The East Carolinian, September 28, 1993







Here's Harvey
Harvey Gantt will be
speaking in the Mendenhall
Great Room today, from
7:00 pm until 8:00 pm. Go
check it out!
Frank Loesser and Damon
Runyon's timeless musical
opens Thursday at the ECU
Playhouse at 8:00 and will run
through Tuesday. See the
preview on page 6.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 54
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, September 28,1993
10 Pages
T-shirt design winner named
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
The Commerce Club
kicked off its 10th anniversary
celebration Thursday with the
unveiling of the new School of
Business tee shirt, designed
through a contest held this sum-
mer.
"The contest was planned
as a logo
ate student and received a de-
gree in graphic design.
The tee shirt contest was
the first event planned for the
anniversary celebration. The
Commerce Club will build its
first float for the Homecoming
parade and then hold a recep-
tion for all seniors and alumni
of the School of Business.
The reception, which will
include a
Speech focuses on
black health issues
The Commerce
Club is one of
the most active
alumni
organizations on
campus.
Photo by Cedric van Buren
Renee Rice designed the new School of Business tee shirt through a
contest held last spring. She won a $100 gift certificate.
and slogan I
contest to
put on mer-
chandise
and market
the School
of Busi-
ness said
data base
manager
Jeff Allen.
E n -
tries were
collected wmmimimmmmi
last April
and jud ged over the summer by
Joanne Kollar from university-
publications, Ernest Uhr, dean
of the School of Business,
Michael Coston, manager of
Student Stores and Steve Jepson.
The Student Store
awarded a $100 gift certificate
to Renee Rice, the winner, and
$25 to each of the six finalists.
All of the entrants received a
free tee shirt.
Rice is currently an MBA
student at ECU. She also at-
tended ECU as an undergradu-
reunion for
many of the
past classes
and a cake
cutting be-
fore the
football
game, is
scheduled
for Oct. 16
from 9 a.m.
to 12 p.m
on the third
mb floor of the
General
Classroom Building.
The Commerce Club is one
of the most active alumni orga-
nizations on campus, with over
900 members. It was founded in
1983 by Phillip Dixon, under
the direction of Dean Uhr, and
has grown steadily for 10 years.
The purpose of the organi-
zation is to develop a strong
relationship between the School
of Business, the community and
the university and to provide
funding for the School of Busi-
ness.
SGA elections to be held tomorrow
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
The Student Government
Association will hold elections
tomorrow for class officers, day
student representatives, dorm
representatives and executive sec-
retary.
The executive secretary is
elected by the entire student body.
All other representatives are
elected by their respective classes
or residence hall.
Freshmen, sophomores, jun-
Grad student
wins scholar-
ship award
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Charles B. Alford, an ECU
graduate student in business, re-
ceived a 1993 National Black MBA
Association Scholarship Award
this weekend in Atlanta.
"I am honored to be recog-
nized in this way with students at
these other fine universities
Alford said. Winners represent
many top-ranked schools includ-
ing UCLA, Harvard and Califor-
nia-Berkeley.
Alford, who will graduate
from the master's program in De-
cember, received $3,000 to be ap-
plied towards his education.
Over 400 students in Master's
of Business Administration pro-
grams across the United States
applied for the scholarship. Alford
was one of the 25 who were
awarded the scholarship based on
his academic accomplishments.
Alford also wrote an essay,
for the scholarship competition,
entitled "Investing in Human
See ALFORD page 2
iors and graduate students will
elect a president and vice presi-
dent. Seniors will elect a presi-
dent, vice president, treasurer and
secretary.
Dorms with fewer than 350
residents will have one represen-
tative, dorms with more than 350
residents will have two represen-
tatives and day students will have
as many as 61 representatives.
Executive office elections
are usually held in the spring, but
due to the resignation of Michael
Carnes, the SGA is holding a sec-
ond election for the office of ex-
ecutive secretary now.
Meredith Howard and
Kristie Hoffstedder are running
for this position.
Meredith Howard is a se-
nior majoring in English and mi-
noring in communications.
Howard has served on the Screen-
ings and Appointments, Elec-
tions, and Rules and Judiciary
Committees and was appointed
to the position of assistant chair
of the Elections Committee.
Howard feels that her good
communication and leadership
skills will help her achieve her
goals of "getting more students
involved in campus activities and
helping to insure that people's
views can be expressed
Kristie Hoffstedder is a jun-
ior double-majoring in history
and early childhood education.
She was freshman vice president,
and has served as chair of the
Elections, Rules and Judiciary and
SGA Publications committees.
See SGA page 3
By Shannon Cooper
Staff Writer
While many Americans
anxiously focus on the Clinton
administration's proposed so-
lutions to health care, one indi-
vidual is focusing on specific
health problems; where they
originate, and why there are so
many medical differences be-
tween blacks and whites.
The Minority Presence Ini-
tiative recently presented a lec-
ture on African-American health
issues, which was sponsored by
the ECU Department of Child
Developmental and Family Re-
lations.
Dr. Norman B. Anderson,
a professor of psychiatry and
psychology at Duke University,
was the guest speaker for the
evening.
He has devoted 10 years
to the study of health issues re-
lated to African-Americans.
His research includes hy-
pertension, cardiovascular dis-
ease, autonomic nervous system
response, cancer and interven-
tion strategies to improve the
health of the African-American
population.
Dr. Anderson, a native of
Greensboro, received his Bach-
elor of Arts degree in psychol-
ogy from North Carolina Cen-
tral University and received his
masters and doctorate degrees
from the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro.
He is a member of several
organizations�the American
Psychological Association, the
Society of Behavioral Medicine,
the Gerontological Society of
America and the Association of
Black Psychologists, just to name
a few.
Anderson is involved in
the behavioral medicine and
health psychology fields of
study.
"Behavioral medicine is a
new concept to people who are
involved in health sciences
Funding campaign
begins for ResearchINC
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
"Research cures. Research
saves lives This is the motto of
ResearcWNorth Carolina, as ech-
oed by Dr. Alvin Volkman, Asso-
ciate Dean for Research and
Graduate Studies at the ECU
School of Medicine.
Dr. Volkman and others
were on hand Thursday afternoon
in the Brody Medical Sciences
Building to kickoff a new fund-
raising � campaign for
ResearchlNorth Carolina, a non-
profit alliance promoting new dis-
coveries in health.
Mayor Nancy Jenkins and
Dr. Thomas Irons, Senior Associ-
ate Dean of the School of Medi-
cine, gave the welcome. Irons de-
scribed the role the medical school
will play in the health research
field.
"We here at ECU have a
unique position to be able to do
something about the lack of medi-
cal research. We have significant
research strengths even though
our primary goal is not to be a
research institution
Irons also pointed out that
more money is spent on Nintendo
games by the public than is spent
on medical research. Volkman
said that only three percent of the
$900 billion spent on health care
goes toward research.
Mary Wooley, President of
ResearchlAmerica, the parent
group of ResearchlNorth Caro-
lina, presented an overview of the
campaign. She asked for more
government spending on health
research.
"Nine out of 10 people be-
lieve more should be done by gov-
ernment. Citizens at the 70 per-
cent level are willing to be taxed
to increase medical research. How
come elected representatives
aren't making sure, as President
Clinton said, that medical research
is truly safeguarded?"
After Wooley spoke, three
professors gave presentations on
their research work accomplished
through grants from the National
Institutes of Health.
Dr. D. Kirk Ways, associate
Professor of Medicine and Direc-
See RESEARCH page 3
Anderson said. "Behavioral
medicine is basically an inter-
disciplinary field, it's a phi-
losophy where you accept that
medical problems aren't just
due to biological factors, but
involve psychological, behav-
ioral, social and cultural fac-
tors, and those factors can be
used in treat-ment
Dr. Anderson's lecture
covered factors that contrib-
ute to the large variation be-
tween black and white death
rates.
Life expectancy, accord-
ing to race and sex, is seven
years shorter for the black
male than the white male, and
life expectancy for the black
female is five years shorter
than the white female.
"Homicide rates are
higher for the black male,
which is primarily true for the
young black male between the
ages of fifteen and thirty-
four Anderson said.
"Are genetic factors re-
sponsible for black and white
differences in health?" Ander-
son said. "I answer that ques-
tion very simply, no
According to Anderson,
we are too mixed up geneti-
cally, and the individual dif-
ferences are more important
than group differences.
Anderson discussed sev-
eral factors that explained the
health differences between
blacks and whites, such as the
socioeconomic status of blacks
and whites compared to their
residential area.
"Living in an impover-
ished area carries with it in-
creased risk for all-cause mor-
tality Anderson said.
Anderson explained that
poor whites don't generally
live in an impoverished area
compared to the number of
poor blacks who generally do.
Comparisons of accessi-
See HEALTH page 3
Ice
cream
anyone?
As the weather
continues to cool
there will be less
people lounging
around outside with
a cold cone. Enjoy
it while you can!
Photo by
Cadric
Van Buren
OPEC agrees to put a cap on production
GENEVA (AP)�Desperate
to force oil prices higher, OPEC
nations agreed today to cap their
surging crude production at 24.5
million barrels a day in the coming
months.
But OPEC Secretary-General
Subroto said the ministers have yet
to set individual pumping limits
for each of the dozen member coun-
tries.
"We have now solved 50 per-
cent of the problem he told re-
porters after a morning meeting of
the Organization of Petroleum Ex-
porting Countries.
The decision to set a new out-
put ceiling for the OctDec. quarter
came after reports that President
Hashemi Rafsanjani of Iran con-
ferred by phone with King Fahd of
Saudi Arabia and stressed the need
for cooperation to drive up prices.
OPEC's excess production
has helped force oil prices to their
lowest levels in three years, with
prices running about $6 a barrel
below the $21 target.
Negotiations had focused on
a new production ceiling of 24.3
million to24.5millionbarrelsof oil
a day for the final three months of
the year. The group now pumps
about24.7 million barrelsaday�
a million barrels over the cap set
for the July-Sept, quarter.
With demand expected to
rise ahead of the winter heating
season in the United States and
Europe, the ministers hope pro-
duction restraint will lift prices.
In the past, thecartelhashad
trouble getting all members to
honor commitments on pumping
levels.
��. in ,n;





September 28, 1993
ground Other
i
ALFORD
Continued from page 1
Students walk in silence
students and faculty members silently marched
sity campus in memory of a student
. four years ago. The silent marchhasbeen
held eni Gray, an Appalachian student, was ab-
ducted and murdered in the fall of 1989. The crowd, which included
a student who was abducted and sexually assaulted bv the man who
murdered Gray, converged on the student center in early September,
w here they listened to speeches they hope will raise awareness and
dispel fears. The Boone, .C, campus has a history of violence.
Gray's abduction took place a block from the campus, and last year
a highly publicized rape took place in a central part of the campus.
While Gray's murderer is on death row, the perpetrator of the rape
remains free.
Heisman Trophy winner returns
After 20 years, a Heisman Trophy winner is back in the classroom at
the University of Nebraska-Lincoln working toward a degree thathe
never received, according to The Nebraskan, the UNL newspaper.
Former Cornhusker wingbacker Johnny Rogers, 42, who was awarded
the Heisman Trophy in 1972, said he regrets not completing the
coursework for his degree, and this time he'll stay in school until he
completes his education. Rogers, a Lincoln resident, is president of
the Omaha-based Malcolm X Memorial Foundation. His education
is being paid for by the Northeastern University Center for the Study
of Sport in Society.
No means no at Antioch University
At Antioch University you better believe it if someone says they don't
want to kiss you. Or hug you. Or go to bed with you. It could mean
your college career. The small liberal arts school, in Yellow Springs,
Ohio, has a sexual offense policy that requires students to give and
receive verbal consent for every act of affection, from touching to
kissing to sexual intercourse. In addition, if an Antioch student �
male or female � fails to disclose having a sexually-transmitted
disease and has intercourse with another student, it could mean a
suspension of three months or more. "Some say we are too strin-
gent said Marian Jensen, dean of students at the college. "But all we
are asking for is that students use respect and common sense The
13-page policy, which was recently revised, covers issues such as
rape, sexual assault, insistent or persistent sexual harassment, non-
disclosure of a known positive HIV status, and non-disclosure of a
known sexually-transmitted disease.
Correction
ECU's Interfraternity Council will hold a meeting tonight at 5
p.m during which time a vote will be taken on any formal appeal
made by the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity in response to last week's
IFC judicial rulings. A successful appeal must gather 23 of the
votes from any attending fraternity presidents.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Capital: Prescription for the Afro-
American Community
"We are very proud of
Charles and pleased about the na-
tional recognition for the LastCaro-
lina University School of Business
said Dr. Ernest B. Uhr, the school's
dean.
Alford graduated from
Not them Durham High School in
1985. Also in 1985, he received the
Durham Rotary Club Scholarship.
His parents are
Janice and
Charles Alford of
Durham.
Before
coming to gradu-
ate school at
ECU, Alford at-
tended Duke
University for
two years before
finishing his un-
dergradua te
work at N.C.
Central Univer-
sity. At Central,
Alford gradu-
ated with honors
and became a
member of Al-
pha Phi Alpha
fraternity. At Duke, he was presi-
dent of the National Associa tion of
Black Students for Educational Ad-
vancement.
"My mother has given me
continued support Alford said.
"She always said, 'You can do it. I
know you can
After graduation, Alford
hopes to land a job with a Fortune
500 company in corporate finance.
Charles B. Alford
He has several companies in mind
such as GE Capital, Hewlett-
Packard and Sony Entertainment.
Alford spoke of a faculty
member who encouraged him to
stick with the MBA program. "Don
Boldt, director of graduatestudies,
has given me general encourage-
ment in the program and he di-
rected me towards the scholar-
ship Alford said.
This past weekend, Alford
was awarded
the scholar-
ship during
the national
conference of
the National
Black MBA
Association.
Over 2,500
people par-
ticipated in
the confer-
ence. The
scholarship
presentation
was one of
many activi-
ties which
took place. A
career fair
was held with
over 100 major corporations repre-
sented by nearly 1,000 recruiters.
Alford felt that the career fair was
a great step towards landing a job.
Alford encourages students
to apply for scholarships, especially
national scholarships. "National
scholarships offer students an op-
portunity to gain national expo-
sure and open a spectrum of op-
portunities Alford said.
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-J2
September 28, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
tat may actually
er against some of
; the black popu-
family character-
; 'portivenetworks
ious participation.
ia oral and psychologi-
iroblems, such as smoking,
alcohol and drug use, were con-
sidered also.
SGA
It has been shown that more
black females smoke than white
females.
Anderson explained that
this may be true because ciga-
rette advertisements are more
prevalent in the black communi-
ties.
Studies have shown that
hostility, depression and blood
pressure (physiological re-
sponses to stress) rates are higher
among the black population.
Anderson explained that
these differences must be looked
at in a socioeconomic status con-
text.
"The increase in hostility
leads to an increased risk of heart
disease Anderson said.
Continued from page 1
"If we can reduce certain comes can be reduced by 30 '
social and behavioral risk fac- Anderson said,
tors among blacks, the black and
white difference in health out-
IIIIIUIIIIIIIIHmiUIIIIIIHIIIINH
Hoffstedder also served as stu-
dent representative to the Faculty
Senate and the Parking and Traf-
fic Appeals Board and was voted
Outstanding Committee Member
of the Year last year.
Hoffstedder considers her
experience an asset and says, "I
would like to see things run
smoothly and effectively with
RESEARCH
more student ideas and less red
tape. I've been on SGA long
enough to know how best to imple-
ment these things
"All members of the SGA
serve as a voice for the ECU stu-
dent population, representing
dorm, day, graduate students and
each class said SGA secretary
Millie Murphy.
"Each member must attend
weekly meetings at 5 p.m. on
Mondays and serve on at least one
committee
The committees have been
divided into Appropriations, Stu-
dent Welfare, Rules and Judiciary,
Screenings and Appointments.
Students can vote between 9
a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept.
Continued from page 1
29, with a current ECU ID. Ballot
boxes will be located at
Mendenhall Student Center, Stu-
dent Stores, the Croatan, Joyner
Library, Health Services Library,
Belk (Allied Health), General
Classroom Building, Jones Cafete-
ria, between Jarvis Residence Hall
and Jenkins Fine Art Center and a t
the bottom of College Hill.
tor of the ECU Diabetes Center,
presented his work on acute leu-
kemia. Ways has discovered a
therapy technique that has fewer
side effects than the old method.
Dr. G. Lynis Dohm, Profes-
sor of Biochemistry, has also stud-
ied diabetics, and has found that
exercise can relieve resistance to
insulin. He advocated funding for
both targeted (project-specific)
and untargeted research.
"We should also let scien-
tists search for knowledge for the
sake of knowledge. That's where
many of our most important
breakthroughs come from Dohm
said.
"Look at the laser, how it is
used to reattach retinas. How was
the laser discovered? By physi-
cists trying to understand the na-
ture of light. No one had any idea
that it could be used in medical
procedures before Dohm said.
Dr. Jacqueline McGinty, Pro-
fessor of Anatomy and Cell Biol-
ogy, talked about the "decade of
the brain " Brain research can not
only save lives, but can make the
quality of our lives better she
said.
Local businessman and
member of the Chamber of Com-
merce Bobby Tripp then gave an
emotional testimonial on how he
benefited from medical research.
Tripp was diagnosed with cancer
in the lymph system in 1984 and
after several bouts with the can-
cer, has apparently fully recov-
ered.
Continued from page 1
Tripp asked the audience to
close its eyes. "Imagine a sunset.
An ECU football game on an Oc-
tober afternoon. A loved one.
That's what you're fighting for
Tripp then quoted a doctor
who said, "It is much more impor-
tant to know what sort of patient
has a disease than to know what
sort of disease a patient has
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Local Officials and Legislators will be preset
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The East Carolinian
ge
Opinion
September 28, 1993
TuesdayOpinion
Clinton's health-care plan
Proposed reform designed to
insure all Americen citizens, offer
more secure coverage
Even if vou don't agree with all of the nuances
and small print featured in Clinton's American
Health Security Act, vou have to admit that the man
has really got it goin' on in terms of focusing on the
issues.
Yes, he started out very badly. Yes, the fight for
gays in the military was embarrassing. And we
can't forget about the North American trade agree-
ment, can we? But last week, President Clinton
presented to America a plausible, workable plan
that could very well improve the country and ben-
efit everyone.
In his speech to Congress last Wednesday night,
Clinton laid out in clear terms what he wanted �
guaranteed health care for all by the end of 1997
without regard to their income or medical status.
And he did this by giving the opposition a choice:
they can either join him in reforming health care or
opt for the status quo.
There are currently an estimated 37 million
uninsured people in this country and the system is
heading for bankruptcy faster than you can say
"Medicare Certainly it isn't too much to ask that
every citizen in a country as advanced technologi-
cally and medically as America receive health care.
Lately, though, you may wonder.
All too obvious is that in an election year, there
isn't a politician alive who wants to look bad. De-
spite deep divisions, two factors lead most lawmak-
ers to predict passage by next fall: Republicans
have an equal stake in seeing something enacted
and lawmakers of both parties fear facing the voters
in 1994 without a final product.
Included in the plan is coverage for treatment
in hospitals or doctors' offices, prescription drugs,
dental work for children, mental health and sub-
stance abuse treatment, outpatient exams, eye-
glasses for children, ambulances, pregnancy ser-
vices (including abortion) hospice and home care,
rehabilitation services and medical devices.
This protects consumer choice and sustains the
quality of care, something often lacking in many
areas of the country. The plan does this by creating
regional health "alliances" that will license a vari-
ety of insurance plans. Washington will dictate the
basic health care package and pay the premiums for
the poor and unemployed.
Clinton pledged to enact the health-care plan
without any new broad-based taxes and he called
for a new tax on tobacco to help foot the bill. Clinton
also acknowledged that his $700 billion, 5-year plan
will be a tough sell. "There can't be any something
fornothingThisisnota free system he said. And
he's right, you know.
The pian is not perfect. And perhaps it isn't
even everyone's first choice. But at least the presi-
dent has skillfully woven a compromise that pro-
vides the blueprint we need to move ahead in the
right direction. It would be ridiculous to think that
the plan that Clinton has proposed will make it �
unchanged� to Congress and then passed into law.
but it's a start.
Under the current system, a person is discrimi-
nated against if they are sick or a have a disease that
they never asked for in the first place. And looking
at it that way, there is something dreadfully wrong
with this country. Kudos to Clinton for bringing a
little humanism back into the American fibre.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham Account Executive
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Tonya Heath, Account Executive
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Karen Hassell, Sews Editor
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Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
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Deborah Daniel, Sh retars
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian
publishes 12.000 copies even Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board The East
Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, w hich may he edited lor
decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
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By Laura Wright

Why ask why?" prompts philosophical thoughts
You know those Bud Dry
commercials? Tin? ones where the
speaker says " why ask whv?" af-
ter asking some prettv intriguing
questions about relationships,
politics, life and so forth? I like
those commercials. They make me
laugh: thev get me thinking.
Nevermind the fact that the un-
derlying message is, "get drunk
and vou won't care why any:
more I still like them.
Why is that?
I've tried that "why ask why"
approach to curiosity; 1 drank a
Bud but for some reason or other,
I was still asking why. For ex-
ample, why was I drinking an
unfamiliar brand of beer? I even
came up with an answer: 1 had
been suckered by a commercial.
After all, I think that it's probably
human nature to ask why when
things don't make sense or when
things don't seem right. So, to the
beer people, I may trv Bud Dry
and still ask why.
The truth of the matter is
that, drunk or sober, there always
seems to be plenty to ask why
about. And not only is it impor-
tant to ask why, it is more impor-
tant to figure out an answer in
order to deal with problematic
situations. Knowing why is the
first step toward change. So pop
open a brewski and let's ponder a
few of ECU's mysteries.
Why is the phone always
busy at the Financial Aid office?
My theory is that it is really off of
the hook. I even dreamed one night
(you can only imagine how many
times I had tried to call there dur-
ing the day) that 1 walked into the
office, leaned over the counter and
saw for myself that the receiver
was hanging from the
receptionist's desk. But to give the
Financial Aid folks their due, they
have always been very nice to me.
I haven't seen my loan yet, but
that's beside the point.
Why is this campus being
covered with concrete and as-
phalt? I think that it has some-
thing to do with those aggressive
squirrels that live on the mall and
shamelessly beg for scraps of my
lunch. The administration has de-
cided that since the squirrels aren't
paying fees, buying books or pur-
chasing parking stickers, grass and
trees should be turned into more
useful things like rec centers. (You
should see those parking ticket
people try to ticket the squirrels
for munching acorns in staff
spaces�it's scarv. No one ben-
efits.)
Why do I think that I've seen
squirrels being ticketed? Because
I'm not feeling well. I think that
I'm running a fever but I don't
own a thermometer so I can't
check. Here's why I think that I'm
sick: germs float around in Gen-
eral Classroom Building�where
I spend about 40 hours a week�
because the ventilation system
doesn't work properly. The win-
dows don't open. The same air
that was in GCB when it was first
built is probably still there now.
Does the phrase "sick building"
mean anything to you?
I'd take a Tylenol but I'm
out. Could I bum a buck so that I
can buv some from Student
Health?"
I'll end by asking: why don't
things change if there is so much
obvious dissatisfaction with the
wav things are? Let's face it, we,
as a student body, are a very tran-
sitory and not-at-all unified en-
tity. Students tend to exist on a
college campus for a while before
they even become aware that thev
are the victims of someone else's
political agenda.
Usually by the time we real-
ize that things smell fishy, we're
about ready to graduate. In theory
at least, those of you that have
beenhereforsix yea rsorsoshould
be pretty ticked off by now. Or
maybe you've gotten the hang of
the "drink, don't think" policy. I
used to think that it was ridicu-
lous that it took students so long
to graduate but now I think that
maybe we should hang out until
the rec center opens since we'll be
paying for it anyway. After all,
1995 is just around the corner.
Or maybe the squirrels will
form a unified front and fight for
their rightsI'm delirious. Time
for a Tylenol.
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Letters to the Editor
Women play large part in their own oppression
To the Editor:
Amen to Laura
Wright's editorial about pag-
eants and the roles women
plav in them. It's about time
that women realize the part
thev plav in their own op-
pression. We'll continue to
be exploited in pageants, as
topless dancers, prostitutes,
in music videos, etc etc.
Women, realize that we must
take a stand and prove to the
world that our brains work
just as well as our bodies.
Women that fall within
a low economic status may
feel the only roads open to
them are prostitution or top-
less dancing. Understand
that you can afford a college
education with government
assistance. Nobody adver-
tises all of the financial help
you can get. But nobody's
stopping you from search-
ing for the answers yourself.
I'm a single parent and
full-time ECU student. No-
body knows better than I that
Clinton is dying to put me
through school so that I can
get off of public assistance
and can become financially
independent.
Unfortunately, women
will probably never be paid
millions to play football.
However, we can go to col-
lege and get a diploma,
which is a woman's best de-
fense against poverty and
the discrimir ation and ha-
rassment tnat come along
with it.
Dana Thiden
Soph omore
Merchandising Major
Insecurity sighted as cause of "Pageant" article
To the Editor:
I'm not positive, but I
think maybe the author of the
articleon "PageantGirls"may
be just a little insecure about
herself to be attacking other
people the way she did.
Whatever the case, she
definitely did not know what
she was talking about nor did
she get her facts straight. First
of all, she mentioned two pag-
eants, the Miss USA Pageants
and the Miss America Pag-
eants. They are two different
pageants (I bet she didn't even
know that). I am only person-
ally familiar with the Miss
America system, so I will fo-
cus on that.
The Miss America Schol-
arship Program is a program
which awards millions of dol-
lars of scholarship money to
voung women every year.
Four areas of competition are
judged: Talent, which counts
for 40 of the total judging,
Interviewing, 30, Evening
Gown and Swimsuit, both
15 respectively. The partici-
pants must also be highly in-
volved in community service
and a platform issue aimed at
improving society. Some will
tackle (to use another football
analogy) domestic violence,
teen pregnancy, illiteracy,
drug abuse, and the list goes
on.
Leanza Cornett, Miss
America of this past year, trav-
eled all over the nation to
speak about AIDS education.
She touched the lives of many
people. Now if you want to
call her a beauty queen, I'll
agree. But I call it inner beauty.
1 know that the actions
of a few can hurt the whole
group, but your generaliza-
tions of "Pageant Girls" are
way off base, and your com-
parison of them to prostitutes
is not only inaccurate but very
rude. I am appalled that such
a story, with such downgrad-
ing comments, was even pub-
lished by a staff person. What
are you, The East Enquirer?
ECU is full of intelligent,
motivated, beautiful and de-
termined young women.
Many of these women have
already been, will be, or are
currently involved in the Miss
North Carolina Scholarship
Program. Maybe next time,
you should get the facts from
the source before you write
such an article.
So whenever vou are
ready for an intelligent, infor-
mative, and factual conversa-
tion, give me a call.
Candy Hudspeth �
Senior
Business Administration
By T. Scott Batchelor
Health plan
presented on
emotional level
It seems, according to President Clinton
and his nattering nabobs of negativism, that
we are in the midst of yet another national
crisis. One wonders how we ever got along
without the president to identify these fester-
ing problems in our society. The crisis du jour
concerns health care in this country, an issue
Clinton eloquently defined and prescribed a
cure for in his speech to Congress last week.
Clinton acknowledged that the United
States health care system, aside from being
"costliest and most wasteful system on the
face of the earth is the best in the world. He
pulled heart strings (the purse strings come
later) with the story of an unfortunate busi-
nessman who has seen his health care pre-
mium "skyrocket" over the last several years.
"And last year Clinton said, "he painfully
discovered he could no longer afford to pro-
vide coverage for all his workers, because his
insurance company told him that two of his
workers had become high risks because of
their advanced age
Laying the groundwork for this kind of
democracy, one network prefaced its broad-
cast of the president's speech with a man who
said his wife had advanced arthritis requir-
ing expensive medical treatments, but com-
plained that insurance for her is either non-
existent or cost prohibitive.
Both of these anecdotes work on an
emotional level to advance the argument for
socializing our health care system; under the
scrutiny of logic, however, they both crumble.
When a person purchases health insur-
ance, or any kind of insurance for that ma tter,
he is insuring against future loss. The risk of
this loss is computed by actuaries working
for insurance companies. Premiums are set
according to the level of risk involved. The
Academic American Encyclopedia says "the
premium charged on the risk must be low
enough to attract a sufficient number of in-
sured people, vet high enough to support the
numbers of probable losses For this reason,
very logically, when the risk of loss increases�
for example, with certain types of dangerous
occupations, lifestyles and, yes, even in-
creased age�premiums can sometimes go
up. Looking at it this way, it seems ludicrous
for a person with a pre-existing, costly health
problem to rebuke the insurance industry for
refusing to insure him. This person doesn't
want insurance; he wants charity.
Trying to purchase health insurance
after you've become sick or injured is like
trying to buy collision insurance on your car
after you've run into a tree. Or, taken to its
logical (and absurd) conclusion, it's like at-
tempting to ta ke out a life insurance policy on
your dead spouse.
If risk elements didn't play a part in
setting insurance premiums or in deciding
who can reasonably be insured, the president
wouldn't be so bent on the idea of partially
funding the new system with a huge tax on
cigarettes. However, if the president is going
to target items that are linked to disease, then
we can look forward to increased prices on a
wide range of items. Big Macs, for example.
Since heart disease is the number one killer in
the country today, and since high-fat. high
cholesterol diets are linked to heart disease,
then we should see a special tax on
McDonald's.Burger King, KFC, Parker's Bar-
becue, Cubbie's the list goes on and on.






MiMMM.WII ri.
Msmf
?tember 28, 1993
-The East Carolinian-
Classifieds
Page 5
For Rent
IQ
ROOMMATEWANTEDtosharebree
s from cam
itLnon p'es, 2 bathrooms
;reat house! Call725-2248. Nan
moker preferred
NAGS HEAD BEACH HOUSES �
weekend or weekly. Very affordable.
Students welcome! Oceanfront and
Ocean view cottages. Call Laura at (919)
261-8417
1 BEDROOM APT. Move in Nov. 1st.
$265 monthly, $265 deposit. 355-5116.
Ringgold Towers
Unit 601 .2 Bdrm
New Carpel & Freshly Painted
Water & Sewer Included. 2 Student Limit
at $290month per student
CONTACT MR. JEBNIGAN AT 1919) 3230415
Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Looking for
mature, responsible female to share 2
bedroom townhouse on 5th St. Non-
smoker preferred. Rent is $390. Call
752-8910 for more info.
ROOMMATE WANTED: To share 3-
bedroom new duplex, 5 blocks from
ECU, washer and dryer. Serious stu-
dent preferred. Rent is $210 plus 13
utilities. Must see. Call Dave at 830-
4030.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share master bedroom in Tar River
Apt. 13 rent, utilities and phone. For
information call 752-8942.
ROOMMATE WANTED: WF student
wants same to share 2BR, 2Bath duplex
on E. 3rd St. $275 12 utilities. Call
830-3885.
El Help Wanted
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING
BREAK TRIPS! Sell only 8 trips and
you go free! Best trips & prices! Ba-
hamas, Cancun, Jamaica, Panama
City! Great Resume Experience! 1-
800-678-6386!
$10-S400 WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! Rush stamped envelope: Pub-
lishers (Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham NC 27705.
AA EARN $5,000Mo. GUARAN-
TEED! FAST Huge money-mak-
ing jobs and opportunities on your
campus. Call today for complete
details. Free cruise! America's 1
Company! 919-929-3139.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All material provided. Send SASE to
Midwest mailers, PO Box 395, Olathe
KS 66051. Immediate response.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENTStudents
Needed! Earn up to $2,500month
in canneries or fishing vessels. Many
employers provide Room & Board &
Transportation. Over 8,000 openings.
No EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!
Male or Female. For more informa-
tion call: (206) 545-4155 ext. A5362.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -
Earn up to $2,000month world
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Carib-
bean, etc.). Summer and Career em-
ployment available. No experience
necessary. For more information call
1-206-634-04468 ext. C5362.
GREEKS&CLUBS: Raise up to$1000
in JUST ONE WEEK! For your frater-
nity, sorority or club. Plus $1000 for
yourself! And a free T-shirt just for
calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 75.
BRODY'S is now accepting applica-
tions for additional Sales Associates
froJuniorSportswear Young Men's.
Flexible 10-2,12-9, or 6-9 scheduling
options. SalaryClothing discounts.
Apply at Customer Service Brody's
the Plaza Monday and Thursday 1-
4pm.
WANTED: Church organist. Salary
negotiable. Call mornings, 9-12. First
Baptist Church, Robersonville, NC
795-3601.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
- Make up to $2000-4,000month
teaching basic conversational En-
glish abroad. Japan, Taiwr t and S.
Korea. Many provide room and
board other benefits. No previous
training or teaching certificate re-
quired. For more information call:
(206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 Ext. P-3712.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to dis-
tribute "Student Rate" subscription
cards at this campus. Good income.
For information and application
write to: Collegiate Marketing Ser-
vices, Box 1436, Mooresville NC
28115.
PART-TIME PRODUCTION ASSIS-
TANT: Person needed for entry-level
position at TV station. Must be de-
pendable and work well with oth-
ers. Must be able to operate camera,
audio, character generator. Send re-
sume to Lori Scott, Production man-
ager, WNCT-TV, PO Box 898,
Greenville, NC 27835. EOE.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
Bring your outgoing personality,
transportation and 35mm SLR cam-
era and become one of our profes-
sional photographers. Noexperience
necessary - we train. Good pay, flex-
ible PT hours. Call 1-800-722-7033
between 12-5pm M-F.
DEPENDABLE person needed to
care for infant in our home. 2 days a
week. 7am-7pm. Nonsmoker. Trans-
portation and references required.
752-8710.
"ANOTHER ME" - Responsible, ma-
ture female needed to assist family
of five weekdays. Cook, iron, babysit,
etc Reliable transportation, refer-
ences and health certificate a must.
Salary and hours negotiable. Call
Janet after 6:00 at 746-6991.
FUNDRAISER: All it takes is a
group with a little energy and a lot of
excitement to earn top dollars in just
one week! Call (800) 592-2121 ext.
312.
FREE ROOM AND BOARD for fe-
male student in exchange for mini-
mal assistance to an elderly lady. 15
minute drive frim campus. Call 355-
3400 or 757-1798.
BRODY'S is accepting applications
for part-time customer service rep-
resentatives. Must display profi-
ciency with mathability to balance
register. Excellent communication
skillsprofessional manner. Flexible
AMAfternoon PM hours. Apply
Customer Service, Brody's, the Plaza
Monday and Thursday 1-4 PM.
WANTED: SOCCER OFFICIALS.
$10 per game. All games played on
Saturday. Call 830-4240.
EARN UP TO $559.89 per week
assembling our products at home!
Amazing 24 hour recorded message
reveals details! Call today! 1-919-243-
1835. Leave your phone number!
CAROLINA ENVIRONMENTAL
PRODUCTS now hiring full-time
and part-time sales representatives.
Call Richard Rabon Tuesday and
Wednesday 758-0645.
ROADWAY PACKAGE SYSTEM
needs package handlers to load vans
and unload trailers for the AM shift
hours 3-7 AM, $6.00 hour, tuittion
assistance available after 30 days.
Future carreer opportunities in op-
erations and management possible.
Applications can be filled out at the
ECU co-op office.
For Sale
ROLLAWAY BED, twin deluxe 6 inch
mattress, adjustable back, new, can't
use. Cost $350, sacrifice at $170 cash.
Call 637-2645.
FERRET FOR SALE. Male, great with
people, descented, healthy, comes with
cage and other supplies-He's groovy!
Call 752-2248.
GOVERNMENTSEIZEDcars,trucks,
boa ts, 4-wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available in your area now!
Call 1-800-436-4363 Ext. C-5999.
BICYCLES, BICYCLES, BICYCLES,
Schwinn, Jamis, Motobocane, Raleigh.
Good names. Good bikes, Good prices.
Call evenings, ask for Cass at 758-7867
or Archie at 752-7669.
BEDROOM SUIT $600, Den set w
dinette $850, glass coffee table $150,
vanity $15, Bike $50. All neg. 355-5116.
ATTENTION WHGHTLIFTERS AND
WATCHERS: Sports supplements at
major discount prices: Cybergenics, Hot
Stuff, Wt. Gain 900, Vanady 1 Sulfate,
Tri-Chromelene, Mega-mass and much
more! For info call Charles at 321-2185.
COUCH FOR SALE! Price negotiable.
In good shape and comfortable. Come
and see. For more information call
Heather at 355-2762.
l-i I .Hi' Mi' K Hmimk, I anlfli
I. iiK r.imk Sls NWriijN Ann11.
uis tji.js ( l-tyhMtty I Mliini! tl.i.ls
Sti'ti'S .M,inrH SIVHK I is I rvink
I Kill Mrs -1 I'liuI itflri 1 II. ni
Mr .lAscrs V.M. -p
FORT HENRYS ARMY NAVY
1501 S. EVANS STREET 756-6781
PROFESSIONAL CARPET CLEAN-
ING priced right for College Students-
call 752-8163 and leave message.
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
(9.278 TOftCS - ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today wtth Visa MC or COD
800351-0222
Or. rush $2 00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave �06-A. Los Angeles. CA 90025
Lost & Found
FOUND: Men's watch, Saturday
night - the 18th at Milano's. Call 752-
1651 after 2 pm to claim.
LOST: Fossil Watch with Brown
Leather band & prism crystal - $20
reward Sentimental value. Please
call 355-8370 after 6pm.
FOUND Mon. (Sept. 20) night by
Wright Circle, young tabby cat. Very
friendly. 756-0843 after 6:00. Tues-
Fri.
LOST: Female Golden Retriever, lyr
& 4mos old. Navy collar & silver
choke chain. Last seen off Woodlawn
park area on 9-13-93. Answers to the
name of Jazmine. Reward offered.
Please call 758-0915.
I7T7T7
Personals
FEMALE KOONTZ FAN - We met in
Fleming laundry room while I was read-
ing Darkfall. Would like to talk to you
again. Promise to be more sociable this
time. Call 931-7923 and ask for John.
DO YOU HAVE A TASTE FOR
TRUTH? Bible Study every Tuesday
and Wednesday. 7:30 PM,
Menddenhall room 242. Drop in on us
anytime. Apostolic Campus Ministry.
gg Greek
TO ALL THE NEW MEMBERS of
Alpha Omicron Pi: Keep up the work.
You're doing a great job. Only a little
bit longer. Love, your sisters.
TO THE SISTERS of Alpha Phi- We
just wanted you all to know that we
appreciate your friendship A friend
is one who walks in your footprints
watching" every step you take. She
walks behind you making sure you
don't make a mistake. A friend is
one who will stick by you when you
are confused. She tries to make easier
and lots of fun, filling each day with
a special kind of love With your
help, we are learning the true spirit
of Alpha Phi and are anxious to be
cornea partof yoursisterhood! Love
always, your pledges.
CONGRATULATIONS to Nix and
Laura Ecklin of the Beta Omega
pledge class in Alpha Phi. Angie
has been selected as president of
Junior Panhellenic and Laura has
been chosen Miss Cotten Hall. We
are very proud of you! Love always,
your pledge sisters.
.
ALPHA PHI: Big-little hunt was so
much fun, too bad it's already done!
The night was full of surprises! We
love all of you! Love, the Sisters.
TO THE PLEDGES: You are all do-
ing a great job, keep up the good
work. Love, the Sisters of Alpha Xi
Delta.
I
DELTA ZETA, KAPPA SIGMA,
KAPPA DELTA RHO - Thursday
night was a blast, and all of the
pledges kept the dance floor rockin
Thanks for a great social and good
luck with your pledges.
PI DELTA FOOTBALL G ALS - You
girls are doing a great job! Good
luck and keep up the hard work!
Love your sisters and pledges.
PI DELTA -OK Girls, have you
found your Misters yet? If not, you 'd
better hurry 'cause Thursday's the
night! Get psyched, pledges- it' s
gonna be great
SIGMA NUcongratulates the mem-
bers of the Nu Pledge class. Bert
Winfrey (Pres.), David Bigelow
(V.P.), Chris Murray (Sec.), Steve
Chen (Tres.), Jimmy Bruni, Travis
Cowen, Mike Edwards, Chris
Gupton, Mike Luck and Brent Will-
iams. We wish you all the best of
luck on your way to becoming part
of our brotherhood.
KAPPA SIGMA, KAPPA DELTA
RHO AND PI DELAT - We had a
great time last Thursday night at the
Elbo! Let's get together again soon!
Love, the Sisters and Pledges of Delta
Zeta.
Announcements
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt
county Special Olympics
is recruiting for volun-
teer coaches in the fol-
lowing sports: soccer,
basketball skills, team
basketball, swimming,
gymnastics, bowling,
power-lifting, and roller
skating. NO EXPERIENCE
IS NECESSARY�JUST A
WILLINGNESS TO WORK
WITH MENTALLY HANDI-
CAPPED CHILDREN AND
ADULTS. Special train-
ing sessions for coaches
will be held. Last day to
volunteer for fall sports
is Sept. 28th. Volunteer
hours may be used as
part of practicum re-
quirements for several
ECU courses. For more
info, contact Connie
Sappenfield at 830-
4541.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Make it official! There
will be an official's clinic
for volleyball on Thurs-
day, Sept 30 in Brewster
D-105 at 5:00pm. Call
Rec Services at 757-6387
for more info.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Center is
running a program
called "Beauty and the
Belief: An Indepth Look
at Catholicism This
program is (1) an inquiry
program for anyone
wishing to learn more
about Catholicism; (2) a
program for Catholics
who may wish to make
their First Communion
andor Confirmation.
For details, please call
Fr. Paul Vaeth at the Cen-
ter, 953 E. 10th St 757-
1991.
WESFEL
METHODIST
PRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Join us on Tuesdays from
12-12:30 pm for infor-
mal worship and
Wednesdays from 5-6:30
pm for dinner and Bible
study. We're located di-
rectly across from
Garrett Dorm on 5th St.
For more info call 758-
2030. GET INVOLVED!
OMICRON DELTA
KAPPA
ODK National Leadership
Society will be outside
the student store on Fri-
day Oct. 1 to answer
questions and provide
information on ODK and
the application process.
Any questions or con-
cerns can be dealt with
by Amanda Hines at 756-
2717.
LEAGUE OF WOMEN
VOTERS OF PITT
COUNTY
League of Women (&
Men!) Voters of Pitt Co.
welcomes all ECU stu-
dents to our member-
ship get-together, 8 PM
Sept. 28, 1993, Willis
Building. Local officials
and legislators will be
present. Info: 355-
3536.
ECU JEWISH
COMMUNITY
The ECU Jewish com-
munity is coming to-
gether to pontificate
and discuss ideas for
this year's activities!
Some of the suggested
outings include: trip to
Washington DC and the
holocaust museum, a
trip to Chapel Hill,
bowling and pizza par-
ties, Jewish social dance
and hip-hop shoe bop.
Come to Hillel and join
in all the fun, Tues.
Sept. 28 at 7 PM in
GCB1005.
DELTA SIGMA
THETA SORORITY
Sexually speaking:
Delta Sigma Theta So-
rority Inc. and the Peer
Health Educators
present a program for
women on how to speak
to your partner about
sex and sexually-trans-
mitted diseases. Tues-
day, Sept. 28 at 7:30 in
room 221 of
Mendenhall. Refresh-
ments will be served.
ECU SCHOOL OF
MUSIC EVENTS FOR
SEPT 28-OCT 3
TUES, SEPT 28 - GUEST
RECITAL: Florida State
Brass Quintet (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8 PM, Free);
SUN, OCT.3 - CONCERT
ON THE LAWN: an event
of the friends of music
and their guests; SUN,
OCT 3, Angela Gomes,
cello, Graduate Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall,
7:00 pm, Free). For more
info, call 757-6851 or the
24-hour hotline at 757-
4370.
GOLDEN KEY
NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY
Golden Key members - it
was great meeting you.
Let's keep in touch! Next
meeting, 7:30, Oct 20,
GCB 3006. VP, Lori-355-
2654.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
SOCIAL WORK
ALLIANCE
Our first social of the
year will be held Friday
Oct. 1 from midnight till
2 AM. That's right - Mid-
night bowling at AMF on
Red Banks Rd. A sign-up
sheet is outside 104
Ragsdale. Please sign up
and encourage alL to
come. This social is open
to anyone interested in
joining our group. All
faculty is invited and en-
couraged to come. For
more info, contact Jason
Shirtz at 355-4598. See
you all there.
ORIENTATION TO
CAREER SERVICES
The Career Services of-
fice will hold an orienta-
tion meeting on Tue.
Sept. 28 at 5 pm in
Bloxton House and Wed
Oct 6 at 3 pm in
Mendenhall Student
Center, Room 221. This
program will include an
overview of services
available to help pro-
spective graduates find
employment, how to
register with Career Ser-
vices, and how to estab-
lish a credentials file.
The staff will discuss
procedures for partici-
pating in employment
interviews on campus.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Bring your own blanket
to the Rec Services and
National Life "Camp out
on the Mall" on Friday
Oct 1. We'll party all
night long from 9 pm -9
am and will enjoy hot
dog and marshmallow
roasts, ghost stories,
volleyball and more.
Register in
Christenbury Gym 204
and enjoy a night of fun
under the stars. Call
931-7748 or 757-6387
for more info.
IH�
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�Al ads must be pre-pald
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
tjmesfreeofcharge. rxetotnelimrbedamoir
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Friday 4p.m. for
Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4p.m. for
Thursday's edition.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled oeforelOa.m. the day prior to
publication however, no refunds will
be given.
For more
information can
757-6366.





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
September 28. 1993
and Dolls' premieres Thursday night
Phot� courtesy of ECU Playhouse
'BottomsUp7
explores dim world
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
In 1950, a musical debuted in
New York City and blew the minds
of theater-goers everywhere. Ithad
everything�a great story, catchv
show runes and a cast of memorable
and exciting characters. Fort)' years
later, Frank Loesser and Damon
Runyon's smash success graces the
stage here at East Carolina.
"Guys and Dolls in director
John Shearin's words, is "one of the
best musicals ever written. This is
one of my top favorite musicals, in
the top two or three. It offers every-
thing you 'd ever want�grea t score,
great tunes, delightful characters
and a perfect story that carries all of
this along
Shearin's notalone in his praise
of this musical that still packs crowds
in wherever it plays. Perhaps the
only true way to do this show jus-
tice is toquote an excerpt from Time
magazine:
"No American musical ever
had a better book or funnier and
more truthful lyrics. And few had
so many catchv, jubilant tunes in
one score. Only a handful have
mined a literary vein as rich as
Damon Runyon's wry stories that
transmuted thugs into thinkers, and
louts into Lochinvars 'Guys and
Dolls' is a fable that romanticizes
hoods and hustlers, touts and
troublemakers into cuddlesome
comicdelights. It rums mean streets,
back alleys and even subway tun-
nels into
twinkly ur-
ban oases of
robust en-
ergy and
great de-
light
East
Carolina
Playhouse
has joined
with the ECU
School of Mu-
sic in this en-
deavortoprovideGreenvillewitha
taste of the Big Apple. A full pit
orchestra and conductor will lead
great showtunes like " A Bushel and
a Peck "If I Were a Bell" and "I've
Never Been in Love Before
When asked the difference be-
tween a musical and a "straight
play, Shearin commented that a
musical requires "a tremendous bal-
ancingact of rehearsal timebetween
dance, music and the book. The
logistical problems is where it's re-
ally challenging.
"Characterizations ina musi-
ca 1 a re not as deep as characteriza-
tions in a play. In a musical, gener-
al!) your characters will have one
to two to three salient characteris-
tics. In a musical, the really impor-
tant stuff is
told in mu-
sic and
dance
"Guys
and Dolls"
will open
Tnursdayat
8 p.m. The
show will
run through
Tuesday,
mmm Oct. 5 with
nightly
showings at 8 p.m. and a Sunday
matinee performance at 2 p.m.
Tickets are currently on sale
at the McGinnis Theater box office
for the following prices: $12.50 for
the general public and $7.50 for
ECU students whopresent a valid
student I.D. The box office is open
Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m staying open until 8:15
p.m. on performance nights. For
additional information, call the
box office at (919) 757-6829
No American
musical ever had a
better book or
funnier and more
truthful lyrics. "
Time Magazine
Striking Distance' casts ray of shame
By Ike Shibley
By Laura Wright
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Staff Writer
The first 50 pages of Jeff
Putnam's Litest m nel, Bottoms Up.
would be a hying experience for
any self-respecting female reader.
Every five pages or so, I had to
suppress the urge toslam the book
shut and throw it across the room.
ou see, the novel's protago-
nist, Gordon Bancroft, an opera
singer fumed raging alcoholic, is
presented asa self-serving lout who
exploits and degrades women in
order to sustain his addiction. And
thataddiction ishuge. This guy can
drink like nobody's business�hide
thecoughmedicineifairdoncomes
over for dinner�yet he can still
seduce anything with breasts be-
cause he looks like a movie star
athlete. Women love him and he
could care less as long as they pro-
vide wine in return for his sexual
expertise. I,onfheotherhand,hated
him. At first, rhatis.
Bancroftsleepson a mattress in
his friend Hilliard'saparfmentand
he latches on to Alice, a divorced
woman with a young son, who
lives upstairs. Gordon assumes that
she is searching for a husband and
he plays upon this "need" in the
hopes that she will feed and care for
him. Alice is only one of seven other
useful females.
.And Gordon drinks. He goes
to work drunk, drinks on breaks
and frits tosed ucea blind co-worker
becauseheb. s" I could stare at her
all I wanted hancroft goes from
job b i job, blowing all of his money
onalcoholandovsterslof all things).
Finally, however, he hits rock-bot-
tom and decides to stop drinking.
At this point, Gordon Bancroft
shows the reader that, yes, he too is
a human being. After Bancroft real-
izes that he is unable to continue at
his present rateof intake, he admits
thathistreatmentof the people that
care about him is deplorable. The
novel proceeds beyond the light-
hearted raunchy antics of a rollick-
ing lush into Bancroft's genuine
struggle to stay dry and to find
some meaning in a world of sobri-
ety.
f It is desperately afraid that
existence is meaningless without
alcohol. With booze, he has some-
thing in which to believe. He says,
even though he feels completely
hollow, "thealcoholsloshesaround
and it sounds like an idea
The man that struggles be-
tiveenplasteredoblivionand mean-
ingJesssobrietyis transformed from
the complete moochjerk that ex-
ists at the beginning of the novel
intoa vulnerableand atfimes lonely-
shell of his former "fun- loving"
self. Itis possible to care about him,
it is possible to forgive him. It is'
even possible to wish him luck in
finding meaning in a world with-
out drink.
But he doubts verv seriously
thatany meaning exists. He begins
to feel "virruous"because "I wasn't
dehumanizing women, I wasn't
sponging" yet at the same time his
suspicions about sobriety are con-
firmed and he says, "I was a cog in
a machineI had come to realize I
could do nothing to stop the ma-
chine
In the end, well, Gordon's life
can t be fixed in a mere 320 pages.
Jeff Putnam even makes the reader
wonder, when Gordon plunges (tf
of the wagon at the end of Bottoms
Up, if some people, no matter how
After seemgwhatTfeFHfwdidfor Chicago
1 was hoping that Striking Distance, the new film
- starring Bruce Willis, might do the same for Pitts-
burgh. Rowdy Herrington, the film's director, comes
from Pittsburgh just as 77k Fugitive's Andrew Davis
comes from Chicago. Unlike Davis, Herrington con-
veys no artistic affection for his hometown
Herrington uses Pittsburgh the way a businessman
would use a prostitute-he extracts the desired
thrill, caring little about the city.
The story Herrington tells could have occurred
in any city. This director utilizes none of the special
attributes of Pittsburgh and leaves the viewer feel-
ing that Herrington has somehow cheapened his
hometown by misusing it so badly. The story in
Striking Distance takes place entirely in the Steel
City, but more of the film looks like it was shot on a
studio lot than on location.
Herrington not only embarrasses the city of
Pittsburgh, he also embarrasses the world of cin-
ema. To think that The Fugitive and Striking Distance
both fit into the action genre d isconcerts one's better
sensibilities. The films are no more alike than Duck
Soup and Forty's, the former being a masterpiece
and the latter a bastardization of an entire genre
Striking Distance concerns a Pittsburgh police-
man named Tom Hardy (Bruce Willis) who testifies
against hisPartner,JimmyDetillo(RobertPastorelli
better known as Murphy Brown's painter, Eldinj
after Jimmv brutally beats a suspect. Hardy be-
Photo courtesy of Columbia Pictures
in
comes ostracized by the force for being a
Not once does anyone on the force
seem to consider that Hardy probably
made an extremely courageous decision
by telling the truth. Only Hardy's father
(thesmall role�and theonly one played
with any credibility�is filled by John
Ma honey) believes that his son did the
correct thing. Hardy Sr. tells his son the
motto that he lives by, and the one used
on the father's tombstone when he dies
in the first five minutes of the film:
"Loyalty above all else, except honor
See WILLIS page 7
�Q " See WILLIS page 7
Bandwagon of bands showcased at O'Rocks
By Daniel Willis
See BOTTOMS page 7
Staff Writer
An interesting musical combi-
nation was featured atO'RocksSat-
urday night. Picasso Trigger, Gee-
zer Lake and Robot played minia-
ture sets.
Robot opened theshowat 11:40.
The crowd was just settling in at the
time. Enthusiasm among members
of the audience was just starting to
increase. On the wall behind the
band a film was shown.
I found myself staring at the
different scenes. It made me won-
der if people were paying more at-
tention to the film or to the music. A
lot of the music seemed to narrate
certain parts of the film.
11 was really hard to distinguish
one song from another. Their music
was very fast, and they fed off of
distortion. Some of the music was
kind of disturbing when it wascom-
bined with the film scenes. Robot
played for, at most, 30 minutes.
The only real complaint that
can be voiced about the show is that
none of the bands played extended
n , �� ��ut uk uanospjayea extended sions w
Don't Run My Life: Campus Recreation Center
sets. The show started too late, and
the breaks between bands lasted an
av erageof 30minutesapiece. In fact,
between the three bands, only two
hours of music was played.
Geezer Lake, a band from
Greensboro, started playingatabout
12:30. They played longer than the
other two bands.
Theircrowdpresencewasvery
evident. The lead singer and saxo-
phonist were nestled back into the
corner of the stage. Most of their
songs consisted of drawn-out ses-
sions which gradually built up in
intensity. But then, when a song
would build up to a climax, the
band would pull back. Then they'd
break into a session that almost
seemed like jazz. In doing this,
they reflected a lot of variety and
covered a wide range of musical
taste.
AfterGeezer Lake, everybody
knew who was coming up next.
Picasso Trigger, a band out of
Chapel Hill, has a reputation for
putting on very enthusiastic per-
Hovv refreshing, how somulat
ing,hou'in'igorafingitmustbewhen
a large conglomeration, a nation, an
infrastructure has its priorities
straight. Life is good that way. It's a
beautiful tiling.
AndlthinkECUhasfmallycome
to its senses and got its act together. I
don't know about you, but an extra
S25 tacked on our tuition per semes-
ter for the next 30 years for a Rec
center is a damn gt x xi idea. Let's see,
that tomes to about oh, just about
19.5 million dollars And the thing
costs what? 18million.Hmm,whata
swell plan.
That, m friends, my babies, is a
thinking man's plan. And do vou
know why I like it? Because I don't
think it matters that our library leaks
and it's rundown and vou can't ever
find books and the on-line system is,
well, unique (but I hear they 're work-
ing on it). And the heck" with the
hundreds of parking spaces this rec
center is going to cost us, dammit' we
need a place to play!
I trust that my point is taken. I've
got a sneaking suspicion that IX I
might not really be a college, but a
business. I mean, how will a rec cen-
ter improve academic standards and
prepare our hearts and minds for the
rigors of that thing we call Ihe Real
World. Pretend with me: we're two
ottersswimrrungpbyfully and hav-
ing fun and splashing when BLAM!
One of us gets shot, leaving the
otherplaymateless. How do you feel7
Sing with me: ECU, ECU. ECU, the
spirit of the East! Maybe all those
library booksand stuff in warehouses
can be put in the rec center. Neat-o
keen-o!
But hey, I could bitchabouthow
oureducationseemstobenotaprior-
itv. but why? They don'tcall it E-2-U
for nothing.
But hey agai n, it's not easv when
vou need to park, is it? Is it easy to
wntea rcsearc) i paperwhen you can't
find a book that the iibrarv says is
there or they charge you for a book
you neverbn wghtbackeventhough
it's on Ihe shelf?
And one more tiling. A truestory
from me to you. It's no secret I run
with the intellectual crowd, so let me
tell you what happened to a good
buddy o' mine in the EDepart-
ment. Well, he needed books for his
students to read. But he didn't know
which books until the semester be-
gan.So,inordertoexpedite things for
his students and hisself, he ordered
the books through a kxral indepen-
dent outlet where the books would
be in in about three or four days. No
problem.
Now, what did our valiant hero
do wrong? He went outside the uni-
versity! He didn't bow down to that
paragonofcapitalistavarice,theECU
Student Store. He didn't want to fill
outoneformperbookandlistsection
numbers et cetera and wait while
they scoured their data banks for the
best price possible on the books be-
fore they ordered them. He didn't
meananyharm.hejustwanted toget
See O'ROCKS page 7
the books quickly! He cares about bis
students! I love him!
Well, the plot thickens. A memo
surfaced, iriedarkscalyhandof"The
Man" had settled upon our hero's
shoulder. Hewasdetained and ques-
tioned mightily. Scary! He had vio-
lated the Umstead Act!
Whatin the world is an Umstead
Act?
I'll tell you what he real! v did he
prevented The Man from raking in
the profits derived from a tremen-
dous mark-up on fifty little o' books,
with retail prices from $7 to SI 3.
Now, does that independent
booksellerenjoya tax-exemptstatus?
I pray thee, hence anon, no way! Is
that very same retailer allowed the
luxury of volume or wholesale pric-
ing so low you can step over it? 1
think not! And did that energetic,
youthful, pensive, caring teacher,
our hero,doanythingvTongin seek-
ing to obtain the books for his stu-
dents in the quickest way possible?
N"o.no,no!Sheesh!Hecrderedthem
i vr the phone for cryin' out loud!
I rv rha I (n campus! This isa placeof
memos, forms and documentation!
Seigheil'
VVhosu tiered 7 Noonesu tiered.
Who's going to suffer when this rec
center blots out Hyperion's warm-
jngravsoteducation?Everyonew ho
comes to college to obtain that most
precu ms ot icons in the free world:
an education.
See REC CENTER page 7





September 28, 1993
The East Carolinian 7
Continued from page 6
� ore i iduse
Kan the 1 ffair between
Tom and o.
I'h, �ry line invoh es
a grislv string of murders that
Hardv was investigating before
being placed on river patrol. Al-
though the police claim that they
have apprehended the murderer,
Hardv knows otherwise, because
dead bodies are still turning up
in the rivers that run through the
CROCKS
mgle-
iurderer
le cops who
turning on his part-
. nces in this film
build d heights. Early in
lm, Jimmy, Hardy's ex-part-
ner, prepares to commit suicide
by jumping off a bridge. Every-
one manages to show up at the
bridge�you would think that
Jimmy sent invitations. Jimmy's
dad (Dennis Farina), a cop, is there
as is Jimmy's brother Danny
(Tommy Seizmore), another cop.
Jimmv's dad also happens to be
Hardy's uncle, because, the best 1
could figure, almost everyone on
the Pittsburgh police force is re-
lated. Of course Hardy also shows
up at the suicide scene and tries to
help Jimmy. But Jimmyjumps any-
way.
To heighten the tension,
Herrington shoots the scene in the
rain to accentuate the dreariness
that surrounds Hardy. The rain
only makes an already flimsy film
soggy.
The ending perfectly fits this
contrived, cliche-filed, overblown,
idiotic film. When the confronta-
tion occurs between Hardy and
the murderer, the killer almost dies
several times and then miracu-
lously arises again to terrorize
Hardy. The killer gets shot, barely
Continued from page 6
avoids crashing his boat into a
bridge piling, barely avoids get-
ting hit by a train, barely avoids
drowning in a ridiculous under-
water battle, and finally gets elec-
trocuted.
This climactic fight drags on
forever as Hardy and the killer
go from a cabin, to a boat, to a
factory and to the bottom of the
river.
Striking Distance stinks. The
film is mired with viciously use-
less violence and unusually bad
taste. This movie comes nowhere
near striking distance of being a
good film.
On a scale of one to 10, Strik-
ing Distance rates a two.
BOTTOMS
Continued from page 6
messed up their lives may be when
they drink,aren'tsomehow better off
smashed out of their minds.
Gordon's pessimism really hits
home when he tells Alice, "in a mass
culture we're all chumps, there's no
way out. Society has become a com-
plex web. You feel free enough while
you walk the designated path. When
you try to deviate you realize you're
caught,something'stuggingatyou
Bottoms Up is the second in a
series of four books about Gordon
Bancroft and it follows By tlic Way-
side which is the story of Bancroft's
former opera career.
Jeff Putnam had a lot of trouble
getting Bottoms Up into print be-
cause initially, publishers were
afraid of such a controversial char-
acterwhoselovehate relationship
with alcohol keeps him from hap-
piness when he's roaring drunk
and when he's dry. This is not a
book for "lightweights
Baskerville: $20 (hard cover)
formances.
Lead singer, Cathy Poindexter,
has a way of demanding the atten-
tion of the crowd. She's frequently
been known to take her shirt off on
stage, and she's always antagoniz-
ing the audience. Unfortunately, they
weren't able to start until 1:40.
When thebandstepped onstage,
Poindexter disgustingly remarked
that they only had 20 minutes to
play. But thev made the most of their
REC CENTER
time. They started out with a hard-
driving version of "Valentine and
once the show started, the confron-
tation also began.
Picasso establishes a jokingly re-
bellious attitude against the crowd.
Throughout the performance
Poindexter threw cans and trash at
the crowd. At one point in the per-
formance, people were doused with
some sort of fluid from the bassist. I
was told that it was vomit, but I'd
Continued from page 6
like to believe it wasn't.
Itwasaveryen tertaining perfor-
mance, even though a couple of fans
mightclaim thatthey weremistreated.
Trigger definitely gained more
support with their belligerent atti-
tude than they lost. Hopefully these
bands can come back to Greenville
and we can get a full lengthed perfor-
mance.
BOOKTRADEK
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When The Man tries to lure you in
with his smiles and his lures of con-
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do what I'd do: run to your nearest
independent business, tell them you
love them, and ask yourself, "Who
runs my life?"
AVAILABLE NOW!
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LOCATED NEAR CAMPUS. NEW. REASONABLE
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-
The East Carolinian
The 411
Friday, Sept. 24
til, away. (2-13)
11-15
Saturday, Sept. 25
Football, away. (1-2)
lost to Washington, 354)
Volleyball, away. (3-13)
beat St. Peter's, 15-11,15-3,15-5
Soccer, away. 3-6 (0-3)
lost to Richmond, 6-1
Sunday, Sept. 26
Soccer, home
Late
What's On Tap?
Tuesday, Sept. 28
Volleyball, home
versus UNC-Wilmington, 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 29
Golf, away
at ODU Sea Scape Collegiate,
Kitty Hawk, N.C
AP Football Top 25
I.Florida St. (58)
2. Alabama (4)
3. Miami
4. Notre Dame
5. Florida
6. Nebraska
7. Ohio State
8. Michigan
9. Penn State
10. Oklahoma
11. Tennessee
12. Arizona
13. Syracuse
14. Texas A&M
15. Washington
16. North Carolina
17. California
18. Louisville
19. Colorado
20. Brigham Young
21. Virginia
22. Wisconsin
23. Auburn
24. N.C. State
25. West Virginia
Sports
September 28, 1993
Buc offense drowns in 'Purple Reign'
Photo by Mary North Davis
Quarterback Chris Hester (8), played well in the first half of Saturday's game connecting on 11 of 20 passes
in the first half. However, he only threw the ball three more times and finished with 99 yards in the air.
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
SEATTLE � ECU'S best de-
fensive performance in two years
was squandered by their worst of-
fensive output since 1980 in a 35-0
loss to Washington.
The Pirates' 103 total yards was
their lowest output since totaling
102 against Florida State 10 years
ago.
It was also 96 percent passing.
Washington's "Purple Reign" de-
fense held ECU to a school record-
low of four yards rushing, prompt-
ing ECU head coach Steve Logan to
call the Huskies' defense the best
he's seen since joining the Pirate
coaching staff. The loss also ended
a 55-game scoring streak dating
back toSept. 17,1988,againstSouth
Carolina.
Washington's offense, spear-
headed by running back Napoleon
Kaufman's 142-yards rushing, to-
taled 288 net yards. ECU had not
held an opponent to under 300
yards since Southern Miss totaled
196 on Nov. 9,1991.
Pirate ruggers win
second straight
By W.W.Ellis
Staff Writer
The Pirate Rugby team con-
tinued its winning ways with a
difficult 19-0 win over the UNC-
Wilmington Seahawks. For the
fourth straight game the Pirates
have shut down their opposition,
but this match was not as easy as
the score indicates.
Bolstered by new coaches and
several British ex-patriots, the
Seahawks threatened the Pirate
goal line constantly. When an
early Pirate score was nullified,
the Seahawks rallied and stormed
back. Again, as they had against
NC State and Carolina, the ECU
ruggers bent, but did not break.
Eventually, the Pirates wore
down their smaller opponents
and began to dominate the game.
"The ECU backs tackled us
in back of the gain line UNC-W
coach JackEvanssaid. "Thentheir
forwards stripped the ball and
started to roll. We did not react as
quickly as they did
The first Pirate score came
when Kevin Loftus found a seam
through the Wilmington defense.
His try was converted bv Richard
"Opie" Moss. Later, Jay Keller
thundered across for a second try
which Moss converted. Up 14-6,
the Pirates had the game well in
hand, but the Seahawks did not
fade away.
The second half proved more
of the same as the Pirates turned
away threats to their linebut could
not finish off the opposition. Af-
ter a series of tackles and short
kicks, wing Chris Patterson
charged downa Wilmington kick
and had it bounce into his hands
with the way clear to the goal line.
Patterson's try gave the Pirates
their final margin of victory.
As part of their new squad
concept, five players moved up
and performed crediblv for the
first XV. Mark Fairchild and Jor-
dan Ashburn had good days at
flanker while Chris Patterson got
his first A side try. On the wing,
Todd Ward covered well and
came close to scoring on several
long kick and chase moves.
After the NC State game,
some ietdown was expected.
UNC-W does not have the man-
power of a State or Duke, but the
match was a crucial league game
to determine the eastern slot for
the Carolina championship.
"We were flat said Keller.
"There will be some changes
made for the Duke game. The
backs have to make the ball avail-
able. The forwards can't run all
the way across the field to see a
back die with the ball
"It was not a spectacular
win ECU head coach Larry
Babits said. "We had problems
on offense but the defense worked
well again. I'm not completely
certain how we manage to shut
down the opposition, but we al-
ways try to pressure them. The
guys know they have to win to
stay in the running for the cham-
pionship . The parts are all in place;
we just need to fine tune them
The Huskies 35 points do
not truly reflect the defensive
effort put forth by ECU. Credit
mostofWashington'spointstoa
floundering Pirate offense. Be-
cause ECU moved the ball past
their own 30-yard line onlv three
times, Washington's average
starting field position was the
ECU 49.
"I saw the beginnings of a
really good defensive unit Pi-
ra te head coach Steve Logan said
"We didn't quit � that was the
only thing positive out of this
game
ECU's running back and
main offensive weapon, Junior
Smith, was held to 32 yards on 24
carries�an average of 1.3 yards
per rush. Smith's longest run on
the day was seven yards and the
impenetrable Husky defense did
not get beat for more than 13
yards in the air.
"It was very frustrating � I
wanted to show my leadership"
Smith said. "I haven't had many
See HUSKIES page 10
Richards shines as soph
Team wins conference opener
By Brad Oidham
Staff Writer
If there is one thing fha t ma tters to sophomore
Melanie Richards, it's taking the East Carolina
women's volleyball team to a new level. The task
is not necessarily an easy one, considering the
team's 1-11 record, but make no matter of that for
now. Because as long as the ball is in Melanie's
court, the changes will come.
The role of being a leader is not new to Melanie
(who prefers to be called "Mel") because she has
been there before. While growing up in West
Henrietta, New York, she lettered in two sports,
playing both soccer and volleyball. It was Mel who
led her high school volleyball squad to a 21-0
record and the county championship title her se-
nior year.
But it was not always an easy ride for her. She
originally started playing volleyball in seventh
grade gym class, and found an interest in the game
from her gym teacher, who was coaching the
school's team. She tried out for the school team
that season, but was cut. Practice and hard work
paid off during the try-outs from that season to the
next. Mel made the team the following season,
went on to play all four years in high school and
has finally ended up here at East Carolina, under
head coach of the volleyball team, Martha
McCaskill.
Mel's reasons for choosing ECU were simple.
First of all, it was located in the South, and second,
she knew that she could make an impact on the
volleyball program. It was always her own desire
that led to her success, and she felt tha t this was the
place for her.
Mel came into this season off an impressive
first year in which she won the ECU Rookie of the
Year a ward for playing outside hitter for the team.
Coach McCaskill assigned her the responsibility of
co-captain this season along with junior Sarah
Laurent. Individual stats are not of importance to
Mel, however, because she chooses to focus on
team goals. One of these goals is to play better as a
team than they did last season. She feels that the
team gets along better this season off of the court,
probablv because of the similarity in age amongst
Melanie Richards
the players, who consist of mainly freshmen and sopho-
mores. This, in turn, produces better chemistry and
knowledge of each other's game on the court. Another
goal for Mel and her teammates is to win the Colonial
ConferencCVChampionship. She feels that every team
on their schedule is beatable. Mel knows that the talent is
there, but feels that the team needs to find a way to make
it click.
Mel wants to pursue a career in child development.
"I figure that since I love kids, and the fact that there will
always be kids around, there will always be jobs some-
where out there for me But, as of now, the priority is
bringing the team back up to a winning record. Mel feels
that the students can help the team achieve this goal by
coming out to cheer them on. For once Melanie Richards
and this young Pirate team become older and better, the
future is sure to look brighter.
Ladies looking good Women runners miss first-place finish
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
The East Carolina women's
soccer club began its conference
season on Sunday bv defeating
Fayettevillle 2-1. The two teams
played to a 0-0 tie last season,
and both teams were looking for
a victory to start the season. ECU
was a little slow out of the box,
and Fayetteville had a couple of
early scoring opportunities that
goalkeeper Jaime Pierce turned
away.
The first score came with 26
minutes gone in the first half.
Junior forward Jill Metzger
headed a Toni DeRose cross into
the back of the net to give the
Pirates a 1-0 lead. ECU mounted
another good attack, but were
unable to finish it, and at the half
the score remained 1-0.
The Pirates began the second
half very lethargically, and
Fayetteville capitalized on a de-
fensive mishap to tie the score at
1-1. ECU made a substitution,
and the new players' energy was
contagious as the Pirates began
to get back on track. With just
over 10 minutes left in the game,
sweeper Jodi Rittenhouse made
a quick run, and crossed the ball
to Jennie Haines who fired a shot
on goal. The shot was denied, but
Amy Warren was there to put the
rebound awav and put ECU up
2-1.
For the remaining 10 min-
utes, ECU was able to keep the
play in Fayetteville's half of the
field, largely due to solid plav in
the middle of the field from
Maureen Corcoran and Kerri
Griffiths.
"This is a good win for us to
start the season ECU coach
Doug Silver commented. "I think
the league play will be a lot more
competitive than it was last year,
and I hope that our team is readv
to respond to the challenge
The Pirates travel to Wilm-
ington this Sunday at 2:00.
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
East Carolina's cross country
teams continued their season last
Saturday afternoon inGreensboro.
The women finished just four
points out of first place versus
Georgia University, and the men
placed a more-than-respectable
fifth place.
"It was a great race with three
teams having a chance to win it
assistant coach Charles Justice said.
"Georgia has a strong team, as does
Furman and once again our girls ran
extremely hard
Three Lady Pirates ran their
personalbestsduring the meet. Dava
and Tara Rhodes continued to pace
the team with times of 18:15 and
18:17, respectively, good for fourth
and fifth place. Meanwhile, senior
Catherine Norstrand was putting
together her all time best with a
19:31, bringing home 17th place for
ECU.
Not to be outdone, Stacy Green
ran Saturday afternoon despite a
nagging injury that just won't seem
togoaway. Shecameinat 12thplace
in the meet with a time of 19:12.
"Stacy showed her courage
running in spite of an injurv Jus-
ticesaid. "YetshTJ recordedagood
time
The rest of the Lady Pirates
once again displayed excellent
teamwork in running together as a
pack helpingeach other along. This
makes for encouraging signs head-
ing into the championship meets
coming up in October.
"Once again the rest of our
girls ran as a strong pack, so it is
really hard to single one out Jus-
See X-COUNTRY page 9
Rec Services fitness week starting in October
(RS) � Come join the fun at
Recreational Services' 5th Annual
Timex Fitness Week on Oct. 17-22.
What is a fitness week? The Timex
Fitness Week, sponsored by Timex
and Ocean Spray, now ei icompasses
over 300 colleges and universities.
The mainpurposeoftheFitness Week
is to highlight overall fitness and get
peopleinvolved inactivities, trynew
thmgsandmainly tojusthaveagood
time. Recreational Services has been
a part of this event for four years and
has proven to be a greatsuccesseach
year.
A feature event of the Fitness
Week is the Flea vy Hands Workout.
In this everjrrtieipante wipe re,
quired tobongtwojcanaoifiQad or
thetoningsessionofanaerobicsclass
and afterwards will donate the
canned foods to a local organization
to promote AIDS awareness. Other
fitness events will include a Loose
and Limber Stretching Clinic, an
entry-level couch potato workout,
an Aqua-Splash Party, a Fitness
Class Extravaganza and a Faculty
Staff Friday Fitness Fling.
Jtecreational Services wi 11 also
host a variety of Speaal Events
throughout the Fitness Week. In-
cluded events will be a ClubPed
Walking Part Blood Pressure
See REC SERVICES page 9





�mf �
September 28, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
Continued from page 8
i
:nuiri�
to improve with each meet we am
Justice said.
"Our freshmen are way ahead
of where wemought that thev would
be at this critical point in the seas m
coming into the CAA and NCAA
REC SERVICES
Pirate
Also
�. asMike
. 9 4,good torWth
nolly continued to
at ior us. placing 13th, and
that w as not very far off of the lead-
er ustice said. And Mike jollev
is pn ving himself to be a pleasant
su rprise by running a personal best
On the whole, the team has rea-
so: i to be optimistic headinginto this
weekend meet at the MethodistCol-
lege Invitational and the more im-
portant meets in October.
ECL FINISHERS
MEN
TIME
L3. SEAN CONNOLLY
2b:2o
30. ERIC ADAMSKI
27:42
39. MIKE IOLLEY
28:04
46 1ASON GIBBS
28:23
52. LARRY LEWIS
28:41
61. JASON ADAMSKI
29:49
WOMEN
TIME
4. DAVA RHODES
18:15
5. TARA RHODES
18:17
12. STACY GREEN
19:12
17. CATHERINE NORSTRAND
19:31
22. CINDY SZYMANSKI
20.12
25. KELLY HANNA
20:33
26. MEGAN McGRUDER
20:50
27. JESSICA MONTGOMERY
20:54
40. DARCY EDMONDS
21:52
49.RAHHAGILL
22:25
Continued from page 8
screenings, a 21-min. Triathlon and
LapClimbingattheHardRcKClimb-
ing Tower. "Basically, wejust want to
promote well-being Tmong the stu-
dents'explainsRecreationalSen'ices
fitness coordinator Kathv Hill. "We
hope this week provides students
withan opportunitv to get acquainted
with good health and fitness and
hopefullv begin to start their own
programs as a result of it. After all,
now is the best time to start, espe-
cially when it's free
Students will have an immedi-
ate opportunitv' to apply their new-
founded fitness knowledge when
Recreation Services fitness program
beginsits "Just Do It" club from Oct.
25 to Nov. 19.ThiscToss-training chal-
lenge invites students to participate
in at least four different fitness activi-
tiesa weekfor four weeks. Participat-
ing individuals log daily activities
and turn in completed information
on a weekly basis. Individuals who
meet the Cross Training Challenge
are eligible to win a t-shirt. "We
thought that the Timex Fitness Week
would bea greatcomplimentto the
"Just Do It" club program because
students will immediately be able
to start their own program based
on what they learned throughout
the Fitness Week explained Ms.
Hill.
So, come start vour fitness pro-
gram at the Timex Fitness Week in
Christenbury Gymnasium and take
advantage of the many programs,
classes and prizes that will be given
away, including Timex watches,
Ocean Spray drinks, t-shirts and
more. Have some fun, some exer-
cises and take a break. For more
information, call Recreational Ser-
vices at 757-6387.
to the first 100 people to come to
tonight's 7 o'clock Volleyball match in
Minges Coliseum with a copy of their
favorite paper� Tlie East Carolinian!
BuylGetl Free
Mini-Sundae
HANK'S HOMEMADE ICE CREAM
316 E. 10TH ST GREENVILLE, NC
758-0000
EXPIRES 101593
Limit 1 per customer. Not valid with any other promotion.
McGinnis Theatre (Corner of Filth and Eastern)September 30, October 1.2,4 and 5,1993 at 8:00 p.m. October 3.1993 at 2:00 p.m. Call - 757-6829General Public: $12.50 ECU Students: $7.50
CveryTuesday
Atlhrv
�All we'll drinks and domestic beers are only
$1 all night long
�Anyone who comes in the door between
9 and 10:30 wins afreet-shirt
�This ad gets you in free between 9 and 10:30
or$loff the cover after 10:30.
Don't miss $1 night this Tuesday at the Greenville Hilton Inn.
J� GreenviUe Jeans and T-shirts allowed.
5jjj��Astep above the rest.
INN 207 SW Greenville Blvd � 355-5000
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU I
ECU STUDENT UNION
ECU STUDENT UNION
ECU STUDENT UNION
ECU STUDENT UNION
ECU STUDENT UNION
LORENZO'S OIL
SEPTEMBER 29
& OCTOBER 3 PG-13
EL MARIACHI
OCTOBER 6
BENNY & JOON
SEPTEMBER 30
- OCTOBER 2 PG
WATERCOLOR & STILL LIFE PAINTINGS
SEPTEMBER 26 - OCTOBER 23
OCTOBER 4th, RECEPTION AT 7:00 P.M.
MENDENHALL GALLERY
CULTURAL AWARENESS FAIR - OCTOBER 7th
11:00 A.M. - 1:00 P.M. ECU STUDENT STORES
JOYCE GREAR
STORYTELLER
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7th, 8:00 P.M.
SOCIAL ROOM
MENDENHALL FREE '
I
All films start at 8:00
and are FREE with
valid ECU I.D. for
students, staff,
and faculty.
-BARRY DRAKE-
70'S ROCK MUSIC, "THE GOOD,
THE BAD, & THE UGLY"
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19th, 8:00 P.M.
HENDRIX THEATRE MULTIMEDIA PRESENTATION
For more information
about these events,
call our ECU Student
Union Hotline
at 757-6004.
M
J
TUDENT
OVERNMENT
SSOCIATION
FALL ELECTIONS 1993
VOTE ON SEPT 29, 1993 FOR THE
CANDIDATE OF YOUR CHOICE
9 AM-6 PM
Positions Available:
1. Dorm Representatives
2.Class Officers
3. Day Student Representatives
4. Executive Positions: SGA Secretary
VOTE IN THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS:
'S ATTENDANCE
AS OF
92693 1,142
1. Mendenhall
3. Crodtan
5. Beik Building
7. General Classroom
9. Bottom of College Hill
2. Student Store
4.Health Science Library
6. Jones Cafeteria
8. Joyner Library
10. Between Jarvis & Jenkins
BRING YOUR STUDENT ID &
MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
Any Questions Call 757- 4726
-





September 28, 1993
Continued from page 8
Tlu
ceand
to put
oints
on the
katotalol 115yards
ime.
Pirates offense was in
- onl opp
i the board.
facing third-and-15
L' ! 2-yard line, Washing-
ton u as called for a face mask, giv-
ing the Pirates' dri e life. Halfback
JerriMcPhail caught the ball t ice
tor first downs and mined the Bucs
across the 50-yard line. A 13-yard
reception by flanker Morris 1 et her
broughtECL to the Husk) 36-yard
line and on the next pla Washing-
ton linebacker Hillary Butler hit
quarterback Chris Hester causing
him to fumble.
Linebacker Andy Mason reocn -
ered the ball on the FX U 40-yard
line, but a penalty against the Pi-
rates moved the ball to the 25- yard
line. 1 he Buc defense held the Hus-
kies, forcing them to attempt a 37-
yard field goal with 18 seconds left
in the half. Ihe kick sailed wide
right, and ECU went into the locker
room down only 13-0.
In the first half, Hester com-
pleted 11 ot 20 passes tor 90 yards,
but threw only three more rimes
during the game while Smith had
two yards on 11 carries at halftone.
Jerris McPhail found earl success
in er me middle, catching five pases
for 31 vards before, but that was all
the receiving he would do after
THURS: Hit the Beach
with Atlantic Avenue
Live Beach Music! Free
Admission 8-12
FRI: Open House Party
DJ EZ Tee � Best in
Dance Music � $3.00
Cover Charge
OPEN HOUSE
DANCE PARTY
COMING OCT. 9
Iff! Of HEAVEN
CLASSIC ROCK'N ROLL
COVER $5
2 1 2 Sfevvar Pkwy,
Washhgfon, NC � 9A 6-7855
20 m.ies East of
Greenvfle on 254
n ihe minus
i e that s not
to be
�; the drown-
unfi ur min-
� � the third quarter Wash-
ton recovered a fumbled snap in
end one for a touchdown.
It was . "il loud and the de-
fense called shift and the center
snappedit'saidl lester "Myteam-
mates couldn't hear what I was
saying, especial!) in the shotgun. 1
was screaming at the top of mv
lungs and the linemen said they
couldn't hear me
After the nap was fumbled an
offensive lineman knocked the ball
into the end one where Mason
smothered it for six points. Going
tor two, Washington quarterback
Damon Huard rolled oft a diving
Reggie Robinson for a 21-0 lead.
Washingtondid not score again
until midway through the fourth
quarter. Starting at the ECL' 34, a
six-yard pass to fullback Matt Jones,
an ECL personal foul and four car-
ries tor 1-1 yards by running back
Napoleon Kaufman brought the
deficit to 28 points.
Two plays into ECU's next
d ri ve, Hester, a freshman, threw his
third interception at the Pirate 23-
vard line. Washington marched the
ball to the 3-yard line on tour plavs
and faced fourth-and-one. Bono
Brj ant ran up the middle and was
metbv linebackers Morris Foreman
and Robinson The first down was
awarded after the spot bv the offi-
cials, and two plavs later fullback
Richard Thomas pounded the ball
into theendone for their last points
on the day.
1 he Pirates gained 17 vards of
total offense in the fourth quarter
and were negative in the rushing
i iuntil I imon'v ilson fought
i- wa for a three yards with tour
ti s before the final gun.
l 7 b 8 14 � 41
ECU 0 0 0 0�22
First Quarter
VU: Napoleon Kaufman, 1-vard
run (Hanson kick). 10:48. l)rie: 7
plays, 48 yards, UW 7, ECU 0
Second Quarter
UW:Jason Crabbe, 30-yd field goal,
8:25. Drive:7plays, 28 yards, L'W 10,
ECUO
UW: Crabbe, 25-yd field goal, 5.
Drive: IS plavs, Ml vards, UW13,
ECUO
Tliird Quarter
UW: Andy Mason end zone
fumble recovery, (Huard run),
11:17. UW 21, ECUO
Fourth Quarter
UW: Kaufman, 3-yard run (Hanson
kick), 8:41. Drive: 5 plays, 34 vards,
8:41. UW 28, ECUO
UW: Richard Thomas, 1-vard run
(Crabbe kick), 5:50. Drive: 7 plavs,
23 vards. UW 35 ECU 0
lumbles-lost 2-2 2-0
Penalties-yards 15-115 7-80
NTs-yards 1-8 3-12
Punts-yards 10-376 7-248
AVG 37.6 35.4
PuntRet-yards 0-0 6-79
KORet-yards 7-82 1-21
TimeofPoss. 2S:24 31:36
3rddownCon. 0-13 6-17
Sacks-yards 1-8 2-2h
PLAYER STATISTICS
Field goals. L'W Crabbe 2-2 1 30,
UW Hanson 0-1.
ECU rushing. Smith 24-32, Wilson
3-4, Blanton 3-4, Foreman 1-3,
McPhail 12
UW rushing: Kaufman 25-142,
Brvant 13-26, Jones 4-10, Bjornson
1-2, Thomas 2-2, Neal 2-0,
ECU passing 1 lester 12 of 23 tor mm
vards, 3 INT
UW passing: Huard 12 of 23 for 102
yards, 1 INT, Bjornson 2 of 5 for 11
yards.
ECU receiving: McPhail 5-31,
Letcher 3-36, Crumpler 2-19, A.
Williams 2-13.
UW receiving: Shelley 5-59,
McCarthy 2-20, Jones 2-16,
Redmond 1-6, Kralik 1-5, Bruener
klIlllIIIISIIltllllllllllllllllllllllllftirj
ELECT PETE DONAHUE
VICE-PRESIDENT GRADUATE SCHOOL
� SGA Day Representative'92-93 E
�Appointed SGA Chief of Staff '93-94 E
VOTE 9 am-6 pm; Wed, Sept 29
ALFRE,
NEW YORK STYLE
I �
s

2 large , large i pitchers oil nSEL,
one topping i one topping j beer i li a e.
Pizzas pizza Sun. Mon. Tues ,5th
$10.991 $5.99 !$1.99i7"r�s2
'til midnight j'til midnight I'til midnight
ALFREOOS ALFREDO'S I ALFPEOOS
TEAM STATISTICS1-5, Hill
ECUUW
First Downs 1021Kickoff 12:31 p.m. End 3:30
Rushing 111p.m. Total Time: 2:59. Temperature:
Passing 6666 Wind: 4 mphout of N. Weather:
Penalty 3 Rushing Aft 334Sunnv
49
Gained 66189Bring a copy of The
Lost 62 Net 414 175East Carolinian to
AVG .113.57tonight's volleyball
Passing Att 2328match at 7 p.m. in Minges and receive a
Comp 12 5214 50
Net 99113FREE GATORADE
NTs 31
Total Off Plays 5877SQUEEZE
Total Net Yards 103288
AVGPlay 1.83.7BOTTLE!
Return Yards 891
ATYTir ' Thjn Undefeated. Undisputed1
Al II IL rvi:lr r-� Thanks For Voting Us
1 VOMedY Tne "Best Place To Hear Live Music"
�&-UB A 209H5thSt. � JONP 19871988198919901991 19921993
Gretnville,NC " GREENVILLE TIMES READERS'POIL
ttm �n)SfD
Tues Oct 5
7e &0H,9ielt4,
$12 in
Advance
special guest:
QUEEN SARAH
SATURDAY
Wed Sept 29
Hie COMedY W& H
Dean fiaiiies: Comedian
Thurs SeDt 30
Zag Man Zig
w special guest
Wild Men from Borneo
TRI-HEADLINERS
James Lee Ree.es
Ml IdllHovs $1 SO Mis;ifu�
Fri Oct 1
The Back Doors
I
Mire Relies: Veatrilequisi
Sat Oct 2
The Gibb Droll Band
East
yarolina
Playhouse
1993-1994 Season
trunk Ixiesser. Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows'
Tom Award Winning Musical
G�
�f�
September 30, October I, 2, 3�, 4 and 5, 1993
Alhol Fugurd's
1988 Winner for Best Foreign Pla
THE ROAD TO
AlECCk
November 18, 19, 20, 21 22 and 23, 1993
Carlo (ioldoni's
llelicious, .am Renaissance Comedy
Tlje Servant of Two Masters
February 10, 11. 12, 13. 14 and 15, 1994
Brian Friel's
Tom Award Winner for Best Pla
DANCING
AT LUGHNASA
March 24. 25. 26. 27. 28 and 29. 1994
Fast Carolina
I anu Theatre
April 21. 22. 23. 24. 25 and 2ft, I�W4
Matmee dates with ,t 2 IM) p.m. curtain
All other dates are evening shiwv with an H;0O pm curtain
McCinnis Theatre1
Individual n. kcis to (H YS AND DOLLS go nn sale one neck prior to
.ipcninj; ai JU so lor die General Public md $7 50 tnr ECU Students
Season ticket! ire availabh ai $37.30 until October 5, l'W
Charge by phone:
(919) 757-6829
or, Bv Mail:
last Carolina Playhouse
East (Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858
ir. Come B:
McGinnis rheatre
Monda) Frida)
mi 00 .mi until 4:00 pm





Title
The East Carolinian, September 28, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 28, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.963
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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