The East Carolinian, September 30, 1993






Awareness
Cuppa Joe?
Next time you're being ssJ!5sl
taunted by that ever-looming
caffeine craving, stop in The Java
Shop and get a fix. Try a lemon
poppyseed muffin too. Review on
page 8
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 55
Circulation 12,(KK)
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 30,1993
16 Pages
Student
Government
Association
election
results for the
September 29,
1993 elections
Freshman class
president:
Jessica Gibson 73
Stephajiie Brown 54
Sophomore class
president:
Dale Emory 27
Wesley Parker 35
Senior class
president:
Lisa Berting 117
Damon Johnson 97
Senior class vice-
president:
RobJones 113
Anna Harrington
124
Graduate class
vice-president:
Pete Donahue 18
Ralph Powell 6
Senatorial prospect focuses on future
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Tuesday night, 19 Sena-
torial candidate Harvey Ganttad-
dressed ECU students and Green-
ville residents on the importance
of the Democratic Tart)' and its
supporters making America a
successful and fearless nation.
During the speech at
Mendenhall Student Center,
Ganttapplauded thestudentsand
young Democrats for his gracious
welcome and for their part in the
Democratic Parry's cause.
He also spoke of the 1990
election when he was defeated by
Jesse Helms. "In a night of sad-
ness and some joy, one of the joys
was looking up on the board and
seeing Pitt Count)' in our col-
umn he said. "These counties
shall lead the way when we do
this again in '96.
"You honored me by allow-
ing me to be the nominee for the
Democratic Party and allowing
me the credibility toexpress envi-
sions for what we as a people can
be together
He said he felt that every-
one, including Helms supporters,
gained from the '90 election.
During the '92 election, he
saw some reflections of his own
race, but what he saw the most
was the involvement of young
people. Gantt felt that in '92, like
'90, real issues were addressed.
"Candidates were talking to
you and listening to you he said.
Clinton's poor start in the
Oval Office was another topic of
discussion for Gantt. While he
recognized that Clinton has had
some pitfalls, he saluted thepresi-
dent for what he thinks is a job
well done.
"I am proud of the presi-
dent he said. "Today, the presi-
dent has got us focused on the big
issues that bury this country.
"You've got to give him
credit because there is a national
congregation going on that heal th
care issue. For the first time even
the republicans are saying,
'we've got to have a universal
health care program This presi-
dent stepped forward and isdeal-
ing with problems that affect ev-
ery single one of us and for that
we ought to be proud
Mudslinging during the re-
cent gubernatorial race bothered
Gantt, but he said that problem
was short-lived.
He praised Governor Hunt
for concentrating on education in
North Carolina. Gantt encouraged
ECU students to get out and vote
for the bond referendum to se-
cure the future of higher educa-
tion and community college edu-
cation. If the referendum passes,
ECU will be getting a $29 million
library.
Gantt emphasized that
Democrats, on all levels, are con-
cerned with people's problems.
"If there was ever one thing
that caused the Republicans to
fall from their perch of 85 percent
approval in 1991, it was because
they did not understand how to
deal with solving people's prob-
lems Gantt said.
The main point of Gantt's
speech was the fear among the
American people. Rather than
celebrating these achievements,
we are struggling. We are fear-
ful of change.
"We have been leaders,
but we are falling back he said.
Gantt said we are afraid
of losingour jobs. He mentioned
the rapid fall of IBM. We are
afraid of not being able to meet
insurance payments.
"When you examine the
fact that one catastrophic ill-
ness can wipe out a whole fam-
ily, health care is a major con-
cern of ours
There is fear among par-
See GANTT page 4
An interview with
Harvey Gantt
By Jason Williams
Photo by Cadric Van Buren
Employees of The East Carolinian and members of the College Democrats interviewed Senatorial Candidate
Harvey Gantt on Tuesday. Gantt lost to Senator Jesse Helms in the 1990 election.
Staff Writer
The East Carolinian (TEC):
After your close loss to Jesse Helms
in 1990, are you going to run for
the United States Senate in 1996?
Harvey Gantt: Yes, yes, I'm
going to run. In politics, three years,
six years is an eternity. I've not lost
any of my en th- isiasm for wanting
to serve in the United States Sen-
ate. After three years following the
campaign in 1990,1 haven't seen
any reason to change my mind. As
of today I am a candidate. I'm not
announcing formally that I am a
candidate, but, yes, I'm going to
run.
TEGDo you think you could
beat Jesse Helms, if he decides to
seek another term?
Gantt: Oh, yes. I thought 1
could beat him in 1990. Maybe I
was the only person in North
Carolina that believed that, but
I'll tell you what, 47 and one-
half percent of the people got
behind the campaign, and I'll
bet that was a shock to a lot of
folks. It never was to me, be-
cause we always believed we
could get 50 percent plus one. If
50,000 people had changed their
minds and voted the other way,
we would have won. There are
certainly some things that we
would have done differently
TEC: Actually that was my
next question, what will you do
differently in your next cam-
paign?
See INTERVIEW page 3
Honorary alumni named at awards Health issues class now open to men
By Lisa Dawson
Staff Writer
ECU's Alumni Association
gave three friends of the college
honorary alumni status during
the annual a wards dinner given
on Sept. 17. According to the
ECU News Bureau, The Alumni
Association's Honorary Alumni
program recognizes special in-
dividuals who have given their
time, energy and resources for
the betterment of the univer-
sity.
"ECU has enjoyed the in-
fluence of a number of special
people outside its traditional
family said David Englert,
president of the East Carolina
Alumni Association. "It's when
we're chosen by someone � a
wife, or a friend � as an object
of respect, trust, and commit-
ment, that we recognize more
fully our worth, our purpose,
and the value of what we're try-
ing to do
The three persons in-
ducted as honorary members of
the Class of 1993 are Kay N.
Abbott of Durham, . Reid
Hooper of Greenville and David
H. Womack, also of Greenville.
Abbott works as a sales
administrator for Deck House,
Inc in Durham. As an active
member of the Durham-Orange
ChapteroftheECU Alumni As-
sociation, she has served as the
organization's secretary for the
past six years, and has hosted
and organized several ECU
Alumni events in the Durham
area.
Her husband, the late Ben-
jamin L. Abbott, was also an
active member of the Durham-
Orange Chapter. She was
present with her two children:
Tamara, currently an ECU stu-
dent, and her son Carl.
Hooper is a retired
Wachovia Bank executive, and
he has been a strong supporter
of ECU, especially the arts cur-
riculum. He helped establish the
Friends of the School of Music,
serving not only as its first presi-
dent, but also as board parlia-
mentarian. He initiated an en-
dowment that recruits promis-
ing music students to the School
of Music at ECU.
See ALUMNI page 4
Red Cross holds blood drive today in Mendenhall
By Stephanie Lassiter
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
In collaboration with the
American Red Cross, Aerospace
Studies will host the Bloodmo-
bile today in Mendenhall from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m.
Individuals whodonateone
unit of blood (nearly one pint)
can save as many as four lives.
According to Helen Monroe,
Blood Services Consultant for the
American Red Cross, the "whole
blood" is divided into four parts,
the red blood cells, white blood
cells, platelets and plasma. It is
seldom that whole blood is used
on a single recipient.
i Because September has
been a slow collection month, this
blood mobile is extremely impor-
tant. The Red Cross needs 250
units of blood for the57hospitals
to which it donates blood.
"This region is counting on
ECU students Monroe said. "I
would like to encourage not only
students, but also faculty mem-
bers, to support our mission of
improving the quality of life for
thesickand injured population
During the past fiscal year
of 1992-93, ECU students col-
lected over 1,500 units of blood.
Judy Baker, coordinator of the
ECU Student Volunteer Program,
said that during the fall of 1992,
421 students volunteered 2,105
hours helping with the blood
drive. She also said that once
someone donates blood, that per-
son will continue to do so.
The actual donating process
will only take 10 minutes, but
with registration and recovery,
the total time will be an hour.
Pizza will be provided for do-
nors after the blood has been
taken.
, At this time, 0-positive and
0-negative are in high demand.
Before the blood is sent to hospi-
tals, it is tested extensively at a
lab in Norfolk, Va. Ifcontamina-
See BLOOD page 4
Staff Writer
The Student Health Services
offers a health issues class, for-
merly known as the women's
health issues class, for those in-
terested in obtaining or learning
more about, oral contraceptives.
Health Issues isopening itsdoors
to men this year for the first time
since the class began over seven
years ago.
According to Jennifer
Phillips, health educator for
health services, the purpose of
the class is to answer important
questions about bi rth control. pap
smears and breast exams that
many men or women may not
fully understand. She also said
oral contraceptives a re drugs and
should be taken seriously.
"It's disappointing that
many women will take a drug
without knowing the effects
said Phillips.
Aside from several brands
of birth control pills, the Student
Health Center also offers over-
the-counter contraceptives. Lif-
estyle condoms with spermicidal
lubricant and OrthoGynol 11 Jelly
can be obtained in the pharmacy.
Students may also be fitted for
diaphragms, and foamsare some-
times available.
Condoms and the jelly are
available through the cold clinic
in the health center. A student
simpl) needs to fill out a green
slip, pay the cashier and go to the
pharmacist. Condoms and the
jelly can each be bought for the
Students
interested in
obtaining over-
the-counter
contraceptives,
as well as other
medications,
must fill out the
form at this
counter and go to
the pharmacy
counter.
low price of $2.12.
Inorder to have a pap smear
for the purpose of obtaining birth
control or being fitted for a dia-
phragm, women are required to
take the health issues class of-
fered Mondays from 2 p.m 3
p.m Wednesdays from 10 a.m-
11 a.m. and Thursdays from 3
p.m 4 p.m. The class focuses on
the effects of birth control, the
purpose and procedures of a pap
smear and the importance of
breast examinations. The class is
held in the resource room on the
second floor of the student health
center; men are encouraged to
Pholo by
Cedric
Van Buren
attend. Pap smear appoint-
ments can be made upon the
completion of the class. The cost
is $30. Birth control must be
bought in quantities of three
($6 a pack) because the phar-
macy buys in bulk to give stu-
dents lower prices.
If you are unsure of where
to go, who to see or have ques-
tions concerning contracep-
tives, anyone in the clinic
should be able to point you in
the right direction.
All of the providers are
very well versed on methods
of contraceptives said
:
�� w





September 30, 1993
Brown denies allegations
Ffstiv.il to focus on bridging races
ences between races? That is
thf kind of question thai will be raised during Clemson
University's first Festival ol African-American Literature
and the Arts to explore the role of race' in novels, films and
other art forms. The Oct. 20-24 festival will feature play-
wright AlkeChilders, novelist Dori Sanders and poet Nikki
Giovanni, who will discuss their work. Other highlights
include an art exhibit and jazz and gospel concerts. Har ev
Gantt, former mayor of Charlotte, N.C will deliver the
welcoming remarks. In 1963, Clemson University was the
first college in the South to be integrated peacefully by
Gantt, then an architecture student.
Fraternity evicted from house
A University oi Arizona fraternity wasevicted from its
chapter house because the building was so badly trashed it
was uninhabitable, the Arizona Daily Wildcat reported in
September.TheTheta Delta Chi fraternity wascharged with
criminal damages in an amount of more than $250,000, pi us
$18,000 in unpaid bills. Under the chapter's lease agree-
ment, the fraternity was responsible for maintaining the
house. Damage to the building, which the fraternity had
rented since 1967, included 40 broken windows, damaged
furniture, broken toilets, gashes and holes in the walls,
missing doors and piles of debris scattered throughout the
building, according to the paper.
Skills course offered at UT
A new course at the University of Texas at Austin
teaches incoming freshmen critical thinking and ways to
manage their collegiate career in hopes of creating a smooth
transition from high school to college. The class, which
includes lectures and discussion sessions by professors and
guest speakers, blends both practical and theoretical teach-
ing on how the university is organized, and what it means
to be an educated person, the Daily Texan, the campus
newspaper, reported. Guest speakers for the course include
names such as Steven Weinberg, a professor of physics who
won a Nobel Prize in physics, and University of Texas
President Robert Berdahl.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
WASHINGTON (AP) �
White I louse strategists are bank-
ing on Commerce Secretary Ron
Brown to weather the controversy
over his dealings with a Vietnam-
ese businessman.
But some administration of-
ficials are privately asking how
Brown managed to get himself into
such a predicament. And the situ-
ation is raising a degree of ner-
vousness at a time when Clinton
needs the commerce secretary to
help him sell a contentious trade
pact with Mexico and Canada and
a new export-promotion program.
Brown, who was so adroit as
Democratic party chief in orches-
trating support for candidate Bill
Clinton among rival party factions
in 1992, has been less successful in
nurturing his own image.
The wealthy lawyerand long-
time lobbyist earlier found himself
having to defend his representa-
tion of such controversial clients as
the government of former Haitian
dictator Jean-Claude "Baby Doc"
Duvalier.
Now a federal grand jury in
Miami is investigating allegations
thatBrownaccepted $700,000from
the Vietnamese government in ex-
change for working to lift the U.S.
trade embargo against that coun-
try.
Some administration offi-
cials, while taking Brown at his
word when he says he took no
money from the Vietnam govern-
ment, are asking privately why he
wasn't more forthcoming in ac-
knowledging his three meetings
with a Vietnamese businessman.
Brown has denied he took
any money, as has been alleged by
Binh T. Ly, a Vietnamese business-
man who now lives in Florida.
However, Brown this week
confirmed � through his lawyer
� news accounts that he had met
three times in the past year with
Nguyen Van Hao, a former Viet-
namese government official who
was Ly's business partner.
That contradicted earlier as-
sertions by Brown's spokesman
that Brown had not met Hao and
seemed at odds with Brown'sown
� more carefully worded � de-
nial of "any kind of relationship of
any kind" on the Vietnamese trade
issue.
It sent the White House scur-
rying to defend Brown.
"A grand jury is looking into
this White House press secretary
Dee DeeMyerssaidTuesday. "We'll
wait and see what the results are.
There's no reason tobelievethatthe
secretary's done anything wrong.
He's spoken to the president; the
president accepts his answer
In the meantime, the contro-
versy raises an ethical cloud that
could prove a distraction to the
administration's efforts to focus on
the president's domestic agenda.
Forinstance,atanappearance
Tuesday to promote the North
American Free Trade Agreement,
Brown was hi t with questions from
reporters on the allegations. Hede-
dined comment.
Brown confirms he met with
Hao three times, in November and
December of 1992 as well as in Feb-
ruary of this year, after he became
commerce secretary. But he denies
expressing any interest in helping
Hao's company in proposed busi-
ness deals linking the United States
arid Vietnam.
Such deals currently are
banned, although the Clinton ad-
ministration has eased some of the
sanctions.
Tom Mann, director of gov-
ernmental studies at Brookings In-
stitution, said that, assuming the
matter goes no further, "the odds
are it will go away But, Mann
added, "I don't want to suggest
there's no cost. Brown has been
bruised. He would have been well-
advised to be more forthcoming
Yeltsin holds back opposition
EDITOR'S NOTE �Tom
Raumhascovered the WhiteHouse
for The Associated Press since 1989
and government and politics since
1973.
EAST (
CAROLINIAN, r,
Chapter 5
Burt's. What a great name for a
bar.
As I walked in the door, deja vu
hit me like a tidal wave. It had been
a while since I'd been in this place,
but it hadn't changed a bit. There
may be different faces, but the story
stays the same. After the times Al
andlhadspenthere,lrealized that
this should ha ve been my first stop.
"Burt, give me a beer and a
shot I stepped up to the bar and
planted myself on one of the worn-
down stools. Aside from the two
drunks in the corner, the place was
�pretty empty. Some people sat in
the shadowed booths, but a quick
glance showed me none of 'em
would be any trouble.
Burt slid a icy bottle and a shot
of whiskey in my direction. As I
tossed back the whiskey, Burt came
in my direction. He was trying to
lock like he was interested in pol-
ishing the bar, but I knew better.
"Mick Long time, no see. Wha t
brings you back?" Short and to the
point. That's what I liked about
Burt, you always knew where he
was coming from. Nice enough guy,
but let him hang around Al too
much and he starts to dance this
funny dance. Oh well, enough
memories.
"I'm looking for Al, Burt. Seen
himaround?"Ididn'texpectmuch,
what with my past luck. But Burt
came through, just like old times.
"As a matter of fact, yeah. Last
I saw, he was over in that booth
talking with Bob Coorstis I
whipped around, cursing myself
for not having checked those booths
more closely. It was my fault that
Coorstis was alone now.
I stepped up to the booth.
Coorstis was sitting there, staring
at his glass like it was a crystal ball.
From the look of him, Coorstis had
been hanging out with Al for a
while. Rumpled clothes, bloodshot
eyes � oh yeah, him and Al were
real good friends.
I sat down in the booth and
pulled Coorstis' glass away from
him. As he looked up, recognition
flared in his watery eyes. "Ham-
mered, just thinking about you
The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one hand on your wallet
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
where a man can forget his troubles and drown his
sorrows for a while.
Mick Hammered had sworn never to set foot
in the Brewery again. Setting out to find his old
friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
in the seedy and fermented world of the Brewery.
Every Thursday in The East Carolinian, Mick
will meet a character who will expose Al in a whole new light. When it'sfinally
over and done with, Mick�andthereader�willbefaced withone of themost
important questions either has ever faced.
What place does Al Cohol have in my life?
The Case of the Ten Beer&
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tough, comparable tdj�
Spillane's Hammer and Hammett's Spade
Joel Keggsy, The Beershorough Gazette
EAST
CAROLINIAN
"Thanks for nothing. Where's
Cohol going and what did he tell
you?" I was tense. But Coorstis had
been with him last, so he was my
best bet Not good odds.
"Got me. But I can tell you a
story about him you probably don't
know. I don't thiriK anyone besides
me does I decided to humor the
old guy. He had been a hell of a
sportscaster in his day, but after too
many nights with Al, he'd been
canned. Life's tough in the big city.
"There was mis kid, see. He
was new to town, he didn't know
much. So, of course, hehungaround
with Al. Hell, all of us did, even the
ones who knew better I nodded in
agreement. Al could have that effect
on anybody. I saw Coorstis's eyes
grow even mistier as he watched the
scene unfold in his mind.
"It's a Friday night and Burt's is
packed. Everyone's having a good
time tonight. Al's the hitof the party
� just like he always is. Everyone
knows him. The kid's been down-
ing them with the best of us. He
looks alright, but his eyes tell a dif-
ferent story. Al's been coaching him
for the past few minutes�there's a
hot dame the kid's been eyeing since
he got here.
"There he goes. He steps up to
the plate, he swings it's a hit I
grabbed Coorstis' arm to calm him
down. He settled back into the booth
and the story. "The girl smiles, the
kid buys her a drink. Before you
know it, they're leaving together.
Happy ending, right? Wrong.
"The kid comes back two weeks
later, looking like some thing the cat
dragged in. Turns out he had sex
with the girl, couldn't get it up half
the time and still ended up catching
something. Last I heard, he was
down and out in some seed, hotel
Coorstis grabbed my arm and
stared me straight in the eyes. "Find
Cohol, Mick. Talk to him before
something like this happens again
He fell back, exhausted and drained.
I stood up and jammed my fe-
dora on my head. "Don't worry,
Coorstis. I'll find him I was des-
perate. I figured I could try anything
� like going to the cops.
BITS
Z04 E. 5TH ST.
75Z-6953
MOSCOW (AP) � Elite
paratroopers reinforced hundreds
of police surrounding parliament
today as authorities stepped up the
pressure on hard-line lawmakers
who have defied President Boris
Yeltsin.
A senior police officer died of
injuries today after he was pushed
in front of a car by anti-Yeltsin pro-
testers during a clash with police,
the Interior Ministry said. Lt. Col.
Vladimir Reshtuk was the third
person to be killed in connection
with the parliament crisis.
Police gave the rebellious leg-
islators and their supporters hold-
ing the parliament buildingan ulti-
matum to surrender their weapons
and leave today, but Yeltsin aides
denied the building would be at-
tacked.
Snow and rain drenched Mos-
cow today aspolicehuddled in over-
coats, stopping anyone entering
parliament. Glum lawmakers and
their supporters inside sang during
the night to keep their spirits up.
Yeltsin has ruled out compro-
mise since he dissolved the Soviet-
era parliament a week ago. He or-
dered parliamentary elections for
December to end a bitter power
struggle with parliamentary hard-
liners over his political and free-
market reforms.
He set presidential elections
in June.
The deployment of police re-
inforcements Tuesday around
parliament increased the war of
nerves on the increasi ngly demor-
alized and isolated lawmakers
who have been holed up in the
building, called the WhiteHouse.
Special red-beret paratroop-
ers armed with machine guns
were trucked in overnight, boost-
ing the riot police and Interior
Ministry military already de-
ployed.
Earlier, police pushed back
demonstrators who tried to brea k
through to parliament.
Protesters hurled rocks at
police and beat on cars before be-
ing dispersed by hundreds of riot
troops armed with shields and
batons.
At least two people were
arrested and several people had
minor injuries.
Shouting "Shame and
"Death to Yeltsin the protesters
marched past the U.S. Embassy
Tuesday night, stoppingat an un-
derpass where three young men
died during the August 1991 pro-
Communist coupattemptagainst
then-President Mikhail
Gorbachev.
The Interior Ministry said
Reshtuk, a traffic officer, died of
injuries after beingpushed in front
of a moving car by demonstrators
during the Tuesday night clash.
Five other police officers were in-
jured, they said.
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September 30, 1993
INTERVIEW
The East Carolinian 3
tt: I will continue to do
I happen to believe that the
Continued from page 1
a job and � � . ears. He
will be there for 24 years. I also
think the issue will be beyond
where Jesse Helms is today. The
importance ofestaWishinga strong
economy in North Carolina re-
quires a senator, and other repre-
sentatives in Congress and in the
governor's mansion who under-
stand the importance of that. Jesse
fightsa rear-guard battle and I think
he misunderstands that.
TEC. Who do you think you
need to reach that you d idn't reach
in 1990?
Gantt: The people who voted
for Helms.
TEC: Well, 1 mean in termsof
constituencies, obviously some
constituencies seem out of reach
Gantt: 1 don't agree with you
there. I recal 1 my first races in Char-
lotte. When I was running for
mayor, in 1979,1 lost the first time,
and I lost by a little over 1,000
votes. And people asked me who I
was going to go after the next time,
and 1 told them essentially thesame
thing 1 just told you � the people
that didn't vote for me. I am going
to go into those communities and
tell them what I'm interested in
and find out what there interested
in,and seeifwecan'tfind common
ground. I think those guys are in-
terested in whether their kids are
going to get a decent education,
they're interested in their own job
security, they're in terestedinhealth
care, what he doesn't understand
iswhetherlhavetheabilitytohelp
him with any of those problems.
TEC: Whatcan you do tocom-
ba t the Congressional Cl ub in your
next race? They are the masters of
negative advertising, and you
tended to focus on positive adver-
tising.
� negative advertising i
more and more peculiar
i Carolina. We've done
some research on that, and we've
found that North Carolinians are
more susceptible to that than any
other state in the union. 1 think
they understand the mind of North
Carolinians better than any politi-
cal organization I 'veever seen,and
they are certainly a formidable foe,
but again, I think we are smarter
and we understand more how we
are being manipulated in the po-
litical process. I'mencouraged that
we got the votes of the younger
people. Idon't think many of them
will change over to Helms,and we
should have the new younger
people coming up.
TEC: That's enough of the
past, I think we can move on to the
present. Obviously if you were in
the Senate now, you would vote
differently than Senator Helms on
a widerangeof issues. Whatissues
in particular would you really like
to focus on?
Gantt: I'm concerned about
North Carolina's economy. I'm
concerned about the fact that in
order to hold down a job, people
are going to need to have at least a
couple of years of college. I'm con-
cerned thatifwedon'thaveawork
force that is well-educated and
well-trained, we are going to be
passed over. What we need is a
smarter public, a smarter North
Carolinian and a smarter citizen
and education then becomes the
focus for that. The issue of health
care also concerns me. Rather than
looking for a way to stop it, as
Senator Helmsisdoing,Iwould be
looking for ways, if I didn't agree
with the president, to address the
sameproblems. Rightnow wehave
two senators in Washington that
are probably not going to have
much to say or do about a major
social change. Soed uca tion, health
care, my record on the environ-
ment is clear
TEC: What would be your
position on NAFTA, the North
American Free Trade Agreement?
Gantt: I support it, even
though I know that it would ap-
pear in the short term that people
are going to lose jobs. There's a lot
ofdemagogueryon this issue, such
as Perot. He tells you about that
greatbigsuckingsound thatistak-
ing jobs to Mexico, but what he
doesn't tell you is that those jobs
would be going to Mexico any-
way. We can't sell Ford cars to
people who make two dollars an
hour. We are better off in the long
run to structure an economy, an
American economy from Mexico
to Canada that does away with
tariffs and barriers to trade. Ulti-
mately, it is going to produce more
jobs in America.
TEC: How about the budget
deal, the deficit reduction plan
passed a few months ago? I know-
no one was perfectly happy with
that, even within the Democratic
Party
Gantt: No I wasn't particu-
larly happy with that. We got one
passed, and we certainly needed
to, but the president wasn't as
strong on that as I wanted him to
be. We need to increase productiv-
ity; that is reallv the answer. It's
almost Republican-sounding, but
thatisreallytheanswer,ultimately,
to reducing the deficit down the
road.
TEC: Have you been active in
Iocalpoliticssincel990,in the Char-
lotte area or statewide?
Gantt: Politics is like the Ma-
fia; once you get into it, you can
never get out. We have worked
with leadership groups that work
with candidates and try to recruit
candidates to run on the Demo-
cratic ticket. I spend a lot of time
traveling around the state on visits
like this to college campuses and
speaking to certain groups. Did
you know we won every major
college town in 1990? So, of course
we place a lot of emphasis on that.
I'm also on the Democratic Na-
tional Committee, and in a few
weeks I'll begoingup to Washing-
ton to work on national policy is-
sues such as health care.
TEC: Knowing that you were
the first black student to enroll at
Clemson University, I have to ask
you, after going to'lowa State for
two years, why did you go back
home to South Carolira to go to
Clemson?
Gantt: Well, I wanted to study
architecture. I was studying archi-
tecture at Iowa State and I didn't
li ke the cold weather. And that's it.
If I wanted to stay home, and I
wanted to practice architecture in
the South, the logical thing for me
was to go to Clemson. Since the
Supreme Court said way back in
1954 that I had the right to go to
school anywhere I wanted if it was
taxpayer supported. No one in
Sou th Carolina had ever challenged
that, but I thought it was time to
challenge it, so I applied.
TEC: Were you ever afraid
there at Clemson, in the midst of
the civil rights struggle and in the
midst of racism in South Carolina
at the time?
Gantt: There's a story about
people from South Carolina They
may not always appeal to the mo-
rality of the issue, but they are al-
ways gentle people, kind of the
country gentlemen of the 13 colo-
nies. My feeling all along was that
they weren 't going to do what they
did to James Meredith
TEC: The first black student
at Mississippi.
Gantt: Yes, in Mississippi,
they gave him a hard time. A lot of
my friends thought I was crazy. I
told them that I was going to walk
up to the first person I meet and
say, 'Hey, you want to walk to
class together?' and that's really
whathappened.
TEC: We really appreciate
your taking the time to talk with us.
Gantt It was my pleasure.
Besides, theCoUege Dernocratshave
me hostage here, so they tell me
what to do.
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September 30, 1993
1ANTT
Continued from page 1
� mealing
America he sail � I wtthe
burglar alarms we buy. All the
-ecuritv we need
"Wearedistrustingan insti-
tution that we used to trust so
much
He made a reference to a
caller on a talk-show who said the
park he used to walk through is
now pad-locked due to crime.
"1 spokelast week at Wichita,
Kansas, and I've been to the West
Coast, the East Coast, and all over
the South, and 1 see fear and it is
paralyzing our nation
Gantt pointed out three ideas
that political parties and support-
ers need to key in on for success.
First, politicians and people
need to reach out to the commu-
nity. He said Democrats must be
as increasing as possible.
"I first became a Democrat
when I was seven he said. "I
asked my momma why she was
so frightened about a Republican
becoming president and she said
'Republicans really only care
about rich people and we were
ALUMNI
i ding to Gantt, Demo-
iut average working
Americans, and average working
Americans are all kind sof people.
He encouraged self-sufficiency-
He mentioned race within
the community, and that race has
been silenced over the past 18-20
years.
"We see each other increas-
ingly on a racial divide
In reference to his '90 race,
Gantt said, "I did not ask you to
vote for me because I was black. I
asked you to vote for me on the
basis of the issues I was trying to
present to you
He said we keep quiet be-
cause we do not want to offend.
"I am a firm believer that if
you give me a chance to talk to
you, we wiil find some common
ground he said.
His second point was that
support needs to be given to hon-
est people who care about the real
issues.
"What we need to do as a
party is ask ourselvesHow can
we solve the problem of the work-
ing family?"
He added that even the
Democrats need to realize that the
government is not always the an-
Continued from page 1
swer.
Gantt mentioned the tobacco
tax that would occur if the health
care reform is passed.
This issue is not the tax on
tobacco, but what will happen to
the economy of eastern North
Carolina in the years ahead if our
children keep leaving to go toother
places he said.
Gantt concluded by saying
we need to stay committed to the
long distance race.
"There is a tendency for us
to become discouraged when
things don't go well he said. "It
takes a certain keen confidence
about the Tightness of what you
are doing
After his speech, Jason Will-
iams presented Gantt with an ECU
tee shirt on behalf of the Young
Democrats.
Heidi Rhoden, a member of
the ECU Young Democrats said,
"Gantt is a brilliant speaker with a
lot ot real issues that apply toeast-
ern North Carolina.
"His ideas on school, health
and racism are correct and people
should take action against these
problems. I am excited about his
running in 1996 and know he will
do a wonderful job if elected
BLOOD
Continued
from
pagel
tion is found, the donor is noti-
fied either bv a letter (if the blood
is tainted with hepatitis) or a cer-
tified letter (if the blood shows
the AIDS virus or HIV-positive
cells).
To be. a donor, you must
weigh a minimum of 110 pounds.
Donors are asked to eat before
donating.
Monroe stressed the fact that
this region is in desperate need of
blood and ECU students are the
primary donors in this area.
"An hour is a small amount
of time out of your life to perform
a miracle in saving another life
Monroe said.
Another Bloodmobile,
sponsored by the ECU Club, will
be held Oct. 23. For additional
information contact the Ameri-
can Red Cross at 758-1142.
Florida men face Nazi trial
MIAMI (AP) � Two Florida
residents face trial in Immigration
Court, accused of illegally enter-
ing this country decades ago by
concealing their World War II jobs
as Nazi concentration camp
guards.
Mathias Denuel, 73, of
Golden Gate and Alexander
Schweidler, 71, of Inverness were
arraigned Tuesday.
"We're denying all allega-
tions except for identity said
Denuel's attorney, Alfred Zucaro
Jr.
The Justice Department al-
leges that Schweidler was a
guard at Mauthausen concen-
tration camp, and that his job
was to shoot prisoners attempt-
ing to escape.
Zucaro said he plans to
challenge a statement Denuel
gave federal authorities last year
in which he said he worked at
Gusen concentration camp and
was a member of Adolf Hitler's
eiiteWaffenSS.
"The problem is that my
client made a statement but
doesn't speak or understand
English very well Zucaro said.
FOR RENT
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. ONLY MINUTES
FROM CAMPUS & REASONABLE RENT W MANY
EXTRAS INCLUDED.
CALL 752-8320 OR 355-6180
Hooper actively supports
the Performing Arts Series, not
only as a Pacesetter, but also by
serving on its Board of Direc-
tors. He was present at the din-
ner with his wife Joan Hooper.
Womack is president of
Womack Electric Supply.
He has been an active vol-
unteer at ECU for years, as a
member of the executive com-
mittee and by serving on the
board of directors for The ECU
Foundations.
Womack has also served
on the steering committee for
the university's Shared Visions
Campaign.
He and his wife serve as
members oECU's Chancellor's
Society, which consists of the
university's most generous
benefactors.
Womack's wife, Sydney
Womack, accepted the award,
as Womack was unable to at-
tend the function.
"We congratulate these
people and extend our deepest
gratitude for their undying faith
in East Carolina University
said James L. Lanier, Jr vice
chancellor for Institutional Ad-
vancement at ECU. "These indi-
viduals did not attend East Caro-
lina, which makes their excep-
tional devotion all the more ad-
mirable
Central Book &
Pitt County Fair
All Next Week
0CT2NP
From 4r&30 come see
WaUer Tayter readfrom his
new booh cWQdShoresy
756-7177
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30 Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
(iivenvillc Square shoppingx-nror (next to Kmart)
.�
Bungee Jumping Every
Night!
See Tuesday
East Carolinian
for details
Pitt County Fair
Biggest Fair East
of Raleigh
Forget the clever headline.
6 It's$949.
Apple Macintosh
Color Classic 4180, Built-in 10"
Color Monitor and Apple Keyboard II.
The Macintosh" Color Classic. It offers a bright, sharp Sony Trinitron special financing with the Apple' Computer Loan- to make owning
display. It's compact enough to fit on any desk. And right now, this already one even easier. Visit your Apple Campus Reseller today. For the -
affordable model is available at an unheard-of price. You can also get power more college students choose. The power to be your best:
Student Stores
Wright Building � 757-6731
'Aratlabie
to,S tfwracaultf �� ��rcKlll0J�r�





. ;T-rfmMhtiimin nMfcX,
- �" ��.�iwrfW" -Wi�w
Krista Anne Roth
Alpha Sigma Phi
Freshman in Child
Development
Active in: Zeta Tau
Alpha, RHA and
intramural sports.
HOMECOMING 1993
Angela Michelle Porter
Alpha Phi
Senior in English
Active in: GAMMA, ECU
Panhellenic, ECU Young
Democrats.
Robbyn Shulman
Chi Omega
Senior in Public
Relations
Active in: No
information available.
. � i
� i
.
Erica McFarland
Dance Expressions
Senior in Leisure Systems
Studies
Active in: Gospel Choir,
LSS Society, ABLE.
Brooke Hunter
Greene Hall
Sophomore in Dance
Education
Active in: Hall Council.
Shanna
Swicegood
Jones Hall
Freshman in
Elementary
Education
Active in: JV
Cheerleaders.
COM� VOT�!
Musk hove a Vblid Student I.D.
Thursday October 14,1993
Voting booths:
Student Stores � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Bottom of College Hill � 8 ci.m. to 5 p.m.
Allied Hecilth � 8 ci.m. to 5 p.m.
Mendenhcill � 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
School of Medicine � 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Jennifer Anne
Carboni
Pi Delta
Senior in Elementary
Education
vctive in: No information
available.
Student Homecoming Committe
chose all photos randomly to be
printed in a three-part series.
Becky Caldwell
PUSH
Junior in Business
Management
Active in: SGA, Hall Council,
Chi Alpha Omega, ECU
Gospel Choir


I ;
i i i
� i
Jill Auerbach
Panhellenic
Council
Senior in MarketingEttfl3&- 'ijMSf"rfek.
Active in: Alpha Phi,BBBft 'il
Society forfc.
Advancement of
Management RHA.

Caroline.4tfcb
Donbroskif
Sigma NuY
Senior in Community
Services
Active in: Pi Delta.
.ll. Hp
Deva Waugh
Zeta Phi Beta
Senior in Special
Education
Active in: Special
Olympics.
HOMECOMING 1993
r - -
.�
�fe
JL
Toya S. Sanders
Tyler Hall
Freshman in
Psychology
Active in: Track team,
Gospel Choir.
vu�j, �� LW 'in- "� JL"
� ��.� , aiiiin)n





The East Carolinian
ThursdayOpinion
tt
So whatcha want?'
WZMB format rumors raise
question of student expectations
and media obligation
When was the List time you turned on the radio and
spun the dial to 91.3 FM? "What's 91.3?" Weil, a lot of
students have been wondering just that. It's WZMB, and
it's your college radio station.
Yes, the radio station dedicated to play ing your music
and your requests�a time-honored tradition of most col-
lege campuses and a very unique forum geared towards
students. But WZMB's got a few problems.
Lately, there's been some serious talk that the Gen-
eral Manager of WZMB, Beth Arthur, has considered
changing the format from what it is now�Progressive
Alternative�to Urban Contemporary. Currently, Urban
Contemporary is a specialty show clocking in each week
at 14 hours.
Chainsaw, WZMB's Production ManagerMetal Di-
rector supports the Urban Contemporary show, but says,
they've already got 14 hours and they're the biggest
specialty show; I don't think they need more Agreed.
Also, if this is actually the case, and Arthur will be at-
tempting to get it cleared through the Media Board, she's
made one dreadful mistake: not confronting her own co-
workers of her idea.
And there is much discord in Media Land.
Yes, gentle readers, the very staff that Arthur man-
ages has been subjected to hearing rumors of this change.
Shouldn't they, at least, be informed of the possibility of
change, before Arthur even decided to run it by the Media
Board? Unfortunately, as we all know too well, it doesn't
always work that way in bureaucracy. Higher-ups tend to
get power-hungry and step over (or on) the little people.
Maybe it would be wise to consider that the little people
know just as much, if not more than the higher-ups. (No,
not that!)
Chainsaw notes, "It kinda gets me that she
hasn'tmentioned it to us, the exec staff, yet. Usually any
decisions like that get cleared through the exec staff first.
That's a major change. Our programing has been alterna-
tive for as long as I can remember and I've been at the
station for four years now Arthur has been at the station
since May.
So let's focus in here: the problem begins where the
least amount of attention is being payed; namely, the
listeners. Who listens to WZMB and what do they listen
to? It seems fairly logical and a little stupid when you put
it that way, but the easiest questions are always the most
over-looked. Kevin Hall, WZMB's Sports Director, states,
"If it were up to me, what I would do with this format, I
would tighten it upI think we should definitely stay
alternative
What do the masses think?
A survey was conducted by the American Marketing
Association (AMA) last spring. Great idea! Except that
they failed topoll all of the different people included in the
ECU populace, not to mention the ECU community. Re-
member, Greenville isn't only made up of students, al-
though it would seem that way sometimes. The poll was
taken in the Student Store and in Mendenhall; a great
representation of a typical ECU student and the commu-
nity, huh?
We need a new poll. A better poll. Chainsaw sug-
gests, "I think the best way to do it would be to take it to
more accessible areas outside of the ECU campus. Record
stores would be a good start, maybe the mall, where a lot
a kids goMaybe they should just poll in more places; in
the individual departments, the groups on-campus and
the dorms. Stand on the street corner downtown even! Just
don't overlook the obvious.
And if any readers have problems with WZMB or The
East Carolinian, you have the power and the right to make
thosegripes known. If you don't like something, change it.
Media should reflect the interests of those it serves.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kcllis, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hassell,Mv� Editor
Maureen Rich, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Jennifer Jenkins,Aeeeam Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shca, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Dim tor
Cedric Van Burcn, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretan
Printed i
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for
decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves die right to edit or reject Idlers lor
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, "Die East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg, ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353 lor more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Opinion
September 30, 1993
By Alex Ferguson
Check out the cheesy chump chafing Chekov!
What is it about celebrities
th.it make us go nuts? Are they
born with somestrangepower that
turns our minds to mush when
they walk by? Do they go to school
for this? Do they pay taxes for it?
Has the government ever thought
of turning this power into a
weapon of deadly proportions?
Let me start at the beginning.
Which began with the Star Trek
Convention that was held at the
Hilton this past weekend.
For anyone who has never
been to one of these conventions,
this is the Cadillac of the misfits'
social gala. These are people who
haven't seen reality since their first
exposure to the show. They are
extremely interesting andor ex-
tremely weird and prolonged ex-
posure to them causes one's lips to
curl back and drool to spill inces-
santly from the mouth. And, un-
fortunately, I'm one of these
people. To an extent.
Probably the most exciting
and worthwhileeventatthesecon-
ventionsare the guest-appearances
made by the actors and actresses
who have made Star Trek the leg-
end it is. And this convention, be-
ing no exception to the gaziilion
others they have every year, had for
their famous guest-speaker none
other than the intensely popular,
well-known Walter Koenig!
Who?Walter Koenig! You
know, the little guy, Mr. Chekov,
with the funny Russian accent who
sat along side Mr. Sulu and had a
more- than-passing resemblance to
Davy, the little English chap from
the Mot thus. And now, Mr. Chekov
was in Greenville, THE Bustling
Metropolis of Famous Personages.
And people were excited. Oh, they
were ecstatic. You could feel the
intense eagerness in the air. These
people were going to see THE
Walter Koenig get on stage and tell
them about a show that was can-
celed over 20 years ago and that
wasn't it time to get a real life?
And where was I amid all this
mind wrenching excitement? I was
atwork.Waitingon tables. Not that
I cared. 1 have no need to see famous
people. They aren't any different
from you or I. What makes them so
special?Then, while pouring tea for
a customer, I happened to glance
over at one of my empty tables,
which suddenly wasn't empty. And
my mind turned to Swiss cheese.
Melted, that is. For there, at MY
table, was Mr. Walter Koenig,
munching on a buffet item!
AAAAAA! Couldn't you just
DIE?!?!
Well, I did die, figuratively. It
was like a dream or something. I
was on cloud nine. The other wait-
resses laughed and cheered me on.
I was so nervous taking his order
my arm was shaking. Pouring cof-
fee becameanightmare(Mr.Chekov
drinksdecaffeinatedcoffee,couldn't
you just DIE?!)
Afterwards, scampering back
to the kitchen, I screamed and
laughed gleefully for several min-
utes. At least, I would have but my
manager came back and told me
people across the street could hear
me, could I please shut up. 1 think
she was just jealous because I was
waiting on Mr. Chekov. Ha!
Hewasn'tbig. Hewasn'tbois-
terous. He was quiet, and looked
very tired. He had on well-worn
jeansand an old button down shirt.
Yet, one glance at the man who
used to blast away at "enemy
wessels" on some campy sci-fi
show, and I became a slobbering
idiot. I suppose it's called having a
"presence And all I can say now is,
what happened?
Celebrities are powerful
With television and the silver
screen playing such a large role in
daily living, it's no wonder they
dictate our lifestyle. Wewear what
they wear, eat what they eat, act
how they act. For something that's
only flesh and blood, they sure
have a hold on the public. If politi-
cians were as popu lar, who knows
whatstateofdisarraythiscountry
would be in.
I'm not downing famous
people. As I've mentioned in an
earlier column, many of these
people are hero material. But con-
sider a good many of the boob
tube stars who are boobs. Then
consider the message, or image,
they portray. And the millions that,
like me, just bubble over in their
presence. Scary, huh?
In the meantime, I want to
thank Mr. Koenig for putting up
with my stare-at-the-ground-and-
shuffle-my-feet-aw-shucks atti-
tude, and wish him my best. I'd
even venture a hearty "Live long
and prosper if it didn't sound so
g(X)fy. I mean, I have some dig-
nity.
(I got the man's autograph,
though. Couldn't you just DIE?!?)
w
100 recycled
paper
Letters to the Editor
Anonymous letter justified by its substance
To the Editor:
Apparently, Steve Cobb
and I have been in very differ-
ent off icesacross the ECU cam-
pus. Actually, I wonder if he
even lives in the same country.
Mr. Cobb responded toa prior
letter to the editor in which
one anonymous student
voiced the opinions of many
� that ECU's bureaucracy isa
perpetual migraine, and stu-
dents everywhere must go
through absolute hell to get
anything done, never mind
pleasantly.
Mr. Cobb sen t the bearer
of truth off and packing to a
small liberal-arts school that
"bottle-feeds, diapers and
burps" each student. After at-
tacking the person's choice to
remain anonymous.
First of all, if every stu-
dentwhowanted to be treated
with respect and dignity
shipped off to a small school,
those small schcx)ls would be
big schools. What a concept.
Anyway
This country affords us
all the luxury of making our-
selves heard when we want to,
either by identification or
anonymously. I don't really
blame the writer for withhold-
ing his or her name.
Who knows how many
internal bulletinboardsECU's
administration keeps, with a
top-ten I ist of students to frus-
trate? (I probably just made
10) But that's a separate is-
sue. Mr. Cobb specifically ad-
dressed the anonymity, and
substance of the letter.
Who fiasn't had a disas-
trous run-in with some facet
of this university? Whether it
was a stony glare accompa-
nied by a shrewd, "You're in
the wrong office or a profes-
sor who has not the time nor
the inclination to address his
or her students' needs, so
many students are overlooked
by this school's administra-
tion.
Perhaps it isn't clear to
these individuals that students
are the foundation of this
school. The faculty, staff and
administration � like it or not
� are here for THE STU-
DENTS. Granted, I under-
stand a dislike for a student
who wants to be catered to,
and guided through life.
But many of us are not
asking for that. We're simply
asking for the time toaskques-
tions, and the courtesy of a
polite, helpful response.
Please? We don't stand in the
wrong lines, walk into the
wrong offices, or fill out the
wrong paper work on pur-
pose, trust me!
Whi le these obstacles ex-
ist every day, I have met many
wonderful people at this
school, from the administra-
tion, faculty and staff. They
are polite, friendly, helpful,
and sometimes even have a
sense of humor. These people
are great to work with, and
their treatment of students
tends to produce a similar re-
sponse.
I think that a student's
respect and admiration are the
highest complimentsany pro-
fessor can receive. The good
professors understand this
theory, the less-than-wonder-
ful ones will probably scoff at
this. No, actually, they prob-
ably care so little for their stu-
dents that they won't even read
this paper.
Ina school that isexpand-
ing so much each year, we as
students should not have to
begforacooperativeadminis-
tration. (And don't even think
that a new rec center should
ease these tensions! I'll have a
career by the time that center
is born from the deaths of a
parking lot!)
It'sawasteof everyone's
time and patience, and it only
creates animosity for every-
one. The image a school
projects begins internally.
Blame students for creating a
publicized brawl, but blame
administration for creating all
the problems on campus that
ESPN didn't have time to film.
Hey, Steve! I'm signing
my name!
Maureen Rich
Junior
Communication
All letters must be signed and accompanied with a phone
number. Students must also provide class rank and major.
All Letters to the Editor should be addressed to: The East
Carolinian, Attn Opinion Editor, Students Pubs. Building,
Second Floor, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
By Stacy Van Peterson
Local bands
deserve more
support
Musicians in Greenville do not get a
fair shake.
I have always wondered why the
words "Greenville scene" are thrown up
with a chuckle, grin and sometimes even
laughter. It seems that everytime I hear
anything by or about a local band on
WZMB, the D.J. has something smart to
say about local music.
If there is a problem with local mu-
sic, perhaps it begins with the fact that
music in Greenville is not heard.
Working for The East Carolinian, 1
have noticed that the majority of club
coverage is reserved for out of town
bands. I understand that this involves
press releases and political publicity for
the band to get good crowds, but why
not review or profile Greenville bands in
order to build up our (chuckle) local
scene.
Perhaps WZMB is afraid to sup-
port local bands (the Media Board and
all) and that's probably the reason that
they tend to play compilations from ev-
ery other college town rather than pro-
gramming more local music. I get the
sense that the subliminal attitude towards
local music is that "nothing that comes
out of Greenville can be GOOD
The real problem is not with WZMB
or The East Carolinian, or any other orga-
nization. The problem is with beer. Yes,
that's right beer.
For some reason, people in
Greenville are moreconcerned with how
many beers they can drink and not fall
down under the people who are already
drunk and jumping up and down for no
other reason than to look like they are
moved by the music.
What I am trying to say is that with-
out beer, hardly anyone would show up
to see a local band. If we do not start
supporting local music then there will be
no music. Remember, every band was
once a local band.
There is nothing wrong with hav-
ing a good time, but if you go to a club
where a band is playing just to drink,
then stay at home. This way you will not
be in the way of the ones who actually
want to see the band, and you will not
make an idiot out of yourself when you
get drunk and jump up and down and
spill your beer on your girlfriendboy-
friend.
The big problem with local music is
with the bands themselves. Why is it that
once a band reaches a certain level,
competitiontums to bad- mouthing and
even hatred?
Local bands can not expect to be
received w ith respect until they treat each
other with respect. The bands need to
form a sort of alliance as a foundation to
build a scene rather than working against
each other. The Greenville scene (no
chuckle) is growing, and there is a lot of
new talent.
Support local music at all levels,
who knows, maybe Details Magazine will
start hanging out at O' Rocks.





September 30, 1993
"The East Carolinian-
Classifieds
Page 7
For Rent
EHI Help Wanted! El Help Wanted
For Sale
IQ
Greek
IQ
Greek
NAGS HEAD BEACH HOUSES
iffordable Students
� �' Oceanfront and Oceanview it
tages Call Laura at (919) 261-8417
1 BEDROOM APT Move in Ncn 1st. $265
monthly, $265 deposit. 355-5116.
LOCAL REALTOR is seeking a nice home
tor a new faculty member to rent. Arrival
date:approv Nov 15-30. No realtor fee, just
trying to help. Please call Betsy Ray,
Cold well Banker 756-3IXX) or voice mail
757-2297. Must be in Rose High School
District.
Ringgold Towers
Unit 601 ,2 Bdrm
New Carpel & Freshly Painted
Water & Sewer Included. 2 Student Limit
at $290month per student
CONTACT MR. JERNIGAN W 319) 373-0415
Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE NEEDED - male or female,
non-smoker, serious student only, to share
2-bdrm, 2-bth unit at Arlington Square.
Avalabie end of October. $220m rent
security deposit 12 utilities. Call 355-
2884.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Looking for ma-
ture, responsible female to share 2 bedroom
townhouseon5thst. Non-smokerpreferred.
Rent is $390. Call 752-8910 for more info.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
master bedroom in Tar River Apt. 1 3 rent,
utilities and phone. For information call
752-8942.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED for
apartment 12 block from art bldg, 3 blocks
from downtown and 2 blocks from super-
market. Great for art students. Call 757-
1947.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3-bed-
room new duplex, 5 blocks from ECU,
washer and dryer. Serious student pre-
ferred. Rent is $210 plus 1 3 utilities. Must
see. Call Dave at 830-4030.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share a 2-
bedroom duplex, 3 blocks from campus.
Private room. Pets welcomed. $175a month
plus 12 utilities. Call 830-6826 or 752-8633
for more info.
E'l Help Wanted
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell only 8 trips and you go free!
Best trips & prices! Bahamas, Cancun, Ja-
maica, Panama City! Great Resume Experi-
ence! 1-800-678-6386!
$10-5400 WEEKLY. Mailing brochures!
Spare full-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC 27705.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All mate-
rial provided. Send SASE to Midwest mail-
ers, PO Box 395, Olathe KS 66051. Immedi-
ate response.
GREEKS & CLUBS: Raise up to $1000 in
JUST ONE WEEK! For your fraternity, so-
rority or club. Plus $1000 foryourself! And
a free T-shirt just for calling. 1-800-932-0528
ext. 75.
BRODY'S is now accepting applications
for additional Sales Associates for Junior
Sportswear Young Men's. Flexible 10-2,
12-9, or 6-9 scheduling options. Salary
Clothing discounts Apply at Customer
Service Brady's the Plaza Monday and
Inursday l-4pm
WANTED: Church organist. Salary nego-
tiable. Call mornings, 9-12. First Baptist
Church, Robersonville, NC 795-3601.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT -
Make up to $2000-4,000month teaching
basic conversational English abroad. Japan,
Taiwan and S. Korea. Many provide room
and board other benefits. No previous
training or teaching certificate required.
For more information call: (206) 632-1146
ext. J5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many posi-
tions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-436-4365
Ext.P-3712.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to distribute
"Student Rate" subscription cards at this
campus. Good income. For information and
application write to: Collegiate Marketing
Services, Box 1436, Mooresville NC 28115.
PART-TIME PRODUCTION ASSIS-
TANT: Person needed for entry-level posi-
tion at TV station. Must be dependable and
work well with others. Must be able to
operate camera, audio, character genera-
tor. Send resume to Lori Scott, Production
manager, WNCT-TV, PO Box 898,
Greenville, NC 27835. EOE.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED: Bring
your outgoing personality, transportation
and 35mm SLR camera and become one of
uur professional photographers. No expe-
rience necessay - we train. Good pay, flex-
ible PThours.Call 1-800-722-7033 between
12-5pm M-F.
DEPENDABLE person needed to care for
infant in our home. 2 days a week. 7am-
7pm. Nonsmoker. Transportation and ref-
erences required. 752-8710.
FREE ROOM AND BOARD for female
student in exchange for minimal assistance
to an elderly lady. 15 minute drive from
campus. Call 355-3400 or 757-1798.
BRODY'S is accepting applications for part-
time customer service representatives. Must
display proficiency with mathability to
balance register. Excellent communication
skillsprofessional manner. Flexible AM
Afternoon PM hours. Apply Customer
Service, Brody's, the Plaza Monday and
Thursday 1-4 PM.
WANTED: SOCCER OFFICIALS. $10 per
game. All games played on Saturday. Call
83O4240.
EARN UP TO $559.89 per week assem-
bling our products at home! Amazing 24
hour recorded message reveals details! Call
today! 1-919-243-1835. Leave your phone
number!
ROADWAY PACKAGE SYSTEM needs
package handlers to load vans and unload
trailers for the AM shift hours 3-7 AM, $6.00
hour, tuittion assistance available after 30
days. Future carreer opportunities in op-
erations and management possible. Appli-
cations can be filled out at the ECU co-op
office.
LOOKING FOR responsible and energetic
person interested in caring fro 3-1 2 yr old
in my home approximately 28 hoursa week.
Must have own transportation and be done
with school by noon. Please call 321 -2891 if
in teres ted. If no answer please ca 11 after 7:30
PM.
and student organizations wanted to pro-
mote the hottest Spring Break destinations,
call the nation's leader. Interampus pro-
grams 1-800-327-6013
HELPWANTED:Cooks,drivers,prep,FT
PT. Call Sante Fe Jack's 758-5225. Ask for
Andy or Greg.
For Sale
USED FURNITURE
STUDENT
5
WAP
HOP
Formerly Estate Shop
Coin & Ring Man
SELLING:
� FURNITURE
Men a Clothing
Dorm Refrigerator
JVlicrowATei
Stereo bquipment
V idro Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
We're Buying Too!
If you are selling you must
be 18 with a picture
ID.(NCDL, ECU)
752-3866
MON-FRI 10am-5 pm,
Sat 10 am-2 pm
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
DARKROOM FOR SALE! Bogen X-35
B&W enlarger weasel, two-speed paper
safe, four chemical trays (each with sepa-
rate tongs), soueegie, 8x magnifying loupe,
timer, graduated cylinder, Vivitar Devel-
oping Tank, two leused safe light, negative
plate, squeegie sink, 35mm bulk film loader
(loaded!), gallons of chemicals, 3 instruc-
tion booklets - easy to set up and use, will
demonstrate. Cash $300 firm. Call after 5
PM, 752-8577.
ROLLAWAY BED, twin deluxe6 inch mat-
tress, adjustable back, new, can't use. Cost
$350, sacrifice at $170 cash. Call 637-2645.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED cars, trucks,
boats, 4-wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available in your area now! Call 1-
800-436-4363 Ext. C-5999.
BICYCLES, BICYCLES, BICYCLES,
Schwinn, Jamis, Motobocane, Raleigh. Good
names, Good bikes. Good prices. Call eve-
nings, ask for Cass at 758-7867 or Archie at
752-7669.
BEDROOM SUIT $600, Den set wdinette
$850, glass coffee table $150, vanity $15,
Bike $50. All neg. 355-5116.
ATTENTION WEIGHT LIFTERS AND
WATCHERS: Sports supplements at ma-
jor discount prices: Cybergenics, Hot Stuff,
Wt. Gain 900, Vanady 1 Sulfate, Tri-
Chromelene, Mega-mass and much more!
For info call Charles at 321-2185.
COUCH FOR SALE! Price negotiable. In
good shape and comfortable. Come and
see. For more information call Heather at
355-2762.
spaid with cage and all accessories. $100.
Queen size waterbed wo headboard $125.
Call 752-2963.
MEMBERSHIP: Club for Women Only.
Low monthlv payments. Save $59 starting
fee! Call Angie 931-9768.
RALEIGH 10-speed. Good condition, rides
excellent. $100 or best offer. Call 830-9092.
22" CANNONDALE ROAD BIKE. Older
model but still rides good. $450o.b.o. (830-
9324).
SEARS KENMORE PORTABLE DRYER
- Excellent condition. $150. Has cotton
sturdy, touch-up, permanent press, air-only
cycles. 756-9642.
TREK 820. '92, Scott bars, accessories. $250.
Call 752-2248 or 757-1640.
lt?nts t�st N-tiiiKjill Ammo
I .Ills Si�i,(i Milil n( Uhimj lines
Stuffs NuiiHve.ii. MiwiiiKv. I'ninKs
f it,l in kt nui) i Hlttn-ril ItHi
-tn iwsit- Wft i rflif
FORT HENRYS ARMY NAVY
1501 S. EVANS STREET 756-6781
mEsm
PROFESSIONAL CARPET CLEANING
priced right for College Students- call 752-
8163 and leave message.
PARTY OVER HERE! Only if you have a
Mobile Music Productions Disc Jockey.
MMP is the most popular choice in disc
jockey services. Wide music selection. Pro-
fessionalism. Fall dates filling fast. Call Lee
at 758-4644 for booking.
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Personals
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY Individuals FOR SALE: Female ferret, descented and
DO YOU HAVE A TASTE FOR TRUTH?
Bible Study every Tuesday and Wednes-
day. 7:30 PM, Menddenhall room 242. Drop
in on us anytime. Apostolic Campus Minis-
try.
CARNIVAL WORKER: Who doesn't
Scooby do? Love, Black-eye.
TO ALL HER FRIENDS AT ECU AND
THE REAL CRISIS CENTER: Lisa Marie
Angeldorf says hello, she misses you all
and will see you soon.
Lost & Found
LOST: Fossil Watch w'ith Brown Leather
band & prism crystal - $20 reward
Sentimental value. Please call 355-8370
after 6pm.
LOST: Female Golden Retriever, lyr &
4mos old. Navy collar & silver choke
chain. Last seen off Woodlawn park area
on 9-13-93. Answers to the name of
Jazmine. Reward offered. Please call 758-
0915.
LOST: Choc. Lab, small female, "Casey"
missing since 924. Please call 756-6725.
PI DELTA loves the ECU Greek System and
supports ALL Greeks!
PI DELTA PLEDGES - You guys are Awe-
some! Keep up the good work! PS. - Any guess
on Big Sis yet? Love, the Sisters of Pi Delta.
HEYPHITAU'S! Ablastwashad by everyone
attheSports Pad. Thanks for a great time. Let's
get together again. Love, Alpha Omicron Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS to Pan Hellenic.
Thanks for all the hard work. Love, Alpha
Omicron Pi.
PI LAMBDA PHI - Can't wait to see you guys
in heaven or hell! The sisters and pledges of
Pi Delta.
PI DELTA backs the Pirates
THE SISTER PLEDGES OF SIGMA
SIGMA SIGMA- We had a great time at the
cookout last week. Hope we can get together
again soon! Love, the Sisters and pledges of
Delta Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS to PanheUenic on
being ranked number one in the nation! Love,
Delta Zeta.
KAPPA ALPHA - Looking forward to a great
timeat the game on Saturday! Love, the sisters
and pledges of Delta Zeta.
HEY DELTA ZETA's and their dates-Satur-
day started off with a cookout here and there,
then off to STRANGER with "many refresh-
ments" to share. The party was fun, the DJ was
great, everyone was happy, dancing with their
date. Thanks to everyone, it was quite a bash.
Especially the six who took a midnight splash!
TO PHI KAPPA TAU: We are looking for-
ward to Saturday. We're gonna have a blast!
Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
TO ALPHA XI DELTA flag football team,you
all are doing a great job, good luck in the
playoffs! Love, the Sisters and pledges of Al-
pha Xi Delta.
ALPHADELTAPI FOOTBALL-You'reawe-
sorne! Keep it up girls! We love you, your
Sisters.
TOTHEGROOVYbrothersofKappaSigma:
We all had a swell time at the (ffs social The
band was right on, man - we didn't want them
to leave! Can't wait for the game - Peace, man.
Love, the Sisters of Alpha Delta Pi.
LAMBDA CHI: We can't wait for Friday
night and Saturday for the football game.
Love, Chi Omega.
THANKS ROB for being the greatest toot-
ball coach Love Chi Omega.
THANKS DUSTIN forthegreatChi-Omega
blind date t-shirts. Love, Chi Omega
THETACHI:Thanksfrothegreatpre-down-
town Thursday night. Everyone loved the
flowers. Love, Chi Omega.
THANKSJAYIWelovedrheporkchopsand
the side order of Johnny Quest! love, the
Sisters and pledges of Zeta Tau Alpha.
COME SEE WHAT sorority life is all about!
Zeta Tau Alpha Rush Party on Thurs. Sept. 30
at 5:30 for dinner. Rides and info: 757-0344.
CHI O Sister? and Pledges- Looking forward
to pre-downtown Friday. The Brothers and
pledges of Lambda Chi.
DELTA CHI. Kevin, Chris and Scott were
the bigger picker-uppers, while Brian was
the lightest of them all. While Dave and Tom
went camping for 4 or 5 hours, the rest of us
all had a ball with Spud-butt We'll have to
head back to Nags so the friendly folks in the
"tan-o-rama" can get some more snapshots.
Did he deserve $42 for filling up 4 drinks?
Oh, well, congratulations to the Epsilon
pledge class of Delta Chi. The Brothers of
Delta Chi.
ALPHA PHI - we are looking forward to our
pre-downtown bash tonight at Kelly's. It lias
been a while since we have gotten together
and we are sure it has been well worth the
wait. Also, everyone is looking forward to
meeting the new Alpha Phi pledges. See you
tonight! The Brothers and AM's of Delta Chi.
PI DELTA, can't wait for Saturday's game.
We hope everyone is up bright and early
Saturday morning, lefs say about 830, ha
ha! ,or some time soon after that. We'll see
you there! The Brothers and AM's of Delta
Chi
DELTA CHL special thanks goes out to all
the brothers who helped me out with Rush.
Todd Holloway, Mike Amazon, Dave
Goreleslcy,DerrickSchwartz,BrianGoodwin,
Jim Downey, Tim Hory and Brad Snyder.
Thanks, Tom Thornton.
Aerobic Instructors:
Only the Elite Need Apply-
Top PaIn Greenville. -
k Callfbraud'rtionsonSLfxfeyOct3- �Jk
f FreeABCofOxxeosraplvvvofrdTop 7
for all vvto audition. . 4i Xk
Taught by AFAA examiner, Karen Watman
Call for information
756-1592
Announcements
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Make it official! There will be
an official's clinic for volley-
ball on Thursday, Sept 30 in
Brewster D-105 at 5:00 pm. Call
Rec Services at 757-6387 for
more info.
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
ODK National Leadership Soci-
ety will be outside the student
store on Friday Oct. 1 to answer
questions and provide informa-
tion on ODK and the application
process. Any questions or con-
cerns can be dealt with by
Amanda Hines at 756-2717.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC-
EVENTS FOR SEPT
2 8-OCT 3
TUES, SEPT 2 8 - GUEST RECITAL:
Florida State Brass Quintet
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 PM,
Free); SUN, OCT.3 - CONCERT
ON THE LAWN: an event of the
friends of music and their
guests; SUN, OCT 3, Angela
Gomes, cello, Graduate Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm,
Free). For more info, call 757-
6851 or the 24-hour hotline at
757-4370.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SOCIAL WORK ALLIANCE
Our first social of the year will
be held Friday Oct. 1 from mid-
night till 2 AM. That's right -
Midnight bowling at AMF on Red
Banks Rd. A sign up sheet is
outside 104 Ragsdale. Please
sign up and encourage all to
come. This social is open to any-
one interested in joining our
group. All faculty is invited
and encouraged to come. For more
info, contact Jason Shirtz at 355-
4598. See you all there.
RECREATIONAL
Bring your own blanket to the
Rec Services and National Life
"Camp out on the Mall" on Fri-
day Oct 1. We'll party all night
long from 9 pm -9 am and will
enjoy hot dog and marshmallow
roasts, ghost stories, volleyball
and more. Register in
Christenbury Gym 204 and en-
joy a night of fun under the
stars. Call 931-7748 or 757-
6387 for more info.
GREENVILLE FRIENDS
Greenville Friend meeting
(Quakers) welcomes students to
weekly meeting for worship.
Open to all. St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 4th and Reade, 4PM Sun-
days. For info: 758-6789 or 355-
7335.
AMERICAN CHEMICAL
SOCIETY
The A.C.S. will be selling tick-
ets for their bike raffle this
Saturday morning at UBE. Tick-
ets are $1.00.
ECU HONORS
ORGANIZATION
ECHO will be meeting on Wed,
Oct 6 at 4:30 PM in the base-
ment of Fleming Hall. Members
please attend with student ID
and a pen. Monetary benefits
dependent on number of people
present! Bring money if inter-
ested in dinner at Wendy's af-
terward.
COUNCIL OF STUDENT
LEADERS
Student leaders - if you had an
office or a leadership position
with an ECU organization, you
are invited to the COSOL meet-
ing on Thursday, October 7,1193
at 4 PM in the multi-purpose
room of MSC. For more info, call
757-4796.
GAMMA RETA PHI
The next meeting of Gamma Beta
Phi will be held on October 5 th
at 5 PM in Mendenhall Great
Room Section 1. All members
are encouraged to attend! Please
remember that dues must be paid
at this meeting. For more info
contact Allison at 931-8285.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Have plans for fall break? Take
a break and go on an adventure
as the Outdoor Recreation pro-
gram of Recreational Services
goes on a backpacking excur-
sion. Spend 3 leisurely days of
backpacking within the Shining
Rock wilderness area of North
Carolina and end the trip with a
splash at Sliding Rock. So be
sure and register now in 204
Christenbury and attend a pre-
trip meeting Oct. 4 at 5 PM in
Brewster D-101. Your adven-
ture will only cost $65students
and $85faculty, staff, guests.
It will include transportation,
most food and equipment. For
more info, call Rec Services at
757-6387.
SERVICES
Can you dig this? Rec Services is
having a Volleyball registra-
tion meeting on Tuesday, Oct 5
in BIO 103 at 5 PM. So come by
and see if you have what it takes
to volley and spike. For more
info, call Rec Services at 757-
6387.
CHQQS1MG A MAJOR AND
A CAREER
This 5-session workshop is the
beginning step in career coun-
seling at ECU. Take assessment
instrument. Learn how to do ma-
jorcareer research. Get a list of
possible career fields that fit
your interest. Classes begin
week of October 4. LAST CHANCE
BEFORE EARLY REGISTRATION!
For more info, a schedule and to
register, stop by the Counseling
Center, 316 Wright Building.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Get in shape this semester! Reg-
istration for the October 18-
December 3rd fitness class will
be October 13-19 in 204
Christenbury Gymnasium. The
cost per session is10students
and $20faculty, staff, spouse.
Drop-in tickets can also be pur-
chased anytime in 204
Christenbury for $5student
and $10faculty, staff, spouse
and will be valid for five classes.
Choose from aerobics, step, low
impact, Hi-Lo, funk, Belly Bust-
ers, aquarobics, Hi-Lo step,
power step, and toning. For more
information, call Recreational
Services at 757-6387.
KAYAKXLUB
Join the ECU Kayak Club from
7:30-9:00 pm at Christenbury
Pool. Beginners encouraged to
attend the first meeting FREE.
A$10 membership fee is re-
quired to join the club. Splishing
and splashing has never been
such an adventure. Call Recre-
ational Services at 757-6387 for
more Kayak Club details.
RECREAI1QHAL
SERVICES
Come join ECU's Martial Arts
Club and take advantage of free
male and female self-defense
karate courses taught under the
direction of 7th degree black
belt champion. Bill McDonald.
Register on Thursday, Septem-
ber 30 at 8:00 pm in
Christenbury Gymnasium. For
more information, call Recre-
ational Services at 757-6387.
COUNSELING CENTER
Learn the difference between
depression and "the blues
Take a self-assessment. Get
ideas on how to overcome feel-
ing down. This workshop on
Wednesday sponsored by the
Counseling Center (757-6661)
will be held Wednesday, Octo-
ber 6 at 7 pm in Mendenhall
221. Thursday, October 7 is
National Depression Awareness
Day. Free screening will be con-
ducted at The Plaza and Caro-
lina East Malls. For more infor-
mation contact the Mental
Health Association of Pitt
County, 752-7448.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Get a grip! The Outdoor Recre-
ation Program at Recreational
Services will host a climbing
workshop at the Hard Roc Tower
on Tuesday, October 5th from
3-5 pm. This workshop will in-
troduce participants to the ba-
sics of climbing including
safety, equipment and utiliza-
tion, knot tying, belaying, and
climbing technique. For more
information, call Recreational
Services at 757-6387. See you
at the Hard Roc Climbing Tower!
-





The East Carolinian
Page 8
Lifestyle
September 30, 1993
Java Shop offers students perfect cup
Come on down and try a cup of gourmet coffee and a freshly baked
muffin. The java Shop is located in Charles Blvd. Shops on 10th street.
By Julie Totten
Lifestyle Editor
When was the last time you had
a good cup of coffee in Greenville?
After three years of searching all
over the Emerald City, we are finall v
blessed with a perfectly brewed cup
of coffee.
TheJavaShop,located in Charles
Blvd. Shops, opened about a month
ago. "The specialty coffee industry is
booming said Patricia Dudek, the
owner. "There is a real craze up north
and out in the midwest right now,
and I knew it was time for Greenville
to have great coffee
Dudek is a former ECU student
and has lived in the area most of her
life. She's very aware of what the city
hastoofferand luckily, she saw what
it was lacking.
The first thing you notice when
you walk into the shop is its pleasant,
cozy atmosphere. The walls are
painted a deep mauve color and art
work catchesyour eyes immediately.
Most of the art decorating the shop
are works by ECU students and
Dudek urges all artistic types tocome
by and show her your works for
possible display.
Some coffee shops are staffed by
rushy, arrogant people, but the staff
attheJavaShopwentoutoftheirway
toexplain the ways they flavor coffees
and combine flavors for a tasty brew.
Eachdaymeshopservesitshouse
blend and chooses from their other
gourmetcoffees to feature along with
the house coffee.
Dudek also said that they sell
fresh coffee beans for home or office
brewing. Among a few of the choices
are: Antigua Guatemala, Cost Rica
Taraznia,MochaJava, Decaf Espresso
'Psychedelic Grunge' invented
Oklahoma natives hit music circuit
By Kris Hoffler
Photo courtesy of eastwest records
Pictured here: (from left to right) Mike Lewis, Miles, Doug Carrion,
Aaron Preston. Check these guys out, you may be surprised.
Staff Writer
Several yearsago, For Love Not
Lisa saved up as much money as
they could from their day jobs and
headed west, leaving their native
Oklahoma behind. They ended up
in Los Angeles determined to make
a commercial success with what
they considered to be an original
sound.
Their influences range from
Fugazi and the Flaming Lips to Pink
Floyd and Iggy Pop. However, I
hear a little of Seattle in their sound.
The Oklahoma City-bred members
aim for a spontaneous anything-
goes musical philosophy which is
enhanced by fellowOklahomaCity
native Aaron Preston and theband's
only Californian, Doug Carrion.
These gentlemen have just
signed a major recording contract
with eastwest records, hoping to
get their foot in the door of the
record industry despite the fact that
they are still a young band. Those
proverbial feet may already be in
the door considering they have
already played with such acts as
Rage Against the Machine and The
Stone Temple Pilots.
FLNL like to call themselves a
punk band, but they are probably
more akin to psychedelic grunge, if
there is such a thing. Their sound
ranges from a hardcore grunge
stomp to a dreamy, feedback-rid-
den, pop-influenced, psychedelic
alloy. They have put a slight twist
on what is popular in music today,
and they just may reap the benefit if
their timing is right.
Their first full-length album is
to be released on Oct. 5. Merge, their
major label debut, showcases songs
that range from the evil and heavy
("Traces" and "Merge") to the laid
back ("Swallow") as well as a com-
pelling spoken word piece ("Just a
Phase").
Half of the recordings on their
EP are live, because the band does
not see their studio performances
as reflective of their real selves.
During the recording of the studio
tracks, For Love Not Lisa shared the
same studio with En Vogue�an
interesting fact that I thought was
neat, but nonessential for this re-
view. Whatever
Anyway, if you are into the
new music scene, like grunge with
an innovative edge, orif you are just
curious, check out For Love Not
Lisa. You may be pleasantly sur-
prised.
Just for fun, I'll end this with a
little quote on what kind of girls the
band likes. "We don't like girls
Myers (Drums) said, "We like pup-
pies and goats, smaller farm ani-
mals�sheep, pigs
Music writers
called upon
by Close -Up
By Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer

Even if you don't brush with
Close-Up brand toothpaste, you
can still enter this contest! In New
York City, a celebration is being
held for the re-launching of Close-
Up toothpaste. Are you excited
yet? It gets even better.
Chesebrough Pond's USA is con-
ducting a unique music competi-
tion for young adults aged 12-25
called the "Close-Up Rap or Roll
'93 What else? Well this contest
is a nationwide search looking for
young people who can express
themselves by writing original
songs about personal relation-
ships. You can write about your
loving relationship with your par-
ents , siblings, lovers (nothing ex-
plicit now) and even good old
Fido.
According to Dr. Judy
Kuriansky�relationship expert
and host of the number one radio
show in New York, "Love
Phones offering advice to teens�
"The transition between child-
hood and adulthood is a turbulent
time. Young people are seeking
autonomy and independence, in
efforts to define who they are in-
side and in a relation to others.
See CLOSE UP page 10
Joe Henry explores music genres
By Andy Suss
Staff Writer
Joe Henry is a good guy. Joe
Henry's Kindness of the World is a
good album. I could stop here
and leave it at that, but I would be
cheating you, and I wouldn't earn
a dollar. So let's talk about the
album, shall we?
Joe Henry says he can sleep
anywhere and he can eat any-
thing anytime. How can you not
love him? "One Day When the
Weather is Warm" is a mellow
tune that makes me want to sit in
a rocking chair on the front porch
on a balmy day and sip bourbon.
I like that image; I like the song.
Henry has that nasal edge to his
voice that's reminiscent of Dylan,
but he's cooler in his use of it.
"There's a fireman's wedding
tonight and everyone will be
there sings Henry in "Fireman's
Wedding It's a swell number
about good news, good things,
drinking and socializing. Just
happy-go-lucky! Sure, you've got
to love a song that blends mando-
lins or dulcimers or whatever it is
that makes that cool little plinking
jamming sound with electric and
acoustic guitars.
Yes! Yes! I like Joe Henry! I
like the whole album. It's mel-
low, yet rocking. Soothing, yet
motivating.
And really, man: it's drink-
ing music. Not like Buffett is
drinking music; with Buffett you
Photo courtesy of Mammoth Records
Joe Henrys latest release Kindness of the World, is on sale now in record
stores. He has a taste of country, blues, folk and roclc all in one album.
can drink anything. With Joe
Henry, you drink bourbon. Not
any of that cheap stuff, either.
The music is like country,
blues, folk, and rock all mixed
together.
It's a lot like Tom Petty's
Damn the Torpedoes, only differ-
ent. Imagine Mike Cross, Eric
Clapton and Steve Earl all rolled
into one. And there you have it.
Joe Henry's Kindness of the World
is Wild Turkey, summer, the girls
from the ZZ Top videos, Buffalo
Wings (real hot ones) and the Su-
per Bowl combined: in short, it's
America. I love it.
And while you're at it, pick
up Short Man's Room and
Shuffle town.
and Kenya AA. Coffee beans not in
the shop can be ordered and in the
shop the very next day.
Dudek has also brought a new
coffee idea into Greenville. "The idea
of flavoring coffee with Torani syrup
(which is Italian), came from the
north she said. "These are wonder-
ful blended with coffee or in our cold
Italian soda's
Expresso, Cappuccino, Mocha
andLattearewonderfullypricedcom-
paredtopricesseeninChicago, Wash-
ington D.C. or evat Raleigh
If coffee isn'tyour thing, the Java
Shop will temptyou with 11 different
teas and a variety of baked goods.
The front case is adorned with
croissants, cinnamon rolls and bread
baked fresh every morning.
There are tablesoutsideforthose
of you that enjoy fall breezes that the
east coast is famous for.
The morning music ranges
from jazz to classical and by the
afternoonyouarelikelytohereNew
Age or 10,000 Maniacs. The music
we play in here really adds to the
atmosphere. It's never anything in-
timidating on, just relaxing, pleas-
ant music Dudek said.
The hours of the shop are
Monday-Friday, 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
and Saturday and Sunday 7:30a.m.
to 6 p.m.
ByOct. lltheshopwillbeopen
in meeveningsuntil9pm. on week-
days and 10 p.m.on weekends.
"What I've created here is a
comfortable, warm shop combin-
ing good coffee, music and an aes-
theticallypleasingenvironmentthat
everyone can enjoy Dudek said.
I couldn't have said it any bet-
ter�check it out.
Get smart about
student credit
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
Credit. How much do you
know about your charge or credit
card? A survey, sponsored by Con-
sumer Federation of America and
American Express Travel Related
Services Company, Inc was done
in Spring 1993. Thismultiplechoice
38-question survey was distributed
to 75 campuses and tested 2010 stu-
dents.
Samples included full-time jun-
iors and seniors attending f on r-year
universities and colleges. Itwasdis-
covered that although access to
credit is easy, few students know
how to use the credit wisely and
responsibly.
Fifty-five percent of all full-time
undergraduate students have at
least one major credit card, and 74
percenthavecards by the time they
reach their senior year. Generally,
these cards are used for life.
As was shown in Adxveek's Mar-
keting Week, 75 percent of college
students keep their first card for 15
years, and 60 percent keep it for life.
According to Gail Wasserman,
Director of Public affairs at Ameri-
can Express Company, "College is
a time when students are learning
to budget time, as well as money,
and are developing life-long skills
beyond what is included in their
classroom curriculum
On the survey test, students
correctly answered only 53 percent
of the questions relating to credit
use. On questions about auto insur-
ance, students answered 58 percent
correctly. About checking and sav-
ings, they answered 53 percent cor-
rectly, and concerning life insur-
ance, they answered 43 percent cor-
rectly.
"Scoring low on questions
about life insurance is not particu-
larly surprising, since most college
students do not use those prod-
ucts. But when so many are unin-
formed about products they are
using every day, like banking and
credit, that is cause for concern
Wasserman said.
Since 1978, American Express,
one of the first financial service
companies, has offered college stu-
dents credit. A charge card is dif-
ferent from a credit card because
the charge card requires that each
monthly bill be paid in full, but no
interest is charged. "The average
college student spends more that
$70 paying interest annually says
Wasserman. "They can lower their
cost of credit considerably by
learning how to manage their
credit cards better and under-
standing all aspects of the cards
they use
Asa result, American Express
is supportive in creating a more
informed, credible customer who
will make more responsible finan-
cial decisions. American Express
has many different customer ser-
vice activities, and access to infor-
mation has been made easy. The
company'sstudentmarketing rep-
resentatives provide consumer
information through a 24 hour-a-
day, seven days-a-week telephone
line. Brochures and other infor-
mation are also available.
These materials are free of
charge and can be obtained by
contacting American Express'
OfficeofPublicResponsibility,200
Vesey Street, New York, New
York, 10285. American Express
also offers a brochure called "A
Student's Plain English Dictionary
of Credit Terms" to educate col-
lege students about how to use
credit wisely. This brochure is free
and can be obtained by sending a
self-addressed stamped envelope
to: Student Dictionary, P.O. Box
2201, Warminster, PA 18974.
� �'mmr&mw.
mmmmmwmm





September 30, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
larvest donates $$$
and
the
Re-
and
e as
immunity
will be t-sell-
ingy riterssuchasV illiamStvron,
Maya Angelou, oyce t. aroli I
and Calvin Trillin. The readings
will be held at book stores
college campuses all across
nation.
American Express Travel
lated Senice Company, Inc
The Princeton Rrcieze will serv
the national sponsors. Thev will
Is Greek life
for you?
By Laura Jachman
Staff Writer
TheInterFratemirvCouncil(IFC)
has gotten a lot of attention lately, but
many people don't know what it is.
Its purpose is to govern the bod v
of the 17 fraternities by setting rules
for rush, alcohol use and social par-
ties. It is overseen by seven board
members and holds meetings every
.Tuesday, which are run by the presi-
dent, Ian Eastman. There are approxi-
mately 47 members but only the 17
fraternity presidents have a vote.
The IFC collects 58 per member
as a due fee that is allocated later on in
various ways. The major expense the
IFC has, is the cost of rush. "Wespent
$2000-2500 on rush this semester,
down from the S3500 we spent last
year said Eastman.
He explains that cutting unnec-
essary corners during rush enables
the council to use the extra money for
other things. For instance the IFC just
donated $250 to Rose Fligh School to
thank them for letting the council use
their cafeteria for a banquet. They are
also in the process on deciding on a
new philanthropy to sponsor in the
community.
The IFC was established in 1957,
and has evoked from a university
leader to a community leader. Last
year, various members of IFC were
downtownatSa.m.deaningupafter
Halloween. Thev also adopted a sec-
tionof Fifth Street in support of Green-
ville.
The term for the IFC runs from
December to December, but new
council goesintoaffectafter theChrist-
mas break, in January.
Greek affiliated students are in-
volved in allaspectsofcampusactivi-
nes and are well respected.
It is strongly encouraged that
ECU men that didn't attend this se-
mesters rush, think about rushing in
the spring. That way you can make
an informed decision as to whether
Greek life is for vou.
�� I lar-

dings will beaccom-
� � I I I' "i ! -
'
Southwest Missouri State I niver-
; m their readings in
play. But the most
unusual format will be presented
in Philadelphia, where the read-
ill be paired with cooking
demonstrations.
1 all ol the Writers Harvest
proceeds will be distributed to re-
!iet agencies located where the
event is held. The remaining prof-
its will be divided between three
na tionaJ grant reci pien Ls, which a re:
the Food Research and ActionCen-
tei for their Campaign to End Child-
hood 1 lunger; first Book, a literary
program for at-risk and homeless
children; and the Society of St.
Andrew s Potato Project. These
agencies distribute surplus produce
to nationwide food banks
ken (Jordan, vice president of
Student Card Marketing at Ameri-
can Express Travel Related Serv ice
Company, says of the program,
"American Express is proud tosup-
port a program that provides col-
lege students with an exciting, af-
fordable opportunity to impact a
rause about which they greatly
care
If you are interested in know-
ing more about particular events
across thenarion,calJ (800)955-8278.
For students, Writers Harvest ticket
prices are S5, and $10 for general
admission tickets.
Don't Run My Life
6tf tteAevut
Look, I know she sells sea-shells
d( n vn by the seashore, butwhatif she
sold ba tteries? Then she'd sell C-cel ls
down by the seashore. And plasma?
Well, she sells blood cells down by
thesea-shore. And hey! If she worked
in a mail-order house at the beach
that specialized in nautical junk!?She
mails sea-shells down by the sea-
shore! Woo! Can you imagine? And
the point, people, is that she can have
this many choices only in America!
Hoy! Hoy! Three cheers for the
red, white and blue. Don t forget to
give "The Man" his 30 percent.
But look, I don't want to talk
about her and the seashore! No sir.
Because they's a problem there. It
seems a certain faction of people are
engaged in a foul and noxious habit
that fouls up the habitat and nobody
buys nothing no matter what she's
selling! And no, I ain't a-gonna go off
on some anti-smoking thing. I'm talk-
ing about PDAs: Public Displays of
Affection.
All this hub-bub about banning
smoking in public places, why don't
webanPDAs?Imean,it'sjustashard
to eat, while Jim-Bob and Marylou
are at the next table tongue-wrestling
as itis if they 're at the next table chain-
smoking Camels!
Think about it. The PDA Police:
"Hey you! Get your hands out of each
other's pockets and walk like human
beings
So tell me, what is it with these
couples who just can't stand to go five
minutes withouteachother? I mean, I
love you too, little snookie-wookie
sweet-cake, you 3.5 Liter 24-valve en-
gine of emotion, but can't we have just
a little space? A little? Aaaghhhh!
It really kills me.
Ha ve you ever seen thesecouples
See CRANIUM page 10
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t 4t
September 30. 1993
OSE-UP
"Mus is the great
'equalizer Jlbound-
CRANIUM
before class? I'm talking about where
lack says, "Well, I'm late better get
in bodass And they've got meir
fingers intertwined like lattkework
and Jillsays Wdl you just better give
me a kiss, yum, -urn, vum, mm So
they have a big mmmm-smack!
sounding like they just had some-
thing yummy at Baskin Robbins.
"Okeydokey! Bye bye sweetie! Love
ya! See you in a hour! I'll miss you!
Google-google, lovey-dovey, honey
bunch "Me too! Kiss kiss And
then they part, their ringers tangled as
long as possible as their arms strain to
form an eight-foot bridge of love and
carebetweenthem .Rrrrrretcccch! Re-
ally! Here, pull my finger.
But you're saying, "Hey! Dick! I
thought you were the Love Man! You
love Love Well, of course I do. But
isn't there a time and place for every-
thing? You don't walk through cam-
pus belching and flatulating,doyou
No,youdoitathome!Well�and this
isreallyaway-outtheory�why don't
you save that mushy sickening lip-
locking garbagola tor home too? Just
asking.
And please. Don't try the ol'
md is .1 form ol freedom,
m from all the new changes
' Ih es. I or young people.
. s the perfect outlet tor self-ex-
ision But what does this have
with toothpaste?
I hrough the years, music has
remained a driving force of ex-
pi ession among young people, re-
fecting and articulating the hopes,
aspirations and concerns of each
generation The people at Close-
L p fed that, since the 1970s, Close
Up toothpaste has continued to
keep pace with the changing dy-
namics ot each generation of voung
people. In the 70s, Close-Up intro-
duced thevery first gel toothpaste.
Bet you didn't know that one.
Then, during the 80s, Close-Up
added fluorideand, soon after that,
tartar-control gel. And who can
forget the ad campaign where ev-
eryone seems to fall together in an
embrace? Most recently came
Close-Up Crystal Clear Mint Gel,
the first colorless clear gel tooth-
paste. Wow, 1 sure didn't know
that. So what about this contest?
Thedeadline for entries is Oct.
31,1993. All entries will be judged
60 on basis of content, 30 on
originality and 10 on clarity. Con-
Continued from page 8
testants must submit an audiocas-
sette tape (no longer than four min-
utes in length) along with a copy
of the lyrics, hand printed or typed
on an 8.5 inch by 11 inch sheet of
paper to: Rap or Roll Contest, P.O.
Box 4313, Manhasset, New York
11030.
Four lucky finalists willbecho-
sen and invited to strut their stuff
in New York City before a panel of
distinguished judges. Thegrand
prize is S2500 with three run-
ners-up each receiving $500. En-
tries must include entrant's
name, address, telephone num-
bers and must be signed by each
performer (up to four). For more
information, call 1-800-RAP-O-
ROI L. I think I'll go brush my
teeth now.
"You'rejustjealou.s"gambit with this
guy. Saliva-swapping is a beautiful
thing. But it's a persona and private
thing. I only pick my nose when no
one's kxiking, and I'm the same way
about casting my tongue down my
lady's throat (except for when she's
been drinkingand she's wantingsome
chapped lips on the spot! Whew
Johnny Dollar!).
Case in point. Look at these swell
folks, B and C. They's both shy and
innocuous folks. Thev got together
and it's a love thang and now he
walks around with his chest thrust on
out and she's showing the leg. Good
God y'all! But you know what, for all
the looks they throw a teach other and
all thesurreptitiouscarryTngs-on, they
don't gross me out. Now, I laugh,
because I see how they stare into each
other'sskulls and I know somebody's
gonna rock 'n' roll, but they save it for
later!
They save it for when they're
alone. It's a beautiful thing. I love
these folks. Of course sometimes she
comes around with her neck loaded
withsubcutaneoushematomasofthe
epidermis; now we got to tell that
young boy to quit treatin' that neck
like a Whistle Pop! I mean, li'l Miss
Thang k x lies I ikesomebod vdone went
and beat her neck with a plank! But
hey, he did it in private. God bless the
love these two share and I mean it
with all the love The Cranium can
muster.
Bu talas. There's a bad story. Let's
invent a couple: Mr. X and Ms. Thing.
Now, immerse yourself in this image
we're constructing. Thev's both our
friends, so we love 'em. But then thev
decide to fall in love. GROSS-OUT
Here'sthescene:theycan'tgoaminute
apart. XhangsoutwhercThing works,
she hangs out in his office, they come
to school together, eat lunch together,
fill in all thegapsduring the day with
each other and leave to go home to-
gether! Haveyouseen thesecouples!?
SHOOT ON SIGHT!
LookahereT'm talkingabouthow
they converse in these hushed tones,
talkin' 'bout, "Whatchawanna do to-
night, huggy bear?"
"Whatever you wanna do, little
sugar biscuit
"I just wanna snuggle with my
sweety-pie darling lover-goo-goo
"That's what I want to do,
yummy, yum, yum husker-do
"I love you
"Not as much as I love you
Gurgle,gurgle,gurgle!I'mdrowning
in my own vomit! Someone save me!
Continued from page 9
These are the folks you have over for
dinner or whatnot and they pull their
antenordeltoidfibersstrainingtohold
hands under the table! All the guys go
in the kitchen forshotsordgarsortalk
aboutsportsandinshecomes: "Sugar-
pi um, sweetener, love, love, kiss, kiss,
hug, hug whisper, whisper?
Do you getit?! Are you with me!?
All you mushy can't-save-it-til-you-
get-home nerds, don't run my life!
Love ya! Mmmm-smack!

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je J2
What'sOnTap?
Thursday, Sept. 30
Soccer, away
at Wake For,
Golf, away
ODU, at Kith Hawk, NC 4:30
Friday, Oct. 1
Volleyball, away
at Mt. Olive College, 7:00
Football. home
Memphis State, 12:08
Soccer, away
Men at William and Mary,
Williamsburg, VA.
Men's Tennis, away
Old Dominion Invit, Norfolk,
VA
Cross Country, away
at Methodist College Invit.
TBA
The East Carolinian
Sports
September 30, 1993
Sunday, Oct. 3
Men's Tennis, away
Old Dominion Invit Norfolk,
VA
The 411
Tuesday, Sept. 28
Volleyball, awav (0-1). f.y4)
Lost to UNC-W 15-6,15-10,5-
15,11-15,15-13
Please . . . No Wagering
Robert Todd, 15 points
TEC Sports Editor
ECU2, 23-21
"This game is a toss-up.
Several key loses will hurt the
Buc s but Chad Holcomb will
be the difference. This could be
the best game of the year
Brian Olson, 21 points
TEC Assistant. Sports Editor
MSU 6, 23-17
"ECU's defense continues
to improve, but Hester gets
banged around again and finds
little time to throw the ball.
This game will be a thriller of
the year
Kevin Hall, 15 points
WZMB Sports Director
MSU 7, 27-20
"The injuries to Tilghman,
Libiano and Leaphart will be
too much for the Pirates to over-
come
Brian Bailey, 15 points
WNCT-TV Sports Director
ECU 3, 20-17
"The Firate defense con-
tinues to come into its own and
the running returns to the Pi-
rate arsenal
Chris Justice, 15 points
WCTI-TV Sports Director
MSU 10, 27-17
"Pirate defense will have
to play great again. Problem is
that it still may not be enough
to win. Pirate offense again will
have some problems moving
the ball
BradZaruba, 18 points
WITN-TV Sports Director
ECU1, 21-20
"Not smart to pick against
the home team
Demetrius Carter, 10 points
ABLE President
ECU1,28-27
"I have faith in my frater-
nity brothers, No. 20 and 25
and I pick us to win in a
thriller
Five points are awarded for
choosing the winner and an
additional three points are
given to the person closest to
the spread (the person clos-
est to the combined score of
both teams settles ties).
Tigers looking for repeat of last year
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
Before the start of this 1993 football season
it could only be expected that the Pirates stand
where they are now, at 1-2. The Pirates return
to Ficklen Stadium after coming off a big loss
to Washington, 35-0, and now are staring in
the face of a Memphis State tenm that is very
similar to the Bucs. It will be no easy task to
reach the .500 mark� the Tigers (2-2) will be
visiting Greenville looking for a repeat of last
year's game in Memphis. ECU received a
beating in the season finale, 42-7.
A big question mark for the Bucs this
week is injuries. The banged-up Pirate team
will come into Saturday's game without line-
backer Mark Libiano and offensive linerren
Terry Tilghman and Derick Leaphart. Libiano
and Leaphart are suffering from knee injuries
and Tilghman a shoulder injury. Theoffensi ve
line will be young and inexperienced from all
of the shuffling.
The Tigers are finding it tough to rebuild
that unique defense of last year. This season
they gave up a whopping 106 points in their
first three games, but upset Arkansas last
week, 6-0. The MSU defense was the third best
in the country last year behind national cham-
pion Alabama and Arizona. Even with such a
powerful defense, MSU only finished with a 6-
5 record last season. They were stingy enough
to only allow 3.6 yards per play. Many key
defensive players were lost last season, but
linebacker Danton Barto is still there with his
See MEMPHIS ST. page 15
Saturday's game against the Memphis State Tigers could put the
File Photo
Bucs at .500 for the year.
Carter abandons
Hoops for Pigskin
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
It is a shame that many foot-
ball players are termed "unin-
telligent" and "all they can do
is toss around a pigskin If a
person met Bernard Carter, he
or she would
probably not
think of him as a
big, mean high-
intensity football
player. That per-
son would prob-
ably refer to him
as a real interest-
ing guy. The
down-to-earth
Carter is a well-
spoken graduate
student who appears to be
headed for stardom with what-
ever career he chooses after col-
lege.
This six-foot-three inch se-
nior from Tallahassee, Florida,
might be the best defensive
player for the Bucs. Many pre-
season football previews have
listed this defen-
sive end as the
10th best in
America. In fact,
there are two
Carters listed in
the top 10 defen-
sive stars. His
younger brother
who attends The
University of
Florida, was
ranked fifth
among defensive linemen in
pre-season polls, according to
Bernard. Carter admits thathis
brother was always the smarter
one of the two and things just
came natural for him whereas,
Bernard would have to work
hard to be a good
student.
Many broth-
ers that are simi-
lar in age usually
like to compete
against each
other but, not
these two.
"We were
not really com-
peting against
each other, like
you see some
other brothers, we always
helped each other out Carter
said. "It wasn't a contest, but
we had little stuff like basket-
ball games. You know, just your
typical stuff
Instead of focusing on foot-
ball during high school, Bernard
enjoyed basketball. He would
dream of playing basketball in
college, not football. He lettered
in basketball three times in high
school. While most kids are
taught basketball by their fa-
ther or friends,
Carter was taught
by his mother.
"My mom is
an athlete, she
never played any
organized sports,
but she taught me
to play basket-
ball Carter said.
"The natural part
comes from my
dad. I wanted to
play basketball in college. I used
to get on my knees at night and
pray so I could be six-four so I
could have enough height so
college prospects could look at
me to play basketball as a guard
or forward in college
Bernard's first steps on a
fcotball field never came until
his senior year at
Tallahassee's Lin-
coln High. He
could never pic-
ture himself in
football pads. He
thought there was
too much contact
and that it looked
much too painful.
The banging
around in the hot
Florida sun just
turned him off. This all comes
from a 6'3 248 defensive ter-
ror.
When basketball was not
going his way, he felt it was
time to give football a try.
"I wanted to score touch-
downs, not play
defense when I
started Carter
said. "When I got
my first sack in the
jamboree, that's
when I liked foot-
ball after that. I
liked playing de-
fense and knew
that's what I
wanted to play
Carter consid-
ered attending
Central Florida (lastSaturday's
opponent) when he was com-
ing out of high school, but de-
cided to test his abilities at a
See CARTER page 15
Tennis shining with McDonald
By Ashley Neal
Staff Writer
Tommy McDonald has a plan
for everything.
"Oncelgraduate I'll play some
satellite tournaments and see if I
can make any money. Then after
that I will have fulfilled my ulti-
mate goal McDonald, co-cap-
tain for ECU'S men's tennis team,
said.
However, if satellite tourna-
ments do not reap many rewards,
McDonald will utilize his degree
in communications for a public
relations position with either a pro-
fessional athletic team or univer-
sity.
Playing competitively since
the age of nine, McDonald was
introduced to the sport by his mom
and dad. In high school McDonald
enjoyed all sports and lettered in
both tennis and basketball, but
says, "It ended up that tennis
was taking me farther than any of
the others
The men's fall tennis sched-
ule consists of tournaments in the
fall and conference matches dur-
ing the spring. During the fall a
formal record of wins and losses is
not kept, enabling players to con-
centrate more on their individual
performance.
"I prefer spring because of the
team concept McDonald said.
"Most of us have been together for
three years-it's close knit. I enjoy
being around that
A two-handed backhand and
"never give up" attitude are what
McDonald considers to be his con-
tributions to ECU tennis. On the
other hand his coach and fellow
players accreuit him with doing
much more for the team.
"Tommy is a hard worker on
and off the court. That transpires
and gives us more confidence as a
team Dave Wallace, a senior,
said. McDonald and Wallace are
roommatesas well as doubles part-
ners. They describe their friend-
ship and partnership as one that
welcomes constructive criticism
and motivation on and off the
Pirates fall to Seahawks
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
The East Carolina volleyball
team took the court at Minges Coli-
seum Tuesday night against the
UNC-Wilmington Seahawks with
hopes of winning their first CAA
match. Although the Pirates fought
hard the entire match, they even-
tually fell to the Seahawks 3-2,
bringing their record to 3-14.
After the game, ECU head
coach Martha McCaskill was
pleased with her team's perfor-
mance.
"We played hard, especially
in the last three games. I'm really
proud of the team though. We had
some unlucky bounces toward the
end,butthat'sallpartofthegame
The first game started off wi th
both teamstradingpointsbackand
forth early. With an exciting and
fast-paced style of play, the
Seahawks tookcontrol towards the
middle of the match, taking 8-4
lead and causing an ECU time-out.
After the TO it was all Seahawks,
as they cruised to a 15-6 victory.
In game two, UNC-W outside
hitter Josie Youngblood led the
Seahawks to an early 8-1 lead with
solid serving. East Carolina called
a time-out and returned to score
five straight points to bring the
score to8-6. The Seahawks followed
the Pirates' lead by calling a TO.
Using good ball-placement on of-
fense, UNC-W jumped out to a 12-
7 lead. Sophomore outside hitter
Melanie Richards helped bring the
Pirates back to 12-10 before
Wilmington eventually scored their
last three points, giving them the
15-10 win and putting the Pirates
two games behind.
In game three, the Pirates fi-
nally got rolling. With the serving
ofjunioroutsidehitterKellyCrowe,
and the ferocious styleplay of fresh-
man Carrie Brne, the Pirates got off
to a 9-0 lead. With the fans going
crazy in the stands, UNC-W was
forced to call a time-out to try to
gain composure. East Carolina
owned the entire game, winning
15-5, with a spike by Mel Richards
to score the winning point. The
Pirates now only trailed by one
game.
East Carolina once again got
off toagood start in gamefour. Led
by middle-hitter Staci Winters, the
Pirates lead early, 5-1. Once again
it was the duo of Carrie Brne and
Mel Richards leading die Pirates,
astheybuilta 10-5 lead before UNC-
W called a time-out. Wilmington
fought back behind senior middle-
hitter AmyChilausky,bringingthe
score to 13-11. With extraordinary
play in the last two points, ECU
went on to win 15-11, bringing the
match to 2-2.
The stage was set for a dra-
matic game five. UNC-W jumped
out early with a quick 3-0 lead be-
fore Seahawk Debbie Taydus made
a crucial error in serving. The Pi-
See VOLLEYBALL page 14
courts.
"Tommys most outstand-
ing characteristic is his depth of
character Coach Moore said.
"He fights real hard on the court
and provides the team with lead-
ership
Beginning his fourth season
with the Pirates, McDonald has
seen several new players become
a part of ECU's tennis program.
This year is no different � ex-
cept that one of the four new
freshmen on the women's team
happens to be McDonald's sis-
ter Beth.
Because the men's and
women's seasons run simulta-
neously, both teams practice and
workout together on a daily ba-
sis. With this much contact and
three years of experience, what
kind of impactwillTommy have
on his sister's game?
"If anything, it will help be-
cause he is here to push me and
I can watch and learn from him
Beth said.
So much for sibling rivalry.
Baseball gets
a quick fix
Assciated Press
Wire Service
Many days ago, major
league owners had most of us
convinced that baseball was
in need of a fix.
According to the czars, the
game was either too tame or
too narrow for the television
generation, and it definitely
lacked a bang-up lead-in to
the postseason. At least that
was what they said on Sept. 9,
when they announced grand
plans to realign the two
leagues into three divisions
each and add a round of play-
offs.
But some funny things
have happened since then.
Sunday night in Montreal,
the Expos were trailing Phila-
delphia 5-4 and down to their
last out. One month ago, the
Expos could have been mis-
taken for road kill, an undis-
tinguished lump among the
many the Phillies glimpsed in
their rearview mirror as they
pulled away from the entire
National League East.
All that changed after
Montreal won 21 of its next
25. But it threatened to change
back agam if Philadelphia
See BASEBALLpare 14

te





September 30, 1993
The East Carolinian 13
n
will feature a bit of e
feature national and local profes-
sionalsteamingv ithamateurplay-
ers.
While the tournament will in-
clude appearances by some fiercely
competitive national players, ac-
cording to ECU golf coach Hal
Morrison, the primary focus of the
event will be having a gixxi time.
"The professional can win
money and the amateur can win
some merchandise Morrisonsaid.
"But the main reason we're out
here is to have fun and trv to raise
some money for the program
Morrison said that this year's
event will host the play of circuit
professionals Bobby VVadkins and
Neil Lancaster, as well as a horde of
local prosand celebrities. Morrison
said that the tourneys held in years
past have been a tremendous help
to his golf program, and the money
raised has helped him recruitqual-
ity players to East Carolina.
Morrison's suggestion is definitelv
supported by his record at East
Carolina as just a short year after
the coach debuted, his Pirate golf
ins Monday
e "u,olt
I987, L988,
�93. Before
arrival, the ECU
id been unable to
� title.
Mi lid that the stricter
emphasis put on recruiting coupled
v ith the necessity of collegeexperi-
for aspiring professionals has
helped him attract the kind of play-
ers necessary for a successful pro-
gram.
"Sometimes it's hard to com-
pete against Carolina and Wake
Forest, vho all have long tradi-
tions. Of course the good ones, ev-
en, school is after, but we've put a
lot more emphasisonworkinghard
at recruiting Morrison said. "That
and the changing of the demands
for professional play has helped us.
College golf has become the feed-
ing grounds of professional golf.
It's like football, you can't go di-
rectly to the pros as easily
anvmoreit's almost to the point if
a kid hopes to play professionally,
he almost has to play in college
competition Morrison said he is
impressed by what he has seen out
of the team during practice and
looks for a lot to come out of this
team. When talking about the up-
coming season, Morrison lists vet-
erans Da ve Coates, Josh Dickenson
and Trey Jarvis as faces to watch on
the Pirate squad, as well as fresh-
man Rob Anderson.
Christenbury one of newest inductees to ECU Hall of Fame
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
The immortal John
Christenbury joins the list of in-
ductees to this year's ECU ath-
letics Hall of Fame.
Christenbury, a 1930 gradu-
ate of Davidson College served
as the head coach of football,
baseball and basketball at East
Carolina Teachers College from
1940-1941. Christenbury led the
Teachers (ECTC's mascot name)
to a 5-3 record in 1940, the
school's first-ever winning sea-
son. The following year,
Christenbury led the Teachers
to a 7-0 record, the school's only
undefeated untied season to
date.
As World War II began,
Christenbury volunteered for
service, but was eventually
killed along with hundreds of
other servicemen in a 1944 am-
munition ship explosion. Fol-
lowing his death,
Christenbury's name was post-
humously given to the gymna-
sium that currently stands on
10th St.
Of all those who loved the
legendary coach, retired Admi-
ral William Greene may be the
most adamant. Christenbury re-
cruited Greene from Brevard
College to play on the football
squad at ECTC and, according
to Greene, Christenbury made
a strong impression on him.
"Besides being quite a
physical specimen, he was a
large man, he was one of the
strongest leaders I've ever
known, both through precept
and example Greene said. "He
never cursed, he never spoke
strongly; he'd give you 16 laps
if you didn't do right, but he
never was abusiveHe was mo-
tivating, caring and reassuring.
When you played for him, you
felt that you were taught, cared
for and raised
When reminiscing about
Christenbury, Greene recalls
one particular trip the squad
took to play Western Carolina:
"We went to Western Caro-
lina on an old, rickety bus and
stopped overnightat High Point
College. We had to stay there,
so Coach said that he was going
to take us to a movie, "The
Hunchback of Notre Dame" That's
the way he was. He was very
generous, but, well, a couple of
us were a little naive and
thought it was a football
movie
Greene said that he be-
lieved Christenbury would be
proud of the direction that
ECU athletics is headed in,
especially in the academic
commitment the university
takes for its players. He also
added that the coach would
have been proud to be a part
of the program's roots.
"If (Christenbury) were
alive right now, he would turn
to Dr. Eakin and say 'I am�
proud of the school spirit and
support shown at ECU' and
then he would commend Dave
Hart and Steve Logan on their
hard work. He would sayI
am proud to be part of the
growth and the beginnings of
this fine football team
Raynor, a former baseball player inducted into ECU HOF
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
The latest list of inductees to
the East Carolina University
Athletics Hall of Fame includes
a "major league" addition in Pi-
rate baseball legend Jim Raynor.
During his career as a Pirate
pitcher, Raynor posted a 17-2
record on the mound and cap-
tured the attention of profes-
sional scouts around the coun-
try after his senior season in
1966.
Raynor joined the ECU
pitching ranks in 1963 as a fresh-
man putting together a 3-0 pitch-
ing record and firmly grasping
a position as one of the Pirates'
top guns for his sophomore sea-
son in 1964. This would turn out
to be Raynor's biggest year as a
Pirate as he would post a 6-0
record and would be named as
an All-State selection.
After falling to an injury in
1965, Raynor would return in
1966 with yet another outstand-
ing season and a chance to play
professional baseball. Raynor
took advantage of that chance
and was drafted by the Los An-
geles Dodgers. Raynor played
in the Dodgers organization for
five years and made the team's
major league roster in 1969, but
a commitment to teaching cost
him a trip to spring training
and an opportunity to play in
the "big league
"I never played there
See RAYNOR page 14
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Special Events
Drop-In Recreation
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Fitness Programs
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(limbing Tower
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NATIONAL SERVICES
There's a whole lot of FUN goin1 on!
Sport Skorts
� Tues Oct. 5 � Volleyball Meeting
� Tues Oct. 19 � Soccer Meeting
� Tues Oct. 19 � Flag Football Qualifier
� Mon Oct. 25 � CoEd Flag Football Meeting
� Mon Oct. 25 � 3-on-3 Basketball Meeting
� Wed Oct. 27 � Bowling Singles Meeting
� Wed Oct. 27 � Trivia Bowl Meeting
5:OOpm
5:OOpm
5:30pm
5:OOpm
5:30pm
5:0Opm
5:30pm
BIO 103
B1O103
B1O103
B1O103
B1O103
BIO 103
B1O103
Men's and women's winners of the Flag Football Quali-
fier Tournament are eligible to compete in the National
Flag Football Championship held in New Orleans, LA.
Facility Spotligkt
WeigLt One Minute '
Christenbury weight Room
Mon. - Thurs 6:30am-9:00pm
Friday 6:30am-6:00pm
Saturday i2noon-5:O0pm
Sunday i:OOpm-5:OOpm
Minges weight Room
Garrett & Aycock Weight Rooms
The Pipeline Pumphouses
MonThurs l:OOpm-8:OOpm
Friday l:O0pm-5:O0pm
Sunday l:OOpm-5:OOpm
Mon. & wed
Tues. & Thurs
Friday
oopm-aoopm
30pm-8:O0prr.
OOpm-5:OOprr.
Natural Life Speoudi oj the Montk
Friday, Oct. l, B.Y.O.B. (Bring Your Own Blanket)
Camp Out on the Mall begins at 9:OOpm
Friday, Oct. 29, B.Y.O.G. (Bring Your Own Ghoul or Guy)
Hayride to Umstead the Haunted House begins at 8:00pm
$1 for a fitness class?
Fitness Class registration for 2nd session begins October 13 - 19.
To sign up for classes held in Christenbury Gymnasium or Garrett
Residence Hall (The Pipeline Pumphouse) go to 204 Christenbury
Gym between the hours of 9:OOam and 4:O0pm. 12 class sessions
cost Sio for students and $20 for faculty, staff, and spouses. Drop-
in tickets are available if you would like to sample several differ-
ent classes at a cost of $5 for students and $10 for faculty and
staff. Participants can choose from aerobics, STEP, aquarobics,
Toning, Belly Busters, Funk, Hi-Lo, and low impact.
Timex Fitness Week: October 18-21
Sunday: -Heavy Hands workout (bring 2 cans of food)
Monday: �Loose & Limber Stretching Clinic
�Club Ped walking Party
Tuesday: -Coach Potatoe entry-level fitness class.
�Blood Pressure screening.
Wednesday: "Aqua-Splash Party.
�21 min. Triathlon.
Thursday: 'Fitness Class Extravaganza
�Lap Climbing at the Hard Roc Tower.
Friday: 'FacultyStaff Friday Fitness Fling.
To get involved in
any of these
programs call Rec
Services at 757-
6387 or stop by
204 Cbristenbury
Gym.
It's Coming

at tfi�
c$5-
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Competition takes place: Saturday,
October 23 beginning at lO.OOam.
Register by Wednesday. October 20 at 5:00pm in
204 Christenbury Gym. Cost in $5 for students, $10
lor facultystaffdependents. $15 for community
individuals.
Fo, �,�� ;��,��� I) R. rs7 am Br pj.k Mp . ,�� (,��� h�(
Saamhr. SO in 2W I U.n.k�. (��
. I






September 9, 1993
Continued from page 12
t arlier in the ninth inning.
tdbailcar-
rst baseman iohn
Nruk s chest and his slide into
first beat Kruk's throw U
pitcher Mitch Williams.
"Impact umpiring takes its
toll again Williams said.
"There s no way in the world
he's .ite. on can't give a team
like them four outs. But he did,
and game over
Needless to say, that's not
the way you want your
ballplayers thinking in the
middle of a tight race. More ap-
propriate would be what Mike
Gallegosaid after New York lost
8-3 to Boston to fall four games
behind the Blue Javs in the
American League East.
After someone pointed out
that the numbers were increas-
ingly stacked against his team,
the Yankees second baseman re-
RAYNOR
rts
i regular
.mt the field
the questioner.
hard to argue with that
kind of logic. Indeed, if base-
ball were logical, Toronto
would have shed the Yankees
and Orioles a long time ago.
And the V lute Sox would have
shed Texas and the rest of the
American League . st by now
as well.
But they haven't. In fact,
Chicago needed a two-run
homer from Robin Ventura �
off Dennis Eckerslev and in the
ninth inning, no less � to es-
cape the clutches of the lowly
Oakland A's and stay 4 1-2 in
front of Texas.
And even that slim lead be-
came posibl eon I v after another
proven closer, the Rangers' Tom
Henke, surrendered a three-run
homer in the eighth inning to
an unheralded Angel � at least
as far as the White Sox are con-
cerned � named Rene
Gonzales.
It gets better. Think the
Braves are home free? Maybe,
Raynor said. "But I got my foot
in the door
Raynor said the experience
he gained at ECU was largely
responsible for his post-colle-
giate success.
"While I was at ECU, I
gained a iot of confidence in my
ability to pitch. It also gave me
the chance to show the profes-
sional scouts what I could do
Raynor, who now lives and
teaches in Clinton, N.C said that
he is honored by the announce-
ment of his selection to East
Carolina's Hall of Fame
"It's extremely difficult for
me to describe how 1 feel. 1 know
maybe not. Most people expected
them to be where they are now in
the National League West � in
first. But most people also ex-
pected them to be leading by
more than they are. And the San
Francisco Giants, whose three-
game sweep of Cincinnati may
signal they are awake and angrv
again, probably know that better
than anvone.
We won't know for certain
until realignment becomes a re-
ality whether it can produceany-
thing as theatrical as this season.
But the guess is that a lot of the
tension will go the way of the
two division setup when the field
is expanded.
The great thing about the
races right now is the grind, the
idea that everybody works so
hard for so long and so few actu-
ally arrive.
The baseball owners need to
grow up and stop bowingdown to
flagrant materialism.The playoffs
suck . . . huh, huh. But pennant
races are cool . . . huh, huh.
Remember: grass will get
you through times of no money
better than money will get you
through times of no grass.
AstroTurf sucks . . . huh,
huh.
Continued from page 13
that there's a lot of words, but
all lean think is very, very good
Raynor said. "To know some of
theHallof FamersI know, it just
makes me very pleased. I know
that there are some great ath-
letes in the Hall of Fame and I'm
just honored to be counted as
one of them
V-BALL
Cont'd
from
page 12
rates and Seahawks battled hard,
alternating points early on. With
an 8-7 lead, Wilmington called a
time-out. They used the TO to
theiradvantageand the Seahawks
scored two points off controver-
sial calls from the umpires. Trail-
ing 10-7, the Pirates kept things
close, and with the score 12-10,
ECU head coach Martha
McCaskill called another time-out.
With the Seahawks up 13-12, it
was up to ECU sophomore
Gwynn Baber to tie the game. Un-
fortunately, tough play by UNC-
W gave them the 15-13 win and
the 3-2 victory in the match.
East Carolina's next match is
on Oct. 1 at Minges Coliseum,
NEWEST BARS IN TOWN
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September 30. 1993
The East Carolinian 15
121 CARTER
Continued from page 12 j
I
entol is touchden
started wrv
indfot
on MSI 'sal
records v. it'l att
two gamesthisseas
The pa;
men ted wit
attack, lliejlT,
Martin andLanv 1
rushed for
and 1 11 Iisl -
vvideoul Isa
532 yards);i i iu
forMatthev. - B"IK ��
has been nithing bu
h.is 2hesfor :
three i"D's
He is aIsoavera
dons .i gaiie. 1vvil
thePirateefenseto
MSU passingllt.lv
the late
m.He
.
� itsspeak
field-goal
2 point after
i he has those
its flving through theup-
� . hil an MSI recordol
I's.
k tor the Pirates to trv and
i ball against a new defen-
hu( staj away from LB
forthe 1 CU defense
� to keepQB Matthews from
tiring out the ball to Bruce and
mtaining running backs Porter
ii d Martin. ITus home game will
ritical for the Pirates to keep the
fi42 voung defense headed in the right
third direction before the) headtoSouth
list with Carolina the next week.
school s defense was very im-
I injus, pressivelastSaturdayagainstavery
talented Husky team even though
n.w the score does not reveal it Wash-
gton had great field position in-
side the Bu 's 50 -HI game. They
revealed immense intensity and
displayed huge improvements
since la t season. New defensive
coordinator Larry Coyer has
aprimetarget brought a much improved defense
s 93campaign to E( L
tasuccess ii It is critical that the Pirates get
345 yards and off to a good start in the first halt"
because the Hgers, under head
coach ChuckStobart, are 16-3 when
i leading at the half. The game will
shutdownthe be televised on the Pirate Sports
k. the risers' Network.
ision 1- - program
arrix ed he w as
redshirted and after that year, he
was onl third sb ing. 1 le consid-
ered heading ba( k to 1 lorida, but
coaches convinced him to stay
because he h o much talent
Bernard not only enjoys on-
the-field football, butvideo games
also. 1 le considers himself just an
ordinary guy who is laid back.
play ideo game- to relax
myself Bernard admitted 'Ijust
got a Sega the other day, so I'm
using that quite a little bit now 1
liked to play the new Bill Walsh
college football game
tarter graduated this past
summer and is now attending
graduate school. He is focusing
on drafting design. He likes to
draw and design machine and
tool parts. Hisdrawing ability can
be traced back all the way to hi-
childhood.
"I've always wanted to
doodle a lot and draw comic book
stuff when I was kid Bernard
added. "1 use to draw superhe-
roes, and Spiderman was my fa-
vorite. I'll draw anvthing 1 see,
landscapes and cars, and make
up mv own carsand superheroes.
When I was young had a friend
in class, and we would draw
everydayday in class, the whole
time instead ot paying attention,
and when 1 got home my little
brother would draw as well, even j
though he wasn't that good, but j
he got good at it I
On the field Bernard Carter is -
a very talented football player
with good speed and instincts
Last season he accumulated s
total tackles, 53 solo tlsacks(the
most in a season tor PC I t.andied
the Pirates with 23 quarterback
pressures.
If Bernard can have a success-
ful season this year, their next
Step for him could be a selection
in next year's NIL draft.
"1 had a pretty good season
last year, but the team didn't do
good Carter said. "If it comes, it
comes. People tell me this and
scouts want to tell you that, and
agents want to tell sou this. But
what it boils down to i how well
1 play this year to determine if I
even have a chance. I'm not going
to sit there and sav I'm going todo
this or going to do that because I
really don't know, 1 could get hurt
tomorrow in practice. If the op-
portunity does come, I want to be
ready fur it and take it
It appears that whatever
course is laid out for Bernard
Carter he will jump on it and be-
come very successful.
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CALL 752-8320 FROM 9am-5pm
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Q. What ECU sport's recruiting class for the
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analyst Bob Gibbons?
s,duAed dippB qoeoo neqiaseq HOB V
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30
THRU
SAEURDAY, OCTOBER 9TH
IF YOU THOUGHT COLLEGE WAS
EXPENSIVE, TRY PUTTING YOURSELF
THROUGH RETIREMENT.
o ,
Think about support ing yoursell for
twenty-five, thirty years or longer
in retirement. It might be the greatest
financial test you'll ever fa e. Fortunately,
you have one valuable asset in your
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Tirm- to take advantage ol tax-deferral.
Time for your money to grow.
But starting early is key. C onsider thi-
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Wait ten years and you'd need to set aside
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J





.
1 he Economics
2 k7U�n plc!u? �fshington smiling exists. Economists believe Washington was
unhappy because he felt he could have received a better deal on war supplies If he used a
C itihank C lassie I ISO card, he would have been assured of getting the best price and probably
would have been happier. (Artist rendering of how he would have appeared on the dollar!
Classic Visa card. How Student Discounts and Price
Protection Contribute tO Upward growth. A variety of facto have been
suggested as contributing to the economic growth of students, including (1) more lottery winners
between the ages of 18 and 22. (2) a 37 increase on earnings from bottle and can returns, (3) more
students doubling earnings in the lightning round of game shows, and (4) the Citibank Classic Vrsa
card. It's this last one, however, that affects most students. 1 The Citibank Classic Visa card offers
immediate savings to student cardmembers. You can save up to 26 on long distance calls versus AT&T
withthe free Citibank Calling Service� from MCI And you can capitalize on a $20 Airfare Discount
for domestic flights.2 Savings on mail order pur-
chases, sports equipment, magazines and music
also abound. Maximize these savings with a low
variable interest rate of 15.43 and no annual fee,
and you can significantly improve your personal
bottom line (especially if one's net income tends
to be pretty gross). Put another way, one might
even have enough savings to reinvest in a CD or two (the musical kind, of course). 10n the way to the
record store, or any store for that matter, take stock of the 3 services concerned with purchases made on
the Citibank Classic card. Citibank Price Protection assures one of the best prices. See the same item
advertised in pnnt for less, within 60 days, and Citibank will refund the difference up to $150.To protect
these investments, Buyers Security" can cover them against accidental damage, fire or theft (ordinarily
causes for Great Depressions) for 90 days from the date of purchase And Citibank Lifetime
Warranty" can extend the expected service life of eligible products up to 12 years; 1 But perhaps the
features which offer the best protection are your eyes, your nose, your mouth, etcall featured on The
Photocard, the credit card with your photo on it. Carrying it can help prevent fraud or any hostile
takeover of your card. (Insiders speculate that it makes quite a good student ID, too.) Even if one's card is
stolen, or perhaps lost, The Lost Wallet" Service can replace your card usually within 24 hours. H So
never panic. As we all know, panic, such as in the Great Panics of 1837,1857, and 1929, can cause a
downswing in a market. But with 24-hour Customer Service, then no reason for it. A question about
your account is only an 800 number away. (Panic of the sort experienced the night before Finals is
something else again.) �n Needless to say, building a credit history with the support of such services can
only be a boost. You're investing in futures-thai future house, that future car, etc. And knowing the
Citibank Classic Visa card is there in your wallet should presently give you a sense of security, rare in
today's-how shall we say?-fickle market. ITo apply, call. Students don't need a job or a cosigner. And
call if you'd simply like your photo added to your regular Citibank Classic Visa card. Here's the num-
ber: 1-800-CITIBANK, extension 19.1 The Law of Student
Supply and Demand states, "If a credit card satisfies more of a
student's unlimited wants and needs, while reducing the Risk
Factor in respect to limited and often scarce rescurces-with
the greatest supply of services and savings possible-then stu-
dents will demand said credit card So, demand away-call.
CLASSIC
U28 0012 3�rSb 1810
unu vHKft ViSA
"�as ft
Not just Visa. Citibank Visa.
�p�
Monarch Notes� Version:
The Citibank Classic Visa card will
be there for you with special stu-
dent discounts, no fee, and a low
rateso your own economy will
be more like a boom than a bust.
Call 1-800-CITIBANK, ext. 19.
nMIMMMMMnii
� m ��





Title
The East Carolinian, September 30, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 30, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.964
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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