The East Carolinian, September 14, 1993






running!
IU.
J
Aladdin' heads for home
Walt Disney's 'Aladdin'
takes a magic carpet
ride into your homes
via local video stores.
See story page 7.
Today
� . ' I
Tomorro
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 50
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, September 14,1993
14 Pages
Recreation Center receives the go-ahead
vi of iNttrr
HakanCorley ft Associates and Hastings Chlvetta Architects
provide students with a large variety of stress-relieving activities.
By Laura Al lard
Staff Writer"
On Aug. 13,1993NorthCarolina Board
of Governors lifted the moratorium on stu-
dent fees which allows for construction to
begin on the new Student Recreation Center.
The $18 million center, paid for by
selling bonds, will cause an increase in stu-
dent fees by $75 to $100 per semester for the
next 30 years. The fee increase will start with
the spring semester of 1994.
The center will sit on the parking lot
between MendenhalJ Student Center and
Green Dorm, facing the mall.
According to Nance Mize, director of
recreationservices,ground-breakingwillbe-
gin in the late fall or January. Construction
time is estimated at 22 months, and the goal
is to be open by fall of 1995.
Richard Brown, vice chancellor of busi-
ness affairs, says the new center will be a
really first-class recreation facility, one of the
top in the country likeourstudentsdeserve
Included in the new facility will be: six
multi-purpose courts, three large aerobic stu-
dios, a weight room the size of the gymna-
sium in Christenbury, a three-lane 1 5 mile
indoor track, seven racquetball courts, one
See REC CENTER page 4
HakanCorley ft Associates and Hastings Chlvetta, Architacts
These first and second view floor plans show the wide
range of activities that will be available by next fall.
Freshmen have Symposium focuses on technology
their life assessed
By Maureen Rich
Assistant News Editor
Vogue has them, TV Guide has
them, even 77k New York Times and
the Washington Post have them.
Now, ECU freshmen have the op-
portunity to get an even better ver-
sion of them. "They" are horo-
scopes. Finding out our futures is a
pastime many pursue diligently
earh day.
Beginning this semester, all
freshmen enrolled in English 1100
have the chance to gain some true
insight into how choices made now
will affect their performances physi-
cally, emotionally, socially, intel-
lectually, occupationally, and spiri-
tually for the rest of their lives.
The "Lifestyle Assessment
Questionnaire (LAQ),developed
at the National Wellness Institute
in the early 70s, provides an indi-
vidualized,accurateaccountofeach
participant's life, now and in the
future, said Dr. David Emmerling,
Deanof Student Development, and
former executive director of the
National Wellness Institute.
"One of the things I think ev-
ery student here is committed to, is
getting the best prepara tion for the
world of work, for their career
Emmerling said.
"One of the things 1 brought
to ECU was a real commitment
to match our good academic prepa-
ration with some good life-style
preparation
There are many facilities avail-
able across campus geared toward
student welfare, but because of the
increasing size of the campus, ad-
ditional attention to students'needs
is required, Emmerling said.
The LAQ provides ECU fac-
ulty with specific data focused on
what students on campus want,
and what they need.
"Using thatdata wecanpro-
vide better help to the students
and provide the students with qual-
ity service Emmerling said. "The
whole initiative was to help serve
the student body better
The LAQ is a voluntary ques-
tionnaire, and targets this year's
freshmen class because of the high
number of students reached
through this required course.
With the support of the divi-
sion of Student life, Emmerling's
office made up packets for "anyone
teaching freshman English
Emmerling said.
"I explained to them what the
instrumentwas,showed them cop-
ies of it, and then just went over the
directions, and if they had any ques-
tions about it Emmerling said.
"Oneofthequestionsbrought
up was, 'what if the students don't
want to take it? and I said, 'That's
fine. It's voluntary And each of the
groups were told that
Besides questioning the obli-
gation to fill out the questionnaire,
many students given the survey
questioned the degree of confiden-
tiality, as all students were required
to put both their names and their
social security numbers on the sur-
vey.
"There is absolutely no way,
none whatsoever, that any indi-
vidual records or results can be
identified by anyone Emmerling
said.
"The answer sheets them-
selves will be held in confidence,
and they're kept under lock and
key. Nobody can get to the indi-
vidual answer sheets. Once they're
scanned into the computer, all we
have then is the data. It will be
identified by social security num-
ber, and not name. It will exist in
one computer.
Comprised of four sections,
the LAQ targets each facet of an
individual's life-style.
"All of the questions are built
around the six-dimensional model
of wellness Emmerling said,
which are: Physical, Social, Emo-
tional, Intellectual, Occupational,
and Spiritual.
Personal data, such as gen-
der, age, race, and education, pro-
vide basic identifying components
used in many types of survey in-
quiries, Emmerling said.
Using a special bubble sheet
and the traditional 2 pencil, sru-
dentsanswer questions about their
life-styles, answer questions per-
taining to heal th risks, and a section
See LAQ page 4
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
The 29th annual Sympo-
sium on History and the Social
Studies will feature a history pro-
fessor speaking on technology.
"This is the first time we've
used technology as a symposium
theme said Dr. Hugh Weaseof
the ECU Department of History
and the symposium's director.
Dr. James A. Mulholland, a
professor at N.C. State Univer-
sity, will address fellow educa-
tors Friday, Sept. 17, on "Teach-
ing About the History of Tech-
nology in Secondary and Middle
Schools
The conference sessions,
which are open only to those
middle and secondary history
and social studies teachers who
were invited, will begin at 9 a.m.
in the Willis Building (Regional
Development Institute). An open
lecture will begin at 12:15 p.m.
Dr. Wease encourages all stu-
dents to attend, but especially
education majors.
"Mulholland will be ad-
dressing the use of technology
in the classroom for teachers
Wease said. "He will also speak
on the need to include the theme
of technology in the teaching of
history
Mulholland, who holds a
chemical engineering degree
from Massachusetts Institute of
Technology (M.I.T.), also has de-
grees in education, physics, and
history. He has focused most of
his research on history and tech-
nology.
Let's
eat!
Freshman
Stephanie
Lormand (left)
and Christy
Newton,
Sophomore,
grab a snack in
Mendenhall.
Photo by Harold
Wise
MS society 'breaks loose' with bike tour
By Richard Holt
Staff Writer
An expected 700 cyclists will
participate in a 150 mile tour of
eastern North Carolina to benefit
the National Multiple Sclerosis So-
ciety on Sept. 25-26. The fifth an-
nual MS 150bike tour, titled "Break
Loose to the Neuse" will begin in
Greenville on Saturday, Sept. 25.
The first 75 miles of the tour
will take cyclists through scenic
North Carolina to Camp Seagull
on Minnesott Beach, where the
Neuse River joins Pamlico Sound.
Here cyclists will enjov an over-
night stay and be treated to dinner,
swimming, tennis and a campfire.
The following morning cyclists will
travel a different 75-mile route
back to Greenville.
Sylvia Hasinger, develop-
ment coordinator of MS's Eastern
North Carolina Chapter is pleased
at the support Greenville provides
for the event. "Greenville has been
absolutely wonderful. They have
really opened their hearts to us
Hasinger said.
"This is the fifth year of the
race in this area and many cyclists
come back each year. The average
amountof money eachcyclistraises
$240 she said.
Cyclists are asked to raise a
rriinimum of $150 in pledges. "The
Greenville cyclists raise around
$200,000, all of which goes to MS
shesaid. " Many MSchaptersacross
the country do similar races that
generate $21 million on a national
basis. This one is a little bit above
average
In addition to the cyclists,
many businesses and organiza-
tions donate goods and services to
make the race happen. "Greenville
has been wonderful and some of
our biggest contributors are The
Hampton, Cricket & Comfort
Inns, Pepsi, Harris-Teeter, Bicycle
Post, Jefferies Wine & Beer, the
Greenville Convention & Visitors
Bureau and Greenville Parks & Rec-
reation. They provide large
amounts of food, services, facilities
and things like tables and chairs
which otherwise would have to be
rented Hasinger said.
People from all walks of life
who enjoy cycling are encouraged
to participate.
"The majority of cyclists are
occasional ones who are not profes-
sionals. These include six-year-olds
to grandmothers in their sixties
See MS page 2
He is a member of the
history department at N.C.
State.
Along with Mulholland
four other historians will ex-
amine technological history
beginning with the 18th cen-
tury England and technologi-
cal advancements brought on
by the American Civil War.
Last year's symposium
dealt with the theme "Teach-
ing About Nationalism Each
year a theme of history or
teaching history is discussed.
Command
exchanged
By Tammy Carter
Staff WriteT
On Aug. 24, Lt. Colonel
Mike George relinquished com-
mand of ECU'S Air Force ROTC
Detachment 600 to Lt. Colonel
Mike Myrick.
In the change of command
ceremony, George passed thede-
tachment flag to Myrick, who
accepted the command. Dr.
Springer, military coordinator,
also presented Lt. Colonel George
with the Air Force Meritorious
Service Medal (second oak leaf
cluster) for outstanding service,
the third George has received.
George also received a retirement
certificate from the Air Force.
Lt. Colonel George served
as commander for three years,
followingserviceatvarious bases
throughout the country, includ-
ing strategic air command at
Offut Air Force Base in Omaha,
Nebraska, and serving as navi-
gator for B-52 bombers. George
is now the commander of the
new Junior ROTC unitatTarboro
High School, one of 80 units to
open in the country.
The new commander of
ECU'S ROTC, Lt. Colonel Mike
Myrick, has served at Pope Air
Force Base, Anderson Air Force
Base in Guam and at Air Force
Headquarters at Maxwell Base
in Alabama. As a 1974 graduate
of ECU, Myrick chose to serve
special duty back at ECU.
During Lt. Colonel
George's command, he and the
See ROTC page 4
���mf






September 14, 1993
Student earns National MS
Beta Scholarship
Continued from page 1
Service with a smile
irently have a different style of helping
and returning students move into their dorms-at least
at the University of Iexas in Austin. President Robert
Berdahl and about 300 other faculty and staff members
participated in the "Mooov In" event in late August, offi-
cials said. The volunteers were stationed at four residence
si tes. As students and their parents drove up to move in, the
volunteers assisted by carrying boxes, luggage, stereos and
other items into dorm rooms. A campus news release said
the first-ever event was designed to give the students an
informal "Texas style" howdy. You may be wondering just
why it was called a "Mooov In The University of Texas
teams are called the Longhorns, that's why.
Students support speech code
Just over half of Stanford University seniors ques-
tioned in a recent poll said they support the university's
policy on free expression, and 80 percent said they do not
feel that it hindered bringing up sensitive subjects in the
classroom. Stanford adopted a policy entitled "Fundamen-
tal Standard Interpretation: Free Expression and Discrimi-
natory Harassment" after concern mounted over racist
incidents on campus. John Marr, who conducted the survey
for his doctoral dissertation in educational administration
at Ohio State University, mailed questionnaires to 1,269
Stanford seniors, or about 75 percent of the 1993 grad ua ting
class.
African spirituality course at Duquesne
The spirituality practiced in Africa is the subject of a
new course at Duquesne University taught by a Catholic
priest who made his home in Kenya. The class is being
taught by the Rev. Raymond Mosha, head of the Spirituality
Department from the Catholic Higher Education Institute
of Africa in Kenya. The goal of the class, according to the
Rev, Clyde A Bonar, director of the Institute of Formative
Spirituality, is to teach about the world views that mold
African spirituality.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Senior Business major M.
Jason Williams is one of ten na-
tional recipients of the 1993-94
Beta Gamma Sigma Student
Scholarship.
Williams, who was nomi-
nated by his Beta Gamma Sigma
student chapter,
maintains a 3.98
GPA and is ac-
tive ;n civic or-
gan: ationsand
several honor
societies. He
was chosen as a
recipient based
on his academic
achievement,
leadership and
community ser-
vice activities.
His $2,500
scholarship has
been divided
into two parts to
be applied to-
wards his edu-
cation for this
and next semes-
ter.
Williams, who graduated
as valedictorian from Ayden-
Grifton High School, is also a
member of Phi Eta Sigma, Golden
Key and Phi Kappa Phi honor
societies. Since arriving at ECU,
he has been named to the
Chancellor's or Dean's List all
semesters. After his high school
graduation, he was awarded the
East Carolina Alumni Scholar-
ship.
Williams has worked with
the College Democrats in plan-
ning rallies for political candi-
dates, and he participated in the
"GetOut the Vote" drive. He has
worked with the county commis-
sioners to form a Citizen's Solid
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still remains loyal to his high
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coordinated a program where lo-
cal college students will speak to
high school classes about differ-
ent fields of study and job op-
portunities.
Williams, who also is a re-
porter for The East Carolinian,
spent his sum-
mer working in
Florida. In his
spare time, he
enjoys playing
golf, fishing,
and especially
playing tennis.
He already has
his next sum-
mer planned.
"I would
like to do some
research for the
PamlicoTar
River Founda-
tion he said.
After he
graduates in
May 1994, Will-
iams is plan-
ning to attend
law school.
"I will probably apply to
Duke, Virginia and maybe
Cornell he said.
Williams accredits his great
experience in the School of Busi-
ness to an advertising professor.
"In particular, I would like
to thank Dr. Reid Claxton he
said. "He teaches the college class
as it should be taught
Beta Gamma Sigma has 270
student chapters in the U.S. and
Canada. Invitations to member-
ship are made to students who
rank in the upper 7 percent of
their junior class, 10 percent of
their graduation class or 20 per-
cent of their grad ua ting master's
class.
she said. "People can go as slow or
as fast as they want. You don't have
to be a real cycling pro to partici-
pate
The bottom line of this event
is that it provides much-needed
money for MS research.
"The most important thing is
that it facilitates research on MS
on both a local and nationallevel
she said.
Anyone interested in cy-
cling, pledging support or volun-
teering should call the Eastern NC
chapter of the National Multiple
Sclerosis Society at 919-781-0676.
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September 14, 1993
n begins meeting tomorrow
The East Carolinian 3
from
OI lilt'
orum is
rig than
ipants
pies oi
Lite to members
nembers range from
ublished pints), and
Liscussionsfoajsrjnrefimhgworks
Accord- in-progress.
En addition to its bt-monthrv
workshop atmosphere in
members Free public readings and
workshops conducted by poets of
national stature. Welsh poet and
sin rt-stary writer 1 eslie Morris, the
first guest ot the semester, is sched-
uled to give a reading on Novem-
ber 4 at 8 pm.
Tin Forum, nearing its 25th
year at ECU, was founded by
Vemon Ward. Ward alsoserved as
editor of Tar River Poetry, which
was, at that time, a publication of
the Poetry Forum. Makuck was
W aid as director ot the Forum and
editor of Tar River Poetry. f,u River
Poetry has, since then, become a
national publication, separate from
the Poetry Forum, but still closely
associated with it
Throughout the academic
year (with the exception of the first
meeting on September 1), the Fo-
rum will te meeting on the first and
third Thursdays oi each month at S
p.m. in Mendenhall Student Q'li-
ter. For more information, contact
meetings the I orum also offers its hired in 1976 to replace the retiring Dr. Makuck at 757-6580
Doctorate in biomedical physics planned for future of ECU
Ca.v ou
By Lisa Dawson
Staff Writer
A doctorate degree in bio-
medical physics is in formation at
FCL This program will show a
omt effort started about four vears
ago from conversations between
the physics department, and the
departments oi medicine, physi
olog) and radiation oncology.
This Doctorate will be as
broad-base ranged as the program
at UCLA said Dr. Carl Adler,
physics professor at ECU and chair
of the PhD Steering Committee.
The program will be unlike any
irograms in this academic area,
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posal to the general administra-
tion. This proposal wassubmitted
in 1989. and last year ECU finally
received permission to go to the
next step, which is to get permis-
sion toestabiish the new program.
"This program will be an
interdisciplinary program be-
tween the physical and the bio-
logical sciences said Dr. Mumtaz
Dinno, Chair of the Physics Dc
?artment at ECU.
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IIMWili
September 14, 1993
REC CENTER
Continued from page 1
education, health education and
academic affairs departments will
also be in the new center
"ECU is the only state-sup-
ported school in North Carolina that
doesn't have a facility of this type
Mize said.
The facility will be an impor-
tant part of the continuing effort to
compete with schools throughout
the state as "the quality- of recre-
ation facilities is in the top three
reasons students choose a univer-
sity Mize said.
"We will use student fees as
wisely as we can Mize said.
Part-time and full-time stu-
dents will have complete access to
the facility. Faculty- members who
wish to use the center will be re-
quired to pay the same fees that
LAQ
.enter may be open to
but that has yet to be deter-
entlv no recreation facili-
pen to students before 3
p m. because they are shared with
the physical education department
which need all of the facilities in
order to provide adequate classes.
Also, Chnstenbury does not meet
the new standards which have been
set by Congress for handicapped
accessibility.
Therefore, many comm u ting,
working and handicapped students
have no opportunity to make use of
the current facilities. The hours of
the new Recreation Center will be
determined by students, who will
fill most of the jobs created by the
project.
Brown described
Christenbury as "woefully inad-
equate compared to other universi-
ties our size, as many smaller uni-
versities have better facilities
Continued from page 1
asking the student to identifv those
subjects about which he or she
would like to receive further infor-
mation.
The results those students re-
ceive, which Emmerling predicts to
have ready in October, cover an
array of issues. The students will
discover just how long the' can
expect to live if they continue to
follow the life-styles they illustrated
in the questionnaire, how that life
expectancy can be increased, and
ways to improve all areas of their
life.
Individual results will be
available only if the student is inter-
ested in receiving them, Emmerling
said.
While the distribution plan
has yet to be completed, students
will not receive the results in the
mail, nor will anyone other than the
students themselves be contacted
regarding the results.
Contrary to campus rumor,
students will not be obligated to
attend any counseling of any kind,
Emmerling said. This questionnaire
will provide beneficial information
to both the students and the faculty,
and any outcome can only be posi-
tive, Emmerling said.
"There's no way thatanybody
can get access to the individual stu-
dent answer sheet unless the stu-
dents themselves ask to come in
and review that answer sheet
Emmerling said.
"Thev can come in and look at
their answer sheet any time they
like and I stressed that with the
English professors and I stressed
that on the instruction sheet
Included in the student's re-
sults packet is information focused
on any areas in which the student
expressed great interest in receiv-
ing more informa tion. For example,
if a student were to consistently
indicate a smoking addiction, at the
end of the packet various organiza-
tions and books pertaining to that
subject would be offered.
Any students interested in
taking the questionnaire may con-
tact the Office of Student Develop-
ment, Emmerling said, wh'h is lo-
cate 1 around the comer from The
Student Stores, in Wright building.
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Christenbury Gymnasium,
the current center for Recreation
Sen ices, was built in 1951 for a
university of 3,000 students.
Over the past 40 years, the
university has expanded by nearly
15,000students. The residence halls,
cafeterias and classrooms have in-
creased to meet the greater demand.
Only the athletic facilities lag be-
hind.
As compared to other uru ver-
sities in the UNC system, ECU is far
below the standard. Western Caro-
lina, UNC-Greensboro, UNC-Char-
lotte and North Carolina Central
have student populations of 5,000-
15,000 students, yet their recreation
facilities are three to four times larger
thanECU's,and the oldest was built
in 1985.
The initial proposal for the
project was in 1985. In 1987, the
SGA and other student organiza-
tions endorsed the proposal, which
was then presented to Chancellor
Eakin, who also endorsed it.
ROTC
Continued from page 1
cadets held a memorial service for a
former Detachment 600 cadet, Cap-
tain Christopher Lambe, class of
1981. Lambe died in an attempt to
rescue a fellow officer while sta-
tioned on the island of Guam.
The ROTC is a voluntary pro-
gram of education that trains quali-
fied students to become Air Force
Officers. During the first two years
of participation in the program, stu-
dents have the option to quit the
program. Once cadets have been
accepted for the final two years,
they are committed to four to eight
years of active duty. Any student
who is a U.S. citizen, in good health,
pursuing an undergraduate or
graduate degree and maintaining
average grades can join ROTC.
People applying for the four-year
program must be members of the
freshman class. Students applying
for the two-year program must have
at least two years left.
Established in 1948, ECU's Air
Force Reserve Officer Training
Corps(ROTC)Detachment600was
one of the first ROTC units in the
country The four-year trainingpro-
gram has commissioned 970 offic-
ers since that time.
In 1969, Detachment 600 was
one of five detachments to allow
women into the program, and it
later commissioned one of the first
women accepted into the missile
field. Another woman commis-
sioned at ECU was one of the first
woman to be a crew member on an
AWACS plane.
The Kitty Hawk Squadron
of the Arnold Air Society is fea-
tured at Detachment600. Arnold
Air Society is a fraternal service
organization of cadets who par-
ticipate in university and com-
munity activities. Angel Flight,
the coed service organization
sponsored by Arnold Air Soci-
ety, and the Air Society, has
earned regional and national
awards every year for the past
several years.
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m





The East Carolinian
1993
Opinion
uesdavOpinion
Survey spreads rumors
"Lifestyle Assessment Question-
naire" causes uproar, stigma-
tized as unconstitutional
�The guest -writer for Tuesday's editorial is
Maureen Rich, Assistant Nrajs Editor�
What a lesson in rumors this has become. First,
publicuproar'Theschoolisviolatingourconstirutional
right to privacy Well, as advocates of the students'
right to know, protectors of the truth and typically
curious newspeople, our ears went up.
"They want to know about our sex lives
More ears went up. This could be serious, we said,
and irnmediatelysetoutto investigate the issue. Drumroll,
please, because here's the truth: The Division of Student
Life, out of concern for the campus and all of us students
trying to get the most out of our tuition bills, is attempt-
ing to find out what matters most to us. And vicious
rumors are killing the attempt.
The "Lifestyle Assessment Questionnaire" (LAQ)
is currently being distributed to all English 1100 course
participants, in an effort to assess students' lifestyles (as
the name obviously tells you), and to determine in what
specific a reas students would like to see more offered on
campus. We will now eradicate all rumors:
� The questionnaire is voluntary.
� THE QUESTIONNAIRE IS VOLUNTARY! (We
felt this one needed to be emphasized.)
� The questionnaire is confidential. Completely.
No doubts. For real. We are not kidding here.
� All faculty in charge of administering this
questionnaire were told what it is, how confi
dential it is, and how voluntary it is and were
told to pass that little information along.
So if you weren't told, call off the law suit and
blame your prof.
� No one will have to go to a therapist because they
answer a question a certain way! No mandatory
AA meetings, no "Learn When to Say When to
Cholesterol" classes and no parole officers.
� THE QUESTIONNAIRE IS CONFIDENTIAL.
Obviously this one needs to be repeated, and
probably put on an audio tape for all of you who
failed to read the directions, on the front page of
the questionnaire, where the confidentiality rule
was CLEARLY stated. (Thus, 90 of the ru-
mors. Learn to read, people!)
� The only questions about sex are phrased like
this: "If I were to have sex, I would take action to
prevent unplanned pregnancy'and, "If I were
to have sex, I would take action to prevent giving
andor getting sexually transmitted diseases
Give us a break! Hardly a question of privacy,
just a question to determine whether any com
mon sense exists! And besides, you have the
option of leaving it blank.
So, basically, that's the situation, as far as taking the
survey goes. Now, what you get back is incredible. It's
like your very own personal horoscope, only this one
comes with an intense guarantee. You find out so much:
Your life expectancy if you continue living the life you
illustrated on your answer sheet, your life expectancy if
you modify this or that area and so much more.
The results give you advice pertaining to the con-
cerns you showed, and the problem spots you may not
have even realized you had. Even better, you get encour-
agement where encouragement is due. It's the diagnosis
without the doctor bill. Or going to the dentist by fax.
Cnton should look into a health plan like this!
Lesson learned: find outthe facts before you spread
the rumors that ruin it for the rest of us. Although, we do
have one complaint about the survey: why didn't you
include the parking situation in the "Emotional Aware-
ness and Acceptance" section? Those would have been
some interesting results!
Page 5
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham. Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Maureen Rich, As.u. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Snorts Editor
Brian Olsen. Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretarx
The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Utters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call (919)757-6366.
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
By Alex Ferguson
It sure ain't easy bein' a dead, neurotic, lame hero!
A's requiring a good dose
of will power to resist the urge to
go into my den and watch the
new Superman show on TV. I've
taken on the challenge in last
Thursday's Opinion page to re-
ject television for a week. But this
Superman thing's really got it
going on, so if I break off in mid-
sentence, I'm probably in the next
room catching a view of the man
in blue.
Do you have a herohero-
ine? I'm reluctant to admit it, but
Superman is one of mine. He's
been around for a long time, he's
cliche, but I admire the man. No
matter the situation, he's always
in control and he never lets it get
to his head. He's a perfect boy
scout. Plus, he flies and burns
things with his Super Heat Vi-
sion�. Who needs a microwave
when a good glare will have the
roast ready in seconds?
-nother of my heroes,
my favorite, is Kermit the Frog.
His only goal in life was to enter-
tain people, to help them laugh
and enjoy life. He showed us how
to count and sing the alphabet on
Sesame Street, taught us to be wary
of pork (remember Miss Piggy,
hii-yahhing her way through ob-
stacles and people?) and told us
he was green, he was beautiful
and he was proud of it, amen,
Hallelujah!
Everyone has heroes
heroines. We take them on as kids,
ogling at them in awe, striving to
be li ke them. Superman, The Lone
Ranger, Super Mario Bros and
yes folks, it's time to admit it�
shudder�Barney the Dinosaur.
(I found that my dislike for the
purple behemoth stems from the
fact that he only has one tooth,
that stretches from one side of the
mouth to the other with no breaks
or gaps.) We hold onto these he-
roesheroines as we grow, using
their beliefs to forge our own.
Yes, our tastes may mature as
time passes, but the principle
stays the same. From Mickey
Mouse to Mahatma Ghandi. Even
my mom has a hero, Darth Vader,
which explains a great deal con-
cerning her behavior. (I'm kid-
ding!)
Now, the catch is that MY
heroes are dead! First, Jim Henson,
the man behind Kermit the Frog,
dies. The company has continued
the character, but it's just not the
same. Then, when I finally be-
came secure that it's okay to re-
spect a fictional muscleman in
blue tights, wham! they kill him!
So, I move to Batman, (thanks to
the Bat-mania this country is un-
dergoing). He's a bit neurotic,
fights birdmen and cat women
and idolizes flying mice, but that's
okay. WHAM! He gets his back
broken and a free ticket to the
Hapless Hero Health Spa. Well.
I'm sorry, b ut that's just too much.
What's wrong with
people? Do we get our kicks from
beating the hell out of the stable
elements that made up so much
of our early years? Is this the
Down with the Good Guy gen-
eration? If so, why stop with
Batman? Why not have Elmer
Fudd finally shoot and eat Bugs
Bunny, give Scooby Doo mange
and a healthy case of heart worms
and for the coup de grace peg
Bullwinkle on Northern Expo-
sure and hang his stuffed head
in Rosalyn's Grill?!
And what's with the
trolls with rocks in their belly
buttons? Does society actually
expect us, and kids, to emulate
the antics of squatty little mon-
sters with bad hair days? A co-
median I saw once on A&E said
i t best when he pointed ou t tha t
the youth of today don't have
much to go on when the only
heroes they're offered are mu-
tant turtles from a New York
sewer. True, good looks aren't
everything, but neither is neon
green radioactive ooze.
To the movers and
shakers out there who make
(and break) our heroic icons,
knock off knocking off the good
guys! And for God's sake, give
our kids some decent heroes
heroines with backbones that
don't have a life of their own or
stick out of their skin. As for
Superman, Batman and Kermit,
Godspeed and come home soon!
Letters to the Editor
Student actions made mockery of university
To the Editor:
I would like to take this
opportunity to sincerely thank
the 100 or so complete morons
that showed up to Ficklen Sta-
dium on Thursday night.
After all the time and ef-
fort that Athletic Director Dave
Hart and his supporting cast
has put in to change the image
of ECU, you succeeded in mak-
ing a mockery of ECU, not only
in front of Syracuse Univer-
sity, but in front of ESPN and
the entire nation.
As a student at ECU, I
have warded off countless
negative and degrading com-
ments from students, alumni
and fans of our sister schools
who questioned the integrity
of our students. On Thursday
night, we as a student body
proved them right.
When are the students of
ECU going to stand up and
show a little pride in our
school? We have a lot to be
ashamed of from the tailgating
fields, to the empty seats at
kick-off, to the ones that left in
the first quarter when it was
14-0.
And last,but certainly not
least, those that mangled the
seats on the student side. The
Athletic Department spent all
summer and 2 million dollars
in order to give Ficklen a fresh,
new look and something for us
to be proud of. Instead, we
destroyed her in just one game.
As far as the Greek orga-
nizations go, your support at
the games is much appreciated.
However, a select few of you
acted like complete animals on
Thursday night. If you think
the games are just a social gath-
ering, then stay home, get
drunk and tear up your own
house.
If we as a student popu-
lation can't get our act together
for the remaining four games,
we could find our ticket privi-
leges taken away, tailgating
banned or worse. In order for
ECU athletics to rise to a next
level, fan support and behav-
ior must do the same.
Be in the stands early, stay
to the last play of the game,
throw away your trash and fi-
nally, drink responsibly dur-
ing tailgating. ECU and ECU
athletic programs are going to
become some of the finest in
the nation.
We need everyone's sup-
port. So either lead, follow or
just get outta the way!
Brian Hardy
Student Pirate Club
Public Relations
Tailgating blamed for Thursday night's fight
To the Editor
You didn't have to be at
the ECU-Syracuse game
Thursday night to see what
happens when you mix abuse
of alcohol and irresponsibil-
ity.
Whether you picked up
the Daily Reflector, The News
and Observer or watched
WNCT, WITN and WRAL, the
pictures were all too clear. How
embarrassing to see a bunch of
drunks fighting!
Yes, I was at the game,
right in the middle of the chaos.
Yes, I tailgated before the
game, yet I could stand up
straight while I watched the
game. The fans (and I use the
term loosely) in front of me fell
back on me several times dur-
ing the game. Finally I asked
them if they couldn't stand up
to try sitting down!
Did the banning of kegs
help at the game? I saw more
bottles of liquor being poured
out by policemen than I saw
people drinking beer. I don't
disagree with the current
policy but it didn't seem to
help in this instance.
Maybe the hours of tail-
gating should be limited to
three hours versus the current
limit of four hours. These are
just suggestions that I'm sure
will not be appealing to those
who were arrested at the game
for underage drinking and
fighting.
It is clear something more
has to be done. I've been at-
tending ECU games for many-
years, and this is the worst I
have ever seen students behave.
We as students share a
responsibility to represent our
school in an orderly fashion. If
you are with someone who is
so intoxicated they are disturb-
ing others, help your friend and
remove himher from the pre-
mises. We can do a few small
things to project a positive im-
age for ECU.
Beth Arthur
Senior
Communications
By T. Scott Batchelor
Computer talk
likened to DOD
nonsense lingo
Aslsatbathedin thelambentglowof my
computer screen recently, forehead wrinkled
in frustration, I wondered what sort of sick
people write computer manuals. Do they do
it for monetary reward, or is sheer sadistic
pleasure the motivation?
Thedocumentationthatcomes with one
particular software application can only be
described as a pamphlet. Hardly giving more
than two vagueparagraphsforanytopichead-
ing, they usually end withsomething like "For
moreinformanononthistopic,seeMflcroWd's
Software Documentation That Should Have Come
With This Expensive Program But Didn't, avail-
able for only $29.95 Telephoning the "Soft-
ware Support Service" doesn't inspire much
confidence either.
I recently had a question about a pro-
gram. In the pamphlet that came with the
program was a long distance telephone num-
ber daiming to be a product support line. So,
being the computer ingenue that I am, I called.
The first layer in the service consisted of
recorded answers to some commonly asked-
questions: (Male voice) "After loading the pro-
gram, I can't get my computer screen to come
on (Female voice) "First, make sure your
computer is plugged in. If it isn't, do so, and
that should solve your problem. (Male voice)
"I can use the arrow keys to move the cursor,
but the mouse doesn't work with the pro-
gram (Female voice) "First�and this is very
important�make sure your computer is
plugged in. If it isn't, do so, and that should
solve your problem
After making sure my computer was
plugged in, I pressed the pound sign to speak
with "the first available technician I listened
to elevator music for a few minutes until a.
man came on the line.
"Product support services, how may I
help you?" "Yes, I'm having a problem trans-
ferring a document to the print screen "O.K
sir, your problem is probably very simple.
Check to make sure your computer is plugged
in. If it isn't, do so, and that should fix you right
up I said, "Thank you very much and hung
up quickly so he wouldn't hear me crying.
Several days later I decided to take the
big plunge and buy a comprehensive refer-
ence manual for the program. This was my
second biggest mistake, next to purchasing the
software in the first place.
The local bookstores carry a large selec-
tion of computer manuals, but it didn't take
long to narrow the field down to two. The rest !
of them either read like they were written by
Department of Defense technicians or were
full of cutesy cartoons. I picked one about three
inches thick that bore the software
manufacturer's seal of approval. This was big
mistake number two, subsection one. Never
buy a manual authorized by the same gang of
sadists who wrote the original documenta tion.
Look at it this way: if you're buying a
computer book from a bookstore you're (a)
cheating the software manufacturer out of $2C
or $30 and (b) the manufacturer probablv
thinks most people who do this have illegally
copied the program from a friend. So don't be
surprised if the first instruction in the manual
is "To test the system, plug the computer into
a nearby 220V range outlet As for the book I
purchased,there'sadoorinmyapartmentthat
won't stay open like I want it to, so I now have
a $30 door stop.
�HHRBMI mm





TheEastCarolinian
m M v � �w-
i - ii" iinil
-ptemberl4, 1993
Classifieds
Page 6
Il.lIMWMIMI
ROOMMATE WANTED Nice 2
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FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
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per month . Private room, semi-
furnished. Call for info! 752-8000!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
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For Rent
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Rlt-pirn(8,i�, Injrik. F, .IL(�kr. !(��
- 'Drttrfnt Itni , I rr . r - V- I; . i i. �
FORT HENRY S ARMY NAVY
1501 S. EVANS STREET 756-8781
BBS Personals
LOSE WEIGHT: Doctor recom-
mended, FDA tested. 100 guaran-
teed, 100 natural. The only thing
you lose is weight. CaU anytime,
756-1166.
WRITERMUSICIAN and Poetic
Soul seeks like-minded lady for
friendship and fun. Send photos
BBS Personals
and correspondence to: KANE, PO
Box 8663, GreenvUle, NC 27835.
TO CHRIS - The Sp. Ed Major Last
Tues. nite I wanted to say "Hi but
I was too nervous and so I just flew
by. At the Elbo tonite I hope you
wiU be there, f or I j ust want to dance
with you on thatdance floor square.
- Daisy Duke.
THE JEFF JONES from Plymouth
who is a research technician in the
Department of Microbiology and
Immunology and a graduate stu-
dent in the Biology Department is
not the Jeff Jones who has been
writing the classified ads appearing
in this paper and is no way associ-
ated with these ads.
TO MR. J. JONES: shut up.
HS Greek
IQ
Greek
RUSH PHI KAPPA PSI - Party ev-
ery night? Drunk aU the time? Then
you're NOT who we are looking for.
Leaders, scholars, men and athletes
notafraidofphUanthropy,that'swho
we're looking for. Create tradition
and build on something new. CaU
Richat 752-2573. RUSH PHI KAPPA
PSI 1416th at 508 West 5th Street.
TOALLFRATERNnTES.Wehope
you have a great rush, love, Alpha Xi
Delta.
GOOD LUCK toaU fraternities dur-
ing rush week! Love, the Alpha Phis.
PI LAMBDA PHI Rush Sept. 13-17.
For more info. caU Steve or Jeremy at
830-5196.
PI LAMBDAPHI would like to wish
aU fraternities good luck this week
during rush.
RUSHEPSILONSIGMAALPHA.
Come be a part of our Service Soror-
ity! End of summer beach rush Sept
20-22at5:30pmintheCampus Meet-
ing Room Reming HaU Basement
Guaranteed fun in the sun! For more
info caU 758-8126.
WHAT IN THE HELL is Rush?
CaU 752-2573 or 830-9536 to find
out
PI LAMBDA PHI and ALPH A
OMICRONPImakeagreatcombo.
We are reaUy looking forward to a
great time Saturday night. Let's get
reday to rumble.
FRATERNITY RUSH is Sept. 14-
17. Come join the most powerful
and influential organizations on
campus. Improveyour self-esteem,
academics, athletics and social
skills. There are over 17 ffC Frater-
nities on campus. WeencourageaU
ECU men to visiteach fraternity on
campus to accurately determine
which one is the best for youGo
Greek!
THE INTERFRATERNITY
COUNCIL would like tocongratu-
late the 1993 Winners at the Greek
Awards Banquet. Most outstand-
ing - Phi Kappa Tau, Most Im-
proved - Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi-
lanthropy - Pi Kappa Alpha, High-
est GPA - Phi Kappa Psi, Univer-
sity Service Award - Pi Kappa Al-
pha, PanheUinic Leadership Award
- Noland Mattocks, PanheUinic
Greek Man of the Year - Ian
Eastman, Chancellor's Cup - Theta
Chi, Greek Week OveraU Winners
-PiKappaPhi, Alpha Delta PiGreek
Man of the Year - Keith Dyer, IFC
Secretary-MattHedrick.Congratu-
lations to saU New Greek HaU of
Fame Members.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new Beta Omega pledgeclass offic-
ers of Alpha Phi: President - Nan
Patterson, Vice president - Robin
White,Scholarship-StaceyKlatsky,
Treasurer - JuUe Smith, Recording
Secretary - OUvia Plymale, Social -
KatyMcNiff,Artiviries-TristanLee,
Panhellenic Delegate - Angie Nix,
Panhellenic Representative -
Mic�ieUeWhitehurst,Philanthropy
- Livia Ritch, Historian - Kim
Laughery, Lockout - Melissa
Chesnut, Scrapbook Laura Baldi,
Fundraiser - Courtney Scanlon.
Love, the Alpha Phis.
NEWMAN CATHniir
CENTER
The Newman Catholic
Student Center would like to
welcome the parents and
invite you to join us at the
center for Sunday Mass,
11:30 am and 8:30 pm. The
Newman Center is located
next to the East end of cam-
pus at 953 E. 10th St. For fur-
ther information call Fr.
Paul at 757-1991. .
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt
county Special Olympics is
recruiting for volunteer
coaches in the following
sports: soccer, basketball
skills, team basketball,
swimming, gymnastics,
bowling, power-lifiting,
and roller skating. NO EXPE-
RIENCE IS NECESSARY-JUST
A WILLINGNESS TO WORK
WITH MENTALLY HANDI-
CAPPED CHILDREN AND
ADULTS. Special training
sessions for coaches will be
held. Last day to volunteer
for fall sports is Sept. 28th.
Volunteer hours may be
used as part of practicum
requirements for several
ECU courses. For more info,
contact Connie Sappenfield
at 830-4541.
ANNUAL Miir. S4I.F
The ECU Ceramics Guild
is having their annual mug
sale. The sale will be held on
Sept. 17, from 8 am - 5 pm in
front of the entrance of
Jenkin's Fine Arts Center
(located on the ECU campus
off of 5th Street). The guild
is also having a Ceramic Sale
on September 18, from 9am-
2pm in Cotanche parking
lot of UBE (located across
from Chico's). All ceramic
work is handmade by stu-
dents and professors of ce-
ramics. For more informa-
tion please contact Sam Wil-
son at 752-8390.
VQI.I.F.YRAM.
Make it official! There
will be an officials clinic
for volleyball on Thursday,
Sept. 30 in Brewster D-105 at
5 pm. Call Rec Services at
757-6387 for more info.
QRIENTF.F.R WORKSHOP
Which way is up? Rec
Services outdoor recreation
program will have an
orienteer mapcompass
workshop on Thurs, Sept. 30
at 4 pm in 117 Christenbury
Gym. Registration for Fall
adventure trips and work-
shops begin Aug. 25 at 204
Christenbury Gym. So be
sure to pre-register and take
a study break as well as an
adventure! For more info
call Rec Services at 757-6387.
CLIMBING WORKSHOP
Get a grip! Rec Services
outdoor Recreation pro-
gram will have a climbing
workshop on Tues. Sept. 14
at 3 pm at the Climb Tower.
Register in 204
Christenbury Gym. Climb-
ing workshops will be $5
student and $10faculty-
staff. For more info call Rec
Services at 757-6387.
EAST CAROLINA NATIVF
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
Our first meeting will be
held Wednesday Sept 15 in
Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 221 at 7 pm. Old mem-
bers bring $4 for your t-
shirt.
CARF.GIVFR SUPPORT
GROUP
A support group for per-
sons responsible for the
care of older or disabled
adults will meet at St. James
United Methodist Church,
2000 E. 6th St, Greenville at
7:30 pm on Tues, Sept 14,
1993. For more info please
call Freda Wilkins at 758-
5932 or Susan Redding at
758622.
RETURNING ADITIT
STUDENTS
We are getting together
at the Upper Crust Bakery
(212 E. 5th St) on Thursday
Sept. 16 at 5 pm. All
undergrad students 25 yrs
or older are invited. Impor-
tant info will be discussed
and it will be a great time for
you to give your input. Call
Dana Thielen at 757-6881 if
you plan to attend.
SURVIVORS OF INCEST
& SEXUAL ARITSF
The Counseling Center
and Student Health Center
are offering three educa-
tional workshops for female
students and abuse survi-
vors. The workshop focuses
on psychological and emo-
tional issues associated with
childhood incest and sexual
abuse. Family behaviors,
rules and individual roles
will be identified, with par-
ticular attention to how
these affect current person-
ality styles and relation-
ships. Participants are ex-
pected to attend all three
meetings. The workshop
will take place three con-
secutive Wednesdays, 3:30-5
pm, 915, 922, and 929.
Please call 757-6661 to sign
up. There will be limited
enrollment.
PHI SIGMA PI
A smoker will be held
September 20 at 7 pm in GCB
1032, for anyone interested
in pledging Phi Sigma Pi
National Honor Fraternity.
To pledge, one must have
between 32 and 96 semester
hours, a GPA of 3.3 or better,
and display the qualities of
scholarship, leadership and
fellowship with the purpose
of the fraternity in mind.
Informal dress; guys - coats
and tie, girls- dresses. For
more info call David Batts at
931-8775.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
Interested in sisterhood
bonding and helping oth-
ers such as the St. Jude's
Children's Hospital? Epsilon
Sigma Alpha International
Service Sorority can pro-
vide just that and more! Rush
will be held Sept 20-22 at
5:30 PM in the campus meet-
ing room in Fleming hall
Basement. Get the best of a
sorority and a service orga-
nization all in one! For more
info call 758-8126.
INTRODUCTION TO
MEDITATION
A short course of in-
struction in meditation
techniques and philosophy
will meet 7:30-8:30, Mon,
Sept 20, in Unitarian-Uni-
versalist Church, 131
Oakmont Drive (across from
Greenville Athletic Club).
The course will continue on
the next two monday eve-
nings. All are invited. Bring
a cushion for sitting or wear
comfortable clothing. The
instruction is sponsored by
the Buddhist Meditation rnd
Study Group of ECU.
PHYS HP MOTOR &�
PHYSICAL COMPETENCY
TEST
PLACE: Minges Coliseum,
TIME AND DATE: 1-3 pm, Fri-
day, September 17, 1993. A
passing score on this test is
required of all students
prior to declaring physical
education as a major. 1.
Maintain an average T-
score of 45 on the six-item
test battery. 2. Having a T-
score of 45 on an aerobics
run. Any student with a
medical condition that
would contraindicate par-
ticipation in testing should
contact Mike McCammon or
Dr. Gay Israel at 757-4688. To
be exempted from any por-
tion of the test, you must
have a physician's excuse.
A detailed summary of the
test components is available
in the Human Performance
Laboratory (Room 371,
Sports Medicine Building).
Your physician's excuse
must specifically state from
which items you are ex-
empt.
MASSAGE CLINIC
The ECU Physical
Therapy Club will have a
massage clinic Thurs Sept
16, 5-10pm on first floor of
Belk Allied Health Bldg.
Tickets: $1.50 (in advance)
or $2 (at the door) for 10
minutes. Tickets available
from PT students or ECU
Back & Limb Clinic in Belk
Bldg.
PRE-PHYSICAT
THERAPY CI IIR
The pre-P.T. club will be
having a meeting Thurs-
day, Sept 16 in Mendenhall
221 at 7:00. There will be a
questionanswer session
with the Physical Therapy
Dept. head. All are welcome.
If you have any questions,
call Dawn (757-0573)
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeofcharge.Duetothelimitedamourit
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Friday 4p.m. for
Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4p.m. for
Thursday's edition.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10a.m. the day priorto
publication however, no refunds will
be given.
For more
information call
757-6366.
nHHOWM MMM M





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
0
Aladdin' spreads magic to homes
Photo courtesy of The Walt Disney Company
Luckily Disney fans will be blessed with vet another home video release.
Look for Aladdin's "crazy cast of chracter's to hit stores Oct. 1.
Don't Run My life
6y TCcAond (2nauuH,
Sosad. So true. I'm referring to
America. You might have heard of
it: the land of the fee and the home
of the naive.
But, as 20 million Jerry Lewis
fans say, c'est la vie.
People sometimes sav to me,
"Hey Dick, you're a good-lookin
guy But that's no surprise. What
about those people who ask me,
"Hey Dick, how come you start
talking about one thing and then
talk about another?" And that's a
valid question. It's like a puzzle,
sort of like that Newhart show
where he wakes up and it was all a
dream.
Face it. I'm a human dynamo.
A spark on the horizon.
Ever see that old Vincent Price
film, The Creeper, orThe Tingler or
something like that? It's about this
mad scientist who discovers that
the tingling feeling you get in your
back when you get scared iscaused
by this creature that lives in your
spine. Every time you get scared, it
grows a little bit, and that's whv
you get that tingling feeling. Of
course, he retrieves one of these
centipede-looking creatures and it
gets loose in a theater where they're
watching a scan' movie and every-
one screams and it grows and then
they find it and scream more and it
grows more and it eats some people
and then it makes you think the
tingler is on you! Scary!
But tinglers are not crawling
� around America today ruining
people 'slivesand inrringingon their
personal freedom. No, we have a
far worse menace souring the hal-
lowed sanctity of American ideol-
ogy Worse than Jason, worse than
the mummy, worse than the end-
ing to most of Stephen King's nov-
els, and yes, even worse than Bon
Jovi: I'm talking about the censor.
The censor. The Censor. Sort of
sounds like a bad movie about a
tough guv who's misunderstood,
gentle yet tough, caring yet noncha-
lant. A guv who has a bad accent. A
terrible actor who has even more
terrible love scenes and single-
handedly destroys the last vestige
of the unwritten law: creativity.
But, as Queen sang, another
one bites the dust. Think about it.
Isn't it possible that what you're
reading and what I wrote are not
the same1 Perhaps I slipped in
some dirty-w'ordies or a feisty scato-
logical limerickand the censor, that
pawn, that lackey for The Man,
crossed them ou t wi th the red, white,
and blue pen of truth, justice, and
the American Way.
Of course, this is all hypotheti-
cal. Who would censor me?
Speakingof censors, what about
Bill and Al? Are they going to re-
structure the American govern-
ment? I doubt it. I heard on the
radio that the government employs
56,000 people just to keep track of
all the different grades, levels and
positions of government employ-
ees. Can you imagine? They just
give a green truck and turn em
loose. But we'll come to back to
that.
While we're on the subject, let
me add that I'm concerned about
the complete lack of decorum ex-
emplified by Pirate fans. Whatever
happened to Pirate Pride? And
personallv, 1 don't care how pretty
you are, it you yak like a rabid dog
near me, you're an ugly stinker.
Which brings us to today's
message. If you'reexpressingyour-
self, and your work has merit and
pertinence, and someone tries to
censor you, get yourself a big ol'
rubber mallet, ring his or her bell
and write on their forehead (in re-
verse letters so they can read it in a
mirror), "Don't run m life
Outpost Trail shop gears
Greenville for fall season
By Jimmy Rostar
Staff Writer
Downtown Greenville draws
many people for many reasons.
Now, with a great new place that
specializes in clothing and outdcxr
equipment, the area will undoubt-
edlv bring in even more folks.
Welcome to the Outpost Trail
Shop. Locatedat530CotancheStreet,
the new store was unveiled on Au-
gust 26 by Mrs. Gerrv Smith, who
alsoowns The Bicycle Post next door.
While the shop is still getting
started in terms of acquiring an ex-
panded inventory, it stands as a
By Danial Willis
Staff Writer
Starting October 1, Aladdin will
be available on video, but only for a
limited period. The standard video
release will cost S24.9V, and a Deluxe
C i 1 lector's Video Editionand a Kid's
Video and Activitv Kit will also be
available priced at'$99.99 and S34.99
respectively.
Atthebox-offksAiaiiJw grossed
over $200 millionmaking it the high-
est grossing animated picture of all
time and the highest-grossing Disney
film ever.
The film received two Academy
awards for Best Original Score and
Best OriginalSong for " A Whole New
World The moie also won five
Golden Globe nominations which
gaveAladdin acclaim identical to the
Academy Award achievement of
winning the Golden Globes for Best
OriginalScoreand BestOnginalSong.
The film tells the story of a coura-
geous Arabianteen's adventures as
he escapes from his nomadic life and
marries Princessjasmine, theSultan's
daughter. A Genie (played by Robin
Williams) is able to present Aladdin
as a noble Prince. Unfortunately the
Princess isn't attracted to Aladdin in
bis high ranking identity. Aftera num-
ber of confrontations and achieve-
ments, he realizes that Jasmine loves
sorely-needed local source that ear-
ner specifically hiking and camping
clothing and gear.
The Trail Shop's management
team remembers your everyday
clothing and leisure needs as well.
With thatin mind, the store appeals
toanvone interested in adding popu-
lar brand-name items to a wardrobe
or to a collection ai tun stuff
The Trail Shop stocks quality
clothingbyWoolrich.Northfaceand
others. Fr� m wi ol si icks to pro-con-
senation t-shirts,button-down shirts
b i sweaters, the st ire can set you up.
See TRAIL page 9
him for his true identity.
One of the most interesting as-
pects of the movie is its varietv of
different voices. Gilbert Gottfried
speaks as Jafar's evil side-kick, lago,
and singeractor Brad Cane provides
Aladdin'ssingingvoice.Butthemost
memorablevoice is theGenie's, which
is Robin Williams
Williams makes numerous im-
personations, such as Jack Nicholson
and Arsenio Hall, adding humor to
the movie. At one point in the movie,
the Genie makes faces that are obvi-
ously based upon Robin Williams'
facial expressions. It'skind of inter-
esting to see Williams in animated
form.
One of the major standoutsof the
movie was Alan Menken, the musi-
cal composer responsible for the
soundtrack.
He received six Academy
Awardsand fiveGrammy's. "I write
for an audience very much like my-
self Menken said. "The fact that
young people respond enthusiasti-
cally to my songs is fantastic, but the
songs are to move the story forward,
to express the characters' feelings
The movie is written from a
child's perspective and is obviously a
cruidren'sstory. But like most Disney
movies, Aladdin is designed to pro-
vide entertainment for audiences of
all ages.
Today: Pap Smears
Answered by Jenni'er Philips. Student Health Service
a
QUESTION: Exactly what
is the purpose of having a Pap
smear?
ANSWER: A Pap smear is
done to see if the cells of the
cervix are normal. Sometimes a
Pap smear will reveal other
changes on the cervix. These
changes do not necessarily in-
dicate cervical cancer. A
Pap smear is consid-
ered a screening
test only. Upon v-
receiving an
abnormal re-
suit, further
tests are 9
needed to con-
firm the nature "
of the abnormal- y
ity n
During a Pap smear,
random samples of cells are ob-
tained from the cervix. A device
known as a spatula is used to
gather cells from the cervical
area. The cells are studied un-
der a microscope by trained
technicians who classify the
cells according to their micro-
scopic cnaractenstics.
There are five classes: Class
I is considered a normal result;
Class II usually indicates some
type of infection or inflam-
mation of the vagina; Classes
III and IV are suspicious for
tumors but not definite; Class
V is definite for tumors.
It is important that
women have Pap smears dene
annually after the age of 18
whether they are sexually ac-
tive or not (unless oth-
� erwise advised by
a physician).
f Risk factors for
cervical can-
�J cer include: �
sexual
intercourse at
an early age
Qj (teen or
younger)
X sexual inter-
course with more than
two partners
sexual intercourse with
someone who has had more
than two partners
Genital herpes
Genital warts
Questions for the health
column should be directed to
Jennifer Phillips, Student
Health Service, ECU, Green-
ville, 27858.
Brady album
sticky-sweetened
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
"Here's a story about a man
named Brady
I've always thought that
would be a nice opening line for a
folkballad of somesort. You know,
"Mike Brady was a steel-drivin'
man" or something. But, as you
and I both know, it's not. It's the
opening line to the theme from the
Bradv Bunch (which is kind of a
folk ballad itself, I suppose).
You remember the Brady
Bunch, right? The family with six
kids and a vaguely disturbing
sexual tension in the air? Sure!
And remember when the Par-
tridge Family was cutting in on
Brady turf? You know, when the
kids started singing? And America
screamed?
Well, now we can re-live the
horror with It's a Sunshine Day, a
compilation of the "best" of the
Brady Bunch. What "Best" means
in this context, however, is
anybody's guess. The music of the
Brady Bunch was pirated from
every pop music fad spawned in
the 60s; it redefines the word
bland. It makes Pat Boone look
like Bo Diddly.
But you don't listen to Brady
Music for soul. You listen to Brady
Music for laughs. And It's a Sun-
shine Day provides those in abun-
dance. Get one thing straight: this
music is bad. But that badness is
its charm. The Brady playlist is so
incredibly wretched that itholdsa
morbid fascination. In spite of ev-
erything, it's fun.
The chuckles begin with the
title track, which is a sort of an ode
to cheery dispositions. If you can
survive the sweetness of this tune
without going into insulin. ock,
the rest of the album is a coast. On
the chorus of "It's a Sunshine Day
the kids are trying for an earnest
Mamas-and-Papas-style vocal
harmony that might work if one
of them (probably Peter, the hap-
less nerd) wasn't flat on his solo.
But the rest of the song, with a
bouncy back beat reminicent of
The Brady Bunch
the theme to Sesame Street, is great
fun.
And remember that time
when the kids had to sing on TV
and Peter's voice was changing,
so Greg wrote "Time to Change
that ingenious tune that incorpo-
rated Peter's vocal abnormality
into the chorus? Well, we get that
one here, too, minus Peter's
cracked solo, unfortunately. It's
one of the few songs you' re likely
to remember, but the absense of
Peter's puberty voice detracts
from it a bit.
Another treat is "Candy
See BRADY page 9
Campus magazine: 'Rebel' with a cause
By Sarah Wahlert
Staff Writer
Most students probably don't
know that The Rebel magazine be-
gan in 1959. I didn't know that
either until I had the chance to
chat with editor, Josie Boyette. To
start, she explained exactly what
The Rebel is.
"The Rebel is East Carolina's
literary and arts magazine. It's
used to showcase ECU students
in the artistic and literary fields.
It's also published with student
fund ing and is completely staffed
by students Boyette stated, "we
welcome all students back to cam-
pus and we need your help. Sub-
mit, submit, submit Hopefully
students will get the idea.
In addition to the last year's
categories, now there are three
more. Thev include the follow-
ing: prose, poetry, interview,
children's literature (broken
down into poetry, fiction and cre-
ative nonfiction), plays (includ-
ing monologues, thirty minute
playsand ten-minute plays), and,
of course, art. These new catego-
ries were added to include his-
torv, political-science, journalism,
education and theater majors
" All majors are definitely encour-
aged to participate Boyette as-
sures.
An important fact that I as a
freshman was unaware of, is that
The Rebel is a contest. Faculty ad-
visors and staff first choose the
best 20 submissions. This year
the staff is comprised of Josie
Boyette, editor; Stephen
Randolph, assistant editor; Lisa
Yates, prose editor; Darlene
Pelliccio, art editor; and Chandra
Speight, poetry editor. This year's
advisors include Craig
Masmrose, Dr. Mike Bassman, Dr.
Pat Terrell, Julie Fay and consult-
ant John Shearin.
The twenty pieces are sent to
the judges. The judges agree on
the first, second and third place
winners whose works are pub-
lished as budget allows. Five hon-
orable mentions are also awarded
but are not always published.
Winners will receive a letter if
they've won and are invited to an
open ceremony at Mendenhall in
their honor. The first place win-
ner receives $150 dollars, second
place, SI00, and third, $75.
The literary ceremony is held
in the first week of April, and
deadlines will be posted on cam-
pus for the different categories.
But all literary entries must be
received by Nov. 2 This year the
staff has decided to incorporate
Pictured here is the
1988 editions of the
Rebel. Submissions
to the literary
magazine have sky-
rocketed, making
publication an
honor only a few
recieve.
the theme of "Changing Perspec-
tives.
"We are hoping for material
on personal reflections S:iys
Boyette. However, this theme
DOES NOT apply to art entries.
Art is a whole other baligame.
Categories include painting,
drawing, wood, metals textiles,
sculpture, photography, graphic
design computer design, ceram-
Photo credit of
The Rebel
ics, printmaking and illustra-
tion
Authors of winning stories
will meet with the illustrators
and collaborate on how the art-
work should look. The deadline
for art entries is Oct. 18, and the
art winners' reception will be
held on Oct 26.
See REBEL page 9





-�Mnm
September 14, 1993
mis
to MS children
-t and
recog-
o! as people
nroon
with a disease.
The exhibitors in "The Cre-
ative Will: Project Rembrandt 1993-
I994"havea range of physical abil-
ity that is as wide as their choice of
mediums � from photography
and targe-canvas painting, to fash-
ioning delicate sculpture, to paint-
ing with a mouth-held brush.
When the body is less able "the
camera makes up the difference
says exhibiting photographer
Karen Stone. A temporary loss of
sight enabled painter Lorna R. War-
den "to appreciate the simple
beauty of glances, skies and mo-
ments she explained.
This 10th anniversary edition
of Project Rembrandt, a national,
juried biennial exhibition of con-
temporary' work, is ready to go on
the road after its Manhattan pre-
miere. It will be shown in cities
around the country over the next
year or so. There's also a color cal-
endar and a glossy art book this
year.
The 80 works of the 30 finalists
include paintings, photographs,
prints and sculpture, selected from
about 200 entries without regard
to degree of disability, from 30 dif-
ferent states.
"I'd always wanted to be a
professional artist said Carol
Hunt at a preview. "It was my
ambition, MS made the way for me
It really motivates you to gef
into the studio � now! � and
create that masterpiece while you
feel strong
She relishes immersion in her
large, vibrant canvases. "When you
focus on your artwork, you totally
forget about your body
Linda Longo-Muth says her
paintings incorporating glass ob-
jects have become "metaphors for
issues of concern
A work titled "The Glass Ceil-
ing" pokes fun at the old boys'
network, and "It's Your Choice" is
about abortion.
"You are so isolated as an art-
ist, you're alone in the studio all
day creating she explained.
So, she says, you engage in
political ideas with your art � "I
don't know how any artist doesn't
come to this point. As Picasso said,
'Paintings are weapons of war
Poetry and photography are
equal passions for Kay Yasutome,
who has four black-and-white pho-
tographs in the exhibition.
"I've only been a photogra-
pher five years. I realized poetry
doesn't sell. So I decided to do
photos as well, to make the books
more beautiful .Then photography
took on its own life � but the
poetry's still there, it's a cross-cur-
rent that never stops.
"You really look a t what you're
seeing by photographing it
Yasutome says all the works
areforsale. "Mine range from about
$8,000 to $20,000
Ten percent of any sales from
the show goes to the National Mul-
tiple Sclerosis Society, which orga-
nizes the project.
The title of the show 'The Cre-
ative Will is well earned. Mul-
tiple sclerosis, a major disease of
the central nervous system, im-
poses physical limits � but not
limits on creativity.
Free-lance photographer
James Uhl has traveled to Nepal
and India to find his subjects. On
the other hand, "I'm stuck in my
house a lot said Charles
Stroucher, who uses a wheelchair
but whose world expands through
the "imaginary landscapes" he
paints.
Bess Bonner's highly-regarded
abstracts in oils have been included
in previous Project Rembrandt
shows and other national exhibi-
tions. She cannot use her hands, so
she holds her brush in her mouth.
"Since creative ideas originate in
the mind, it does not matter (how)
the paint is applied she says.
Longo-Muth has exhibited in
four previous Project Rembrandts.
"The art world is very com-
petitive she remarked. "It's twice
ashard if you'rea woman, 10 times
as hard if you're disabled.
"Project Rembrandt has been
wonderful for us
Health Care Reform topic of lecture
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Alead rig irchitect of national
health nn will be the fea-
tured speaker at the 13th Annual
Health 1 aw Forum in Greenville
on Wednesday, Sept. 15.
Kenneth E. Thorpe, U.S.
deputy assistant secretary for
health policy, will deliver the H.
Horton health care reform initia-
tives slated to begin at 1:15 p.m.
This year's forum, presented
by the East Carolina University
School of Medicine, is devoted en-
tirely to health care reform.
Thorpe's visit and the topic of
the forum are timely. Within a week
after the forum, President Bill
Clinton is expected to reveal his
long-anticipated plan to redesign
the health care system. Although
final congressional action on the
Clinton plan is not expected until
next year, the intervening months
are likely to be filled with debate on
its provisions
A nationally known health
economist, Thorpe is on leave from
the School of Public Health at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, where he has been an
associate professor in the depart-
ment of health policy administra-
tion since 1990.
The forum brings in speakers
from around the country to present
an intensive, one-day analysis of
issues at the interface of medicine
and law for physicians, hea 1th ca re
attorneys and others. The forum
director is Edward E. Hollowell, a
Raleigh attorney and adjunctpro-
fessor of medical jurisprudence in
health law at the ECU School of
Medicine.
Among the other forum
speakers will be State Sena tor John
B. Codington of Wilmington, a
retired physician, who will dis-
cuss North Carolina's health care
reform initiatives, and Edward P.
Richards, an attorney and health
law expert from the University of
Missouri at Kansas City School of
Law. Richards will discuss the im-
pact of national health care re-
form on patients.
The East Carolinian
is new occeptmg opplicotiens for Crativc Director.
This is o poid petition that will tend) you to work with a twin. You'll gem o vaiuoble
reference source end experience applicable to luture employment. Macintosh skills
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September 14, 1993
BRADY
Continued from page 7
pe
pa;

hind tl
brings up the somewhat disturb-
ing question of Bradv sexuality.
After all, they weren't blood rela-
tives or anything, and those long
suburban nights can be awfully
lonely
Ahem. Anyway, the album
also features "Cheyenne an
unreleased Greg solo tune that,
strangely, has nothing to do with
American Indians. Then we have
"Born to Say Goodbye a country
song from Mrs. Brady that sounds
like Loretta Lynn backed up by
the Beach Boys.
i,
iwningmo-
- the highest low
is got to be
er of Don
a' .in Pie This
rid bad; it's pain-
hi ode to musical
death with Satanic overtones, is
delivered witha disgusting white-
bread cheeriness that would be
unsettling if it weren't so damned
funny. If anything proves thatthe
Brady Bunch should never have
sung a note, "American Pie" is it.
And the fun doesn't stop with
the music. Heavens no! The liner
notes are good for a chuckle or two
as well. One particularly funny
picture shows Bobby decked out
in an Elvis-style white jumpsuit.
In another, Marsha blandly flashes
some (undoubtedly wholesome)
cleavage to the camera. The whole
package is a painful reminder of
America in the early Seventies.
But all in all, It's a Sunshine
Day isn't an unpleasant way to kill
an hour. Granted, the cheese fac-
tor is high, and you occasionally
shudder with revulsion when you
realize exactly what you're wal-
lowing in. But the music makes
you feel good, in spite of yourself.
It's not the worst music ever re-
corded.
I'd much rather listen to the
Bradys, for instance, than be sub-
jected to their Eighties counter-
parts, the New Kids on the Block.
So get out there and groove to the '
beat with the Brady Bunch! It's
ginchy!
"Entries would make great
portfolio pieces and look good on
resumes too added Boyette.
Winners receive three copies
of The Rebel. Everyone else can
pick up a free copy in April at any
of the following locations: the art
building, Mendenhall, the Gen-
eral Classroom building or the
Rebel offices. Students may enter
Continued from page 7
as many times as they wish but
The Rebel will not accept anony-
mous pieces, previously accepted
pieces or previously published
pieces. All work must be original
and upon submission, submitters
must fill out a form to verify that
works are original. These forms
are located on a rack outside of
the offices which are located on
TRAIL
the second floor of the Student
Publications Building.
If the office is closed, literary
entries can be slid with the form
under the door. Office hours are
Monday and Wednesday 3 to 5,
and Friday 10 to 2. The phone
number is 757-6502. I know I'm
going to enter. How 'bout you?
Continued from page 7
The shop also has a wide selection of
knapsacks by Jansport, and there are
enough frisbee golf discsavailable to
keep you golfers happy.
If hiking and camping equip-
ment is what you're in the market
for, the Outpost Trail Shop can help.
Manager Mac McCotter, who at-
tended an outdoor equipment show
in Charlotte over the weekend, said
that he would "be doing a lot of
looking and a lot of buying" in the
upcomingweeks. Inaddition,hesaid
thatcustomerscanplacespecial cata-
log orders as well.
The shop has a variety of gear
that can make a weekend in the
woods more comfortable. McCotter
stocks tents by Sierra Design, sleep-
ing bags by Cannondale and Sierra
Design and a host of accessories and
cookware, such as small grills, mess
kits,canteensandSwiss Army knives.
Lookingforsomenew footwear?
The Trail Shop has it. McCotter pre-
dicts that he will sell many pairs of
Vasque hiking boots, adding that
they are "the best boots the world"
forrugged outdooruse. You can also
pick up a pair of Merrell boots, or
maybe a pair of Teva sandals, which
McCotter said havebeensellingvery
well.
For you serious outdoor types,
the shop stocks Jansport backpacks
in both theextemal and internal frame,
types. Prices and the type of pack
vary according to your individual
needs. The external packs, for in-
stance, allow you to attach additional
accessories onto them, while the in-
ternal models are self-contained.
Your height also comes into play
when you choose the size of back-
pack, said one salesman.
While the shop has plenty of
hiking and camping merchandise on
hand and on order, remember that
you don't have to be an expert out-
doors enthusiast to enjoy what this
new place has to offer. The Outpost
Trail Shop team hopes that anyone
with an active lifestyle will stop by,
and they ensure an increasingly
larger inventory that will suit a range
of budgets as time goes on.
Check in with Mac McCotter
and the rest of the gang down at the
Outpost Trail Shop regularly to keep
up with the latest arrivals. The store
is open weekdays and Saturdays
from 10a.m. until6p.mand you can
eet in touch bv ohone at 757-0713.
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The East Carolinian
September 14, 1993
Scoreboard
Thursday, Sept 9
FootbalUO-l)
lost to Syracuse, 41-22
Friday, Sept. 10
Volleyball (1-6)
beat N.C. A&T 15-4,15-12,15-13
Saturday, Sept. 11
Volleyball (1-8)
lost to Radford, 15-8,15-7,15-7
lost to Virginia Common-
wealth, 15-11,15-6,15-6
Soccer (2-1) Tournament
defeated VMI, 5-1
Sunday, Sept. 12
Soccer (2-1) Tournament
defeated Marshall, 3-1
What's the 411?
Tuesday, Sept 14
Volleyball (1-8)
versus N.C. State in Minges
Collesium at 7 p.m.
Wed Sept. 15
Soccer (3-1)
at Duke, Durham, N.C. at 7
p.m.
P Football Top 25
I.Florida St (59)
2. Alabama (3)
3. Miami
4. Notre Dame
5. Tennessee
6. Syracuse
7. Colorado
8. Nebraska
9. Florida
10. Michigan
11. Ohio State
12. Oklahoma
13. North Carolina
14. Penn State
15. Arizona
16. Texas A&M
17. N.C. State
18. Washington
19. Brigham Young
20. Stanford
21. California
22. Boston College
23. Arizona State
24. Wisconsin
Sports
Page 10
Syracuse surges in second half
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
Marvin Graves, Syracuse's
Heisman candidate, made a great
case for himself when he picked
ECU's defense apart and led the
Orangemen to a 41-22 victory,
Thursday.
In the first half, the Pirates
played well and were within five
points, 21-16.
However, after intermission,
ECU did not respond to Syracuse's
defensive adjustments.
The SU offense did not need to
adjust and kept rolling, with Graves
doing the most damage.
"I'm not really concerned with
(the Heisman), I just want to keep
on winning all I'm thinking
about right now is the fumble I had.
That's the one mistake I made in the
game Graves said.
How true. His performance
was almost flawless. He threw for
three touchdowns,no interceptions
and 329 yards on 20-27 passing. He
also ran into the end zone twice and
totaled 44 yards on the ground.
Graves benefited from a wide-
open Marvin Harrison. The wide
receiver burnt the ECU backfield
for 180 y'cirds on seven catches. Wide
receiver Shelby Hill tried to keep
up with Harrison, but fell short
with 116 yards on nine catches.
ECU's quarter back, Marcus
Crajidell, held his own, throwing
for 160 yards in the first half of play.
However, the Orangemen's de-
fense held him to only 13 yards
passing in the second half, but Pi-
rate fullback Junior Smith picked
up the slack, gaining 100 of his 164
yards after the break.
Crandell completed 13 of 33
passes but several throws hit re-
ceivers in the hands and were
dropped.
The freshman also ran the op-
tion for 32 yards.
"We're not going to (run the
option) much at all Pirate Head
Coach Steve Logan said, Aug. 15, in
what now seems to have been an
attempttothrowSyracuseoff ECU's
game plan.
After the game he said, "I
wanted to run the option a little bit
more, but (Crandell) hurt his shoul-
der early in the first quarter and I do
See GAME page 13
Photo by Harold Wise
Pirate fullback Junior Smith rushed for 164 yards on 28 carries against the Orangemen last
Thursday. His performance earned him Player of the Game honors.
Crandell coming of age
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
After Thursday'sgameagainst
Syracuse, Pirate Head Coach Steve
Logan said, "I had no idea when I
recruitedMarcus(Crandell)whatI
was getting
Now he knows: not the next
Jeff Blake � the first Marcus
Crandell.
Marcus whispers into micro-
phones, but leads his team in the
huddle.
A handful of reporters ap-
peared to overwhelm him, but he
didn't seem to notice the 33,000
fans in Ficklen or the national tele-
vision audience.
After the game, he admitted
he was nervous, but he showed no
fear on the field.
His numbers were not good,
mostly because of a poor receiv-
ing effort � eight passes were
dropped. Still, he played up to
expectations and gave his captive
audienceglimpses of things tocome
over the next four years.
Marcus said he didn't see his
first collegiate touchdown. Noprob-
lem � hell have many more op-
portunities. Marcus' improvement
is inevitable.
At this point, several schools
(including North Carolina) may
Soccer squad finds
success early this year
Photo by Harold Wise
ECU's 19-year-old quarterback, Marcus Crandell, answered his
critics with a commanding performance against Syracuse.
regret telling him toswitch positions.
Some "experts" thought he would
be better at intercepting passes than
throwing them. ,
"I think I proved toa lot of people
that I can play quarterback on the
college level Marcus said.
No doubter here.
Hey,Marcus, will you be ready
for next week?
"Yeah, I'll be ready he
whispered.
L
(SID) � ECU's soccer team
won their second match of the week-
end and went undefeated in their
own tournament by defeating
Marshall Sunday, 3-1.
ECU'sfirstgoalofthedaycame
in the first half by senior Zach Fine.
Fine's goal was unassisted.
Late in the second half, Dusty
Belk and Joel Lenk both scored
unassisted goals to put the Pirates
ahead for the day.
ECU'ssenior goalkeeper Bryan
DeWeeseplayed all90 minutes and
recorded nine saves.
East Carolina's record now
standsat3-l. On Wednesday, Sept.
15, the Pirates travel to meet the
Duke Blue Devils in Durham at 7
p.m.
On the first day of the ECU
, Tournament, the Pirates defeated
VMI, 5-1.
ECU scored no goals in the first
half, but came back in the second
half and scored all five goals.
Senior midfielder Zach Fine
scored first off an assist by sopho-
more midfielder DanStaton.Staton
went on to score ECU's next three
goals in a matter of six minutes.
Staton was assisted by Mike Beck,
Gary Boucher, and Zach Fine re-
spectively.
Freshman Chris Padgett fin-
ished off the Pirates' run with an
unassisted goal with two minutes
left in the match.
DanStatonnowhasfivegoals
and two assists for the season.
The Pirates suffered their first
loss of the 1993 season Wednes-
day, falling 6-0 to the University
of North Carolina.
Junior forward Ben DiMeo
led the Tarheels with two goals
and one assist. Four other North
Carolina players had one goal
each.
UNC's squad held the Pirates
to one shot by Dan Staton. UNC
amassed 22 shots of their own.
Photo by Harold Wise
ECU's has matched last year's
win total in just four games.
25. Virginia
Spikers still
struggling,
fall to 1-8
Richmond, Va. (SID) � On
the final day of the Virginia Com-
monwealth volleyball tourna-
ment, ECU lost two matches, both
in three straight games, moving
ECU's record to 1-8.
The Pirates met up with
Radford in game one and lost 15-
8,15-7, 15-7. In game two, ECU
played host team Virginia Com-
monwealth and lost 15-11,15-6,
15-6.
ECU returns home and hosts
NC State on Sept. 14 at 7 p.m.
On Wednesday, East
Carolina's volleyball team lost
its sixth match of the season to
UNC-Greensboro in Minges
Collesium. The Pirates lost in
three straight games, 6-15, 8-15,
6-15.
Leading ECU's offense was
freshman Carrie Brne with 10
kills, and Sarah Laurent, ECU's
setter, had 22 assists.
On defense for the Pirates,
Brne and Melanie Richards had
six digs each. Junior college trans-
fer Staci Winters had three solo
blocks and four assisted blocks.
high!
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
The debut package of running
backs Junior Smith and Jerris
McPhail is complete. As a duo, the
performance could be rated as sat-
isfactory inabattlethatwaslost41-
22 to Syracuse. Smith's number was
called on many more times than
expected and McPhail's was not as
much as expected.
Smith was outstanding, earn-
ing the ECU Player of the Game. He
stood tall and got a head start on
back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons.
He ran for 164 yards on 28 attempts
for an average of 5.9 yards.
This was McPhail's first game
in two years. The sophomore had
to sit out last season because he
transferred from Wake Forest. He
ran the ball three times for 11 yards,
and hisbright spot was four catches
for 47yards. However, he dropped
a pass in the endzone.
"It feels real good to be playing
again McPhail said. "I was real
nervous, really nervous. I haven't
seen that many people before com-
ing to watch a game in a while. I'm
disappointed with the loss, but it
was a good learning experience for
me. Hopefully, I can build on that.
I calmed down a little bit and could
have had a touchdown, but I blew
that and let my team down. I'm
going to bounce back and come
back strong
Because the Pirates fell be-
hind 14-0 early, the duo could not
see much action together because
the Bucs were forced to play catch-
up foofball.Smithsaid he felt they
were not able to use their total
package because they got behind.
Smith, a junior, only caught
one pass for three yards. Smith's
longest carry came in the second
quarter for 23 yards to help the
See BACKFIELD page 13
Men and Women show teamwork at Pembroke Invitational
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
On a beautiful day for running
in Pembroke, N.C. last Saturday,
EastCarolina'smen'sand women's
cross country teams turned in their
best performance of the young sea-
son.
The Lady Pirates, led by fresh-
men Tara and Dara Rhodes, took
the first five places in capturing
overall first place. Tara was first
with a time of 17:41, followed by
her twin sister Dava, who also
posteda 17:41,onlyafewhundreths
of a second behind.
They were followed by Stacy
Green with a 18:31, Catherine
Norstrand with a K .01 and yet an-
other Lady Pirate freshman, Cindy
Szymanski with a 19:16.
"We knew as far as the teams
were concerned, we were the best
going into the meet Assistant
Head Coach Charlie Justice said.
"We just didn't want them to know
that, and they all had impressive
legs
Most significant about the
women's race was the fact that the
team worked together in helping
eachotheroutbyrunninginapack.
"One of the brightest spots of
todav's race was that most of the
girls ran out of the pack and to-
gether Justice said.
After the group of five ECU
runners finished, several more Lady
Pirates crossed the line very close
together showing their teamwork.
Megan McGruder, Jessica Mont-
gomery, Theresa Marini and Kelly
Hanna all worked hard for ECU
and ran terrific races.
Several Lady Pirates turned in
their all-time personal best times in
the meet including the Rhodes sis-
ters. "The twins ran an exceptional
race, both had personal best times
Justice said. "Also Kelly Hanna
turned in her best ever time by a
good 30 to 40 seconds
The men also showed their to-
getherness in Saturday's race by
helping one anotheralong. Sean
Connolly led the way for the Pi-
rates with an overa U second place
finish a few hundreths of a sec-
ond out of first place with a time
of 20:16.
"I think Sean would 've won
had he known the course a little
better Justice said. "He sepa-
rated himself from the group
with one mile to go and the guy
just barely nipped him at the
line
All the men ran good races
up to the point thatCoach Justice
See X-COUNTRY page 12
HHMMM
jgj
�r





" Tim,
September 14. 1993
-that-
run h.
less tie in a � ifomia
at the Sky-Dome.
Thf vi:i kept the Blue Jays 112
games ahead of Baltimore and put
them two games in front of New
York in the AL East
"I'vebeen saying all season that
we have more hea rt on this d ub than
anv team I Ye been associated with
manager Cito Gaston said. "The
whole team is like that. Thev just
don't quit. I've tried to keep an even
keel
Ryan, returning from the dis-
abled list to start on a day in his honor,
was sharp after some early wildness,
but couldn't escape the sixth inning
in Minnesota's 4-2 victory at Texas.
The Rangers stayed 312 games be-
Look for
rian Olson's
Trivial Quiz
in the next
issue of The
East
Carolinian.
Prove hitn
wrong and
WINHIS
CAJxl (some
restrictions apply)
holds lead in AL
i- the AL V est-leading
it 6-3 to Detroit
a special day tor me. I'm
tolook forward to my life away
rrom baseball Rvan said. "Mv ca-
ertainly has surpassed any ex-
11 ms I liad. It'sbeena thrill pitch-
ing
David McCarty's two-run
double chased Ryan (5n with two
outs in the sixth, ending tl. Rangers'
six-game winning streak. Ryan struck
out three, walked five and allowed
four runs on four hi ts in 5 2 3 innings.
Kevin Tapani (9-14) dominated
the Rangers after giving up Juan
Gonzalez's career-high 110th RBI in
the first inning. Rick Aguliera pitched
the ninth for his 30th save.
The first-place Blue Jays lost a
three-game series at Anaheim last
weekend, and dropped three in a
row at home to Oakland before fi-
nally winning Friday.
Dave Stewart (9-8), forced to
leave after re-aggravating an injury
to his right groin.
Clemson to host NFL
CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) �
Clemson's Memorial Stadium will
be home for the Charlotte's pro-
posed NFL franchise, a school of-
ficial said Monday.
Tim Match, the assistant ath-
letic director of public relations,
said officials from Clemson and
Richardson Sports, the proposed
team's ownership group, would
officially announce the move at
an afternoon news conference to-
day.
"Obviously, we're very
pleased Clemson athletic direc-
tor Bobbv Robinson said. "It got
real serious at the end of the week
and it's final
Robinson said he talked with
Richardson Sports officials on
Thursday, Sunday and today.
Richardson Sports headed by
Spartanburg businessman Jerry
Richardson, was seeking a sta-
dium for the pro team to play its
first season in 1995. A new sta-
RU
will be holding
FALL RUSH
Sept. 14,15, a 16th
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over the weekend said he made a
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L I '�� "l"��JJ Ml





September 14, 1993
in the cheek sparks controversy
The Fast Carolinian 12
'tv. ew to expend ner-
vou . gy, especially when
the- pennant race going on, as
in tins night s game between the
Winston-Salem Spirits and the
Kinston Indians, both hoping tor
theClass A Carolina Leaguecrown.
If they chew, it's gum or sun-
ilower seeds now. Tobacco is
banned in the minor leagues, and
there's a heftv fine.
If players chitchat in the pauses
between pitches, the subject these
days might be that tough new rule,
how guys are coping with it � but
more titan that, whether it's fair,
whether it's "American who has
what rights, and how far being a
role model for kids reallv goes
In parks such as Winston-
Salem's, baseball's tobacco ban it-
self'has become something to chew
on.
Tobacco was always part of
baseball said Eric Owens, short-
stop for the Spirits, a farm team of
the Cincinnati Reds. Owens, who
grew up in Virginia tobacco coun-
try, expects a100 fine�about half
his weekly net pay � after his "dip
can" was spotted during a recent
locker nxim search
"This is supposed to be a free
country he said. "They can al-
- n vi �ur wal-
al tie said, the
I here
trad cards and delivered
free chews to clubs, and
where a chaw-packed cheek re-
lins Lin icon.
that's Hke caking Don
Mattingly and Wade Boggs � and
foe I HMaggio! �out of the game
said Owens, who on a 3-2 pitch in
the second inning poundedagrand
slam over an outfield fence lined
with cigarette, beer and other bill-
boards.
Given such advertising, the to-
bacco ban seems ironic to manv
players. It's also inconsistent, they
say, because major leaguers who
have greater influence on children
but are protected bv a powerful
union can chew with impunitv,
even on network television.
"All you hear is grumbling
said Greg Booker, chewing pea-
nuts across the field at the Indians'
dugout.
When the ban was imposed
lune 15, Major League Baseball of-
ficials gave as reasons players'
health and their status as role mi d-
eis for young fans Federal studies
have shown a sharp increase in
voungrnen suseotsnuff and chew-
ing tobacco, which research has
linked to disease.
Major league officials will not
say how manv players have been
fined for violations but believe the
ban is working, said Richard Levin,
a spokesman in New York.
"We do send people around"
to monitor compliance, but penal-
ties onlj tome after violations in
plain sight, he said.
For main players, breaking the
i id habit is lurd and makes them
irritable.
"I tried to quit for about two
weeks, and I got in fights with my
wife said Troy Buckley, a catcher
for the Spirits who started using
tobacco when he entered pro
baseball's instructional league four
years ago.
When the season's over, he'll
try again to quit. "I know it's bad
for me he said behind iridescent
sunglasses, his cap turned back-
ward.
The ban has made ballplavers
rethink being role models.
Buckley said it onlv reinforced
his feelings. Back when he carried
a snuff can in his uniform pocket
and a young fan would ask his
brand, he'd pretend not to hear.
"I wouldn't answer them he
said. "I don't want them to start
His teammate, third baseman
Bobbv Pema. holds baseball skills
clinics for kids and notices how they
regard players: "You walk up to
'em and see their eyesgertingbright.
You'd be surprised how much
kids listen
While urging young fans to
avoid bad habits, Perna considers
tobacco chewing "my right" and
sees no inconsistency. "I always
believed that if you forced a kid �
'Don't do this, don't do that' �
they're going to find a way to do it
anyway. You've got to buiid trust
Chewed-and-spit-out sun-
flower seeds line the dust along the
baselines and the concrete dugout
floors.
On the Indians' bench, coach
Danny Norman, spirting seeds as
he tries to break his tobacco habit,
said that in an off-season trucking
job, "they don't care what you
look like, what you wear, as long
as you make that freight But put
on a baseball uniform and, yes,
you're something different.
"We as American people,
we're the ones who put the ath-
letes on a pedestal rather than the
police officer or the doctor
Norman said. "Itshouldn'tbe that
way, but that's the way it is
What bothers him is the dis-
parity that the tobacco ban reveals
between nonunion minor league
players and those in the majors,
where he spent five years.
"Baseball's like a fraternity,
what's good for one is good for
all he said. "The pitcher's mound
is 60 feet, six inches away, the
bases are 90 feet. Except, we take
bus rides and they fly And big
leaguers cannot be told what to
chew.
X-COUNTRY
Continued from page 10
expected. Senior trie Adamski,
along with upper classmen Mark
Mathis and Mike iollev held the
group together and pushed the
freshmen into well run perfor-
mances.
"The upper classmen took out
from the get go and made things a
Iittleeasieras a group Justice said.
"They took the pressure off the
freshmen and smoothed tilings out
for even one
The whole team showed much
improvement from last year at this
point and with the season very
young, coachesand runnersare en-
excited about this vear -conference
race.
MEN
POINTS
l.Duke
2. Citadel
3. ECU
4. Charleston South.
5. C. of Charleston
6. NC A&T
20
70
78
89
122
183
WOMEN
POINTS
1.ECU 15
2. Charleston South. 58
3. C.of Charleston 64
4. NCA&T 110
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
u hile you wail
Free & Confidential
Sen ices & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
ALFREDO'S
NEW YORK STYLE (gSp;
CONSIGNMENT SHOP
� Quality Furniture
� Accessories
� Clothing (New and Used)
� Household Items
10-5 Tues-Fri
10-2 Sat
924 Dickinson Ave, Greenville
752-2139
2 large large
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'til midnight 'til midnight
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'til midnight j
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DELIVERY
218 E.
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'752.0022
ECU'S
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RUSH
SIGMA PI
10th Street
CAMPUS
5th Street
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Down
Town
SGA JUDICIAL
BRANCH
SORORITY
HOUSE
(in RUSH)
fc
ALPHA DELTA PI
SORORITY
HOUSE
Sept
14-17
757-0707
752-0184
Is Accepting Applications for the Academic Year 1993-94
The following Positions are available:
HONOR & REVIEW BOARD MEMBER
All applicants will be screened
by the SGA Executive Council.
REQUIREMENTS:
2.0 Grade Point Average
Good Standing with the University
Applications Available At:
Secretary's Office (255 Mendenhall Student Center)
Attorney General's Office (236 Mendenhall Student Center)
DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS:
FRI SEPT 17,1993
5:00 pin
sn in in m m m zn zn.





an
September 14, 1993
GAME
Continued from page 10
Montreal over-shadowed
rEAM STATISTICS
ECU
intne
e allowed
del twice,
out pis erall.
Mark Libiano held the spot-
light on ECU's defense, recording
1 tackles. The sophomore line
backer had two less tackles than
ECU's entire defensive line.
I assing
Penal ty
Att
Gained
Lost
Net
AH,
AH
Comp
3
41
248
225
5.48
SU
20
13
0
37
207
22
185
SL
ECU
41
14 7 7 13
0 16 0 6 �22
First Quarter
SU: Shelby Hill. 27-vard pass from Marvin
Graves(PjtO'Will kick), 4:47. Drive: lupkn s,
80 yards, 5:10. SU 7. ECU 0
SU: Marvin Harrison, 57-vard pass from
Graves (O'Neill kick), :45. Drive: 2 plavs, 57
yards. 16 seconds. SU 14, ECU 0
Second Quarter
ECU. Morris Letcher, 16-vard pass from
Crandell(Holcombkick), 10:13. Drive:9plavs,
63 yards, 2:59. SU 14, ECU 7
SU: Graves 3-yard run (O'Neill kick), 2:56.
Drive: 7 plays,45 yards, 3:47. SU 21, ECU 7
ECU: Letcher. 18-yard pass from Crandell
(Holcomb kick failed), 10:13. Drive: 9 plavs,
63 yards, 2:59. SU 21, ECU 13
ECU: Holcomb, 43-yard field goal :12. Drive:
6 plays, 16 yards, 1:03. SU 21, ECU 16.
Tliini Quarter
SU: Graves, 4-yard run (O'Neill kick), 7:21.
Drive: 10 plays85 yards, 1:03. SU 28, ECU 16
Fourth Quarter
SU: Al Wooten, 1-yard run (O'Neill kick),
14:57. Drive: 8 plavs, 79 yards, 3:23. SU 35,
ECU 16
ECU: Junior Smith, 7-yard run (run failed),
11:29. Drive: 9 plavs, 71 yards, 3:28. SU 35
ECU 22
SU: Graves, 38-yard run (pass intercepted),
7:37. Drive: 7plavs, 79 vards,3:52.SU41, ECU
22
BACKFIELD
Pirates drive to score their second
touchdown. Smith improved this
year's performance against Syra-
cuse compared to last year's seven
carries for six yards.
"Junior is a quality back Head
Coach Steve Logan said. "I think
Junior would start for Syracuse or
anybody in the country. He can
play the game and he keeps our
Net
INTs
Total Oft Plays
Total Net Yards
AVG. Play
Return Yards
Fumbles-lost
Penalties-yards
INTs-yards
Punts-yards
AVG
Punt Retyards
KO Retyards
Time of Poss.
3rd down Con.
Sacks-yards
33 30
13 20
39.3 66.6
173 329
1 0
74 67
421 514
5.69 7.67
9 8
3-0 3-2
10-95 6-79
0-0 1-0
8-313 6-247
39.1 41.2
3-9 2-8
3-63 4-82
29:09 30:51
4-17 5-12
1-13 2-14
PLAYER STATISTICS
Field goals: ECU (Holcomb 43, 38-) SU (none)
ECU1 rushing: Smith 28-164, Crandell 6-32, Wil-
son 2-13, McPhail 3-11, Blanton 2-5
SL rushing: Dar Dar7-67,Graves9-44, Richardson
7-36, Wooten 7-19, Lee 5-16, Willis 1-3
ECU passing: Crandell 13 of 33 for 173 yards, 2
TDs.lINT
SL' passing: Graves 20-27 for 329 yards, 2 TDs, 0
INT
ECU receiving: Grumpier 3-60, Letcher 449,
McPhail 4-17, A. Williams 1-14, Smith 1-3
SU receiving: Harrison 7-180, Hill 9-116.
Richardson 3-18, Chenoweth 1-15
ECU tackles leaders (solos-asst-tot): Libiano 9-7-
16, Dav. Hart 6-3-9, Cooke 34-7, Foreman 1-6-7,
Crane 0-7-7
SL tackles leaders (solos-asst-tot): Bevill 9-1-10,
Tarker 84343, Thomas 4-3-7, Mitcheil 4-2-6 Jones
4-04
Kickoff. 8:01 p.m. End: 11:42 pm. Total Time: 3:41.
Temperature: 82c. Wind: 5-10 mph out of SW.
Weather dear
Continued from page 10
offense balanced
Look for this dynamic pack-
age to unload next weekend when
the Pirates host Div. I-AA Central
Horida. Look for more of Smith
carrying the ball and McPhail catch-
ing screen passes.
The Pirates offense should be
able to explode over a weak Knight
defense.
(AP)�While Atlanta's run at
San Francisco in the NL West has
been well chronicled over the past
few weeks, Montreal's surge in
the East is just starting to earn
rave reviews.
The Expos, who trailed the
Phillies by 14 12 games Aug. 20,
won for the 15th time in 16 games
� while Philadelphia lost 9-2 to
Houston on Sunday. Montreal has
gained 9 1 2 games in 24 days.
It's a relief to manager Felipe
Alou, who until recently-could have
been forgiven had he accepted the
role of also-ran.
"We had to suffer through
three months of seeing Philadel-
phia score five in the first inning
he said when asked about
scoreboard-watching. "It's about
time to see it the other way
Meanwhile, St. Louis manager
Joe Torre saysa failure to believe in
themselves may be hurting the Gi-
ants � who until losing five of six
to the Braves in the last month
appeared a shoo-in.
"Their lack of confidence is
what's hurting the Giants Torre
said after the Cardinals won 4-2
Sunday, sending San Francisco to
its season-high fifth straight loss.
The Cardinals' sweep was their
first in a four-game set against the
Giants since 1957 at the Polo
Grounds in New York. At least the
Giants didn't lose ground Sunda v.
The Braves lost 5-4 at San Diego
and lead the division by a game.
Friends of Sheppard Memorial Library
BOOK SALE
September 17, 18, & 19
at The Plaia Mall (next to J. C. Penney)
More Than 5,000 Used Books: 25t-$5
Fiction � Biographies � Literature � Romance
m, ol7j Cookbooks � History � How To's
� Children's Books � Dictionaries � Sports
� National Geographies 1910-90
Friday & Saturday 10-9, Sunday 1-6
THERE ARE THREE SIXES,
666
ON EVERYTHING YOU BUY.
fire You fiware of
Whotls Unfolding?
A Slide Presentation of the Evidence
Mcndcnhall Room 242
7:30 p.m. Sept 15,16
(Refreshments)
Apostolic Campus Ministry
TUESDAYS
SilverBullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
AmateurNightfor Female Dancers11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE
�Qmtotaiifc �rf (o oiH & ngistcr in dma. Miul amor by MO
THURSDAYS -SATURDAYS
SilverBullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
Dancers wanted
TcuUe&U
SIKwBuMBartandar
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00OFF Admission AnyNighttvfiscoupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time9:00pm
Call75f6278
ECU lo
tr��ld'Sj
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Dickinson A
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
JOIN THE STUDENT STORES
AS WE GO GREEK!
MONDAY SEPT. 20th
9 am-3 pm
Greek Venders will be Displaying
of Samples All Your Greek
Paraphenalia!
T-SHIRTS � SWEATSHIRTS � HATS
KEYCHAINS � PADDLES
MUGS � CALENDERS
STICKERS � LICENSE PLATES
ARE YOU MOVIN' UP WITH
ECU STUDENT UNION?
September 22 & 26
From ihk Director
o i ta r k m a in"
Trapped in lime Surrounded by evil.
Low on gas
ARMiV
DARKNESS
R
REACHING OUT TO SERVE YOU !
The Visual Arts Committee Presents.
eniitat
Student Stores
ECU Student Stores: More than just books�
your dollars support student scholars
Located inWright Building � 757-6731 � Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
and
Sku-CHina f&
September 26 - October 23
(CuCtural'Awareness '71 'eekj
Reception: October 4
7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Wenhai Ma and his wife, Shu-Ching Ma were both trained in
China and the US , and have both experienced
successful artistic careers in varied
fields of interest.
All films start at 8:00
and are FREE with
valid ECU I.D. for
students, staff,
and faculty.
FOR MORE
INFORMATION,
CALL 757-6004.
THE FOLKS WHO BRING YOU BAREFOOT
-





����� �
- i�
ECU'S 1 Fraternity
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
A lodge, a crest, a handshake - none of these things
km
ever made a fraternity. The things that are
� seen are merely the beginning. The invisible
things - the brotherhood, the friendship, the
loyalty, the honor are the foundation. Together
they develop the fraternity and strengthen the
individual. Sigma Phi Epsilon is not looking
for just anyone. We
are searching for
a man who is willing to
commit himself to the principles and
goals of our fraternity. A man who wants to
associate with an outstanding brotherhood. We
are looking to the future - your future and our future.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
TOMORROW'S FRATERNITY TODAY
SEPTEMBER 14-17
Subs, Pizza, and
Hors d'oeuvres
will be served
during RUSH.
is
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&
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IMUM
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W"
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Jtrr
MS
nnim
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win
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iL
Best Location On Campus
HEY CHASE, ARE YOU HAPPY NOW?
CALL 757-0487 or 757-0305 or 830-9647 or 830-9646
For Information or A Ride





Title
The East Carolinian, September 14, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 14, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.959
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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