The East Carolinian, October 5, 1993






it See
iges 1 and 5.
Lifestyle
True Romance5
Quentm Tarantino's 'True
Romance' presents an all-star
cast including Christian Slater
Gary Oldman, Christopher
Walken and Val Kilmer
Story page 7.
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
ol. 68 No. ;6 Circulation 12.000 GreenvillP Nnrth r� v7
Greenville, North Carolina Tuesday, October 5. IS
Joyner updates computer catalogs
Photo by Cednc Van Buran
The new Marquis computer system is gradually replacing the slow
bmited capacty LS2000 computer catalog system in Joyner
Yeltsin forces
storm Russian
parliament
MOSCOW (AP) - Armv
tanks blasted holes in the parlia-
ment building just after dawn
Monday and commandos
stormed inside through smoke
and flame to crush an armed
challenge by hard-liners op-
posed to President Boris Yeltsin.
Hundreds surrendered, but spo-
radic gunfire persisted after sun-
down.
The hard-liners' leaders
Vice President Alexander
Rutskoi and parliament speaker
Ruslan Khasbulatov � were in
custody, Yeltsin aide Dmitri
Rurikov told CNN.
What appeared to be a cru-
cial victory for Yeltsin in the fight
for political control in Russia
came with a high price. Soldiers
piled dozens of bodies outside
the building after the nearly 10-
hour battle, which climaxed the
worst political violence in Mos-
cow since the 1917 Bolshevik
Revolution.
Hundreds of lawmakers
and supporters, hands on their
heads, filed out of the burning
building and were ushered by
troops onto waiting buses in la te
afternoon. Gunfire erupted sev-
eral times during the surrender,
scattering crowds of onlookers
outside the white marble build-
ing known as the Russian White
House.
Vladimir Polyakov,
spokesman for Yeltsin's chief of
staff Sergei Filatov, confirmed
that the lawmakers had capitu-
lated.
But the hard-liners' lead-
ers � Vice President Alexander
Rutskoi and parliament speaker
Ruslan Khasbulatov � were not
among those who immediately
See YELTSIN page 3
By Tammy Zion
Staff Write7
If you have visited Joyner
Library this semester, you have
probably noticed that some of
the LS2000 computers have
been replaced with newer mod-
els.
If you had the opportunity
to use one of the new computers,
you have been introduced to the
Marquis work station system
that is replacing the terminals
most of us learned in the past.
It is an improved, intelli-
gent system that offers several
different systems at one work
station.
According to Steven
Nielson, associate director of
Academic Library Services, the
Marquis system is sort of a "one-
stop shopping trip" for informa-
tion.
"Students can do all their
work atone place Nielson said.
"They users don't have to go to
several different terminals to get
the information they need. They
can do it all at the work station
According to Nielson,
Joyner Library is the first uni-
versity using Marquis' intelli-
gent work stations that are run-
ning applications software. Half
of the information is at the sta-
tion and half of it, or the "brains"
of the Internet, is stored in the
basement of Joyner.
Joyner Library began look-
ing into buying this system
around January-1992. In July of
thisyear, they began pp"ing'the
computers on-line. Currently,
18 work stations are up and
working. By the end of this week,
28 will be set up. By Dec. 16 the
LS2000 terminals will be taken
off-line and be fully replaced
with 40 Marquis work stations.
The work stations will
eventually be capableof display-
ing full-page text, images, and
voice and video applications,
probably after the first of next
year.
The library will implement
a campus network within about
two years. This will connect the
Marquis system to dorms, cam-
pus offices, etc.
The new work stations give
users access to the Jovner library
systems, CD-ROMS and to the
Internetsystem. Internet allows
users to search any library in the
world that is connected the
Internet system.
According to Nielson, there
are millions of Internet locations,
and more are being added every
day.
Nielson gave some ex-
amples of the information
Internet can access. It can pull
up original pictures of the
Vatican from the Library of Con-
gress; ithad current satellitepic-
tures of Hurricane Emily at the
time she was about to hit the
North Carolina coast line; and it
can pull up daily forecasts of
any location in the world.
Any person who has expe
rience using either IBM or
Macintosh and can even half-
way manipulatea mouse can use
the Marquis. Joyner is setting
up both Macintosh and IBM ter-
minals so that anyone with com-
puter experience can use the sys-
tem.
David Burke, one of the
employees responsible for help-
ing implement the Marquis sys-
tem, has done a lot of work to
make the work stations user-
friendly, according to Nielson.
Hehas set up all the menus
and is adding new information
every day. He has even set up a
tour of the library in graphical
front-end.
"I am hoping that it the
Marquis systemj will not have
to be taught Nielson said. "But
we are setting up a lab to hold
special classes to help students
learn how to use the mouse and
other uses of the Marquis sys-
tem.
"I encourage every student
to come in and give it the Mar-
quis a try Nielson said. "If
you have any problems, let us
know and we will help you. If
you have any suggestions for
improving the system, let us
know that, too. Students are our
reason for being here and we
want to make everything as ac-
cessible to them as possible.
�Q j � una coast line; and it cessible to them as possible "
Body outlines memorialize rape victims
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
In case any of you were
wondering, there was not a mass
slaughter on campus this past
weekend. The body outlines
scattered on the grounds Mon-
day were promoting rape
awareness.
This week is Sex Week. For
those few students out there
who may be interested in the
topic, the Resident Hall Asso-
ciation (RHA), Peer Health edu-
cators and Student Health de-
partment are sponsoring
SexFest. 6
"It rape is a sexuality is-
sue, as well asa violence issue
said Jennifer Phillips, student
health educator. "Rape aware-
ness is sort of a kick-off for sex
week
The body outlines were
traced randomly around cam-
pus by Phi Kappa Tau mem
bers, as memorials to actual rape
occurrences. They do not, how-
ever, represent actual locations
of the rapes.
SexFest starts at 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 6 outside
Mendenhall Student Center.
The activities include a talk from
an individual who is HIV posi-
tive and has AIDS. Organiza-
tions such as Campus Minis-
tries and the Gay and Lesbian
Alliance will appear to express
their views on subjects related
to sex. A play entitled "But I
Said No will begin at 7:30 in
room 244 in Mendenhall.
Physical Plant workers
washed away the body outlines
from campus grounds late Mon-
day afternoon. It is unknown at
this time who authorized this
removal. Dean of Students
Ronald Speier was unable to be
reached for comment.
Photo by Cadric Van Buren
�5�� SCattered:he S�" on Monday, in remembrance of
rapes that have occurred on ECU campus.
U.N. attacks fugitive forces
Ouch!
Joanne Todd,
an exchange
student from
England gave
blood at the
Red Cross's
Bloodmobile
on Sept. 30.
About 275
students
donated.
NAIROBI, Kenya (AP)�At
least 12 U.S. Army soldiers died,
75 were wounded and "a small
number" were feared taken cap-
tive in Somalia as U.N. troops at
U.S. helicopters and armored per-
sonnel carriers destroyed in a
firefight.
Two U.S. Blackhawk helicop-
ters were shot down in the U.N.
, , , r-� ici� were snot aown m the U N
tacked forces lovaltofugitivewar- searrhfnr AiHiHVL I -
lord Mohamed Farrah JLh p1. �8"i? sley lieu tenants
Photo by Cedric
Van Buren
J
lord Mohamed Farrah Aidid, Pen-
tagon officials said Monday.
As the battle raged in the
streets of Mogadishu, the Penta-
gon prepared to send about 200
infantrymen, bolstered by tanks
and armored vehicles, to bolster
the U.S forces battered in the latest
round of fighting, other officials
said.
Two senior Pentagon offi-
cials, speaking on condition of ano-
nymity, said reports indicate at
least 12 U.S. soldiers have been
killed in the recent fighting in
Mogadishu and that 75 have been
wounded.
"It could go higher one of
the officials said of the death toll.
Somalis dragged the body of
an American soldier through the
streets of Mogadishu today and
danced around the wreckage of
A Malaysiansoldieralsowas
killed on Sunday, the Malaysian
Defense Ministry said, and an un-
determined number of peacekeep-
ers were wounded in the opera-
tion, which entered its second day
today.
NBC News reported that
seven Army Rangers were miss-
ing and may have been taken hos-
tage. An administration official,
speaking on condition of anonym-
ity, would not confirm the report
but said the administration ex-
pected the forces of warlord
Mohamed Farah Aidid to an-
nounce they had captured U.S
troops.
The two Blackhawks were
shot down by rifle-propelled Gre-
nades a mile east of the Bakara
Market in southern Mogadishu,
injuring crew members.
Health care reform
seems not only to be a major
concern for thegovernment
and the nation, but for the
School of Allied Health Sci-
ences, a branch of the ECU
Division of Health Science,
as well.
At the beginning of
this year, the School of Al-
lied Health Sciences kicked
off a year-long celebration
of its 25 anniversary.
Thecelebration began
with a lecture entitled "Na-
tional Health Care Reform:
Directions for the '90s pre-
sented by Dr. Claudia
McKay, a representative
from PresidentBill Clinton's
task force on health care re-
form.
McKay is Deputy As-
sistant Secretary of Minor-
ity Health Care for the U.S.
Department of Health and
Human Services.
McKay is, also, direc-
tor of the Office of Minority
Health, where she is respon-
sible for coordinating all
public health service pro-
grams related to minorities
and under-represented
populations.
"I came to be with you
this evening to provide a
progress report and to talk
about considerations with
which we have approached
this task McKay said.
"Months of work led to the
reform package known as
the American Health Secu-
rity Act, and although this
was an exciting experience
it proved to be complicated
and full of sleep depriva-
tion
McKay outlined the
objectives of the reform
package beginningwith the
problems that initially led to
the idea of a health care re-
form bill.
Twenty million
Americans lose their insur-
ance because of a change in
their employment status
such as losinga job or chang-
ing jobs.
Another 37 million
Americans are uninsured
and 22 million have inad-
equatehealth insurancecov-
erage.
Many Americans in
rural areas and inner cities
do not have access to much
needed quality' care due to
poor distribution of health
care providers, hospitals,
clinics, support systems, as
well as a lack of transporta-
tion.
"Lead poisoning and
drug resistant TB are
handled insufficiently ornot
at all in this nation McKay
said, "thus potentially
threateningthehealth of the
entire population
As McKay explained,
theplan will guarantee com-
prehensive coverage for all
American citizensand legal
residents.
"Health coverage un-
der this plan continues w; th
no life-time limits or inter
See CLINTON page 3
���jlwe-t-sw





October 5, 1993
1
PiSfi
A
�papers
.

ling what he said wasblacks' preferential
trtLtment in admissinsand disciplinary procedures
Pot plants found at Ithaca College
Whoever was having a high old time in the woods of the
Ithaca College campus has probably hit an all-time low this tall.
. er 20 neatly-potted marijuana plants, with an estimated street
value of $400,000, were discovered in a densely wooded lot on the
nthem edge i t the campus, offic ialssaid The well-tended cache
was discovered in three clearings, with all of the plans appearing
to be of similar age, according to the New York State National
Guard which investigated the case. The investigation began when
a campus safetv bicycle patrol otticer who was patrolling the
woods stumbled on a clearing tilled with pots of marijuana.
Further investigation revealed sin larl dingp ices sebv.
NBC's Bryant Gumbel named trustee
NBC "Today" show host Br antGumbel has been elected to
serve on the board of truste s of Bates � ! ewiston,
Maine, schviol where he received a bachelor's degree in history in
170. Gumbel, who has anchored "Today" since 1982, which is
longer than any other host, was awarded an honorary degree from
Bates in 1 86. He has received set era! journalism awards, and has
hosted television specials during the Bush and Clinton presiden-
tial election campaigns. Gumbel's 1984 interview with top Krem-
lin officials who announced a willingness to resume disarmament
talks with the U.S. won him the Edward R. Murrow Award for
Outstanding Foreign Affairs Work from the Overseas Press Club.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Health and safety graduate course offered
the grad
elude sa
fetv
management, i ndus-
trial hygiene and fir onand
hi n.
C Hirgraduateswill learn how
to reduce worker compensation
costs dramaticall through appro-
priate loss control techniques and
save the employer money in other
safety-related areas, ' Friend said.
Before graduation, students will be
red to work full-time for a
minimum oi three months
Dr. A. Darryl Davis, dean oi
theSchool of Industrvand Technol-
ogy, believes this program could
'ill tx nlyoneof betterpreparegraduates Unchang-
ing demands m the workplace The
ty and health on tragic tire at 1 lamlet has served to
level. Courses will in- focus attention to workplace safetv
and health law, envi- and has spurred actions on a num-
lead-
r. Mark
in the
� itthe
ms with 400
n is firmh in
AW news writers should plan to be at The East
Carolinian Thursday at 5:30. There will be a
mandatory writer's workshop.
I er ol fronts. I ff(
workplace safen. have
mandates requiring large
and small businesses as w
lie agencies to cope with
ingly complicated reg
broader nforcementinitiativesand National Safetj imncil's annual
changing technologies Davissaid safer congress in Chicago
� tsareal-
showing an interesl in the
jam. Plans are underwa) for
lent sei hi n of the American
SocietyofSafetvEng SSE)
and a studenl trip to this v ar's
liniiiiiiiiiniimiminm
golden
corral
1
J
STEAKS, BUFFET & BAKERY
LUNCHEON
BUFFET
MON-SAT 11 -5
4
99
SUNDAY
BUFFET
$549
carved meat
NIGHTLY
BUFFET
5-CLOSE
$529
carved meat nightly
WEEKEND
BREAKFAST
MON-SAT 11-5
$469
ENTREES 2s6"
STEAKS, CHICKEN, SEAFOOD
:j$ 1.00 OFF!
I any purchase of an entree buffet and a
I beverage
8 golden i
corral i
� Valid only at Golden Corral in Greenville, NC.
expires Oct. 31, 1993
504 SW Greenville Blvd
���������IIlllllllllllll
STUDENT ONION � WE'RE MORE THAN BAREFOOT
'S ATTENDANCE
AS OF
103932,670
BEACHING OlT TO SERVE YOU !
For more information
I about these events,
call our ECU Student
i Union hotline
at 757-6004.
CULTURAL AWARENESS FAIR
Thursday, OCTOBER 7th
11:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M. In front of ECU STUDENT STORES
FREE AND OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC
JOYCE GREAR - STORYTELLER
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7th, 8:00 P.M.
SOCIAL ROOM - MENDENHALL
FREE AND OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC
- BARRY DRAKE - 70's Rock Music,
"THE GOOD, THE BAD, & THE UGLY"
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19th, 8:00 P.M.
HENDRIX THEATRE MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION
FREE AND OPEN TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC
EL MARIACHI
OCTOBER 6 R
All films start at 8.00 and are FREE with
valid ECU I.D. for students, staff and faculty.
October 14th & 16th
October 14th &
16th
The Greatest Adventure
On Both Sides Of The Screen!
Mtx-p all di
K.iri all night
V-vt-r ;r.n ok!
Viit (.Ik
It III'
i .tmp;n
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY:Each of these advertised items is COPYRIGHT 1993-THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND
required to be readily available for sale in each Kroger Store, except PRICES GOOD SUN OCTOBER 3 THROUGH �5AT
as specifically nbted in this ad. If we do run out of an advertised rr
�TWzMn �: ��! � iT; Ti I �jisVIfsTiilKvJ iTiliWsPTcTl!
iiaL�i�i3mMMiAIiiti:oaV'i �ia�Yis
RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES.
able, reflecting the savings-or a raincheck which will entitle you to m�mcT55 k � Acai Joo
purchase the advertised item at the advertised price within 30 days. NUNfc &ULU IU UbALtHS.
Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item purchased.
I
18-OZ. SPECIAL K, 25-OZ. FROSTED FLAKES,
25.5-OZ. RAISIN BRAN, 15-OZ. COCOA
KRISPIES OR 17.6-OZ. HONEY SMACKS
Kelloggs
Cereals
OFF
AS INDICATED ON YELLOW TAG
"IN THE DAIRY CASE"
RFCULAR, HOMESTYLE
OR WITH CALCIUM
KROCER
Kroger Chilled Moroni &
Orange Juice cheese Dmner
"IN THE DELI-PASTRY
SHOPPE
variety Cake
Donuts
FISCHEP'S BEEF BOLOGNA OR
Beef
Wieners
1 Lb. Pkg.
FROtN, SELECTED
VARIETIES
Lenders
Bagels
9-12-Oz.
LOW PRICES AND MORE!





October 5, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
CLINTON
Continued from page 1
.ilth
benel
intet of universal
life-timeco1 soneofthesingle
most important developments of
the plan McKay said.
Six principles underlie the
health care reform proposal: secu-
rity guaranteeing comprehensive
benefits for all citizens and legal
residents; controlling costs by tak-
ing effective steps to control rising
health care costs; improvement in
the qualify of health care; increased
YELTSIN
dersandhealthplans
onsumers; simplicity
re luction or bureau-
ores and by making
every me responsible for health care.
"A new national framework
organizes the market tor health cov-
erage Dr. McKay said. "The fed-
era 1 government, the states and alli-
ances divide the responsibility
The federal government sets
the basic framework.
It will define the guaranteed
benefits package, determine the
capital growth insurance premium
and reform the insurance system.
The states will implement
health care reform for which thev
are allowed flexibility in forming
their health care delivery system
Continued from page 1
and their state plan to meet their
local needs.
They will also establish health
alliances, monitor the quality and
availability of care through con-
sumer surveys and implement in-
surance reforms.
The alliances will serve as
purchasing agents for the consumer
and employer, thus bringing down
the cost of providing health insur-
ance coverage while insisting on
quality.
They will also distribute easy-
to-read consumer information ma-
terial.
"This plan cuts down on the
projected growth in health care ex-
penditures by increasing competi-
tion in health care, by reducing ad-
ministrative costs and imposing a
budget discipline McKay said.
The new health care reform
will have a large impact on the un-
der-represented population.
"As everyone is aware of, the
health care needs of the under-
served, including racial ethnic mi-
norities, residents of rural and in-
ner-city areas,are nota mere matter
of dollars and cents McKay said.
The health reform plan will
improve the access of health care
for rural and inner ci ty areas, assure
that alliances don't exclude the
health care deliver' svstem of rural
and inner city communities, im-
prove cooperation between rural
and urban health care facilities and
develop communication links be-
tween rural heal th professionals and
academic health centers.
"Our goal is ultimately to pro-
vide universal coverage and to
insure that choice and quality are
protected McKay said.
FOR RENT
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. ONLY MINUTES
FROM CAMPUS & REASONABLE RENT W MANY
EXTRAS INCLUDED.
CALL 752-8320 OR 355-6180
left the building.
Continuing gunfire indi-
cated there were still some hold-
outs.
City authorities reported at
least 31 killed and 219 injured in
both days of fighting, but the toll
was expected to rise.
Five Americans were
wounded, said Strobe Talbott,
the State Department's senior
Russian affairs official. He said
he did not have details.
Black smoke billowed from
at least three places in the shat-
tered parliament building. Or-
ange flames came out of the
ground floor of the 19-story
white marble structure.
Earlier, one government of-
ficial said hundreds may have
been killed inside parliament.
Orange flames spit from the
barrels of the T-72 tanks as they
pounded the huge white marble
office building. Papers floated
from the shattered windows, fol-
lowed bv heavy black smoke.
Soldiers dragged away
bodies while machine guns
blasted from a neighboring hotel
and apartment house. No accu-
rate casualty count was avail-
able, but Yeltsin's military ad-
viser, Gen. Dmitry Volkogonov,
told reporters up to 500 may have
been killed inside, although
"that's not confirmed He did
not give the source of his infor-
mation.
Crowds watched from a
distance as the battle unfolded
after a two-week standoff that
began when Yeltsin ordered par-
liament dissolved and decreed
early elections.
Yeltsin was answering the
hard-liners' challenge to his au-
thority over his efforts to restruc-
ture theeconomy. The parliament,
which was elected before the col-
lapse of the Soviet Union and was
dominated for Communists, tried
to hinder Yeltsin's reforms.
CONSIGNMENT SHOP
Quality Furniture
Accessories
Clothing (New and I sed)
Household Items
10-5 Tues-Fri
10-2 Sat
924 Dickinson Ave, Greenville
752-2139
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
. The East Carolinian needs a
typesetter on Mon. & Wed. from 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. Call 757-6366.
RESTAURANTS
OPEN 24 HOURS
Dennyburger combo
$3.89
Burger, Fries .& choice of soup or salad
with this coupon
VALID ONLY IN GREENVILLE, NC
808 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE-GREENVILLE, NC
757-1610
Adult
Entertainment
f Center
"Greenville's ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub'
We now Offer
Limousine
Service!
TUESDAYS
SilverBullet's Female "ExotJc" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS .
AmateurNightforFernaleLTancers11pn1arn
CASH PRIZE
�OmtatmiU mat to emit St rtjitttr in riaam Mutt mrriac by UO.
THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS
SilverBullet'sFemale'Exotic" Dancers
Dancers wanted
SfcwBuMBartandar
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00OFF Admission toy Ngh with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm StageTime9:00pm
3p Call756-6278
!
I
I
(behind John's Convenient Mart) i W I I i
Jalid N. C. I. D. Required MMUT
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
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F E A
AT THE
TUESDAY
Rove
0 DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
WEDNESDAY
CLASSICS NIGHT
with the best in classic Rock & Dance Music
& 0 DRAFT EVERY WEDNESDAY NIGHT!
THURSDAY
Come join us every Thursday as we count down to our 25th year
serving ECU! Every Thursday is NEW YEAR'S EVE with $1.00
Champagne Cocktails, $1.00 Domestics & $1.00 House Highballs
FRIDAY
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for Members & Greek ID's.
Reduced guest Admission 7-9. $50 Prize to the Frater-
nity & Sorority with the Best Attendance Before 9.
Bar Specials All Nite Every Friday.
SATURDAY
Kick off football season with Coors Lite! $1.50 Zimas, $1.50
16oz Coors Lites, & $3.00 Noxzima Every Saturday!
Come Early
Bar Specials All Nite Every Friday.
Need Money For
Fall Break?
$$CASH ON THE SP0T$$
�Dockers
�LEVI'S
�GANT
�LEE
�Bugle Boy
�GUESS
�Polo
�Union Bay
We're Buying:
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�Nautica
�Alexander Julian
�Duck Head
�Lands' End
�Eddie Bauer
�GAP
�Structure
and all quality brand men's clothing
We'll BUY any man's clothing,
even your DAD's:
shirts, pants, sweaters, jeans, winter
coats, tennis shoes, etc
&
tjFfP
p
p
JUDENT
WAP
HOP
414 South Evans St.
EVANS STREET MALL
V
Park behind Globe Hardware,
use our new rear entrance
If you are selling you must be 18
with a picture ID.(NCDL, ECU)
MON-FRI 10am-12pm � 1pm-5pm � Sat 10arn-2pm
752-3866





October 5, 1993
HOMECOMING 1993
Rolanda E.
Kittrell
Alpha Phi Alpha
Senior in Elementary
Education
Active in: ECU Gospel
Choir.
t
Holly Leann Fleming
Alpha Omicron Pi
Junior in Radiology
Active in: PCMH, Opertation
Sunshine.
Scarlett Ginn
Parks
Alpha Xi Delta
Senior in Decision
Science
Active in: Decision
Science Society,
ASQC, APCIS, Beta
Gamma Sigma.
Claudine Nicholson
GAMMA
Senior in Fashion
Merchandising
Active in: SGA, Alpha Phi.
Nancia Michelle
Nettles
ECU Gospel Choir
Junior in Middle Grades
Education
Active in: ABLE, Christian
Fellowship, ECU Friends.
Kristen
Oliver
Jarvis Hall
Sophomore in
Pre-Physical
Therapy
Active in: ECU
Ambassadors.
:���
COM� VOT�!
Must hove o Valid Student I.D.
Thursday, October 14, 1993
Voting booths:
Student Stores � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Bottom of College Hill � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Allied Health � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Mendenhall � 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
School of Medicine � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Rhonda P.
Cummings
RHA
Junior in
Accounting
Active in: SGA,
Honor Board.
Marci Christine
Blake
Scott Hall
Senior in Biology
Active in: Navigators,
Chi Alpha Omega,
Aquatic Science Club.
Student Homecoming Committee
chose all photos randomly to be
printed in a three-part series.
Anna L.
Harrington
Sigma Sigma
Sigma
Senior in Business
Marketing
Active in: Panhellenic,
SGA, Media Board,
GAMMA, A.M.A.
Annie Dudley
Visual Arts Forum
Graduate in Art
Active in: Sculpture
Guild, Alpha Kappa
Upsiion lota, SGA
Senate, Gamma Beta
Phi.
Dionne Denise
Evans
White Hall
Senior in Exercise
Physiology
Active in: Resident
Education, ECU
Ambassadors, National
Residence Hall.
Jennifer Coxe
Zeta Tau Alpha
Senior in Fashion
Merchandising
Active in: Sigma Alpha Iota,
ECU Concert Choir, ECU
Opera Theater.
HOMECOMING 1993
� . �,
�W�W"�����"�"�





The East Carolinian
Page
Opinion
Tuesday-Opinion
Smutnoye vremya
"Time of troubles" epitomizes the
chaotic violence that Moscow
suffers in the wake of reform
It is 1993, right? With the violence that occurred
in Moscow this weekend, any good Russian historian
would say that we've virtually gone back in time�
namely to the year 1917. That's right, the start of the
Bolshevik Revolution.
Up to 10,000 protesters armed with sticks, clubs
and rocks broke through line after line of riot police,
turning Moscow into a virtual battle zone, Sunday. At
least 24 civilians and soldiers were reported killed and
as many 100 were injured as President Yeltsin de-
clared a state of emergency. These hard-line protest-
ers were an odd mixture of communists, fascists and
extreme nationalists united by their opposition to
Yeltsin. Quite a group indeed.
They savagely beat police to the ground and
punched and kicked them while waving red Soviet
flags. "Death to Yeltsin" and "Out with the fascists
were the rallying cries along with "Down with
America
In retaliation to this, thousands of unarmed
Yeltsin supporters took to the streets to support the
president. Yeltsin is responsible for dissolving parlia-
ment on Sept. 21 in an effort to end his long power
struggles with the Soviet-era people that were so bent
on crushing his reforms.
Just after dawn Monday morning, armv tanks
blasted holes in the parliament building, and govern-
ment commandos stormed inside to crush an armed
challenge by the hard-liners. Hundreds surrendered,
but sporadic gunfire persisted after sundown. At
press time, the leaders � Vice President Alexander
Rutskoi and parliament speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov
�were in custody. It is estimated by Yeltsin's military -
adviser that up to 500 might have been killed inside
the White House, but stressed "that's not confirmed
"Down with America huh?
Of course, through our own doing and the stigma
of being the Big Brother of the world, the U.S. gets
yanked into the conflict. Not a surprise. Why not
blame Russia's internal problems on a country that is
handing over financial stability to the tune of $2.5
billion? It is a sad fact of American politics that has
never made much sense. We supply the money and
are damned without a thank-you.
President Clinton stuck to his guns and told
reporters that he remains "convinced that the United
States must support Yeltsin and the process of bring-
ing about free and fair elections. We cannot afford to
be in the position of wavering at this moment or
backing off or giving any encouragement to people
who clearly want to derail the election process and are
not committed to reform in Russia
Fine, except we drop the $2.5 billion in their laps
and run a way in terror. The whole mess simply doesn' t
seem to add up. Granted, we are not saying that the
U.S. should apply full military force and bomb the hell
out of Moscow, but nice little press conferences with
rallying cries don't really solve much. The money
may help initially, but the wide scope of problems lies
in turning a large, un-unified country into a capitalist
wonderland. It's not that simple. On paper it looks
good, but when dealing with the typical Russian
citizen, you retain the angry communist supporters.
In other words, what happens in the big city of Mos-
cow doesn't mean much to an Odessa potato farmer.
Yeltsin faces a situation wherein the 88
semiautonomous regions may declare independence.
If that happens, what looks good on paper may just as
well go up in flames.
Dos vidanya, comrades.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Maureen Rich, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Tonya htoiii - wutive
Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Mike Ashley, Creative Director
Elain Calmon, Asst Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretan
Serving ihe ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for
decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. Tlte East Carolinian
Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353 For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
w
100� recycled
paper
October 5. 1993
By Alex Ferguson
Man's position in abortion issue questioned
Well, I knew this was HirtheClubofRelimonsRi.Thtwv- a�� -�,�a- 2� T,
Well, I knew this was
bound to happen. "The time has
come the Walrus said, " to talk of
other things. Of shoes and ships
and sealing wax, and cabbages and
kings And while I mayjokearound
with such silly things like wax and
ships, I find it prudent now and
then to tone down the humor and
get serious. All kidding aside, I'm
afraid I witnessed something this
weekend that has a profound effect
on our lives today. A topic that has
been battled over in the courts of
America for years.
This weekend, while trav-
eling in Wilmington, down one of
the main thoroughfares, I came
upon an unusual sight. I saw sev-
eral hundred people lined up and
down the street, ages ranging from
young child to elderlv. Each one
was carrying a sign promoting the
termination of (gasp) dare I sav it?
Abortion.
AAAAAhhhhhh! Warn-
ing! The "A " word! Warning! I know
many of you are probably reaching
tor theClubof Religious Righteous-
ness even as you read. Well, I can't
stop you, and won't. I've been hear-
ingaboutwho has the right tedtoose
vs. who has the right to decide for
someone, and 1 guess I've finally
come to my oyti decision. So, forget
the beating around the bushes, let's
get to the nitty gritty.
First to clear up the basic
facts. Mainly, who s having the kid
here anyway? The man? I don't
think so. It's thewoman's party here.
Okay, so the man did his part in the
beginning, I'm sure we've all taken
the Birds and Bees 101. And I'm
sure many of you 90s caring, sensi-
tive types (like me) would be glad to
share or take over the burden for
your significant other. Bu t you can't,
so siddown and shut up.
So, with the woman in
charge of taking care of Joe
Josephine Jr I assume it's auto-
matically the man's responsibility
to oversee the safety of the kid's
nine month trip into Real World
101, right? I don't think so. And
that, my friends, is my main prob-
lem with today's fight for Pro Life
Choice: men's role in deciding about
abortion.
I hear preachers and poli-
ticians screaming left and rightover
the battle to save the unborn chil-
dren, to stop these women from
killing their child-to-be. I see men,
young and old, lining the streets or
barricading abortion clinics, voic-
ing their opinion.
Well, it's nice to see that they're
so concerned wi th the current prob-
lems of today. That's very thought-
ful. But, does it ever occur to them
that maybe the women don't need
the opinion of a man to complicate
things? I don't think so.
That doesn't mean I don't
feel strongly about what is happen-
ing when a women chooses the fate
of her baby. It is a tragedy to take a
life, no ma tter how young and inno-
cent of the elements that brought it
into being.
But, I'm having my doubts on
why a function thatis so completely
feminine, something that women
cherish as a gift no male can ever
experience, has men playing such
a crucial role.
These women are aware
of the stakes, probablv even more
than we are. There are all types of
psychic or maternal bonds with
her child that I couldn't even begin
to expound upon. This must be a
very hard decision to make, ma ybe,
for those in that position, the hard-
est. They don't need outside noise
(compliments of the Men's Dept.)
butting in.
Perhaps I'm being hypo-
critical in voicing my opinion, see-
ing as lama male. Maybe wedon't
even have a say so in having an
opinion. But hopefully, I'm reach-
ing out to some of the men out
there. Have a heart, guys. Leave
something that is truly a biological
part of the woman to the women.
And their Deity.
After all, Icertainly would
prefer if they stay out of my pros-
tate cancer.
Letters to the Editor
Thursday editorial labelled slanted, misinformed
To the Editor:
As most journalists or re-
porters know, it is usually good
practketoiookatseveralangles
of a story versus one side. Who-
ever wrote Thursday's Opin-
ion page in The East Carolinian
failed to do so. Why wasn't I
asked to tell my side of the
story? Instead, you choose to
interview the Sports Director
and the Production Director.
Yes, these two people are im-
portant and on the executive
staff and I value their opinions.
I have not discussed this issue
because it is only an idea I have
not yet decided how to handle.
I havediscussed it with the Pro-
gram Di rector, so your article is
incorrect in saying I haven't
discussed it with the executive
staff. If you would have inter-
viewed me on this subject you
could have avoided printing
untruths.
I have not discussed this
withthestaffatWZMBbecause
I have not finished researching
the subject. I have consulted
Arbitron, local radio GM's,
broadcasting professors and a
survey was done last spring. I
plan to do another survey to
acknowledge what it is the col-
lege students at ECU want to
hear.
The second incorrect in-
formation is my length of em-
ployment as General Manager.
I have been General Manager
since March of 1993 (not May).
It's usually a good practice as a
"journalist" to check facts be-
fore printing.
The most important fact
here is the college population
as a whole is not being served.
In the Pitt County and more
precise,Greenviilemarket,KlSS
102 and WRNS are top runners
for the 1 listened to format
(thisincludescollegestudents).
I agree with one point in
your article. A new survey has
to be done and if you would
have consulted me, you would
have found out my plans to
implement a random survey
to ECU students. I agree the
media should reflect the inter-
est of those it serves, I don't
feel like WZMB is accomplish-
ing this to it's fullest capacity.
This is why changes have to be
made.
As far as my knowledge
and credentials, I worked at
WCTI-TV. WJKA-TV, WNCT-
TV and Z-103 FM so it is highly
probable I know what I am
doing. I am not on a "power
trip" as you suggested, but I
am an enlightened, experi-
enced, intelligent person try-
ing to run a college radio sta-
tion to the best of my ability.
Beth Arthur
Senior
Communication
All letters must be signed and accompanied with a phone
number. Students must also provide class rank and major.
All Letters to the Editor should be addressed to: The East
Carolinian, Attn Opinion Editor, Students Pubs. Building,
Second Floor, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
By T. Scott Batchelor
Anger key to
the downfall
of society
ABC's "2020" aired a segment last week
exploring the reasons we become angry and
how we control that anger. The story profiled
one woman who seems to make a habit out of
showing it. Video tapeshowed her shouting at
motorists, arguing with her husband over a
trifling matter and protesting the long lines in
both the post office and the supermarket.
We've all met someone like this and
usually manage to survive the experience. But
when the chronically angry individual hap-
pens to be in theservice industry or thegovern-
ment, then the situation can become intoler-
able.
I recently accompanied my friend on a
visit to the Department of Motor Vehicles in
another city. He had to pay a fine for failing to
comply with one of the myriad regulations
governing a u tomobile licensing and use in this
state. I walked into an office and was totally
surprised and indignant when we met the
DMV enforcement officer in charge.
My friend, Bob, told the officer about the
fine and said he'd like to pay it. The officer
seemed put off by having to deal with this
matter. Hedenched his jaw, let out an exasper-
ated snort and began subtly shaking his head.
At this point I noticed that things might not be
going too well for us, but Bob didn't pick up on
the signals. He asked the officer for a receipt.
Bad move.
"You can geta receipt from Mr. Johnson
the officer said, in a tone that suggested he
couldn't understand why Bob asked such a
ridiculous question. "Is he around today?"
asked Bob.TheofficerimpliedthatMr. Johnson
wouldn't be in until the next morning. "Well,
can I get a receipt today?" Bob continued. I
knew he was in trouble then. "You can get one
tomorrow the officer responded, as if he were
talking to someone with a hearing problem.
Bob finally backed off and left the officer to
processing the paperwork.
Not once did the DMV officer smile,
exchange pleasantries or even act civil, as a
civil servant ought to. This behavior is espe-
cially ironic and hard totakewhenyou remem-
ber that these people are paid by our taxes to
serve us. Govemmentemployees whoare hired
to deal with the general citizenry need to have
a sense of pride in carrying out their duties
respectfully and amiably. When a state em-
ployee makes a person feel as put upon as Bob
and I felt, then something is terribly wrong.
We have very little chance to change the
behavior of bureaucrats, but private sector
employees can perhaps be made more aware
of their behavior by a drop in sales due to this
attitude. In a local Burger King recently, I had
an altercation with an employee who gave me
the wrong order and then argued with me
about it. She apparently had never heard of the
timeless and wise saying, "The customer is
always right In contrast to the bureaucrat
mentioned above, if enough customers are
driven away by this behavior and Burger King
loses sales, then the business will be forced to
take corrective action and retrain its employ-
ees�teaching them to be courteous, friendly
and respectful to customers.
This appearance of an angry undercur-
rent in people comes out more and more often
in our society. Although the two examples
above are really trifles, this same anger often
turns intomuch more threateningsituations. If
we don't learn to control this emotion now, it
could resultinan increasingly dangerous soci-
ety. Petty bureaucrats with attitude problems
will then be the least of our worries.






a
TheEastCarolinian
October 5, 1993
Classifieds
Page 6
For Rent
LOCAL REALTOR is nice
home fur a new faculty member to rent
Arrival date: approx. Nov 15-30 No
realtor fee, just trying to help. Please
call Betsy Ray, Coldwell Banker 756-
3000 or voice mail 757-2297. Must be in
Rose High School District.
3-BEDROOMTOWNHOUSEtoshare,
1 furnished room. Near Hospital. Stu-
dentpreferred. Washer and dryer. S225
per month, including utilities. 757-2868.
PRIVATE PARKING: Private spaces
for rent 1 block from ECU campus on
Lewis Street. Call 756-9864
3-BEDROOM, 2-12 bath townhouse
for rent Very nice, quite - Sheraton
Village, 5 minutes from campus, $625
month, deposit. Students welcome! 321 -
4798.
Ringgotd Towers
Unit 601 ,2 Bdrm
New Carpel 6 Freshly Painted
Water & Sewer Included. 2 Student Limit
at S290month per student
CONTACT MR JERNIGAN AT 9I9i 330415
CTl Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE NEEDED - male or fe-
male, non-smoker, serious studen t on ly,
to share 2-bdrm, 2-bth unit at Arling-
ton Square. Avalable end of October.
5220m rent security deposit 12
utilities. Call 355-2884.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share a
2-bedroom duplex, 3 blocks from cam-
pus. Private room.Pets welcomed. S175
a month plus 12 utilities. Call 830-
6826 or 752-8633 for more info.
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY:Marurefe-
male roommate for 3-bedroom
townhouse; rent $167 plus 13 of all
other expenses; within 2 miles of ECU
campus. Call 830-0579.
RESPONSIBLEMALEnon-smokerto
share 2-bedroom 2 bath apartment
(washer, dryer and cable included)
$237.50 rent & 12 utilities. UPPER
CLASSMAN PREFERRED. Call 758-
8567and leave message. Availablejanu-
ary 1st.
Help Wanted
EARN$2S0O&FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell only 8 trips and you go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City! Great
Resume Experience! 1-800-678-6386!
$10$400WEEKLY.Mailingbrochures!
Sparefull-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705.
GREEKS & CLUBS: Raise up to $1000
in JUST ONE WEEK! For your frater-
nity, sorority or club. Plus S1000 for
yourself! And a free T-shirt just for
calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 75.
BRODY'S and Brody's for Men are
now accepting applications for addi-
tional part-time sales associates . We
seek individuals who have an interest
in retail and genuinely like helping
people. Flexible schedulesalarydis-
count. Interview at Customer Service
Brody's the Plaza Monday and Thurs-
day l-4pm.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
Make up to $2000-4,000month teach-
ing basic conversational English
abroad. Japan, Taiwan and S. Korea.
Many provide room and board other
benefits. No previous training or teach-
ing certificate required. For more in-
formation call: (206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 Ext. P-3712.
ROADWAY PACKAGE SYSTEM
needs package handlers to load vans
and unload trailers for the AM shift
hours 3-7 AM, S6.00bour, tuition assis-
tance available after 30 days. Future
career opportunities in operations and
management possible. Applications
can befilledoutattheECU co-op office.
LOOKING FOR responsible and ener-
getic person interested in caring for 3-
1 2 yr. old in my home approximately
28 hours a week. Must have own trans-
portation and be done with school by
noon. Please call 321-2891 if interested.
If no answer please call after 7:30 PM.
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY Indi-
viduals and student organizations
wanted to promote the hottest Spring
Break destinations, call the nation's
leader. Inter-campus programs 1-800-
327-6013
HELPWANTED:Cooks,drivers,prep,
FTFT. Call Sante Fe Jack's 758-5225.
Ask for Andy or Greg.
CAROLINA ENVIRONMENTAL
PRODUCTS now hiring full-time and
part-time sales representatives. Call
RichardRabon WednesdayandThurs-
day at 758-0645.
TRAVELFREE! SPRING BREAK!Sell
quality vacations! The hottest destina-
tions! Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas,South
Padre, Florida. "Professional" Tour
company, Easiest Way Towards Free
Trip! Best Combinations! Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710.
AGRICULTURAL RETAIL STORE:
Has opening for part-time stacker and
sales. Person needs to have stocking
experience andor farm background.
Must be able to work afternoons and
every other Saturday consisting of
approx. 30 hours per week. Pick up
application at Agri Supply Co. No
phone calls.
PART-TIME typisttranscriptionist
needed for busy law firm. Hours flex-
ible wchanging schedule &25 hours
needed per week. Preferably 65 wpm.
Send resume to: Typist, PO Box 1766,
Greenville, NC 27835.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY! As-
semble products in your home. Call
toll free 1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESEN-
TATIVES - Brody's is accepting appli-
cations for part-time customer service
representatives. Assist customers with
inquiriesmerchandise returns, flex-
ible schedulesalarydiscount. Inter-
view at Customer Service, Brody's, the
Plaza, Monday And Thursday 1 -4 PM.
FREE ROOM AND BOARD for Fe-
male student in exchange for minimal
assistance to elderly lady. 15 minute
drive from campus. Call 355-3400 or
757-1798.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST using
WordPerfect and Windows, with fil-
ing and organizational skills for 20
hours a week. $5.00 an hour. Call 830-
0521.
CAMPUS REP
WANTED
s
The nation's leader in college marketing
is seeking an energetic, entrepreneurial
student for the position ot campus rep.
No sales involved. Place advertising on
bulletin boards lor companies such as
American Express and Microsott.
Great part-time job earnings. Choose
your own hours; 4-8 hours per week
required. Call:
Campus Rep Program
American Passage Media Corp
215 W Harrison. Seattle, WA98119
(800) 487-2434 Elt 4444
For Sale
DARKROOMFORSALE' BogenX-35
B&W enlarger weasel, two-speed pa-
per safe, four chemical trays (each with
separate tongs), squeegie, 8x magnify-
ing loupe, timer, graduated cylinder,
Vivitar Developing Tank, two leused
safe light, negative plate, squeegie sink,
35mm bulk film loader (loaded!), gal-
lons of chemicals, 3 instruction book-
lets - easy to set up and use, will dem-
onstrate. Cash $300 firm. Call after 5
PM, 752-8577.
GOVERNMENTSEIZEDcars,trucks,
boats, 4-wheelers,motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available in your area now!
Call 1-800-436-4363 Ext. C-5999.
BICYCLES, BICYCLES, BICYCLES,
Schwinn, Jamis, Motobocane, Raleigh.
Good names. Good bikes, Good prices.
Call evenings, ask for Cass at 758-7867
or Archie at 752-7669.
For Sale
ATTENTIONWEIGHTLIFrERSAND
WATCHERS: Sports supplements at
majordiscountprices: Cybergenics,Hot
Stuff, Wt. Gain 900, Vanady 1 Sulfate,
Tri-Chromelene, Mega-mass and much
more! For info call Charles at 321 -2158.
COUCH FOR SALE Price negotiable.
In good shape and comfortable. Come
and see. For more information call
Heather at 355-2762.
FOR SALE: Female ferret, descented
and spaid with cage and all accesso-
ries. $100. Queen size waterbed wo
headboard $125. Call 752-2963.
MEMBERSHIP: Club for Women
Only. Low monthly payments. Save
$59 starting fee! CaU Angie 931-9768.
RALEIGH 10-speed . Good condition,
rides excellent. $100 or best offer. Call
830-9092.
22" CANNONDALE ROAD BIKE
Older model but still rides good. $450
o.b.o. (830-9324).
SEARS KENMORE PORTABLE
DRYER-Excellentcondition. $150.Has
cotton sturdy, touch-up, permanent
press, air-only cycles. 756-9642.
TREK 820. '92, Scott bars, accessories.
$250. Call 752-2248 or 757-1640.
BICYCLE-88Trek 140062 cm, Shimano
150 comp. Avocet mod. 30 computer,
MUST SELL. Never wrecked, well-
maintained, near perfect condition.
$375 neg. Call 758-7041.
FERRET FOR SALE - 7 months old,
greybrown for $100. Includes cage,
water bottle, litter box, dish and food.
Call 752-4627 - leave message.
SOLOFLEX - weight machine for sale.
Excellent condition, new weight
scrapes, no butterfly attachment, but
can be bought from factory. $575 neg.
756-9864 anytime.
SPRING BREAK -Plan early, save$50
and get best rooms! Prices increase 11
15! Bahamas Cruise 6 days includes 12
meals, $279! Panama City room w
kitchen, $129! Cancun from Raleigh,
$339, Jamaica from Raleigh, $419, Key
West, $239, Daytona Room wkitchen,
$149! 1-800-678-6386.
your tennis racket strung? Call Greg at
758-3313 for prices.
WHOOTT HERE IT IS - World Music
Productions Disc Jockey Service. Bring-
ing you the biggest variey of music,
best rates and most experienced DJ's.
Go with Greek's No. 1 choice. Call Vic
at 752-6164 for early booking.
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SSB Personals
DO YOU HAVE A TASTE FOR
TRUTH? Bible Study every Tuesday
and Wednesday. 7:30 PM,
Menddenhall room 242. Drop in on us
anytime. Apostolic Campus Ministry.
WRITERMUSICIAN and poetic soul
seeks like-minded lady for friendship
and fun. Send photos and correspon-
dence to: KANE, PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
LOST: Female Golden Retriever. lyr&
4mos old. Navy collar & silver choke
chain. Last seen off Woodlawn park
area on 9-13-93. Answers to the name
of Jazmine. Reward offered. Please call
758-0915.
LOST: Choc. Lab, small female, "Casey"
missingsince924.Pleasecall 756-6725.
MW Greek
E3 Services Offered
FARTYOVERHERE'Onlyifyouhave
a Mobile Music Productions Disc
Jockey. MMP is the mostpopularchoice
in disc jockey services. Wide music
selection. Professionalism. Fall dates
filling fast. Call Lee at 758-4644 for
booking.
ATTENTION TENNIS PLAYERS:
Tired of paying high prices to have
MATTQUINNofDELTACHI-Your
band SMACKAPPLE was awesome
Friday night! Look forward to seeing
you guys rock again soon
DELTA CHI - The EARLY morning
tailgatewasgreatwith you guys! Let's
get together again soon. Love, the Sis-
ters and Pledges of Pi Delta.
DELTACHI: We had a blast with ya'll
at our pre-downtown. You guys are
great. Love, Alpha Phi.
KAPPA DELTA RHO Welcomes the
Delta Pledge Class. Congratulations:
Steve Belch, CorbbettEvendge, Bryon
Feth, Kenny Hanlin, Josh Hill, Kent
Honeycutt, Ronnie Sweatman, Mark
White and Travis Williams. Stick with
it, and the rewards are endless!
PI DELTA, DELTA ZETA & KAPPA
SIGMA - Thanks for the quad-social
on the 23rd. We had a blast and are
looking forward to doing it again- the
IQ,
KAPPA DELTA RHO gentlemen.
ATTENTION.Lost, twouglypoodle
trees from the porch of Alpha Omi-
cron Pi house. If found, please don't
return. Thank you, Alpha Omicron
Pi. PS. Would you like the other pot
and trail of dirt?
TO SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Thanks
for a great time at the pre-down-
town Thursday! Love the sisters
and pledges of Alpha Xi Delta.
PI DELTA wants to wish a belated
thank you to everyone who came by
our carwash, especially to you guys
who lent a "helping hand
PI LAMDA PHI - Was it heaven? Or
was it hell? Whatever it was it was
definitely out of this world! Hope to
get together with you guys again
soon! Love the Sisters and Pledges of
Pi Delta.
ALPHA PHI flag-football players:
Good luck in the championships.
You all are awesome! Love, your
Sisters.
PHISIGMAPIPLEDGES-Keepup
the good job pledges. You are doing
really great. Remember, when you
set up an interview, try not to be late!
Keep your heads held high and try
not to get behind. Pledging can be a
really fun time Love, the Brothers.
THANKS to Lisa and Shawn for an
awesomeweekend'Emeraldlslewas
oh so much fun; our pledge retreat
was great, but where was the sun?!
Love, the new members of Alpha
Omicron Pi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI Big Sisters
are the best! Thanks for everything.
We love you! - your little Sisters.
KAPPA SIGMA - We had a great
time at your induction social. Let's
get together again soon! Love, the
Sigmas.
TO THE PLEDGES OF SIGMA
SIGMA SIGMA:Pledgeretreat was
a blast! But maybe next time, we
should leave signs and yard animals
behind! Julie Farmer, thank you for
letting all of us stay at your house!
TO ALL SINGLE YOUNG MEN -
Homecoming is so close! Don't you
agree that you should be asking
someone soon. If you don't get
quickly, that special girl may be
wisked away by some other guy!
SIGMA PHI EPSILON, the 70's So-
cial was real groovy! Let's do it again
sometime! Love, the Sigma's.
PI KAPPA ALPHA -Thank you very
much for the beautiful flowers; we
continue to support you. Love, the
Sigma's.
Announcements
SCHOOL OF BUSINFSS
SCHOLARSHIPS AVAII ART F
Approximately $22,300 will be
awarded in scholarships to School of
Business majors (those students al-
ready in the School of Business).
Students interested in making appli-
cation for these scholarships should
secure forms from one of the follow-
ing department offices: Accounting -
GCB 3208; Decision Sciences - 3418;
Finance- 3420; Management- 3106;
Marketing - 3414. All applications
must be submitted to Ruth Jones
(GCB3210),Chairman of the School
of Business Scholarship Committee,
by October 18,1993. Students may
apply for one or more of the scholar-
ships. Final selection will be made by
the ECU Student Scholarships, Fel-
lowships and Financial Aid Commit-
tee upon recommendation of the
Dean of the School of Business. The
Dean's recommendation willbe made
from candidates selected by the
School of Business Scholarship Com-
mittee
ECU HONORS
ORGANIZATION
BCHO will be meeting on Wed, Oct 6
at4:30PMin the basementof Fleming
HalL Members please attend with
student ID and a pen. Monetary ben-
efitsdependentonnumberofpeople
present! Bring money if interested in
dinner at Wendy's afterward.
COUNCIL OF STUDFNT
ORGANIZATIONAL LFAPlFRS
Student leaders - if you had an office
or a leadership position with an ECU
organization, you are invited to the
COSOL meeting on Thursday, Octo-
ber 7, 1193 at 4 PM in the multi-
purpose room of MSC Formoreinfo,
call 757-4796.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next meeting of Gamma Beta Phi
will be held on October 5 th at 5 PM
in Mendenhall Great Room Section
1. All members are encouraged to
attend! Please remember that dues
must be paid at this meeting. For
more info contact Allison at 931-
8285.
RECREATIONAL SFRVirFS
Can you dig this? Rec Services is
having a Volleyball registration meet-
ing on Tuesday, Oct 5 in BIO 103 at
5 PM. So come by and see if you have
what it takes to volley and spike For
more info, call Rec Services at 757-
6387.
CHOOSING A MAIOR AND A
CAREER
This 5-session workshop is the be-
ginning step in career counseling at
ECU. Take assessment instrument
Learn how to do majorcareer re-
search. Get a list of possible career
fields that fit your interest Classes
begin week of October 4. LAST
CHANCE BEFORE EARLY REGISTRA-
TION! For more info, a schedule and
to register, stop by the Counseling
Center, 316 Wright Building.
RECREATIONAL SFRV1CFS
Get in shape this semester! Registra-
tion for the October 18- December
3rd fitness class will be October 13-
19 in 204Christenbury Gymnasium
The cost per session is10studen ts
and S20faculty, staff, spouse. Drop-
in tickets can also be purchased any-
time in 204 Christenbury for $5
studentand$10faculty,staff,spouse
and will be valid for five classes.
Choose from aerobics, step, low im-
pact, Hi-Lo, funk, Belly Busters,
aquaerobics, Hi-Lo step, power step,
and toning. For more information,
call Recreational Services at 757-
6387.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Get a grip! The Outdoor Recreation
Program at Recreational Services will
host a climbing workshop at the
Hard Roc Tower on Thursday, Oct
21 from 3-5 PM. This workshop will
introduce participants to the basics
of climbing including safety, equip-
ment and utilization, knot tying, be-
laying, and climbing technique For
more information, call Recreational
Services at 757-6387. See you at the
Hard Roc Climbing Tower!
ECU GOSPEL CHOIR
ECU Gospel Choir, Fall Concert, Oct
6,1993, at 6:30 PM in Fletcher Music
Center. We invite you to come out
and enjoy an evening of gospel mu-
sic.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
It's time to get involved! All mem-
bers, non-members and faculty are
welcome to attend the AMA general
meeting on Thursday, October 7 th
at 4:00 in GC 3008. Refreshments
will be served.
RETURNING ADULT
STUDENT ASSOCIATION
There will be a meeting in room 205
of Joyner Library on Oct 7 at 5:00.
We will be nominating officers so
don't miss this meeting! Any stu-
dents 25 and older are welcome
ECU POETRY FORI1M
ECU Poetry Forum will meet October
7 at 8 PM in 241 Mendenhall SC.
Those wanting feedback on their
poems should bring 8-10 copies of
each poem
ECU STUDENTS FOR THF
ETHICAL TREATMENT OF
ANIMALS
ECU SETA Club will hold its first
meeting Thursday, October 7 at 6:30
PM in General Classroom Building
room 1005.
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAI
HONOR SOCIETY
Members- Thanks for all your help
with AIDS Awareness Ribbons Day. It
was a great success Next meeting
will be Oct 20, GC 3006, 7:30 PM,
Lori 355-2654.
ECU DEBATE CLUB
The ECU Debate Club will hold a
meeting on Wednesday Oct 6 from
7-8 in room 212 of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Please call Greg at 758-
3943 for more information. All inter-
ested students are welcome to at-
tend.
STUDENT HEALTH SERVICFS
In October, the Student Health Ser-
vice will be offering the FLU VAC-
CINE for the 93-94 school year. It is
recommended that all high risk indi-
viduals be immunized. High risk in-
cludes infants, elderly, immunosup-
pressed individuals and persons with
chronic illness. If you are at high risk
or would just like to be immunized,
the vaccine will be given beginning
October 11 through Nov. 19th. There
is a nominal fee for the vaccine. For
more info, call SHS At 757-6841.
COMMUNICATING TO
ASSERT YOURSELF
The counseling Center is offering a
two-session workshop for students
designed to identify effective com-
munication techniques for achiev-
ing assertiveness in your life Em-
phasis will be placed on the relation-
ship between self-esteem and
assertiveness behavior. Members are
expected to attend both meetings.
The meetings will be Wednesday
October 13 and Friday October 15
from9-10AM. Call 757-6661 tosign
up.
RELATIONSHIPS GROUP
The Counseling Center is offering a
therapy group for male and female
students who wish to understand
the challenges and confusions ex-
perienced in relationships with oth-
ers. The group will meet Wednes-
days, 3:30-5:00 PM. Please call 757-
6661 for more information. The
group begins October 13.
ECU SCHOOL OF MHSir
EVENTS FOR
OCTOBER 5-OCTOBER 11
WED OCT. 6 - ECU SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA, Robert Hause, con-
ductor (Wright Auditorium, 8 PM,
free). THUR.OCT. 7 - ECU FACULTY
RECITAL "Saxophone in Chamber
Music Brad Foley, saxophone;
Coastal Winds Quintet; East Caro-
lina Brass; Mark Ford, marimba;
John B. O'brien, piano; A. Louise
Toppin, soprano; Nathan Williams,
clarinet (A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 PM, free). FRIOCT. 8 - RUSSELL
SMITH, trumpet, in Senior Recital
(A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall, (9:00 PM,
free). For additional information,
call 757-6851 or the 24-hour at
757 4370.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words a less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�AD ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Mry organization may use the Amoince-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
tirrfreeofcharge.DAjetothelirnitedarriajnt
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Friday at 4 pm for
Tuesday's edition
Tuesday at 4 pm for
Thursday's edition
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day prior to
publication however, no refunds will
be given.
For more
information call
757-6366.





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
Depeche Mode plays NC
Photo courtesy of
Sire Records
Pictured here is the latest Depeche Mode album Songs of Faith And
Devotion. They gave fans a great show in Chapel Hill (minus the egos).
By Steve Griffin
Staff Writer
Depeche Modeplayed in Chapel
Hill Tuesday night coming off of a
sold-out European tour. This show
was not even close to sold out. Once
thelightswentoutandDepecheMode
started playing,itdidn'tmatter where
you were sitting, because the band
put on a great show.
The The opened up for Depeche
Mode, which had a very impressive
performance. The lead singer had a
strong voice to accompany the tal-
ented guitarist who used to play for
The Smiths. The harmonica made
The The so different from any other
band. They played for about an hour,
and Depeche Mode started shortly
after.
Depeche Mode opened up with
a song called "Higher Love" off their
new album,SoHgs Of Faith and Devo-
tion. This album is a little slower-
paced than their previous hit album
Violator, but they still have the same
familiar sound in every song. When
the show started, lead singer An-
drew Fletcher, at the frontof thestage,
was the only visible member of
Depeche Mode. Then a large curtain
dropped, and the rest of the band
appeared on a pedestal in the back.
They had some really unusual visual
effects and a block of screens behind
the lead singer. It was like the Zoo TV
thatU2 usedattheirshowstodisplay
differentpicturestogoalong with the
music.
After the first few up beat songs,
the guitarist came down to the front
and serenaded the audiece with the
slower"Queshon of Lust
This mixed up the show nicely
by going from fast to slow songs and
also from new songs to old ones. The
lead singer came back out and sang a
couple of their more recent songs,
including, "Walking in My Shoes"
and their most recent hit, "Condem-
nation which has a slow gospel
sound to it
Depeche Mode played mostly
new songs during the show, which I
enjoyed, but 1 was disappointed that
old hits seem to be forgotten.
The downfall .of the show was
itslength. Depeche Mode left thestage
after playing only about an hour and
a half. They did comeback outfor one
of several encores and played "Per-
sonal JesusThe crowd reacted more
to this song than any other and
chanted "reach out touch faith" con-
tinuously throughout the song.
The band went througha couple
more encores and played songs from
Violator. These were songs everyone
knew,so thecrowd was much louder
by the end of the concert. Depeche
Mode ended up doing five encores
and played one song each time the)'
came back out.
I enjoyed the encores but I don't
know why tne the Dana won't let the
encore die. The band's ego got high
by the end of the show.
The lastsong they played was an
old,oldone,anditseernedlikenoone
knewit. Andrew Fletcher tried toget
the crowd to sing along, but no one
knew the words. I found this amus-
ing, considering it was their last song
after all the familiar hits they played
throughout the show.
Depeche Mode put on a great
show inspiteof its length. They could
have played longer than two hours
because they have so many songs. If
the band was a little tired after the
long European tour, they would have
saved energy by not running back
onto the stage five times, simply to
fufill their egos.
Storyteller visits
ECU campus
By Jimmy Rostar
Staff Writer
Forabout75 years, there hasbeen
away of telling that fall hasarrived in
Pitt County. Sure, the shorter days
and cooler air act as reminders, but
what we're talking about here is the
county fair.
The74th Annual PittCounty Ag-
ricultural Fair opened last evening,
and expo tions for another year of
record-breakingcrowdsarehigh. Fair
manager Elvy Forrest said, "We're
hoping for an attendance of 90,000-
plus this year and he added tha t he
has seen larger and larger groups
every year since 1987.
Forrest isexcited about the pros-
pect of anothergood sea son and says,
"Well have the exhibits, livestock
shows, rides, music, midway shows,
and free entertainment that people
from all over eastern North Carolina
have come to expect from the Pitt
County Fair. We have truly become a
regional fair in size and scope
The fair has always been known
for introducing the masses to local
agricultural,commercial and histori-
cal exhibits. This year's event is no
exception.
Livestock shows, featuring
swine, sheep and ca ttle wi 11 be staged
throughout the week, and other ani-
mals ranging form rabbits to horses
will alsobeseen. Theexhibition hall is
open nightly until 1030 p.m.
County
The EastCarolina Villageof Yes-
teryear highlights this year's fair as
well.In the Village, you can check out
examples of how farm life was lived
in Pitt County from me 1840s to the
1940s. Local craftspeople will also be
around to show off their creations.
The fair's midway is once again
operated by Amuserrcrntsof America,
the country's largest carnival com-
pany. You can expect to see between
35 to 40 rides this year and about 60
concessions.
For all you lovers of death-defy-
ing insanity, you'll be entertained by
Jamie Garcia's "Circo de
Espectacular This "Circus of
Thrills which is located on the main
midway, features four performance
Swinging Steaks please country fans
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
The Boston Phoenix, in a re-
view of a new band, asked the
musical question, "What do you
get when you baste Boston rock
with a marinade of Georgia Satel-
lites, Black Crowes and Oak Ridge
Boys?" Answer: The Swinging
Steaks. This latest band to come
from the once-and-still-fertile
Boston music scene is said to have
a rich catalogueof influences and
inspirations ranging from no-
frills rock tofunked-up soul, pure
honky tonk and gospel to pop
harmony.
The Swinging Steaks, formed
in 1989, is a five member band
made up of many of Boston's lo-
cal club veterans and one ex-Del
Fuego drummer, Joe Donnelly.
These guys have been called
borderline rock and country, but
they aredefinitely closer to coun-
try in their sound and subject
matter.
Paul Kochanski (bass, vocals)
pointed out, "We're a rock band
that does some country tunes. I
know we've won a few a wards as
a local country band, but hey,
you can call us 'Best Reggae
Polka band' as long as you give
us an award for it Hey, now
there's a rock n' roll attitude for
ya nothing like a little artist in-
tegrity. Anyway, they call them-
selves "roots music
Photo courtesy of
Capricorn Records
The members of Swinging Steaks fromleft to right are: Tim Gilvanniello,
Paul Kochanski, Jim Gambino, Jamie Walker and Joe Donnelly.
acts by daredevil motorcyclists and
trapeze artists.
Other events mis week include
the Hollywood Stunt Show (provid-
ing car and motorcycle stunts), the
Lions of the Serengeti cage show
and�with another appearance by
Chief Wahoo McDaniel�profes-
sional male and female wrestling.
While the above events are free,
you'll have to pay to get into the fair
and to partake of the midway's rides
and concessions. Parking at the fair-
groundscosts$l,and general admis-
sion is $3 for adults and $2 for kids.
Thereare, however, special discount
days when you can get in for less.
See FAIR page 8
Today: PMS
By Laura Wrisht
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
On Oct. 6 at 8 p.m African-
American storyteller JoyceGrear
will perform at East Carolina
University's Hendrix Theater.
Grear will present traditional
tales and the program is free
and open to persons of all ages.
Human beingsarestorytell-
ers by nature but we have come
to depend upon the media to
provide us with wisdom and
insight. Before there was televi-
sion and radio, there was the
written word. Before writing,all
of our cultural lessons and his-
torical facts were passed from
generation to generation
through the spoken word in the
medium of storytelling.
In non-western cultures, like
traditional African communi-
ties, historical information, cus-
toms and beliefs were passed
from one generation to the next
through folk tales and parables.
Americans have always had
their historical information re-
corded in writing and as a re-
sult, weareoutof touch with the
ancient art of storytelling.
Joyce Grear is a native of
North Carolina and was raised
near Wilmington. She works
full-time as a professional per-
former and spends most of her
time on tour. Her engagements
are very popular and aud ience
members total about 200,000
each year.
After she graduated from
FayettevilleState University in
1970, Grear taught English to
junior high school students in
Pittsburgh. From 1975 until
1979, she attended Carnegie-
Mellon University and the Uni-
versity of Pittsburgh forgradu-
ate studies in English and the-
ater.
Grear was the artist-in-
residence for the City of
Wilmington for seven years.
While she held this position,
she founded and coordinated
a variety of community-based
programs including two com-
munity theater groups and the
Youth Storytelling Festival.
Since 1987, Grear has fo-
cused primarily upon her
storytelling ana ner touring.
Her appearances include per-
formances at the National Fes-
tival of Black Storytelling in
California, the Three Apples
Festival at Harvard University
and the National Storytelling
Festival in Tennessee. Grear
has also devoted some of her
time to making films.
Currently Grear is on the
North Carolina Arts Council's
Tour Program and on the ros-
ter of the South Carolina Arts
Commission.
Storyteller
Joyce Grear will
appearaspartof
ECU'S Cultural
Awa ren ess
week activites.
The program'
will take place
on Thursday
Oct. 6 at
8:00p.m. in
Hendrix
Theatre.
Photo courtesy ot
Mendenhall
Student Center.
)
Answered by 1989
Parlay International
Their major label debut,
Southside of the Sky, was released
on Sept. 14 of this year on the
Capricorn label�the Southern
record label that put The Allman
Brothers on the map (although
these guy are not even on the
same planet as the Allman Broth-
ers).
Ifyoulikecountrywitha little
rock guitar thrown in and, 1 must
admit, some good harmonies, this
may be a new band for you. This
album runs the gamut of stan-
dard "tears in my beer" country
songs like "Suicide at the Wish-
ing Well" to Most-mv-woman-
life-is-hell-songs like
"Trainwreck" and other slight
deviations from country stan-
dards.
These guys may have a
chance in today's modern coun-
try music scene, but I doubt that
any Top 40 air play will develop
a college listening audience or
any other audience for that mat-
ter.
Before I end this on a sour
note, let the record show that this
reviewer is biased against coun-
try music; you may want to check
it out for yourself if you have
As many as8outof 10 women
have physical and emotional symp-
toms of premenstrual syndrome,
or PMS. While the symptoms can
be uncomfortable and upsetting,
PMS can be easily managed in
many cases. A healthy diet and
self-care can result in more com-
fort and less stress, every month.
Recognize Symptoms
You may have PMS if you have
these physical symptoms u p
totwoweeksbeforeyour ,�
period: exhaustion; � �
sleep disturbances;
breast swelling;
bloating; weight
gain; acne; ,
cravings for sweets;
and constipation,
then diarrhea. The
emotional symptoms
canbeevenmoredifficultto
deal with than the physical. Com-
mon emotional symptoms include
irritability; depression; anxiety;
confusion; feeling out of control.
For some women, thesesymptoms
are mild. For others, symptoms a re
severe and make life very difficult.
While there are many theories
about the cause of PMS, scientists
agree that it's real, and not "all in
your head
Diet Makes A Difference
For many PMS symptoms,
your diet can make a big differ-
ence. Try using these suggestions
for a week or two before your pe-
riod:
n u
Eliminate
sugar (including honey, syrup,
and ose" additives like fructose
or sucrose), caffeine (in coffee,
chocolate, and cola drinks), artifi-
cial sweeteners, cigarettes, and al-
cohol.
Emphasize
whole grains (bread, pasta,
brown rice), dried beans, nuts, fresh
vegetables(especially spin-
ach), and fruit.
Avoid
salty and
smoked foods, and
dairy products. If
bloating is a prob-
lem, limit fruit and
eliminate fruit
juices.
Your doctor may
suggest supplements in-
cluding a basic multivitamin with
minerals (including Vitamins B6
and E, calcium and magnesium);
evening primrose oil (available in
health food stores).
More Help
Thereareother things thatwill
hel p to red uce PMS syp toms. Most
importantly, take steps to manage
your stress levels. Vigorous exer-
cise will reduce both physical and
emotional symptoms. Relaxation
through meditation, Jeep breath-
ing, walks, massage or a hot bath
See PMS page 8
True Romance'
strikes strange
humor chord
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
True Romance, a new film di-
rected by TonyScott and written by
Quentin Tarantino, tells the tale of a
newlywed couple who must evade
the Mafia and the cops to sell a
milliondollars worth ofcocaineand
escape to Mexico to live the life of
their dreams.
Tarantino, who wrote and di-
rected lastyear'sknodcoutResmwr
Dogs, again combines his high-oc-
tane wit with his penchant for vio-
lence. He ends up with a script that
draws viewers in and instantly
makes them feel affection for the
characters in the film. Every charac-
ter, and there are plenty of them,
adds something to the film.
Unlike Reservoir Dogs, True Ro-
mancehasA glossy Hollywood style.
Reservoir Dogs reveled in its own
grunginess and grit. The characters
are as fully developed in True Rch
maticeas they were in Reservoir Dogs,
but TnteRomanceis filled with bright
colorsand interesting sets. Reservoir
Dogs seemed to have been shot in
shades of gray with little to look at
except the characters' faces. On the
other hand tlie mix of gritty charac-
ters insidea g ssy Hollywood film
See TRUE page 8





f
October 5, 1993
Continued from page 7
TRUE
"� the National PMS
� H I 800 344-4PMS,orPMS
' al 1 " 4PMS. Tor
milder symptoms, trj the sugges-
tions above and speak to your doc-
tor when you have your annual
gynecological check-up.
Continued from page 7
FAIR
Today,an empty CokeorMeUo-Yeflo
can will cutadmissionbyadoUar,and
Thursday is College Day. Bring your
student ID rbr half-price admission.
You can buy individual ride tick-
ets inside the gates. And from today
untilThursdayasvvellason Saturday
aftermxm, ride passes can be pur-
chased for $8.
"fbefairrunsuntilSaturday,and
thegatesopenat3 p.m. until Friday.
The midway cranks up at 4 p.m.
each day except Saturday when it
will open at 1 p.m. (gates open at
12:30).
Forrest is confident that this
Continued from page 7
works miraculously well m Inn-Ro-
mance,
rbm, Scott who has directed
many glossy Hollywood pictures,
including Top t am, Beverly Hills Cop
II. Days of Thunder and The Last Boy
Scout, appeared to be a hack director
destined to rnakeacareer of directing
gexxi-kxiking hollow motion pic-
tures. With TnwRoinance, Scottproves
that his style just needed the right
script.
Though Tony Scott's clout in
Hollywood will increase with this
film, he still must be considered less
accomplished as a film maker than
hisbrorher Ridley. WhileTonyinher-
ited theability tomakecommerdally
successful pictures, Ridley was
blessed withartisticabilities.Perhaps
with a little help from his brother,
Tony Scott may actually turn into an
artist. For now, he is a workman-like
director, though, who was blessed
with the perfect script that allowed
True Romance to evolve into a work of
art
The director and writer explain
only part of the wonder of Trite Ro-
mance. The castoh! the cast.
Christian Slater plays Clarence,
a misfit who works at a comic book
store and loves watching martial arts
movies. Dennis Hopper plays
Clarence's dad, an ex-cop forced to
work as a security guard. Patricia
Arquette plays Alabama, Clarence's
wife. Gary Oldman plays Drexl, a
white pimp who thinks he is black.
Christopher Walken plays a Sicilian
mobster, an impatient man with a
love for violence. Val Kilmer plays
theghostof Elvis,aguidingvision for
Clarence. Other members of the cast
include Brad Pitt, Saul Rubinek,
Branson Pinchot, Michael Rapaport,
TomSizemoreandChristopherPenn'
The story begins on Clarence's
birthday. His boss pays a hooker to
show Clarence a good time, since
Clarence's usual way of celebrating
his birthday is to watch movies. The
hooker, Alabama, falls in love with
Clarence, and the twoof them decide
to get married. After their wedding
Clarence begins to think that
Alabama's pimp, Drexl, should be
killed, so he sets out to do just that.
Clarence steals cocaine from
Drexl and beginsa cross-country jour-
ney to Los Angeles to try to sell the
drugs. While he's in LA Clarence
meets a whole host of oddballs and
finally finds someone who is willing
to buy thecocaine. Unfortunatelv the
Mafia has located Clarence, and the
cops have been alerted to the sale of
drugs. Everyonemeetsina hotel room
in a smashing climax.
Becauseoftheexceptionallvlarge
number of characters, the film mak-
ers introduce many of them before
they become involved in Clarence's
life. Whenaarencefinallyvisits them,
the audience already knows a little
about each character.
The two cops, played by Tom
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question a feckless prod ucer who has
arranged the cocaine sale. The way
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The beauty of Trite Romance is
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The film never really tries to be taken
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modem day fairy tale. The Brothers
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True Romance will not excite all
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fits.
For those viewers who can ap-
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delight.
On a scale of one to 10, True
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THRU





�lMW
October 5, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
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, �� -





��
The East Carolinian
Page 10
The 411
Thursday, Sept. 30
Soccer, aw.iy
lost to Wake Forest, 2-1
Sports
Friday, Oct. 1
Memph
October 5, 1993
Volleyball away
beat Mt. Olive 15-5,15, 15-4
Saturday, Oct. 2
Football, hnmp
Lost to Memphis State, 34-7
Soccer, away
lost to William and Mary 2-1
Cross Country, away
Split, women beat UNC-W 31-
24, Men lost to UNC-W 28-27
What's on Tap
Tuesday Oct. 5
Volleyball, h�rf"
North Carolina A & T at 7 p.m.
Swimminp-men and wompn
Pentathlon, 3 p.m.
AP Football Top 25
i 1. Florida St. (61)
2. Alabama (1)
3. Miami
4. Notre Dame
5. Florida
6. Ohio State
7. Nebraska
8. Penn State
9. Michigan
10. Oklahoma
11. Tennessee
12. Arizona
13. Washington
14. Texas A&M
15. North Carolina
ByBrian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
Ifyouattended thisSaturday's
gameatFicklen stadium, you might
still be hearing these same words
over and over again in your head:
"MemphisStatequarterbackSteve
Matthew's pass is complete to
PA announcer John Moore seemed
to say this over and over.
Moore would say ita total of 30
tirnes on a beautiful fall afternoon,
but the fall day was anything but
beautiful for ECU. The Bucs were
handed a 34-7 loss.
The Tigers' quarterback had a
field day against a young ECU sec-
ondary. Matthews stole the show
completing 23 of 30 passes for 287
yards, three touchdowns and two
interceptions. He had the luxury of
having wide open receiversal! day
and his favorite hook up was the
sure-handed Isaac Bruce. Bruce
would finish with seven catches for
147 yards.
The question marks about the
ECU offensive line were definitely
answeredrtheystill need some more
work. Quarterback Chris Hester
and Perez Mattison did not have
much time to throw the ball and
helped seta new ECU record with
six total interceptions in a game.
Hesterwas sacked fourtimes. They
were a combined 12 of 26 for 83
yards and no touchdowns. The Pi-
rates were forced to play without
starters Terry Tilghman and Der-
rick Leaphart on the offensive line.
Tilghman is gone for the year with
a shoulder injury and Leaphart for
six to seven weeks with a knee
injury.
A questionable coaching call
came in the third quarter when
backup QB Mattison came in to
replace Hester. He came in with
3:56 left and the Pirates trailing by
only 17. Hester was not surprised
or disappointed that he was re-
placed by Mattison and said that
Logan told him that he wanted to
give him a breather for a little bit.
After Mattison completed the
first pass to tight end Carlester
Crumpler for seven yards, his next
pass was intercepted. This was the
first of four for the freshman.
"Well, at some point we are
going to have to create some quar-
terback play and it's time to push
Perez out there even though it's
obvious he's not ready. But we got
to just go ahead and'jump in the
water and see what it's all about
Head Coach Steve Logan said.
"There was a price to pav for that
and we paid it today it's just a
shame that right now were sterile
on offense
The turning point in the game
came just before the half with the
Bucs trailing 21-7. The Bucs had
possession on theMSU 15-yard line
and Hester threw a pass intended
for Allen Williams, but was inter-
cepted and returned all the way to
the ECU one-yard line. The speedy
tightend, Crumpler, ran the length
of the field tomakethesavingtackle.
The Bucs were able to catch a
break when the Tigers were issued
a 15-yard penalty on the next play.
MSU were forced to use Bobby
Allison fora 34-yard field goal with
eightsecondslefttoextend the lead
to 24-7.
The ECU defense once again
gave up the big pass plays. They
gave up 287yards against'the pass
and Matthews was able to pull his
quick trigger overand over to wide
open receivers. With the loss of the
injured linebacker Mark Libiano,
the Bucs were forced to use young
and inexperienced talent. The Pi
Photo by Harold Wiso
rates shot themselves in the foot
with missed arm tackles in the sec-
ondary.
"We are going to be a good
defense, but we can't give up big
plays Defensive Coordinator
Larry Coyer said. "Memphis State
is a good team, but that is a game
you ought to win. Hank (Cooper)
had a hard day, but kids have hard
days. We can't continue to give up
big plays
The Pirate defensive line
twisted around and only allowed
50 yards on the ground. The Buc
defense rallied after half-time and
only allowed 10 points the rest of
the way. The rushing defense has
improved tremendously since last
season.
"For some reason our history
right now is that in the first half we
practice and then in the second half
we understand and play better
Coyer said. "Daw gone, we've
played four games and it seems to
me like thatthey would learn sooner
or later that what we practice all
week they're gonna run there, it's
not going tochange. Seems likewe
go in and don't believe it
The bright spot for ECU was
the running game. Running back
Junior Smith ran for 146yardson20
carries. Smith brokea 52-yard run
on the opening drive to give the
Pirates their only lead at 7-0. The
Pirates were forced to stray away
fromSmith when they were trail-
ing in the second half and had to
go to the air. This is when the
Pirates fell apart.
Rightnow the downward
spiral is emanating from the of-
fensive side of the ball, putting
our whole football team under
too much stress because of the
lack of production offensively
Logan said.
See MEMPHIS page 12
�, � -����-M-Mi Jun,orSmithranforl46yardson20 See MEMPHIS
bpikers net fourth win I Pirate Lacrosse
By Brad Oldham L "��- -CM-HjaaC
opens season 2-1-1
16. California
17. Louisville
18. Virginia
19. BYU
20. Colorado
21. Wisconsin
22. Auburn
23. Syracuse
24. West Virginia
25. UCLA
By Brad Oldham
Stef7Write7
The East Carolina volleyball
team trounced MountOli ve Friday
night at Minges Coliseum. The Pi-
rates won the match 15-5,15-4,15-
3, and brings their record to 4-14 for
the season.
"Nogame iseasy, butl feel that
we are really starting to come
around'EastCarolina Head Coach
Martha McCaskill said after the
game. "Especially in the last few
weeks, wehavestarted toplavverv
well 7 '
In game one, it was fairly easy
toseethatMountOlivewouldhave
trouble hanging with ECU in the
match. After Mount Olive scored
the first two points of the game, the
rest was all Pirates. Outside hitters
Carrie Brne and Melanie Richards
led ECU to a 15-5 win.
Game two was very similar to
game one. Again Mount Olive took
the early two point lead, but again
it was the Pirates dominating the
gamefrom then on. Carrie Brne led
theattackearlywith extremely good
serving, abusing Moun t Olive with
kill after kill. The Pirates ran off
eleven consecutive points before
Mount Olive could answer. Lead-
File Photo
The ECU volleyball team took out their frustrations against Mount
Ol.ve over the weekend. The Bucs are now 4-14 on the season.
ing 14-4, junior Kelly Crowe served
the game- winning point. The score
stood ECU two, MountOlivenoth-
ing.
With East Carolina dominat-
ing the first two games, the third
was no exception. Junior Sarah
Laurentled the team from theopen-
ing serve. The Pirates seemed to
play flawlessly and showed lots of
enthusiasm and emotion on the
court, as they went on to trounce
Mount Olive 15-3.
The team was very excited af-
ter the game. "We started off good
from the get-go. We were "really
pumped up coming in, and we just
feltifwastimetogetsomeW's.Our
passingisgetringbetter,butmainJy
our communication is improving
See VOLLEYBALL page 11
Soccer team falls to William & Mary
(SID) The East Carnlina cnr. M in uiia �'
(SID) The East Carolina soc-
cer team battled it out Saturday
night with the Tribe of William
and Mary in college soccer ac-
tion.
The Tribe's Chris Scrofani
scored the go-ahead goal with
only seven minutes left to give
William & Mary the victory.
In the first half, W&M's Billy
Owens took a pass from Tim
Prisco and knocked it in at 4:37.
ECU's Dan Staton countered only
minutes later on a goal assisted
by freshman Chris Padgett.
Staton's goal gives him a to-
tal of seven goals and two assists
for the season.
William & Mary dominated
the match, outshooting the Pi-
rates 23-8. ECU senior goalkeeper
Bryan DeWeese recorded 13
saves in 90 minutes of play.
The loss puts the Piratesat3-
8 for the season, 0-4 in the CAA.
No. 10 William and Mary ups
their record to 10-1-1 overall and
3-0-1 in the CAA.
ECU takes a break for the
week and plays their next
match Saturday, Oct. 9 in Buies
Creek against Campbell at 2
p.m.
The 25th-ranked (Adidas
ISAA National Division I Soccer
Rankings) Wake Forest soccer
team defeated East Carolina 2-1
in a non-conference contest
played at Wake's Polo Field on
Thursday afternoon.
The Deacons hit the
scoreboard with 35:20 on the
clock in the first half when Steve
Schumacher swiped thehallfrom
Pirate defender Mike Stansbury
in front of the East Carolina goal
and kicked the ball past ECU se-
nior goalkeeper Bryan DeWeese.
Wake increased its lead to 2-
0 after Eric Brandsma took a long
lob pass from a teammate and
blasted it in.
East Carolina scored late in
the second half when senior
Bryan Harpole took a direct kick
from Pirate teammate Drew
Racine and beat Wake Forest
goalie Tim Woods to the lower
right corner of the Deacon goal.
It was Harpole's first goal of the
season.
Harpole'sgoalisthefirstgoal
the Pirates have scored against
an ACC team in five meetings
since 1983 when ECU's Mark
Hardy scored against North
Carolina State. The Pirates lost
that match 4-1.
The Pirates, whose record fails
to 3-7 on the season, travel to
Williamsburg,Va.tofacetheTribe
of William and Mary on Saturday
evening. With Thursday's win,
Wake Forest improved their
record to 5-2-1 on the vear.
ByDavelLockett
Staff Writer
Lastweekend, 15ofthetopEast
Coast lacrosse teams competed in
the National Collegiate Lacrosse
League's Fall Tournament. The East
Carolina lacrosse club (1993 South-
eastChampions) faced stiff competi-
tion from a host of strong northeast
opponents. ECU finished the week-
end at 2-1-1.
Saturday momingbrought cold
and rainy weather. ECUfaced Loyola
of Maryland, one of the most consis-
tentwinningand experienced teams
in the league. With almostone-fourth
of ECU's team being rookies, it
brought some first game jitters. It
took some time before the Pirates
moved intotheir usual groove.Loyola
capitalized on ECU's tentative play
by defeating the Pirates, 9-4.
ECU's second matehfound them
pitted against another tough com-
petitor, George Mason University of
Virgirua. Sfrong defensive play from
Jeff Gauland and Ken Stevens kept
George Mason at Bay while rookie
Brian Trail gained confidence and
poise in his first start at goalie for the
Bucs At the other end of the field,
veterans Drew Borque, Ward Taylor
and newcomer John MixkeptGeorge
Mason's goal-tender nervous. After
a long and hard fought game, the
Pirates split the match, 7-7.
Saturday's third match had to
be played on Sunday because of a
rain cancellation. They were pitted
againsta powerful Kutztown Uni-
versity from Pennsylvania. From
the beginning of the match, ECU
displayed its typical styleofaggres-
sion and executed plays well.
Addingto the BorqueTaylor
attack positions, 'Troy Boy" and
'Tubby" performed well by mak-
ing contributions to the offense.
With a textbook face off by veteran
and rocker John Fox, tough "D" by
Rich Rollason and Mike Marshall,
ECUdroppedKutztownbyascore
of 7-5. Bart Revels was able to get
his nerves back and played well
after a freak shot shook him up on
Saturday.
On a roll, ECU continued to
play well by ending the tourna-
ment with a resounding 64 win
overYorkCoUegeofPennsylvania.
East Carolina lacrosse looks very
good again this year after losing
some key seniors. With the antici-
pated return of high-scoring Kirk
KatzaburgandTarhyAlford,ECU
should grow into another top con-
tender for the Southeast Champi-
onship in 1994.
Special thanks go out to La-
crosseClubPresidentDaveLesage,
whosededicationandexcellenttal-
ent (both on and off the field) have
helped ECU perpetuate this dub.
Anyone interested in playing
on the team(with or without expe-
rienoe)isencouragedtophoneDave
at 752-7641 for more details.
The team travels to Raleigh
this weekend to take on NC State.
Ruggers destroy Blue Devils
By W.W.Ellis
Staff Writer
East Carolina'sPiratescontin-
ued to run roughshod over their
opponents.
This time, Duke fell 27-7 in a
rough-hewn victory orchestrated
more by continual pressure than
spectacular play.
The Pirates got on the score
board first when Mike Shunk ran
in fora try after 22 minutes passed.
When Rich Moss kicked a penalty
goal at 30 minutes, it was all the
points East Carolina would need.
Itappeared that Duke was giving
the Pirates fits with a hard crash-
ing defense that shut down the
East Carolina wings.
At half-time, changes were
made. Hy half Andy Horrocks
was told to keep the defenders
honest by kicking so his wings
could chase the ball. Scrum half
Sean Miller was given the green
light to run at the blind side as
well. These Iwo changes gave the
Pirates somebreathingroomnir.e
See RUGBY page 11
.
i





October 5, 1993
EYBALL
Continued from page 10
the
return we
� hail
really start-
ing to make a name for herself here
from (
iiitrMi
irolina. With vouth like
t round. Coach McCaskill'sPi-
ratesare sure to be getting better on
tlie court, as- they .showed Friday
night.
East Carolina's next home
match is on October 5, against NC
A&T. Come out and show your
support for the Tirates.
FOOTBALL TICKETS
Student groups can pick up
tickets for the Louisiana Tech
game beginning Thursday,
Oct. 7 at Minges at 8 a.m.
Regular student pick-up is
Friday, Oct. 8-14 at 8 a.m. in
Minges or in Mendenhall Oct.
12-14 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
The East Carolinian 11
RUGBY
Continued from page 10
minutesintothesecondhalf. Jason
Webb crashed over for a score be-
tween the posts. When Moss con-
verted, the Pirates were up 15-7.
Then Duke woke up. Victori-
ous over State and UNC-
Wilmington, Duke players were
used toclosegamesand camestorm-
ing back. Several rimes they nearly
scored, bartering away at the goal
line. They were rewarded as the
Pirates committed one infraction
many. The tapped penalty kick
iroduced a try which wasconverted
make the score 15-7.
The momentum shifted to
ike long before they became the
first to cross the Pirate goal line this
season. Stung, the Pirates rallied
and played and rolled back and
forth with neither side obtaining
any clear advantage. Duke seemed
to lose their momentum when a
Duke player went down with an
injury.
ECU will face either UNC-
Chapel Hill or AppalachianSta teat
the end of the month. The winner of
the championship will go on to the
regionals, the first step toward ter-
ritorial and national recognition.
The weekend off will be spent
scri mmaging to fine-tune teamwork
and work on fitness.
AVAILABLE NOW!
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LOCATED NEAR CAMPUS. NEW. REASONABLE
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CD-ROM technology brmgs vast new
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Bring your papers, projects and presentations to
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October 5, 1993
Continued from page 10
ird
is there any quarterback con-
trovers) for next week? No. Logan
madeitdearthatHesteristhenum-
ber one man and will start next
week when the Pirates travel to
Columbia, S.C. to battle the Game-
cocks. Hester did not practice on
Sunday because of a knee injury,
but will be back in rime for Satur-
day.
"Everybody has a bad game
and were justgoing to prepare hard
this week for S.C. next week and
everythingwillbefine Hester said.
Allison would kick two con-
secutive field goals of 34 and 27-
yards to extend the lead to 27-7.
Allison set the all-time MSU record
of most career points.
It could be said that the Tigers
ran up the score by going for a TD
Ait
ne-J
Net
assinj
1
41
192
45
147
3.5S
ATT
Comp
Team Statistics
ECU MSU
First Downs 15 17
Rushing 10 10
Passing 4
46.1
83
6
Net
NTs
Iotal Off Plays 67
Total Net Yards 230
AVGPlay 3.43
0
39
129
79
SO
128
30
24
80.0
287
2
69
337
4.88
Return Yards
Fumbles-Lost
Penalties-Yards
NTs-Yards
Punts-Yards
AVG
PuntRet-Yards
KO RetYards
Time of Pass.
3rd down Con.
Sacks-Yards
51 182
H) 2-1 Player Statistics
4-23 6-45 Field Goals: MSU Allison 2-2 L-34
24) 6-130 ECU Rushing:Smith 20-146, Hester
4139 3.94 14-1, Floyd 3-10, Mattison l-(-5),
34.7 313 Wil:onO-2,LetcherO-(-5)
l-(-l) H) MSU Rushing:Fatterson7-47,Mar-
3-49 2-52 tin 10-15, Spaulding 7-12, Fletcher
29:56 30:04 3-26, Hawkins 5-8, Matthews 7-(-
2-16 7-15 58).
6-60 4-24 ECU Passing: Hester 11 of 20 for 76
yards, 2 INT. Mattison 1 of 6 for 7
yards, 4 INT.
MSU Passing: Matthews 23 of 30
for 287 yards, 3TD2INT.
ECU Receiving: Letcher 4-31,
Grumpier 4-23, Floyd 3-19, Wilson
1-10.
MSU Receiving: Bruce7-147,Cody
9-110, Martin 5-15, Patterson 1-10,
Anderson 1 -5.
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LEGION AGRICULTURAL FAIR JP
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EXHIBIT BUILDINGS
1993 FREE ATTRACTIONS
MAIN EXHIBIT BUILDING
Agriculture and Commercial. Eastern Carolina shows, off its regional pride by displav ing its bountiful
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SWINE BUILDING AREA
SWINE and SMALL FARM ANIMALS PLUS:
Monday. October 4- 6:(X) p.m. Pitt County Market Hog Show
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Wednesday, October 6.6:(X) p.m
Wednesday. October 6.7:30 p.m.
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Pitt County Lamb Show
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THE 1993 MIDWAY
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� Children of all ages will love the Petting Zoo located in the Cattle Building! A wonderful collection of Animals
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� Andre Shambechi's thrilling Wild Animal Arena, "Lions of the Serengeti" with a complete Lion menagerie
on display at all times- Independent Midway. Sponsored by Coca Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville.
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Sponsored by Domino's Pizza
STUNT THRILLS scream vour way when Hollywood Stunt World brings all new 1993 Toyotas to Delight
and Excite you! Brought to you this year by GREENVILLE TOYOTA and WASHINGTON TOYOTA
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WEDNESDAY NIGHT IS WRESTLING NIGHT at the Fair' I Hour of wrestling featuring CHIEF
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The old 1910 CAROUSEL ORGAN will belt out Midwav Music on the Main Midway all night every night
again this year, as well as the GIANT GERMAN FAIRGROUND ORGAN, built in Germany in 1900!
Sponsored by. Garris Evans Lumber Co. & Hooker & Buchanan. Independent & Main Midways.
GENERAL ADMISSIONS
Adults S3.00 - Kids free with schcxl pass until f:(X) pm - Kids S2.IX) at night and Saturday.
Mon Oct. 4 through Thurs Oct. 7. These are OPTION NIGHTS. Wristbands are for sale Inside the gate for
S8.(X)oryou may purchase straight ride tickets.
Tues Oct. 5 Only - Bring a Coke or Mellow Yellow can to the Fair and get A SI .(X) discount on gate admission!
Order a Domino's Pizza and get a SI gale admission discount!
Sat Oct. 9 - Wristbands on sale Inside gate unul 4:(X) pm honored until 6:(X) pm.
College Night- Thursday, Oct. 7 ECU & Pitt Community College Students- Admitted for $1.50 with Student ID!
Senior Citizens Day- Wed Oct 6- All senior citizens free 1-3 p.m.
PUT COUNTY FAIR
Biggest Fair East of Raleigh
Eastern Carolina's Greatest REGIONAL Exposition!
Hwy 24 East
Sponsored by the American Legion Posts of Greenville, Farmviile & Ayden





Title
The East Carolinian, October 5, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 05, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.965
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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