The East Carolinian, September 16, 1993







� m
hoi Awareness
why do we drink?
f v
the Guru,
on page 2.
A Taste of the Arts'
Don't miss the multi-
cultural art exhibition
on Sept. 18 at 8 p.m.
in Speight Auditorium.
See story on page 8.
Today
w
Voo
ToJn-oSo
The East Carolinian
bl. 68 No. 33
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
rfwsHfili,&rrf- lIn
1993
18 Pages
Countdown for university bond vote begins
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
North Carolinians wilJ soon
vote on a S740-millionbond pack-
age that will include a S310-mil-
lion university improvement
bond. The university bond prom-
ises to benefit ECU greatly if it
passes, with the long-awaited im-
provements to Joyner Librarv and
the acquisition of Rose High
School. For ECU students this
means they need to get registered
to vote.
"One of the biggest prob-
lems we have is that people don't
turn out to vote ECU Chancel-
lor Richard R. Eakinsaid. "Here is
an opportunity for this university's
students to take a conscious action
registering and then vote, to ben-
efit themselves and succeeding
generations
Oct. 11 is the voter registra-
tion deadline for the Nov. 2 elec-
tions.
"Keith Dyer (Student Gov-
ernment president) is trying to get
together an advocacy group for
one of the more critical issues, voter
registration vice chancellor
Alfred T. Matthews said.
In conjunction with the Resi-
dent Hall Association (RHA),
Panhellenic Council, Interfrater-
nity Council (IFC) and theStudent
Union, Dyer is organizing voter
registration drives to be held on
campus. According to Dver, stu-
dents will need to bring two forms
of identification and be willing to
register as Pitt County residents.
Even students who Jive in dormi-
tories should be able to claim Pitt
County as their home address; oth-
erwise, they would need to vote
with an absentee ballot.
Eakin said that Bob Thomp-
son, director of planning and insti-
tutional research and a voter regis-
trar, stated that one of the main
problems is that students tend to
move around a lot. Registered vot-
ers are prohibited from voting if
they do not provide notification of
their new address.
The North Carolina General
Assembly approved a package of
referendums lastsession with only
one dissenting vote. The entire
package includes issues that will
touch many areas of North Caro-
lina life. Each of the four bond
issues will be voted on separately.
If the university bond passes,
it means two things for ECU. First,
Joyner Library will receive almost
$29 million for much needed reno-
vations. Joyner, built in 1954, re-
ceived an addition in 1975. Enroll-
ment has risen by 40 percent since
then. Both shelf spaces and seating
are suffering from severe short-
ages. Over two years ago, the li-
brary began to store part of its
collection in a warehouse to make
room for seats.
" I think we ha ve like 800 sea ts
or so for 17,728 students Eakin
said. "We have been warehousing
books off campus, literally in a
warehouse, and trying to go find
them in case you need some par-
ticular material, which is absolutely
deplorable, but that's the way it is.
"When the Southern Asso-
ciation of Colleges and Schools
came, they were aghast of our fa-
cilities. They were critical of our
lack of both space for students to
work in the library and space for
materials themselves. They have
asked us in fact, this next month,
to make a progress report to them
and they will continue to ask us
for progress reports until this is
remedied. I don't want to throw
up any scare tactics here, but fail-
ure to have this library improved
could have serious consequences
for us with our regional accredi-
tation
Second, the bond will pay
$5 million for the acquisition of
the former Rose High School. The
See BOND page 5
Fight sparks new NAECU chooses new Ms. Ncnacohe
controversies
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
Safety controls for this
Saturday's game against Central
Rorida were announced at a spe-
cial Interfraternity Council (IFC)
meeting held the evening of Sept.
14. Earlier in the dav, ECU sus-
pended the Pi Kappa Alpha frater-
nity from participating in activi-
ties on campus. The suspension is
the result of investigations sur-
rounding the fighting thaterupted
at the ECU-Syracuse game Thurs-
day, Sept. 9. No action has been
taken against Sigma Tau Gamma.
While investigations are still
pending, clips of the fight that oc-
curred involving members of the
two fraternities have been broadly
televised. The IPC is still conduct-
ing its investigations into the man-
ner, and IFC judicial hearings are
to be held Monday and Tuesday of
next week.
"As a group, the worst pos-
sible punishment they would get
would be to revoke their charter
said Noland Mattocks, executive
vice president of IFC. "They would
no longer be recognized by IFC. To
be recognized as a fraternity by
this campus you have to be recog-
nized by IFC
IFC handles actions taken
against fraternities as a whole. The
university deals with individuals
separately.
ECU's suspension of Pi
Kappa Alpha does not mean they
are no longer recognized by the
IFC. Next week's hearings will deal
with that matter.
"The IFC will not tolerate nor
permit any misconduct that brings
discredit to the university andor
the fraternity system said Ian C.
Eastman, president of IFC. "This
incident has hampered our efforts
with the Athletic Department and
the Administration.
"These actions will include
possible suspension of charter as
well as other actions. At this mo-
ment, a full investigation is in
progress and charges will and are
pending
Dean of Students Ronald P.
Speier asked that anyone with in-
formation on those individuals
involved inThursday'sdisruptive
behavior, whether they be Greek
or not, come forward.
"Our student judicial system
is prepared to deal with individual
student behavior at this point
Speier said. "We are prepared to
take a stance. When students have
been involved in assault on indi-
viduals, whether they be male on
male, male on female, female on
female, our position has been that
those students need to separate
from the university. We're mak-
ing a statement right now that that's
where we're going to begin
Therewere46rowsof bleach-
ers damaged during the football
game. The cost of repairing the
bleachers before the football game
on Sept. 18 stands at $6,200. The
damage to the bleachers did not
occur in just the fight section. How-
ever, damage was contained
within group seating.
"A high percentage of stu-
dents conducted themselves in a
responsible manner said Dave
Hart, athletic director. "Aslsaid in
early September, prior to the game,
it would only take one ugly inci-
dent to hurt ECU.
"We had a terrific crowd, a
lot of enthusiasm. We had a na-
tional television audience, our
team conducted themselves very
well in sportsmanship and com-
petitiveness. But, I'm not reading
about that.
See FIGHT page 5
Parents to invade ECU
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
This year's Parents Week-
end kicks off tomorrow with class
visitation, beginning at 8 a.m. and
lasting until 5 p.m. Students
should make prior arrangements
with their professors if their par-
ents wish to attend their classes.
"We are excited about the
activities in the classroom and
would like parents to experience
the classroom setting at ECU
said Laura Sweet, assistant dean
of students and chairperson of
Parents Weekend.
Early registration for parents
who arrive tomorrow will be held
in room 244 Mendenhall from 3
p.m. until 5 p.m.
Tomorrow night there will
be two options for visiting par-
ents. The Limeliters, folk singers
who combine satirical humor wi th
harmony, will be performing at
Wright Auditorium at 8 p.m.
Time magazine said, "If the
button-down, scrubbed-looking
Kingston Trio are the undergradu-
ates of big-time U.S. folk-singing,
The Limeliters are the faculty
Tickets for the Limeliters are
available at Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall at $15adults and
57ECU students and youths.
More information is available
from Central Ticket Office (757-
See PARENTS page 3

Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Katina Lynch, Ms. Ncnacohe, of Native Americans of ECU, dances a
traditional fancy shawl dance she has known since the age of 4.
By Shannon Cooper
Staff Writer
The Native Americans of
ECU have kept a low profile for
the past few years, but they are
finally getting the wheels turn-
ing again for their organization.
Katina Lynch, vice presi-
dent of the Native Americans of
ECU, has recently been chosen
to represent all Native American
campus organizations as Ms.
Ncnacohe. Lynch is the first per-
son to be nominated.
"I feel excited and honored
by the mere fact that someone
thought enough of my past ac-
complishments to nominate me
for an achievement like this
Lynch said.
Lynch became actively in-
volved in the preservation of the
Native American culture at a very
young age.
"I've participated in pow-
wows since I was four years old,
and I've seen pow-wows up and
down the eastern coast Lynch
said.
In the area of community
service, she has gone to different
schools in Pitt County and neigh
boring areas to talk to students
about the Indinn culture.
Lynch 'as been fancy-
shawl dancing, a traditional In-
dian dance, since the age of four,
and wasa member of the Haliwa-
Saponi dance group.
Lynch and her mother per-
sonally make all of her regalia.
She is a 1990 graduate of
Northwest Halifax High
School. Currently, she is a se-
nior history education major,
and also a North Carolina
Teaching Fellow.
The idea of nomination is
not new to Lynch. She has been
involved in other pageants over
the years. She participated in
the Ms. North Carolina Native
American Youth Organization
pageant in 1989, and she was
first runner-up for Haliwa-
Saponi Princess.
Lynch is a tribal member
of the Haliwa-Saponi tribe,
where she has shown her lead-
ership skills as president of the
Haliwa-Saponi Cultural
Group.
"The Haliwa-Saponi tribe
resides in Halifax and Warren
County areas Lynch said.
"This is where the tribal name
Haliwa is derived
The Saponi Indian tribe
ancestors can be traced in North
Carolina as far back as the
1850s. The tribe received state
recognition in the 1960s, and is
currently seeking federal rec-
ognition. '
Candidates for Ms.
Ncnacohe were chosen through
a nomination process.
All North Carolina Na-
tive American campus organi-
See NAECU page 4
Greenville Green way creates green landscape
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
The rush of a sparkling
stream. The melodious song of a
sparrow. The majesty of a hun-
dred year-old cypress tree. These
are just some of the sights and
sounds associated with a project
called Greenville Greenways.
Greenville Greenways is a
project of the Greenville Depart-
ment of Planning and Community
Development designed to create
linear parks, or long corridors of
open vegetated space connecting
parts of the city. The first green way
to be constructed will connect Col-
lege Hill with Green Springs Park.
"This is the first of an even-
tualcitywidesystem of linear green
spaces Greenville Environmen-
tal Planner Don Belk said. "Hope-
fully, one day we will be able to
link the many undeveloped natu-
ral areas throughout the city toour
greenway system
The greenway will consist of
a 25-foot-wide corridor of green
space containing a 10-foot-wide
paved bike path andor foot path
that follows Green Mill Run across
town. In some areas of particular
natural beauty, a pedestrian board-
walk will extend out from the pa th.
Beginning at College Hill
Drive, the greenway will run be-
tween Jones Dormitory and the
Commuter Parking lot through the
woods to Elm Street. It will cross
Elm Street continuing parallel to
Elm Street Park and follow Green
Mill Run to Tenth Street.
The Department of Planning
is currently in the process of ac-
quiring a wooded lot behind the
Methodist Retirement Homes.
Plans are to build a boardwalk
there to complement the bikeway.
If the city cannot obtain this land,
the greenway will cross Ninth
Street and turn right onto Eighth.
It will then duck back into
the woods behind Wahl-Coates
School and follow the creek until
reaching Green Springs Park.
Within the park, the city plans to
build another boardwalk and a
longer foot path.
Greenways have been popu-
lar in North Carolina for about 20
years, but itwasn 't until 1981, when
Dr Bob Wend ling of ECU pro-
posed a linear park running the
length of Green Mill Run, that
Greenville began considering
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Greenville Greenway has a project underway in an effort to help
provide long corridors of vegetated spaces, such as this bridge area.
greenways.
In 1989, after several studies
by ECU faculty and students in
leisure systems studies, theGreen-
ville City Council appropriated
money fora master plan. Construc-
tion of the bike trail is to beftin in
November, and the Greenway
should be open to the public in
March, 1994.
The Greenville Greenway
will offer a wide range of ben-
efits to the city. It will provide a
low traffic path connecting ECU
with city parks and apartment
complexes. "People who com-
mute from the apartments on
Fifth Street and other apartments
See GREEN page 4
;





r
nan
September 16, 1993
MOund Other
Political science department has new chair
Some condoms don't protect against HIV
Two brand-name condoms sold at the University of Texas
Student Health Center pharmacy do not reliably protect against the
virus that causes AIDS, according to a study by a California
research scientist. The study, scheduled for publication in the fall,
identified a total of five unreliable condoms, with viral leakage
rates ranging from about six percent to 100 percent. One of the
brands � Contracept Plus � has been pulled from the market
because of its dismal performance. The five unreliable condoms
include: Contracept Plus, made by National Sanitary, with a 100
percent failure rate; Trojan Naturalube, made by Carter-Wallace
Inc with a 22.8 percent failure rate; Tahiti, made by Ansell America
Inc with a 10.3 percent failure rate; Trojan Ribbed, another Carter-
Wallace product, with a nine percent failure rate; and LifeStyles
Conture, another Ansell product, with a 6.3 percent failure rate.
The Ramses non-lubricated condom, however, passed the test with
high marks for reliability, said Bruce Voeller, the primary investi-
gator.
Woman can't enroll at The Citadel
A woman who sued to attend The Citadel, a state-run, all-
male military institution, was blocked by a federal appeals court
that said it wants to hear more about whether or not women should
attend. Shannon Richey Faulkner, 18, of South Carolina, had won
an earlier injunction in district court in Charleston. A judge had
ruled that she may attend day classes at The Citadel, but not belong
to the corps until the issue is settled. The Citadel appealed to the
federal court, which supported the institution. Faulkner applied to
The Citadel earlier this year and was accepted. She had deleted all
references to her gender, however, and when the institution found
out Faulkner was a female, it rejected her. She then sued.
Controversial murals to be displayed
Murals that depict Native Americans in an unflattering light
will go on permanent display in 1994, Dartmouth College officials
said, after access to them was limited in 1979. The murals were
painted in 1937-38by Dartmouth graduate Walter Beach Humphrey
in Hovey's Pub. The murals illustrate the words to Richard Hovey's
1894 song"EleazarWheelock and depict college founder Wheelock
and several Native Americans meeting with "500 gallons of New
England rum The murals feature drunken and scantily clad
Indian men and women, and when Dartmouth began actively
recruiting Native Americans in 1971, students called for the murals
to be painted over.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Dr. David Conradt
Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
Dr. David Conradt is fit-
ting in well as the new chair of
ECU's political science depart-
ment. He began his tenure here
at ECU on Aug. 1, and has many
plans underway for departmen-
tal development.
He is currently working
with members of the political sci-
ence department on areas such
as implementing major require-
ments, giving more opportuni-
ties for international study and
creating more freedom in faculty
research.
Dr. Conradt has moved
to Greenville after 25 years of
teaching at the University of
Florida. He is the author of sev-
eral books, which will be used as
texts for his classes. Dr. Conradt
has also received numerous
grants and awards, mostly for his
research in Germany. The grants
have been received from several
sources including the federal gov-
ernment and countries such as
Germany, Japan and Russia.
Dr. Conradt was at-
tracted to North Carolina because
he was seeking a new challenge,
and was impressed with the out-
standing reputations of NC col-
leges.
"I'm very happy to be
here. I enjoy the faculty. This is
definitely an up-and-coming uni-
versity said Dr. Conradt.
The new political science
Career Services holds
Business Career Day
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
On Tuesday, Sept. 21, Ca-
reer Services will hold its annual
Business Career Day. The event
will allow students to get first-
hand knowledge of prospective
employers.
Representatives from bank-
ing, manufacturing, accounting,
law enforcement, insurance, re-
tail and government will be avail-
able to provide students with in-
formation on their respective or-
ganizations.
Students are invited to ask
questions, pick up literature and
distribute their resumes. Profes-
sional attire is recommended.
"We are pleased with the
response this year said Margie
Swartout, assistant director of
Career Services. "It's better than
last year and maybe that is some
indication that the economy is
improving
There are many opportuni-
ties within the business commu-
nity for a variety of interests.
"Any major who is inter-
ested in working in a business
environment is invited to attend
Swartout said.
Burlington Industries, IBM,
Wachovia, Social Security Ad-
ministration and Carolina Tele-
phone will be among the 56 orga-
nizations to be present on Tues-
day.
"The event is especially
helpful for seniors graduating in
December, May or the summer of
'94 Swartout said.
Career day is open to any-
one who is interested in becom-
ing acquainted with the opportu-
nities that are available.
Career Services and the
School of Business sponsor the
event that is held in September of
each year. Last year 49 organiza-
tions participated in the event
compared to this year's 56.
Career Services also spon-
sors Health Career Day on Nov.
4, and Education Career Day on
Feb. 15.
EAST 4.
CAROLINIAN J
Chapter 3
It was a dark and stormy night
I'd stood outside Guru's build-
ing long enough to get soaked to
the skin. My fedora and my
& trenchcoat didn't do much to keep
the rain out, but my mind wasn't
J on the chances of getting pneumo-
nia. It was more on what I had
� learned about Al. Think you know
? a guy and then someone shows up
" and shoots it all to hell.
I had walked into the Guru's
pagoda-style building with my
wind up. TheGuru and I hadn't left
on the best of terms, so I wasn't
sure how'd he take seeing me. As I
slipped through the darkened door-
way, I felt a rush of air blow past
me. Next thing I knew, the Guru
was sitting in front of me, lighted
by a flickering candle. My .38 was
- resting on the floor in front of him.
I grabbed my empty holster
and cursed myself for not having
Betsy out when I walked in. Must
be getting old, Mick. It looked like
the Guru hadn't lost his touch.
"Mister Hammered His voice
- sounded like old leaves being
blown down a dusty lane. I
i shouldn't have been able to hear
him over the continuing crash of
� thunder,butIcould.Beersteinwas
right to be spooked about this guy.
"That's me. Got a minute?" I
. hated being polite to this guy, but
anybody who could take Betsy
. away commanded some respect.
"I think you are looking for
more man just casual conversation,
" Mister Hammered He closed his
5 eyes, almost challenging me to get
Betsy back from him. "Would this
J meeting have anything to do with a
man named Al Cohol?"
"How did you know?" I
blurted, unable to stop myself.
i When I saw his half-smile, I cursed
'myself once again. Real smart,
? Mick, play his games. I switched
tacticslikeatrainwillswitchrracks
Jo avoid a collision. "That's the guy.
If you know I'm looking for him,
' .then you also know why. Spill it
"Mister Hammered, a person
searches for this man, as you call
I him, for many different reasons.
4"he difficult part is finding him at
I the right time, for he wears many
The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one hand on your wallet
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
where a man can forget his troubles and drown his
sorrows for a while.
Mick Hammered liad sworn never to set foot
in the Brewery again. Setting out to find his old
friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
in the seedy and fermented world of the Brewery.
Every Thursday in Die East Carolinian, Mick
will meet a character who will expose Al in a whole nezo light. When it's finally
over and done with, Mick�and the reader�will he faced with one of the most
important questions either has ever faced.
Wltat place does Al Cohol have in my life?
tcgmtt. �
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tough, comparable to
Spillane's Hammer and Hammett's Spade
Joel Keggsy, The Beersborough Gazette
EAST
CAROLINIAN
different masks. As the caterpillar
sheds his cocoon, so does this man
shed his name
"Masks? Cocoons? Enough of
this mystical crap, just tell me why
the guy is so popular and where I
can find him I was close enough
to Betsy to smell the oil I'd used to
clean her this morning. As I bent
down to pick her up, the Guru's
hand stopped me.
He looked at me with eyes the
color of sandpaper. "Mister Ham-
mered, your attitude does not re-
flect a soul in tune with the body.
However, I will give you half of
what you seek as a goodwill ges-
ture. The other half you must find
elsewhere
"This man you call Al Cohol
goes by many different names.
Blotto, smashed, tipsy, trashed,
plastered, toasted, slap happy, lit,
slushed�all of these and more. He
has even gone by your name. Ham-
mered. Knowing these names will
shed light on why people follow
him like a god
"So tell me He still hadn't let
me go and his grip felt like cold
iron. The cold iron I wish I was
holding right now.
"People follow him for many
reasons, but three stand out. People
go to him to celebrate, to feel pow-
erful or violent, and to feel sexually
attractive. By associating with any
one of his names, these people tran-
scend their daily lives and become
someone�or something�differ-
ent. Different and better
He finally let my hand go and
I scooped up Betsy and trained her
on him. But I wasn't in the building
anymore. I was out on the street
comer, looking at a boarded-up hole
where the door used to be. Same
old Guru, same old tricks.
As I moved to open my car
door, I heard his voice again. "Re-
member, Mister Hammered, the
chameleon hides in plain view
where all can see if they only open
their eyes The street was empty
on both ends, nowhere a man could
hide. "Seek the learned man for
more knowledge
The learned man, huh? Guess
it's back to college.
BITS
Z04 E. 5TH ST.
752-6953
chair has a wife and three chil-
dren who are still in Gainesville,
Florida, but will be joining him
soon. He is enjoying the atmo-
sphere in Greenville and feels it
is similar to the town he moved
from.
"They even sound
alike said Conradt. Aside from
teaching and moving into his
office, which is piled high with
paperwork, Dr. Conradt is cur-
rently working on a paper for
an upcoming meeting in Wash-
ington, DC. Even though it
seems that he has his hands full
in filling the duties of the politi-
cal science chair and writing,
Dr. Conradt has become a Pi-
rate fan and has already taken a
trip to the beach.
The party's over�What next?
WASHINGTON (AP) � Is-
raeli negotiators have gone home
to celebrate their new year. The
White House stage has been dis-
mantled. Yasser Arafat has left
town. The party's over. What hap-
pens now?
In one sense, it's back to the
plodding diplomacy, behind-the-
scenes contacts, veiled language
that characterized the first 22
months of the Arab-Israeli nego-
tiations begun at Madrid, Spain.
It's hard to beat the stunning
action of recent days: the Arafat
arrival in Washington on Sunday,
the White House signing of the
Israel-PLO peace accord on Mon-
day, the signing of the Israel-Jor-
dan agenda on Tuesday and the
unexpected visit by Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Rabin to Morocco
where he agreed with King Hassan
to establish diplomatic relations.
In another sense, things in
the peace talks will never be the
same.The Clinton administration
is hopeful that the picture of Arafat
and Rabin shaking hands will send
shock waves through the Arab
Israeli-Arab agreements.
"We believe today's
agenda, which has been final-
ized, will give a strong impetus,
a strong momentum, to the other
negotiations Secretary of State
Warren Christopher said at
Tuesday's signing of the Israel-
Jordan accord.
For now, no dates have
been set for the next round of
Israeli-Syrian talks and the ad-
ministration will be in touch with
both sides to fix a date, probably
next month. The question offi-
cials are pondering is how now
to translate the momentum into
action on the most intractable of
the remaining disputes � that
between Israel and Syria.
The issues are fairly
straightforward. Syria wants Is-
rael to withdraw from the Golan
Heights, a strategically located
plateau the Israelis captured in
the 1967 Mideast War. Israel, on
the other hand, wants Syria to
first define just what it means by
its promise to make peace. After
that, Israel says it might con-
sider a partial withdrawal from
the Golan.
world and topple barriers to other
m

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2V06S. dulls Bkd. - ??I'6.800 - Wullni. 9v8p, Sai. 9vp





- �Jl ��.
September 16, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
ecu holds ethics lecture Career Day assists in j ob-hunting
organ donation, and the
mous medical advances from
such, in his lecture, Brain I teath
and Organ Retrieval: Can We Ig-
nore the DarkSide?" at East Caro-
lina University on Monday, Sep-
tember 20,1993, at 7:30 p.m.
Youngner's lecture will be
the last in a lecture series on Eth-
ics and the Technological Revo-
lution in Health Care sponsored
by the GTE Foundation and ECU.
ECU Chancellor Richard Eakin
will introduce the lecture, which
e in the auditorium
. hoolol Medicine'sBrody
ieru es Building,
gner i Associate Pro
or i'f medicine, psvchiatrv,
and biomedical ethics at Case
Western Reserve and director of
the Clinical Ethics Program of
the University Hospitals of
Cleveland.
He has been a major con-
tributor to the medical literature
on the topics of the determina-
tion of death and organ procure-
ment.
The public is cordially in-
vited to attend this lecture. For
further information, pleasecon-
tact the Department of Medical
Humanities at 816-2797.
Tuesday, September 21
General Classroom Building
First and Third Floors
9:08 a.m. to 1:08 p.m.
Co-sponsored by ECU School of Professional Pysiness Programs and ECU Career Seruices
PARENTS
4788).
The ECU cheerleaders and
marching band will hold a pep
rally on the mall at 9 p.m.
Registration is Saturday,
from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in room
244 Mendenhall. Parents can pick
up their registration packets and
tickets for the picnic at this time,
and parents who have not previ-
ously registered can do so.
ECU Student Ambassadors
will conduct walking tours of the
campus from 10 a.m. until 10:45
a.m. Interested persons should
meet in the main lobby of
Mendenhall.
Chancellor and Mrs. Eakin
will host a reception in
Mendenhall from 10:30 a.m. until
11:30 a.m.
The Parents Association will
hold sessions to allow parents to
support university academics and
student life. Dr. James
Westmoreland from Career Ser-
vices will speak in Hendrix The-
ater in Mendenhall. Manny
Amaro from University Housing
and Frank Salamon from Dining
Continued from page 1
Services will speak in the Social
Room in Mendenhall. The sessions
will begin at 11:30 a.m. and last
until 12:45 p.m.
A "down-east" style picnic
will be held from 1 p.m. until 3:30
p.m. on the north side of Ficklen
Stadium. The menu, prepared by
Campus Dining Services, will in-
clude roast pig, chopped pork
BBQ, cold tried chicken, potato
salad, cole slaw, spicy baked
beans, corn muffins, dinner rolls,
iced tea, soft drinks, sliced water-
melon and jumbo chocolate cook-
ies.
Students can purchase their
own tickets at a special student
rate and guest tickets for $10 at
any Campus Dining Service until
closing time Friday. Tickets will
also be available at the registra-
tion at Mendenhall and at the pic-
nic on Saturday.
The ECU Pirates and Cen-
tral Florida Knights will kick off
Saturday at 4 p.m. Although no
half-price tickets remain, full-price
tickets are available at Central
Ticket Office and at Minges.
VkWmV
Companies Attending:
Rnderson Consulting
Arthur Andersen
ATC0M Business Telephone System
Belle Stores Seruices
Burlington
H.C. Brill Company, Inc.
Campbell University School of Law
Coopers & Lybrand
CopyPro, Inc.
DiKon, Odom & Co.
ECU School of Business Graduate Programs
ECU Career Seruices
Fastenal Company
Ferguson Enterprises, Inc.
Fidelity Bank
First Citizens Bank
Foot Locker
Guilford Mills, Inc.
High Point Police Bepartment
IBM Corporation
Jacksonuille Police Bepartment
Jefferson-Pilot Life Insurance Company
K-Mart Corporation
Lady Foot Locker
MBM Corporation
MaddoK Supply Company
McGladrey & Pullen
NationsBank Corporation
Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co.
Bide Biscount Corporation
Perdue UJaterhouse
Rosdujay Express Inc.
Social Security Administration
Sprint-Carolina Telephone
State Farm Insurance Company
TGC Aetail, Inc.
UAACU, Inc.
United Parcel Seruice
United States Coast Guard
UJachouia Bank of North Carolina
Paul B. Williams
Wilson Trucking Corporation
VAV.1
J fniri
I
Entrance
Entrance
EmployefSludcfit Regislralion
sBi edej mm n
Checkers
aMV
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CHECKERS DRIVE-IN RESTAURANTS OF NORTH AMERICAJNC
SATURDAY!
GREENVIIIE BOULEVARD ACROSS FROM THE PLAZA
FREE T-SHIRTS
While supply lasts
Saturday, September 18th
With purchase of any sandwich, large fry,
large drink & apple nuggets.
ssm Limit two per car maximum -�
ATTIC
752-7303
209 E. Sth St.
Greenville, NC
CoMedY
ZONE
EVERY
WEDNESDAY
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
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GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
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September 16, 1993
ECU
Continued from page 1
mter-
sionofln-
rs m Raleigh "he final
is made by the commis-
! In' Native Americans of
s organized in the 1960s
ide fellowship for Native
nericans.
Recently, interest had
d off, until Kim Sampson,
our president, transferred here,
d more or less got the wheels
Mining again Lynch said.
The campus organization is
GREEN
a member of a larger organiza-
tion, the North Carolina Native
American Council on Higher
Education.
The organization is rela-
tively small. Anyone interested
in experiencing the Indian cul-
ture is invited to join.
As Ms. Ncnacohe, Lynch
will be representing all Native
Americans who are in college.
"One of my goals Lynch
said, "is that by going to pow-
wows, the younger kids will see
and hear what my title is and,
hopefully, it will help them to
aspire to go to college after they
graduate
Continued from page 1
will have a vehicle-free route to
i � mpus Belk said.
In addition to serving com-
muters, the path will be used for
recreational pursuits such as bik-
i g, jogging and walking. "People
can .njoy the outdoors away from
the street in an area that is natu-
i. j i -a ttractive Belk said.
.Environmentally, the
j jehway will meet a number of
objectives as well. The green spaces
will improve water quality inGreen
N! ill Stan by act'rig as a buffer and
tr 'pping pollution. It will also re-
duc4 flood damage and help re-
charge underground water sup-
plies.
;The green way will provide
refuge and safe nvgration routes
for Wildlife and help reduce air
and ftoise pollution.
tBelksaid greenways can even
helpcool the city, which retains
l.ugtyamounts of hea t in roadways
and ljuildings.
Finally, many at ECU and
possibly Pitt County Schools plan
to utfiize the greenway as an out-
d oorelassroom, especially in study-
ing nature and habitat.
Several members of the ECU
faculty have participated in bring-
ing greenways to Greenville. In
addition to Dr. Wendling, profes-
sor of geology Dr. Mulatu Wubneh
and professor of environmental
health Dr. Bernard Kane helped
prepare feasibility studies for the
project.
Professorof Biology Dr. Vince
Bellis has also served on the
Greenways Committee since its
inception in 1989. "We on the com-
mittee have seen it evolve from a
greenway dedicated to habitat pro-
tection to more of a bikeway, but
that's okay too Bellis said.
Belk said that the Board of
Trustees from ECU and all who are
involved have been very coopera-
tive. "Greenways, in general, fig-
ure very prominently in ECU'S
comprehensive master plan Belk
said.
The project will cost $450,000,
with $298,000 of that amount con-
tributed from the NC Department
of Transportation. The remainder
will be provided by the City in its
Capital Improvements fund.
"The City Council decided to
fund the Greenway project at the
expense of some other worthy pro-
grams. I really believe that the
Greenway will do more for the
quality of life in Greenville than
any of the other things Belk said.
ECU Football Parking
ECU Public Safety officials aduise fans to arriue at Ficklen Stadium
early to fully enjoy all the festiuities planned for the euening. Pirate
fans are encouraged to arriue at the stadium parkingtailgate area by
2:00 p.m. UJe also encourage you to be in your seats by 3:38 p.m.
Suggested Routes
for General Public
Parking-FicKlen
Stadium
3. Minges
Coliseum Rrea Lots-
Greenuille Blud. or
14th Street to
Charles Bouleuard
to Ficklen Driue
8. Field Parking-
Greenuille Blud.
(264-Bypass) to
Charles Blud.
9. Allied Health
Lot-Either IBth
Street or 14th
Street to Charles
Blud.
Priuate RU
Parking
Limited number
of priuate RU spaces
auailable. Contact
the Pirate Club at
(919)757-4548 for
further details.
PRRENTS CRN
PRRK IN L8TS 3,8,9-
,

4

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September 16, 1993
BOND
wev, . vivroll. we will move
imeofour grant programs which
are dealing with externals of the
university. We will move some oi
those kinds of things that will free
up space on campus to provide
teaching spaces and for faculty of-
fices
Eakin said that the master
plan for campus includes getting
all of the things that are not aca-
demic in nature and do not affect
students off central campus. The
acquisition of Rose High is a move
in that direction. "It's hard to imag-
ine two projects that could be more
critical to this university and to its
students Eakin said.
Analysts say this is an excel-
lent time to sell bonds and build.
Interest rates are extremelv low
and the construction industry' has
been suffering from the real-estate
recession. Because of the slow con-
struction rates, bids should be fa-
vorable. Another thing to consider
is North Carolina debt. Today it
stands at $104 for every state resi-
dent. The median state debt per
capita in the United States is $391.
"It is sound public finance,
and recognized as such by the
bond-rating agencies, to borrow
worthwhile capital projects. North
Carolina, with its very low debt
currently, has the borrowing ca-
pacity to take on the proposed new
debt in the Nov. 2 bond referen-
dums. Because the debt service on
those bonds will be a tiny percent-
age of the overall state budget, state
taxes should not have to be raised
to meet payments of interest and
principal State Treasurer Harlan
Boyles said.
The UNC bond issue comes
at a critical time to the school sys-
Continued from page 1
md w ken on a
� �� !� foi the
iving I989.1nl992,
, ropriated for three
uildings and two more are
luled for 1993. The total ap-
. iated for this time frame was
million; however, capital needs
amounted to $644 million. In the 16
campus UNC system, enrollment
has grown by 16,400 since 1988.
" As important as our projects
are here, and they're obviously ter-
ribly important, each of the univer-
sities in the system have projects
that are very worthy Eakin said.
If the bond referendum passes
on Nov. 2, it will be at least 90 days
until construction can begin,
Matthews said.
The Bureau of Economic
Analysis of the U.S. Department of
Commerce states that $1 million of
construction in North Carolina cre-
atesaround 36 jobs; therefore, if the
referendum passes, it should create
more than 11,000 new jobs.
"Thesearebuildingsthathave
to be built Matthews said. "And
the state, if the bond issue doesn't
go, will have to make some hard
decisions. They will probably have
to pay $50 million to $60 million for
the new buildings, which is about
twice what they're going to have to
be paying in the debt service
"This is a situation where East
Carolina has so much to gain if the
referendum passes and so much to
lose if the bond referendum goes
down Eakin said. "For me, as
chancellor, I'll say it straight out,
this is the opportunity of my career
here. It's an opportunity that few
chancellors will ever have at this
university. We must, must do
eventiling I can to educate people
and to try to make sure we get that
new library immediately. This is a
big deal
The four-bond package also
includes a $250 million bond for
community colleges, a $145 million
bond for clean water and a $35 mil-
lion bond for state parks.
The East Carolinian 5
FIGHT
Continued from page 1
"Dr. Eakin worked harder
than any of you can ever imagine
for seven years to improve the im-
age of this institution so that you
can get your degree and enter the
field of your choice and be proud
of East Carolina. Athletics has
worked very hard to put on a
show that people could be proud
to acknowledge.
"I don't think I can put my
personal disappointment into
words Hart said.
"The logic behind the no-
group seating deserves explana-
tion, forty-six rows were dam-
aged When you consider that it
took a lot of people all spring and
summer to get that stadium run-
ning When you consider com-
ing out the morning after and hav-
ing it looking the way it did, in my
opinion we had no choice but to
stop group seating
Hart stated the privileges that
ECU students receive are un-
matched at other schools.
"No where else do students
sit beyond the 30-yd line, no where
else do they sit on the 50, no where
else do they have chair back seats,
no where else do they have the
right to buy half price tickets for
their guests Hart said.
When Chancellor Richard
Eakin addressed the group, he be-
gan with an overview of the ac-
complishments that had been made
since he came to ECU.
"I arrived at this university
back in 1987 full of hope for this
ECU said Chancellor Richard
Eakin. "Literally everyone shared
the hope that this could become
one of the finest universities in the
Southeast, in fact the nation. We
started on that course and have
been on that course for about six
and a half years During the
course of Thursday night's events,
this university took a giant step
back.
"I couldn't have even made
these comments Thursday night. I
was so hot. My frustration, my dis-
Get on the
Track to a
scholarshf
An Air Force ROTC scholarship may
get you on the right track to success. Find
out if you qualify for tuition and other ex-
penses, plus $100 each academic month.
Get on the right track. Talk to :
Contact Captain Steve Cooke
307 Wright Annex
757-6597
Leadership Excellence Starts Here
appointment, my embarrassment
was so high, I'm not sure I could
have escaped the rage. I've gotten
over that, now we need to get
around to solutions
Eakin reminisced back to the
first football game he attended, at
North Carolina State, which was
the last game ECU played against
the Wolfpack.
Controls have been enacted
for Saturday's game.
Members of Greek organiza-
tions are asked to use Gate 6 dur-
ing the football game on Saturday.
There will be no group seat-
ing.
Signs will be placed to indi-
cate the gates available for students
and IFC members.
Additional security person-
nel will be retained.
Signs will be placed outside
the stadium to indicate that alco-
holic beverages will not be allowed
in the stadium.
Those people in possession
of alcoholic beverages will be sub-
ject to immediate arrest.
There will be a point-of-sta-
dium entry inspection. This in-
cludes all parcels and bags. Stu-
dents in possession of alcohol in-
side the stadium will also be sub-
ject to severe sanctions.
Ouring the meeting, several
IFC members charged la w enforce-
ment officers with failing to do
their jobs. One individual stated
that an officer was approached
prior to the fight, in a plea to deal
with the increasing tensions. The
officer allegedly did not attempt to
confront the action at that time.
A member also claimed that
officers were not placed in the
stands,and therefore were not close
when the fight erupted.
During the game other inci-
dents occurred, including an in-
stance where the gates were over-
run and people began trampling
other people. In retaliation officers
sprayed the crowd with pepper
spray.
ATTENTION,
REMEMBER,
LOOK AT
THIS!
There is a
news writers
meeting
Thursday at
5:32
3-D POSTERS
Are Here
Drop by our poster
gallary and sec our
selection.
646 Arlington Blvd.
Arlington Villogc
Open MonFri. 9:30-6
Sat. 9:30-5
Phone 756-74 54)
AEXAEXAEXAEXAEXAEX
Delta Epsilon Chi
invites you
Date: Tuesday Sept 21st
Time: 6:00pm
Place: room 2014 GCB
An Education & Business Co-Ed
Fraternity Open To All Majors
Contact Skip Lilly, VP of
Public Relations or Advisors At
757.6549
AEXAEXAEXAEXAEXAEX
SGA JUDICIAL
"
Is Accepting Applications for the Academic Year 1993-94
The following Positions are available: .
HONOR & REVIEW BOARD MEMBER
All applicants will be screened
by the SGA Executive Council.
REQUIREMENTS:
2.0 Grade Point Average
Good Standing with the University
Applications Available At:
Secretary's Office (255 Mendenhall Student Center)
Attorney General's Office (236 Mendenhall Student Center)
DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICAnONS:
FRI SEPT 17,1993
5:00 pm





The East Carolinian
Page 6
ThursdayOpinion
Referendum: Campaign '93
Registration for voting on bond
referendum imperative to future
of Joyner Library, ECU
"This is a big deal
Chancellor Richard Eakin said it so elo-
quently with one tiny phrase. That's right ev-
eryone, we're back to the bond referendum
issue again. And the time has come for you,
thelowlynothin-I-ever-say-is-heardstudent
to get involved and help that sorry library we
call Joyner receive funding for a face-lift.
What exactly is the bond referendum, you
ask? Well, for those of you who don't know by
now, pay attention: The North Carolina Gen-
eral Assembly approved a $740 million pack-
age last session that includes a $310 million
university improvement bond.
To ECU, that means basically two things:
Joyner Librarv could receive almost $29 mil-
lion for renovations and $5 million could be
put towards the acquisition of the former Rose
High School. The latter would mean more
faculty office space, teaching spaces and the
like.
But there's one small, teenv-weeny catch:
YOU ABSOLUTELY, POSITIVELY, MUST
REGISTER TO VOTE! (Did we make that
perfectly clear?)
The bond has not been passed yet. And
right at this moment, ECU is stuck with a
library that must store its excess materials (i.e.
books, magazines, newspapers) in a ware-
house. This same Joyner Library only has
enough seating for a mere 4.5 percent (that's
roughly 800 people) of the student popula-
tion. Doesn't that make you mad?
To top it off, the failure to improve the
library could have serious consequences for ECU's
regional accreditation. The Soutern Association
of Colleges and Schools was shocked by the state
of our facilities and are now asking for progress
reports until it is remedied. Kinda reminds you of
elementary school, huh?
Joyner (and this is directed towards any-
one who has ever tried to find a periodical,
journal or book in that place) is just plain-old
crying out woefully with charges of neglect.
Finally someone cares enough to address the
issue, so let's not screw it up! If, for some odd
reason, you think the bond referendum does not
concern you personally, then vote with the
thousands of future students in mind. This money
is imperitive to the future success of ECU. And
hey, you'll be alumni then. So at that point (Mr.
and Miss Selfish) it can make you look better.
The expansion of Joyner depends solely
on whether or not the bond referendum is
passed. Tentative plans include 165,000 square
feet of expansion towards lOthStreet, the hous-
ing of 1.4 million new books and additional
computing and television studio space.
The possibilities seem absolutely endless.
Imagine, walking into Joyner, sashaying over
to the computers, pulling up the badly-needed
book you must have for a killer paper on-
screen, finding it and checking it out! Sweet,
sweet success
That is, if the ECU student body and the
surrounding community will get off their duff
and register to vote. Oct 11 is the voter regis-
tration deadline. Elections will be held Nov 2.
Opinion
September 16. 1993
By Laura Wright
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham. Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Maureen Rich, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifesnle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olsen, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, otaff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board Tlie East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reiect letters for
publication Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU. Greenville, N.C 27858�353. For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
TO
100 recycled
paper
You're shelling out $70 for a lousy piece of plastic (?)
At the beginning of this se-
mester, 1 simply could not afford
to pay $70 for a parking sticker
(vou know how it is: mega bucks
spent in the bookstore, other silly
little expenses like tuition, food,
gasoline, whatnot). I've been
parking in a friend's driveway
and walking a couple of blocks
and this isn't bad except on 95
degree days or when it's raining-
I was planning to buy a sticker at
the end of September, but now I
refuse.
It's not that 1 mind getting
to campus two hours early and
circling the parking lot like a
parking space vulture, driving
along side anyone who might be
headed for a car�have you no-
ticed that people love to frus-
trate parking space vultures?
They walk slowly; they stand still
and read the newspaper; they
stop at about five cars before they
get to theirs. Or once they get in
their cars, they sit and make you
wait while they take a short nap.
It's frustrating, but I can deal
with it.
It's not that when I get back
to my space at the end of the day
my doors have acquired a few
new dents. I've resigned myself
to the fact that you can't keep
this from happening unless you
park across two or three spaces.
Unfortunately, this practice
tends to make people angry
enough to dent doors with their
feet. I can even handle circling
the lot for half an hour only to
have some guy with an attitude
and a Monte Carlo steal the space
that I was patiently waiting for
and signaling to enter.
I have learned to tame my
temper and accept a little healthy
competition. I even enjoy read-
ing other people's bumper stick-
ers, no matter how inane they
may be, as I rush to class after I
find a space. I accept that ECU
sells about a million more stick-
ers than there are spaces. I'm
willing to deal with these things
if they keep the university from
tearing up land to construct more
lots, which would, no doubt,
raise the price of those already
too-expensive stickers.
So what's my gripe? Why
am I foregoing a parking sticker
if I've resigned myself to the sys-
tem? Because the system has got-
ten under my skin. I parked in
the lot across from Darryl's at 6
p.m. so that I could attend a 6:30-
9:30 class. I'd done this twice this
semester and hadn 't had a prob-
lem, but when I came out of class
last week, there was a $35 ticket
on my windshield.
Now granted, the lot did
have signs that said "staff park-
ing 9-5 but I was under the
mistaken notion, since I hadn't
been ticketed before, that maybe
the members of the traffic ticket
patrol get off work at five and
have lives. I thought that since
the ku was half full, since I don't
like walking long distances in
the dark, since there was an es-
caped murderer on the loose and
since I couldn't afford the
sticker, I was acting in my own
best interests. The worst part of
the whole thing was that at the
top of the ticket was printed:
"Welcome to our campus
I think it was the "wel-
come" that did it. If you're go-
ing to stick me for $35, don't be
nice about it. Being friendly
makes the whole experience
seem somewhat condescending.
I was wrong, oh gods of
trafficdom! Forgive me for feel-
ing that ECU might take mercy
upon me in a lot where no one
was competing for spaces.
I would like to suggest that
my $35 go toward improving
the library, not into the pocket
of the person that gave it to me.
Also, if tickets are used to gen-
erate money for the school, think
of how much the school could
save if it didn't have to pay traf-
fic patrol after 5 p.m. Just a
thought.
AH, J0YN��.L-l6fcA�y
VOU KMOW $oti, IT
HASNT �5fULY CHANGED
MUCH SNCB I fJENT
TO SCHOOL HEft-tl
S35SS
Letters to the Editor
ECU fans show no respect for Pirate football
To the Editor:
Chris Siegal's article
"Orangemen Show No Re-
spect for ECU" from the Daily
Reflector, Sunday, September
12, was right on track. I am
glad that he pointed out to
those who want to fight to stay
home and watch ESPN's fight
night.
Just to add to Siegal's
comments, one of my pet
peeves at an ECU football
game is that when the national
anthem is being played, the
stands are less than half full
and there is a lot of commotion
outside the gates. I have at-
tended many ECU football
games over the years and it
really saddens me when
people have no more respect
than this for our national an-
them.
Also, the stands should
be full when the players run
onto the field. It was really
embarrassing when it was an-
nounced over the PA system
that we were going on national
TV with ESPN and to give a
big ECU welcome. How could
we? The stands were not even
half full! Can you imagine
what the TV audience was
thinking, ar well as our play-
ers? Where is the support? Not
only a re some fans la te getting
into the game but then they
decide to start leaving fifteen
minutes before thegameends.
Why even come in the first
place? It was a sad sight to see
how our stands looked at the
end of the ESPN broadcast.
Comments are made all
the time about ECU and its
fans being respected. Well,
folks, get real! Respect is some-
thing that is earned not handed
to you on a silver platter. Coach
Logan has clearly spelled out
his message to the players and
you could tell by the comments
of the ESPN commentators
that the team has that respect�
now let's see if our fans can get
the same.
Windy Bowen-Horn
Greenville resident
ECU administration operates ineffectively
To the Editor:
In the past month or so I
have had my introduction to
the administrative intricacies of
ECU. I am not joyful. I trans-
ferred to ECU as a first-year
graduate student, coming from
a small liberal-arts college within
the state where I worked as an
assistant to the registrar. I did
not expect ECU's student af-
fairs to be as competent and
personalized as at my under-
graduate institution, but I was
unprepared for the Orwellian
morass that greeted me.
The cashier's office was a
chaotic quagmire of rude and
hopelessly impersonal nay-say-
ers who possess little knowl-
edge of the procedures of other
of fices on campus. They repeat-
edlv gave me false and mislead-
ing information, wanting only
to rush me out the door in order
to frustrate and misinform as
manv students as possible in
the shortest amount of time.
Small and simple tasks that
should have taken half-an-hour
(forgiving theubiquitousqueue
at the door) took half-a-day, as I
ran from office to office to get
information, signatures and
other administrative effluvium
that seemed barely necessary.
Similarly,theOfficeofStu-
dent Financial Aid passes out
information with the zeal of a
cold war Chinese politburo with
many arcane references to the
mysterious and obviously sa-
cred "handbook Maoism is
aliveand thriving in Greenville.
Someone get the John Birchers
on the phone.
Is it necessary for every-
one in administrative positions
at ECU to be totally ignorant of
the requirements of other offi-
cial departments? Does com-
mon sense and practical intelli-
gence have to take the back seat
to some obscure reference in an
indecipherable necronomicon
of a handbook?
Iunderstand thatrulesare
necessary. Operating proce-
dures must be observed to bal-
ance order against chaos, but
should "rules"beobservedeven
after thev have ceased to be of
anv real and practical value?
Doesn't anvone who runs these
offices have the strength of char-
acter to say, "This is stupid. We
shouldn't do this anymore. The
handbook be damned?
I am a proud five-year vet-
eran of America's military and
have seen bureaucracy at its
most profound. But to my jaded
surprise, I have realized thatthe
public school system, as it is
found at East Carolina Univer-
sity, supports as many lame
Bozos anu brain-dead paper-
clip counting weasels as the U.S.
.Army.
Willitend?Idoubtit.The
ECU governing body, at my ex-
amination, is a gaggle of inef-
fectual sterile goobers who can't
tie their own shoes without ap-
pointing a chairperson. How
long, oh Lord, how long?
"A pig wearing a silk hat
is still a pig Samuel L. Clemens
said that. But he's dead; as dead
as some of the wood piled up in
offices all overcampus. I'mhop-
ing that the sky will open up
and the creek will rise to wash
all that memo producing dead-
wood on downstream. But
that's not likely. There's not a
storm cloud in sight.
Pray for rain,
A frustrated student
By Stacy Van Peterson
Prof evaluations:
to publish or
not to publish?
The professor provides sufficient of-
fice hours: 5 - Outstanding
4 - Very Good
3 - Good
2 - Fair
1 - Poor
0 - No Opinion
As an East Carolina University stu-
dent you are either calloused by student
evaluations of professors or will start to
form your number two pencil blisters by
the semesters end.
Yet most students are not informed
of the outcome of the evaluations. If our
opinion of the professor is so important to
the university, why are the results hidden
away in Mr. Salary's office for some offi-
cial board to measure the professor's per-
formance?
On the ranking scale listed above,
the university should receive a "1" for
providing sufficient office hours to dis-
cuss our evaluations of the professors.
The results of the student evalua-
tions should in fact be published either by
the university or by the students them-
selves.
Both Duke University and UNC-
Chapel Hill have published evaluations
for several years. Presently, N.C. State
University student body president Chris
Jones has given the university an ultima-
tum: publish the evaluations, or the stu-
dents will.
Jones considers the student evalua-
tions a consumer issue. "Since we are the
consumers, we should know the product
we're investing in, and that product is
teaching Jones said in Monday's issue of
The News ami Observer.
Arguments have formed on both
sides of the issue of publishing the evalu-
ations. Some are arguing that that there is
no real fairness to the evaluations. Stu-
dents may be vindictive to hard instruc-
tors, or the evaluations can be considered
null and void if the instructor's style of
teaching is difficult for a student. How-
ever, some argue that the evaluations are
fair, and even valuable.
Even professors. Leroy B. Martin Jr
a math instructor at NCSU, suggests that
students should use the evaluations to
help identify and single out weaknesses
of the instructor. The evaluations, in a
sense, are helpful for both the students
and instructors. By making the evalua-
tions public, instructors would have noth-
ing to fear but accountability.
At UNC-Chapel Hill, student fees
were raised $1 to publish the evaluations.
With tuition being raised now, what is one
more dollar? If NCSU does not publish
the evaluations, Jones has suggested that
student leaders could mail out question-
naires, and provide a prize incentive for
those who returned them. To cover the
costs of publication, students could pay
for the publication.
Some may argue that the student
evaluations are unreliable, and should not
be published. Why not let the students
decide? The dishonesty that some argue
about will balance the butt-kissing to build
a coherent and accountable publication.
� - -






,��
September 16, 1993
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 7
For Rent
PARKING - Priva
bkck from campt
FEMALE NS ROOMMATE NEEDED
.to share 3 bedroom townhouse at
Sheraton Village S230.00 13 utii.
etc. 756-8459.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
large 4 bedroom house. 4 blocks from
campus. Kitchen privileges, 2 bath-
rooms, great house! Call 725-2248.
Non-smoker preferred.
Roommate Wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 BEDROOM in Tar River. $155
per month . Private room, serni-fur-
nished. Call for info! 752-8000!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share apt close to campus, $142.50 plus
1 2 utilities. Call 830-6166 for more info.
3M Help Wanted
PIANO PLAYER NEEDED. Small
Christian Church near Greenville, Sal-
ary neg. Call 757-3207.
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell only 8 trips and you go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City! Great
Resume Experience! 1-800-678-6386!
$10-$400 WEEKLY. Mailing brochures!
Spare full-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705.
AA EARN $5,000Mo. GUARAN-
TEED! FAST! Huge money-making
jobs and opportunities on your cam-
pus. Call today for complete details.
Free cruise! .America's 1 Company!
919-929-3139.
ATTENTION STUDENTS Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes a t home. All
material provided. Send SASE to Mid-
west mailers, PO Box 395, Olathe KS
66051. Immediate response.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Students
Needed! Earn up to $2,500month in
canneries or fishing vessels. Many em-
ployers provide Room & Board &
Transportation. Over 8,000 openings.
No EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Male
or Female, for more information call:
(206) 545-4155 ext A5362.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn
E5 Help Wanted
up t $2 � month - world travel
iwaii, Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.).
Mimmer and Career employment avail-
able. Noexperience necessary. Formore
information call 1-206-63404468 ext.
C5362.
GET THE FALL SEMESTER under-
way with a part-time sales position
with Greenville's Fashion Leader.
Brody's is now accepting applications
for the JuniorMissy sportswear and
Men's departments. Enjoy extra spend-
ing money and clothing discount. Ap-
ply at Customer Service, Brody's, the
Plaza Monday and Thursday 1-4 pm.
NEEDED: Responsible, athletic per-
son to help with transportation of a 9-
yr old to activities, approx. 2 hours, 3-4
times a week after school. Must be a
non-smoker and have transportation.
Call 752-0209.
WORK STUDY POSITIONS avail-
able in ECU Recycling program. Inter-
ested persons contact George
Armistead at 757-6166.
GREEKS & CLUBS: Raise up to $1000
in JUST ONE WEEK! For your frater-
nity, sorority or club. Plus $1000 for
yourself! And a free T-shirt just for
calling. 1-800-932-0528 ext. 75.
BARTENDERS NEEDED AT
SH ARKY'S. Experience preferred. Fill
out application between 1 and 6p.m. at
Sports Pad.
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT: Law
firm needs mailroommessenger
mornings, 7:30 to 1:00, 5 daysweek,
applications Ward & Smith 120 West
Firetower Road.
STOCK SALES PERSON part-time.
Heavy lifting required. Apply at the
Youth Shop Boutique Arlington Vil-
lage.
For Sale
NEED CASH!
'TUDENT
WAP
HOP
Coin c Kinu
BUYIN6
� FURNITURE
� Men'i Clothing
� Dorm K.efriger�tor�
� .Microwave
� Stereo Equipment
� Video Equipment
� i'liscell&neous Items
Were SELLING Too!
752-3866
MON-FRI 10am-5 pm,
Sat 10 am-2 pm
EVANS STREET MALL
ROLLAWAY BED, twin deluxe 6 inch
mattress, adjustable back, new, can't
use. Cost $350, sacrifice at $170 cash.
Call 637-2645.
A DEAL: O'Brien "Sensation" All pur-
pose recreational sailboard. New Con-
dition, used twice, Two Neil Pryde Sails,
Clamp-on doom front. $589. Call 830-
8883.
For Sale
printer, $300. Phone 756-9642.
MEMBERSHIP to the CLUB FOR
WOMEN ONLY. Take up payments of
only 29.95 a month. Contract good un-
til 1194. If interested call Melanie at
931-8343.
SURFBOARD FOR SALE 6 4" Power
Tool tri-fin, speed finish $200 OBO.
Call 752-6833.
10 Services Offered
TRAVEL FREE! Sell quality vaca-
tions. The hottest destinations in Ja-
maica, Cancun, South Padre, Florida.
Most reliable Spring Break Company
with the easiest way towards free
trip! Best commissions! Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710.
DJ. FOR HIRE Experienced DJ. from
Bogies available for all types of par-
ties: Greek mixers, Weddings, Birth-
days, etc. Best selection of music from
the fiO's to the 90's! Discounts to all
ECU organizations. Call Rob 757-
2658.
BELLY DANCING! For women 18 to
80. Great exercise; great fun! Lessons
begin Sept. 22. $30month. To regis-
ter call Donna Whitley 355-5150.
LOOK YOUR BEST for the brand
new year. Call Kimberly at 931-7863
for your personal fitness training.
PROFESSIONAL CARPRET
CLEANING prided right for College
Students- call 752-8163 and leave
message.
;
Personals
fff Greek
ATTENTION: THE STUDENT PI-
RATE CLUB will meet Tuesday Sep-
tember 21st. in Mendenhall Student
Center at 8p.m. room number will be
announced in Tuesday's paper. All
students welcome! For information
call 757-4540.
CARTER LAWRANCE Happy Birth-
day to the best little sis' around You
deserve the best Love ya lots Love
your Big Sis.
ATTENTION! Delta Epsion Chi in-
vites all those students interested in
joining a new and exciting organiza-
tion to an orientation social Tuesday
September 21,6:00pm. At Room 2014
GCB. An Education & Business Co-ed
Fraternity. OPENTO ALLMAJORS
Contact Skip Lilly, VP of Public Rela-
tions or Advisors @ 757-6549!
1
IQ
Greek
For Sale
1991 TOYOTA 4X4 Extra nice, $500
and take over payments. 50 K miles.
Call 321-3864.
FOR SALE - '87 Ford Escort GL, silver,
2-door ha tchbac k. 4 speed, a c, a m fm
cass power steering. Verv clean.
$1500.00. Call Melissa at 321-2926.
'83 VOLVO; blue, 4-door, one owner,
excellent condition, very clean; selling
to accommoda te growing fa mily; needs
a good home; call 753-3218 after 6 pm.
FORT HENRYS ARMY NAVY
1501 S. EVANS STREET 75&-S781
WASHING MACHINE FOR SALE -
Good condition. Looks like new and
washes well. Frigidaire model. $75 or
best offer. Call Susan at 758-6787.
FERRET FOR SALE Male, Great with
people, descented, healthy, comes with
cage and other supplies-He's groovy!
Call 752-2248.
SEARS KENMORE PORTABLE
DRYER- excellent condition. $150.00
has cotton sturdy touch up, permanent
press, air only cycles.
TANDY 1000HX COMPUTER. Excel-
lent condition. 640K, 2 disk drives,
monitor, monitor stand, dot matrix
Lsrgoxt Library of iirtutiiutnn in U.S.
1S.m TOPICS-AU SUBJECTS
Order Catalog Today with Visa MC Of COD
H 800-3510222
Or. rush $2 00 to RKttrch Information
11322 Idaho A� 206-A. Los Angeles. CA 9002;
cm
Personals
LOSE WEIGHT: Doctor recom-
mended, FDA tested. 100 guaran-
teed, 100 natural. The only thing
vou lose is weight Call anytime, 756-
1166.
WRITERMUSICI AN AND POETIC
SOUL seeks like minded lady for
friendship and fun. Send photos and
correspondence to: KANE, PO Box
8663, Greenville, NC 27835
RUSH PHI KAPPA PSI - Party ev-
ery night? Drunk all the time? Then
you're NOT who we are looking for.
Leaders, scholars, men and athletes
not afraid of philanthropy, that's who
we're looking for. Create tradition
and build on something new. Call
Rich at 752-2573. RUSH PHI KAPPA
PSI 14-16th at 508 West 5th Street.
WHAT IN THE HELL is Rush? Call
752-2573 or 830-9536 to find out.
to all of the fraternities during Rush
Week! Love the Sigmas.
GOOD LUCK to all the fraternities
during Rush Week! ve the Sigmas
To the SIGMA PLEDGES- You are
doing a great job! Thank you for all
your hard work and dedication!
Love, the Sisters.
THANCKS to Chi-O, ADPi, and
AZD pledges for participating in our
Scavenger Hunt on Sunday. Look-
ing forward to more fun times! Sigma
Sisters and Pledges.
LAURA SWEET, Thank you for all
of the hard work you do! Our Greek
system would not be as strong as it is
without you! Love, the Sigmas.
PI KAPPA ALPHA the game was a
real hit! Love, the Sigmas.
Good Luck to the ECU Pirates, beat
Central Florida!
The Sigmas would like to welcome
all parents to Parent's Weeken
TO ALL SIGMA PLEDGES-Thurs-
day is here and all of us Big Sisters
can't wait to let you know who we
are!
CONGRATULATIONS to Chi-
Omega's new Piedge Class Offic-
ers: President- Stephanie
Cholewinski, Vice-Presiderit-
Heather Carroll, Secretary- Julie
Samples, Treasurer- Judy MorgaSn,
Spirit Chairman- Amy Schroeder,
Jr. Panhellenic- Joanna Krekel aid
Shel ley Smith, Community Servide-
Grace Kelly, Song Leader -Ldri
Sherman, Campus Activities- AnVy
Gardner and Krisaina Stutzmai,
Historian- Stacey Turner, arid
Intramurals- April Chambers. The
Chi-Omegas
KDP- Thanks guys for a great tail-
gate! Can't wait to party in the Wild
Wild West! Love the Sisters of Pi
Delta.
RUSH EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
Join us for fun at our "Beach Party
Rush '93 Sept. 20-22nd at 5:30pm in
the Central Campus Meeting
Room Fleming Basement. Learn
about our Service Sorority and its
rewards from doing philantrophic
work while having the special
bonds of sisterhood. See ya there!
THE SISTERS and new members of
Alpha Omicron Pi would like to
wish our Pirates the best of luck
against Central Florida.
WELCOME to all ECU parents. We
hope everyone has an enjoyable
weekend. The sisters and new merr-
bers of Alpha Omicron Pi.
ZETA TAU ALPHA Pledges: It te
finally time for you to find out wharf
having a Big Sis is all about! The
sisters are ready and hope you are
too, come find you Big Sis, she's
waiting for you! Love- The Sisters.
We can't wait for Parent's Week
LAMBDA CHI. Love AlpDelta.
TO KAPPA SIGMA: We had a great
time tailgating. Love, Alpha XS
Delta. I
i
i
TKE: Thanks for a great time Thurs-
day night. The Chi Omegas.
KAPPA SIGMA: Parents weekend
is going to be lots of fun. We can't
wait! The Chi Omegas.
Announcements
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
CFNTF.R
The Newman Catholic Stu-
dent Center would like to wel-
come the parents and invite
you to join us at the center
for Sunday Mass, 11:30 am
and 8:30 pm. The Newman
Center is located next to the
East end of campus at 953 E.
10th St. For further infor-
mation call Fr. Paul at 757-
1991.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt county-
Special Olympics is recruit-
ing for volunteer coaches
in the following sports:
soccer, basketball skills,
team basketball, swim-
ming, gymnastics, bowl-
ing, power-lifting, and
roller skating. NO EXPERI-
ENCE IS NECESSARY�JUST A
WILLINGNESS TO WORK
WITH MENTALLY HANDI-
CAPPED CHILDREN AND
ADULTS. Special training
sessions for coaches will be
held. Last day to volunteer
for fall sports is Sept. 28th.
Volunteer hours may be
used as part of practicum
requirements for several
ECU courses. For more info,
contact Connie Sappenfield
at 830-4541.
PHI SIGMA PI
A smoker will be held Sep-
tember 20 at 7 pm in GCB
1032, for anyone interested
in pledging Phi Sigma Pi
National Honor Fraternity.
To pledge, one must have
between 32 and 96 semester
hours, a GPA of 3.3 or better,
and dispay the qualities of
scholarship, leadership and
fellowship with the purpose
of the fraternity in mind.
Informal dress; gus - coats
and tie, girls- dresses. For
more info crll David Batts at
931-8775 or Lindsay
Fernandez at 321-2577.
FPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
Interested in sisterhood
bonding and helping others
such as the St. Jude's
Children's Hospital? Epsilon
Sigma Alpha International
Service Sorority can provide
just that and more! Rush will
be held Sept 20-22 at 5:30 PM
in the campus meeting room
in Fleming hall Basement.
Get the best of a sorority and
a service organization all in
one! For more info call 758-
8126.
INTRODUCTION TO
MEDITATION
A short course of instruc-
tion in meditation tech-
niques and philosophy will
meet 7:30-8:30, Mon, Sept 20,
in Unitarian-Universalist
Church, 131 Oakmont Drive
(across from Greenville Ath-
letic Club). The course will
continue on the next two
Monday evenings. All are
invited. Bring a cushion for
sitting or wear comfortable
clothing. The instruction is
sponsored by the Buddhist
Meditation and Study Group
of ECU.
PHYS ED MOTOR &
PHYSICAL COMPETENCY
TEST
PLACE: Minges Coliseum,
TIME AND DATE: 1-3 pm,
Friday, September 17, 1993.
A passing score on this test
is required of all students
prior to declaring physical
education as a major. 1.
Maintain an average T-
score of 45 on the six-item
test battery. 2. Having a T-
score of 45 on an aerobics
run. Any student with a
medical condition that
would contraindicate
participation in testing
should contact Mike
McCammon or Dr. Gay
Isreal at 757-4688. To be
exempted from any portion
of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A
detailed summary of the
test components is avail-
able in the Human Perfor-
mance Laboratory (Room
371, Sports Medicine Build-
ing). Your physician's
excuse must specifically
state from which items you
are exempt.
MASSAGE CLINIC
The ECU Physical Therapy
Club will have a massage
clinic Thurs Sept 16, 5-10pm
on first floor of Belk Allied
Health Bldg. Tickets: $1.50 (in
advance) or $2 (at the door)
for 10 minutes for a maxi-
mum of 30 minutes. Tickets
available from PT students
or ECU Back & Limb Clinic in
Belk Bldg.
PREJHYSICAL
THERAPY CLUB
The pre-P.T. club will be hav-
ing a meeting Thursday, Sept
16 in Mendenhall student
center room 221 at 7:00.
There will be a question and
answer session with the
Physical Therapy Dept. head.
All are welcome. If you have
any questions, call Dawn at
757-0573.
GAY, LESBIAN, AND
BISEXUAL ISSUES
The counseling Center is of-
fering a weekly group expe-
rience for students which is
intended to offer a safe and
accepting environment in
which to share feelings and
concerns. The challenges
presented by a homophobic
society for gay, lesbian, and
bisexual identity develop-
ment will be discussed. Call
757-6661 for an appoint-
ment.
LESBIAN ISSUES
ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
The Counseling Center is of-
fering a four-session work-
shop for ECU lesbian students
as they plan their lives in
the context of families of
origin, coupling, social re-
lationship networks, lifeca-
reer planning, parenting,
spirituality, etc. Limited en-
rollment. Call 757-6661 for
more information.
EREJ'RQfESSIQKAL
HEALTH MAJORING OR
MINORING STUDENTS
You are cordially invited to
our Annual Welcome Back
Reception. Faculty and other
professionals will be
present. This reception is to
welcome all new interest
persons and returning stu-
dents on September 21, 1993
from 5:30-7:OOp.m. in the
Multipurpose Room of
Mendenhall. Semiformal
dress is the attire.
STUDENT EXCHANGE
It is not too late to consider a
student exchange or study
abroad experience for
spring semester! If you are
interested in study sites
which are available, please
contact Stephanie Evancho,
International Programs,
757-6769 for details on how
you can pay ECU tuition and
study at another location!
You have until early Octo-
ber so don't delay!
ECU DEBATE
The first meeting for the for-
mation of the ECU Debate
team will be in room 212 of
Mendenhall on Wednesday-
Sept 22 at 7:00p.m. All inter-
ested students are welcome
to attend.
LNJ�RNAIiaNALSIU
DENT QRGANJZATLON
We are having our first
meeting of the year Thurs-
day 16th at 5p.m. In the Gen-
eral Classroom Building 2002.
We'll be nominating offic-
ers and talking about upcom-
ing events. See you there!
WOMEN'S
SUIDIEALUAMCE
The ECU Women's Alliance
will hold a reorganizational
meeting on Thursday, Sep-
tember 23 at 4:00p.m. in GCB
2002. We're actively seeking
new members interested in
social and political equality
for women and men.
STUDENT
HEALTH SERVICES
Last chance immunization
clinic at the student health
service is scheduled for
Wednesday September 22
from 8:30-11:30a.m. and 1:30-
4:00p.m.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Events: Thur Sept 16�Tif-
fany Campbell, voice, Senior;
Recital, (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00pm, Free); SherrS
Morris, trumpet, Senior Re-
cital, (Fletcher Recital Hall
9:00pm, Free); Fri. Sept. 17�
Roger T. Vincent, voice
Senior Recital, (Fletcher;
Recital Hall, 7:00pm Free);j
Tiffany Hassell, percus
sion, Senior Recital;
(Fletcher Recital Hall
9:00pm Free); Mon Sept
20�Sharon Munden.j
mezzo-soprano; Perry;
Smith, tenor; John B
O'Brien, piano, (Fletcher;
Recital Hall, 8:00 pmj
Free); Wed Sept. 2 2 � j
School of Music Noon-Hour
conceit Series: NEW FAC-
ULTY SHOWCASE, (Brodyj
Auditorium, 12:L30
pmFree). For additional
information, call 757-685P
or the 24-hour hotline at
757-4370.
NEWMANXATHQLLC
STUDENT CENTER
Invites you to worship
with them. Sunday masses:
11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10tl
St. Two houses from the
Fletcher Music Buildingl
For more info, contact Fr
Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
CHOOSING AMAJQR !
ANILA CAREER
This five session workshop
is the beginning step in
Career Counseling at ECU.
Take assessment instru-
ment. Learn how to do ma-
jorcareer research. Get a
list of possible career
fields that fit your inter-
ests, classes begin the
weeks of September 20 and





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 8
Photo courtesy of Gray Art Gallery
Pictured above is one of the many works that will be on display this
Saturday night at Gray Gallery. "Johnney-Laborer by Marsha Burns.
Have yourself a
fall adventure
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Come have some outdoor rec-
reational fun when Recreational
Services gets geared up this fall!
Surf's up come join an af-
ternoon outing of wind surfing
sun and fun on Thursday, Sept. 16
from 3 p.m8 p.m. Your fun-filled
afternoon will begin with instruc-
tion about equipment, terminol-
ogy' "gging' safety and
practice and will end
with success at
Whichards Beach,
NC. For only $8,
students ($10 for
faculty, staff or
guests) will get
all of this plus
transportation and
equipment! So, come register now
in 117 Christenbury gym and let
your adventure begin.
Your adventure doesn't have
to end here, because there will be
another opportunity to enjoy
more wind surfing and hang glid-
ing on Friday and Saturday, Sept.
24 and 25. Let the wind blow
through your hair when Recre-
ational Services' outdoor adven-
ture takes a trip to Kitty Hawk
and Cape Hatteras, NC. Your ad-
venture will include hang gliding
instruction by professionals at
Kitty Hawk Kites on Friday,
camning on Friday night at Or-
egon Inlet and wind surfing all
day Saturday at Canadian Hole.
Most food, equipment, instruc-
tional fees and transportation are
also included. You can have all of
this for $75 for students anc1 85
for faculty, staff or guest, so regis-
ter now in 117Christenbury Gym
and don't letanothergreatadven-
ture go by. All registered partici-
pants should attend a pre-trip
meeting in Brewster D101 on Sept.
22 at 5 p.m.
What are you up to this Fall
Break? Well, take a study
break and take a hike
when the Outdoor
Recreation Pro-
gram at Recre-
ational Services
goes backpacking
Oct. 8-12. Spend
three leisurely
days of backpack-
ing within the Shining Rock Wil-
derness Area of NC, and end the
trip with a splash at Sliding rock.
A student fee of $63 and a $75 fee
for faculty, staff or guest will cover
transportation, most food and
equipment. Your adventure will
begin at 12:30 p.m. on Friday and
will end at 6 p.m. on Tuesday.
Come by 117 Christenbury Gym
to register and attend an informa-
tional meeting on Monday, Oct. 4
at 5 p.m. in Brewster D-101.
Enjoy yourself this Fall and
take a break and have an adven-
ture. For more information, feel
free to call Recreational Services
at 757-6387.
Peking Palace sure to tempt,
please Chinese lovers
By J. Horst & L. Fernandez
Staff Writers
In the cultural Mecca that is the
city of Greenville, a person might
not be able to find restaurants that
cater to specific tastes. Chinese and
Mexican food lovers are hard-
pressed to find a variety of restau-
rants to sample from. However, Pe-
king Palace, located in the K-Mart
shopping center across from the
Plaza Mall, offers a wide variety of
Chinese dishes guaranteed to satisfy
even the most finicky eater.
Establish i in 1979, Peking Pal-
ace brings an authentic mix of Man-
darin, Chinese and Szechwan foods
to the Greenville area. Walking in
from the busy parking lot, the cus-
tomer is instantly transported into a
quiet, laid-back atmosphere. A small
but comfortable waiting area pre-
cedes the actual dining area, with
both having subdued lighting and
soft, rich colors.
The first thing thathitsyou when
you walk into the main dining area is
the smell. Light's brighter than the
overheads and a delicious aroma
draw you immediately to the buffet
table, which is Peking Palace's spe-
cialty. Priced around $5, the buffet
includessuchitems as chicken wings,
fried pork, pork lo mein, egg rolls,
beef with broccoli, hot soups, ice
cream for dessert and more.
For customers who aren't inter-
ested in buffet-style eating, Peking
Palace also offers a diverse menu
ranging from poultry to seafood to
vegetables. Entrees include curry
chicken (which is mildly spicy for
you cautious eaters), shrimp with
lobstersauce, beef with mushrooms,
bamboo and snow peas, assorted
Chinese vegetables, fried rice and
other dinner combinations.
The menu offers entrees for ev-
eryone, from the die-hard Chinese
food fanatic to the person who thinks
they hate Chinese food. Prices for
See PEKING page 12
ECU Gallery hosts 'taste of arts'
By Laura Wright
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The Art Enthusiasts of East
Carolina University's third annual
"Taste of the Arts '93: A
Multicultural Approach" will fea-
ture an inter-
disciplinary
the Speight Auditorium of the
Jenkins Fine Arts Center at 8 p.m.
Admission is free and the program
is open to the public.
The evening wili begin with a
lively performance of African-
American cultural songs sung by
the ECU
sampling of
the diverse ar-
tistic talent at
ECU. The pro-
gram will in-
clude musical,
theatrical, lit-
erary and fine
arts presenta-
tions.
"There is a
lotofdiversity
among the art
programs and there are high qual-
ity programs at ECU said Gray
Gallery director, Charles Lovell.
The idea behind "Taste of the Arts"
is to present a glimpse of the vast
array of artistic achievement at
ECU.
"Taste of the Arts" will take
place on Saturday, Sept. 18,1993 at
The idea behind
'Taste of the Arts' is
to present a glimpse
of the vast array of
artistic achievement
at ECU.
gospel choir.
Samuel
Schedit's
C anzana
Bergamasca,
Jan Bach's
Scherzo and
John
Cheetham's
Scherzo will
be presented
by a student
�� quintet from
�"����" the ECU
School of Music. The members of
the quintet, Timothy Odom and
Russell Smith (trumpets), Abigail
Pack (hom), John Lowe (trombone)
and Jeffery Davis (tuba), performed
this past summer at the Menorca
Summer Music Festival in
Menorca, Spain.
A structured improvisation
featuring students from Dr. Dawn
Clark's Improvisation I class from
the dance program of the Theatre
Arts Department is also on the list
of events. The Theatre Arts De-
partment will perform selections
from its upcoming production of
Guys and Dolls.
Other scheduled performers
include Alan Arnett and Patricia
Weeks. Arnett will perform a piece
based upon his impressions of the
statues and ruins that he saw in
Greece and Turkey over the sum-
mer. WeeKs will present an excerpt
from a work by four women about
no-longer-useful "rules of wom-
anhood" that are learned in child-
hood. The piece includes move-
ment and text and focuses upon
the nagging d ia logue of self-doubt
that we all experience.
The English Department will
provide a poetry or fiction reading
and the program will conclude with
a reception in the Wellington B.
Gray Gallery. Two exhibitions,
"Norman Keller: Sculptor and
"Marsha Burns: Portraits of
America are on display now and
will be featured during the recep-
tion.
The Speight Auditorium is
located on the campus of ECU in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Center off
of Fifth and Jarvis Streets. The
Gray Gallery is open Monday
through Saturday from 10a.m. to
5 p.m. and on Thursday evenings
until 8 p.m. All programs are free
and open to the public. For more
information, call Charles Lovell
at (919) 757-6336.
Downtown bar Kelly's tries its luck
As we all know, it's been tough for any bar to stay open there�will Kelly's survive?
By Quinton Pickup
Staff Writer
Those of you who have been
familiar with Greenville's club
scene over the last few years will
appreciate this article more than
others.
Remember that great bar New
Deli? Yeah the one that used to
have great bands from all around
the nation? Then we had Mugshots
take over after the Deli left.
Mugshots offered a few decent
bands in its short life in Green-
ville. Now we have the latest
downtown establishment:
"Kelly's
I can honestly say that I went
to Kelly's for the first time with an
open mind. As I went into Kelly's,
I paid the typical coverchargejust
like anywhere else. Then as I
worked my way into the club, I
started to feel more and more un-
comfortable as I went farther in.
Maybe if I had Greek letters on my
shirt or my hair was teased high
enough to stop air traffic it would
have been different.
I was impressed with the
club's music. It was dance music,
but not typical dance music. It
was good music. The music just
could not get me past the fact,
however, that I felt like I was at a
"Love Connection" convention.
It was obvious all the people in the
club were looking for a one-night
companion(not to say that doesn't
See BAR page 12
Photo courtesy of Cedric Van Buran
East Carolina students line the street outside of the latest bar, Kelly's.
Drink specials and better dance music have drawn them to the green.
Latest dance album gets energy through soul, r&b
Badyard Club
Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
You may have never heard of Dave
Morales, but you have probably heard some
of his work on other artists' productions.
He has done remix and reproduction con-
tributioas for such artists as Shabba Ranks
and The Brand New Heavies. He has also
worked as producer for such acts as Cece
Peniston, Maxi Priest, Ten City and Jody
Watley. Before all that he worked as a DJ in
the hippest clubs of New York and London
for many years.
After two years of working off and
on studio work, David Morales and The
Bad Yard Club have produced a dance
album, The Program. There are many guest
vocalists on this release, many unknowns
and a few famous names, like reggae inno-
vator Sly Dunbar of Sly and Robbie fame.
Although I am not the biggest fan of
dance albums, this one has sort of grown on
me. The majority of the tracks could be con-
sidered house music, but there are reggae,
soul and R&B influences that keep the mo-
notony to a minimum. There is much energy
here.
There is also a variety of performers to
help keep one's interest. Papa San, Stanrvck.
Delta, Anastacia, Natural L f aui Alexander
and Donna Giles help with the vocals, instru-
mentation or whatever else was needed for
this album. It is quite admirable to use un-
knowns on one's first solo effort.
Some of the tracks are quite smooth,
like "Jazzy Mo" with its heavy house beat
makes a solid base for the saxaphone to travel
See BAND page 12
Cafe provides pleasant escape
By Stephanie Tullo
Staff Writer
A summmer escape is located
in the new cafe and grill by the
name of Staccato, whether it be
the tropical atmosphere of ceiling
fans or the neon lights, or perhaps
the shiny marble floor.
In here, one can es
cape the pressures
of work or school.
This cafe
and grill has a
variety of foods
for different
budgets, even
the college stu-
dent. Food ranges
from the classic
hamburger with
fixin's, to hot meals,
not to mention ap-
petizers to wet your appetite or
dessert for a delicious finish. Prices
of main dishes range from around
$3to around $13depending on
your appetite. Salad prices range
from $2.50- $6 (large and small
available) which include a side
dish and bread, sandwiches are
around $4-$5 and hot meals such
as ribs or pork chops range from
$6.95-$13.
Diners can sit a t the bar where
drinks are plentiful or at a table to
enjoy the food. Drinks vary from
beer and house
wines to mixed
drinks. There is a
la rge selection of im-
ports as well as do-
mestic beers, in-
cluding beers
from Japan all
the way to Italy.
The prices of the
imports are rela-
tively good. The
Italian beer Peroni
that I tried was
$2.50 a bottle ex-
eluding tax. If you
want to go domestic,
then these beers are less costly.
The bar and grill is rather
small, but the atmosphere is com-
fortable. Staccato also has Euro-
See STACCATO page 12
Want to be published? It's easy,
bring all poetry submissions to
TEC. (across from Joyner)
Mmmmmmmmmmmmm!�m





September 16, 1993
Restaurant
Address
Phone
JieerWine Delivery Cost
WWs.1
golden
corral
jigpyMM - � ���'
JJ RIVERSIDE
STEAK BAR
Alfredo's
A Matter of Taste
Andy's Cheesesteaks
Annabelle's
Applebee's Restaurant
Barbecue Barn
The Beef Barn
Bistro
Bojangles Restaurant
Boli's 5th St. Pizzeria
Boulevard Bagel Shop
Burger King
Captain D's
Carolina Grill
Checkers
Chic-Fil-A
Chico's Mexican Rest.
China Town Express
Christine's Fine Dining
Cliff's Seafood Bar
Clyde Richard's
Crabby Sam's
Crusty's Pizza
Cubbie's
Darryl's "1907"
Deli Kitchen
Denny's
Dino's Pi�za
Domino's Pizza
Ernie's Famous Pizza
Famous Pizza
Filibuster's
Final Score
Fosdick's "1890" Rest
Golden Corral
Golden Dragon
Gumby's
Hardee's
Harvey's
Hickory Hams
Java Shop
K&W Cafeteria
KFC
King Sandwich
Kwa-San Sandwiches
Little Caesar's
Mandarin Restaurant
Marathon Restaurant
Margaux's Restaurant
Mazatlan Mexican Rest.
McDonald's
Mike's Deli
Milano's
Ming Dynasty
Monkster's Grill
Omar's Express
Papa Oliver's
Parker's Barbecue
Peasant's Cafe
Peking Palace
Peppi's Pizza Den
Pizza Hut
Pizza Inn
Pizza Transit Authority
Professor O'Cools
Quincy's Steakhouse
Ragazzi's
Red Lobster Rest.
Riverside Steak Bar
Ryan's Steak House
Saffron's (Ramada Inn)
Santa Fe Jack's
Sbarro's
Shabop's
Shoney's
Smoke House
Sonic Drive-In
Staccato's
Substation II
Subway Sandwiches
Szechuan Express
Szechuan Restaurant
Taco Bell
Tar Landing Seafood
Three Steers Restaurant
Tom's Restaurant
Venter's Grill
Villa Roma Restaurant
Waffle House
Warren's Hot Dogs
Watertree Terrace
Wendy's Hamburgers
Western Sizzlin'
Wok's Chef
218 E. 5th St.
658 Arlington Blvd.
The Plaza
The Plaza
202 SW Greenville Blvd.
RFD 14
400 St. Andrew's Dr.
207 SW Greenville Blvd.
911 S. Memorial Dr.
123 E. 5th St.
327 E. Arlington Blvd.
3016 E. 10th St.
626 S. Memorial
907 Dickinson Ave.
703 SE Greenville Blvd.
The Plaza
521 CotancheSt.
218 E. 5th St.
115 Red Banks Rd.
Hwy. 33 East (10th St. Ext.)
103EastbrookDr.
710 N. GreeneSt
1414 Charles Blvd.
501 S. Evans
800 E. 10th St.
103 Raleigh Ave.
808 Memorial
1414 Charles Blvd.
1201 Charles Blvd.
911 Memorial Dr.
100 E. 10th St.
114 E. 5th St.
2816 E. 10th St.
2903 S. Evans St.
504 SW Greenville Blvd.
Hwy. 11, Carolina East Cntr.
315 SE Greenville Blvd.
2907 E. 10th St.
817 Memorial Dr.
803 Red Banks Rd.
Charles Blvd. Shoppes
Carolina East Mall
600 W. Greenville Blvd.
512E. 14th St.
The Plaza
323 Arlington Blvd.
2217 MemorialDfc
560 Evans St.
706 S. Evans St. �
608 SW Greenville Blvd.
301 E. 10th St.
810 E. 10th St.
213 E. 5th St
Rivergate Shopping Center
103 SE Greenville Blvd.
206 E. 5th St.
314 E. 10th St.
2020 E.Greenville Blvd.
110 E. 4th St
Greeny tile Square Mall
421 Greenville Blvd.
260IE. 10thSt. i
1840 E. Greenville Blvd.
S. Charles St.
605 SE Greenville Blvd.
603 Greenville Blvd.
109 SE Greenville Blvd.
3501 S. Memorial Dr.
315 Stantonsburg Rd.
Memorial Dr.
203 W. Greenville Blvd.
1414 Charles Blvd.
The Plaza
14th and Charles
803 Memorial Dr.
703 SE Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Blvd.
505-C Red Banks Rd.
215 E. 4th St
208 E. 5th St.
The Plaza
100 E. I0th St.
319 E.Greenville Blvd.
105 Airport Rd.
2725 Memorial Dr.
West End Circle
MumfordRd.
2713 E. 10th St.
306 E. Greenville Blvd.
325 Arlington Blvd.
702 S. Memorial Dr.
501 E. 10th St
2903 E. 10th St.
Buyers Market
752-0022
355-1111
321-0588
756-0135
355-2421
752-3000
756-1161
355-5000
757-3456
752-2654
355-3311
752-9776
758-6761
752-1188
321-6779
355-4529
757-1666
757-1183
355-9500
752-3172
752-1413
752-0090
758-2233
752-6497
752-1907
752-5339
757-1610
758-2233
758-6660
752-4388
757-0I
758-4888
757-1122
756-2011
756-4412
756-3844
321-4862
752-7822
758-1084
756-0805
830-JAVA
756-7577
756-6434
752-1005
756-4787
756-7256
756-9687
752-0326
752-7566
355-3737
752-1119
830-6686
758-9550
752-7111
756-3993
830-0588
758-6600
758-9215
752-3717
756-1169
756-0825
752-4445
758-6266
757-1955
355-2946
756-7888
321-1976
75:6-4000
752-5001
35:5-3111
355-8300
758-5225
355-4929
752-1955
752-7572
355-2211
756-9190
321-0064
752-2183
758-7979
355-8228
757-1818
756-8231
758-0327
756-2414
756-1012
752-2767
758-1042
756-7441
321-1000
758-3401
758-5535
758-2712
321-1383
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DISCOVER
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September 16, 1993
The East Carolinian 10
its sure to charm ECU
lunched
usl lungry
e I imeliters have
three generations
e s appearing at
will include original mem-
w comers,
. and John ! a id.
� mblearetenors
arbrough and Red
long the Limeliters' best-
ivvn hits are "Wayfaring
Stranger, There'saMeetingHere
night" and "Have Some Ma-
deira, M'Dear In all, their songs
have been recorded on more than
two dozen albums for Elektra,
UCA and West Knoll Records.
The Limeliters are an histori-
cally significant group of artists,
having been one of the nation's
ou Gottlieb and Alex leading folk groups during the
I960's. However, the program
promises to be more than a "nos-
talgia trip because the band has
continued to evolve and blend new
elements into their exciting and
energetic performances.
1 ickets for the Limeliters' con-
cert are $15 each for the general
public and 57 for students and
youth.
Tickets can be ordered or pur-
chased in person from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center at 757-4788 or toll free
1-800-ECU-ARTS. Major credit
cards are accepted.
Hendrix Theater ready for reopening
esus Christ Superstar' revisted
, f Reports
Hast Carolinian
he Shoestring Theatre of Wil-
� nd the Arts Council of Wilson
teamed up to present the rock
iipe: a "Jesus Christ Superstar Oc-
I -3, and Oct. 7-10 in the public
next to the Wilson Arts Cen-
rtormances begin at 8:15 p.m.
1 his production is directed by
-tring Theater director, Bob
on. Written by Tim Rice, the
ous musical score is by An-
d: Lloyd Webber, famous for his
Iway and London musicals,
�'�. ph and the Amazing
licolor Dreamcoat "Evita
JCats ' and "The Phantom of the
C'i i "Superstar" deals with the
m of Christ�his last seven
�ia ;in earth�by presenting con-
temporarydepictionsof his journey
to Jerusalem, the cleansing of the
temple and, finally, the crucifixion.
This play is open to the public a t
a cost of $7 for adults and $4 for
students.
Performances will be canceled
in the event of rain.
Tickets may be used for any
performance with seating on a first-
come, first-serve basis.
This production featuresplenty
of local talent including WyattStaton
as Jesus, Rhonda Ward as Mary
Magdalene, Alvaro Coronado as
Judas, Mark Ed wardsas King Herod
and Jeff Creech as Pontius Pilate.
This play burst onto New York
and London stages in 1971 and still
has a strong story to tell.
The lead character is never pale,
wan or passive. He is a vital, active
person in this "biblical drama" with
distinct and interesting supporting
characters.
Sponsoring this program are the
Arts Council Grassroots Program,
the City of Wilson Parks and Recre-
ations Department, Downtown De-
velopment Corporation and Cen-
tral Wilson Business Association.
Steve Griffen
Staff Writer
Hendrix Theater has been
renovated and hopes are high for
the 1993-94 mov ie year. The reno-
vation included a new stage, car-
pet and curtains allot which make
the theater look brand new.
Travis Jarrel, the new films
chairperson, has come up with
many ideas and has made up a
better schedule of movies than
any other year.
The first weekend show of
the year will be Falling Doivn star-
ring Michael Douglas and will
premiere on Thursday, Sept. 23
and run through Saturday the 25.
The first Wednesday and Sunday
show will be Army of Darkness
which premieres Wednesday,
Sept.22. The second week at
Hendrix will start off with
Lorenzo's Oil on Wednesday,
Sept.29 and Sunday, Oct. 3. The
weekend movie will start on
Thursday, Sept. 30 and run until
Saturday.
"I want to book movies that
appeal to a wide variety of audi-
ences instead of the same old mov-
ies played last year Jarrel said.
On Wednesdays and Sun-
days, Hendrix will show foreign
films, cult films and mid 80s clas-
sics.
An example of cult film to be
shown will be Adventures ofBucka-
roo Bonzai, and a mid 80s classic,
The Lost Bois.
The weekend agenda of mov-
ies will becurrent blockbuster hits
like The Fugitive and True Romance.
Both are to be shown in the spring.
The films committee has also
come up with a plan called "Pen-
nies from Hendrix a take-off
from the movie Pennies from
Heaven.
The com mi ttee is shooting for
at least 35,000 people to come to
Hendrix Theater throughout the
year. The 35,000th persm will
receive 35,000 pennies which
equals to S350 in cash, bok for
updated tallies in futun issues
of The East Carolinian.
The committee willalso be
giving outa few certificaes from
L'BE and local restaurant to ran-
dom students who come to the
movies. Just think, the movies
are free in the first plare, and
now they are going to gve you
prizes for coming to Heidrix.
The film committee has
planned an exciting yearaf mov-
ies and prizes that should ap-
peal to everyone. Remenber, the
movies are free with y�ur ECU
ID, and you can bring oie guest.
The movies start at 8 p.m.
Hendrix Theater is located in-
side Mendenhall Student Union.
If you have any ideas or ques-
tions, call the film chairman, J.
Marshal at 757-4711.
LUTHERANS
im@s
SI Carolina's Trail & Nature Shop
fur Trails Are Also On the Water"
jggjlf Patagonia yHor�
Parents Weekend
Bring your parents to a special Lutheran Student Minis-
tries led Church Service on Sunday, Sept 19. Held at our
redeemer Lutheran Church 1801 S. Elm Street 11 am
Regular meetings on Sunday evenings: 6 pm at Lutheran
Student Center.
ly. 931.8999 or The Center, 756.4a52
Midnight M;dfcu
Monday Night, Sept 20th at Midnight
mm 13,93 0
$9.98 CASS
$3.00 OFF ANY CD IN STOCK
$15.08 OR ABOVE
Nirvana In Utero
1109 CHARLES BLVD
758-4251
OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT
EVERY NIGHT
Midnight $
Madness
Vs
Be the 1 st on Your Block to Rock"
ssmmm swrnnnr, �sph mh �? ssmbs
-





September 16, 1993
usic consumers beware: Do not buy
. this N
do vou want to
. V, the reviewer
tap iD and saj s
yes or no.
Now, it is into rap then X
probablv won't opt to review the
Litest speed-metaJ selection. So
some stuff languishes in the
boss sdesk, becausepeopledon't
want to review something they'll
hate.
I once reviewed a tape by
Disincarnate. This tape scared
me. I still can't lose it; it followed
me when I moved to a new apart-
ment. But I reviewed it because
I'm a trooper.
STACCATO
with no further ado,
in new releases that
on iv appearing in the"pre-
v uui-i -owned" binol a CD store
near you.
Andrew I ogan's Show Me
Your Heart is a nasty bit of pure
pop dance schmaltz with as much
diversity and fun as a weekend in
the burn ward. 1 think all the tunes
were played on one of those cool
keyboards that does everything.
My wife of almost four weeks
says, "I don't like this music. It
sounds like some dance music,
like when I was a teenager But
hey, if you were upset when the
New Kids on the Block broke up,
here's some music for you. I'll
admit, it's better than Michael
Bolton, but then, so is roadkill.
If you're into monster metal
or death metal or whatever we're
Continued from page 8
pean style dining with outdoor
seating if you prefer the fresh air to
air conditioning. As for myself, I
was quite comfortable inside
where it was cool.
The food was delectable and
freshman Cynthia Sanderford
said, "the food was good but they
could have given more food for
the money Staccato has poten-
tial as long as management doesn't
increase prices and there is contin-
ued good service and tasty food.
On Friday and Saturday nights
from 10 p.m1 a.m live entertain-
ment is available. Some previous
shows include acoustic guitar, jazz
and a variety of other music such
as Kitty West.
Staccato's hours are Monday-
Wednesday from 11 a.m10 p.m.
and Thursday-Saturday from 11
a.ml a.m. They are closed on Sun-
days except for private parties.
If Staccato interests your taste
buds, then have lunch, go for a
drink or even get something to go.
The restaurant is located off Red
Banks Rd. behind Adam's Car
Wash, on the left. Good luck, Con-
noisseurs!
AVAILABLE NOW!
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS
LOCATED NEAR CAMPUS. NEW. REASONABLE
RENT INCLUDING FREE WATERSEWER, MINI-
BLINDS, LAUNDRY FACILITY & ECU BUS SERVICE.
CALL 752-8320 FROM 9am-5pm
calling it these days, Sam Black
( hurch's Boston is a must have. 1
found it to be a useless addition to
the music scene, but vou know
me; I'm not keen on music remi-
niscent of malaria and
conjunctivitis personified. How-
ever . the guitar player does amaz-
ing things for a guy who only
knows eight chords.
Clutch's Transnational Speed-
way League: Anthems, Anecdotes and
Undeniable Truths really touched
me. Touched me in a way I've
never been touched before. I
thought this was going to be a
cool CD; I mean, it's got a great
title and all. And the jacket has a
bunch of swell pictures and cool
song titles, like "A Shogun Named
Marcus" and "Earthworm but
despite the variety of metal licks
and Black Sabbathesque riffs,
Clutch has Dr. Doom on vocals.
Sad, but true.
And then, there's Triangle's
Shine. This release really saddens
me, because the music flatout
jams. One hundred percent. The
bass player is just gone with the
wind: he's thumpin' like a dream
come true!
But then it happens. The
singer intrudes upon the jam with
an effect not unlike Godzilla in-
truding upon Tokyo. This guy-
sounds like he's singing through
an empty Maxwell House can
while push-pins are driven into
various parts of his body. 'Nuff
said.
So check it out if you're so
inclined. After all, this is just my
opinion. And, as my friend D.P.
would say, "Alas, how bitter am
I?"
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
I�90 SEAFOOD
Walnut Creek
Update
Bob Dylan A Soutane.
will hit the stage at 6:30 p.m
Sunday, Sept. 19. Tickets are on
sale now at selected ticket
outlets.
Lovers of 60'$ classics shouldn't miss this
musical extravaganza ok the Croak.
Chock it out!
BICYCLE POST & ACS
WIN NEW TREK 830
Valued at $370
donated by
Bicyde Post
Raffled by
American Chemical Society
Buy tickets in Flanagan
Tickets $1.00 ;
Visit Bicycie Post at
215 Arlington Blvd (Next to Bucaneer)
756.3301
530 Cotanche St. (Next To UBE)
757.3616
BICYCU
P0S
BICYCLE POST & ACS
NOW ACCEPTED AT
BELL'S FORK &
10TH ST. LOCATIONS
It's Tailgatin' Time!
2512 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE
.7S501K)
1112N.GREENE STREET
7S4111
1204 N. MEMORIAL DRIVE
75B2SD1
BELL'S FORK SQUARE
7566705
2510 E. 10th STREET
757-1880
iLALALL
HAVING A PIG PICKIN? IF YOU'VE GOT THE COOKER WE'VE GOT THE PIG!
QUARTER, HALF, A WHOLE PIGS
in the MEAT DEPARTMENT at all HARRIS locations
BEST VARIETY OF THE COLDEST BEER
Y
14thStree�
KXhStreet
5thStreet
FRATERNmES & SORORITIES
Call NOW for a CHARGE ACCOUNT
and Plan ahead for your Big Events
STUDENTS
Enjoy the convenience of our Check Cashing
Card at all locations
Applytodav
and at our BELL'S FORK SQUARE location
BAKERY
�Greenville's best decorated cakes & fresh sub rolls�French
bread �Rollsmadefrom scratch daily: Donuts,Fritters,
Pastries, Pies, Cakes, Gourmet cookies
ECU Specialty Cakes & Cookies
756-6160
DELI
�Completelineofmeats&cheeses�Pizzas�Friedchicken
Chicken drum mettes
�Hot meatball & Italian sausage subs �Coid subs & Sandwiches
�50-item Salad bar
�Partytraysfortailgating
Freezer Queen
28oi Suppart -assorted
varlstlss including �Head
turkey a Salisbury sisak
3for$5
i?
USDA
Boneless
NY Strip
$3.98 lb
Tropicana
Chilled Orange Juice
BegyiarorHome style
12 GALLON
Fresh Fryer
Leg
Quarters
33C lb
GOLDEN
WHEAT
MACARONI
CHEESE
DINNER
Golden Wheat
Macaroni &
CheeseDinner
7oz
4$1XX
MgMjf,
Coca Cola
Products
20ca�pknorHstumabie
Aquafresh
4.6 oz Tubes
$129
$199
6pk
Lenders Bagels
7
Sealtest Premium
Ice Cream or Frozen Yogurt
All Flavors
$199
1�GALLON
Coors,
Budweiser.or
Miller Lite Beer
HARRIS SUPERMARKET SPECIALS GOOD THRU SEPTEMBER 23
$1199






September 16, 1993
Miss North Carolina
USA pageants near
Deadline extended until Oct 1
hat the
entr) into the 14
and
the 14 Miss North Carolina
' een USA pageants has been ox-
tended until midnight, Oct. 1,
1993.
Both pageants will run con-
currently Nov. 14 and 20 in Char-
lotte, North Carolina. Miss USA
delegates must be at least 18 and
under 27 as of February 1, 1 994,
and Miss Teen USA delegates
must be at least 15 and under 19
as of July 1,1994.
Delegates must be U.S. Citi-
zens, six month residents of NC
(dorm students are welcome to
apply), single, must never have
been married or have had chil-
dren.
Competition will be in
evening gown and swimsuit. In-
appearanc i
udging will be
personalit) and
� pel torm-
PEKING
ing talent required
The winners will receive a
five day trip to Ne rk, a two
week expense paid trip to com-
pete tor their respective national
titles, a luxurious fui coat, ward-
robe, evening gown, cash and
many other prizes, including the
chance to win 5225,000.00 in cash
prizes at the Miss USA Pageant
and the chance to win SI 50,000.00
in cash prizes at the Miss Teen
USA Pageant.
Interested women should
write to the Miss North Carolina
USA Pageants, 51 Holley Lake
Road, Drawer CNP, Aiken SC,
29803, or telephone 803-648-6220.
Include name, address, telephone
number and birthday along with
a brief biography and snapshot.
Continued from page 8
Henry and
Delia will be
opening in
Arlington
Hall Gallery
Sept. 21 and
will run
through
Nov. 13.
Photo courtesy
olArhnqton Hall
Gallery
BAR
The East Carolinian 12
Continued from page 8
happen almost everywhere down-
town).
I compared the typical drink
prices with Kelly' -election. Some
of the drinks were a little high, but
the overall prices were moderate.
The bar was very well-stocked and
had good drink specials.
Basically, being at Kelly's
made me feel like being at almost
any other Creenviile bar.
There are two things on the
patrons' minds: sex and beer.
OK, and don't let me forget per-
sonal appearances.
I personally will not be go-
ing back.
If you've seen one Green-
ville bar, then you've seen
Kelly's. Some people would re-
ally enjoy Kelly's. Take your
chances and visit a new place.
Who knows, it may be for
you.
entrees range from $5 - $11, with
diruTercombinationsstarangat$4.95.
Mdinnercombinanons,specialsand
the buffet include soup, egg rolls,
rice, hot tea and fortune cookies. For
the health conscious, Peking Palace
advertisescooking in cholesterol free
vegetable oil and will offer no MSG
on demand.
The a tmosphere of the main din-
ing room offers a welcome change
from the hustle-bustle of some res-
taurants. Evenly mixed booths and
tables allow the customer the choice
BAND c��y�
����������iiiaaaaiVMHaaWiiaaaaHMMRSaaaaaaaaaaBMNiaaaaaBaaaaMK
around on. There is also some
slower Jamacian dance-hall type
stuff and some hyper, kick-the-
drum-machine-into-high-gear-
take-some-ectasy-and-dance-your-
feet-off house music. The variety of
artists and sounds that it from driv-
ing you insane like some dance
albums can.
"It's different says Mo-
rales, describing his album. "It
dosen't sound like anything else;
no two tracks sound the same. I
want to burn into people's minds:
songs, please
The 90s concept of club mu-
sic is imaginative, all-enveloping
and, above all, diverse. The Pro-
gram adheres to this criteria and
does it with style.
of privacy (high-backed booths) or
openness. Decked in rich burgundy
or black, the decor relaxes the cus-
tomer right from the start. Oriental
paintings, a Chinese z�. -iac place mat
and an easy-to-follow guide on us-
ing chopsticks all combine to let the
eater relax and enjoy his meal.
Take mcxlerate pricing, a conve-
nient location, an all-you-can-eatbuf-
fet and a comfortable atmosphere.
What do you get? A recipe for an
eating experience that vou will re-
member for a long time to come.
Central Book & News
Come See Our
CALENDARS
r
i
Mon-Fri 8.30-930
Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square shopping
Center (next to Kmart) I CXCCpt magazines &
10 OFF
EVERYTHING
756-7177
i
i
L.
WVALID ECU ID
I
I
nAIR IS HAIR
toSRESsryE fu gBgSBB
BRING THIS COUPON IN FOR THESE SPECIALS:
Shampoo, Blow Dry,Cut, Style $20.00Shampoo, Blow Dry, Style $25.00
RELAXERS $35.00-
EXPIRES OCTOBER 16, 1993
Coll for appointment
� . 321-6960
Greenville Buyers Market Open Mon-Fri 9am-9pmSaturday 8am-4pm
Catholic Student Center
Would Like To
WELCOME PARENTS
& Invite Them to Join Us For Sunday Mass
11:30 am & 11:30 pm -Of
Scop by the Newman Center anytime.
Ft Paul6eth and the Newman Center Community (757-1991).
953 E. 10th St.
(2nd house from Fletcher music Bldg.)
ForYourDining Pleasure EnjoyOneof
GreenvBte's Most Elegant and Unique Atmospheres
WELCOME PARENTS
EXPANDED BUFFET including 5 NEW ITEMS!
TAKE
OUT
WELCOME
:&&
te&&m
BUFFET
LUNCH -$4.69
DINNER - $6.49
7 DAYS A WEEK
SUNDAY BRUNCH 12:00-2:30 - $5.99
752-7111
Rivergate Shopping Center
E. 10th St & Greenville Blvd.
(Next to Wlnn Dixie)
juuei
Fall Savings Spectacular!
a
TOYOTA QUALITY LUBE , OIL & FILTER � includes up to 6 quarts of Genuine Toyot a oil � Install Genuine Toyota dcubie-Wtermg oil filter � Lubrication (when applicable) � Check all fluid levels M T QC Turbos . x4s end dtesets may be slightly higher Musi present coupon at time repair order it written Expires 9 3093
�� M3

TOYOTA QUALITY
MINOR TUNE-UP
$29.95
� install Genuine Toyota spark plugs
�Check air, fuel and emmissicn inters
�inspect ignition wires distributor cup and
rotor bens hoses and PCv valve
' 6-cylinde' shghtty higher Ext'udea 60.000-rrut� platinum plugs
Must present coupon at time repair order it wntten
Expires 930 93
TOYOTA QUALITY
CHECK- UP
$1.95
Comprehensive bumper to bumper inspection of all
major systems. Make your appointment now!
' Musi peasant coupon it tima rapair ordat is wnttan
Exp.t 930 S3
TOYOTA QUALITY
WINTERIZATION
� Drain cooling system and replace anti-freeze
for protection to 20-30 degrees below zero.
� Check all fluid levels.
� Check battery and starter
� Clean and inspect battery terminalscables.
'Must ptB5.nl coupon at time tapair ordar it
Expires 930 93
$22.95
TOYOTA QUALITY TIRE BALANCEROTATION � Inspect tires for wear. � Balance all four wheels. � Rotate tires $-4 f QC � Check tire pressure. 5JB53 'Must prasanl coupon at ttma tepatt oroat is wnttan Exptras 930 93.



Regular Pnoe $6 13
TOYOTA QUALITY
OIL FILTER $4 99
Double stage filtering element with
Your Cost
anti-drainback valve.
' Umit 2 plus tax Not valxi with other coupons Over the counter sates onty Must present coupon at time
repair order is written
Expires 930 93
3
7 love what you do for me.
99
� TOYOTA
Mon-Fri 7:30 am-6:00 pm
� TJ��fts
S�� 3615 South Memorial Drive
"rUUaiil- Located Across From Carolina East Mall
1:00 pm 321-3000
for
ECU PARENTS!
ON SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 18TH THE
FIRST 500 PARENTS WILL RECEIVE

516 S. Cotanche Sl Downtown Greenville
Hours: M-F 9-6, Football Saturday 9-6
Serving ECU for over 20 years.
Join us at the Beef Bam For
Lunch Before the Game!
or
Dinner After the Game!
We'll pamper you in air conditioned comfort with a
delicious buffet for lunch, for only $7.95 per person,
(other menu items also available) or the finest
steaks and freshest seafood anywhere for dinner.
East Carolina and the Beef Barn
Always a winning tradition.
Please call for Reservations.
Lunch Serving Time: 1-2pm
400 Sl Andrews Dr.
756-1161





���-
ff
Adventures Of Kemple Boy
By Kemple
Phoebe
llll! �H I I IF iia- asalitiiiiiiiiiiil iiiimmmii
by Stephanie Smith
CANDACE, YOU'RE NOT SERIOUSLV
CONSIDS�ING PAVING ��o FOU
A WfEK-LONi SEMINAR ON
w�ttNESSv. pLMse Teu. me
Vt"m� IS AU. A BIG JO Kg.
fOOHT MMvrC Vou� TV�S AND
WON 6V.&IKLI PONY SUCCUMB
TO OM� QUACK'S INTER-
PRETATION OP VXMATi NIGHT
.PON VOU.OO'NC Too OtO TO
BE TmS MAlu6A8le;j

BE STRONG!pont 601 ncul
ON NOUN OWN JUPG�M�NT.�tlV�
on fouN own -reams, you �� a
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OP�NIQMO
.v�;
Demonseed
Fred's Corner
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rne n�iu6B��tr' rue Hton
fVffHIi Hne l BTTNUR.m F
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Fred's Corner
by Parnett
WANG TV
By Manning & Ferguson
r.�
LersmcaiTPOLKi�
ME HOT P�S�RT SOW
AMD CAIfAPMrWCAOUS
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MIX.
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foe. sou -rob . &urpi�As�.
ppj'ru'amjt. s�jbFe�i s
MCtAa CSZTAhJ THAT UB'LL
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WANG TV
By Ferguson & Manning
MRS. UMIibb I'M QUlTti5R
wowep rcA�T WHWNW6
Hi, HOW"iW00iOfc?
6KEflTi3VISIJTir?
B'T MOT WO- �
� SH�lLSaK� &J&JT
- ra a� J Mf OFFICE
THE fTH6Hr�rilU6
7WIM6 is T��rr
xauenv coo-r
7HJ� HSFESCSlT
cPI(RmtE comics,
(liunls your body)
Veah, that's right! Its Fall, school has started and that can only
mean one thingPirate Comics is in dire need of cartoonists! Not
just any ole cartoonists, but good ones! Ves, baby! Now you can
be part of the mystique and glamour that is Pirate Comics. Rmaze
your friends, scare your neighbors, stay up late and haue lots of
adoring fans! So if you are reasonably well-skilled in drawing and
the art of sequential story-telling, then high-tail your boom-boom
down to the offices of The East Carolinian. We're located on the
second floor of the Student Publication Building, right across from
Joyner Library (you know, that place with the books). Or giue
Chris Kemple a call at 757-6366. Who knows, well either be
your ticket to fame and fortune or utter rejection!
Attention Ya Cartoonist Bums!
That's right, you devil-may-care pedote blossoms, it's
time lor the first ot many cartoonist meetings Tor Fall H)3.
All presently employed and newly hired cartoonists must
come to'the offices o'Tlw East Carolinian next Thursday.
Sept. 16. at 6:00pm. Attendance is mandatory. If-you
don't show up. don't expect to see your strip on-this page.
1 mean bidness! If there is a scheduling conflict contact
Chris Kemple or leave a message at 758-S824 and have
a written excuse signed by your mommy. But I know
you'll all be there; it'll be more fun that a Monster Truck
show! And you might "just learn something. Hot cha!
i
mnHaBMM
. j i'jiii ii i
IHiJi.i





The East Carolinian
What's the 411?
Friday, Sept. 17
Volley ba
i
Soccer (3-1)
versus George Mason,TBA
Saturday, Sept. 18
Football (0-1)
versus Central Florida
Volleyball (1-9)
at UNC-G Tri-Match versus
Georgia St. at 10 a.m.
Cross Country
at Wake Forest Invitational
Sunday, Sept. 19
Soccer (3-1)
versus James Madison, TBA
Monday, Sept. 20
Golf
at Kiavvah Island Collegiate,
Charleston, S.C
Scoreboard
Tuesday, Sept 14
Volleyball (1-8)
lost to N.C. State: 15-9,15-6,
15-13
Wednesday, Sept.15
Soccer (3-1)
at Duke, Durham, N.C, Late
Probable Starters
ECU
OFFENSE
QB: 5 Marcus Crandell
FB: 35 Junior Smith
HB: 23 Jem's McPhail
FL: 4 Morris Letcher
SE: 87 Ronnie Williams
TE: 88 Carlester Crumpler
LT: 51 Ken Carroll
LG: 74 Tom Coleman
C: 63 Kevin Wiggins
RG: 52 Ken Crawford
RT. 78 Terry Tilghman
DEFENSE
RE: 91 Willie Brookins
RT: 70 Jeff Cooke
LT: 97 Derek Taylor
LE: 80 Bernard Carter
WLB: 7 Morris Foreman
MLB: 33 B.J. Crane
SLB: 81 Mark Libiano
RCB: 13 Hank Cooper
SAF: 21 David Hart
SAF: 22 Daren Hart
LCB: 3 Emmanuel McDaniel
CFlorida
OFFENSE
QB: 12 Darin Hinshaw
TB: 34 Willie English
FB: 32 Gerod Davis
WR: 18 David Rhodes
WR: 14 Mark Whittemore
TE: 81 John Wouda
LT: 77 Chris Tabscott
LG: 66 Doug Schoen
C: 60 Mike Gruttadauria
RG: 78 Buster Mills
RT: 74 John Moore
DEFENSE
DE: 95 Greg Jefferson
ST: 90 Tavares Tate
WT: 97 Robert Braucht
LE: 58 Emil Ekiyor
SLB: 43 Charles Anderson
MLB: 42 John Bryant
WLB: 1 Nakia Reddick
SCB: 28 Allen Powell
SS: 7 Steve Wright
FS: 31 Todd Burks
WCB: 17 Brian Crutcher
Sports
September 16, 1993
UCF showcases offense
By Robert S Todd
Sports Editor
Take Central Florida very seri-
ously.
The last time these teams met
was in 1991, the year the Pirates
won the Peach Bowl. ECU capital-
ized on seven UCF turnovers and
won 47-25. Only four teams (Illi-
nois, Syracuse, Tulane and N.C.
State) scored more points against
the Bucs that year. Also, the Knights
were able to march up and down
the field for 497 net yards that day
� three more than ECU.
Crandell and Co. should have
their way with the Knights' de-
fense. The outcome of this game
will result from the play of ECU's
defense.
Again, take this team very seri-
ously. In 1992, Central Florida was
the East Carolina of Division I-AA.
The Knights managed a record of
&A by scoring 37.3 points per game,
despite 36 turnovers.
However, UCF's defense
ranked 81st last season. All offense,
no defense.
Quarterback Darin Hinshaw
returns after throwing for 2,505
yards and 24 touchdowns. The
Knights also welcome back two
1,000-yard rushers and their entire
offensive line. Runningbacks Gerod
Davis, only a sophomore, and Willie
English may be the main source of
frustration for ECU.
Receiver David Rhodes, who
caught 51 passes last year for 1,005
yards, Hinshaw and Englishplayed
against Robert Jones and company
two seasons ago. Rhodes got his
hands o. six passes for 116 yards.
Hinshaw, one of three quarterbacks
used, threw for 100 yards onnine of
17 passing, with one touchdown
and one interception.
English rushed for 114 yards
on 19 carries but sat out 1992 after
blowing-out his knee in the season
opener. Davis took over where he
left off. Both are back. Both are ex-
pected to play. Both will do dam-
age.
There is some question in
scheduling I-AA schools. A win is
meaningless in the polls and a loss
is devastating. N.C. State learned
this the hard way every year against
Marshall (defensive coordinator
Larry Cover's alma mater).
The Pirates will be forced to
prove they are the better team. Also
on the Knights' side when thev
meet: the Pirates have a losing
record (8-9-2) as a home favorite
over the last 10 years.
A loss to UCF would devastate
the team. Little hope for the season
would remain if ECU travelled to
Washington in week three with
losses to, perhaps, the best and
worst teams on the schedule.
If they do not win against Cen-
tral Florida, ECU could find them-
selves 0-4 after the Memphis State
game, with five of their last seven
games on the road.
Editor's note: Because of the fight
and damage to the stadium last week,
there have been serious consequences
for students and the university. The
executive director oftlie CFA and the
athletic director ofUNC at Chapel Hill
wereinattendancelastThursday. Wliat
they saw will certainly affect the Pirate
ECU offensive
lineman Terry
Tilghman has
battled back from
many injuries in
his career. He was
recruited by 38
Oiv. I schools
while in high
school.
File Photos
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Photo courtesy of SID
Mark Libiano was "The Man" on defense last week against Syracuse. How ECU's defense plays against Central
Florida will determine the winner of this week's contest. Last year, UCF averaged 37.3 points per game.
athletic program as well as ECU's at- after kickoff should be aware of all the A girl was trampled by the crowd at
tempt to enter The Big East. gates available to them. Gate 5, in front last week's game. Please make use of
Also, people entering the stadium ofMinges, is not the only student gate, gates 5a and 6 (see map).
Tilghman holds his ground
By Dave Pond
Staff Writer
For offensive tackle Terry
Tilghman, beating the odds and
vjoming back strong is nothing
new. A bad right knee has tried
to halt Tilghman's athletic career,
but his heart has different ideas.
Tilghman came to Greenville
from Mesquite, Texas. He lettered
three seasons while at Mesquite
High School, and was recruited
by 38 Division I-A schools his
junior season.
During the preseason of his
senior year, Tilghman was listed
among the top 20 players in
Texas, and was also named to the
Dallas Times-Herald Metro-Plex
Top 100 list.
Early in his senior season,
Spikers fall to
Wolfpack in
Minges, 3-0
By Brad Oldham
Staff Writer
The Pirates volleyball team
took the court Tuesday night
against the Wolfpack of N .C. State
at Minges Coliseum and lost their
ninth match of the season, 15-9,15-
6,15-13.
"I feel we are playing much
better, especially considering that
we have only one true starter back
said Martha McCaskill, ECU's
head coach. "We are playing more
s a team, and making fewer er-
rors. We just need to continue to
play hard, and the victories will
come. Weareplayinganextremely
tough schedule, but we are having
fun, and that's what it's all about
The Pirates (1-9) started the
first game with a quick five points
before N.C. State got on the board.
The Wolfpack soon came alive,
however, behind six-foot-two-inch
senior middle hitter Tennekah Wil-
liams and senior outside hitter
Gretchen Guenther. The Pirates
rallied back behind junior Sarah
Laurent, but eventually lost the
game 15-9.
In game two, N.C. State started
off the game with five points and a
See VOLLEYBALL page 18
though, he suffered the first of
Moore heads tennis team
two injuries to his right knee,
decreasing the number of Divi-
sion I-A schools that were inter-
ested in him from 38 down to 6.
"I chose East Carolina for
three reasons Tilghman said.
"One, I could step in and play
immediately. Two, I had a guar-
anteed scholarship, which would
still be valid if I got injured, and,
lastly, the coaches at East Caro-
lina really wanted me to come
play for them in Greenville
Coach Jeff Jagodzinski,
ECU's offensive line coach said,
"We're lucky that Terry got hurt
(in high school); otherwise, we
wouldn't have got him here
said.
During 1990, his freshman
year, Tilghman was one of five
true freshmen to add live game
action to their athletic resumes.
He played in six games as a
backup offensive tackle.
Tilghman laughingly re-
called his most embarrassing
moment to date. It came during
his freshman season in Talla-
hassee, Fla where he was tak-
ing part in the ECU-FSU game,
Tilghman's first away game.
"We were there in front of
68,000 fans, and all of a sudden,
for no reason, my nose started
bleeding and wouldn't stop
said Tilghman. "Coach said that
he'd never seen anyone before
who was so scared they started
bleeding
During his sophomore sea-
son, Tilghman was part of an
offensive line unit that did not
allow a sack for 20 quarters early
See TILGHMAN page 19
By Ashley NeaI
Staff Writer
Tennis is the only sport in
the NCAA that pla y s year round.
As a result of having a seven-
month tennis season, one won-
ders if students experience men-
tal or physical fatigue. Accord-
ing to Dr. Bill Moore, ECU's ten-
nis director, players become
"stale" at intervals, but rarely
experience burnout.
"Intensity of the schedule
catches freshmen off guard Dr.
Moore said. "Once players real-
ize the discipline necessary to
play, they settle down, and the
year-round regime helps main-
tain consistency in their perfor-
mance
In addition to his position as
tennis director, Dr. Moore also
teaches graduate classes at ECU.
Now in his fifth season, Dr.
Moore and his assistant coaches,
See TENNIS page 18
STADIUM INFORMATION
Holcomb reacts
well to pressure
By Brian Olson
M) 0til ojr o).I- I '
Id1�
�� :5
QQ4 v�
���"��m
a.M
- � - t t t r
Gate
Students should try to use all available gates, Saturday in Ficklen
Stadium. Gates 5, 5a and 6 are for student use.
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU football squad has
taken one small step for a Pirate
and one giant leap for Pirate-kind.
Only one game into the '93 football
season and the Bucs already have
one-half the total
field goals of last
season. Whatanac-
complishment.
Freshman
Chad Holcomb has
this year's respon-
sibility of saving
the Buc kicking
game. Holcomb
has to live up to
high expectations:
he is the first place
kicker in school his-
tory to receive a
scholarship.
In his first college football
game, Holcomb went one for two
for field goals and the same for
extra points. He connected on a 43-
yarder and missed on a 38-yarder
in the fourth quarter. Some could
say that there are still question
marks about the rookie, but most
fans must feel pleased that there is
an option this year to even attempt
Chad Holcomb
field goals.
He entered his first game
against the No. 6 team in the na-
tion, Syracuse, on national televi-
sion, ESPN. You can only expect
the butterflies to be turning inside
such a young man. Credit the
nerves to his missed extra point.
He only missed one ex-
tra-point during his
high school career (87-
88).
"I was nervous, of
course, I was real ner-
vous Holcomb said.
"High School to college
is a huge difference. It's
a big transition
Only time will tell
if Holcomb can supply
the answer to a team
that desperately needs
a kicking game.
"(The coaches) took
a chance on me. They wanted an
experienced junior college kicker,
and I'm going to pull through for
them Holcomb said. "Coach
Logan told me when he recruited
me that 'You're going to make
some and you're going to miss
some. But no matter if you make
them or miss them, we're going to
go through this together $
�pcmwmhmw
�mm
Hhm���' ����'� ��





September 16, 1993
The East Carolinian 15
Judge denies mistake Smith hold-out causing conflict
controversy continues
thati.
m Pernel
Whitaker during the sixth round
ol his WBC welterweight title de-
tense against Julio Cesar Chavez,
winch ended in a draw.
Vann denied it.
Dan Duva contends that a
pointshouJd be restored to Vann's
card, making his assessment of the
sixth round 10-10 and making his
total score 116-113 in Whitaker's
favor. That would make Whitaker
a split-decision winner since judge
Jack Woodruff of Dallas favored
Whitaker 115-113, while Franz
Marti of Switzerland called it 115-
115.
Ken Gorman of the Daily Star
of London quoted Vann as saving
hededucted a point from Whitaker
because of "an appallingly low
�til round. The ref-
ill official wam-
omt aw ay from
1 he only one who can take a
point a way is the referee, and that's
true in fights all over the world
Duva said.
1 deducted no points on anv
round and I told no one that I de-
ducted a point Vann told The
Associated Pressby telephone from
England on Tuesday. "I gave it an
even fight (115-115). Mr. Marti
scored it an even fight. If Mr. Woo-
druff had given Chavez just one
other round, he would have had it
an even fight. That's how close it
was
In a poll of 16 ringside report-
ers conducted by New York
Newsday, 14 of them thought
Whitaker won and two called the
fight a draw. Three of the writers
favoring Whitaker were Mexicans
� Juan Carlos Gutierrez of Excel-
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sior(115-l 14),Carlos RiverootL'no
Mas Lno (116-113) and Carlos
Hernandez of La lournada (116-
114).
Duva, through his attorney Pat
English, has asked the Texas De-
partment of Licensing and Regula-
tion, which oversees boxing in the
state, to take away the point.
A spokesman for the depart-
ment said no action could be taken
until a formal complaint is filed.
"We seek to overturn theerro-
neous decision in order to insure
Whitaker's rightful place in box-
ing history as the first man to 'offi-
cially' defeat the 'unbeatable'
Chavez Duva said Tuesday.
Whitaker retained his title on
the draw Friday night in the
Alamodome at San Antonio.
Although he failed to win a
fourth world title, the draw kept
Chavez unbeaten, with an 87-0-1
record. His super lightweight title
was not at stake.
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IKYTNG, Texas (AP) � The
EmmittSmith problem issomething
Dallas Cowboys coach Jimmy
Jolinsoncan'tdoanythingabout,and
he'd rather not hear about it, either.
With the defending Super Bowl
champions off to an 0-2 start without
Smith, owner Jerry Jones is taking
heat over his refusal to give the two-
time NFL rushing champion the con-
tract he wants.
Jonessaid he had "extensivecon-
versations" Monday with Smith's
agent, Richard Howell, but could re-
port no progress.
Smith, interviewed at half-time
of ABC's Monday Night Football
game between San Francisco and
Cleveland, said negotiations don't
appear to have budged over the past
month.
"It's very frustrating to see my
teammatesdoingeveiythingpossible
towinandknowinglshouldbethere
with them Smith said. "I think the
team is playing its hardest and com-
ing up short, and I feel if I had been
there, I could have made a difference
in some way
Defensive end Charles Haley
punched a hole in the dressing room
wall after Sunday's 13-10 loss to the
Buffalo Bills because of frustration
with the Smith holdout.
"We'll never win with a rookie
running back said Haley, who im-
bedded his helmet into the wall We
need to either get Emmitt here or
they've got to get rid of him
Johnson wore a long face during
interviews after the loss and when
someone asked about Smith's ab-
sence, his face took on an even more
pained look.
"Justtohaveto answer thatques-
tion is nauseating. I've been hearing
about it so long, I'm sick of it. We just
have to eliminate the negative talk.
It's just been one negative after an-
other Johnson said.
"When things are going bad,
everything wears on you. It's wear-
ing on me right now
The fans were restless in Texas
Stadium.
"We want Emmitt, we want
Emmitt the crowd chanted. An-
('ther banner read, "Sign Emmitt and
Trade Your Ego
Smith watched on television
from Pensacola, Fla where he said,
"I could miss the entire season
Jones said he would like to
sign Smith before the next game,
but can't guarantee it.
"I don't want to jeopardize
the future of this team Jones
said. "I'm frustrated and so is
Emmitt. I understand the players
being frustrated. Whileeveryone
has an opinion, wehaveopinions
that are sound ones for the fu-
ture
Smith wants $4 million per
year�inlinewithwhatBuffalo's
Thurman Thomas makes �
while Jones has offered $2.5 mil-
lion.
Thomas said after
Sunday's game, "I don't know
how the Cowboys can expect
to get back to the Super Bowl
without Emmitt Smith. They
just can't do it
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September 16, 1993
Beat The Experts?
Five points awarded for correct winner and an additional
three points given to the expert closest to the spread.
please, no wagering.
ECU14, 41-27
"ECUbetternot
take this team
lightly. Central
Florida can put
points on the
board in a
hurrv
Points: 8
ECU22, 44-27
"High octane
offenses collide,
but the Buc de-
fense pulls it
out. Good
warm-up for
Washington
Kevin Hall
VVZMB Sports
Director
Points: 5
ECU 14,31-27
"This will be a
good game to
gear up for Wash-
ington and im-
prove on the
things they did
wrong against
Syracuse
Brian Bailey
WNCT-TV
Sports Director
Points: 5
ECU 17,31-14
"The Pirate De-
fense shows much
improvement. The
wide receivers
catch everything in
sight and make for
a big day for
MarcusCrandell
Chris Justice
WCTI-TV
Sports Director
Points: 5
ECU 6,36-30
"Both teams
have plenty of
offense and
ECU has just a
little more de-
fense
Brad Zaruba
WITN-TV
Sports Director
Points: 5
ECU 15,27-12
"A week of hard
practice will pay
off with a fo-
cused effort on
Saturday
Demetrius Carter
ABLE
President
Points: 0
ECU14,24-10
"Last week,
Marcus Crandell
showed a lot of
poise. Watch out
forNo.20(Garrett
Beasley) and 25
(Derrek Batson)
Keith
SGA
President
Points: 5
Dyer
SU20,48-28
"I don't see a
Division I-AA
school beating
an up-and-
coming Pirate
team
ACC season in full swing
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) �
Clemson, the top rushing team in the
Atlantic Coast Conference six of the
last seven seasons, is averaging 2.3
yards per carry after two games �
worst in the league.
"Thebiggestthingwe'vedoneis
we've been able to throw and catch
better than any teaml'vebeen around
and we've been the least effective
running of any team I've been
around said Tiger coach Ken
Hatfield.
TheTigershavenooneinthetop
15 among the ACC rushing leaders.
Rodney Blunt, who rushed for
812yardslastseason,hasjust47yards.
Hatfield said it's possible backups
Derrick WitherspoonandGregHood
could see more playing time at
tailback.
and started the first seven games last
season before injuring a ligament in
his knee.
There are many things thatmake
Honda State the nation's top team �
and depth is one of them.
With the game tied in the fourth
quarter Seminole coach Bobbv
Bowden said Horida State has 17
players he can use on defense and as
many as 19 on offense.
At times during their first three
games, the Seminoles have substi-
tuted a whole unit on offense for a
play or two.
"We don't care what the score
is" on offense to use that many,
Bowden said.
"I 'm not real sure rightnow (who
will start) Caldwell said of his sec-
ondary. "It will be a little bit different
makeup than in the past
Maryland's Mark Duffner may
be growing tired of high-scoring
games.
The Terrapin coach saw his team
and its run-and-shoot offense score
42 points inlastSaturday'slosstoNo.
13 North Carolina.
"I sure don't want to have
shootout games Duffhersaid. "We
are working like crazy for our de-
fense to eliminate the big plays
TheMarylanddefensehas given
up 30 or more points in eight of the 13
games Duffner has been head coach.
Scott Youmans, who has battled
numerous injuries throughout his
career, isexpected to return to Duke's
defensive front against Army this
weekend.
Youmans missed Duke's first
two losses after reinsuring a knee in
preseason drills.
Duke coach Barry Wilson said
it's unclear how much the senior
would play against Army's wish-
bone attack. However, the Blue Dev-
ils lost two interior linemen to injury
in practice this week.
"We hope we can get him back
into game competition without try-
ing to put the whole load on him
jWilson said.
� Youmans brokehisanklein 1991
Wake Forest coach Jim Caldwell
expects hissecondary to be improved
this Saturday against Appalachian
State.
The Demon Deacons were
riddled with deep passes in a 34-16
losstoNo. 17N.CStatelastSaturday.
But Caldwell expects two defen-
sive backs who have been injured �
Tim Hailstock and Alexis Sockwell
� to be back in action against the
Mountaineers.
Is N.C. State the most relaxed
team in the ACC? First-year coach
Mike O'Cain believes so.
Teams do refltct the tempera-
men t of the hea d coach said O'Cain,
who replaced Dick Sheridan. "I've
been very relaxed. You have to be
confident. The first two ballgames
our players have been confident.
"That comes from me. I've been
morerelaxed than we'vebeen around
here in the past
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S
STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR A
DAY-STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE
FOR THE 1993-94 TERM
RESPONSIBILITIES: Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
QUALIFICATIONS: � Full time Student
� Resides Off Campus
� Independent
DEADLINE TO APPLY: WEDNESDAY, SEPT 22
APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP AT THE STUDENT
UNION OFFICE - RQPM 236 MENDENHALL
Boomer booming in N.Y.
HEMPSTEAD,N.Y. (AP)�The
longer and higher Boomer Esiason
throws the ball, the more the New
York Jets soar.
The common perception that
the only thing coach Bruce Coslet's
offense was missing was a quality
quarterback might be accurate.
Ken O'Brien was too limited physi-
cally and Browning Nagle was
too green.
Esiason was perfect because he
is familiar with all the nuances of the
offense, having run it for the Cincin-
nati Bengals when Coslet was the
coordinator. Forget rumors that
Esiason's arm is shot, Coslet insisted.
So far, Coslet looks right and
Esiason looks great.
"We've got something special
going here said Esiason, who leads
the NFL in three passing categories
and ranks second overall to John
Elway. "I've finally got a coach that
knows me and my limitations and
doesn'tputmeinbad situations. And
he's got a quarterback that he can
depend on
So far, Esiason is 51-for-73 (69.9
percent)for694yards,a9.51-yard pa-
attempt average and four TDs. He
also ran four yards with a quarter-
back draw for a touchdown Sunday
in a 24-14 victory at Miami.
Friends of Sheppard Memorial Library
BOOK SALE
September 17, 18, & 19
at The Plaza Mall (next to J. C. Penney)
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Friday & Saturday 10-9, Sunday 1-6
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Olson's Trivial Quiz
Q: What ECU
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had only one
-winning season
ever, and is on
pace for its
second?
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gh in South
September 16, 1993
The East Carolinian 17
inSta-
"fotreDamea mal lift that
helped upset his beloved
verines.
With his passion for the Notre
Dame-Michigan series flowing
like the tears from his eyes, the
Michigan-star-turned-Notre-
Dame-coach used an impas-
sioned pregame speech to get the
Fighting Irish ready for
Saturday's 27-23 win.
Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz
compared the speech to the 1928
address in which Notre Dame
coach Knute Rockne used the dy-
ing words of former Irish star
George Gipp to spark an upset of
Army.
"Knute Rockne's speech on
the Gipper is now No. 2 on the
all-time list behind Mike
Trgovac's locker room speech up
at Ann Arbor Holtz said.
"I was never so emotionally
charged up for a game said
Notre Dame linebacker Peter
Bercich, the most fiery player on
the Irish defense. "I came out
pumped up, with tears in my eyes
and everything
Notre Dame, which jumped
from No. 11 to No. 4 after the
victory, dominated the first half.
The Irish rolled up 257 yards and
scored on four of six possessions
to take a 24-10 lead.
Michigan, which came in as a
9 12-point favorite, fell from
third to 10th.
D upsets Michigan
I rgovac, 34, Notre Dame'sas-
n head coach and defensive
line coach, wouldn't reveal Mon-
day exactly what he said to the
team. He said Holtz gave him
about a minute to prepare for the
speech, in which he recounted
his feelings for the 106-year-old
rivahy.
"I just had to say the first
thing tha t came to mind Trgovac
said. "I just told them a little bit
about the history of the game. It
got me fired up
Trgovac joined the Irish staff
last year after stints as an assis-
tant at Michigan, Navy, Ball State
and Colorado State.
It was Trgovac's first trip as a
visiting coach to Ann Arbor,
where he twice earned All-Big
Ten honors as a Wolverine
noseguard from 1977-80.
"I probably didn't sleep two
hours in the hotel Friday night
Trgovac said. "I knew a lot of
eyes would be on me.
"It was difficult, to say the
least
The speech was not a wall-
punching, chair-throwing tirade,
he said. It was simply the heart-
felt emotion of an excitable man
who loves the game and has
strong feelings on both sides of
the Notre Dame-Michigan ri-
valry.
"If I throw a chair I'd prob-
ably hit someone who was play-
ing for me, and I'd hit him in the
eye and he'd be out of the game
Trgovac said. "That would hap-
pen to me
STADIUM I N F 0 R M A T I ON
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16
17
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Alcoholic Beverages: Alcoholic beverages
are strictly prohibited within the stadium
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day of the game. For the convenience and
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ContainersCoolers: Containers and coolers
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Field Regulations: No one is allowed on the
playing held during or after the game without
credentials. Stadium ramps must be used for
exit. Fans may be ejected for throwing any
objects within the stadium.
Gate 2
First Aid: The First Aid facility is located
under the North stands behind Section 19 (be-
tween Gate 5A and 6) with a nurse on duty at
all times. Rescue Squad units are located at
both ends of the held.
Game Times: All game times are subject to
change. ECU will publicize anv game time
changes. Ticket refunds will not' be made be-
cause of a change in schedule of kick-off time.
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handicapped is located at the service gate en-
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near Section , with a seating section available
in the South stands at field level directly in
front of the Press Box.
Public Telephones: A telephone for public
use is located under the South stands at Section
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athletic contests can be purchased through the
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p.m. Tickets on the day of an ECU home foot-
ball game can be purchased at the Minces
Coliseum Ticket Office.
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September 16, 1993
"ILGHMAN
Continued from page 14
ti Us this past
re-injured his
� is thought he would
be lost tor the season. However,
through the .support of his
coaches and his family, Tilghman
has battled back to take over the
right tackle position for the Pi-
rate hogs on the offensive front
line.
"As soon as I got hurt again,
I told the coaches not to count me
out he said. "I knew I'd be back,
since I had been through it once
Ste c Logan
man - return vv as
�' �� a miracle
cally, I ilghman, a
ourth � nior, is in pursuit
helor's degree in Health
and Physical Education. He as-
pire- to coach college football af-
ter graduation, which will come
tor him in the spring or fall of
1994.
Off the field, Terry spends
his leisure time outdoors, deer
hunting and fishing. In Decem-
ber of 142, Terry married his
hometown sweetheart and
brought her and their two-year-
old son, Terry Jr to Greenville.
"Call him T2 forshort Tilghman
said.
"My family motivates me
said Tilghman. "When it is a
rough morning, they are what
gets me up and going
"Married life has settled him
a lot said Coach Jags. "He's a
great guy, I love him to death
Tilghman said that the main
strength of the Pirates' gridiron
squad is the tremendous amount
of team unity, and the only weak-
ness is the youth and inexperi-
ence.
"Thai will disappear as the
season goes on, though noted
Tilghman.
Looking ahead, Tilghman
forecasted a win for Saturday's
ECU-Central Florida match-up.
"We are going out to hurt
somebody he said.
TENNIS
Allen Farfour and Doug Lewis,
know what it takes to have a
productive season.
Although Dr. Moore and his
staff do not recruit players from
junior colleges, ECU Tennis has
several international students.
Sweden, Australia, and Finland
are only three of the countries
represented on the men's team,
while North Carolina, Virginia,
and Georgia are the states that
dominate the women's line-up.
An important issue in all
sports is the balance between aca-
demics and athletics. Many stu-
dents have a tough time keeping
up with both.
"In my mind the kids we get
perform not just on the court, but
in the classroom as well Dr.
Moore said. "In the past he has
found that players who do not
excel in class lack something on
the court as well
"My grades have never been
so good Elke Garten, captain
VOLLEYBALL
for the women's team, said.
"You're on a tight schedule, so
you balance your time better
Coach Moore is realistic
about the potential each team
possesses for the up-coming sea-
son. Realizing their strengths and
weaknesses, both teams look for-
ward to another season.
"I think in general we stress
execution, the process of work-
ing hard and getting better Dr.
Moore said. "The cohesivenessof
the group, that's something we
stress a great deal. Tennis is an
individual sport, but if you're do-
ing it for a buddy, it's a lot bet-
ter
For both men's and women's
tennis, the fall season requires
players to participate in several
tournaments. A schedule of duel
matches dominates the spring cal-
endar. Competition for the
women begins on Sept. 24 and
goes through thesixth of October
for the Lady Pirate Invitational.
Continued from page 14
The Old Dominion Invitational
marks the beginning for men's
tennis on Oct. 2-3.
With everyone on the men's
team returning, the team will be
very similar to last year. Last year
the men finished 5-3 in their con-
ference and 14-14 overall. Coach
Moore believes that with an im-
provement in consistency, the
team can have a successful sea-
son.
"Everyone understands what
they have to do. That's a real ad-
vantage for a coach to have Dr.
Moore said.
The women's team, however,
is more difficult to predict. In
spite of their inexperience, the
outlook is positive. Coach Moore
said they are a young team with
more talent than ever before.
� With considerable improve-
ment from last year, the coaches
and players of both teams are
optimistic that this season will be
the best yet for Pirate tennis.
Continued from page 14
strong serving performance by six-
foot-three-inch freshman Pam
Sumner. The Wolfpack seemed to
control the entire tempo of the
game, with sophomore Shelley
Partridge scoring several strong
spikes. The Pirates, who played
good defense throughout the
game, failed to execute on their
serves, and fell to 15-6.
In game three, the Pirates
showed what their young talent
Did you know
possesses: they came out on fire
and jumped to an early 2-0 lead.
Freshman Carrie Bme and junior
Kelly Crowe kept the Pirates close
early on, but a quick five points
from N.C State forced an ECU
time-out, with the Pirates trailing
7-2. After the time-out, ECU came
back and tied the score at nine.
The Wolfpack scored the next four
points, but in an exciting game
that changed momentum from one
.team to the other, the Pirates ral-
lied behind the serving of sopho-
more Kristy Blair, and tied the
score once again, this time at thir-
teen. N.C. State fought on to get
the final two points to nip the
Pirates 15-13.
The Pirates will next travel to
Greensboro, North Carolina, where
they will play in the UNC-Greens-
boro Tournament on September
17-18.
Native Dancer lost his only
race in 22 starts in the 1953 Ken-
tucky Derby by a head to Dark
Star.
The 1944 Chicago Bears com-
pleted the entire NFL season with-
out attempting a field goal.
Only one pitcher ever faced
both Babe Ruth and Mickey
Mantle; Al Benton, who did not
allow a home run to either man.
Johnny Unitas of Baltimore
went 47 straight games between
1956 and 1960 with at least one
touchdown pass.
In 1965, Gale Sayers of the
Bears scored six touchdowns
against the 49ers, four rushing,
one pass reception and one on a
punt return.
Paul Hornung made 15 touch-
downs, 15 field goals and 41 extra
points in scoring a record 176
points for Green Bay in 1960.
In a 1961 game against Balti-
more, Paul Hornung of the Pack-
ers scored 33 points on four touch-
downs, one field goal and six con-
versions.
The first World Series in 1903
was scheduled for nine games but
the Red Sox beat the Pirates in
eight.
When the Giants defeated the
Athletics in five games in the 1905
World Series every game was a
shutout.
GO PIRATES!
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��





Title
The East Carolinian, September 16, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 16, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.960
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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