The East Carolinian, September 21, 1993






r die?
fashion
�nd in sight?
Lifestyle
Don't Panic!
Don't miss Widespread
Panic's "San Francisco
psychedelia" at the
Attic tonight. See story
on page 6.
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7?
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 52
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Civil suit filed in fight case
3y Stephanie Lassiter A week lafpr Wfamr , O
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
One ECU student faces
criminal charges and a civil suit
and another student has with-
drawn from school following a
brawl at the ECU Syracuse game
held Thursday, Sept. 9.
ECU student Daniel Mar-
tin haspressed chargesagainst tified as a participant in the fight
nan Weaver after Martin was According to Carnes, university
A week later, Weaver was
taken into custody based on
Martin's civil claim and was held
under $50,000 bond. The civil ac-
tion seeks more than $10,000 in
compensatory and punitive dam-
ages.
Senior Michael Carnes, 23,
withdrew from school for "per-
sonal reasons" after he was iden-
punched in the face and left un-
conscious in the stadium stands.
Martin was taken to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, treated and
released.
Later Thursday night,
Weaver was arrested and charged
with assault inflicting serious in-
jury. He was released that night
under $200 bond.
officials were warned that there
was trouble in the stands, but they
failed to intervene before the fight
occurred. Carnes said the officer
told a friend, whom he would not
identify, "Take care of it your-
self
Later, according to Carnes,
a video tape of the fight showed
Carnes' friend saying "I told you
so; I told you there was going to
be trouble
Chancellor Eakin did not
notice the conversation between
the officer and Carnes' friend.
"I don't recall that particu-
lar event in the video Eakin said.
"Most of my attention was di-
rected to the violence Eakin also
said that even if that happened,
the violence in the stands was not
justified.
According to Vice Chancel-
lor Richard Brown, Saturday's
gameagainstCentral Florida went
much more smoothly than the
previous game.
"I spent quite a bit of time
personally observing gates, but
aside from one individual who
brought alcohol in fake binocu-
lars, I did not see one instance of
inappropriate behavior Brown
said. Brown added that he had no
reports of problems on either side
of the stadium.
"The behavior in the stands
could not have been better he
said.
The two fraternities in-
volved in the fighting in the
stands, Pi Kappa Alpha and Sigma
Tau Gamma, are being reviewed
in front of the Interfraternity
Council (IFC).
Pi Kappa Alpha has already
been banned from campus activi-
ties by the university.
The worst punishment pos-
sible for the groups by the IFC is
having their charter revoked. This
would result in the university no
longer recognizing the group as a
fraternity.
Governor stresses early childhood education
Rv IOr?n HpcccII
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
Speakers at the 1993
Chancellor's Forum held Sept.
16, focused on childhood edu-
cation as a foundation for im-
proving life in eastern North
Carolina and the nation.
The Chancellor's Forum
provides an arena for business,
government, education and
community leaders to discuss
issues of concern to eastern
North Carolina. This year the
Forum centered on "Support-
ing Community Leaders' Initia-
tives for Quality
The featured speakers this
year included Dr. Ernest Boyer,
president of the Carnegie Foun-
dation for the Advancement of
Teaching and a former U.S.
Commissioner of Education,
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. and Wil-
liam F. Winter, former Gover-
nor of Mississippi.
Boyer gave the opening
address Thursday morning.
"The simple truth is that
education has seen its way, and
it we ever hope to achieve ex-
cellence in higher learning, we
must begin to understand that
schooling begins before univer-
sities and even before birth it-
self Boyer said.
Boyer said that we must
focus on the physical needs of
Photo by Harold Wise
Governor James B. Hunt Jr. and Chancellor Richard Eakin at last weeks Chancellors Forum stressed
beg,nn,ng educat.on early in a persons life. The forum was directed toward supporting communUy leaders
children in order for them to be
able to focus on learning.
At the luncheon speech,
Gov. Hunt also spoke of young
children as a focus for educa-
tional reform. Under Hunt's
leadership, N.C. earned a repu-
tation for educational innova-
ECU Forensics Society
gets resuscitated
tion and economic develop-
ment.
"If we are really going to
change the lives of our children
and thus our future, we're
gonna have to get everybody
involved Hunt said. "I want
to see this university reach out.
Stretch into some of those coun-
ties that need some extra help
ECU and SprintCarolina
Telephone sponsored the 1993
Chancellor's Forum. Dr. Henry
Peel, a member of the ECU
School of Education faculty,
served as the forum's director.
Students operate restaurant
By Tammy Carter
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Are you the kind of person
who would argue with a sign
post? If you are, Greg Boyd
wants you to sharpen your de-
bate skills and try out for the
new ECU Forensics Society.
Boyd is trying to revive the
Forensics Society, the debate
club that was active on campus
until 1989. The group will hold
its inaugural meeting Wednes-
day, Sept. 22, from 7-8 p.m. in
room 212 in Mendenhall Student
Center.
"Considering the size of the
pool of talent at this university
and the fact that all other schools
of comparable size have them, I
think ECU deserves a debate
team Boyd said.
The team will compete in
two categories of debate � par-
liamentary debateand forensics.
Parliamentary debate consists of
two-man teams that propose and
defend different positions. Fo-
rensics is a more general cat-
egory encompassing a wide va-
riety of techniques.
"I'd like to thank Doug
Kern, a world-ranked debater at
Princeton for helping me intro-
duce parliamentary debate to the
university Boyd said.
Boyd said he expects the
team to compete in events
around the area with local
schools as well as participate in
some larger debate competi-
tions.
"We plan to compete
heavily in local and regional
competitions with schools from
North Carolina and the ACC
schools. We also would like to
participate in two or three of the
big parliamentary debate com-
petitions at the University of
Virginia or the University of
Maryland. That's where we
would face schools like Harvard,
MIT, Columbia and Yale Boyd
said.
See DEBATE page 3
Staff Writer
The Human Environmen-
tal Sciences Building is home to a
unique dining experience that
few ECU students and faculty
know about.
Every Tuesday and Thurs-
day during the fall semester, and
only on Thursday during the
spring, students in the Hotel
Management and Food Services
Department take on the roles of
cooks, wait staff, production,
managers, etc. They prepare and
serve meals to any ECU student
or faculty who has purchased a
ticket.
According to Dr. Postel, one
of the three hospitality manage-
ment faculty members who ro-
tate through the course, the stu-
dents learn theory, management
principles and production prin-
ciples in the food lab. The other
two professors are Dr. Crouch
and Dr. Okeiyi. All three are in
charge of planning and supervi-
sion of the lab. They coordinate
the course and the dining room
functions.
"They are trained to have
back of the house management
before they go out into the field
experience as interns Postel
said. "It is their first attempt at
managing a restaurant
The meals prepared by the
students are served from 12 p.m.
until 12:50 p.m.during each lab
time. The food is made totally
from scratch and consists of a
salad, one entree, one or two veg-
etables, homemade bread, and a
dessert. Three or four of the meals
include a soup.
The formal service meals
consist of a wide variety of foods.
"We have different interna-
tional combinations Postel said.
"We have a Mexican meal, Chi-
nese, we have added a German
meal, and down-home Southern
cooking, too
"We serve recipes that we
know work and that we know
will be good Postel said.
Postel admitted that the
food is not always low-fat, but
that they are full, substantial
meals. They try to keep the fat
content down by not serving any
fried foods, but sometimes there
See RESTAURANT page 2
Tuesday, September 21,1993
10 Pages
Student studies at
Bermuda College
Bermuda offers sun, surf, sand and
business administration
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
Andrew Parker Davis, a
senior at East Carolina Univer-
sity, is the first ECU student to
attend Bermuda College
through study abroad.
Davis is a psychology
major, with a minor in leisure
systems studies, and hehascho-
sen hotel management for his
career. Although it is a two-
year school, Davis chose Ber-
muda College because of its
hotel and business administra-
tion program, one of only three
major programs at the college.
Davis is the son of Fred
Davis and of
Pam and Jim
Mullen, all of
Greenville.
According to
Pam Mullen,
Davis is en-
rolled as a full-
time student
with 13 credit
hours. He is
taking the fol-
lowing
courses: intro-
duction to
management,
hospitality su-
pervisory prac-
tices, food ser-
vice (stresses
management skills), wine and
liquor technology and tennis.
Pam Mullen recently
spoke with Davis who said that
with the exception of introduc-
tion to management, which is
"very difficult all his classes
are "fun courses that are not
real hard. They are mostly
hands-on practice
Parker Davis
Bermuda College is lo-
cated in Devonshire, Ber-
muda. Bermuda's parliament
created the college in 1974,
and it is the only post-second-
ary school on the island. Ap-
proximately 2,500 students
attend Bermuda College and
enjoy small classes of about
eight to 10 students per class.
The other programs offered at
Bermuda are Applied Science
and Arts and Science.
"The teachers are really
nicePam Mullensaid. "They
try to make the classes fun
and enjoyable
In 1980, the college built
the Stonington Beach Hotel to
give practical
experience to
hotel man-
agement stu-
dents. Ber-
muda Col-
lege runs the
hotel and all
the staff are
students of
the College.
Pam
Mullen said
that Davis
loves attend-
ing school in
Bermuda. He
can not work
because you
have to be a
resident of Bermuda in order
to earn money. Therefore,
when Davis finishes his
classes and homework, he
tours the country and learns
about its history and the way
people live.
Davis is also enjoying the
See DAVIS page 3
Photo courtesy of ECU News Bureau
Dr. Howard Schaeffer (left), president of the Burroughs Wellcome
Fund, congratulates the first two recipients of "Burroughs
Wellcome Fund Fellowships in Organic Chemistry" at ECU. Lisa
Hill and Ming Wang will each receive $7,500 to support their
research in synthetic organic chemistry.
ECU students receive awards
By Lisa Dawson
Staff Writer
Barry Kevin Holmes, the son
of Marjorie Holmes of Greenville,
and Melinda Dalise Weidner, the
daughter of Fred and Barbara
Weidner of Vienna, V.A were
named as recipients of awards for
the 1993-94 academic year.
Holmes was named one of
57outstanding marketing gradu-
ates from across the nation to be
selected as this year's George Hay
Brown Scholars. A recent MBA
graduate of ECU, Holmes has
joined NationsBank as an em-
ployee in the firm's Commer-
cial Loan Department. Holmes
is a graduate of Rose High
School.
According to the ECU
News Bureau, The George Hay
Brown Scholar of the Year Pro-
gram is sponsored by the
American Marketing Associa-
tion, which is headquartered in
Chicago. The purpose of this
program is to honor the
memory of a former AMA
president. Selected for the top
award froman ,ong the57nomi-
See AWARDS page 2





September 21, 1993
CRIMB'SPENE
RESTAURANT
September 1
a.m.
esponded to a report in Aycock Hall that an identi-
fied 18-year-old male attempted "tohave sexual intercourse with
a female victim against her u ill
September 4
1:13a.m.
ECU pohce arrested a 26-year-old male on College Hill Drive for
providing fictitious information and failing to have a driver's
license while operating a motor vehicle.
September 9
10:15 a.m.
A 19-year-old Scott Hall resident received a campus citation for
"pulling down his trousers in public
5:55 p.m.
ECU police arrested a subject at Harrington Field for underage
possession of alcohol, resisting arrest, delaying and obstructing
justice and assaulting an officer.
6:16 p.m.
A 19-year-old ECU student received a campus citation at
Harrington Field for public intoxication and urinating in a public
place.
8:55 p.m.
An offender was arrested northwest of Ficklen Stadium for
possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana, re-
sisting arrest, obstructing justice and assault on a government
official. Police seized 3.5 grams of "green vegetable matter as
well as rolling papers.
9:18 p.m.
A 19-year-old male was knocked unconscious by an "offender
striking the victim in the nose" in the Harringtor field parking
lot. The incident will be investigated further, according to ECU
police reports.
is more fat in some meals than
others
People who are interested
in experiencing this unique "res-
taurant but who are a little ner-
vous about eating food prepared
by students, need to worry.
"We guarantee good food
Postel emphasized. "We the fac-
ulty control what comes out
The lab not only serves
people who purchase tickets for
the meals, but they also prepare
food for the daycare center main-
tained in the Human Environ-
mental Science Department. The
students prepare a total of 130
meals each lab period, and 66 are
for the daycare. The rest are for
ticket holders.
Each lab section serves a to-
tal of nine meals. People wishing
AWARDS
nees this year was a student at the
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology.
Weidner was named as the
recipient of a University of North
Carolina Institute of Nutrition
Research Fellowship. As a gradu-
ate student of the ECU School of
Health and Human Performance,
her master's degree project is an
investigation of the effects of ag-
ing on glucose transporter levels
and insulin sensitivity. She is re-
Continued from page 1
to purchase a package may do so
through the Nutrition and Hos-
pitality Management Section.
Packages, which include nine
meals, sell for $36. Presently, there
are approximately' 10 packages
left.
Money will be refunded if
there is a problem on the part of
the food lab, or the food lab will
issue a ticket for a free meal next
semester. If a ticket holder does
not show up for a meal, the money
is not refunded.
Because the labs are run pri-
marily with the money from ticket
sales, meals must be purchased
in the nine-meal package. Per-
haps in the future, as interest in
this "restaurant" continues,
smaller packages will be avail-
able.
Continued from page 1
ceiving a master's degree in exer-
cise physiology, and plans to use
the award of $3,000 toward her
studies here at ECU.
Before pursuing her degree
in exercise physiology at ECU, she
received a bachelor's degree in
sports medicine from Old Domin-
ion University. After graduation,
she plans to pursue a career in
either the cardiac rehabilitation
field or in a corporate fitness pro-
gram.
Quality Furniture
Accessories
Clothin$t(Nc and I sed)
Household Items
10-5 Tues-Fri
10-2 Sat
CONSIGNMENT SHOP "24 Dickinson Ave, Greenville
752-2139
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golden
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MON-SAT 11-5
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SUNDAY
BUFFET
$549
carved meat
NIGHTLY
BUFFET
5-CLOSE
$529
carved meat nightly
WEEKEND
BREAKFAST
MON-SAT 11-5
$469
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
ALFREDO'S
NW YORK STYLE cT
1 2 large , large
I one topping i one topping
pizzas 1 pizza
$10.99; $5.99
'til midnight' 'til midnight
ALFREDO'S
I
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beer 218 e.
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Street :
752.0022
$1.99
'til midnight
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. Jin .iiimim






U Mi�
��!��
� � ��
September 21, 1993
7g �af Carolinian 3
prepai
M.C
mECUir
- at ECU. D.n is
in the ECU medical
department of surgery.
He also worked at Empire Brushes
from 4 p.m. to 12 a.m. in the eve-
nings to earn spend ingmonev tor
Continued from page 1
mda trip.
� Davis is the first
to attend Bermuda
� re are many other in-
ternational study programs avail-
able to E U students. They are
� � : as exchange pro-
ms with students who want to
ted States.
to J( hn Heise ot
Intt
g� with Da aus
uda's British connection
i e very dose ties
with the Bnti-h Commonwealth,
rleis Student . com-
ma at Bermuda
College typically gotoCanada to
: inue their education
Heise also said that thev have
ut discovered international in-
ternships For HospitalityTourism
majors.
PekingPalace
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ALLYOUCANEAT
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'Lunch
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Shopping
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Take Out Orders Available
LUNCH
Mon-Fri 1 1:00am-2:30pm I
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Mon-Thur 5:00pm-9:30pm � Friday 5:00pm-10:30pm
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DEBATE
Cont'd
from
P9-1
Janice Schreiber will serve
as faculty advisor to the team,
and Dr. T. Harrell Allen, chair of
the Communication Depart-
ment, will aid the team as well.
"Dr. Allen said he will lend
intellectual support, and that he
and his department will help in
any way possible. I know Mrs.
Schreiber will be a good advisor.
She was the advisor to the old
team, back in 1989 Boyd said.
Boyd said the team will use
the fall semester to lay the
groundwork for the future and
get competitive in the various
types of debate. The team should
begin competing in the spring.
At the first meeting Boyd
said the team will elect officers
and discuss fund raising efforts.
"Some schools get $15,000-
$20,000 a year. At Princeton the
debate club has a $750,000 en-
dowment and has their own
building Boyd said.
WEDNESDAY
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Greenville,NC
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9871988198919901991 �19921993
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
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Applications are Now being Accepted for
SGA SECRETARY
September 20-24th
REQUIREMENTS:
� 2.0 Grade Point Average
� Completed at least 16 Credit Hrs
� Full-Time Student
Election will be
held on Sept. 29,
Rling deadline is Friday at 5 pm.
Applications may be submitted
between 8 am & 5 pm in the
SGA office (266 MendenhalD.
Any Questions?
Call 757.4726
?o
xHT UNION
l FOR MORE
INFORMATION,
CALL 757-6004.
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU !
Watercolor and
Still Life Paintings
MfjD
September 26 - October 23
Reception:
Monday, October 4th
7:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Gallery
SO
M
"ARMY OF DARKNESS"
SEPTEMBER 22 & 26
"FALLING DOWN
SEPTEMBER 23 - 25
"LORENZO'S OIL
h-
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SEPTEMBER 29 & OCTOBER 3
I "BENNY AND JOON"
I SEPTEMBER 30 - OCTOBER 2
PG-13
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ALL FILMS START AT 8:00 P.M. AND
FREE WITH VALID ECU I.D. FOR
FACULTY, STAFF, AND STUDENTS.
E FOLKS WHO K10






�' I 111 �
The East Carolinian
Opinion
September 21, 1993
TuesdayOpinion
By Alex Ferguson
Abusing "Pirate Pride
n
"Just what are you doing with your life, anyway?"
Fighting, over-consumption of
alcohol at SU game presents an
unfair portrayal of the real ECU fan
We're not trying to beat a dead horse. Honest.
The consequences of last week's fighting a t the ECU-
Syracuse game will be felt for a long time. And not
because the media is forcing its longevity. Contrary to
popular belief, it has nothing to do with us; rather, it
lingers in the conversations at Mendenhall, in the Letters
to the Editor and in the much-needed disciplinary meet-
ings.
We, the media, are here to present an objective
overview of the situation and to offer a few solutions.
Then, and onlv then, can the controversy and rumors be
put to rest.
For the few people that have no clue as to the
incident that occurred on Sept. 9, we will expound. Vari-
ous members of Pi Kappa Alpha and Sigma Tau Gamma
fraternities were involved in a fight at the ECU-Syracuse
football game, held at Ficklen Stadium. Although inves-
tigations are still pending with the Interfraternity Council
(IFC), ECU suspended Pi Kappa Alpha from participat-
ing in activities on campus. No action was taken against
Sigma Tau Gamma. The IFC will now determine if Pi
Kappa Alpha will have their charter revoked.
There were 46 rows of bleachers damaged during
the game. The cost of repairing the bleachers before this
past weekend's game against Central Florida stands at
$6,200. The damage to the bleachers did not occur in just
the fight section, but also in group seating.
This brings us to our first point. The reckless over-
consumption of alcohol (legal or illegal) is the primary
component in problems that occurred during the game.
Whether anyone wants to admit it or bring it into focus,
this university has always had a problem with controlling
substance abuse. Especially during sporting events. And
it always seems to be a problem that is dealt with after the
fact. Thorough, viable options for the cessation of prob-
lems in the future usually don't see the light of day.
Our second point: this is not to say that people
haven't tried. What happens is that a solution is offered,
everyone gets really enthusiastic about solving the ills of
the university, and then when they try and fail, the issue
gets put on the back burner until the next time it occurs
Well, we're now asking the ECU community one
simple thing: to listen. Listen to a group of people who
would like to see the end of stadium fighting, alcohol
over-consumption and bad press. The Editorial Board of
The East Carolinian believes with strong conviction that
ECU never has to see another incident like the one at the
SU football game happen again.
We recommend that the controls that were enacted
for this past weekend's game be in effect throughout the
season and into the future. This means no group seating,
extra security personnel and a point-of-stadium entry
inspection. Those in possession of alcohol at that time
would not be allowed to enter the stadium.
In addition to this, we recommend that since ECU is
one of a handful of universities that has a section on
campus property for tailgating, that alcohol be strictly
limited, if not altogether prohibited, for questions of
liability.
The use of alcohol, when abused, has no place at a
sporting event. Most of the fans that were consuming
alcohol were not old enough to legally purchase it. And if
you're too drunk to stand up, then you certainly don't
belong at a football game. You should be there to support
your team and to enjoy the event.
Last week's incident hurt a lot of people, most im-
portant of whom are the ECU Pirates. If anyone is listen-
ing, make some real changes for them. Maybe then we can
honestly talk about the meaning of "Pirate Pride
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Exec Mive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Maureen Rich, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Serving the ECU community since 1925. The East Carolinian
publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday The masthead
editorial in each edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250 words, which may be edited for
decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
w
100 recycled
paper
It is a question that has
plagued the sanity of college stu-
dents for ages, of that I am sure.
It's uses are unlimited: as a pick-
up line, an ice breaker at parties
and social gatherings, conversa-
tion stimulators, fill-ins for those
awkward momentsof silence. the
list goes on and on. It's the cattle
prod of progress that parents,
teachers and fellow colleagues
use to jolt you in the backside.
And during your final years of
college, this question is repeated
more often than old episodes of
The Cosby Shoiv. The question is:
"What are you going to do with
yourlife?"(Tobereadinawhiny,
nasal tone.)
Eeeeeeee-yuck. The words
alone make one's insides flop
with an abdominal squelch. The
meaning behind these words can
range from indifference to fanati-
cal devotion that may border on
molestation. Everyone, from
your Aunt Bertha (who remem-
bers when you were only this
high, you sweet little thang) to
the neighbors next door, will at
one time or another corner and
coddle you with small talk to
weaken your defenses. And then,
with your mind in a whirl, deliri-
ous with the deluge of questions
concerning classes, who you're
dating and your next haircut ap-
pointment, they swoop down
and plant the bomb.
"What are you going to do
with your life?" (Don't forget that
whiny, nasal tone.)
And if that isn't enough to
make you abandon all thoughts
of a career and take up needle-
point with the other loonies in
Belvue, here's one to really get
the ole self-esteem rocking. It's a
variation of the original that
smacks of hidden objectives, like
cynicism and sarcasm. How
many of you have been ap-
proached with this one?: "Well,
what are you going to do with
your life once you decide to grow
up? (Whiny tone, touch of su-
periority now.)
As E.T. so eloquently put it,
"Ouch
Oh, how I long to jump up
and yell in their faces. Tell them
I'm considering the field of axe
murdering and how I'd like to
use them as my first test subject.
Tell them I'm taking up Interna-
tional Terrorism and I'll have to
dispose of them for fear of giv-
ing away my identity. Tell them
anything, but just tell them off.
When I was younger and
asked about my career goals, I
thought little of it, just that it was
polite and a tad bit nosy for them
to be interrogating me. Now,
when people put The Question
to me, I feel like putting my hands
to my ears and screaming (like
Dustin Hoffman in Rainman
when he was in the airport), in
hopes of blocking out the inces-
sant chatter. Better yet, hitting
the accursed over the head with
a sock full of pebbles would cer-
tainly be a possibility. More grati-
fying to say the least.
At any rate, whatever my
choice of violent response, the
emotional status remains the
same. I can't speak for everyone,
but my indecision concerning my
purpose or lack of one terrifies
me. I have such hard feelings
towards people questioning
my future career choices
mainly because I'm already
pre-occupied with deciding
my goals.
And I'm not alone. Mil-
lions of students today worry
about what's ahead. Jobs aren't
a dime a dozen any more and
often the correct procedures to
get where you need to go are
hidden from view. And the last
thing we need are little remind-
ers popping up, reminding us
to get a life. As if we didn't
know.
So until we find our niche
in life, we'll continue the battle
of control. We'll rein in the
urge to pound the bejeezus out
of the ignoramuses who con-
tinue to poke and prod at our
indecision. And when they ask
what I plan to do with my life,
I can at least say I have one to
work with, and the opportu-
nity to actively influence its
outcome.
Letters to the Editor
Inappropriate actions at game disappoint fans
To the Editor:
Never before have I
been so amazed, amused, an-
noyed, angry, abused and fi-
nally, maybe apathetic (I guess
that takes care of the A's). I was
bumped, bruised, banged, bad-
gered, bemused, befuddled and
bitched at (so muchfor the letter
B). This brings me to my point-
(the letter C)�confused and
concerned. To what am I refer-
ring? The football game Thurs-
day night against Syracuse and
the ECU student population.
In the spirit of "Purple
Pride I anxiously looked for-
ward to my first opportunity to
attend a football game. I stood
in line, got my ticket, arrived
early and found my seat. While
the pre-game festivities were
pleasant, I was appalled (another
A) at the conduct of my fellow
students during the "Star
Spangled Banner Surely, all
students, being high school
graduates, must know it is ap-
propriate to stand and if noth-
ing else, be silent during the
performance of our national an-
them. What I experienced was
cursing, drinking and shouting
until at last a TV camera was
pointed in our direction. Finally
the crowd rallied and sang the
final strains "and the home of
the brave Who says we aren't
media conscious? This was the
start of the end.
Although I had a ticket
with a seat number and a sec-
tion and row designation, I was
systematically shoved, shouted
at and sweared at until I ended
up in a completely different sec-
tion. Where was the usher? He
was three sections away trying
to restore order. At this point I
call it a little too late. If tickets are
too be given out, yea, even sold,
shouldn't someone take respon-
sibility for seeing that proper
seating is enforced? I doubt Sol-
dier Field in Chicago experi-
ences the same problem. I left
the stands and went below to
where the real game, the game
of reality, was being played. I
spentthe rest of the game watch-
ing the ambulances come and
go and the drunks stagger out.
This brings me to my final point.
I am concerned with
the conduct and image of our
university and its students.
Okay, so we have some semi-
reputation to uphold as a "Party
School Great, I love to tailgate.
I even indulge in drinking. My
priority is not to get so blitzed
that I am rude, unpleasant and
ignorant about common cour-
tesy. Is this what school spirit is
all about? I don't think so. I am
concerned that our campus se-
curity is so diligent in checking
for parking stickers and yet so
completely blind to the stagger-
ing amount of alcohol in the
stands. I am concerned about
the campus newspaper's over-
emphasis on banning the kegs.
This is not oppression; it is the
law for most of us. Did anyone
see a shortage of alcohol or
drunks at the game? NOT.
While I am at it, just what IS the
legal drinking age anyway?
(Never mind, just kidding)
Suffice it to say, I had
a negative experience. While this
unfortunate episode will not
diminish my support of the Pi-
rates and ECU, I will be a little
quieterwhenmyfriendsatState
and Carolina rib me about our
"Party Hardy" reputation and
the reasons we don't play
against each other. I would,
however, hope that someone
somewhere will reconsider their
inappropriate actions next time
they attend a football game. We
expect 3 and 4 year-olds to say
"please "thank-you" and "ex-
cuse me Is that too much to
ask of a college student wearing
purple and gold?
Carole L. Bovard
CDFR Major
Letters to the Editor must be signed and accompanied
with a working phone number. Students must also provide
class rank and major. All letters should be addressed to: The
East Carolinian, Attn Opinion Editor, Students Pubs.
Building, Second Floor, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
By Gregory Dickens
Retro-mania:
the hip disease
of the 90's
Editor's note: In keeping with the retro-
craze, this column is being reprinted from
last semester. Our sincerest apologies. (But
read it anyway! You '11 be glad ya did!)
Sometime in the last 10 years, some-
one decided to put our culture into con-
stant retro and now we dwell in nostalgic
kitch. It's annoying. Most of our society
either refers or steals from the past 30
years.
Our popular music is a rehash jam-
boree that nods with affection or non-
creative envy at the blues-inspired swag-
ger of the '60s (Black Crowes, Ju-ju
Hounds) or at the shallow pap of the '70s
(the return of disco via Whitney Houston
and a plethora of Top 40 songs). Remem-
ber the Dirty Dancing craze?
Some of the homage is done with
sincere appreciation of respected works
(most beer commercials apply). Some is
in subtle or blatant mocking; Faith No
More covered The Commodore's "Easy"
and some thrash band did a rendition of
Air Supply's "Making Love Out of Noth-
ing At All Also there is Ugly Kid Joe
demolishing "Cat's In the Cradle" and
Michael Bolton (pick one) for whom death
itself is too good a punishment.
There's the hip fashions. USA TO-
DAY reported that the trends from Eu-
rope for Fall '93 would be "part '70s, part
swashbuckler, part Edwardian dandy
Yes, ladies, now you can freely admit that
the man of your dreams is a lanky, un-
washed fop in a poet shirt with the God-
help-us bell-bottoms that somehow
avoided bonfires in the '80s.
Even tattoos are the rage again,
which causes flashbacks of either "Fan-
tasy Island" or Schneider from "One Day
At A Time
These examples may seem trivial,
but at college, what else is there to put
effort into during personal time? Sure,
there's the pursuit of the opposite sex, but
what is she wearing? What are they
listening to at the clubs? Even recreational
drugs of choice on campuses across the
nation are the "old standards" � mari-
juana, mushrooms and LSD. Everything
old is new again.
Diet Coke used stunning effects to
allow Paula Abdul to perform with Louie
Armstrong, Groucho Marx and
Humphrey Bogart. Do we need to be
entertained with plagiarized film clips of
dead entertainers in order to sell carbon-
ated syrup? More importantly, do we
need Paula Abdul?
We seem to be lost in a Jim Beam
magazine ad where our bathing suits,
Christmas trees and road signs reflect our
desire to "return to the basics Do we
tend to look upon the good old days with
too much enthusiasm? Are we losing our
originality to trends and nostalgia? It
seems too soon to write off progress en-
tirely.
And whose bright idea was it to
make The Brady Bunch cool again?
� �






zaam
��
September 2 1993
The East Carolinian
Classifieds
Page. 5
For Rent
H Help Wanted I Z Help Wanted
For Sale
CEE
Personals
XQ
Greek
PARMt, Pi aces I
block
756-9864.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
large 4 bedroom house. 4 blocks from
campus. Kitchen privileges, 2 bath-
rooms, great house! Call 725-2248.
Non-smoker preferred.
NAGS HEAD BEACH HOUSES �
weekend or weekly. Very affordable.
Students welcome! Oceanfront and
Qceanview cottages. Call Laura at (919)
261-8417.
Roommate Wanted
FEMALE - Wanted to share 4 bedroom
apt. in Tar River Estates. $162.50 1 4
utilmo. Ask for Christine.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Looking for
mature, responsible female to share 2
bedroom townhouse on 5th st. Non-
smoker preferred. Rent is $390. Call
752-8910 for more info.
B'l Help Wanted
EARN S2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell only 8 trips and you go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City! Great
Resume Experience! 1-800-678-6386!
$10-5400 WEEKLY. Mailing brochures!
Sparefull-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705.
AA EARN $5,000Mo. GUARAN-
TEED! FAST Huge money-making
jobs and opportunities on your cam-
pus. Call today for complete details.
Free cruise! America's 1 Company!
919-929-3139.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
material provided. Send SASE to Mid-
west mailers, PO Box 395, Olathe KS
66051. Immediate response.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Students
Needed! Earn up to $2,500month in
i anneries or fishing vessels. Many em-
ployers provide Room & Board &
Transportation. Over 8,000 openings.
No EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Male
or Female. For more information call:
(206) 545-4155 ext. A5362.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn
up to $2,000 month world travel
(Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.).
Summer and Career employment avail-
able. Noexperience necessary. Formore
information call 1-206-634-0468 ext.
C5362.
GREEKS & CLUBS: Raise up to $1000
in JUST ONE WEEK! For your frater-
nity, sorority or club. Plus $1000 for
yourself! And a free T-shirt just for
calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 75.
STOCK SALES PERSON part-time.
Heavy lifting required. Apply at the
Youth Shop Boutique, Arlington Vil-
lage.
FUNDRAISER: All it takes is a group
with a little energy and a lot of excite-
ment to earn top dollars in just one
week! Call (800) 592-2121 Ext. 312.
RECEIVING ROOM POSITION -
Verify price tag merchandise. Must
be available 4pm to 9pm Mon-Fri, 3-5
nights per week and Saturdays. Apply
at Customer Service. Brody's, the Plaza
Monday and Thursday 1-lpm.
BRODY'S is now accepting applica-
tions for additional Sales Associates fro
JuniorSportswear Young Men's. Flex-
ible 10-2, 12-9, or 6-9 scheduling op-
tions. SalaryClothing discounts. Ap-
ply at Customer Service Brody's the
Plaza Monday and Thursday l-4pm.
WANTED: Church organist. Salary ne-
gotiable. Call mornings, 9-12. First Bap-
tist Church, Robersonville, NC 795-
3601.
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT
- Make up to $2000-4,000month
teaching basic conversational English
abroad. Japan, Taiwan and S. Korea.
Many provide room and board other
benefits. No previous training or teach-
ing certificate required. For more in-
formation call: (206)632-1146ext. J5362.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 Ext. P-3712.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to distrib-
ute "Student Rate" subscription cards
at this campus. Good income. For in-
formation and application write to: Col-
legiate Marketing Services, Box 1436,
Mooresville NC 28115.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY! As-
semble products at home. Call toll free
1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
NEEDED: Responsible, energetic per-
son to take care of teenagers after school,
3-6pm, Monday-Thursday. Must have
transportation. Call collect after 6pm
524-5446.
KEYBOARD PLAYER NEEDED -
Gender is irrelevant. Must have chops,
equipment and vocal proficiency.
(Pompous, egotistical, lazy, irrespon-
sible, close-minded, "I'm-not-helping-
with-the-PA money-grubbing, stingy,
feeble-minded, "What's-MIDI?" type
people need not apply). Call Wayne or
Matt at 752-5586.
For Sale
FOR SALE - '87 Ford Escort GL, silver, 2-
door hatchback 4 speed, ac, amfm cass
power steering. Very dean. $1500.00. Call
Melissa at 321-2926.
ROLLAWAY BED, twin deluxe 6 inch
mattress, adjustable back, new, can't use.
Cost $350, sacrifice at $170 cash. Call 637-
2645.
FERRET FOR SALE Male, great with
people,descented,healttiy,comeswithcage
and other supplies-He's groovy! Call 752-
2248.
SEARSKENMORE PORTABLE DRYER-
excellentcorelitkTL$150iX)hascottDnstuidy
touch up, permanent press, air only cydes.
TANDY lOOOHX COMPUTER Excellent
condition. 640K, 2 disk drives, monitor,
monitor stand, dot matrix printer, $300.
Phone 7564642.
Membership to the CLUB FOR WOMEN
ONLY. Take up payments of only 29.95 a
month. Contract good until 1194. If inter-
ested call Melanie at 931-8343.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED cars, trucks,
boats,4-wheelers, rnotorhomes,by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available in your area now! Call 1-
8004364363 Ext C-5999.
1990 HONDA CRX - Teal blue, AT, AC,
AMFMCass40MPGExcCondlowner,
Hi miles, super dean $6100.00. Call Tun at
355-6024.
TWIN SEALY MATTRESS and box
springs. Like new Call 355-5452.
GRADUATING SOON? Have (4) new
Italian suits. Boughtforwork,butdedded to
gobacktoschool.SizeO:415-P-3131)hardto
find, 12 price. Rizzo 752-7107.
!? Services Offered
TRAVEL FREE! Sell quality vacations.
The hottest destinations in Jamaica,
Cancun, South Padre, Florida. Most
reliable Spring Break Company with
the easiest way towards free trip! Best
commissions! Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
LvgMt Ubmy tlMmmMn hi U.S.
13.27STUKS-ALL SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC or COO
800-3510222
Or. rush $2.00 to: Rtfttrdi li
11322 Idaho Ave 206-A. Los Angetes. CA 90025
LOOK YOUR BEST for thebrand new
year.Call Kimberly at931-7863 foryour
personal fitness training.
PROFESSIONAL CARPET CLEAN-
ING priced right for College Students-
call 752-8163 and leave message.
BARTENDER for private parties. 3
years experience. Call 355-5452, ask for
Gunnar.
ATTENTION! Delta Epsilon Chi in-
vites all those students interested in
joining a new and exciting organiza-
tion to an orientation social Tuesday
September 21,6:00pm. At Room 2014
GCB. An Education & Business Co-
ed Fraternity. OPEN TO ALL MA-
JORS Contact Skie Lilly, VP of
Public Relations or Advisors @ 757-
6549!
RUSH SILVER WINGS! A National
Co-Ed service organization that is a
refreshing alternative to Greek Life.
Mendenhall Rm. 14, Sept. 21, 22, 23
7:00-8:30 pm.
Lost & Found
FOUND: Medium-sized mixed black
lab. Green collar, flea collar and choker.
Found on lOthSt. by ECU Police. Please
call 752-1564.
IQ
FORT HENRY S ARMY NAVY
1501 S. EVANS STREET 756-8781
Greek
SIGMA TAU GAMMA - Thanks for
Friday night guys, we had a blast! And
congratulations to your new pledges!
PI DELTA wants to welcome the new
Epsilon pledge class! Hope you had
fun at the picnic girls! P.S. - Thank you
for having the picnic, Susan and Eliza-
beth! Love, the Sisters.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA - Thanks for
a great time last Thursday! Tailgating
was great and the game was too.A
special thanks to Danny for getting
everyone home safely.) Can't wait to
see you again and meet the new
pledges! Love, the sisters of Alpha
Delta Pi.
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA DELTA
PI would like to especially thank
DUSTIN for all of his hard work. We
all appreciate your help! Couldn't have
done it without you - love, ALPHA
DELTA PI.
PI DELTA would like to congratulate
all fraternities on a great rush!
TO PI KAPPA ALPHA- We had a
great time Friday Night. And con-
gratulations to your new pledges.
Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
sisters of Alpha Xi Delta: Amy
Dodson, Torie Thurston, Christy
Spears, Kelly Fountain, Nancy-
Barrett, Misty Blalock, Michelle
Bowen, Hollie Casey and Leslie
Alexander. We love you!
i
THANK YOU THETA CHI for the
best pre-game fun on or off campus!
You guys can sure show us a great
time! Love Delta Zeta.
TOPSAIL BEACH was quite a blast;
Elephants, forests and shark teeth
from the past. Delta Zeta pledges,
ya'll are an awesome bunch, too bad
Beth had a littlecrunch! M&M's, fire-
works and lots of pictures too, no-
body wanted to comeback to school!
Thanks for a great weekend. Love,
Erica.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA, glad to
see everyone came out last night for
rush! Looking forward to seeing you
again tonight for subs! All those still
interested- it's not too late! Comeout
and join us tonight at the Central
Campus Meeting RoomFleming
Basement & Wednesday (TBA) at
5:30pm. See ya there!
CHI OMEGA PLEDGES love their
big sisters! Thanks for making Chi
Omega and our pledging special.
Love, pledge class of 1993.
PANHELL. EXEC. & RHO CHI's,
Time has passed, this may be late,
but thanks for making rush so great.
The days were hot, rushees full of
fear, but was definitely worth seeing
Yetta's cheers. Deaha's parking strat-
egies were bold, Anna's still search-
ing for her gold. And wow Nikki,
how about our big lie. When we con-
fessed, you rho chis cried. Don't for-
get Berting, you did great with rush,
get ready Phoebe - Junior Panhell.
will crush. We missed you Louisa,
but it was still fun, what can I say,
Laura, but a job well done! Love, Jill.
Announcements
PRE-PROFESSIONAL
HEALTH MAJORING OR
MINORING STUDENTS
You are cordially in-
vited to our Annual Welcome
Back Reception. Faculty and
other professionals will be
present. This reception is to
welcome all new interest per-
sons and returning students
on September 21, 1993 from
5:30-7:00p.m. in the Multi-
purpose Room of Mendenhall.
Semiformal dress is the at-
tire.
ECU DERATE
The first meeting for
the formation of the ECU De-
bate team will be in room
212 of Mendenhall on
Wednesday Sept. 22 at
7:00p.m. All interested stu-
dents are welcome to attend.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
ALLIANCE
The ECU Women's Alliance
will hold a reorganizational
meeting on Thursday, Sep-
tember 23 at 4:00p.m. in GCB
2002. We're actively seek-
ing new members interested
in social and political equal-
ity for women and men.
STUDENT HEALTH SER-
VICES
Last chance immunization
clinic at the student health
service is scheduled for
Wednesday September 22
from 8:30-11:30a.m. and
l:30-4:00p.m.
GET CONTROL OF YOUR
TIME AND YOUR LIFE
Are you struggling to get ev-
erything done on time? Put-
ting things off until the last
minute? Come to a workshop
on time management on Sept
22 at 7pm in Mendenhall
Room 221. Brian Haynes, di-
rector of Minority Student
Affairs, will be the pre-
senter. This session is part
of the workshops on Wednes-
days series coordinated by
the Counseling Center.
PSI CHI
There will be a Psi Chi meet-
ing and pizza party on Sept
21 at 5:15 pm in Rawl 208.
All interested members are
welcome. Check the Psi Chi
bulletin board for any up-
dates.
CRIMINAL
JUSTICESOCIAL WORK
ALLIANCE
There will be a meeting
Wednesday Sept 22 in
Ragsdale 218 from 4:30-5:30
pm. We will be discussing
the events for the new school
year. Please try to attend.
For more info, contact Jason
Shirtz at 355-4598.
GREEKS ADVOCATING
MATURE MANAGEMENT
OF ALCOHOL
GAMMA will be holding their
first meeting September 22
at 7:00. This will be an in-
formal meeting at the Alpha
Phi house on 10th St. Call
Angle at 830-6738 for more
information. All GAMMA
delegates must attend! Bring
ideas for an alcohol aware-
ness week and homecoming.
GAMMA BETA PHI
There will be a meeting to-
day at 5:00 pm in room 244
Mendenhall. We will be dis-
cussing ideas and a possible
membership drive.
CHILDREN'S MIRACLE
NETWORK
Join the Children's Hospi-
tal of Eastern North Caro-
lina by becoming a volun-
teer and ensuring that if
your child, or a friend's
child is in need of special-
ized medical care, he or she
will have the highest qual-
ity of healthcare. Please call
the Children's Miracle Net-
work Telethon Office at' i-
800-673-5437.
BUSINESS CAREER DAY
Sept. 21, 1993
9:00 A.M1:30 P.M.
Co-Sponsored by ECU School of Business and Career Services
Participants:
ANDERSEN CONSULTING (3)
ARTHUR ANDERSEN (35)
ATCOM BUS. TELEPHONE SYS. (30)
BELK STORES SERVICES (17)
BROOKS FASHIONS (4)
BURLINGTON INDUSTRIES (10)
CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY (14)
COOPERS & LYBRAND (44)
COPYPR0 1NC. (!2)
COMPUTER DATA SYS INC. (52)
D1XON, ODOM & CO. (22)
FASTENAL COMPANY (32)
FERGUSON ENTERPRISES (13).
THE FIDELITY BANK (26)
FIRST CITIZENS BANK (41)
FIRST UNION NATIONAL BANK (40)
FOOT LOCKER (37)
GUILFORD MILLS (18)
H.C. BRILL COMPANY (9)
HIGH POINT POLICE DEPT. (28)
IBM RTP (25)
INST. OF INTERNAL AUDITORS (46)
INST. OF MGT. ACCOUNTANTS (43)
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE (54)
JACKSONVILLE POLICE DEPT. (45)
JEFFERSON PILOT LIFE INSUR. (7)
KMART (15)
KPMG PEAT MARWICK (50)
LADY FOOT LOCKER (27)
MADDUX SUPPLY COMPANY (33)
MBM CORPORATION (23)
MCGLADREY & PULLEN (19)
MURPHY FARMS, INC. (47)
NATIONSBANK CORP. (36)
NIKE SPORT GRAPHICS (21)
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� �m �'�





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
September 21, 1993
Widespread Panic to hit Attic on Tuesday
Photo courtesy ot Capricorn Records
Widespread Panic will make its second appearance at the Attic on Tuesday. Panic, originally from Athens, Ga played at the HORDE Festival this
summer with Big Head Todd and the Monsters.
By Steve Griffen
Staff Writer
The band Widespread Panic
will be making their second ap-
pearance at the Attic on Tuesday
night. They have a new release
called Everyday, and they have
just completed a successful
H.O.R.D.E. tour performing with
bands like Blues Traveler and
Phish. Widespread Panic has a
distinctive sound like no other
band. They have been described
by The Boston Globe as having "a
blend of Southern 1 ack'n'blues
sound with San Francisco
psychedelia
The band is originally from
Athens, Ga. Their new release
Evenday was released on March
23,1993, and has been a huge hit.
Many major radio stations began
playing the album's first single,
"Wondering even before official
add day.
Along with their new album,
Widespread Panic also was in-
volved with the H.O.R.D.E. Festi-
val this summer. The festival in-
cluded bands like Blues Traveler
and Big Head Todd, who also have
had success with their new al-
bums. Rolling Stone Magazine said
these bands had so much success
on the H.O.R.D.E. Tour, because
"they are all more exciting live
than on record Many fans
thought that Widespread Panic
put on a better show than anyone
on the tour because of their easy-
to-dance-to, groove-style music.
Lead singer John Bell says, "A
Today: Jock Itch
Answered by Jennifer Philips, Student Health Service
Question: What is jock itch
anyway?
Answer: The medical term
for "jock itch" is tinea cruris, a
fungal infection of the pu-
bic region. This type
of infection is more y
common among
majes than fe- .
males and it is
usually aggra- �
vated by friction
and moisture. The 9
fungus frequently J
grows on athletic sup-
porters that have not been
washed.
Jock itch is characterized
by redness, oozing or some pe-
ripheral scaling and itching.
The symptoms of jock itch can
be minirnized by wearing boxer-
type shorts as opposed to close-
fitting shorts or jockey briefs.
The application of pow-
�� i der to the infected
area is often recom-
mended. Soiled or
� sweaty undergar-
ments should be
' changed fre-
quently.
The "powder,
air and clean shorts"
" regimen is usually suc-
cessful at relieving symptoms,
but it may take up to two weeks
for complete relief. If symp-
toms persist, a health care pro-
vider should be seen.
Thumbs down for 'Blues'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Undercover Blues is a new movie
starring Kathleen Turner and Den-
nis Quaid. Both stars desperately
need a hit film to buoy their failing
careers. Undercover Blues is as far
from a hit as one could imagine.
Undercover Blues tells the tale
of Jane (Kathleen Turner) and Jeff
(Dennis Quaid) Blue, government
agents married to each other and
the proud parents of a little girl.
Both parents want time off to raise
their baby, Jane Louise (or Louise
Jane since the parents cannot agree
on the order of the names).
The running joke about the
baby's name is one of many con-
tinuing gags in Undercover Blues
thatelicits no laughter. Like almost
every joke in this boring film, this
joke is played as being exquisitely
cute, though it exhibits neither wit
nor wile.
As the film opens, Jane and
Jeff are seen at a party. Only later
does the viewer learn that they
only showed up to eat; they did
not even know who threw the
party. Their brash behavior indi-
cates the intellect of these two
agents. Jane and Jeff act smugly in
every situation so that after 10 min-
utes of film, I was tired of them.
Their sophomoric sense of humor
grates harshly upon the viewer.
The music is justplain terrible.
The most interesting part of this
cinema tic experience is seeing what
type of obvious soundtrack
rhythms would accompany the ac-
tion on the screen. Stealthy music
pulses while Jeff walks down a
dark alley; emotionally nauseat-
ing music wails while Jane tells
Jeff to be careful before he departs
for a dangerous rendezvous; and
jazz music shows up everywhere
else, since the tale unfolds in New
Orleans.
Just for fun (and out of sheer
boredom), I counted the number
of bands that appeared on screen.
To beat boredom in class, I re-
member counting the times some
teachers would say "urn and the
feeling during the film was simi-
lar. I found at least five instances
where musicians appeared on the
screen: in nightclubs, parades,
funeral processions and on street
corners. I suppose the film mak-
ers really wanted to get the idea
across that New Orleans is a city
filled with music. Either that or
See BLUES page 7
Norman Connors
makes world funky
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
This Mojazz label from
Motown Records is really smokin'
like a coal fire. I mean it. Every
release I've heard on this label
has been a beautiful thing, and
Norman Connors' Remember Who
You Are is no
bompNaima" is a smooth num-
ber that somehow manages to
ease in a fast quality amongst its
pristine smoothness.
"I Can't Wait Til I See You
Again" is good stuff, featuring
D e n i s e
exception. I
love it, you'll
love it, the
whole world
will be a better
place because
of it.
This album
features lots of
guest stars,
smooth bal-
lads, funky bal-
lads, some
funky movers
and all that lus-
ciousjazz and thumpin' bass that
make life worth living.
Oh, life is good. But hey, this
album is half and half: half funky
jazz and half jazzy ballads and
half fun (what the heck, it's half
soul too).
So hey, I think my favorite is
"Just Like This a prime little
mover, with one of those bass
riffs that 1 dig: a-bomp-bomp-
This album
features lots of
guest stars and
thumpin' bass that
makes life worth
living.
Stewart.
Eve
Cornelius
adds her
delicious
vocals to
"Tell Me a
Bedtime
Story a
fairy tale
song writ-
ten by
H e r b i e
Hancock.
And if you
like it slow, mellow and nice, try
"Only When She Cries
"Lush Life with its fresh pi-
ano and Spencer Harrison vocals,
slays me; I think you'll love it.
You'll also love the title track, it's
beautiful.
So do yourself a favor and get
more value for your jazz dollar.
Check out Norman Connors. Life
is good.
4Non-
Blondes
Neither Roger
Rocha, Christa
Hillhouse, Linda
Perry, nor Dawn
Richardson is
blonde.
Photo courtesy ot
Interscope Records
Dirty Dozen to bop at Thalian Hall Center
Wilmington, N. C.�To kick
off the 1993-94 "Thalian Hall Pre-
sents" Season, Thalian Hall Cen-
ter for the Performing Arts, Inc.
has cooked up an evening that's
easy on the pocketbook and "Big
Easy" in style. The evening be-
gins at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept.
23 at Thalian Hall with a concert
by the Dirty Dozen Brass Band.
Direct from New Orleans, the
Dozen will dish out a potent mix
of jumping jazz, featuring music
from their latest Columbia re-
lease, Jelly, celebrating the music
of Jelly Roll Morton. After the
concert, roll on down to the Pilot
House where era wdads and more
live music are on the house; a
cash bar will be available.
From the most prestigious
jazz festivals here and abroad,
from the Far East to the Midwest,
the Dirty Dozen Brass Band is
constantly on the road playing
their irresistible brand of New
Orleans music. The London Times
heralds the group as "one of the
two or three most enthralling jazz
acts in the world
The eight piece band takes its
name from the Dirty Dozen So-
cial and Pleasure Club, a descen-
dent of one of New Orleans his-
toric black "sou sous" or burial
societies. In recent times, the sou
sous have become pleasure clubs
and places where great music of
the city is perpetuated. The Dirty
Dozen Brass Band was born in
just such a club, created to keep
the city's dying funeral and
marching band tradition alive
while injecting fresh young tal-
ent and ideas into the these tradi-
tions.
In style, the band takes a mod-
ern attitude and combines it with
historic roots, adding bop, funk
and rhythm and blues to the
steamy mix of music that they
create. In concert, they'll move
fiom a street march to a soulful
ballad and finish off with a
bopping jazz romp. Overlaying
their performance is pure joy in
their music-making.
The band's eclectic appeal has
See ART page 7
lot of people like to be surprised.
Whenever we play, it seems that
we're either right on the verge
or smack in the middle of some-
thing new�and if it's new to us,
it's got to be a surprise for oth-
ers. Music should be exciting
foreverybodyallatonce The
first time Widespread Panic
came to the Attic in Greenville,
everyone I talked to said it was
one of the best shows they had
ever been to. This year should
be even better with their new
album and gained experience
from the H.O.R.D.E. Festival.
The band enjoys playing on
the big national circuit, but they
seem to really like going back
and playing for small towns like
Greenville. John Bell says, "Play-
ing live for a different city each
night is what keeps it exciting.
It's a great thing having differ-
ent situations available where
we can experiment and interact
musically
It is not often that such a
popular band as Widespread
Panic comes to Greenville. The
band puts on a good show wher-
ever they go, whether it's at a
huge festival like the H.O.R.D.E.
or at a small town club like the
Attic. A review of the band in
Secret Guide to Music said, "Ev-
erything about them clicks�the
keyboard and piano, the guitar,
the bass, the drums, the
vocalsthe sum effect being ul-
tra-professional and seasoned
to perfectionthe kind of stuff
legends are made of, really
Foley on
Mojazz
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
Foley's debut on the phenom-
enal Mojazz label, 7 Years
AgoDirections in Smart-Alec Mu-
sic, isloadedwithstrongmessages;
he addresses drugs, date rape and
mesorrystateofblackentertainers.
Yet,whilehefrontsaheavyprernise,
the conglomeration ot rap, funk,
blues and static creates a dynamic
listening experience. And look out,
there's the ever-popular warning
label: explicit lyrics!
Foley wasaclosefriendof Miles
Davis, andhiscredits "forever dedi-
cate" his work to Jimi, Miles, Sly,
and Richard Pryor. Foley's work
shows flashes of genius, and I think
he too will one day be a superstar
(bytheway,that'sSlyStone,notSly
Stallone).
The album contains 23 tracks,
ranging from a few seconds to al-
mostsix minutes. There'ssomecra-
ziness here and there. Foley mixes
a lot of modes in the tunes, some-
times dialogue, sometimes an in-
terview or a slowed-down rap, and
it all works together to create a
context from which to blast the so-
cial condition of America. There's
"Ain't No Class (N Da Middle)
which talks about the system and
"The Man and "Cum 'Round
(Parts I & II) a scathing look at
physical and mental rape. "R U
Gonna B" is about the support and
loveeveryone needs. Foley'ssongs
are about life, plain and simple.
"Better Not Die (N Amerika
Being Black)" parallels Elvis and
Miles, and suggests The Man don't
like no prosperous blacks. "Sep-
tember 28th, 1991" has some wail-
inggui tar commemorating theday
MilesDavisdied. "Little Davis"isa
jazzy little jammin' number and
"Who Did What?" contains some
of those words of wisdom that we
all need.
So basically, I like this album. It
jams and it touches the heart and
mind at the same time, and thaf s
good stuff. Don't forget his cover of
"Black Dog a jazzy jam that
smokes the lacquer off the guitar.
You' ve got to listen closely to know
it's the Zeppelin tune. Hey, this is
all good stuff, and it's all about life,
and a life i- something everybody
should have, so I guess that means
everybody should get this album.
� "������





September 21, 1993
The East Carolinian 7
,ed �
i pg. 6
BLUES
Continued from page 6
with
have brought
nd to recordings
b Manhattan "ransfer, the
Neville Brothers, Buckwheat
Zydeco and Poi Dog Pondering.
The band s own recordings have
featured guest performances by
Dizzy Gillespie, Branford
Marsalis and Dr. John, among
others.
Tickets for the kickoff con-
cert and evening are $12 per per-
son for reserved sea ting. For tick-
ets or reservations, call or visit
the Center Box Office at Thalian
Hall, 310 Chestnut Street, 343-
3664. Long-distance customers in
North Carolina mav call toll free
at 1-800-523-2820 The perfor-
mance is presented by Thalian
Hall Center for the Performing
Arts and is sponsored by the Pilot
House Restaurant.
Be kind to
Mother
Earth and
recycle this
newspaper.
(after you read
it!)
the wanted to add something to
. � me in this tiresome film.
nnis Quaid has always
proved annoying as an actor. His
cocky brashness seems to derive
more from conceit than good-
hearted bragging. His characters
continually grate on one's nerves.
He has never made a blockbuster
film mostly because he possesses
no charm as an actor.
Though he has made a few
vvatchable films, their success has
come about more in spite of than
because of Quaid.
Quaid's character in Under-
cover Blues displays exaggerated
conceit. A New Orleans police lieu-
tenant says at one point: "I hate
him. I really hate him I agree.
Kathleen Turner once made a
nation of cinema-goers turn its
head. Lately, mostof her films have
only turned stomachs. Her choice
of roles has been ill-advised since
1989's War of the Roses. The only
one of several films she has made
since then that I even remember
opening in theaters was V. I.
Warshawski, which closed almost
immediately after it opened.
Her work in Undercover Blues
shows off the same smart, sexy and
defiantTurner of Prizzi's Honor and
Body Heat, but the script gives her
nothing to say and little to do. This
film will move quickly to the back
of the video shelf along with all of
her other recent work.
One continuing joke in Under-
cover Blues provides some amuse-
ment if only because it gets carried
on way too long. Early in the film, a
crook who calls himself M uerte tries
to mug Jeff. Jeff quickly dispenses
of him with a baby stroller while he
holds his infant. If this is your idea
of a funny plot contrivance, you
may just like the film since most of
it is like this.
The assailant vows to kill Jeff
and continues trying to do so until
the closing credits. When Jane asks
about Muerte after Jeff encounters
him while he is out shopping, Jeff
tells her that "he could be useful
The director, Herbert Ross, obvi-
ously felt so too, since he has Muerte
show up in almost every scene.
Undercover Blues offers nothing
to its audience, not wit, humor, sus-
pense, good family funnothing. It
has a wafer-thin plot with uninter-
esting characters. As for Turner and
Quaid, they had better hope for bet-
ter scripts, because if they keep
making garbage like this, they soon
may find themselves working next
on television movies.
Yet even as a television movie,
Undercover Blues would have had
low ratings. Even television audi-
ences are more discriminating than
this.
On a scale of one to 10, Under-
cover Blues rates a two.
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Leadership Excellence Starts Here





-��
The East Carolinian
Fage8
Sports
September 21, 1993
Wliat's the 411?
Friday, Sept. 17
Volleyball
lost to UNGGreensboro, 15-6,
11-15,16-14,13-7
Soccer
lost to George Mason, 5-1
Saturday, Sept. 18
Football
beat Central Florida, 41-17
Volleyball
lost to Georgia State 15-8,9-15,
15-10,15-7
Cross Country
men placed 3rd, women placed
2nd
Sunday, Sept. 19
Soccer
lost to James Madison, 3-0
Monday, Sept. 20
GaJf
at Kiawah Island Collegiate,
Charleston, S.C Late
What's On Tup?
Tuesday, Sept. 21
Volleyball (1-11)
at Coastal Carolina, Conway,
N.C at 6 p.m.
Golf
at Kiawah Island Collegiate,
Charleston, S.C.
Wednesday, Sept. 22
Soccer (3-4)
versus VCU at 4 p.m.
P Football Top 25
I.Florida St. (57)
2. Alabama (5)
3. Miami
4. Notre Dame
5. Florida
6. Nebraska
7. Ohio State
8. Michigan
9. Penn State
10. Oklahoma
11. Tennessee
12. Syracuse
13. Colorado
14. Texas A&M
15. Arizona
16. Washington
17 Stanford
18. North Carolina
19. N.C. State
20. California
21. Brigham Young
22. Virginia
23. Wisconsin
24. Louisville
25. Auburn
Pirates beat UCF, 41-17, lose QB
By Brian Cunningham
Photo by Harold Wise
Freshman quarterback Chris Hester stepped up big for the Pirates after Marcus Crandell was lost for
the year in the beginning of the second quarter. Hester was 17 of 23 for 216 yards.
Crandell's season ended
by late hit from Ekiyor
Staff Writer
Another solid performance
by running back Junior Smith,
combined with a much improved
defensive effort, helped belt ECU
to a convincing and emotional
victory over the Golden Knights
of Central Florida,41-17, in front
of a capacity crowd of 30,867 Sat-
urday at Ficklen Stadium.
However, the victory may
have been overshadowed by a
devastating and gruesome injury
suffered to starting quarterback
Marcus Crandell at the hands of
Knight outside linebacker, Emil
Ekiyor.
"Marcus Crandell suffered a
dislocation of his left ankle on the
field according to ECU team
physician Dr. John Spiegal. This
report came immediately after
the game.
Dr. Spiegal went on to say
that the degree of the injury
would determine Crandell's sta-
tus for the remainder of the sea-
son. It turned out the team's worst
-case scenario came true:
Crandell will be out for the re-
mainder of the season.
Redshirt freshman Chris
Hester stepped in and turned in
a flawless performance in which
he completed 17 of 23 passes for
216 yards and a touchdown.
"When I saw Marcus go
down, I knew it was up to me to
come in and lead the team
Hester said. "After the first se-
ries, the guys had confidence in
me and I had confidence in my
own abilities Hester will offi-
cially make his first collegiate
start next Saturday at Washing-
ton.
Hester's presence was
quickly felt as he found the seams
and connected on numerous
short passing routes. He also hit
some crucial passes on third
down. Hester did a fine job of
looking to secondary receivers
such as Ronnie Williams when
primary targets Allen Williams
and Morris Letcher were cov-
See GAME page 9
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
ECU's 19-year-old quarterback, Marcus
Crandell, lay on his back with his left foot twisted
over 90 degrees, like his leg was made of play-doh.
It was hard to tell what was broken, and specu-
lation of a career-ending knee in-
jury ran through the stadium
along with vivid memories of Joe
Theisman's broken leg at the
hands of Lawrence Taylor.
Doctors operated on Crandell
for 2 12 hours to repair a dislo-
cated ankle and broken fibula. He
is expected to miss the remainder
of this season.
The person responsible for
this would not be so important
except that, unlike Taylor, Emil
Ekiyor hit Crandell late.
To the dismay of most ECU
fans, Ekiyor- was not ejected. He
found comfort in his coaches on
the sideline, who patted him on
the head.
"1 don't know if he clobbered him Central
Florida Head Coach Gene McDowell said.
Really? Simple physics would suggest that
Crandell's ankle would not have snapped from a
love-pat.
"(Ekiyor) claims that he was trying to catch him
and keep him from falling McDowell added in
defense of his player.
Well, Crandell would not have needed to be
caught if Ekiyor had not smashed into the freshman
from behind, after the play was over.
A player lacking true ability will rely on breaking
the rules: Ekiyor had one tackle during the game.
A coach lacking integrity will let his players get
away with breaking the rules: four minutes after
Crandell's season ended on a cheap-shot, Junior
Smith ran out of bounds and got tackled late by
linebackerCharlesAnderson(15-yard personal foul).
"That was just a horrible one on us McDowell
said.
On the next play, Jerris
McPhail got an eye full of fingers
and his face mask twisted (15-
yard personal foul).
"(It) was just a rake across
the face � he didn't even grab
his face mask McDowell re-
plied.
Somehow, the UCF coach
seemed more confused about the
ill will towards his team than the
flagsandsaid, thecrowd,for
whatever reason, thought we
were the bad guys after (Ekiyor
injured Ciandell)
Seconds after Ekiyor rolled
off of Crandell, tight-end
Carlester Crumpler took off his
helmet, fell to the ground and his prayers were on
their way up. Ekiyor mulled around the field, took
a seat on the bench and waited for play to resume.
To protect Ekiyor from the brunt of angry spec-
tators, several additional security officers were
moved from the student section to the Central Florida
bench on the south side of the stadium.
Even though no one on ECU's football team
would offer any warning to Ekiyor after the game,
he may, again, need protection if the Golden Knights
ever face off with the Pirates again.
Ekiyor is now a wanted man.
Rugby kicks off
season with style
By William Ellis
Staff Writer
Wham, bam, thank you
ma'am.
The ECU rugby team opened
their new season with a work-
man-like win, 43-0, over North
Carolina State's Wolf Pack. The
Pirates dominated all phases of
the game as they smashed through
State at will.
Despite wet conditions, the
Pirate backs handled very well.
The halfback combination of Sean
Miller and Andy Horrocks kept
the ball steadily moving down the
line. For example: both wings and
fullback scored.
The Pirates were led by Rick
Snow's hat trick as he ran in three
tries from right wing. His cohorts,
fullback Opie Moss and left wing
MikeCulligart,alsoscoredagainst
ahard tacklingState defense. Moss
also added four conversions to
the total.
The forwards had a field-day,
too. Senior lock Jay Keller domi-
nated the lineouts, provided a
driving force in set scrums and
ran amok through a disorganized
State defense. Whenever State
tried to stabilize play, the Pirate
forwards drove in, knocked State
back, stripped the ball and passed
it to the backs who continued the
assault on State's goal.
ECU committed numerous
penalties as they aggressively
sought out Wolfpack ball carri-
ers. In a closer game, the minuses
would have crippled the Pirates.
On this day, the Pirates so thor-
oughly dominated State it did not
matter. The penalty total reflected
the reckless abandon with which
Pirate ruggers went after the
Wolfpack in all phases of the
match.
Forward domination was so
thorough that State nearly con-
ceded two pushover tries to the
Pirate forwards.
Captain Jason Webb cred-
ited his two scores to the forward
pack which relentlessly drove
forward.
TheWolfpackbacksnevergot
started because Webb and flank-
ers Scott Grieger and Dave
Gauthier harassed them unmer-
cifully, forcing them into numer-
ous errors.
"The backs moved the ball
as well as I've ever seen them
Pirate coach Larry Babits said,
"The ball movement got the for-
wards into support and we just
kept rolling
Babits said he worried about
State because they always have
tough forwards and it was the
Pirates' first game. The team lost
See RUGBY page 10
Cross Country
good effort vs.
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
Heading into Saturday's
Wake Forest Invitational, the ECU
cross country team did not expect
to be so competitive. The women
finished second behind the Dea-
cons and the men finished a close
third out of five teams.
The meet featured last year's
runner-up, UNC-Charlotte, and
nationally ranked powerhouse,
Wake Forest University. East
Carolina proved itself danger-
ously competitive in both the
men's and women's cross-coun-
try races.
The Lady Pirates went into
the race fresh off an overall first
place finish at Pembroke State last
week and was looking forward to
the challenge of racing against the
49ers and Demon Deacons who
were the definite favorites going
into the race.
Heading the pack once again
for ECU were freshmen twin sis-
ters, Dava and Tara Rhodes, who
are quickly making a name for
themselves very early in the sea-
son.
Dava finished in overall
fourth place with a time of
puts forth
in-state foes
18:33.03, just 16 seconds behind
meet champion Stevenson of
Wake Forest who won with a time
of 18:17.95. Tara came in at
19:06.18 which earned her a sev-
enth place finish three spots be-
hind her sister.
"Dava and Tara went after
them from the start and never let
up Assistant Head Coach
Charles Justice said. "And all the
girls, right on down the line, re-
ally did great
For the men, a third-place fin-
ish was more than respectable
against tough competition. Sean
Connolly led the way for the Pi-
rates with an overall eighth-place
finish with a time of 16:26.
Eric Adamski was the senior
leader for ECU placing a respect-
able 17thplacewithatimeof 16:57.
Also running well for the Pirates
was Mike Jolley, who ran a per-
sonal best on a track that was
considered extremely slow be-
cause of the difficulty of the turns
and hills.
"Probably, it was the best
meet we've ever had as a team,
even though we didn't win Jus-
tice said. "The efforts and perfor-
mances were the best we've ever
had
Bums displays complete package
By Brian Paiz
Staff Writer
He's 6'5 245 lbs. He bench
presses3151bs. He runs the forty-
yard dash in 4.88 seconds. He
starts at defensive end for the
ECU Pirate football team, and
he's only 19 years old.
Meet Lamont Burns.
"When I came here I weighed
220 lbs Burns said. "I weigh
closer to 250 lbs. now. When I
graduate I could possibly be
about 290 lbs The "Outlaw as
his teammates like to call him,
grew up in Greensboro, N.C.
Lamont played football under
coach Marion Kirby, at Page High
School in Greensboro. Burns said
he liked growing up in Greens-
boro,but sometimes it was hard.
"It was fun growing up in
Greensboro. My neighborhood
wasn't the greatest, but I found
ways to stay out of trouble. When
I go home and see some of my
friends who are selling drugs or
working a t a restaurant, I a lways
tell them to set goals and keep
their heads up.
Duke, James Madison, N.C.
State and Wake Forest courted
Edwards when he came out of
high school in 1992. He instead
chose ECU, even before the Pi-
rates had won the Peach Bowl.
"Seeing a program that was
on the rise, but wasn't quite there
yet was a determining factor why
Ichose ECU Burns said. "Iwant
to help put the Pirate football
program on the next level
Burns came close to backing
out of his commitment to ECU.
"I had second thoughts when
Bi'l Lewis left he said. "Coach
Lewis came to my house and told
me that he was not going to stay
as coach. I didn't hear from any-
one for about three weeks, so I
went and visited Duke. An assis-
tant AD from ECU called me and
told me that someone already in
the program was taking over. If
an outsider would have became
coach, I would not be an ECU
Pirate
Respect is something that
Lamont Burns believes is very
important. He likes to gain re-
spect from other players, but he
also shows respect for his fellow
teammates and coaches. "I've
played against a lot of people, "
Burns said. "Curtis Johnson, star
running back for the North Caro-
lina Tarheels; Jerry Stackhouse,
High school basketball Ail-
American and UNC recruit etc
Lamont Bums
but the two people that I have
shown the most respect for are
my teammates Daren and David
Hart
"They played at Carver
High School in Winston-Salem
when I played at Page
"When we played each
other, they killed me. They
whipped my tail Burns said.
Burns, a communications
major, would like to work in the
See BURNS page 10
�ii :�'��'
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mmmu





September 21. 1993
The East Carolinian
Continued from page 8
impl i n !i i
;i iii- Ku k on the
f p!o from scrimmage follow
ing Crandell's injur)
Veterans sui h .is t rumpler,
Letcher and Smith will need to be
in top torm again it the Bucsare to
have any chance of beating Wash-
ington (1-1).
kfter Marcus got hurt, we all
jus! wanted to go over there and
tight, but that's not our style of
football I etcher said.
The Pirates showed maturity
by not retaliating against the
Knights and used the emotion to
blow open the game.
"We needed to make a state-
ment Crumpler added.
That they did and for this dav,
so did Hester.
BOX SCORE
UCF 7 3 7 0� 17
ECU 17 10 7 7 � 41
FirtstQuarter
UCF: David Rhodes 6-yard pass
from Darin Hinshaw (Pierce kick),
11:45. Drive: 10 plays, 85yards,
3:15 UCF 7 ECU 0.
ECU: Junior Smith, 22-yard
runfHolcomb kick), 9:36. Drive: 5
plays, 79 yards, 2:09. UCF 7 ECU 7
ECU: Holcomb33-yard field goal.
4:34. Drive: 8 plays, 20 yards 3:59
ECU 10 UCF 7
ECU: Morris Letcher 18- yardpass
from Crandell (Holcmb kick) :02
Drive: 7 plays, 53 yards, 3:41. ECU
17 UCF 7
Second Quarter
UCF: Pierce 27-yard field goal
11:22. Drive: 10 plays, 70 yards
3:40ECU17UCF10
ECU: Junior Smith 19-yard run
(Holcomb kick), 4:40. Drive: 3
plays, 71 yards, :36. ECU 24, UCF10
ECU: Chad Holcomb 42-yard field
goal 1:22 Drive: 5 plays, 15 yards
1:46.ECU27UCF10
Tliird Quarter
UCF: Jerod Davis, 2-yard run
(Pierce kick), 10:38. Drive: 8 pla vs,
72 yards, 2:37. ECU 27, UCF 17
ECU: Ronnie Williams, 11-yard
pass from Hester (Holcomb kick)
1:40 Drive: 10 plavs, 68 yards, 5:05
ECU 34 UCF 17
Fourth Quarter
ECU: Junior Smith, 2-yard run
(Holcomb kick), 5:56. Drive: 11
plays, 55 yards, 3:38.
ECU41UCF17.
TEAM STATISTICS
ECUUCF
First Downs 2619
Rushing 311
Passing 1216
Penalty 30
Rushing Att 4323
Gained 190105
Lost 425
Net 148100
AVG 3.444.57
Pass Att 3047
Comp 2326
76.655.3
INTs 30
Total Off Plays 7370
Total Net Yards444391
AVGPlay 6.085.58
Return Yards 449
Fumbles-lost 3-10-0
Penalties-vards 6-679-84
INTs-yards 3-320-0
Punts-yards 4-1597-215
AVG 39.7530.7
Punt Retyards 3-122-9
KORetyards 4-466-140
Time of Poss. 35:2724:33
3rd down Con. 8-163-12
Sacks-yards 1-52-18
PLAYER STATISTICS
Field goals: ECU (Holcomb 33
4245- UCF (Pierce 27)
ECU rushing: Smith 30-150, Floyd
2-9, Hester 3-7 Wison 4-6,
Crandell 1-5, Whitaker 2-0,
McPhail 1-0
)a
! : '
I iinshaw 26 ol 17
ird l"D, 3INTs
illiam
i eti her - umplei
R W illiams 57 h rh.nl 4 55,
Nniih V-Id Bal ion2 14
I c 1 receh ing W hittemore i 108
Rhodes 8-90, Huff 3-42, Da is )
27, Payne 2-10, Wouda 1-3, Huzzie
1 - v Brown 2-1.
I�( U tackles leaders (solos-asst-
tot): Dar. Hart 6-1-7, Foreman6-l-
7.1 ibiano4-3-7,( rane 5 2 5,( oo
per 3-1 -4
UCF tackles leaders (solos-asst
tot): Reddick 9-0-9, Blake 6-2-8,
Anderson 6-0-6, Burks 5-1-6,
Crutcher 4-1 -5
Kickoff: 4:00 pm End: 7:05 pin.
Total Time: 3:05. Temperature: 85 .
Wind: 1-3 mph out of SW.
Weather: partly cloudy, humid
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September 21,1993
niitZRV
I I LJ i� I
from
BURNS
Continued from page 8
provided outstandii i rship,
Babits said.
Ilu biggest plus came in the
play of new backs And) Horrocks,
Kevin Loftusand Mike Shunk tack-
led well on defense, but it was on
offense that their play stood out.
"Horrocks, Weasel Lofrus and
Shunk were very steady. They made
sure they had the ball, then passed
it on without losing speed or caus-
ing errors Babits added, "Given
wetconditions, their steadiness was
the key to our offensive movement
The Second XV, or B side, fell to
State 15 - 13 when ECU alumni
offered their services to the short-
handed VVolfpack and provided
crucial scoring. Every Pirate rugger
saw action as new players got their
feet wet. Todd Ward and Chris
Patterson scored tries and Matt
Flynn booted home a penalty for
the ECU points in the second match.
The Rugby club is still welcom-
ing prospective players. The team
practices Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday at 4pm. No prior experi-
ence is necessary although Babits
would like to see "a couple of lads
with good feet" turn up.
The next match is another home
game Sept. 25 against UNC-
Wilmington. Game time is 2 p.m.
on the Allied Health Field.
GET WELL
SOON
MARCUS!
from The
East
Carolinian
sports
writers
relations field when he
ites. I would like to do
harles Bloom does. I lehas
� lot for the ECU program
Another job Lamont Burns
wouldn't mind having is being a
comedian.
Lamont won "Rookie Night"
last year on the football team. "At
practice I sometimes crack a joke
to break the tension Burns said.
His favorite comedian is Rodney
Dangerfield.
Burns, son of Mr. Willie and
Dorothy Burns, is the youngest of
five children. He said he and his
parents had a pretty good rela-
tionship when he was growing
up.
Burns likes to listen to music,
and his favorite song of all time is
"Adore" by Prince.
Burns said that he loves kids,
and in 10 years he would like to
be living well in whatever he
chooses to do.
Academics is a very impor-
tant part of Burns' life also. In
high school he was a member of
his school's National Honor Soci-
ety.
He has a 2.7 GPA at ECU.
It sometimes bothers Burns
when people say that ECU is an
"easy" school. "That's not true
Burns said. "When I come home
from practice, I study a lot. I also
go to study hall
Whatever Lamont Burns
chooses to do in life, he will strive
to be the best.
Whether it's on the football
field, in the classroom, or in the
game of life, Lamont will always
give 100 percent.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 21, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 21, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.961
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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