Andy and
Jed learn that they went to the same
high school so Andy offers Jed the
apartment in his house.
This plot arrangement takes
15 minutes and sets the scene for all
that follows. Because of the twists
and turns that this thriller takes, I
will refrain from other plot discus-
sions. Suffice it to say that the path
to the end of this story is circuitous.
Malice promises to keep viewers
guessing.
The talent in this project should
impress most viewers, even if the
names are nothousehold ones. Gor-
don Willis (all three Godfather films
plus many of Woody Allen's films,
including Manhattan) does the cin-
ema tography quite well. By inten-
tionally providing particular
closeups, he frustrates the tense
viewer who desperately wants to
discern which characters are lurk-
ing in the background. He also ef-
fectively uses lights and shadows
to invoke the desired mood.
Aaron Sorkin, whocrafted the
script for A Fezv Good Men from his
own play, co-authored both the
story and the script for Malice. He
displays a cunning ability to enter-
tain the masses without being con-
descending. He has written an ex-
tremely intelligent, though at times
implausible, thriller that far sur-
passes the likes of Basic Instinct,
Unlawful Entry or Fatal Attraction.
Director Harold Becker has
proven to be more than capable of
directing thrillers, having been at
the helm for The Onion Field and
Sea of Love. He provides the audi-
ence with a few expected thrills,
presenting them intelligently with
many other, more subtle, pleasures
such as the interesting characters.
The cast solidifies this well-
photographed, intelligently writ-
ten and smartly directed thriller.
Alec Baldwin skillfully portrays the
arrogant surgeon. He gives Jed
plenty of life in his eyes, causing
the viewer to be wary oihim. Nicole
Kidman gives a knock-out perfor-
mance and seems poised to be-
come a major star. Bill Pullman,
who was last seen as Meg Rvan's
allergy-prone fiance in Sleepless in
Seattle, anchors the cast with the
most important role. He, like
Kidman, should see his Hollywood
stock rise considerably with his role
in Malice.
The supporting cast also de-
serves acclaim. Neurith (Lilith
Crane on "Cheers") plays an of-
ficer on the Westerly campus po-
lice force who keeps trying to con-
vince Andy that her people are
doing all they can to stop the string
of rapes and deaths that occur on
campus. Peter Gallagher plays a
lawyer who, though unctous, en-
gages the viewer's empathy.
George C. Scott and Anne Bancroft
both ha ve small but important roles
that give Malice the necessary star
power to be considered a serious
film.
Like Sea of Love, one of the rea-
sons Malice is so entertaining is
that the story not only provides
thrills but also raises other interest-
ing issues. In Sea of Love, the lives of
despera te people seeking romance
through newspapers weighs
heavily on audiences. In Malice,
medical malpractice issues arise
that cause the viewer to think.
Another discussion occurs within
See MALICE page 10
House of Love abandons 'perfection'
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
It has been five years since
The House of Love appeared on
the music scene with their 1987
88 debut, The Creation. Their lat-
est effort and fourth LP, Audi-
ence With the Mind, was released
in June of this year. So this re-
view may be yesterday's news
to some of you.
Like their third release, Au-
dience With the Mind was re-
corded in 12 days, which may
tell you something about the
album's sound.
The House of Love has been
noted for their attention to struc-
ture and production, but this
time they are abandoning their
perfectionist approach for a more
raw and appealing sound.
It seems that a lot of today's
alternative music is suffering
from over-production�there
are too many cooks spoiling the
broth. However, this album
should be worthy of some type
of non-sellout award. There is no
fanciful production here. They are
not releasing a single or planning
an endless tour to promote this
album, and that's a brave move
for any musician.
The band has returned to its
original three-piece lineup of Guy
Chadwick (vocals, guitar), Chris
Groothuizen (bass) and Pete Evans
(drums). Although they dropped
their fourth member, Terry Bick-
ers (guitar), they still manage to
come through with a full sound.
Since there is no hype sur-
rounding this release, the album
has to speak for itself, and it does.
This is an all-around good al-
bum with 12 tracks that differ
greatly in texture and feel. Some
of the more notable ones are "Ero-
sion "Portrait in Atlanta" and
the haunting "Hollow
I should probably end this re-
view before I over-scrutinize
House of Love; it is probablv best
to adhere to the band's policy of
no hype.
Just give it a listen.
Photo courtesy of Mercury Records
Pictured above are members of The House of Love. From left to right
are Pete Evans, Guy Chadwick and Chris Groothuizen. Check it out.
Filibuster's nice getaway from campus dining
By Steve Griffin
Staff Writer
Filibuster's Restaurant is some-
thing downtown Greenville needs
more of.
This restaurant adds a new fla-
vor to downtown. Filibuster's de-
cor is what makes it so different
from any other downtown restau-
rant. They have a colorful carpet
surrounded by matchinggreenand
maroon walls. The restaurant also
features an upstairs with a nice view
of downtown and of the bar, which is
centered in the middle of the bot-
tom floor. The walls in
Filibuster's are covered with
photographs of politicians
from Bill Clinton to Jesse
Helms. Themanagersaidthis
idea came from some restau-
rants in Washington, D.C. with
similar political symbols.
Before Filibusters opened up, the
owners wrote to all of the U.S. Con-
gress and many of them sent in
autographpictures to therestaurant.
The picruresof someof thepresi-
dents came from antique
stores and friends. The
manager said there are
equal amount of both Re-
publicans and Democrats
on the walls of Filibusters.
The food is as great
as the atmosphere of the restaurant.
The menu offers a wide variety of
mostly sandwiches and dinner en-
Don't Run My Life: Beautiful
trees. They also have something a
little different with a section of
smothered potatoes including
bacon,cheddar and broccoli and
potatoes.
In the steak section of the
menu, they offer different meat
temperatures they could prepare
your steak at. I thought this was
very helpful when ordering a steak
to my exact liking. I tried the
See FOOD page 10
You know how it might be
somebody's birthday and you
like them but they're not your
very bestest friend and vou want
to give them something but you
don't want to spend any money?
Well look, it's the thought that
counts, so sometimes you can
just give that.
But anyway, here's what
concerns me: bad, dumb, mean
students. Why should other stu-
dents and teachers be subjected
to rude individuals who disre-
spect them? I mean, if you disre-
spect your teachers and fellow stu-
dents, aren't you really making a
statement against education, a
commodity that many never get a
chance to own? Aren't you indict-
ing the whole educational system,
using your own unfounded and
misguided principles? Aren't you
making a personal statement, with
no substantiated support or docu-
mentation, against America?
In short, aren't you threaten-
ing the life of the president? Mv
friends, that is a federal offense!
So think twice before strolling into
class late and using foul language
and strutting around and being
cool and packing up your books
20 minutes before class ends. You
could get into big trouble. And
besides, chicks aren't impressed
by rudeness anymore. Don't be-
lieve those Brut commercials.
Speaking of Brut commer-
cials, how come that guy grits his
teeth and furrows his brow, but
he never sweats while he's un-
screwing the radiator cap? De-
spite all that steam! And while
we're at it, let's change "Be
Young. Have Fun. Drink Pepsi"
to "Be a Mass Consumer. Have
No Free Will. Drink What You're
Told
And one last tiling. Why
don't Meister Brau and
Milwaukee's Best advertise on
TV? Why should they? They've
already cornered the market on
See CRANIUM page 10






-
October 7, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
ns release new album
i uind them
a )roughttosociet) Evolv-
ing throughout its 21-year career,
beginning in l971,thisGermanband
has performed for audiences all over
the world,creating tor themselves a
record-brea kmg ca reer.
The Scorpions areoneof the few
Western bands to have had the
chance to play at locations world-
wide, even in areas that would not
normally host foreign bands. They
were there when the Berlin Wall
came down; they performed in the
Soviet Union in 1988 at the Moscow-
Music Peace Festival and, in 1986,
and they also performed in Budapest
from behind the Iron Curtain.
The band touches on world is-
sues. With their album, Crazy World,
on which they include an anthem for
the Desert Storm troops, thev sing
about the regressive reality of
Germany's wave of hate crimes.
"Winds of Change" was a global hit,
becoming number one in 12 coun-
triesaround the world, selling nearly
seven million copies worldwide.
In their new album, Face tlie Heat,
a new band member, Ralph
Rieckermann, replaces the original
bassist Francis Buchholz. This is both
a musical purgative and rebirth for
the Scorpions. Thebandstill consists
of Herman RarebeU'scolorful trade-
mark drumming, the dual guitar
work of Rudolf Schenker and
Matthiasjabs. Jabs' rhythm and lead
riffs abound in blissful intensity.
In this album, The Scorpions
cover several social issues ("Alien
Nation "Ship Of Fools "Unholy
Alliance"). Thev also face some dis-
tinct personal and professional prob-
lems including a painful and public
parting of the ways with Buchholz.
They have chanelled those painful,
negative feelings into strong, posi-
tive bodies of work. "That has al-
ways been our philosophy
Schenkersavs. "And throughoutthe
pastcoupleof years, wereally needed
to test our mettle
Face tlie Heat is a distinguished
Photo Courtesy of Mercury Records
These guys had their start in 1971 and, to everyone's surprise, are still
releasing albums. Face the Heat, the latest release, has political overtones.
body of work that shows a remark-
able musical and conceptual matu-
ration. It is an adventurous addition
to its predecessor, Crazy World. "We
knew earlv on that we were going to
take theplunge'jabsadds. "In spite
of, and probably because of the tu-
mult around us, we gained the cour-
age to take some risks
The band wanted toachieve the
same influence in the recording stu-
dio that they had previously cre-
ated. Therefore, they employed the
"single take" theory in making Face
Vie Heat. This resulted in a sponta
neity and experimental effortpresent
in the punk metal meandering of
"Nightmare Avenue" and the jazv
quality of Jabs' skilled guitar work
on "Hate To Be Nice
Thev are trying to become stron-
ger than thev had been, since before
the loss ofa band member. Schenker
says, "You must laugh in the face of
adversity and we all have to face the
heat in life. Some things, both person-
ally and on a much larger scale are
simplv out of our hands. The trick is
to emerge relatively uascathed and
stronger than before
The Scorpions started out as a
rock 'n' roll band, but they have
emerged as the voice and eyes of the
people. With their background of
backyard geography, The Scorpions
report, through their music, the
changing complexion of the political
world. The band has gradually al-
tered its purely rock'n' roll intentions
in moving toward more meaningful
messages about the power of living
life on the front lines.
The Scorpions have used music
to move towards world unity. They
have broken rules and crossed invis-
ibleboundariesduring their career of
music. Now, they have broken
ground with their new album, and
they Face Tlie Heat as they always
have.
The Lifestyle
section of TEC is
looking for a
dependable,
great-writing
book reveiwer.
All majors can
apply at the
Student
Publications
Building, across
from Joyner
Library.
PAPA OLIVER'S 1 ST ANNIVERSARY
4-7 PM THURSDAY OCTOBER 14TH
j&EH
?
BEST PIZZA ! BEST PRICE!
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316C East 10th Street
Serving ECU & Surrounding Area
758-6600
FREE DELIVERY!
LIVE REMOTE
WFTHWRQR&
JEFF DIAMOND
� free giveaways from East Coast Music
� free Huanuchi wing samples
� Drawings for free concert tickets
� 49c slices
Huanuchi wing eating contest
Call to register at 758-6600
Harris feerer
mm low prick
QUALITY AND VARIETY
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GROUND FRESH SEVERAL TIMES DAILY
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Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday October 6 Through Tuesday, October 12 1993 In Orccnville Stores Only.
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federa! hood Stamps.





October 7, 1993
age 8
menu.
� i me ot
� cms Ihave
from Barbecue
i potato dans v ith
ces n the menu a re very
reasonable with a fuJJ dinner rang-
. round five tn se en dollars.
Iheone thing on the menu fruit
disappointed me u as the dessertse-
lection. There were only two on the
menu including French silk pie and
cheesecake. There was one other
dessert thatthewai tress told usabout,
which was a Reese's pie which I
tried. It was a little too rich for me,
but my guest seemed to enjoy the
French silk pie. I think they need
mi ,re selections for dessert beca use it
is an important ending to a good
meal.
The restaurant's appearance
was unique and interesting and the
food was delicious. I would rate
Filibuster's as definitelv the best res-
taurant downtown and one of the
best in Greenville.
Continued
CRANIUM p��
iss under-age drinkers
� buds w ho'd drink
snot n it was $3 i 2 pack
imerhing to think about.
How long will Americans al-
media to treat us like in-
fantile gullible peons? I'll tell you
long. As long as we keep
perpetuating a failed two-party
system and allow continued sub-
jugation of the masses through
taxes, a non-functioning judicial
system and universities that
would rather build rec centers
than libraries!
Yes, I love you all. Yes, we are
all brothers and sisters But re-
member, just because I love you
don't mean I like you.
I'm Richard Cranium. Don't
run my life.
70s
Rock!
Rock Historian
Barry Drake will
bring his multi-
media
presentation
"70s Rock�The
Good, The Bad,
and The Ugly" to
Hendrix Theatre
on Tuesday, Oct.
19 at 8:00. The
program is
sponsored by the
ECU Student
Union.
Photo courtesy of
Student Union
MALICE
Continued from page 8
the film about whether or not
people would actually "give their
right arm for a million dollars
Malice bristles with excitement
and is presented in such a way as to
engage the viewer�from first
frame to last.
in the final tally though, Malice
never rises above its commonplace
roots. Though the story is better
than the ones found in most thrill-
ers, the script never distances itself
far enough from theconvenrionsof
the genre to be considered artistic
in any way.
The film provides great
thrills with better than usual char-
acter developmentbut not much
more.
Still, the story is so engaging
thatMaRcwarrantsa hearty rec-
ommendation. Without giving
too much away, 1 must say that
any thri Her, in which a serial killer
plays only a small part, provides
lots of unexpected thrills.
Oil a scale on one to 10, Mal-
ice rates a seven.
3 CLUBS IN ONI
There will NOT
be an editorial
meeting
Thursday. Have
a gi eat,well
deserved fall
break.
yj��.
��WHHMWRMnMHHHgaMMMHaMWHNniWHH
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
316 East 10th Street
within walking distance from ECU
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BUY ONE-GET ONE
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Close to Campus in Downtown G'ville
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Hours 10am-6pm, Mon-Sat
1 Item Blend-In
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THE PLAYGROUND �
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now out! Came early for
first picks!
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
vGreenville Square shopping Center (next to Kmart)
I SI XII SI MAI I I1ANCI SHOW l AMI R(
Show is Oct. 9th at 9:00pm
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�� �� 'ndrmtirtofGmlKTElKtrama �






(' ia
Adventures Of Kempie Boy
By Kempie WANG TV
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Spare Time
by A. Farkas
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PREVIOUS COMK PoRTRAyiNo- CHIMP'S AS fllNDLESS
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Phoebe
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MUST RE-LEARN EVERYTHING
SOCIETY MAS TAUGHT YOU. IT'S UKCM
YOU NEVE. auESTlONEP ANYONE
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ENUGHTENEP
Introducing three special cartoonists from our very own newspaper staff. We laughed at
their strips when first submitted, but after some slick persuasion and a handgun to the head,
we realized that Pirate Comics wouldn't be complete without their contributions! So grit yer
teeth and hope they go back to their own jobs soon as we welcome Burt Aycock (Layout
Manager), Amy E. Wirtz (Opinion Editor) and Gregory Dickens (Managing Editor)!
The Snoring Planet
Seigfreid and Barth
by Murphy and Davis,
M oue. cwweese, ee.c is n s�fliL, BLuE-6e.�� plUuct whicw it-s hobitovts call, cailth (that is, i else
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by Frieda "I hate being lefthanded" Mae
Attention Ya Cartoonist Bums!
That's right, my little everlasting gobstoppers, it's time for another newly renovated crystal-clear
cartoonist meetings. All presently employed cartoonists must come to the offices of The East Carolinian
next Monday, Oct. 18, at 6:00pm. Attendance is mandatory. If you don't show up. don't expect to see
your strip on this page. Just because we don't deal with the Real World doesn't mean we can slack oil!
If there is a scheduling conflict, call Chris Kempie or leave a message at 758-K824. But I know you'll
all be there; it'll be more fun than a Russian Coup! And you might just leam something!
���
��' .1 J� "M �� �





October 7, 1993



" .

J40W�C0WJnG CUCffDS
� 1:30 p.m.
Judging for Banner Contest Entrants
@ Student Store
Voting for
Homecoming Candidates
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Allied Health
Bottom College Hill
Student Store
Brody Medical School
(Support Services Office, 2 N45)
9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
� Bring valid ECU I.D.
� Vote for 8 candidates
(no more, no less)
Check the Oct. 14 issue of The
East Carolinian for a full-page
visual listing of all candidates.
Saturday
Octa&en, ?6
�5-6:30 p.m.
PIRATEFEST @ Central
Campus Mall
� Featured: ECU Marching
Pirates, Golden Girls,
Cheerleaders, Pure Gold
Dancers, Dance Expressions,
Gospel Choir, Jeff Charles and
1993 Homecoming Candidates
� Floats line up for judging at
4:30 p.m.
� Organizations bring canned
goods for Spirit Cup points.
� Mark canned goods with
organization's name.
� Piratechest drawing
� 8 a.m. Line up for parade @ CM. Eppes Middle School on Elm St.
� 10 a.m. Parade begins
�Parade will be televised on WITN-7
� Parade will travel down Elm St. to 5th St. and turn left.
From 5th St it will travel to Washington St. and turn right.
The parade will end at the Willis Building parking lot on 2nd St.
� 2 p.m. ECU v. Louisiana Tech @ Ficklen Stadium
Includes announcement of Homecoming candidates and contest winners.
7 p.m. October 16, 1993
NPHC & Student Union Minority Arts Step Show
and Del Comedy Jam Comedian Derrick Fox III
@ Minges Coliseum
Admission prices @ Central Ticket
Student � $8
General � $io
Door � $12




� �

M MM! -�rr ��symwmMmmr





The East Carolinian
Ocfcotx
Sports
Page 13
What's On Tap?
Thurdsday, Oct. 7
Men's tennis, aw
av.
at Tar Heel Invit, Chapel Hill,
N.C TBA
Friday, Oct. 8
Volleyball, home
ECU invitTBA
Men's tennis, away
at Tar Heel Invit Chapel Hill,
N.C TBA
Woman's tennis, away
at UNC-W, Wilmington NC,
TBA
Saturday Oct. 9
Football, away
at South Carolina, Columbia,
S.C.at 1 p.m.
Volley ball, home
ECU invit TBA
Soccer, away
at Campbell, Buies Creek, N.C.
2 p.m.
Men's tennis, away
at Tar Hell Invit, Chapel Hill,
NC,TBA
Women's tennis, away
at UNC-W, at Wilmington, NC
TBA
Sunday, Oct. 10
Men's tennis, away
at Tar Heel Invit Chapel Hill,
NQTBA
Women's tennis, away
at UNC-W, at Wilmington, N.C.
The 411
Volleyball, home (5-14)
beat NC A&T, 15-4,15-9,15-12
Please .No Wagering
Robert Todd, 20 points
TEC Sports Editor
S.C. 18, 28-10
"The Bucs' offense needs to
open up and play to win � not
try to 'set the table for next year
A blow-outthis week will shrink
the Homecoming crowd even
more
Brian Olson, 26 points
TEC Assistant Sports Editor
S.C. 25,35-10
"The Pirates two-year win
streak over the Gamecocks
comes to an end. The ECU of-
fense still can not come together
and put points on the board
Kevin Hall, 20 points
WZMB Sports Director
S.C17,30-13
"ECU has the talent, but not
the experience. A year or two
from now I will pick the Pirates
over USC, but not this time
Brian Bailey, 15 points
WNCT-TV Sports Director
S.C. 10,24-14
"The maturity process con-
tinues and bring on Louisiana
Tech
Chris Justice, 23 points
WCTI-TV Sports Director
S.C 24,31-7
"Tough place to win for a
team still learning how to play
BradZaruba, 18 points
WITN-TV Sports Director
S.C14,24-10
"Pirate injuries begin to take
their toll
Demetrius Carter, 10 points
ABLE President
S.C14,28-14
"ECU is going to have a
tough time against South Caro-
lina, but beware of Derrick
Batson
Keith Dyer, 15 points
SGA President
S.C 28, 42-14
"South Carolina is too much
for the struggling Pirates
Five points are awarded for
choosing the winner and an ad-
ditional three points are given to
the person closest to the spread
(the person closest to the com-
bined score of both teams settles
ties).
Jordan announces early retirement
DEERFIELD, 111 (AD �
Basketball's greatest plaver
planned to announce his retire-
ment toda at age 3D, a startling
turn of events that leaves the Chi-
cago Bulls without their seven-
time scoring champion, the NBA
without its biggest attraction and
millions of fans without the hero
who redefined standards of ex-
cellence.
Jordan said he chose to make
the announcement today because
he "wanted to get it over and
done with before training camp
-tarts, so that they can start on
their own two feet
The Bulls open camp today
and Jordan had three years left
on his $4 million-a-year con-
tract.
NBA deputy commissioner
Russell Granik said Jordan tele-
phoned commissioner David
Stern on Tuesday to say he was
leaving.
"David said Michael had
made up his mind Granik told
the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
"Whether it's permanent or not
remains to be seen. But it's true
Jordan left open the possibil-
ity of returning to the game.
"Would I ever unretire? I
don't know. I think the word 're-
tire' means you can do whatever
vou want, and mavbe somedav
down the road, that's what I'll
desire to do he said.
The team, preparing for a
shot at a fourth-straight title, said
nothing about Jordan on Tues-
day except to announce that he
would have toe surgery, with his
recovery to last two weeks.
That night, Jordan threw out
the ceremonial pitch at Comiskey
Park for the opening game of the
American League playoffs be-
tween the Chicago White Sox and
the Toronto Blue Jays.
By the seventh inning, word
of Jordan's retirement had
spread. Flanked by security
guards, Jordan left the stadium,
drivingoff in hisblack Mercedes-
Benz. The White Sox would lose
7-3, but in a city where Jordan is
the undisputed king of sports,
the baseball setback was tame
stuff.
At least two of Jordan's team-
mates said they weren't surprised
he would walk away.
"He's just so tired. You could
see it coming one unidentified
teammate told the Chicago Tri-
bune.
"I don't think this decision
Fila Photo
South Carolina, 2-3, has been inconsistent this season. The 'Cocks are hoping to break a two-game
losing streak against the Pirates in Columbia, S.C. this Saturday. Kickoff is slated for 1 p.m.
Historically black colleges unite
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) �
Several historically black colleges
are exploring the possibility of
forming a new Division I-A foot-
ball conference.
Possible members include
Tennessee State, Grambling, Jack-
son State, Southern, Florida A&M,
South Carolina State, North Caro-
lina A&T and Howard.
"It is strictly an exploratory
conversation so we can get a feel
for where different schools stand
at this point said Tennessee State
athletic director Bill Thomas.
"On the surface, I think a foot-
ball league! i ke that would do very
well in attendance and fan inter-
est he said.
Tennessee State has a com-
bined attendance of more than
100,000 for games this season
against Florida A&M, JacksonState
and Grambling.
Charlotte still
in football
franchise race
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Jerry
and Mark Richardson promised
an impressive presentation when
the investors' group attempting
to land an NFL expansion team
for Charlotte got their chance be-
foreleaguecommitteeslastweek.
The presentation will outline
reasons why a city should be se-
lected, give results of premium
ticket drives and discuss theover-
all financial status of the poten-
tial owners.
"It will be very hard for any-
one to yawn during our presen-
tation Mark Richardson said.
The presentation by
Richardson Sports to the NFL's
expansion and finance commit-
tees will be the last of five made
by gToups that each want a new
franchise. Other cities in the run-
ning for a new NFL team are
Baltimore,St. Louis, Jacksonville,
Fla. and Memphis, Tenn.
See NFL page 14
The Tennessee State-Florida
A&M game drew about 31,100 in
Jacksonville, Fla. The Tennessee
State-Jackson State game had
43,800 in Chicago, and last
Saturday's Tennessee State-
Grambling game drew about
42,000 in Memphis.
Tennessee State president
James Hefner said he has not dis-
cussed theproposalwithhiscoun-
terparts at other schools. But he
said there is "an obvious appeal to
increasing the athletic revenue at
the university
"When you talk about foot-
ball within the African-American
community, you cannot leave out
Tennessee State he said.
The NCAA requires a Divi-
sion I-A school to have a mini-
mum stadium capacity of 30,000
and average attendance of 17,000.
Tennessee State's Hale Stadium
seats only 16,000, but the school
would like to renovate it and ex-
pand it to at least 30,000.
Tennessee State is now in the
Ohio Valley Conference and games
against league opponents draw far
fewer fans than games against the
traditionally black schools.
OVC commissioner Dan
Beebe said the league constitution
could be changed to allow schools
to seek their own level in football
while maintaining conference
membership in other sports.
The OVC plays at the Division
I level in basketball butatDivision
I-AA in football.
Tennessee State has been in
the OVC for seven years.
Another OVC school, Middle
Tennessee State, has flirted in re-
cent years with applying for mem-
bership in the Southern Confer-
ence.
Climbers mount a Hard Roc
Recreational Services
sponsorins contest
(RS) � Come climb with us!
For the first time, ECU's Depart-
ment of Recreational Services and
its outdoor adventure program
is providing all students, staff,
faculty members and community
residents with the opportunity
to learn the outdoor sport of rock
climbing.
This year's climbing compe-
tition, entitled "Flatlanders
Fling will be held on Oct. 23ru
at the Hard Roc Tower from 10
a.m. until everyone's satisfied.
The "Flatlanders Fling coordi-
nated by Reid Cross, professional
rock climber and head of Recre-
ational Services Hard Roc tower,
is a climbing competition de-
signed for any level from begin-
ner to advanced.
" I u rge everyone to come ou t
and enjoy the program, it will
offer a lot of fun, a lot of learning,
and a challenge that many have
never experienced Cross said.
The Hard Roc Tower, located
at the south end of Allied Health
Fields, can accommodate ap-
proximately 100 adjustable holds
and is capable of holding up to
six climbers at one time. Made
entirely of treated lumber, the
tower stands 32-feet high and
offers numerous routes, suitable
to challenge any climbing appe-
tite.
All entries for the
"Flatlanders Fling" climbing con-
test will be taken in room 204
Christenbury Gymnasium. The
deadline is Wednesday, Oct. 20,
at 5 p.m. Entry fees of $5 for stu-
dents, $10 for faculty-staff and
$15 for community members
must be paid at the time of regis-
tration.
So, come enjoy a day of climb-
ing fun, light competition and
maybe even win a t-shirt and
other prizes.
For more information, call
Reid Cross and Recreational Ser-
vices at 757-6387, or pick up a
contest brochure in 204
Christenbury Gymnasium.
was made in the last few days
anothersaid. "The rumors started
not long after the third title, and
I'm sure he's done a lot of soul-
searching since then
Jordan's secluded suburban
home was dark Tuesday night.
His car was parked in front. A
note taped over the doorbell said:
"No solicitors. No autographs. If
you are not expected, PLEASE
do not ring this bell
Fueled by his spectacular
play and endorsements for prod-
ucts ranging from sneakers to hot
dogs, Jordan's fame extended far
beyond the borders of Chicago
and the NBA.
At last year's Barcelona
Olympics, he was treated more
as a potentate or rock star than a
basketball player. In China, he is
the most celebrated figure apart
from Mao Tse-tung � this in a
country where basketball isnot
even the most popular sport.
Charles Barklev, the Phoe-
nix Suns MVP who played with
Jordan on the Dream Team at
Barcelona and against him in
last season's NBA finals, said:
"Michael Jordan i s the only per-
son in this entire world that I've
ever met who is as competitive
as I am. That's why I'll miss
playing against him
MJ's departure follows the
retirement last year of Larry-
Bird and Magic Johnson, deal-
ing the NBA an incalculable
loss. With his slithering drives
through the lane, airborne slams
and radar 3-point shots � al-
ways with the trademark
See JORDAN page 15
Bucs travel to
'Cock territory
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
The Pirates travel south of
the border this Saturday looking
for their second win of the sea-
son. The Bucs have beaten USC
the past two seasons, but it will
be tough to get three in a row
because the 'Cocks are a much
improved team.
The Pirates enter Columbia,
S.C. with a 1-3 record and are
coming off a miserable loss to
Memphis State, 34-7. The Game-
cocks also have a losing record at
2-3. South Carolina is coming of
a loss to No. 2 ranked Alabama,
17-6.
According to the NCAA,
South Carolina played the
nation's toughest schedule in
1992. After loosing their first
five games, the Gamecocks
turned things around and
closed out the year going 5-1 to
finish 5-6 overall.
ECU unleashed running
back Junior Smith for the first
time against South Carolina, last
year, and slipped by with a two
point victory, 20-18, on a mudd v
field. The win marked the sec-
ond in a row for the Pirates
against USC after loosing the
first eight games of the series.
Smith had 146 yards rush-
ing on 20 carries and one touch-
down last week against the Ti-
gers. He has rushed for over
See COCKS page 15
V'ball team wins
second in a row
File Photo
The Pirates have improved their record to 5-14 after Tuesday's
match-up with North Carolina A&T.
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
East Carolina's volleyball
team won their second consecu-
tive match of the season Tues-
day night, moving their record
to 5-14. ECU defeated the
Aggies of NC A&T in three
games, 15-4,15-9,15-12.
The Pirates took control of
the game early. Co-captain
Melanie Richards, who had 12
killsand seven digs on the night,
helped the Pirates to gain 6-1
lead, forcing an A&T time-out.
After A&T came out of the TO,
they did their best to cope with
the Pirates. However, the Pi-
rates were just too tough to
handle. They played ruch
more aggressively than the
Aggies, especially at the net.
The Pirates cruised to a 15-4
victory.
In game two, the Pirates got
solid play early on from sopho-
more middle-hitter Gwynn
Baber. As in their previous
match with Mount Olive Col-
lege, ECU played with more
confidence than usual. East
Carolina made some crucial
mental mistakes that many
more experienced teams
would have easily capitalized
on. The Aggies fought hard
the entire game, but eventu-
ally fell 15-9.
In game three, ECU got off
on the right foot, jumping out to
a 5-0 lead. ECU Coach Martha
McCaskill let her reserves see
some playing time halfway
through the game. Leading only
13-11, ECU called a time-out.
McCaskill sentstarter Carrie Brne
back into the game to help finish
off the Aggies. Sophomore Kristy
Blair served the game-winning
point, giving the Pirates the vic-
tory by a score of 15-12.
'Thisteamissoyoung said
Wendy Schultz, an ECU assis-
tant coach and captain of last
year's volleyball team. "There
are a lot of players who have
very littleexperience. They have
a lotof potential, but the problem
is, tonight for example, they just
are not communicating well
enough
The Pirates play in the Holi-
day Inn-Golden Corral Lady Pi-
rate Invitational this weekend at
Minges Coliseum.
� � -





October 7, 1993
ie up for North Carolina Championships
� meet. We
i that made it
ild've been
n s team managed
ired off in a
rival
furday
nampu"nhip
(oming up in two weeks at
em Carolina University in
lowhee, C.
Without it's, third-best run-
ner, Stacy Green, ECU found it-
self in a closer meet than if Green
had been available. Green is rest-
ing an injured leg in preparation
iwks, however,
odes ameoutand set
anew course record.
smashed the old
course record. It'll probably stand
for a while Assistant Head
Coach Charles justice said. "Her
and Tara continue to improve
with each week
Asa whole, the team showed
once again that they will be no
push-over in Cullowhee where
they will be up against competi-
tion from the top ACC schools
and perennial state powerhouses
L NC-Charlotteand Appalachian
State.
"The girls continue to step it
up each week justice said. This
w as evidenced by two new per-
sonal best times set on Saturday-
afternoon. Cathrine Norstrand
and Jessica Montgomery both
broke their personal bests on a
very difficult, hilly and challeng-
ing course.
"Heading in to the conference
meet, we're in very good shape to
compete Justice said. "Our
women should be in contention
for one of the best spots
The men fell to the Seahawks
by only one point in what proved
to be a very exciting finish. The
Pi rates were hampered by theab-
senceofSean Connolly, the num-
ber one runner who is resting a
banged up knee. Senior Eric
Adamski anchored the young
squad with a second-place finish.
However, ECU finds itself in
contention for one of its best sea-
sons ever with the pleasant sur-
prise of young talent. This in-
cludes the outstanding determi-
nation of freshmen Larry Lewis
and Jason Gibbs, along with the
continuing improvement of Mike
Jolley.
"Mike Jolley continued
to run really well Justice
said.
Hornets' Johnson inks largest pro contract in history
CHARLOTTE(AP)�NBAA1I
Star forward Larry Johnson and the
Charlotte Hornets tied themselves
together with the biggest contract in
professional U.S. team sports � $84
million over 12 years.
The sum to be paid to the 1992
NBA rookie of the year dwarfs the
$32.5 million Hornets owner paid to
establish the team as an expansion
franchise six years ago.
"(NBA commissioner) David
Stem laughed when I told him
Hornets owner George Shinn said a t
anewsconferenceTuesday"Hesaid,
'George, you're goingto sign him for
twice thedamn pricewechargedyou
for the franchise
The contract links Johnson and
the Hornets through the spring of
2005. All but the last year is guaran-
teed under terms of the deal reached
Friday. Johnson will be 36 at the end
of the contract.
"Iwasflippingthrough thepages
looking at it and finally said, 'You'd
better hurry and sign this, big guy,
before someWlydianges their rnind
" Johnson said.
Johnson led the Hornets in scor-
ingand rebounding last season,aver-
aging22.1 pointsand 10.5reboundsa
game. Fans voted him to the NBA
Eastern Conference all-star starting
lineup last February.
He was selected to the NBA all-
star second team at the end of the
year.
Johnson, along with rookie cen-
ter Alonzo Mourning, were the ca ta-
lysts for the team's advance to the
second round of the playoffs, where
they lost to the New York Knicks.
"I just feel in my bones we're
going to have a championship here,
butlalsofeelwecan'thaveitwithout
Larrv said Shinn. "If we want to
win, we've got to pay the freight
The market for elite basketball
players hasescalateddrasticallvsince
Johnson signed his original six-year,
$20 million contract in the fall of 1991.
The Philadelphia 76ersgavefirst-
round draft pick Shawn Bradley of
Brigham Young an eight-year con-
tract worth an estimated $44.2 mil-
lion, now the second-largest salary
package in the NBA.
Johnson's original con tract gave
him the option of becoming a free
agent the summer of 1995, The Char-
lotte Observer reported today. When
Johnson expressed interest in signing
a "career-ending"extension overthe
winter, the Hornets were quick to
respond.
The Hornets should have
looked before they lept.
Nike signing best college basketball teams to contracts
RALEIGH(AP)�Nikelncwas
paying for the right to link itself with
by-the-book sports excellence when
it signed a four-year clothing deal
wi thNorth Carolina for an estimated
$4.7 million, an athletic-wear indus-
try analyst says.
"I think you should look at it as
great, good fortune and a well-de-
served round of applause for schools
that have stood for excellence and
made it stick Brian Murphy, pub-
lisher and editor for the Sports Mar-
keting Letter, said in a telephone in-
terview.
Part of the interest on the part of
the Oregon-based company was its
desire to have coach Dean Smith's
basketball players wear its shoes,
Murphy said.
"UNC is considered to be one of
rheschoolsatthetopofthebasketball
world. That might have been an im-
portant consideration he said.
"This is consistent with their
ongoing strategy of trying to outfit
everyathlete in the world said Gary
Jacobson, an analyst for Kidder
Peabody&Co.
The company will pay $12 mil-
lion for Smith's advice as a consult-
ant. That money is to be used to
support the basketball program and
othervenruresatUNCInall,26ofthe
28 athletic teams at the school will
wear Nike equipment. The men's
and women's soccer teams will stay
with Adidas.
Richard Hiskey, achemistry pro-
fessor and chairman of the UNC ath-
letic council, said the arrangement
will greatly benefit the athletic de-
partment, providing sizable relief to
its budget. However, Hiskey told The
News & Observer of Raleigh that the
school should closely monitor the
contract. School officials should not
lose sleep over fear that Nike's far-
reaching influence in the American
sports industry would compromise
their authority, Murphy said.
"A lot of people's reaction is that
the school isbeingpurchased for $4.7
million he said. "They're not going
to have control oxer the sports pro-
gram. WhatNikehasdoneisinjected
a lot of money to be used not only by
the basketball program, butall people
who want to participate in sports
TheNikedeal represents the sec-
ond time this year the company has
lined up a college basketball power-
house from Tobacco Road.
Duke, which won consecutive
national titles in 1991 and 1992, wore
Adidas shoes for years before it
switched to Nike in April. UNC and
Duke could become testing grounds
for new Nike products, and could
serve as experimental markets for
advertising campaigns aimed at col-
lege students, Murphy said.
Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: What ECU varsity sport has had only one
winning season ever and is on pace for its second?
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THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Your Link to the ECU Community
For advertising information call on:
Wes Tinkham
Kelly Kellis
Jennifer Jenkins
Brandon Perry
Tonya Heath
at 757-6366 for assistance.
Across from Joyner Library
2nd floor Student Pubs building
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NFL
The Richardson group will
have to explain how they will
come up with the $200 million
franchise fee.
The Charlotte group's biggest
asset is expected to be the results
of a campaign which has fans
paying annual fees to earn the
lifetime rights to buy season tick-
ets in order to finance construc-
tion of a new downtown stadium,
The Gaston Gazette reported.
"People told us that concept
wouldn't work Mark
Richardson said of the Perma-
nent Seat License idea. "But we
in the Carolinas have shown that
public financing like this does
work. We feel like it's the wave of
the future
Jerry Richardson, the poten-
tial majority owner of the Caro-
lina Panthers, will likely lead with
a discussion of the recent ticket
drive when nearly 50,000 seat li-
censes were sold. The tickets
range in price from $600 to $5,400,
8,314 club seats and 102 luxury
suites.
The money will be used to
build the stadium in Char-
lotte.
Continued from page 13
General Manager Mike
McCormack, former Seattle
Seahawks General Manager,
will focuson the football-only
stadium's unprecedented
sightlines and cozy atmo-
sphere. The lease agreement
with Clemson's stadium,
which holds 81,000 fans, will
be included.
Consultant Max
Muhleman will try to con-
vince the NFL that the Caro-
lina Panthers will be a re-
gional draw, bringing in fans
from both North and South
Carolina within a 150-mile ra-
diusaround Charlotte. About
5 million people live in the
area.
Muhleman, whohelped
bring the NBA's Hornets to
Charlotte, said he just hopes
leagueofficials responsible
for selecting the winning
expansion cities don't al-
ready have their minds
made up.
"You can have the right
strategy and still fail for some-
thing as simple as a political
reason Muhleman said.
When the Best Views are
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Attendance at this presentation
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October 7, 1995
The East Carolinian
115
Continued from page 13
In a ne ice at the
igo Bulls' training center,
lordan said the murder or his fa-
ther, lame in July made him re-
alize that
it car
be taken awav
I gratinca-
ositive per-
in et out of my father
' iav is. that he
ist basketball game. It is
that we have talked
about a lot Jordan said.
The startling announcement
in basketball's greatest player
leaves the Chicago Bulls without
their seven-time scoring cham-
pion, the NBA without itsglitziest
attraction, and millions of fans
without the hero who redefined
standards of excellence.
Jordan's departure at the top
of his game occurred during a
vear of unprecedented success�
and personal tragedy. He led his
Chicago Bulls to a third-straight
NBA championship, but also suf-
fered the loss of his father, who
was shot and killed. The 30-year-
old superstar, whose salary and
endorsements bring him more
than $50 million a year, also was
dogged by reports of excessive
COCKS
gambling.
In recent years, Jordan ad-
mitted losing large sums of
money in wagers to a convicted
North Carolina drug dealer in
1991. He was also the subject of a
book in which he was accused of
losing more than $1 million in
golf bets.
The same week the book was
released, Jordan gambled with his
father at an Atlantic City, N.J
casino the night before a playoff
game with the New York Knicks.
Continued from page 13
No other source can give you sports
coverage like The East Carolinian!
100 vards in three games this sea-
son. For the season he has 492
yards rushing and is averaging
4.8 yards per carry.
South Carolina returns most
of their offense from last year.
Quarterback Steve Taneyhill fin-
ished fourth in the Southeastern
Conference in passing efficiency
as a true freshman. He will choose
from wide receivers Toby Cates,
Asim Penny and true-freshman
Calvin Owens. Pirate head coach
Steve Logan says that the whole
team seems to rally behind
Taneyhill.
Cates and Penny averaged 17
vards per catch, but Owens may
be the one to watch. He was
touted as the best in the state and
may make an immediate impact.
The Ga mecocks have two solid
running backs in Brandon Bennett
and Rob Deboer. Last season they
combined for over 1,000 yards.
Bennett has compiled 489 yards so
far this season. Deboer gained 88
ardsonl5carriesversusECUlast
year. Bennett rushed 11 times for
34 ya�-ds in the same game.
The South Carolina defense
put in a terrific performance last
week by shutting out the Crim-
son Tide in the fourth quarter.
The Pirates must be aware of out-
side linebacker Ernest Dixon and
strong safer)' Tony Watkins. They
combined for 19 tackles last week
and one sack. Defensive end Stacy
Evans will give ECU's injured
offensive line some trouble. Stacy
picked up two sacks against the
No. 2 powerhouse. It will be piv-
otal for the Pirate QB's to know
where inside linebacker Mike
Landry is at all times.
The Buc offense will be with-
outhalf-backJerrisMcPhail,who
will likely sit this one out with an
injured ankle. ECU will have to
establish a good running game to
take the pressure off the passing
game. Logan said this week that
Chris Hester will be his starting
quarterback again, but he will put
Perez Mattison in the game at
some point. The freshman
Mattison came in last week to
throw four interceptions while
Hester threw two, setting a new
school record for INTs in a single
game.
The South Carolina series be-
gan in 1977 with a Buc loss, 19-16.
Their next meeting was in 1984
and the Gamecocks routinely
thrashed ECU by an average of
29 points per game every year
until 1991 when Jeff Blake led the
Pirates to a 31-20, victory.
Last year South Carolina
kicker Mart Simpson missed two
field goals in the final seconds
that would have won the game.
One was blocked, from 36 yards
out, and recovered. The next,
from 37 yards out, was wide right.
For the Pirates to pull the up-
set this week they must not com-
mit turnovers, while the key on
defense will be the ability to key
on Tanneyhill and not give up
the big pass, as they did against
MemphisState. New defensive co-
ordinator Larry Coyer has
brought a very much-improved
rush defense to ECU.
The Buc defense will prob-
ably miss starting linebacker Mark
Libiano, again, for this game. He
should be able to return the next
week for La. Tech. The offensive
line will miss starters Derrick
Leaphart and Terry Tilgham, who
are lost for the season. The big
'Cock defensive line will look to
take advantage of their absences.
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graduation, can you afford not to? Apply for a
position at our office in the Student Publications
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 7, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 07, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.966
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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