The East Carolinian, September 23, 1993






I Awareness
Shotglass
ege and
Shotglass
ime? Check
z.
Lifestyle
Keep your head down!
Greenville area residents can
now take their frustrations out
via Paul Shaw's exciting new
See story on page 6
Paint ball.
Today
J High 80'
Tomorrow
Vol. 68 No. 53
The East Carolinian
Circulation 12,000
�����iMMMZl, l rsday, September 23,1993 10 Pages
IFCjletermines PIKAs acted as a group
ML. nA � , Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Three PIKAs await the Interfrajernity Council's judicial board decision
to determine involvement of the fraternity in the Sept. 9 fight.
By Maureen Rich
Assistant News Editor
ECU's Interfraternity
Council (IFC) judicial board
handed down several disciplin-
ary rulings to the Pi Kappa Al-
pha fraternity Tuesday night.
The board listened to witnesses
and "PIKA" representatives and
reviewed videotape of the
Ficklen Stadium fight that oc-
curred d uring the ECU-Syracuse
game on Sept. 9.
ECU officials determined
early last week that ECU's
Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity
was not involved in the fight,
and they were released from any
responsibility, said IFC execu-
tive vice-president Noland Mat-
tocks.
"After Dean Speier's in-
vestigation, it was his determi-
nation, after reviewing film, and
talking to people that Sigma
Tau Gamma was not involved,
except as victims said assis-
tant dean of students Dr.
Michael Schardein.
"We were not involved in
the fighting said Chad
Bornstein, vice president of fi-
nance for Sigma Tau Gamma.
"It was not a fra ternity-against-
fraternity fight. It was non-
Greeks in a Greek section
According to Mattocks,
several individuals were seated
in a section reserved specifi-
cally for Pi Kappa Alpha frater-
nity members. Anthony
Andujar, president of PIKA,
confronted the individuals, and
a fight ensued.
The IFC met Tuesday
night not to determine who
threw the first punch, Mattocks
said, but to determine the in-
volvement of Pi Kappa Alpha
members.
"We had to determine
whether this was a group mat-
ter which would bring disci-
plinary action against the en-
tire fraternity, "or whether it
was just individuals involved
in the fighting Mattocks said.
"We do not deal with individu-
als
The IFC judicial board,
consisting of four fraternity
presidents and Schardein, de-
termined that the fraternity did
act as a group, Mattocks said.
Fraternities are brought
up for judicial action i they
are involved with conduct that
brings discredit to the univer-
sity andor the fraternity sys-
tem Mattocks said.
"Once you join a frater-
nity he said, "you don't just
represent yourself, you repre-
sent the entire fraternity in all
that you do.
"In the board'seyes, there
were more people doing wrong
Nigerian civilians hold key to politics
By Jason Williams of the conflicts in West Africa � ��
the seriousness of the people
doing wrong outweighed the
few individuals that were try-
ing to stop the fighting
After lengthy delibera-
tion, the IFC judicial board
came up with six disciplinary
measures to be followed by the
PIKA fraternity for the remain-
der of the fall '93 semester.
In an effort to curtail fu-
ture incidents, IFC asked the
PIKAs to sponsor a speaker on
alcohol awareness, to which
Mattocks hopes all ECU orga-
nizations will be invited.
"We need to learn to
drink responsibly Mattocks
said. "We need to teach that
violence is not the answer, and
that you are accountable for
your own actions
Pi Kappa Alpha was also
fined $250, which will be do-
nated to Greeks Advocating -
Mature Management of Alco-
hol (GAMMA).
The PIKAs will not be al-
lowed to tailgate at the next
three home football games re-
maining this semester, Mat-
tocks said, and they will clean
up the areas where people tail-
gate after those three home
games, if ECU agrees to this
arrangement.
For the rest of this semes-
ter, the PIKAs will be on social
probation, which Mattocks de-
scribed as a restriction from
holding any formal parties to
which a sorority is formally
invited.
However, the PIKAs
will be allowed to participate
in Homecoming, Mattocks
said.
Finally, the Pi Kappa Al-
pha fraternity is restricted
from intramurals.
"The PIKAs are a very
strong fraternity on this cam-
pus Mattocks said. "We're
not trying to close down this
fraternity, but they con-
ducted themselves wrongly
they'll think next time
"I feel that a fraternity
needs to be responsible for its
fraternity members at a group
function Schandeir said.
"The. decision of the
board was a decision of
PIKA's peers. I think they
rendered a fair and very ap-
propriate decision you can't
be involved in this type of
behavior
"I appreciate the IFC
making a thorough investi-
gation into this matter, and
taking a stance on this, which
should send the message to
other Greeks that such inap-
propriate behavior will not be
tolerated said Ronald
See IFC page 3
Byjason Williams
Staff Write7
ECU received a progress re-
port Tuesday on the political situ-
ation in Nigeria from a man who
has experienced it first hand. Dr.
Oyediran Oyeleye, a former pro-
fessor of international studies at
ECU, gave a lecture entitled "Po-
litical Brinkmanship, Nigerian
Style
Oyeleye began his speech
by attributing his topic to his work
at the Brooklyn Institute, where
he has been studying the nature
of the conflicts in West Africa.
He attributed the rise in con-
flict to four factors: (1) unequal
distribution of resources, (2) dif-
ferential access to power, (3) com-
peting definitions of what is just,
what is right and what is fair and
(4) the push and pull of different
identities such as religion,
ethnicity and class. "These fac-
tors can give rise to conflict within
communities, within states,
within nations and among na-
tions Oyeleye said.
"The proposition I want to
explore is this: When the political
leadership of a nation is in the
hands of civilians, whatever the
nature of the conflict, the likeli-
hood is that when the situation
gets to the brink, the citizens will
know how to compromise and
move away from the brink
Oyeleye said. "Where the mili-
tary occupies political power,
they move closer to the brink and
create a bigger crisis
Oyeleye said that since the
British ended their colonial occu-
pation in 1950, Nigerian politics
has been dominated by tour ma-
jor national conflicts, all demon-
strating his original proposition.
First came the constitutional
crisis of 1951. "The essence of the
constitution of 1951 was to give
Nigerians the right to take part in
the legislative arm of the govern-
ment he said.
At this time a deep division
between political parties in the
northern and southern regions of
the nation dominated the popu-
lar assembly. Sensing they had
the strength to win an election,
both parties asked for indepen-
See NIGERIA page 3
Jostens sponsors
service grants
Fulbright Grant recipient plans for Yemen fain
BWvureenRlch After years of hard work and at ECU. u- , ,
Assistant News Editor
Edward F. Prados is the right
guy. He has the right background,
the right grades, the right inspira-
tion, the right project and he even
speaks tiie right language. And he
gets a trip to Yemen because he is,
well, right!
After years of hard work and
dedication toacademics, Prados re-
ceived theFulbrightGrant, a schol-
arship which enables graduate stu-
dents to visit foreign countries for
research purposes.
An honors program gradu-
ate from theCollege of William and
MaryandformerresidentofYemen,
Prados completed graduate school
Game group tickets reinstated
at ECU.
"Edward was such a won-
derful candidate for this, because
he did the right things not specifi-
cally to get this award, but because
he'sintellectuallycurious'saidDr.
David Sanders, director of ECU's
honors program.
"He has studied abroad, he
knows the area, he knows the Ara-
bic language, he's interested in a
field that's not overly-populated,
he's come to the right school for
that field, and he wants to go to
the right place
Prados presented a proposal
to the Fulbright committee in which
he outlined a plan to pursue under-
See FULBRIGHT page 2
(S.I.D.) Group ticket plans
for the remainder of the 1993 East
Carolina University football sea-
son ha ve been determined, f ollow-
ing discussions with the Division
of Student Life and the ECU Ath-
letics Department.
Group ticket pick-up privi-
leges will be reinstated for the re-
maining three games on the sched-
ule. However, all seating in the
student sections, will remain gen-
eral admission by section in the
Sections 12-17, as was done for the
Central Florida game on Sept. 18.
This plan allows students
privilege to submit group lists in
the same manner as previously
done on Mondays of home game
weekends and pick-up tickets on
Wednesday of that week. If stu-
dents want tosit together they must
arrive to the desired seats in the
stadium together. There will be no
saving of blocks of seats.
School officials were pleased
with the proper utilization of game
entrances, aisle ways and seating
areas during the Central Florida
game.
For the remainder of the
games, students are encouraged
toarriveearlyand utilize the games
designed for student entry (Gates
5,5A, 6 and 1) to avoid long lines
upon entering the stadium. Gates
at Ficklen Stadium open two hours
before kickoff. This will also assist
in avoiding congestion on stair-
ways and aisle ways.
Groups identified through
the Division of Student Life that
See TICKETS page 3
I need
a job
Mike Carlson
(left), of
Perdue
Farms talks
with senior
Tom Morris
(marketing
major) at
Business
Career Day
held on
Tuesday,
Sept. 22.
Photo by
Cedric
Van Buren
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
The Jostens Foundation
and the Campus Outreach Op-
portunity League (COOL) will
give away 10 grants up to
$2,000 each for students to de-
velop and implement commu-
nity service projects.
The program, called "The
Big Idea is designed to
encourage college
students to get in
volved in the
short-term com-
munity service
projects.
COOL is pro
viding the grant ad-
ministration and
technical assis-
tance, and the
Jostens Founda-
tion is providing
funding.
Jostens Founda
tion Manager Mary
Leonard said they
are providing
these funds be-
cause, "We be-
lieve that college
students hold the
key to revitalizing
the nation's focus on grass-
roots volunteerism, and we
think it's important to give the
students access to the funding
that will help them transform
their ideas into actions
COOL's executive direc-
tor Kristin Parrish said, "We're
excited about this partnership
with Jostens because COOL is
committed to creating oppor-
tunities which support stu-
dent social entrepreneurship
through training and techni-
cal assistance
The 10 winning students,
collaboration with the
in
greater community, will de-
vise an innovative project
that displays a sensitivity to
cultural differences, could be
replicated in other campus
communities, involves other
students, and shows a clear
connection to major and ca-
reer objectives.
A completed
application must
include a cover
sheet summariz-
ing your "big idea"
in 200 words or less,
a project description
and time-line, an in-
dividual learning
plan explaining
how the project re-
lates to your major
and three ways you
will judge the success
of your project, an esti-
mated budget and a
letter of support
from a commu-
nity or school of-
ficial.
Because
students are re-
rT�,r quired to tie their
projects to their
career objectives, partici-
pants will gain valuable
work and life experience that
may help in the job market,
as well as helping their com-
munities.
Applications are avail-
able on campus through rep-
resentatives from Jostens
College Ring Division or by
calling 1-800-433-5184.
Applications are due by
Nov. 19 and winners will be
notified bv Jan. 21, 1994.
Projects must be completed
by June 15, 1994.
BJ i mimuuuii
j .��ml
te





September 23, 1993
HOiuses
Train crash kills at least 38
'�oilmenexp


academic
g i�partm
will :
A
nt reci
at will be
jcords Ae-
14,000 asso-
lon bachelor
and
00'J profes-
378,000 master's degrees 4! 10 irate
sional degrees in medicine theok�g and law Average spending
pertull-rimoequivalentcolleci tisforecasttoreach$15,900,
up 23 percent since 1983-1984. Public college spending averages
513.400 per student; for private Mil!egos,speiuiing averages S24
Women dancing with women a no-no?
A courttry-and-western dance class instructor created a brouhaha
by telling a University of New Mexico stu 'lent that the school had
a policv that women can't dance with other women in the class.
The class, which attracted manv women, was offered by the
physical education department for one credit with the intent to
teach students how to dance in social situations, according to the
Daily hobo, the school newspaper. The instructor, Jim Calvert,
made the comment to graduate student Jn Cornell. He later said
he did not intend to discriminate, but wanted to keep the ratio of
men and women even so traditional roles could be practiced in the
classroom.
Mandela offered honorary doctorate
African National Congress founder e!son Mandela mav be
offered an honorary doctoral degree by the University of Florida,
for his work in human rights in South Africa. There are some
behind-the-scenes discussion on the matter, said Peter Schmidt,
director of the Center for African Studies at IT. "It's in delicate
negotiations right now. We haven't heard vet Schmidt said. A
formal invitation will be sent to Mandela if he is interested in
accepting. Mandela was nominated bvSehmidtand Distinguished
Sen-ice Professor Carlton Davis a vear ago, and negotiations
began shortly thereafter. Mandela spent 27 years in a South
African prison before being freed.
Correction �
The Interfraternity Council canceled a hearing it had
scheduled for Monday. Sept. 20 to hear testimony from Sigma
Tau Gamma concerning the fight that took place at the ECU-
Syracuse game on Sept. 9. Sigma Tau Gamma is not facing
any formal reprimands.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
�iVia (AP)- -An
iinjumpe kson
day trapping passengers in a sub-
tnd killing at least 38
ithoritiessaid.
Fifteen others were missi ig
�oat Guard I errj Officer
David Schmidt.
It was the deadliest crash in
story of Amtrak, created in
the nation's long-dis-
tance . - gei trains. Sixteen
peopleut-re killed fan.4. NS7,inan
Amtrak crash in Chase. Md.
All three engines and four of
the eight cars on Amtrak's Sunset
I imited derailed just alter 3 a.m in
a remote,swampvarcaon north-
ern outskirts of Mobile, Amtrak
spokesman Clifford Black said in
Washington. Two of the derailed
cars were passenger cars, he said.
FULBRIGHT
Survivors reported that a fire
that erupted from the derailed en-
gine and the collapsed bridge ham-
pered their efforts tosaveother pas-
sengers.
The train had gone into the
. ate said Cliff Hurst of London.
11 was burning but the bridge was
down. We couldn't get there to give
any help. There was no way you
could get to it
1 le and others said they man-
aged to pu 11 some passengers out of
the water.
"People started to emerge
from the carriages in the water
said Bnan McConnell of Ayrshire,
Scotland. "1 just tried to give some
of them a hand. Nothing spectacu-
lar. It was all I could do
One of the train's fourpassen-
gercars was completely submerged.
Water at the site is reported to be
about 23 feetdeep, the railroad said.
Continued from page 1
water archaeology in the Red Sea
and theCuif of Aden. He also plans
toanalvze traditional shipbuilding.
"In this held ou get to do a lot
of things Prados said. : ie folds
" the prospect of the unknown" the
most intriguing aspect of his hi hire
plans.
'A'ou don't know w hat you're
going to find Prados said.
Whatever Prados dixs dis-
cover will be or vast importance to
future archaeologists, as no one has
ever worked in that area of the
Middle Fast before. Prados said.
While Prados' plans to leave for
Yemen come as a timeh birthday
present, he still does not know e-
actlv where he will conduct his re-
search. The Department ot Antiq-
uities in Yemen iscurrentfy review-
ing Prados' listot 12 proposed sites.
"Yemen is right on a cross-
roads Prados said, "so the gov-
ernment is concerned about thestra-
tegic security
Prados' futuredependsonhis
findings in i emen, which he hopes
(�eventually publish. When he fin-
ishes, he must present a report to
CAROLINIAN Ki
Chapter 4
EBU, or East Beersborough
University, looked like most other
colleges in the country. However,
being located on the border of the
Brewery and the rest of
Beersborough, it had an odd mix of
students that came into these hal-
lowed halls. And an even odder
mix of professors.
As I walked through the cen-
tral campus mall, I got mv fair share
of long looks and stares from the
others on campus. Guess thev don't
see a lot of guys walking around
wearing a trenchcoat and fedora in
the middle of September nowadays.
At least not at EBU, where Septem-
ber is usually hotter than anv hell
the Devil could create.
I was headed to west campus,
where I hoped to get some clearer
answers than the ones the Guru
had given me. I didn't think it would
be too much of a problem; I was
going to the guy who was sup-
posed to know all the answers,
wasn't I?
The Professor.
I walked into the Professor's
second-story office, not stopping to
admire the decor or listen to the
secretary who was trying to stop
me. As I stepped into his office, he
stood up from his desk and ex-
tended his hand. "Mister Ham-
mered, what can I help you with?"
he said, confirming his reputation
of knowing everyone who came on
this campus.
"Just a little matter, shouldn't
take too much of your time I shook
his hand and sat down before he
could get a chance to come from
behind his desk. The Professor had
an annoying habit of standing too
close to people when he talked to
them. Guess it had something to do
with his height.
He sat down behind his desk
and laced his fingers together. The
fluorescent light reflected off his
glasses and cropped head of gray
hair, doing nothing to hide the
shrewd way he looked at you.
"Come to talk to me about Al Cohol,
haven't you? Well, it's about time.
Anyone in the Brewery should have
The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one tmtd on your wallet
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
VSLH where a man can forget his troubles and drown his
jEKSln wife sorrows for a while.
CjSJ-A "N" Mc Hammered had sworn never to set foot
gnf in-0(Q fM inc Bravery again. Setting out to
yP$rf p frkad Al Coho1' x k finds hints,
1 ' " r'i$' i11 th seedy and fermented zixyrld of t)
" � Every Thursday in Tlie East Laroll man, Wick
will meet a character who will expose Al in a whole new light. When it s finally
�kyi�and done with, Mick�and the reader � will befaced with one of the most
important questions either has ever faced.
What place does Al Cohol have in my life7
his old
neck
ewerv.
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tougjh, omparahle to
Spillane's Hammer and Hammett's Spade. "
Joel Keggsy, I he Beersborough Gazette
EAST
CAROLINIAN
told you that college students know
everything about Cohol, and I
know even thing about college stu-
dents
You know, I was getting tired
of everybody knowing what I was
doing before i did. The Professor's
smug attitude didn't help much,
either, if you're so smart, Profes-
sor, then tell me what this guy
means to students. If you can
"Oh, 1 can. He means a lot to
my students, too. You should see
the statistics. On second thought,
why don't you do me a favor and
look at the stats on your wav out?"
I got the hint and the statistics.
I d never liked statistics, too
wordy and boring. As I was walk-
ing back through campus, though,
I learned that the Professor was
right � students did know Al. Real
weil, too.
� 98 of 2,2e8 incoming fresh-
man had never been arrested for
DW1 DU1 (driving with Al).
� 22� reported never using
alcohol in the last year.
� During the past year, 72
never drove a car while under the
influence.
� During the past year, 86
have never been taken advantage
of sexually or have taken advan-
tage of someone sexually.
� 50 reported using Al six or
less times in the last year.
� 56 have never done some-
thing they later regretted because
Of Al.
� In the last year, 44 have
never experienced a hangover af-
ter a night out with Al.
Even students knew more
about Al than I did I'd had enough
of being second-guessed and
played for a patsy. That's gonna
change right now, with my next
stop.
I had to get more, I had to go
ku k to where I'd first met Al and
drank with him so manv times. I
had to go back to Burt's.
i Statistics provided by Dean of
Student Development, ECU, from a
study of freshmen students in sum-
mer of1993.)
BIT'S
04L 5 FUST.
752 b9bi
AVAILABLE HOW!
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS
LOCATED NEAR CAMPUS. NEW. REASONABLE
RENT, INCLUDING FREE WATLRSEWER, MINI-
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BLOW
WOUT
OF THE
WEEK
the Fulbright Commission, as well
as to several other benefactors.
The Fulbnght Grant is very
prestigious in that applicants must
fulfill many specificareasof achieve-
ment and purpose. While there are
as many as 4,000 applicants each
year, roughly 700 grants of various
denomination are awarded.
"You have to have a project
Sanders said. "You have to be a
mature senior � thev don't let
undergradsgo
Students also benefit from a
high grade point average, Sanders
said. "A tour-oh is alwavs helpful
The preparation for applica-
tion takes a good six months, ac-
cording to Sanders, and the appli-
cation itself is a lengthy document.
Sanders said that so far this
5 ear no one hascome forward to see
him about the Fulbright Grant, or
two others, the Truman award and
the Rhodes award. The Truman
award isgeared toward college jun-
iors interested in public service, and
the Rhodes award sends well-
rounded . athletically-inclined indi-
viduals to stud y m Cdbrd, England.
Blind
Melon
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September 23, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
Continued from page 1
Mattocks said,
mmend to the
thai PIKA's
i -ed "
a Alpha remains
universit suspension, Mat-
OKe tocks said, and group seating is
said still a withheld privilege.
h nt Matt pj Kappa Alpha appeal
rheonlj people that is a possibility, Mattocks said.
can our charter are the and a successful appeal must
nationals. ' gather two-thirds of the IFC ju-
"We can't take anyone's dicial board's votes in order to
NIGERIA
o erruleand 'or reduce the pen-
alties
According to Andujar, Pi
kappa .Alpha plans to pursue
an appeal.
I feel that the penalties
given were excessive and not
designed to prevent any future
incidents Andujar said.
Andujar also said Pi kappa
Alpha is presently working on
disciplinary action within the
fraternity.
Continued from page 1
dence from the British.
Fearing defeat, Northern
leaders wanted to split the coun-
try into two parts, but the British
intervened and mediated talk be-
tween the sides that eventually
led to Nigerian unity. "I'm sug-
gesting it was possible to come to
a compromise only because civil-
ian politicians were in charge
Oyeleyesaid.
Oyeleye called the second
crisis the federal election crisis of
1964-5. The first true election in
Nigeria was held in December of
1959, and again the participants
were from the North and the
South.
"The election was looked at
as a way of rescue from the North-
ern leaders because there were
more people in the other regions.
The North disputed the census,
however, and commissioned an-
other one which allowed them to
win Oyeleye said.
As a result the president re-
fused tocall on the Northern lead-
ers to form a government. Oyeleye
cited political pressure frombusi-
TICKETS
ness and religious leaders who
rose to power, plunging the na-
tion into civil war.
"The civil war lasted 3D long
and terrible months, and millions
of Nigerians lost their lives. The
fact that military leaders would
not compromise led us to a civil
war. They know nothing about
compromise Oyeleye said.
Oyeleyedated the fourth cri-
sis from June 12, 1993, to the
present. A disputed election left
the Nigerian government in anar-
chy and a general strike, but the
trade unions paralyzed the
economy.
"In Juneelections were held,
and they were the cleanest, free-
est elections ever held in Nigeria.
For the first time in history a South-
erner had been elected President
of Nigeria Oyeleye said.
The ruling party of the North
annulled the elections on June 23
and called for new elections the
next month.
Ironically, Oyeleye said the
refusal by the U.S. government to
accept the results of the elections,
announced on June 1 I, made the
elections possible. " It helped a lot.
In fact we wouldn't have even had
and election. The military govern-
ment would havecontinued with-
out an election
"Right now we don't have a
government. We have people who
occupy positions. But effectively,
we don't have a government
Oyeleyesaid.
Oyeleye concluded on a
positive note. "The elections
helped us a lot in the fight for
democracy in Nigeria. Within the
next few weeks, the legitimate
government may take over
Oyeleye is currently travel-
ing in North Carolina on a visit
from Nigeria. He is scheduled to
return to his native country in a
couple of weeks, where he will
continue as a political science pro-
fessor at the University of Lagos.
Sponsors of the lecture were
ECU's African Studies Commit-
tee, theofficeof international stud-
ies and the departments of politi-
cal science and geography and
planning.
Continued from page 1
were involved in inappropriate be-
havior at the Syracuse game on
Sept. 9, will not receive group privi-
leges for the remainder of the sea-
son. Additionally, as dictated
through the Division of Student
Life, individuals identified in the
same manner will lose ticket privi-
leges as well.
Evaluations of student seat-
ing will be on-going and meetings
with student leadership, like those
that have occurred over the previ-
ous two years, will continue this
spring.
The meetings will continue
to of ter open communication in an
effort to continue receiving stu-
dent input in evaluating and de-
termining plans for future football
seasons.
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�Iflfe,
'





The East Carolinian
Opinion
September 23, 1993
ThursdayOpinion
Rec Center increases fees
By Laura Wright
Pageants rate women on meat market standards
Future Student Rec Center will
raise student fees, take valuable
parking space
W hat would you do with $18 million?
ECU is building a new Student Recreation
Center. Kinda says a lot about how much stock
Americans put into relaxing, doesn't it? What-
ever happened to just going outside, or to the
country, and simply taking a day off? Noooo,
we're so technologically advanced that we spend
millions of dollars on the fine art of unwinding.
There are (as alwavs) more than a few things
about this center that just aren't right. Let's go
through them, shall we?
Most important of all is the fact that the
center will cause an increase in student fees by $75
to $100 per semesteror the next 30 year. This is per
student, per semester for the next 30 years. For
this kind of money the darn thing better be paved
with gold and the walls bedecked with Dali origi-
nals. The amount of money that will be spent on
this thing is just sickening.
And why is it that this same money couldn't
go towards the refurbishment of Jovner Library?
Why must we vote on bond money towards an
establishment that is crucial to our advancement
as students and we're expected to pay for a build-
ing that most of us will never use (opening is set
at fall '95)?
"For the good of the university thev keep
telling us. Well, are you just going to sit there and
take that?
This same rec center fee will go into effect as
of this spring semester, 1994. So next semester, on
your ever-sky-rocketing tuition bill, you andor
your parents will be gazing upon an absurdly
increased student fee.
Welcome to bureaucracy.
The Student Rec Center was decided on and
passed into law by people you don't even know
(and done very quietly, too). And thev actually
expect us to be happy! Sure, we hear about the ills
of Jovner for years, but�surprise!� a new rec
center, and we're supposed to get down on all
fours and thank the administration. Richard
Brown, vice chancellor of business affairs, says
the center is one of the top in the country like
our students deserve Well, thank you Mr. Brown,
but don't you think we deserve a decent library,
too?
This is not to say that it won't help the
university to have a new rec center. Obviously,
since one of the top five things a gradua ting senior
looks for in a college is its sports facilities, this can
be helpful with recruitment and selectivity.
Eut in the age of empty promises and hollow
ideas, ECU decides to build an aesthetically pleas-
ing structure that will do just that�look nice. It
doesn't house new periodicals or journals, it
doesn't have office space for new teachers and it
certainly doesn't have classroom space to handle
the influx of new students. But, hey, it's got squash
courts! And in the end, isn't that what's impor-
tant? Nevermind about classes and the real rea-
son that we're here at ECU (to learn, you fool).
What we have is a nice place to take our minds off
things.
To top it all off, this dandy of a building will
sit smack dab on top of the parking lot between
Mendenhall Student Center and Green Dorm. A
brilliant way to solve the parking problem.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
VVes I inkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hasstll News Editor
Maureen Rich, Asm. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lfemle Editor
Laura Wright, stt Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson. Asst Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Cops Editor
Tonya Heath, A i ouni Executive
Jennifer Jenkins, A. ouni Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, sst Layout Manage)
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo ESditor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Semng the ECU community since I92x The E.ist Carolinian
publishes 12.(100 copies even. Tuesday and Thursday The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board The East
Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for
decency or brevity
The Easi Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letter tor
publication I,etters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N C , 27K5X -Cisi For more informa-
tion, call (919)757-6366.
Printed on
101) recycled
p.iper
Well I'll be. I just finished
re .id ing an adrticle in the Tuesday,
Sept. 14 East Carolinian about the
Miss North Carolina USA Pageant
and m v suspicions have been con-
firmed: beauty pageants, no mat-
ter how much they may insist oth-
erwise, rate women by the same-
meat market standards that come
into plav at the Elbo. At least at the
Elbo, after a guv sizes up a poten-
tial "babe he'll probablv give her
the chance to speak. She'll prob-
ably talk about something appro-
priate, like how drunk she is, be-
cause one night stands don't re-
quire in depth comersation. Nei-
ther does the Miss North Carolina
USA Pageant.
Here's the criteria if you're
interested: delegates must fall be-
tween the ages of 18 and 27, must
be single, must never have been
married and never have had chil-
dren. After all, how could a mar-
ried woman or a woman whose
body has been "deformed" in child
birth have anything left to offer? I
mean, puh-lease. Furthermore,
competition will be judged on the
contestant's appearance in evening
gown and swim suit and no per-
forming talent is required. Talent,
I imagine, takes away from the
useless beauty that this pageant
seems to idolize. Or maybe talents
became too difficult to perform
on-stage in front of an audience
Suppose, for example, that a young
woman's talent is brain surgery
When, you may ask, are
women going to be awarded tor
their real mental and intellectual
talents? It appears that beauty
pageants represent a circular sys-
tem: men exploit women by rat-
ing their chest sizes, long legs, etc
women let men exploit them bv
entering these pageants, so men
continue to exploit womenin
other words, as long as women
participate in beauty pageants, we
are trapped in a system where
women are valued for their looks.
But dare to think what would hap-
pen if women refused to enter!
Sure, it would have to go
deeper than beauty pageants.
Women would also have to give
up those other professions that
require them to sell their bodies in
some capacity or other (topless
dancing, modeling, prostitution)
and give up the scholarship money
that is awarded to pageant win-
nets i his could be hard for a lot of
women to do but battles for equal-
ity have never been easy and I
never promised you a rose gar-
den. It society is willing to dole
out cash to women in return for
their bodies, maybe if women re-
fused tosell thiscommoditv,soci-
ety would discover that there are
other things that women possess
that are equally valuable to it. Per-
haps these would be things that
society would be willing to help
cultivate.
In case I've lost vou, let me
offer a sports analog. Beauty pag-
eant winners are like football he-
roes: thev both cultivate a physi-
cal talent and eventually they age
out of their "professions They
are different in that the football
player's career lasts longer and
he'll be remembered by has fans
after he has retired. For the rest of
her life, a beauty queen will re-
member that she once epitomized
society's ever-changing standard
of beauty and that she was valued
for that beautyonce upon a
time.
It would almost be better, I
think, not to win. At least that
way you wouldn't be as devas-
tated when you realized that
you'd never again be able to live
up to the standards that made
you Miss North Carolina or Miss
Idaho. I don't know for sure, but
I would bet that there is more
than one bitter Miss Ex-this or
Miss Ex-that out there.
Incidentally, the only pag-
eant winner that I remember is
Vanessa Williams-the first black
woman to win the Miss America
title. She had to give up her
crown after someone blabbed
that she had once posed nude in
Playboy Magazine. The Miss
America people thought that it
was really sordid of her to sell
herself that way. Her case may-
have been one of outright rac-
ism, but I think that it probably
had more to do with property
rights. After all, pimps tend to
punish unfaithful employees
that seek similar employment
elsewhere.
c?2H�In� 5HE comE
H5. AMERICA d
UM, SINCE m like
M�- AMSrZICA JOaJjTHAT
frOESNT AlEN V� GoT)
TO (lEAO STUFF,
Does t"?
:�t,rV
AH, THE IOBAL
AMERICAN WOMAN?
QuoteoftheDay
(the last hurrah)
Marcel Marceau
(SP-ADUVnoA at ECU ! 2ooo).D.
HovJ,�c OUT IHT�
THE wo�lO, FEELING
CoNFiOBNT ASOUT TH&
Quality &tucnoM You
HWE-fcEdElvBfcVAiiTH THE
firSoiurE &EST FACILITIES
(5 L A H (5 L AH jWmm'L H
6
don't fcNoW Squat
BUT CAM p�Ay A MEN
CAME O'SQUASH
rrTv
J
Letters to the Editor
Student asks for signed letters in future papers
To the Editor:
Please adopt a policy of
printing only signed letters. I
am referring of course, to
"ECU administration oper-
ates ineffectively Allowing
a person to bash the adminis-
tration (and US Army) under
a cloak of anonimitv is a lousy
way to run a newspaper
If this person doesn't
have the guts to stand behind
hisher opinions, then she
should go back to the "small
liberal-arts college Obvi-
ously, A Frustrated Student is
used to being bottle fed, dia-
pered and burped bv the
people running that institu-
tion.
Mv suggestion would be
for him her to get a tuition
refund and enroll in Tammy's
Daycare Naptimeisa required
course and she could skip
straight to 400,1) level name-
calling.
Steve Cobb
Senior
Decision Science
Editor's note:
It is The East Carolinian's policy to print any and all letter from students faculty and the E( (I
community, a long as they enclose their name, class rank and major, along with a working telephone
number. The telephone number is to verify your existence It is not policy to print a person's name if they
SO choose. Anonymous letters are. and always will be, printed.
By Stacy Van Peterson
Listening to
others can also
benefit you
Rubbing the condensation from
my glass of iced tea onto my dark blue
pant leg, I sat beside my grandparents
in the living room. It was my
grandfather's birthday-gathering and
everyone was busy with the hustle of
being the host and gossiper. The young
people were outside, our parents clean-
ing the table, and I sat discussingwon-
dering who in fact made the best black
walnut cake.
Call me insecure, call me John-
Boy, but people today do not care about
each other. If the 80s represented the
"Me" generation, then the 90s repre-
sents the "Screw You" generation.
Ever since I was old enough to
spell "tea my grandfather has made it
at all of the family gatherings. Whether
or not the tea is the best in the Western
Hemisphere or the tea was his way of
helping is not important, but that tea
was always there.
The day before his birthday-
gathering, my grandfather tried to make
the tea, but ended up breaking down
and crying because he was really con-
fused and could not think straight. You
can never know what the person beside
you is going through.
The black walnut cake conver-
sation changed to college, the good ol'
days and the blue sky outside. Within
one hour, my grandfather and I were
outside with the "young folks laugh-
ing and acting like we were both 15-
years-old again. Whether that black wal-
nut cake conversation helped my grand-
father feel good and forget a little about
all the problems, I will probably never
know. However I do know that I felt so
good that I was singing Pamolive
praises as 1 helped with the dishes.
On the way back to Greenville that
night I almost felt selfish for feeling so
good about helping some one. I guess
that is because I never really take time
to listen to people. I could visit my
grandparents more often, I could spend
less time worring about my problems
and more time helping with a friend's
problems. The next time you get a
chance, try showing some concern to
someone close to you, and note their
reaction.
I suppose that our generation
has accepted that we will make less
than our parents, have to deal with
overpopulation, violence, the environ-
ment and a terrible economy, and as a
society, built up enough strain and an-
ger to hide emotions and feelings. I
challenge you, the reader, to go up to a
total stranger today at 3:03, hug them
and tell them that you are glad that
they are alive.
The condesation from the glass
of tea dried on my pants in no time. I
leaned back in the reclinerand decided
that mygrandfatru r's tea is better than
any black walnut cake. After all, it was
always there.





���-� HIT i� �� �1
�P llO ��
September 23, 1993
-TTie Easf Carolinian-
Classifieds
Page 5
For Rent
S3 Help Wanted I S3 Help Wanted
For Sale
IQ
Greek
m Greek
PARKING Pt
block from can
75M864
aees !
Street
-41
ext A5362.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
Targe 4 bedroom house. 4 blocks from
campus. Kitchen privileges, 2 bath-
rooms, great house! Call 725-2248.
Non-smoker preferrjd.
NAGS HEAD BEACH HOUSES �
weekend or weekly. Very affordable.
Students welcome! Oceanfront and
Oceanview cottages. Call Lauraat(919)
261-8417.
FEMALE ROOMMATE toshare 2bed-
room apt 13 mile from ECU, $150
rent, 12 utilities and phone. Available
Sept. 20, smoker, social drinker pre-
ferred. Call after 7. 830-3771.
Ringgold Towers
UnrUSOUBdrm
New Carpet FfMtty NMft Wits & Sew
$240montJh
I COWTftCT Ma JHMSAH AT 191913Z3-0415
Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Looking for
mature, responsible female to share 2
bedroom townhouse on 5th st. Non-
smoker preferred. Rent is $390. Call
752-8910 for more info.
FEMALE - wanted to share 4 bedroom
apt in Tar River Estates. $162.50 14
utilmo. Ask for Christine. Call 758-
4332.
H Help Wanted
EARNS2500&FREESPRINGBREAK
TRIPS! Sell only 8 trips and you go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City! Great
Resume Experience! 1-800-678-6386!
$10-$400 WEEKLY. Mailingbrochures!
Sparefull-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC
27705.
AA EARN $5,000Mo. GUARAN-
TEED! FAST Huge money-making
jobs and opportunities on your cam-
pus. Call today for complete details.
Free cruise! America's 1 Company!
919-929-3139.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
material provided. Send SASE to Mid-
west mailers, PO Box 395, Olathe KS
66051. Immediate response.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Students
Needed! Earn up to $2,500month in
canneries or fishing vessels. Many em-
ployers provide Room & Board &
Transportation. Over 8,000 openings.
NOEXPERIENCE NECESSARY!
Male or Female. For more information
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn
up to �2,000month world travel
(Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.).
Summer and Careeremployment avail-
able. Noexperiencc necessary. Formore
information call 1-206-634-04468 ext.
C5362.
GREEKS & CLUBS: Raise up to $1000
in JUST ONE WEEK! For your frater-
nity, sorority or club. Plus $1000 for
yourself! And a free T-shirt just for
calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 75.
BRODY'S is now accepting applica-
tions foradditional Sales Associates fro
JuniorSportswear Young Men's. Flex-
ible 10-2, 12-9, or 6-9 scheduling op-
tions. SalaryClothing discounts. Ap-
ply at Customer Service Brody's the
Plaza Monday and Thursday l-4pm.
WANTED: Church organist. Salary
negotiable. Call mornings, 9-12. First
Baptist Church, Robersonv ille, NC 795-
36C1.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
- Make up to $2000-4,000 month
teaching basic conversational English
abroad. Japan, Taiwan and S. Korea.
Many provide room and board other
benefits. No previous training or teach-
ing certificate required. For more in-
formation call: (206)632-1146ext. J5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 Ext. P-3712.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to distrib-
ute "Student Rate" subscription cards
at this campus. Good income. For in-
formation and application write to:
Collegiate Marketing Services, Box
1436, Mooresville NC 28115.
NEEDED: Responsible, energetic per-
son to take care of teenagers a fter school,
3-6pm, Monday-Thursday. Must have
transportation. Call collect after 6pm
524-5446.
KEYBOARD PLAYER NEEDED
Gender is irrelevant. Must have chops,
equipment and vocal proficiency.
(Pompous, egotistical, lazy, irrespon-
sible, close-minded, "I'm-not-helping-
with-the -PA money-grubbing,
stingy, feeble-minded, "What's-MIDI?"
type people need not apply). Call
Wayne or Matt at 752-5586.
PIANO PLAYER NEEDED. Small
Christian Church near Greenville. Sal-
ary neg. Call 757-3207.
WELLNESS ASSISTANTS: Pitt
County Memorial Hospital is accept-
ing applicationsresumes for Wellness
Assistants. 1-2 yrs of experience in
teachingaerobicclassesrequired.Com-
petitive salaries offered. For consider-
ation, send resume to: Pitt Count'
Memorial Hospital Employment Of-
fice, PO Box 6028, Greenville, NC 27835-
6028,(919)816-4556.
PART-TIME PRODUCTION ASSIS-
TANT: Person needed for entry-level
position at TV station. Must be de-
pendable and work vvell with others.
Must be able to operate camera, audio,
character generator. Send resume to
Lori Scott, Production manager,
WNCT-TV, PO Box 898, Greenville,
NC 27835. EOF.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED:
Bring your outgoing personality, trans-
portation, and 35mm SLR camera and
become one of our professional
photoghraphers. No experience
necesary, we train. Good pay, flexible
PT hours. Call 1-800-722-7033 between
12-5pmM-F.
For Sale
IRS, DEA. Available in your area now!
Call 1-800-436-4363 Ext. C-5999.
1990 HONDA CRX - Teal blue, AT, A
C, AMFM Cass 40 MPG. Exc. Cond
1 owner, Hi miles,superclean$6100.00.
Call Tim at 355-6024.
BICYCLES, BICYCLES, BICYCLES,
S�iwinn, Jamis, Motobocane, Raleigh.
Good names, Good bikes, Good prices.
Call evenings, ask for Cass at 758-7867
or Archie at 752-7669.
��flHHiU�
USED FURNITURE
STUDENT
WAP
HOP
Formerly Estate Shop
Coin & Ring Man
SELLING
� FURNITURE
� Aien a I lothiiig
� lvorivi ivcf narrators
� . Iirrcwavrs
� Olrroo il(iiupm�ril
� niro ilfijiiipniont
� - iisrriianPDus itcnis
LOOK YOUR BEST for the brand new
year. Call Kimberly at 931-7863 for your
personal fitness training.
PROFESSIONAL CARPET CLEAN-
ING priced right for College Students-
call 752-8163 and leave message.
MMP - Mobile Music Productions is the
most popular choice in disc jokey service,
bringing the widest music selection and
professionalism to your next social party,
reception or mixer. Call Lee at 758-4644
for booking.
Largest Library ot Information m U.S.
19.278 TOPICS � ALL SUBJECTS
OnJet Catalog Today with Visa MC ot COO
H8M00-3510222
Or. rush $2 00 to Rauarch Information
11322 Idaho Aw 206A. Los Angeles CA 90025
EE
Personals
We're Buying Too!
If you are selling you must be 18 with
a picture ID (NCDL. ECU)
752-3866
MON-FRI 10am-5 pm,
Sat 10 am-2 pm
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
L
RUSH SILVER WINGS! A NationalCo-
Ed service organization that is a refresh-
ingaltemativetoGreekLife. Mendenhall
Rm. 14, Sept. 21,22,23 7:00-8:30 pm.
FEMALE KOONTZ FAN - We met in
Fleming laundry room while I was read-
ing Dartfall Would like to talk to you
again. Promise to be more sociable this
time. Call 931-7923 and ask for John.
LARA WILLIAMS:
Meow! Love Fluffy.
Meow-Meow-
ROLLAWAY BED, twin deluxe 6 inch
mattress, adjustable back, new, can't
use. Cost $350, sacrifice at $170 cash.
Call 637-2645.
FERRET FOR SALE. Male, great with
people, descented, healthy, comes with
cage and other supplies-He's groovy!
Call 752-2248.
K11 l.i. !� Iliumk.
Mr Si,S �(,(! MiW.irv U'ltliim H.ml.
sh.u'N H.uuwMr' Sfcf�inj B.lt Injul
IY � rv 1 0!KlW1Tnl llm
I!r a.T, VV'4 .��
FORT HENRYS ARMY NAVY
1501 S. EVANS STREET 756-8781
GOVERNMENT SEIZED cars, trucks,
boats, 4-wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
Lost & Found
FOUND: Medium-sized mixed black
lab. Green collar, flea collar and choker.
Found on 10th St. by ECU Police. Please
call 752-1564.
FOUND: Men's watch, Saturday night
-the 18thatMilano's. Call 752-1651 after
2 pm to claim.
FOUND: Bike, Friday 9-17-93, phone
752-8975 to collect.
LOST: FossilWatch with Brown Leather
band & prism crystal - $200 reward
Sentimental value. Please call 355-8370
after 6pm.
FOUND: A piece of jewlery on 9-21-93.
Call 752-3848.
DELTA CHI would like to thank
Tom Thornton, our rush chair, for a
job well done last week for rush.
Thanks, Tommy! The brothers of
Delta Chi.
TO PI KAPPA PHI: We are going to
have a blast tonight. Can't wait! Love,
Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA SIG - Thanks for a great
time last Friday. We had a "yucka"
time. Love, the Sisters and pledges
of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETAs- Get ready for
Saturday's stranger mixer because
life's too short to dance with ugly
men.
REBECCA HOLLOMAN: Thanks
for all of your hard work with
parent sweekend! Love, your Delta
Zeta Sisters.
PHI SIGMA PI brothers would like
to welcome all new pledge brothers
fro the Fall semester. Good luck and
don't forget your pledge meetings
on Wednesdays at 5pm.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
additions to the Pi Pledge Class: Lisa
Hetrick, Tiffani Inman and Amy Wil-
liams - Love, Zeta Tau Alpha.
CONGRATULATIONS to the of-
ficers of the Pi Pledge Class: Presi-
dent - Kathy Thompson, VP - Allison
Wisser, Secretary - Audra Latham,
Treasure - Lora Kirn, Jr. Panhellenic
- Vikki Moore, Jr. Panhellenic Alter-
nates inaLaMarca and Shela Elliot,
Historian - Stefanie Hippie, Service -
Donna Christian. Keep up the good
work! Love - Zeta Tau Alpha.
CONGRATULATIONS to the newly
elected officers: Megan Ferretti
Treasurer, Amy DodsonMarshall,
Crissy Boswell Recording Secretary,
Publicity, Michelle Stoen, Robin
McCrawSocial, Intermurals
Megan Cumberland, and Stacy
HenningChaplin. Love, Alpha Xi
Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
Delta Zeta Pledge Class Officers:
President - Julie Cooper, Vice Presi-
dent - Jennifer Robinson, Secretary -
Jennifer Eddleman, Treasurer -
Debra Beaman, Fundraiser - Delores
Wood, Philanthropy - Martha
Vaughn, Historian - Kristen Napier,
Intramurals - Jill Johnson, Chaplain-
Beth Benton, Bis Sis Party - Donna
Creech, Activities - Amanda Will-
iams, Social - Jessica Midgert, Jr.
Panhellenic - Katherine Bailey, Ban-
ners - Janice Santucci. We know you
guys will do a great job! Love, the
Sisters
THETA CHI - Thanks fro a great
time on Bid Night and congratula-
tions to an outstanding pledge
class! Love, the Sisters and
Pledges of Zeta Tau Alpha.
TO OUR GOLDEN GIRL
Courtney Hinson, and our favor-
ite ECU twirler, Jill Wagner. You
both art doing a wonderful job,
keep up the hard work! Love, the
Sisters and Pledges of Zeta Tau
Alpha.
DELT ACHI would like to thank
everyone who came out to rush
last week. Also, congratulations
to the new associate members of
Delta Chi: Kevin Whitley, Steve
Gallo, Kelly Fair, Doug Cline,
Chris Carrier, Brian Swanson, Jay
Clement and Scott Griffith. Wel-
come aboard the "Brotherhood
of a Lifetime The Brothers of
Delta Chi.
KAPPA SIGMA: Thanks for a
great parents' weekend. Every-
body had a blast! Love, Chi
Omega.
CHI OMEGA: Everybody get
ready for a blind date, because it
is going to be lots of fun!
CONGRATULATINS to the Chi
Omega pledges. You are all do-
ing a great job. Love, the Sisters
of Chi Omega.
CHI OMEGA LITTLE SISTERS:
We can't wait until Thursday.
Love, Chi Omega Big Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS to our
flag football team. You guys are
awesome! Love, the Alpha Phis.
ALPHA PHI Pledges: You are all
doing a wonderful job! We love
you! The Alpha Phi Sisters.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: Thanks
for Friday night. We had the best
time. Good luck with your
pledges - love, the Alpha Phis.
GOOD LUCK ECU football this
weekend at Washington. Go Pi-
rates
ANGIE NIX: Congratulations on
winning Junior Panhellinic Presi-
dent. Love, The Alpha Phis.
TO ALPHA DELTA PI: Thanks
for the help with rush, and the
use of your facilities. It really
came in handy. Sigma Pi.
SIGMA PI PLEDGES: Congratu-
lations. Hope you have as much
fun as we do! Brothers.
ALPHA DELTA PI: The bid party
was a blast. We'll get up with you
soon. Sigma Pi.
Announcements
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt county
Special Olympics is recruit-
ing for volunteer coaches
in the following sports: soc-
cer, basketball skills, team
basketball, swimming, gym-
nastics, bowling, power-lift-
ing, and roller skating. NO
EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY-
JUST A WILLINGNESS TO
WORK WITH MENTALLY
HANDICAPPED CHILDREN
AND ADULTS. Special train-
ing sessions for coaches
will be held. Last day to vol-
unteer for fall sports is Sept.
28th. Volunteer hours mav
be used as part of practicum
requirements for several
ECU courses.
For more info, contact
Connie Sappenfield at 830-
4541.
New Rat in town 752 5855 1 1 0. E 4th St Downtowr
MENU STARTS IN 3 WEEKS'
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BANDS: Rare Daze
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he Sharpest
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'HEN EACED WITH THE ULTIMATE
CHALLENGE IT TAKtS MORE THAN
IS THf INDIVIDUAL WITH THf STRONG
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CAIL 1 800 MARINES
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THE FEW. THE PROUD. THE MARINES.
FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT THF STUDENT
J UNION FROM 10:00 ?:00 PM SEPTEMBER ?7
1993 OR CAU I 800-72J-67IS ABOUT OFFICER
PROGRAMS.
WMWMMIMIWW"





-
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
September 23, 1993
Koenig greets Greenville
By Gresory Dickens
Staff Writer
Walter Koenig is a busy man.
The 56-year-old actor, best
known to even the most casual of
television fans as 11. Comm. Pavel
Chekov from theoriginal "Star Trek
is hard at work in three different
media. Besides television and the-
atre roles, Koenig is currently writ-
ings comic Lxxik of hisovvn creation.
lovvever, his schedule was recently
put on hold by a heart attack. His
appearance this Saturday at the Star
Trekconvention will be his firstsince
taking ill. In an exclusive interview
via telephone, Koenig talked about
his recent 11 ndertakings and life after
the Enterprise.
Bom in Chicago to Lithuanian
parents, Koenig grew up in New
York. He received his B A in Psychol-
ogy from UCLA and went back to
New York for two years where he
worked on-stage. He then wentback
to L.A. and worked on "probably
eight ornine, maybea dozen shows"
before being cast as Chekov.
When asked how "Star Treks
popularity affected hiscareer, Koenig
responded, "I don't know. It cer-
tainly had a deleterious effect. It was
difficult to find work because I was
known so strongly in the role. There's
two states in economics: recession
and depression. Well, here there's
alwaysadepression. There are 75,000
union members and only a couple of
Photo courtesy of Clnafantaatiqua
Koenig (back) will be at the Star Trek convention this Saturday at the Hilton. $10 admission with ECU I.D.
hundred acting jobs. Supply exceeds
demand. It makes it difficult to earn a
living in general A lot of work
simply isn't there
Koenig has found some success
in television recently. He has begun
work on the futuristic "Babylon 5
"It starts in November. Hope-
fully, it will be a recurring role When
asked if fans of "Star Trek" may not
accept the actors working in other
roles, Koenig answered, "I think the
industry has a false impression.
Babylon 5 will be a good test of that.
I get to play a heavy and the fans
will get to decide how well I do
Television isn't the only avenue
Koenig is utilizing. He recently
worked with Mark Lenard (who
played Sarek,Spock'sfather)on-stage
in a play called "Boys In Autumn"
that has garnered "tremendous re-
sponse" on college campuses.
"It's about Tom Sawyer and
Huck Finn meeting 40 years later. It's
See KOENIG page 7
Paintball rage
comes to east coast
By Jimmy Rostar
Staff Writer
Imagine that you are pinned to
the ground, and shots are whizzing
through the trees all around you.
You've been caught in a crossfire for
two minutes now, and you're run-
ning dangerously low on ammuni-
tion. Suddenly, you think you see
someone moving a few dozen yards
away. Or is that just a tree branch
swaying in the wind?
Moments later, your fears be-
come realities as you hear your
enemy's gun fire. You reach down to
your leg after the shot has hit its
target. You grimace as you realize
your enemy has won.
Don'tworry,folks. The town isn't
under attack by some insane aggres-
sors. "The Emerald City" is, how-
ever, under assault by an exciting,
fast-paced and visual sport that's a
unique experience to the area.
Greenville, say hello to Pirate
Paintball.
Paul Shaw, the owner and chief
operator of the business, promises
thathecan prcmde "the most intense
thing you've ever played in your en-
tire life. " Hbroughtpaintball here in
Marchofthis year with theenthusias-
tic hopes of drumming up local sup-
port for a sport that hasbeen growing
in popularity across the nation over
the past decade.
Shaw said that service is a top
priority in his business. "When you
come out to the paintball park he
said, "you deserve to be catered to
and served like you were royalty
Without a doubt, Shaw and his team
of personnel aim to please.
To get things started, give Paul a
callathLofficetosetupa reservation.
Paintball sessions currently run on
Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
from2p.m. to6p.m.Sundaysessions
are also available from 2 until 6 in the
afternoon Weekday sessions can be
arranged for groups. All hours of
operation will change next month to
accommodate daylight savings
hours.
A deposit and admission fee are
required in advance. Prices vary, so
be on the lookout for special coupon
discounts as well as group rates. Fees
cover your rental equipment, which
includes your Tracer pump shotgun,
face mask and a tank of air (the guns
operate by C02 tanks).
Paintball prices range from $6 to
$10 per 100 rounds, depending on the
numberof rounds you buy. And you
decide at the park just how many
rounds you'll need to keep going.
Shaw recommends that you plan on
firingbetween 300 to 500 rounds dur-
ing a session.
After you set up your playing
date and time, start preparing for a
wild four hours. Be sure to wear long
pants, preferably camouflage or jeans
(remember, you'll be in the woods).
Dress in dark-colored clothing to
make yourself a less easy target, and
GQGLbGnQG
Graphic courtesy of Pirate Paintball
Take a day off from hectic college life and have a day of fun in the woods
with Pirate paintball. They provide the guns and you purchase the paint.
try to cover as much skin as possible.
High-top shoes or boots are the best
bet for footwear, and keep in mind
that you will get dirty!
Plan on getting to the park at
least forty-five minutes early to fill
out a registration form and to get
familiarized with the woods.
Shawandhisstaffrunatopnotch
operation, from the informative
rulessafety equipmentbriefingbe-
forethesession to the helpful referee-
ing during the games. "Basically,
you're going to be told how to play,
what to do.you're going to know
what'sgoingon'Shawsaid. "We're
going to make sure everything is or-
ganized
In addition to service, the Pirate
Paintball team really stresses safety.
Shaw said that, according to the Na-
tional Safety Council, paintball is ac-
tually safer per 1000 injuries than
such seemingly harmless sports as
golf, bowlingand tennis. The referees
make sure that you keep your face
mask on at all times, and plenty of
water is on hand to keep you from
getting overheated or dehydrated.
Don't lose sleep worrying about
the paintballs hurting you. At the
worst, they may sting for a moment
See PAINT page 7
Husband and wife art exhibit visits Mendenhall
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
For the first time at ECU, there
will be a Chinese art exhibit spon-
sored by the Student Union Visual
Arts Committee.
The exhibit is part of the Cul-
tural Awareness Week events at
ECU.
The husband and wife artists,
Wenhai Ma and Shu-Ching Ma are
well known and have experience in
a variety of areas. The exhibit will
range from watercolor illustrations
from children's magazines and
books to still lifes.
This exhibit should be sensa-
tional since both artists have re-
nowned reputations in the field or
art. Mr. Wenhai Ma is an illustrator
for several different children's
magazines such as Cricket (Nov.
1992), Otfissey (JulyAugust, 1993),
Ladybug (April 1�93) andalii pe
ii
(JanuaryFebruary, 1993). In the
past year, he has done illustrations
for three books: The Painted Fan by
Marilyn Singer; The Magic Swan,
which has been renamed Swan's
Gift, by ssssajsjajjmaaaajaaaaaaj
Bran da
Seabrook;
and Red
Means Good
Fortune by
Barbara D.
Goldin. All
are to be pub-
lished in
1994.
Pres-
ently,
Wenhai Ma is
an assistant
professor at Duke University. He
works in the drama department
teaching set design. Most of the
works he does are in watercolor,
but n i ccasksi he will ?! Com
I'm trying to
explore a kind of
technique to
portray the
characters
this medium and paint in oil or
Indian paint. -
"Watercolor is a unique me-
dium Wenhai Ma says.
"I'm trying to experiment with
�������������������������� techniques
other than
what I've seen
so far He
also adds,
"I'm trying to
explore a kind
of technique
oflight,andits
subtlety upon
watercolorsto
portray the
characters
Oneofthepic-
���������������������� hires on dis-
play is from an ancient Chinese
novel called Journey to the West; the
piece itself is The Amazing Monkey
King, which was done in wa tercolor
and Indian paint by Wenhai Ma.
99
Wenhai Ma
Duke Art Professor
Shu-Ching Ma was trained in
bothChina and theU. S. She worked
at the Central Academy for Drama
for seven years and has been work-
ing with the Duke University Drama
Program for two years.
She has worked as a set de-
signer, scenic artist and costume
designer for ballets, dramas and
television productions. She works
mainly with watercolors and paints
her still life paintings which prima-
rily depict flowers.
The exhibition will be displayed
from Sept. 26 through Oct. 23,1993,
in the Mendenhall Student Center
Gallery. An artists' reception will
be held on Monday, Oct. 4, from 7-
8 p.m.
The gallery hours are Monday
through Thursday from 8:30 a.m.
until 11 p.m Friday 8:30 a.m. until
midnight,Saturday noon until mid-
night, and Sunday 1 p.m. until 11
p.m.
Superstars surprise
Creek audience
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
Sund a y's Dylan and Santana
show at the Walnut Creek Am-
phitheater in Raleigh featured
an interesting variety of classic
tunes, rangin g from Dylan's clas-
sic folk style to Santana's spicy
Spanish-influenced rock 'n' roll.
One of the major surprises
was tha t Dylan opened the show.
It seemed to be the consensus
among most members of the au-
dience that he was the head liner.
Dylan started his first set
with an extended version of
"Stuck Inside of Mobile With a
Memphis Blues Again Then he
played an incredibly moving
version of "All Along the Watch
Tower" which lasted about fif-
teen minutes.
His performance was pre-
dominantly electric but he also
played four acoustic tracks.
Though his band was a lot
heavier than expected, they were
very tight and they comple-
mented him well.
The perfoi .nance reached a
climax when he played
"Maggie'sFarm" toward theend.
In fact, it signified the height of
his enthusiasm throughout the
show.
Dylan ended with "It's Not
Me Babe" as one of his encore
songs. He then walked off stage
quietly, and he didn't say a word
to the crowd during the entire
show.
Santana created a very
elaborate setting.
When he first came out on
stage, he told the audience about
a vision he had pertaining to
world peace and unity. Soon
after this, he dedicated a song
about Heaven and the afterlife
to Arthur Ashe.
Santana's entire band ex-
hibited incredible individual
musical talent. The show
seemed designed to spotlight
each member of the band indi-
vidually many times during the
show. There were numerous
drum solos a couple of bass so-
los, and, of course, Carlos
Santana had many opportuni-
ties to play lengthy guitar solos.
At times it seemed as if there
was no real format. Band mem-
bers were playing as hard and
fast as they could and they suc-
ceeded because the music came
together.
One of the major themes
throughout the concert was one
of cultural unity. Every mem-
ber of his band was from a dif-
ferent ethnic background, and
every member was able to re-
flect an individual, independent
style.
Strangely enough, the
crowd started shrinking about
two-thirds through the show,
right after Santana played "Oye
ComoVa
This surprising disappear-
ance of people was somewhat
puzzling. There is no way fans
could have left this show unsat-
isfied.
Staff music featured
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Saxophonist Brad Foley of
the East Carolina University
School of Music faculty will be
featured in a faculty recital,
"Saxophone in Chamber Music
scheduled for ECU'S Fletcher
Music Center Recital Hall Thurs-
day, Oct. 7, at 8 p.m.
Foley will be assisted by fac-
ulty soprano, Louise Toppin;
marimbist, Mark Ford; and pia-
nist, John O'Brian as well as two
quintets from the School of Mu-
sic: the East Carolina Brass and
the Coastal Winds Quintet.
Works on the program are
"Welcoming Piece a contem-
porary work by ECU faculty
composer, Mark Alan Taggart,
for clarinet, alto saxophone and
piano; Foley's arrangements of
several selections from J.S. Bach
cantatas; "Concertoda Camera"
by Fisher Tull; "Wind Music"
by Leslie Bassett; and?
"Divertimento" by AkiraJ
Yuyama.
Foley is assistant dean for
undergraduate studies in the
ECU School of Music, and also
teaches saxophone and cham-
See SAX page 7
B�aWBWWWPJV.gyWWW" "TBy






September 23, 1993
HAA7
from
pg. 6
KOENIG
Cont'd
from
P9-6
SAX
rhe41-aere park is di ided
different sections, covering wooded
areas as well as open fields. Referees
lead teamsot about 10 orfewerplay-
ers throughout a numberof scenarios
during the da
You can plav a number of blix k.1-
pumping team games such as "Cap-
ture the Flag" or "The Alamo both
games in which players band together
while trying to reach another team's
base. Team unity and strategy are the
keys to success here. Watch out, be-
cause one hit from the enemv means
you're out of that particular game.
There are alsoseveral games tha t
feature "all players for themselves"
tactics, in which the only way to win
is to "knock off" everybody else. You
better check your paintball supplv
before getting into anv of these
scenarios.Shaw said that Pirate
Paintball is for anyone looking for an
unparalleled day of fun. He encour-
ages both men and women to come
out and says that "anyone can play
this sport and have a good time and
do really well at it
Judging from an afternoon ses-
sion over the weekend, paintball is
heretostay.Participants ranged tnm
E.C.U. freshmen to local business
people, and everyone seemed anx-
ious to start up another game.
"It's definitely an adrenaline
rush said Robbie McDonald, 24, a
Greenville resident. Nathan Greene,
27, also from Greenville, agreed, add-
ing mat paintball is "a lesson in com-
municationand teamwork " Bothsaid
they would be back.
Paul'sofficenumber is 752-8380,
and you canleaveamessage anytime.
The park is located on highway 43
Norm(towards Rocky Mount),about
eightmiles past the hospital. Look for
Jarman Stables on your left, and turn
onto thegraveledroadatthe paintball
sign. Go ahead and give yourself a
day of adventure you'll never forget.
md has comedy in it he
a very dimensional role. 1
�� hole gamut ot emo-
lt's ery rewarding
Koenig has also created a comk
i ailed "Rava "v hkhispublishedby
Malibu comics.
"Coni!cvritt'rMarvVoltnian
invited me to write a lew issuis ot
"Star "rek" for DC Comics. It was
good and Site and I thought that was
theendot it. hvas driving along and
1 began to think about the medium
The ability to create such dramatic
characters and theplotlinesavaiiable
to portray inticed Koenig to the me-
dium again.
After submissions to Marvel, DC
and Dark Horse proved unsatisfac-
tory due to delays, Malibu Publish-
ing showed interest and signed
Koenig toathree-issuedealAfter the
contract expires, Millennium Pub-
lishing may continue the comic. "It's
fun. Later on, we'll bring in other
writers to continue the series. I'm
won't have to be locked in
Recently, a stumbling block to
Koenig's career came in the form of a
heart attack on July 25, followed by a
quadruple bypass five days later.
Koenig attributes the attack to genet-
ics from his father'sside. When asked
what changes were made to his
lifestyle, Hesaid, "I'm fine. I exercise,
I walk two mileson the treadmill, I'm
on the stationary I 'ce. I feel strong
and comfortable enough to go for-
ward
Cont'd
from
pg. 6
The East Carolinian 7
her music, lie is also actne as a
solo recitalist and chamber musi-
cian and has performed with or-
chestras in Virginia and Texas.
The saxophone aim ert is tree
and open to the public.
NOTE: Dial 757-4370 for a 24-
hour hotline listing School of Mu-
sk amcerts. To receive this year's
printed calendar of events for the
School ot Musk,call 757-6851 dur-
ing ottice hours.
Remember
writers
meetings are
every
Wednesday at
3:30
East Carolina's Trail & Nature Shop
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MUMM�MM
iiiTWIWJl
The East Carolinian
Sports
What's On Tap?
Friday, Sept. 24
V ollevball. away
MD
burn
Tennis, home
I ady Pirate Invitational, TBA
Saturday, Sept. 25
Football, away
at Washington, Seattle, Wash
at 3:30 p.m.
Volleyball, away
at Loyola College � MD
Tournament, TBA
Soccer, away
Men at Richmond, at 7 p.m.
Tennis, home
Lady Pirate Invitational, TBA
Sunday, Sept. 26
Tennis, home
Lady Pirate Invitational, TBA
Soccer, home
Women v. Fayetteville, 2:30 p.i
The 411
Tuesday, Sept. 21
Volleyball (2-11)
def. Coastal Carolina, 15-10,15-
10,15-11
Golf
tied Florida State for 9th at
Kiawah Island Invitational
Wednesday, Sept. 22
Soccer (3-4)
Men, 3-1
Please No Wagering
Robert Todd, 10 points
TEC Sports Editor
UW 21,38-17
"ECU will play well enough
to earn some well-deserved re-
spect
Brian Olson, 16 points
TEC AssistantSports Editor
UW25,42-17
"The trip to Washington is
to much to beare for the Pirates.
The Huskies roll over the young
ECU defense
Kevin Hall, 10 points
WZMB Sports Director
UW13,34-21
"The young Pirates put up
good struggle, but Washington
is way too tough. ECU will gain
much needed experience from
this game
Brian Bailey, 10 points
WNCT-TV Sports Director
UW17,38-21
"Pirates continue to show
improvement, but the Huskies
areinadifferentclassrightnow
Chris Justice, 10 points
WCTI-TV Sports Director
UW23,38-15
"Hester will see the blitz this
week. The running game will
have to step up or the game will
not be close
BradZaruba, 10 points
WITN-TV Sports Director
UW32,42-10
"The Huskies are just too
tough at home. The Pirates will
look forward to getting back to
Greenville
Demetrius Carter, 5 points
ABLE President
UW21,42-21
"Hopefully, ECUcanhavea
good showing against Washing-
ton
Keith Dyer, 10 points
SGA President
UW24,45-21
"The Huskies are too strong,
especially at home
Five points are awarded for
choosing the winner and an
additional three points are
given to the person closest to
the spread (the person clos-
est to the combined score of
both teams settles ties).
West
Page 9
By Roberts. Todd
Sports Editor
ECU qu.irterlvickChris Hester
wilL undoubtedly, be under-esti-
mated by Washington's "Purple
Reign" defense and he should be
able to use that to his advantage.
The past two games have dis-
played, perhaps, the most conser-
vative offensive approach seen in
the Steve Logan era. Disabled quar-
terback Marcus Crandell rarely
went deep, likewise Hester. This
approach may find additional suc-
cess in Seattle, especially if Hester
can find Jerris McPhail over the
middle with short passes.
McPhail has yet to be unleashed
and this may be the way to do it �
a la Roger Craig, late of the San
Fransico 49ers. McPhail has the
speed to turn those short passes
into long gains.
However, a young Washing-
ton backfield may be open for an
occasional deep throw from Hester.
Hanker Morris Letcher, one of the
toughest players on the team, is not
likely to be intimidated by UW's
rookie defensive backs. If his leg,
injured last week against Central
Florida, is ready by game time, ex-
pect Hester to find him deep.
Coming off of a loss, the Hus-
kies might be looking to take out
their frustrations on ECU. They
were on the verge of replacing Mi-
ami as the elite program for the
'90s. Now, Head Coach Don James
is gone, along with their image as a
model program because of NCAA
sanctions.
When quarterback Billy Joe
Hobert was suspended last year
for accepting illegal loans totaling
$50,000, Washington was unde-
feated and No. 1 in the country. The
program was shocked and lost two
of their last tliree games � and
their 22-game winning streak. They
ended the season with a 38-31 loss
to Michigan in the Rose Bowl and a
final ranking of 12th in the polls.
Despite their troubles, they
again field one of the best teams in
the country. Their offense is still
tremendous but their defense is
weakened from last seasons' losses.
Running backs Beno Bryant
and Napoleon Kaufman may be
the best backfield in the natioh.
Helping them move along is an
experienced line, although the loss
of two-time All-American tackle
Lincoln Kennedy (drafted 9th
overall by the Atlanta Falcons)
will hurt.
As a sophomore, Kaufman
rushed for over 1,000 yards and
averaged 6.5 yards per carry.
Bryant missed nearly all of 1992
after helping the Huskies to their
See Pirates page 10
Photo courtesy of SID
Lady Pirate SOCCer Garten born to play
team wins opener
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer"
TheECUWomen'sSoccerClub
began its Fall 1993 season with an
impressive win over Jacksonville
Unidas on Sunday behind the Al-
lied Health Building. The program
is among the most successful on
campus, and the fan turnout for this
scrirnrnagegamewas fantastic. ECU
survived a couple of early scares as
shots from Jacksonville rang off of
theposts just minutes into the game.
The game formatwas changed from
two 45 minute halves to three 30
minute periods to allow the ECU
team to get all of the record 36 play-
ers into the match. 19 minutes into
the first period, ECU sophomore
fullback netted a rebound from a
comer kick taken by Amy Warren
forherfirstcareergoalatECU. This
was the only tally of the first period.
In the second period, the Lady
Pirates took the opportunity to look
at a number of the rookie players
that have joined the squad this
season. FreshmanShariTomasetti
narrowly missed a scoring oppor-
tunity 16 minutes into this session.
The ECU defense repeatedly
turned back theUnidasattack with
strongplaybyMaureenCorcoran,
Margaret Richards and goalie
Nancy Johnson. At the end of the
second period, ECU still led 1-0.
Early in the third period, a
Jacksonville player lofted a shot
just over the outstretched finger-
tips of ECU keeper Susan Mower
totiethegameatl-1. Thatreallylit
a fire under the Lady Pirates, as
they went on an offensive ram-
page. First,halfbackJennieHaines
rifled a shot past the goalkeeper to
put ECU up 2-1. Just four minutes
later, forward Toni DeRose fin-
ished off a three-on-two counter-
attack for a 3-1 lead. Freshman
See SOCCER page 10
"Elke"keeps her
eyes on the prize
By Ashley Neal
Staff Writer
Alison "Elke" Garten, a junior,
has been surrounded by tennis all
herlife.Hermorherwasranked num-
ber one at the University of Missouri
and her aunt also held the number
onepositionatheralmamater. Con-
tinuing a family tradition, Garten is
the number one seed, as well as cap-
tain, for ECU's Women's Tennis
Team.
Garten's nickname, Elke, began
as a term of endearment used by her
grandmother, whose sister's name
was Elke. The name stuck as other
relatives and friends began using it.
"It'sjust one of those names that
people remember you by � it's dis-
tinct Garten said.
As a result of her mother and
aunt playing tennis incollege,Garten
and her older sister were exposed to
the sport at an early age. They each
took lessons and practiced with their
mother until they were old a iough
to compete.
"I remember being dragged
along to her Garten's sister tourna-
ments, but I wasn't old enough to
play Garten said.
When she was eight, Garten be-
gan competing. Generally, she
played kids who were a couple of
years older. To date, Garten says her
greatest career victory was at age
nine whenheropponentwas 12years
old. Gartenlost the firstset, but came
backand won the matchin three sets.
"She her opponent got frus-
trated Garten said. "I mentally de-
feated her
Garten, a biology major, at-
tributes heroutgoingpersonality and
self-confidence to athletic accom-
plishments. Describing herself as
"goal-oriented Garten plans to at-
tend medical school and become ei-
ther an orthopedic surgeon or psy-
chiatrist.
Academics and athletics con-
sume the majority of Garten's time.
Althoughshebelievesplayingasport
SeeELKEpagelO
VCU drops Pirates, 3-1
By Brian Cunningham
Staff Writer
Though the World Cup will
notbearrivingintheUnitedStates
untill994,the Virginia Common-
wealrhRamsgavetheECUmen's
soccer team a taste of what the
competition might be like.
VCU'sVladislavBezborodov
scored a goal and added an assist
as the Rams extended ECUs' los-
ingstreak to four games by taking
a decisive 3-1 win yesterday.
Despite ECU, 3-5, jumping
out to an early 1-0 lead on sopho-
more Marc Mullin's first goal of
the season, VCU had the Pirates
on their heels. VCU outshot ECU
19-to-7.
In the first half, the Pirates
displayed some spectacular de-
fense, stopping the Rams' attack-
ers on many good scoring oppor-
tunities.
Senior Mike Beck andsopho-
more Drew Racine, in particular,
made some good sliding
. takeaways when VCU was deep
into the Pirates' zone.
When the second half arrived,
VCU displayed their quicker speed.
Fourplayerson the VCU roster come
from San Fernando, Trinidad, and
their quicknesswasevidentthrough-
out the remainder of the match.
Bezborodov tied the game at
one after he slid the ball just by ECU
goalie Bryan DeWeese on an assist
from Rams forward, Chris Barnard.
Shortly thereafter, VCU captured
the lead off a direct kick from senior
Anthony Sherwood, one of the re-
cruits from Trinidad.
Sophomore Peter Roberts gave
the Rams their final score off an
assist from Blezborodov. The junior
from St. Petersburg, Russia, blew
through the ECU defense and sent
a passtoRobertstoicethegameat
3-1.
"Somepeople need toplay with
more effort these next upcoming
games Mullin said dejectedly, "We
need tostartplaying withmoreteam
focus
File Photo
Soccer is gaining popularity on ECU's campus. The women's
team is hoping to soon become a varsity sport.
DOG POUND INFO
Location: Seattle, Wash.
Enrollment: 34,000
Conference: Pac-10
Stadium: Husky (72,500)
Surface: AstroTurf
1992 record: 9-3 (6-2)
Head Coach: Jim Lambright
Primary off: One-Back
Primary def: 3-4
Colors: Purple and Gold
Nickname: Huskies
1993 Schedule (1-1)
Sept 4 def. Stanford, 31-14
Sept. 11 lost to Ohio St, 12-21
Sept. 25 EAST CAROLINA
Oct 2 SAN JOSE STATE
Oct 9 at California
Oct. 16 at UCLA
Oct 23 OREGON
Oct. 30 at Arizona State
Nov. 6 at Oregon State
Nov. 13 SOUTHERN CAL
Nov. 20 WASHINGTON ST.
Another frosh
QB for Bucs
By Brian Cunningham
Staff Writer
When ECU faced off
against nationally ranked Syra-
cuse on Sept. 9, no single player
felt mote pressure or had more
responsibility placed upon him
than red-shirt freshman quar-
terback Marcus Crandell. Pi-
rate Head Coach Steve Logan
repeatedly insisted thathis man
was more than capable of earn-
ing a passing grade and, thus
far, he had.
Now it is Chris Hester's
turn. The fellow redshirt re-
sponded spectacularly. At one
point, he completed seven
straight passes in a row during
a stretch in the third quarter.
As is the case on any level of
football, however, depth is al-
ways a top priority. Logan, who
was visibly shaken up follow-
ing the game, assessed Hester's
strengths and weaknesses.
"111 have to shift gears with
Chris Logan said. "He has
great leadership and character-
istics, but his mobility concerns
me
Not only does Hester's mo-
bility concern Logan, but so
does the thumb on his throw-
ing hand. "1 hat thumb is only
65-70 percent said Logan.
"He's playing on guts, because
that thumb's not ready
Despite Logan's concerns,
Hester said at a post-game
press conference that his thumb
was feeling grea t. ECU will still
need to make sure that the per-
sonnel behind Hester is ready
for action.
"Our quarterback situation
here is unique Logan said.
"Those two freshmen may be
the most talented I've ever
worked with, but they don't
know anything yet
ECU ran the balleffectively
the first two games, but Hester
took several hard shots from
UCF defenders. Logan said,
"Our offensive line played
hard, but they did not play
See HESTER page 10






September 23, 1993
wing v true
Dan Gonzale2 and
zMattison.
: definitely be ner-
that's only natural
Gonzalez said "But it 1 got in
there, I'd try to do my best and
whatever happens, happens
Free Gatorade
Squeeze Bottle
to the first 100
people with a copy
of next Tuesday's
East Carolinian
corning; to watch
the ECU-UNCW
volleyball match
Sept. ?8, at 7 p.m
Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: What former ECU
football star holds the
record for career
touchdowns?
�L-U6l wo4i� itfhn
PIRATES
Continued from page 9
h rback
- nex-
ay hurt
I imon
. of the
- have ever
s defense returns
starters but should have
little trouble keeping the 1 luskiesin
op25.0utsidelinebackerAndy
Mason isa I ombardi award candi-
date who racked up eight sacks and
143 tackles for a loss last season.
The new L'W defensive backs have
the biggest shoes to till but are tal-
ented enough to do so.
ECU may have a tough time
making this game respectable, but
thev held their own with Syracuse.
The Pirates have a history of sur-
g top ranked teams. From
ti i 1990,1 C Li regularly played
i neol the toughest schedules in the
a ���� ttrj 1 he Pirates faced of with
Miami eight times, Florida State
seven times, Auburn and Penn State
twice and Floridaand( leorgiaonce.
In 1983, the Pirates went 8-3.
rheironly losses came against FSU
by one point, Florida by a touch-
down and Miami by five. Thirteen
points separated FCU from unde-
feated season and, probably, a na-
tional championship. It's 1493 and
Miami has been replaced on the
schedule by Washington, theSemi-
noles by theOrangemen and Florida
was replaced with Central Florida.
Washington is 31-6 over the
last three years. Do not count on
their seventh loss coming against
ECU. However, the Huskies will be
ripe for picking at the hands of an
underdog if they cannot recover
from the loss of their coach, James,
and their loss to Ohio State.
'1
u
to
NORTH CAROLINA
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STUDENT ID
SOCCER
Continued
from
page 9
Mandy Gaster, coming off a suc-
cessful season at Sanderson High in
Raleigh began her college career
with a goal 22 minu tes into the third
session.
Junior Forward Kellie Troy, a
new member this year, finished off
the Unidas squad as ECU won 5-1.
This is an impressive start for
the Lads' Pirates, and thev will look
to build on it this Sunday as thev
take on the team from Favetteville
at 2:30 p.m. on the Men's Varsitv
field.
This is the first game for ECU in
league play Md thev are attempt-
ing to become the first ECU team
ever invited to the Women's Na-
tional Cup competition in Novem-
ber.
ELKE
Continued from page 9
has made her more focused, Garten
also acknowledges that tennis cre-
ates obstacles for her during the sea-
son.
"After practice, to go study is
hard. MostptvplehaveaUafternoon,
but we don't get a break Garten
said. "Abo during exam time and
CC A conferencechampionships it's
hard to concentrate, but academics
always come first
Last year the women's team got
a new assistant coach, Allen Farfour.
From him, Garten has realized the
importance of her mental game.
"Defini telv my mental game has
improved 100 percent Garten said.
"Your skills can only improve so
much, it's really the mental aspect
you can improve
Except for two freshmen and a
junior � Garten � sophomores
make up this year's women's tennis
team. Because ECU women's team
lacks experience when competing
in the college circuit, Coach Farfour
says leadership is an important com-
ponent for the team to possess.
This season, Garten's goal is to
maintain hertechnical skills and de-
velop a stronger mental game. To
improveherconcenrrationduringa
game, Garten will try to break each
match she plays into points � not
sets, enabling her to stay "mentally
involved
ECU's women's tennis team
will begin its season Fnday, Sept.
24, at 2 p.m. when they host the
Lady Pirate Invitational.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 23, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 23, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.962
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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