The East Carolinian, September 9, 1993






�� ���
wareness
Lifestyle
The Man Without A Face'
Actor Mel Gibson
moves to the other side
of the camera and tries
his hand at direct in
See story on page
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 40
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, September 9,1993
18 Pages
Health Services charges for all medications
By Jason Williams
Health Services
medications. In
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
has altered its services this year to allow for extended hours and a wider variety of
return, students will pay a minimal fee for over-the-counter drugs.
Staff Writer
Students who get sick this
semester will notice a change in
the Student Health Services. In ad-
dition to extending its hours,
Health Services has begun charg-
ing for its over-the-counter phar-
macy medications.
"We've started charging for
our pharmacy, as most all schools
charge for their over-the-counter
medicine. Because of this we are
able to offer more medicines at
reduced charges said Kay
VanNortwick, Director of Student
Health Sen-ices.
All over-the-counter items
now cost SI. Health Services offers
a range of analgesics, antihista-
mines, decongestants and other
popular pharmaceutical items.
New this vear are antacids, diar-
rhea suppressants and medica-
tions for nausea and motion sick-
ness.
VanNortwick said the $1 per
item does not necessarily reflect
cost.
"For a bottle of Robirussin,
Campus plans
cover all aspects
we pay more than a dollar. For the
Tylenol, we don't. We try to in-
clude popular and affordable
medications.
"What prompted this action
was that we received a written
complaint from a student who re-
sented the fact that some students
were shocking up on free medicine
that he paid for with his student
health fee VanNortwick said.
"The student health fee basi-
cally pays salaries for the doctors,
nurses, psychologist, psychiatrist
and administrative personnel. The
medicine comes more through
state grants
Prescription drugs will now
cost $2.50, although the doctor's
visit will still be free.
"Before, when students
didn't pay for it, some thought our
prescription drugs were of an in-
ferior quality. It's the same thing,
of course, whether it's prepared
by ECU pharmacists or someone
else VanNortwick said.
Other changes in Health Ser-
vices include changes in the hours
of operation and the way in which
appointments are made. Appoint-
parkin
ments have been extended an
hour since last semester and are
now scheduled from 8:00-5:30
on weekdays. Weekend urgent
care hours have been changed
from 2 p.m4p.m. to 10 a.ml
a.m.
Students are asked to
scheduleappointments for non-
urgent health concerns. If a stu-
dent requesting care has not
made an appointment, he or she
will be referred to the triage sys-
tem. A triage nurse will assess
the student's illness andor in-
jury and determine whether he
or she requires urgent care,
same-day care by appointment,
a visit with the nurse or an ap-
pointment at a later time.
"We try to serve the
student's needs VanNortwick
said. "Westay abreastof changes
in student health care needs. We
also serve health education and
wellness needs. As part of an
educational institution, we have
an educational motive as well.
We want to teach students how
to take care of themselves after
graduation
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
Todd Dining Hall is only the
tip of the iceberg of changes called
"The Visions Plan" that ECU stu-
dents will witness during the next
two decades.
ECU has embarked on a 20-
year plan to create a more distin-
guished campus environment,
provide more completely for the
needs of students and faculty mem-
bers and strengthen the relation-
ship with the city of Greenville.
The changes are an attempt
to make the university "a more
friendly, pleasurable experience
for students, faculty, and potential
students said Richard Brown,
vice chancellor of business affairs.
Many of the major repairs
and renovations are the result of
deferred maintenance when fund-
ing was low, Brown said.
The changes are a drive
to make this a serious university
a first-class institution that can at-
tract the very best in students
said Bruce Five, director of facili-
ties and managing designer for the
project.
Five projected overall enroll-
ment to be 20,000 by early in the
next decade, with more growth in
the doctorate and masters level
programs.
The Visions Plan began three
years ago. With the input of stu-
dents, faculty, staff, trustees and
members of the community, The
EastCarolina University Compre-
hensive Facilities Master Plan de-
veloped in 1992
The renovations outlined in
this plan are divided into three
phases. Phase one projects are cur-
rently underway, and scheduled
for completion within five years.
Phase one began in July 1992,
and includes the new Todd Dining
Hall located on College Hill, reno-
vations of Slay and Umstead resi-
dence halls, renovationsof Minges
Coliseum, and the demolition of
the green garage located on cen-
tral campus.
The expansion of Joyner Li-
brary and the acquisition of the old
Rose High School property are also
B -heduled to begin during phase
one as long as the bond issue
passes in November.
"TT-ie tibrarv expansion will
be 165,000 square feet towards
Tenth Street, and will house 1.4
million new books, 100 faculty
study carrels, and additional com-
puting and telev ision studio space.
"The library will become the
information hub of the campus
Brown said.
A 10th Street entrance simi-
lar to the one on Fifth Street will be
built at the new library, and a new
road will connect the library to the
Slay and Umstead parking area.
Phase one also includes the
construction of the new Student
Recreation Center. The Recreation
Center was approved on Aug. 15,
and construction will begin in late
fall or early in the spring semes-
ter.
The center, which will in-
clude six multi-purpose courts,
three aerobic studios, a large
weight room, an indoor track, rac-
quetball and squash courts, in-
door golfarchery facilities and
indoor and outdoor pools, is
scheduled to open for the fall se-
mester of 1995.
The university plans to make
the main campus pedestrian only,
so commuting students who
choose not to ride the bus will
park at satellite lots and take the
shuttles, which currently run ev-
ery 10 minutes from Minges to
campus. The lots on Reade Street
will be paved and expanded, and
several small lots will be paved
and consolidated in order to pro-
vide additional spaces.
College Hill will also be
closed at 10th Street in order to
eliminate much of the congestion
at that entrance. A loop will be
built through the Hill with paral-
lel parking throughout, and a 14th
Street entrance will be opened
during phase two.
Phase two projects are
scheduled for completion during
the next six to 15 years. Highlights
for phase two include an addition
to and renovation of the Jenkins
See PLAN page 2
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
If you are a commuter, you
know the problems that students
face when they look for a parking
space. The new student transit
svstem offers a solution to this
problem that has been successful
this semester.
Parking and Traffic Services
has set up a shuttle schedule that
carries students from designated
parking areas at Minges Coliseum
to Christenbury Gymnasium ev-
ery ten minutes from 7:30 a.m.
until 2 p.m and every 20 minutes
from 2 p.m. until 5:30 p.m
According to Patricia Gertz,
director of Parking and Traffic
Services, the two parking areas
on Ficklen Drive designated as
the blue and gold parking areas
are for commuters. Freshmen still
have parking areas at the East
end of the Minges parking lot, at
the bottom of the hill.
"I am surprised and thrilled
that it has worked as well as it
has Gertz said.
Ryland Walters, head of the
transit system, said that many stu-
dents are already using the new
commuter service. He said that
there are about three times more
people using the shuttle bus than
were previously expected.
Gertz said that part of the
transit's success was due to the
way Parking and Traffic Services
regulated parking stickers.
"Anyone with 31 or less
hours as a commuter is restricted
to limited parking permits that
are valid only in Ficklen parking
lot until four in the afternoon
Gertz said. "After four, anyone
with a University registered ve-
hicle can park in the regular com-
muter lots on campus
The great part of the transit
system is that parking stickers for
the Ficklen parking lot are only
$30, as opposed to the $70 sticker
See TRANSIT page 5
Photo by Harold Wise
The transit system is providing a less expensive way for students to
get to class.You can save $40 on a parking sticker with the service.
Suzuki teaches children
By Maureen Rich
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Frank Salamon, Ronald Speier and Fred Bissinger cut the ribbon at
yesterday's grand reopening of The Spot.
Mendenhall hits The Spot
By Lisa Dawson
Staff Writer
The Spot, the newly reno-
vated snack area within the
Mendenhall StudentCenter, cel-
ebrated its grand reopening with
a ribbon cutting and cake
Wednesday, Sept. 8.
Special guests at the rib-
bon cutting were: Frank
Salamon, Director of Dining Ser-
vices; Dr. Alfred T. Matthews,
Vice-Chancellor of Student Life;
Ron Speier, Director of Students;
Rudolph Alexander, Director of
University Unions; and Betty
Hardy, Director of Mendenhall
Student Center.
"The Mendenhall Student
Center snack area needed a sepa-
rate identitv, and as such, The
See SNACK page 5
Assistant News Editor
ECU welcomed a diverse
age group to campus this sum-
mer, when children and adults
from North Carolina and across
the U.S. participated in the 10th
aru.ual North Carolina Suzuki
Institute, hosted by the ECU
School of Music.
About 225 students and
their parents took part in a five-
day intensive program, July 11-
15, focused on teaching and
maintaining music as an inte-
gral part of one's life, said Rob-
ert L. Hause, professor at ECU's
School of Music and co-director
of this year's program.
Joanne Bath, of Greenville,
is the program coordinator of
the Suzuki Institute.
"It was a very wonderful
summer Hause said. "It was
very intense, but we had fun
The faculty, traveling from
as far west as Washington state,
as far south as Florida, and
known nationally in Suzuki
pedagogy, taught in the style
first introduced by Dr. Shinichi
Suzuki in Japan.
"Dr. Suzuki believed
in the idea that children can
learn all kinds of things
Hause said. "Suzuki's style
encourages parents to expose
children to music, and they'll
learn it just like they learn their
own language
While the teaching tech-
nique is adapted primarily to
violin, the ultimate outcome
is aimed at improving
children's lives and helping
them grow up to be better in-
dividuals, Hause said.
"Research has shown
that children who study mu-
sic at a young age are able to
learn it just like their mother
language Hause said.
While the week-long pro-
gram consists of three- and
five-hour sessions, depending
upon the participants' ages,
faculty members do not steer
the children toward a career
in the music field.
"Our �,oal is not to create
professional musicians
See SUZUKI page 5
f"
��i





September 9, 1993
fi
' U
lupuses
Hayfever sufferers can make money
Survi
ilsalcohol on campus top health scourge
cam-
nsequence
tearl) hall the students
surveyed admitted recent i rior to the survey.
Forty-two percent I " tudy imbibed five
ur more drinks in one sitti ned by the studv i binge
drinking, in the two weeks before they were surveyed. The
study, titled "Alcohol and Drugs on American College Cam-
puses: Lse, Consequences, and Perceptions of the Campus
Environment is the most comprehensive look at chemical
dependency among young people in the nation's historv. offi-
cials said. "This report is a challenge to every college adminis-
trator to find more effective ways to discourage dangerous,
irresponsible, and in some cases, illegal behavior said Richard
VV. Riley, U.S. Secretarv of Education, when the research was
released to the press earlier this year. While there has been
speculation that males are heavier drinkers than females, the
survey documents this as fact. About 28 percent of male stu-
dents consumed 10 or more drinks a week, and 10 percent had
21 or more drinks in a typical seven-day period. In contrast,
about 12 percent of women downed 10 or more drinks a week,
while only two percent drank as many as 21 drinks in one week.
Report: top boozers in northeastern schools
The comprehensive "Alcohol and Drugs on American
Campuses" survey disclosed regional alcohol drinking patterns
throughout the countrv for the first time. The heaviest collegiate
drinking takes place in the Northeast, with the average student
consuming 7.1 drinks of liquor, beer or wine per week and 53
percent admitting that they indulged in binge drinking in the
two weeks before being surveyed, the studv said. Students in
the South report quaffing 3.9 drinks per week with 35 percent
saying that they did binge drinking in the two-week period.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
CORRECTION
A story on Sept. 2 incorrectly noted the donation of a rare
map. The map was actually found in the attic of Mrs. John
Graham of Edenton. Mrs. Graham donated it to the ECU
Manuscripts Collection. Reproductions of the map are lo-
cated in Special Collections, as a project of Friends of the
Library.
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
The East Caro'ina School of
Medicine will be conducting a
studv at Lake Laupus on Sept.
18th and 19th, in order to test the
effectiveness of a new hayfever
nasal drug developed bv Glaxo.
Participants in the study will
spend twodavs fitting in the park
beside the School of Medicine.
This area is infested with ragweed
(the substance that irritates
hayfever).
The School of Medicine is
looking for 100 people with hay
fever to participate.
"We're looking for those
who usually take over the counter
antihistamines for their allergy
symptoms said Dr James
Metzger, section head for allergy
in the Department of Medicine.
Participants will spend the
weekend at Lake Laupus. One
third will be treated with theGlaxo
drug, one third with a standard
prescribed drug and the rest will
have to tough it out with a pla-
cebo. A staff of over twenty-five
people will be monitoring the par-
ticipants' condition throughout
the weekend.
The purpose of the studv is
to test the nasal drug's effective-
ness.
"We want to determine how
fast it works, and how well said
Metzger.
Unlike most prescription
antihistamines, the new drug from
Glaxo contains no steroids. East
Carolina School of Medicine and
five other centers across the coun-
try are testing the drug.
Breakfast and lunch will be
provided both days along with
musical entertainment that in-
cludes a blue-grass band and a
barbershop quartet. Organized
events such as volleyball and a
raffle will be held. Glaxo is pay-
ing each participant SI 80 to com-
plete the study.
Those interested should be
atleasttwelvevearsold and have
a history of fall hay fever. The
allergists do not want partici-
pants who also have a historv of
asthma to register.
Participants will be re-
quired to have a checkup and
interview before and after the
studv is completed. To receive
more information, and to regis-
ter for the "park studv" call 816-
3424 or 816-3426.
Protests threaten to disturb Middle East Peace
JERUSALEM (AP) � Police
used a water cannon and clubsearlv
today tobreakupa right-wing dem-
onstration bv tens of thousands of
Israelis who were protesting a plan
for Palestinian self-rule. Police said
45 people were injured.
Also today Israel's Supreme
Court issued a ruling that was ex-
pected to initiate a political crisis for
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin's rul-
ing coalition, threatening the future
of the Middle East peace talks.
The five-member court panel
asked Rabin to fire a minister and a
deputv minister who are under in-
vestigation forcorruption. The two,
Interior Minister Aryeh Deri and
Deputy Minister of Religious Af-
fairs Rafael Pinchasi, belong to the
PLAN
ultra-Orthodox Shas Party.
Shas has threatened to bolt
Rabin's ruling coalition if Deri and
Pinchasi are fired. Shas has six seats
in the 120-seat Parliament.
Without Shas, Rabin could
continue to rule with a thin one-
vote margin since his coalition
would still control 56 seats and have
the support of five Arab legislators
who are not part of the coalition.
But Shas' departure would
rob Rabin of his Jewish majority for
making peace with the Arabs and
weaken his ability to grant conces-
sions in the peace talks.
It also might hasten elections,
which are not scheduled for three
years.
The anger that Rabin faces
Continued from page 1
Fine Arts Center, construction of a
new Science Laboratory and Tech-
nology building, a new field house
to be located on the Rose High
property, a new Academic Re-
searchLaboratory building where
Christianburv Gym stands now,
an addition to Fletcher Music Cen-
ter, and a new parking garage lo-
cated near Joyner Library,
Mendenhali Student Center and
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Chapter 2
Well, that was a lot of help,
wasn't it?
I stood on the sidewalk out-
side The Drunken Boar, smoking a
cigarette. Father Time Beerstein's
main establishment was like any
other in the Brewery, scarred wood
on the outside from the hundreds
of brawls at night and an even
worse interior from the never-end-
ing parade of drunks.
'Stein was sitting in a booth
when I walked in, flanked by two
guys who looked like their upper
body had absorbed pretty much all
of the space between it and the
head. No long-necks here, if you
know what I mean. They both
stepped forward to meet me, but
stopped when Father Time raised
his crone-like hand. "Hammered
he croaked, "it's been a long time.
Have a seat
"Not long enough I replied
as I sat on the edge of the booth,
ready for any move Time's bud-
dies might make. "Enough small
talk. What do vou know about Al
Cohol?"
"Not a whole lot. The guy's
been around the Brewery for a long
time, though. Even longer than me,
if you can believe that 'Steinbroke
into a coughing fit, eventually
wheezing and gasping like a fish
out of water. "Sounds like I might
not be here much longer, doesn't
it? Better than you have thought as
much he said, slipping me a
toothy grin.
"Whatever. Exactly when did
he start showing his face in the
Brewery?"
"Got me He saw the look on
my face and sobered up pretty
quick. "Seriously, when I got into
town, the guy was everywhere. I
asked about him, but nobod y cou Id
seem to agree on where he came
from. Some said he was a gift from
the gods, others said he may even
be a god himself. But I have yet to
see the guv who could face down a
bullet He grinned another grin. I
didn't grin back.
The Brewery.
A place where dreams are made and unmade, lives are turned upside
down and a drink is a drink. A place where you kept one hand on your ivallct
and one eye on the guy across the street. Basically, a place
V! where a man can forget his troubles and drown his
? 7&L sorrows for a while.
Mick Hammered had sworn never to set foot
in the Brewery again. Setting out to find his old
friend Al Cohol, Mick finds himself up to his neck
in the seedy and fermented world of the Brewery.
Every Thursday in The East Carolinian, Mick
-will meet a character who will expose Al in a whole new light. When it's finally
over and done with, Mick�and the reader�will be faced with one of the most
important questions either has ever faced.
What place does Al Cohol have in my life?
The Case of the Ten Beers
"Gritty, realistic. Hammered is the ultimate in tough, comparable to
Spillane's Hammer and Hammett's Spade
Joel Keggsy, The Beersborough Gazette
EAST
CAROLINIAN
"After a couple of years of
getting to know the people, I'd see
him everywhere. Parties, where
people work, at their houses �
you name it, the guy was there.
Pretty soon, he was almost indis-
pensable. People were using him
to cure their sickness, to cheer them
up�for anything and everything.
There was always a demand,
though. No doubt about that
He seemed finished, but I had
one more thing to ask. "Where is
he now?"
"Who knows? I'm not kid-
ding when I say this guy was ev-
erywhere. One night you'd see him
at a party, the next day in some
slob's medicine cabinet. If this
guy's been around as long as some
people say � and some say he
started as early as the Old Stone
Age�hecould have thousands of
hiding places. So your guess is as
good as mine, Hammered
I stood up, adjusted my fe-
dora and walked between Time's
two glaring bodyguards. As I
reached for thedoor, Father Time's
scratchy voice stopped me.
"You know, Hammer, I prob-
ably shouldn't say this, what with
my reputation and all The hair
on the back of my neck started to
rise. "If you really want to find this
Cohol, try the Guru. That guy
knows stuff that scares even me
I tipped my fedora to the old guy,
who shrugged it off and went back
to his drink.
So here I was, standing on a
street corner, figuring out my next
move. The sun hung low in the
sky,causing the riffraff of the Brew-
ery to walk a little faster in antici-
pation of the night. I'd almost got-
ten used to these people again �
they had a certain flavor and smell
about them that was like returning
to an old friend. Except this old
friend had stabbed me in the back.
I flicked my cigarette into the
gutter and walked around my car
to get in. Next stop O Great
Guru.
U H . H Fv:
BITS
Z04 L 5TH ST.
752-6953
was underlined by the demonstra-
tion, in which government leaders
were denounced as "traitors Po-
lice spokesman Shmuel Ben-Ruby
said 50,000 turned out for the pro-
test, but organizers claimed hun-
dreds of thousands. Thirty-three
people were arrested.
The right-wing Likud bloc
along with militant settlers and the
ultra-religious Chabad movement
organized the demonstration as part
of a campaign to force new elec-
tions.
"This is the opening round in
an unprecedented struggle Likud
leader Binyamin Netanyahu told
the rally Tuesday night.
Knesset, is expected to begin re-
viewing the plan on Thursday.
But it is unlikely that either the
protests or the political crisis
would stop the process or roll
back the agreement.
"It will not bring peace, it
will bring more terror, more ter-
ror, more terror. It is laying the
ground work for the next war he
said.
Rabin's Cabinet has ap-
proved the plan to begin self-rule
in the Gaza Strip and West Bank
town of Jericho and is trying to
work out details of mutual recog-
nition with the PLO before next
week's hoped-for signing of the
agreement.
the new Student Recreation Cen-
ter.
Long-range plans include the
demolition of Jones, Aycock and
Scott residence halls, the construc-
tion of new residence halls as
deemed necessary at the time, con-
struction of a new dining facility or
expansion of the Croatan, and the
construction of a new Student
Union.
c
GRAND OPENING SPECIALS NOW THRU SEPT 18
)
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September 9, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
hevy Chase joins the late night talk test
i
till not
t. hevy
impeted
ne ChaseSiiov " de-
butd riesd;5 rtighton Fox
Broadcasting Co.
Outtrolled Chisedapper
in anavybkasuitlinepocket
squ.ire.
"If I knewyou were going to
be this enthusiastic, I would have
rehearsed he told the cheering
audience.
Chase's show often hark-
ened back to his "Saturday Night"
glory days, when he established
t as a member of the NBC
riginal "Not Ready for
metime Players" before jump-
in to what proved to be a tepid
; i areer.
I uesday night's show was a
mix of traditional late-night fare
� he chatted with guests Goldie
Hawn and VVhoopi Goldberg �
and some comic bits intended to
fulfill his promise to stretch the
traditional talk show boundaries.
Before they saw Chase on
stage, audience members watched
him do a takeoff of the old Senor
VVences routine from the Ed
Sullivan show, turning his hand
into a puppet that appeared to
spit up in the direction of the
camera.In a taped sequence, he
took a tumble into wet concrete
while supposedly trying to leave
his Hollywood-style handprint.
He also reprised the satirical
news reports tha t ga ined him fame
on "Saturday Night" in 1975-76.
In a gag borrowed from his old
routine, there was Chase, inter-
rupted by the camera while talk-
ing on the phone to a girlfriend.
"Good evening. I'm Chevy
Chase and there he trailed off,
letting viewers supply the
punchline, "and you're not
"Our top story: Generalis-
simo Francisco Franco, still dead
he said in another blast from the
past for those who recalled how
much mileage Chase got from the
protracted death of the Spanish
dictator.
He also mixed in the'new
and equally irreverent.
"While performing a concert
in Singapore, pop star Michael was
taken by surprise when the audi-
ence spontaneously broke into
song, wishing him a happv 35th
birthday Chase said. "Before
continuing his performance, the
singer was heard to say 'Even
though I just turned 35,1 still feel
like a 13-year-old
Chase's show, which airs at
11 p.m. in most markets, has a 35-
minute head start on CBS' "The
Late Show with David Letterman"
and NBC's "The Tonight Show
with Jay Leno In a display of
pinpoint bombing, his news up-
date will run nightly just as Leno
and Letterman are launching into
their opening monologues.
Also vying for shares of the
nearly $700 million late-night ad-
vertising purse are ABC's
" N ightline" with Ted Koppel and
the syndicated "Arsenio Hall
Show
Judge rules lesbian is not fit
RICFIMOND, Va. (AP)�In
a ruling that unsettled gay-rights
activists, a judge declared a
lesbian's "immoral" relationship
with her live-in lover makes her
an unfit parent and denied her
custody of her 2-year-old son.
The case pitted 23-year-old
Sharon Bottoms against her own
mother, Kay Bottoms, who had
argued that her grandson would
grow up unable to tell the differ-
ence between men and women if
he were raised by two lesbians.
Circuit Judge Buford Par-
sons ruled Tuesday that Sharon
Bottoms' relationship with April
Wade "renders her an unfit
parent'He also noted that Ms.
Bottoms had admitted engaging
in oral sex, a felony in Virginia.
"In the opinion of this court, her
conduct is immoral he said.
Upholding a Juvenile
Court order awarding custody
of Tyler Doustou to the boy's
grandmother, Parsons said the
"extraordinary nature" of Ms.
Bottoms' deficiency as a parent
outweighed the legal presump-
tion in favor of keeping mother
and child together.
"It's the kind of case that
strikes terror in people's hearts
� makes them wonder, 'Could
this happen to me? said Liz
Hendr ickson, executive director
of the National Center for Les-
bian Rights in San Francisco. She
denounced the ruling as "just
based on bigotry
Ms. Bottoms and Ms. Wade
wept and embraced outside the
courthouse. Neither they nor
Kay Bottoms would talk to re-
porters.
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September 9, 1993
German tourist
killed in Miami
Governor expresses distress
tourist d
Miami airport was killed early
today by a gunman tiring trom a
van that had repeatedly bumped
his rental ear from behind, police
aid.
Seven other foreign visitors,
three of them Germans, have been
slain in robberies or robbery at-
tempts in Florida since last Octo-
ber.
When the attack began soon
after midnight, theman's wife was
reading a safety-tip pamphlet that
car-rental agencies started giving
to tourists this spring. One of the
tips warns people not to stop driv-
ing if bumped from behind.
Killed was Uwe-Wilhelm
Rakebrand, 33, of Adendorf, Ger-
many, said police spokesman
Angelo Bitsis. The 27-year-old
wife's name was not released, and
Bitsis declined to comment on re-
ports that she is four months preg-
nant.
The couple picked up their
red Toyota Corolla at Miami In-
ternational Airport and were
heading east on the Dolphin Ex-
pressway, en route to their hotel,
when they were first bumped from
behind by two men in a van, the
wife told police.
Police said the car had no
markings indicating it wasa rental
car, a problem in past tourist
slayings.
"The victim's wife, who was
reading a safety-tip pamphlet pro-
vided by the rental car agency,
told him not to stop police said
in a statement.
Thevanbumped them again
and again, then pulled alongside
when Rakebrand refused to stop.
One of the men in the van fired
one shot through the driver's side
window of the car, striking
Rakebrand in the back.
The van sped off as the car,
now out of control, jumped the
median and wound up in the other
lanes, where it was inv 'ved in a
minor collision, police lid. The
woman was not injured.
Gov. Lawton Chiles, who
was in Miami on state business
today, said he was "just so dis-
tressed I don't know what to say
"The message is out there:
You've got to be careful when you
go to Florida said state Sen. Gary
Siegel, who led a special Senate
committee on tourist-related
crime. "This is really going to hurt.
This kind of image has got to stop
Woman dies, mother survives
ST. GEORGE, Utah (A?)�A
mother and daughter who decided
to take a shortcut on their way to a
new life in California got a flat tire
and wound up stranded in the
desert. Only the mother lived to tell
of the week-long ordeal.
Hunters found 68-year-old
Zora Jacobs on Sunday in Sawmill
Canyon in Nevada, just west of the
Utah line.
She told authorities she found
her 45-year-old daughter, Janet,
dead on Thursday near the car,
where she had gone to sleep the
night before.
An autopsy was to be per-
formed today, but she apparently
died of exposure, said Sgt. Elden
Adair of the Sheriff's Department
in Lincoln County, Nev.
"We had a U-Haul and the
road was so narrow we couldn't
turn around Zora Jacobs said from
her hospital bed on Tuesday. "We
had a spare, but we were on an
incline. We just didn't have the
strength to fix it
They had set out from St.
George on Aug. 29 for Petaluma,
Calif 40 miles north of San Fran-
cisco. The younger Jacobs had a
job waiting for her at a restaurant,
said Pam Seifert, who worked wi th
her at an eatery in St. George.
Lincoln County Sheriff Dahl
Bradfield said the two women
apparently had been told they
could save two hours by taking a
shortcut. But they took a wrong
turn onto a dirt trail used bv hunt-
ers and cattle ranchers.
Temperatures ranged from
70s at night to 90s during the dav.
They had some canned food, and
Janet Jacobs twice walked to a
spring a mile or two away two
times and brought water back to
her mother, Bradfield said.
The mother and daughter
had moved to St. George from Las
Vegas in March after their home
was broken into and both were
assaulted.
The intruder raped and
stabbed Janet Jacobs and broke
her leg. Her mother's pelvis was
broken.
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September 9, 1993
)
Boi
techn
Boei
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries
Ltd Kawasaki Heavy Indus-
tries Ltd. and Fuji Heavv Indus-
tries Ltd. � three of its major
suppliers � about an 80-seat
commuter jet. Boeing now
builds jets wi th 100 or more seats
only.
"This is crazy Michael
SUZUKI
ks with Japanese
'logy Strategic
w hich sells strat-
S companies that
technologj said
Seattle-based Boeing, the
s No. 1 maker of passen-
g i jets denied it is nurturing a
future rival.
Boeing had dabbled in the
mall-jet business for about six
years but got out when it sold
its former deHayilland of
Canada unit last year. Teaming
with the Japanese would save it
most of the cost of developing
the smaller jet.
Continued from page 1
Hause said, "but to create chil-
dren who are aware of their cul-
tural heritage
The Institute is a family par-
ticipation program, and children
under the age of 13 must be ac-
companied by an adult. In many
cases, both parents attend, Hause
said.
The Suzuki Institute's suc-
cess may be measured in im-
proved grades, higher Scholas-
tic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores
and higher college course grades,
Hause said.
During the program, con-
certs and o ther en terta inmen t are
held in the evenings. On the last
day all of the children present a
final concert in Wright audito-
rium.
"The program has gone
very well since the beginning,
ten years ago Hause said. "The
reputation of the institution has
grown, and it now attracts fami-
lies from all over the country
This year's program at-
tracted musicians ranging from
children as young as three or
four years old to teacher trainees
studying toward certification by
the Suzuki Association of the
Americas.
The Carolinas, the
Virginias, Maryland, Tennessee,
Georgia, Florida, Kentucky
Ohio, Pennsylvania, Minnesota
Wisconsin and even France were
represented this year.
Instead of a news
writer's meeting, go to
the football game! Karen
THE MEDIA BOARD
SEEKS
GENERAL MANAGER
FOR 93-94 EXPRESSIONS
MINORITY STUDENTS
MAGAZINE
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Bulding
Telephone: 757-6009
Applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
or better
Application Deadline:
Noon, Tuesday September 14
BLOWOUT
WEEK
Bob Marley
Legend
"best of"
$ 1298CD
The East Carolinian 5
SNACK
Spot was created, "said Mr. David
Bailey, Marketing Manager.
"The set-up is better, because
before the lines were twisted and
there were items in the middle of
the way said David Adams,also
an ECU student.
The new name of the snack
area came from a contest that ran
two weeks last spring. Over 100
total entries were received, and
after being reviewed! by a special
chosen committee, the name "The
Spot submitted by ECU student
Ashley Young, was chosen as the
best entry.
Renovations were started
over the summer, with work tak-
ing about six weeks to complete.
To complete the new look, new
uniforms were also issued to the
workers, signifying the identity of
the new snack area.
Many items will be served at
the new snack area, including
Continued from page 1
ITZA pizza, 14 lb. hot dogs, deli
sandwiches and a great variety of
baked goods.
Various items that are of-
fered at the other area sites will be
offered also.
"The new snack area has a
lot of new items, especially
healthier items said ECU stu-
dent leniffer Pazenski.
Hou rs for the new snack a rea
will stay basically the same as they
were previously, except for Sat-
urday and Sunday. Saturday, The
Spot will be open from 12 noon till
9 p.m. On Sunday, it will open at
12 noon and will stay open till 11
p.m.
"The Spot will bring new
items to the east side of campus
said Bailey. For many students and
faculty, this will be a welcome
change, and as Anthony Jones, an
ECU dining services employee
said, the idea is " pretty cool
TRANSIT
for regular commuter parking on
campus.
Another good point is that it
is set up to serve the students first
because the students pay for it.
Walters said that the transit
system was set up to help cover
limited parking when the lot be-
side Mendenhall is closed for con-
struction of the new recreation
center.
Gertz said that students who
currently park in the lot beside
Minges will have to relocate their
cars. Freshmen who use it can
park in Minges parking lot, and
residents can park in the resident
parking lot on the comer of 5th
and Reade Streets.
Continued from page 1
Parking and Traffic Ser-
vices considered building a
parking deck, but the depart-
ment does not bring in enough
money. The transit system is
the most cost-efficient system
for ECU at this time.
And if you already use the
transit system and the buses are
too crowded for you, don't
worry. Walters said that a new
and bigger bus will be added to
the shuttle in November.
More information about
the transit system is available
and the information desk at
Mendenhall or from the Park-
ing and Traffic Services Depart-
ment.
The East Carolinian would like (o wish
Karen Hassell a very Happy Birthday
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East Carolina University
Fraternity Locations
1993 Rush
Rush Week Sept 14-17
GO GREEK!
5TH STREET
ITlKAl
Q

J
BQ
00
W
-I

X
o
rt
AX
Hie Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity was nationally founded in December of 1845 at Yale
University. Alpha Sig has been a strong growing chapter on the campus of ECU for many
years. They give annually to the American Lung Association and enjoy a very active
intramural, academic, and social life. If you are interested in rushing a fraternity go by and
visit Alpha Sigma Phi
422W�rt5thSt
Beta Theta Pi is one of the oldest fraternities in the nation; founded on August 8,1839
From a small town in Ohio has stemmed one of the greatest fraternities ever. Here on this
campus we strive to combine all aspects of fraternity life social, academic, athletic as well
as many other activities which show the day-today life of a very tight brotherhood.
501E.11thSt
AX
Delta Chi was founded at ECU to break away from the "norm" in fraternity life We believe
in strong Brotherhood, while maintaining each Brother's distinct personality. Delta Chi
has outstanding friendship athleticism, leadership, scholarship, and most of all good
dines. We are looking for men that want to make the most of college life. If you would
like to build a tradition rather than become part of one, Delta Chi is for you. We look
forward to meeting you at rush, and remember, If you can find a better fraternity, join
them at
Kingston Place Clubhouse!
A�
Delta Sjgma Phi was chartered at East Carolina in April of 1971, and has continually given
what it could to better the ECU Greek system. Delta Sig is based on three simple, but loyal
principles: Leadership, Scholarship, and Brotherhood. Brotherhood is a phenomenon that
can be felt and witnessed much better than it can be explained. It is a deep friendship with
men who can always be depended upon to help when there is a need, and to be there
to share the experience of self growth in the incredibly complex world of college life.
510 E. 10th St.
KA
The KappaAlpha Order was chartered on September 26,1958 at East Carolina University.
At KA there is a deep tradition in preserving the quality of Southern gentlemea Kappa
Alpha's athletic program is known for its consistent rate of success. Our brotherhood
would like to extend an invitation to all interested men to attend rush at our house. We
are looking forward to meeting you during rush 500 E. 11th St
KZ
Kappa Sigma was founded on the East Carolina Campus on November 20, 1966. Since
then the fraternity has strived to represent the Greek system of ECU welL Located on Tenth
Streetdirectly across from campus, the fraternity offers a convenient spot for its member
to gather between classes, as well as being in easy walking distance from the residence
halls. The basis of the Kappa Sig fraternity is its brotherhood and through that
brotherhood we will continue to grow and prosper long into the future.
700E.10thSt
AXA (Most Improved Fraternity '93)
Lambda Chi Alpha is a fraternity of honest friendship. We have over 210 fraternity
chaptersnationalh.BemgaLambdaCmmearis'Deconiingapanofabrotherho()dofmen
fe-
te
I
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
5TH ST.
10TH ST.
ECU CAMPUS
TKE,
aj Hen
5
iM
ncri
111TH ST.
whose friendship will last a lifetime. Being a Lambda Chi means knowing that there will
always be someone who cares about you. someone who will be anxious to help you over
those rough spots in life. The Lambda Chis invite you to become a part of their association.
Come by and look us over, we think you will be glad you did!
500 Elizabeth West 5th St
OKH' (Highest G.P.A. Award '93)
Phi Kappa Psi is one of the newest fraternities on the ECU campus. Nationally founded
in February of 1852 at Jefferson College, Phi Psi has been on the ECU campus for 4 years
and has fast become a working part of the Campus Greek system. During rush if you are
interested in rushing a fraternity, try Phi Kappa Psi. We might be just what you re looking
for in your college life.
ZTA House West 5th St
4KT (Most Outstanding Fraternity)
Your college years are a prime opportunity to challenge yourself. This means making the
most of the classes, people, and situations you encounter. Fraternities encourage this; Phi
Kappa Tau is comprised of a solid brotherhood involved in a wide range of campus
activities. We are also very strong on a national leveL with over 100 chapters across the
country and about $50,000 in academic scholarships awarded annually through our
headquarters. The advantages of fraternity memberships do not end upon graduation. Phi
Kappa Tau graduates have the opportunity to get together at the house every year at
alumni events, such as Homecoming. So go ahead and challenge yourself, get involved
with a fraternity.
409 Elizabeth St West 5th St
(University Service AwardBest Philanthropy ZTT
riKA
?93)
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity was founded on March 1.1968 at the University of Virginia.
Pika at ECU is a fraternity that takes great pride in their involvement on the campus and
around the community. Pika was rechartered at ECU six years ago and has flourished to
be one of the greatest supporters of the Greek system If you're thinking of going Greek
this year check out Pi Kappa Alphait may be one of the best decisions of you college life.
West 5th St
nKD (Overall Greek Week Champions '93)
Pi Kappa Phi was chartered at East Carolina in 1963- Since the beginning we have proven
to be a strong force in the development of fine young men to serve our campus. We offer
a variety of activities to excel in ranging form a string athletic program to community
servic and projects for the handicapped. We are known to have a very strong social
program and hold many major events throughout the year. We have a very strong alumni
association that helps in our endeavors. Our scholarship program helps to develop our
brothers as students. So remember, when you're in a rush to the only wayGO PI KAPP!
830 Hooker Rd.
IN
At East Carolina Sigma Nu is a combination of rich tradition and new membership. First
chartered in 1959, the Eta Beta chapter of Sigma Nu is among the oldest of all Fraternities
at ECU. Fraternity life at Sigma Nu offers many things for all its members: an active social
life, strong support for athletics, community service, and academics. Nationally, Sigma Nu
is among the best in all categories. With over 230 chapters and 130 thousand brothers,
it !i -lie third largest fraternity internationally. Its comprehensive Educational Foundation

2
3

X
8
(LEA.D.) provides many scholarships and offers many great leadership development
programs We encourage you to Rush Sigma Nu and above all, GO GREEK!
618 Pitt St
At Sigma Phi Epsilon we believe that as well as providing numerous opportunities during
the college years, the fraternity experience continues throughout one's life. Sig Ep
provides an environment where a brother develops and learns many important social
skills such as sportsmanship, scholarship, and communication among many others. We
pride ourselves on being one of the best fraternities at East Carolina as well as in the
nation. Sigma Phi Epsilon has been named ECU'S most outstanding fraternity two out of
three years. On a national level the North Carolina Kappa Chapter has been recognized
as one of the best all-around Sig Ep chapters in the nation. Sig Ep is looking for balanced
men who excel not only in academics, but in athletics, leadership, and social skills as well.
We extend an invitation to all interested, qualified men with a desire to become a part
of Sigma Phi Epsilon.
505 East 5th St
zn
The Eta Kappa chapter of Sigma Pi was the second fastest chapter in Sigma Pi International
history. Sigma Pi is the up-and-coming fraternity on campus. Sigma Pi is known for its
diversity among members yet has a very strong brotherhood. Sigma Pi is very competitive
with each and every fraternity on campus and with your help will become an even more
dominant part of the Greek system at East Carolina. If you want to go Greek, experience
a great brotherhood, meet lots of people, and have a good time then go Sigma Pi.
Alpha Delta Pi house 5thMeade.
Sigma Tau Gamma has a long and proud heritage of offering young men the opportunity
to broaden their lives through fraternal brotherhood. With over i 00 chapters across the
country. Sigma Tau Gamma is recognized nationally and has its home office in
Warrensburg, MO. Our national office works closely with ourchapter here at East Carolina
which maximizes our bonds to one another and the community. Come see what makes
Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity the most unique and diversified on campus. Sigma Tau
Gamma taking tradition to tomorrow.
1210 Dickinson Ave.
TKE
Tau Kappa Epsilon, founded in 1899, has become the largest international fraternity with
around 365 chapters in the U.S. and Canada. TKE calls itself "the fraternity for life" and
over 100,000 members worldwide are proving it through their interest in the fraternity
that continues long after graduatioa TKE participates in activities ranging form sports and
scholastics to community projea If you like what you hear, come on down to the bottom
of the hill to the TKE house and find out if TKE is for you.
951 East 10th St.
0X (Chancellor's Cup Champion ' 93)
Theta Chi was first chartered at East Carolina on March 15,1958. We are an established
Fraternity with over 50 active brothers who pride themselves on the concept of unity and
closeness within the brotherhood. Theta Chi strives among the top in athletics and
scholastics and is a catalyst for individual accomplishment We challenge you to be a part
of our continued success and extend an invitation to rush Theta Chi.
Our new house location is 312 East 11th St. (758-6969). Be a part of the
Greek leader of the 90s. ROLL CHI!





The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 7
'hursdayOpinion
Health Center raises prices
Student Health Services hikes
prices on prescription drugs,
other medication
It seems rather obnoxious, doesn't it? It
wasn't enough that tuition was raised, so a
decision was made wherein a student must pay
to receive over-the-counter medications at the
Student Health Center. Medication that re-
quired no payment before. Come on, give us a
break!
It's brilliant, in a way�who better to take
advantage oi than the sick and run-down? The
equation goes something like this: Students get
sick. Students need medicine. Student Health
has medicine. They know students need this
medicine and depend (somewhat) upon them
to obtain said medicine. Pardon the pun, but it
just makes me sick.
And to legitimize this fee implementation,
Student Services can "offer more medicines at
reduced charges Curious as to what some of
those medicines are? Take a gander: antacids,
diarrhea suppressants and medications for nau-
sea and motion sickness.
Question: how many times in the past year
have vou (yes, vou) had motion sickness? And
if vou have had motion sickness, did you have
it enough times to prompt you into a fit of rage
against Student Health Services because they
didn't carry Dramamine?
Supposedly, what prompted this was a
written complaint by some poor student "who
resented the fact that some students were stock-
ing up on free medicine that he paid for with
his student health fee Or so Vannortwick,
Director of Student Health services, says.
Sorry, but it seems highly unlikely that
one mere person could sway a very powerful
branch of ECU to do anything simply because
they resented someone, let's say, stocking up
on Nyquil. (Ever done that?)
In case you ever wondered, the Student
Health Fee (of which you shelled out $114)
basically pavs for salaries�those doctors,
nurses, psychologists, psychiatrists and admin-
istrative persons that keep Student Health
cranking along.
Medicine isn't fully funded by the Student
Health Fee; rather, it comes more from state
grants. Crants that we all know don't usually
offer as much monev as you'd expect.
And we could go into a whole sob story
about how the state government doesn't allo-
cate enough funds for the university to prop-
erly serve the needs of the ECU student body,
but that would be pointless.
The real problem here is the fact that over-
the-counter drugs are now SI per item, pre-
scription drugs are $2.50 each and Student
Health is passing it off as some sort of public
relations, Mr. Good-Guy solution.
They've made a sneaky, money-making
ploy into a seemingly innocent look-at-us-
we're-taking-car e-of-the-studentssugges-
tions-campaign.
So the next time you get an unexpected case
of motion sickness, stagger yourself over to Stu-
dent Health, shell out a buck and pick up some
little tablets. While this is happening, be rest as-
sured that no one is stocking up on free Immodium.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Exei utive
By Laura Wright
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Maureen Rich, Asst News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
RoBert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olsen. Asst Sports I ditor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Pagt Editoi
Amelia Vongut. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley Copy Editor
Tony Dunn, Harness Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Set reran
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies cver Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
bditorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which mas he edited for decenc) or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should he addressc ' lit I Tht East Carolinian,
PublicationsBldgECU.Greenville.N.( 2785! I c more informa
tion, call ("liT-MMv
Television: a great oae-eyed guru or mere McMedia?
1 want to suggest something
radical to you. Don't watch ITVfor
a week. Now, before you rupture
something from laughing at me
and before you turn the page with
anangrv "right, Laura. Why don't
I stop breathing while I'm at it
think about a few things.
.According to a survey in
Connoi seurir, Septemberol 1989,
the number of murders the aver-
age child had eon on television
by the ag oi 16 was 18,000. The
number of commercials that
American children had seen bv
the age of IS was 350,000 (if com-
mercials are 40 seconds long, this
averages out to 160.4 days). If you
a re one of those people that say, "I
never watch TV you probably
watch about! 0 in mrs of TV a week.
You're just in a of state of denial.
There were 751) million tele-
yision sets in American homes in
1991. Being on TV isn't really even
something to aspire to anymore
because in 1989, one in four Ameri-
cans had been on television. I was
floored by this statistic at first and
then I thought of Geraldo, Oprah,
Phil and SalK esse (not to men-
tion all of those lesser knowns that
seem to have a "talk show" one
day and then get cancelled the
next). It's nuts; you can be a guest
on a talk show it you've done
something as unoriginal as get a
di orce.
But I'm really more inter-
ested in television's ability to pro-
mote complacency than in the pro-
liferation of talk shows. By com-
placency I don't just mean the prac-
tice oi sitting on the sofa and eat-
ing chips while laughing at
Roseanne; I mean the tendency to
ignore the fact that there is ti real
world with real problems that hap-
pen while we watch "mothers that
steal their daughters' boyfriends"
on Geraldo and think how lucky
we are that such things aren't hap-
pen ing to us.
In George Orwell's 1984,
"Big Brother controlled people
through their television sets. These
people had trouble opposing un-
fairness, because they were moni-
tored by a power that threatened
violence against subversive ac-
tions. We don't even need to be
threatened with violence; the false
reality of telev ision assures us that
there is no need for subversion.
You need an example? Soap
operas show women that happi-
ness can be found by marrying a
wealthy man and having babies
forhim. Don'tbedissatisfied; there
is no need for self-fulfillment.
Other TV genres 11 e sit-coms with
all-black casts) also do a lot to
enforce the notion that things
aren't as bad as you've been led to
believe, that the racist hierarchy is
as it should be. These black sit-
coms are directed (mostly) by
white men and present little more
than happy go-lucky buffoonery.
Racism appears to be non-existent
and the more we watch, the more
convinced we tend to become that
the world is fair and as u should
be. We are easily fooled.
So, for one week, get out
there and find out more about
those "non-existent" problems.Go
to a bookstore (try Eponymous)
and read a book by a personyou've
never heard of and form an opin-
ion about it. Who knows? Maybe
you'll even feel like using the
monev that vou spend on cable to
support an organization that will
act in vour interests, the ones that
vou discover while you're not
watching TV. Work for a week on
cultivating a belief or two on your
own and then argue with some-
one who disagrees with vou. But
don't back down (don't punch that
person out, either).
If you don't feel that you're
ready to give up "Beavis and
Butthead" for a few days, I under-
stand. Like I said, it's just a sug-
gestion. But while vou watch,
keep this in mind: during an av-
erage hour of MTV, there are 20
minutes of commercials and
commercials lie to vou.
You may get the impres-
sion that you're a careless mother
if vou don't choose Jit; a "cook
who doesn't know" if vou don't
use Crisco; that you will lose all
of vour friends if vou don't
"Oxycute" vour problem com-
plexion; and that people will
cross the street to get away from
vou if you don't "shower to
shower each day You may start
to believe that men never wash
clothes, that static cling, spotted
dishes or cat litter box odor mieht
cause you to die of embarrass-
ment and that vour breath really
stinks. None of this (with the
possible exception of the odor of
your breath) is true.
Besides, I know Beavis and
Butthead. I went to high school
with those guys. I didn't like
them very much, but I'll be glad
to introduce vou to them if you're
at a loss for anything better to
do. If you think about it, you
probably went to high school
with them too. I bet you didn't
like them verv much either.
By Joseph Horst
God heals and the doctor takes the fees.
Letters to the Editor
Problems concerning Media Board addressed
Printed on
UK) recycled
paper
To The Editor:
In the past year or two, a
lot has been written about the
East Carolina University Media
Board. Several conflicts have
arisen between the Media Board
and WZMB, the campus radio
station. Why has there been all
thisconflkt and tensic m between
the Media Board and WZMB?
Asa former emploveeof WZMB,
before I left in May, I dealt with
the Media Board on a regular
basis and might be able to shed
some light on this question.
First of all, what zs the Me-
dia Board? You have been read-
ing about them for years now
and might not know exactly who
they are or what they do. The
Media Board was set up by the
university to oversee campus
media, including WZMB, The
East Carolinian, Expressions, The
Rebel and the year-books, both
videoand print It was formed to
advise,consultand allocate funds
to these mediums. Thus, they
plav an extremely crucial role in
the operation ot these media.
However, there is one very seri-
ous problem. Thei e is ni om ton
the Media Board that has ever
actually worked in any one of
these mediums.
There is a serious problem
thatarises when you havea regu-
latory body controlling the op-
erations of mediums that thev
haveno first hand experience in.
For example, if WZMB needs a
new piece ercadcastag equip-
ment, or The East Carolinian
wants an upgrade in their com-
puter system, they have to ask
the Media Board. The Media
Board then has the responsibil-
ity of determining it this is a
crucial piece of equipment
needed, or simply some frivo-
lousexpenditure. They normally
do tlnis without am knowledge
ofw'hatthisequipmentisorhow
essential it may be to fheorgani-
ation. Rather, they base their
decision almost solely on its cost
Tlie , ledia B a rd a 1st (con-
trol and advises the media man-
agers in their jobs and regulates
how they run their organiza-
tions. But again, thev do this
without first-hand experience
If the Media Board con-
sisted of members who actually
worked at a radio station, the)
would be better informed and
equipped to advise and regulate
a campus radio station, but they
don't. It's like hiring someone to
teach a video production class
that has never used a camera or
editing equipment. Tlie result is
ineffective, uninformativ e, un-
know ledgea ble o ver-regula ti on.
This has to change. This
may sound crazy and radical,
but how about composing the
Media Board with some mem-
bers with actual media experi-
ence1 This would earn the Me-
dia Board a lot more credibility
and respect. It would give our
campus media someone they can
reh on to properly advise and
assist them in areas that these
member have actually worked
in and dealt with.
Ma vbe then, and only then,
can the conflicts between the
Media Boaid and the campus
media cease Then the Media
B ird can w rk with, rather than
against, these mediums to pro-
duce the best information and
entertainment possible to the
campus community.
Kevin Brelstord
Senior
Communications
Censorship of
materials only
piques interest
Censorship. What an uglv word. For
years now, people who "know best" have
tried to tell the rest of the world what they
should read, what they should watch, what
they should listen to I'm only waiting for
some one do-gooder to tell me what air to
breathe or what side of the bed to sleep on.
From violence on television to explicit
lyrics in music to those oh-so-nasty words in
books, I've just got one thing to say: "If you
don't like it.changethediannel, turn ii off or turn
the page It's just that simple, people! I can't
believe thatour society has gone so far down-
hill that people can't (or won't) take the time
to exercise their God-given right of freedom
of choice. Call me crazy, call me stupid, call
me lshmael,justdon'tcall me late for dinner!
(Someone please tell me you got that joke.)
The most recent example of these
people-vvho-have-nothing-better-to-do-
than-stick-their-nose-somewhere-it-doesn't
belong is an AParticle from Washington that
states that "parents made 347 attempts to
censor books, plays and other material in
their children's schools last year In 143
cases the complaints resulted in the mate-
rial being withdrawn or somehow censored
This means that roughly 41 percent of this
material is being taken off library shelves or
reading lists.
Let me list a few examples of these
awful books:
� "Sleeping Beauty" � for its violence
and frightening nature. (What about Snow
White, a woman who lives withsevendirtv,
old men7 HMM?)
� "Where's Waldo?" � for a woman's
partially exposed breast that probably had
to be discovered under a magnifying glass.
� "Dracula" (the play) � tor refer-
ences to God and blood.
Proponents of this "enforcement as
they call it, state that these actions only show
"parents who choose to be involved in the
lives of their school-age children Involved.
or in charge of? Now, I'm not saying that
parents shouldn't superv ise their children.
What I am saying is that keeping material �
any material � away from children does
more harm than good.
Everyone knows from pretty early on
the basic rule of reverse psychology � if you
tell someone not to do something, they will
probably do it just out of spite. So telling a
child that he can't read a book or see a play,
for whatever reason, makes that same child
want to read or see it all the more. What
greater thrill is there than doing something
you've been told not to do?
If a parent wants to supervise their
child (which they should), then why not
read that book to your child or watch that
L.V. program with himher7 As a parent,
v ou get to spend quality time with your child
and you can talk about tough questions, like
violence or sex. Putting blinders on your
child in the hopes that he won't ever be
exposed to this darker side oi mankind is
naive at best and dangerous at w irsl
"What viva don't know wont hurt
you"? Untrue





September 9, 1993
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 8
For Rent
WYNDHAM COURT apartments.
New 2 bedrooms, read semes-
ter. Now taking applications
395.00 per month. Lease and deposit
required. Duffus Realty, Inc. 756-2675.
REEDY BRANCH APARTMENTS
New 2 bedrooms on East 10th Street.
Readv for fall semester. Now taking
applications. S385.00 pm. Lease and
deposit required. Duffus Realty, Inc
756-2675.
HUGE ROOM with 2 closets and pri-
vate bath. Fumishe walk to ECU,
kitchen privileges, utilities included.
Prefer quiet female non-smoker. $230
mo. Call 752-2636.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two bed-
room apartment across from campus.
Rent $325 and one year lease. Call 752-
2615.
FEMALE NS ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share 3 bedroom town house at
Sheraton Village. $230 13 utilities
etc. 756-8459.
SPACIOUS ONE BEDROOM APT.
Fully furnished. Corner of 10th and
Elm. AC. $125 on Sept 15 then 1 yr.
lease in Oct. Big Comer Apt. call 830-
0229.
Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED. Nice 2-bed-
room, partially furnished. $175mnth,
$175deposit, 12 utilities. Male pre-
ferred. 807 College View Apts near
ECU. Call Rich 758-6196 weekdays,
(919)455-0603 weekends.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Looking for
neat, organized person. Male or female.
Apt 1 yr old and fully furnished. $155
mo and 12 utilities. Call 321-18217.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 BDRM in Tar River. $155 per
month . Private room, semi-furnished.
Call for info! 752-8000!
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
apartment 1 2 block from Art Build-
ing 3 blocks from downtown and 2
blocks from supermarket. Great for art
students. Call 757-1947.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom townhouse. On bus
route, patio, central air and heat. Good
neighborhood. Spacy end unit.
$182.50month 1 2 utilities. Call 758-
8921.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share apt, close to campus, $142.50
plus 12 u tiliries. Call 830-6166 for more
info.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY. Incredible house in a nice fam-
ily-oriented neighborhood. $187.50
mo plus 14 utilities. Students only,
please. Must See Phone 321-2390.
H Help Wanted
PIANO PLAYER NEEDED. Small
Christian Church near Greenville, Sal-
ary neg. Call 757-3207.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPT. is recruiting 12-
16 part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge of
I3E2EEHIS3 � �:nn;vT!Tg
�a ��in (��
iimrm.v.rm! mm
Greek
soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Appli-
cants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-16, in soccer fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3:00 pm until 7:00
pm with some nights and weekend
coaching. This program will run from
September to mid-November. Salary
starts at $4.35 per hour. For more infor-
mation, pleasecall Ben James or Michael
Daly at 830-4550.
SPRING BREAK '94 - Sell trips, earn
cash and go free Student Travel Ser-
vices is now hiring campus reps. Call 1-
800-648-4849.
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVES
needed by Sportswear Company to sell
to fraternities and sororities. Average
$50 - $100 working one night per week.
Call 1-800-242-8104.
EARN $2500&FREESPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Sell only 8 trips and you go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City! Great
Resume Experience! 1-800-678-6386!
$10-$400WEEKLY.Mailingbrochures!
Sparefull-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705.
AA EARN $5,000Mo GUARAN-
TEED! FAST Huge money-making
jobs and opportunities on your cam-
pus. Call today for complete details.
Free cruise! America's 1 Company!
919-929-3139.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
material provided. Send SASE to Mid-
west mailers, PO Box 395, Olathe KS
66051. Immediate response.
SOCCER OFFICIALS NEEDED -
games on Saturday. Call 830-4240.
LEAGUE SUPERVISORS NEEDED
(soccer)- games on Saturday. Pay $6.00
and up. Call 830-4240.
ATTN LADIES. Looking for ladies to
work part-time for good money. For
details call 321-1817.
WANTED: CHURCH ORGANIST.
Salary Negotiable. Call mornings, 9-
12. First Baptist Church, Robersonville,
795-3601.
WANTED: PART-TIME VAN DRIV-
ERS: CIS Management Company is
looking for van drivers to operate the
PATS vans. PATS is a local para transit
system for theelderly and handicapped
citizens of Pitt County. Some early
morning and afternoon hours, as well
as midday. Duties include operation of
vehicle and some assistance of elderly,
handicapped, and disadvantaged pas-
sengers. Criteria for job: 1 - Positive
attitude. 2-21 years of age, 3 - Clean
driving record, 4 - Clean criminal
record. If you are a people person with
interest, please contact: CTS Manage-
ment Company, Wlicar Executive Cen-
ter, Suite 107, 223 W. Tenth St,
Greenville NC 27834,830-1939.
SOCCERGOALKEEPER:Forfallsea-
son. Greenville F.C. Soccer Team is
recruiting a goal keeper for the fall
season. Call 756-3879 after 6 pm.
2:30-9:30 PM HELP NEEDED to pro-
vide male quadriplegic with physical
assistance. Contact Marty at 8300426.
FRIENDLY, ENERGETIC babysitter
w anted for preschoolers one day every
other weekend. Must be dependable.
758-4454.
PART-TIME SALES. Need 10 part-
time sales people for number 1 com-
pany in number 1 industry. Work 8-10
hours per week with earning potential
of $1000 per month. Call Richard Rabin
at 758-0645 after 2:00 pm.
WASH PUB: Attendents needed for
morning and night work. Apply in
person 251 IE. 10th St.
CARPET BARGAIN CENTER: Help
wanted. Apply in person 1009
Dickinson Ave.
GET THE FALL SEMESTER under-
way with a part-time sales position
with Greenville's fashion leader.
Brody's is accepting applications for
the JuniorMissy sportswear and
Men's departments. Earn extra spend-
ing money and clothing discount. Ap-
ply at Customer Service, Brody's The
Plaza Thursday Sept9,1993, Q to4pm.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY! As-
semble products at home. Call Toll Free
1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
FUNDRAISER: All it takes is a group
with a little energy and a lot of excite-
ment to earn top dollars in just one
week! Call (800) 592-2121 ext. 312.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT DEVEL-
OPMENT, Dept of Athletics, is now
accepting applications for tutors. A
minimum 2.5 GPA is required. We are
especially in need of tutors 7:30-9:00
am, M-F. Please call 757-4550 for more
information.
BABYSITTER needed MWFaftemoon
in my home. 4 mo. old boy. Prefer
experience with infants. Non-smoker,
must have transportation. Appreciate
references. 830-9452.
DEDICATED-compassionate,
caregivers to provide high quality, non-
medical in home elder care services.
CNA preferred, but not necessary.
Mature, reliable students considered.
Resume to Silvercare, PO Box 3262,
Greenville, NC 27836.
ALASKA EMPLOYMENT Students
Needed! Earn up to $2,500month in
canneries or fishing vessels. Many em-
ployers provide Room & Board &
Transportation. Over 8,000 openings.
No EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Male
or Female, for more information call:
(206) 545-4155 ext. A5362.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn
up to $2,000 month world travel
(Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.).
Summer and Careeremploymentavail-
able. No experience necessary. For more
information call 1-206-634-04468 ext.
C5362.
CHOREMASTER - positions available
to provide housekeeping, lawn, and
general household chores. Perfect for
reliable students needing flexible work
hours. Resume to: Silvercaare, PO Box
3262, Greenville, NC 27836.
NOW HIRING
Greenville Company has immedi-
ate openings for part time help.
Work in the evenings. We are
interviewing this week for sales
Reps and marketing Reps. Training
provided, fun work place, good
money.
Ball 355-7633 After 12:00 Noon
For Sate
GJBvkPdcKj HanirmicksrCantfi'tis ihn
Cook Sets, Netting. Cots. Ammo fns Su-
2-60-Military Clothing Boots, Sfn �;s. Uwiv.wir.
Sleeping Bags. Trunk Fool Lu kun .1 u'
- OJterenl Items. Browsers Wi k.�r i
FORT HENRYS ARMY NAVY
1501 S. EVANS STREET 756-8781
USED FURNITURE
TUDENT
'HOP
Formerly Estate Shop
Coin & Ring Man
S"
1
I
�SELLING
�� FURNITURE
� -Men s Clothing
� �� ivorni Ivi'lrigerators
�� .Microwaves
� olereo iiyuipment
� :dpo liqiiiprnent
?� .Misrrllaiirous items
We're Buying Too!
if you are selling you must be 18 with
a picture ID CNCDL. ECU)
752-3866
MON-FRI 10am-5 pm,
Sat 10 am-2 pm
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
EARLY AMERICAN OAK FINISH
bedroom suite . Includes fullqueen
headboard, 5 drawer chest and2drawer
nightstand. Practically new, $225.00.
Call 321-1708. Leave message.
EARTH CRUISER: Dark green, needs
crank. $50 or best offer. Please call Steve
758-9904.
SPECIALIZED Hardrock Ultra. Less
than 1 yr. old. Excellent condition, like
new. Zoom stem and toe clips included.
$300 or best offer. Call 355-0258 for
details.
LOFT FOR SALE. In good condition.
Sturdy, wooden, disassemblable, mat-
tresses also available. $100. Call 830-
1019.
MOUNTAIN BIKE, TREK 830. Black
frame, toe clips, bar ends and new tires,
20" frame. $300. Brian 355-2363.
FOR SALE - Panasonic stereo, dual
cassette, 24 preset, AMFM, turntable,
great for dorm. $150 or best offer. Call
Linda 931-9662.
FOR SALE -TREK 830 Mountain Bike
1 year old-like new. Black20" Frame U-
Lock aand seat leash. Cost $450 new
$350 best offer. 321-3956 before
4:00pm.
TRAVEL FREE! Sell quality vaca-
tions. The hottest destinations in Ja-
ma ica, Cancun, South Padre, Florida.
Most reliable Spring Break Company
with the easiest way towards free
trip! Best commissions! Sun Splash
Tours 1-800-426-7710.
TUTORING SERVICES Offered for
children in Kindergarten through
seventh grade in math andor read-
ing. Masters in Education. Call 752-
5542.
LOOK your best for the brand new
year. Call Kimberly at 913-7863 for
your personal fitness training.
D.J. FOR HIRE Experienced D.J.
from Bogies available for all types of
parties: Greek mixers, Weddings,
Birthdays, etc. Best selection of mu-
sic from the 60's to the 90's! Dis-
counts to all ECU organizations. Call
Rob 757-2658.
E2E
Personals
LOSE WEIGHT: Doctor recom-
mended, FDA tested. 100 guaran-
teed, 100 natural. The only thing
you lose is weight. Call anytime, 756-
1166.
JOIN THE STUDENT PIRATE
CLUB TODAY! Have the best seats
in the stadium. Receive discounts
from local restaurants and night-
clubs. Call 757-4540 and apply to-
day.
A MAN they seek. To Lisa, Cindy.
You said you were Greek. You asked
are you crazy? No gay? No, no, no.
Tell us what we think. I heard you
were a crazy shrink. We dare you to
tell us what is in our head in the
paper were by us it will be read. Oh
where, oh where is Mr. Able. A man
of realty, myth and fable. If he did
exist you could not resist, a man of
glory in a foolish, improbable story.
An imaginary plot in a warm and
sunny tropical spot. A fantastic no-
tion. To put your mind in motion.
Your mind has a vision of images not
real. But you are put in a trance by
how they make you feel. A trance of
people and places exotic. You some-
times think extremely psychotic.
Your thoughts are images of battles
and scrimmages. Thoughts con-
trolled by opposing gods that hit
your head like lightning rods. Your
thoughts are promiscuous with men
you mingle. You are held back by a
force. You at times are single. Your
thoughts are perception in a world
of deception. Mr. Able? Him you
will receive. You, he will not deceive
and him you will believe. Good
Luck, Jeff Jones
RUSH DELTA CHI!
RUSH PHI KAPPA PSI - Party every
night? Drunk all the time? Then you're
NOT who we are looking for. Lead-
ers, scholars, men and athletes not
afraid of philanthropy, that's who
we're looking for. Create tradition and
build on something new. Call Rich at
752-2573. RUSH PHI KAPPA PSI 14-
16th at 508 West 5th Street.
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA- Can't wait
for tonight! The Pikes
FRESHMEN! Make the choice
rightRUSH PIKE.
ASPi: Pref night was a blast. Never
had so much fun with a Kiddie pool.
Unit next time. Love, The Pikes.
THE BROTHERS of Kappa Sigma
wish to invite all gentlemen interested
in rushing for fall to come by our
house on Sept. 14-17. We are located
at 700 E. 10th St. beside Danyls. For
more info, or ride call 757-1005 or 752-
5543.
GOOD LUCK to all the fraternities
during rush. The sisters and new mem-
bers of Alpha Omicron Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS MELODY
We're so happy for you. Love your
sisters of Alpha Omicron Pi. P.S. Hey
Scott, have you checked your oil lately?
THE SISTERS of Alpha Omicron Pi
want to congratulate and welcome
the new members: Michelle Benedetti,
Emily Allison, Tara Franklin, Jackie
Gaillard, Natalie Lanprecht, and
Nicole Peele. Sisters and pledges of
ADPi. We are looking forward to hav-
ing a great time with you at our Pre-
game Pig Out. Love, the brothers of
Lambda Chi Alpha.
To KAPPA SIGMA: We are looking
forward to tonight! We're gonna have
a blast! Love, ALPHA XI DELTA.
ALPHA XI DELTA wishes thebestof
luck to the Pirates!
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA-welcome
back sisters. Looking forward to tail-
gating with you Thursday. Good luck
to the Pirates. We love you. Love, The
ESA sisters.
GO PIRATES BEAT SYRACUSE!
Love, The Alpha Phi's.
PHI KAPPA TAU: Can't wait to tail-
gate with all of you before the game.
Love, The ALPHA PHI'S.
Teek: We are really looking forward
to the football game. See ya Thursday
night. The Chi Omegas.
ACTSNTODN
Gamma Beta Phi members:
Our first meeting will be Tuesday Sep-
tember 14th at 5 pm. Contact Ruthann
at 752-3536 for information.
All members encouraged to attend!
Announcements
ECU Water,
Join the ECU Water Ski Club!
Beginners are welcome. Meet-
ings are every Tuesday nights
from 9-10pm in Mendenhall
room 14. For more info, call
Jason or Thomas at 758-8215.
ECU Country nance And
Song Society
All members are invited to
attend a Contra Dance with the
Greenville Folk Arts Society,
Sat Sept 11, at 7:30, at the city
Rec parks building, on Cedar
Ln. (between 10th & 14th
streets). Admission: $3.00 w
ECU ID.
NEWMAN CATHOIIC
CENTER
On Monday, Sept. 13, the
Newman Center will start its
program entitled "Beauty and
Belief: An In-Depth Look at
Catholicism This program is
an inquiry program for any
student wishing to learn more
about Catholicism. It is also for
Catholics who may want to make
their Confirmation or First
Communion. The program will
begin at 7:30pm. For details,
please call Fr. Paul Vaeth at
the Center, 953 E. 10th St
757-1991.
ORIENTATION TO CA-
REER SERVICES
The career Services office
invites students who will
graduate in December, 1993 or
MaySummer, 1994 to attend
an orientation meeting on Mon,
Sept. 13 at 3:00pm in Bloxton
House.
The program will include
an overview of services avail-
able to help prospective gradu-
ates find employment, how to
register with Career Services,
and how to establish a creden-
tials file. The staff will also
discuss procedures for par-
ticipating in employment in-
terviews on campus.
WE NEED YOUR EXPERI-
ENCE!
Your achievements in ev-
eryday situations can be use-
ful to others. Earn that feeling
of accomplishment. Real Crisis
Center is recruiting volunteer
crisis counselors for our tele-
phone hot-line and walk-in
center. We will be offering
training classes in this en-
riching fields beginning Sept
13. Call 758-HELP or come by
312 E. 10th St.
WOMEN'S I ACROSSF
CLUB
Women's Fall Lacrosse is
starting. New and old mem-
bers, no experience necessary!
For info, call Alan Tevekelian
at 758-5017.
CHEMISTRY DEPART-
MENT
The Chemistry Dept. of ECU
has received an endowment of
$390,000 to establish a
"Burroughs Wellcome Fund
Fellowship in Organic Chem-
istry" from the Burroughs
Wellcome Fund, Research Tri-
angle Park, NC. Formal presen-
tation of the endowment by Dr.
Howard Schaeffer, President,
Burroughs Wellcome fund and
Ms Martha Peck, Executive Di-
rector, will be made at a recep-
tion, Mon, Sept. 13 in Room 204
Flanagan Building. This fund
will provide fellowship s for
graduate students to pursue
research projects in organic
chemistry. This year's recipi-
ents of the Fellowships are Lisa
Hill, Richfield, NC and Ming
Wang, People's Republic of
China. Ms. Hill's research di-
rector is Dr. Fred Parham and
Mr. Wang works under direc-
tion of Dr. Phillip Zoretic.
ECU VOLLEYBALL TUIR
Anyone wishing to play vol-
leyball on either competitive
or recreational level should
attend our first meeting on Sept
20 at 6:00pm in room 102 in
Christenbury Gym. Questions?
Call Wes at 830-9549 or Mark
at 931-7091.
CAMPUS CRJISADF FOR
CHRIST
SLAM JAM 3 on Basketball
Tournament and Give-Away
First Prize $75.00! Second
Prize Grand Slam T-shirts and
Coupons! Everyone come .vatch
the tournaments and Register
to win prizes to be given away
every 30 min. Players: Pre-
register your team with Hart at
321-3977 orHeywardat931-
9021 or Chris 931-8133. No
entrance fee! Sept. 11th
ll:00am-4:00pm. Basketball
courts beside Belk Residence
Hall. Free lunch for everyone
provided.
INTERNATIONAL STII-
The counseling center is offer-
ing a weekly group for stu-
dents whose adjustment to
American culture might be fa-
cilitated through the shared
expression of experiences. The
group will meet Tue, 4-5 pm,
beginning August 31. Please
contact 7 5 7-6661 for more info.
MEN'S ISSUES
The Counseling Center is of-
fering a support group for male
students who wish to explore
current social expectations and
the pressures men experience.
The group will focus on expos-
ing stereotypes and redefin-
ing what it means to be a man
in light of current ideas about
emotional health and well-be-
ing. The group will meet Mon-
days 3:00-4:00 beginning Sept
13. Call 757-6661 for info.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt county
Special Olympics is recruit-
ing for volunteer coaches in
these sports: soccer, basket-
ball skills, team basketball,
swimming, gymnastics, bowl-
ing, power-lifiting, and roller
skating. NO EXPERIENCE IS
NECESSARY-JUSTAWILLING-
NESS TO WORK WITH MEN-
TALLY HANDICAPPED CHIL-
DREN AND ADULTS.
Special training sessions for
coaches will be held. Last day
to volunteer for fall sports is
Sept. 28th. Volunteer hours
may be used as part of
practicum requirements for
several ECU courses. For more
info. contact Connie
Sappenfield at 830-4541.
"�C - 'll�
h





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 9
'
It's, like, the News?
A special tr TEC. By.Tim Graham
I he bab boomer journalists
who now dominate the nation's
newsrooms don't have a very good
historical memory. In the '60s, they
complained that the) weren't taken
ish , mat their beliefs werecari-
ired
then intelligence in-
.lVOv
Illustration and copy courtesy of
Diversity and Division Journal.
suited Now th � - ershavedone
me thing to our generation. In
the nurrv of pn ss iverage of the
I992campaign reporters celebrated
MTV s effort to bring in young vot-
ers Iheunderh ingn i they're
too stupid to handle regular news,
the kind without a rock music
soundtrack and snappy edits every
three seconds.
I lie beneficiary of this press
boomlet was MTVs tenacious 25-
year-old political correspondent
labitha Siren, he effusive, oonde-
scvndingpraisepoured from all quar-
ters. Dan iel Cerone of TheL BAngeles
Time raved: "MTV News reporter
Tabitha Siren last year on the I os
Angeles riots: I .A. burned brightei
than iJOOOpointsoflight'Suchsharp
commentaiy madeSoren, 25, pohti-
cal reporting' rookie of the year
I ike a broken record. People maga-
zine concurred: "With hip, smirky
poiseSiren herself has become po-
litical reportmg's rookie of the vear
This is somewhat akin to reviewing
Bryant Gumbel and gushing, "my,
what an articulate black man
Ourgeneration is now being rep-
resented and interpreted in the me-
dia by an exact replica of the 60s
generation (she touts spending time
with her friends who "don't bathe
too much"); someone who thinks
everything mat's wrong with the
1990s is that it's not the 1960s; some-
one who thinks tha tvoung conserva-
tives don't exist, and therefore, don't
seem toappearinhernews" stories;
someone whose lackof political intel-
ligence is supposed to represent our
i u n lackof intelligence. We.afterall,
supCH ised 1 v depa id on MTV' for our
news
As for her journalism, Soren's
reporting may have captured the
interest of young voters tor the first
time and may have informed them
on topics and ideas aboutwhich they
knew nothing. Pundits and press
watchers tended to praise the posi-
hve impact of young voter outreach,
but they ignored the potential nega-
tive impact�thatTabithaSorenand
MTV News only magnify the faults
of network news, both its liberal bias
and its increasingly self-destructive
devotion to style over substance.
While most or the media beats its
breasts about being manipulated
over catchy visuals and sound bites
in 1988 and declared their devotion
See NEWS page 11
Irish band Ghost anything but disappearing
Young band's second album lays path for
expansion.
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
A little Connels, a taste of di-
luted REM, a dash of Irish fla vo, and
a little twistof GlenCampbel go into
making up a quartet from Belfast,
Ireland called Ghost of an American
Airman.
Belfast is also the home of the
Irish folk taie the band derr.es its
name from
Ghosts have just released their
second album. Skin. Thev sav thi
album is the end product of a
fhsof hell' tour that look them
ks�8 ows and 36,00 miles
in a Winnebago across this
land mass w e all home
DtxiiZeNkK.wH i valsiexplains,
"V ith this second record, we aimed
to capture the energy and the feeling
we create as a live band. We've al-
ways thrived on this. And given the
amount of touring we've done re-
cently and in the past, we think we
have managed to convey this on
Skin
Most of the tracks on this re-
lease do have a definite live feel. But
the re a re also a lot ot production and
studio tricks that blunt what could
have been the real force ot a live
recording.
Their sea re of two t pes
pop-influenced, altematn e ballads
And pop-influenced.altematr. gi
tar rock. I ds over
when I hrst played Skin and their
responses probabh give a b-rter re-
lew than I e er couid
know, these guys would
� it the weren't so watered
down was ;n. essence of their ut-
terance
There are a few tunesof quality
here despib fl : landness of the
majority. "Warboys "Country
See GHOST page 12
Photo courtesy of Hollywood records
Pictured above: (right to left) Ben Trowell, Dodge Mckay, Alan Galbraith, and Matt. They were blessed with
81 gigs in 20weeks, closing out summer with anticipation.
Don't Run My Life fy i&eUut&��
I'm a fed- up guv.
Only a double order of egg foo
young can quell the rampaging
seething ball of fire that is my rage,
my ire.
I gotta ask, what's with the
Barney-bashing? Sure he's big and
purple and goofy and sm ug and his
girl-friend seven goofier and smug-
ger with her Zsa-Zsa eyelashes, but
why musteducated Americans bash
'em? Aren't there some real screw -
ups out there, like Michael Damian?
I mean, we live in a countn
where people like Tom Arnold are
more readily identifiable than the
VP. And yet, cartoonists, talk-show
hosts and their guests, columnists,
and yes, people we know, people
like us, indulge in bashing the nur-
turing staples of childhood
iconoclasticism. Is it because thev
don't have children? Or !s it some-
thing else?
Barney is a pretend friend and
he teaches kids about playing to-
gether and loving everybody and
using the imagination. .And excuse
me honey, but isn't love what if s all
about?! Why the graffittied ideal-
ism?
But I digress. A couple of vears
ago, one Paul Reubens was arrested
in a Florida adult cinema bv two
cops. Apparently, Mr. Reubens (the
actor responsible for the greatest
character ever invented in the his-
tory of the known universe, PeeWee
Herman) was playing pocket pool.
AndsoensuedrheddugeofPeeWee
Herman jokes. The same people
who now trash Barney engaged in
24-hour PeeWee Bashafhons. But it
wasn't PeeWee who was nabbed in
delecto flugranto, no! It was Paul
Reubens;educated people know the
See LIFE page 10
Comic legend begins again
By Cliff Coffey
Hootie happy with release, ready for more
Staff Writer
How do you keep a good man
down?
Don't ask Jim Shooter. He
keeps winding up smelling like
roses every time someone dumps
manure on him. He has recently
begun his new line of comics under
the Defiant label, his third com-
pany.
In the early '80s he was the top
man of the country's largest comic
company, Marvel Comics ' Mar-
vel he started some of the biggest
changes in comics. He started
alimited series, which are now a
staple in the indusry. A limited se-
ries gives the company the chance
to see if a character has enough
popularity to give the company an
ongoing title. Shooter also devel-
oped the graphic novel, which
showcases more intense action in a
magazine format. He was also in-
strumental in creating a mature
reader's comic line. Yet, for still
undisclosed reasons, Shooter was
"forced" out of Marvel.
Although hedisappeared from
the comic industry for a couple of
See JIM page 12
Gibson
attempts
directing
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Many actors have tried their
hands at directing after years of
work on the other side of the
camera, rhelatestactortoattempt
this transition is Mel Gibson. The
film that he directs is called Tlie
Man Without a Face.
Gibson, like many actors
directors, decided to cast himself
in his directorial debut. He stars
as Justin McLeod, a mm who is
severely bumed in an auto acci-
dent and who becomes the tutor
of a young boy with an unpleas-
ant home life.
Charles Norstadt (Nick
Stahl) detests his home. His
mother (Margaret Whitton) has
three different children bv three
different men. During the storv,
she meets and marries husband
niimberfive.Charleshates his
oldest halt-sister Gloria (Fay
Masterson) because she dislikes
him. Hisyoungerhalf-sistertalks
i ncessantfy and even though she
adores Charles, he can barelv tol-
erate her attachment to him.
Charles's one dream is to
leave his familv and enroll at a
military academy . Lhfortunatelv,
he fails the entrance exam. In a
desperate attempt to get into the
school, he convinces his mother
to let him retake the exam at the
end of the summer but retaking
the exam means a summer of
studying. Charles dislikes his
homelife so much that no sacri-
fice seems too large in order for
him to gain aimittance to the
school and a reprieve from his
familv.
Through a series of chances,
Charles meets Justin McLeod, a
former teacher. McLeod takeson
Charles as a pupil and helps him
to realize his full potential.
McLeod lives alone. In the
quiet New England town in
which he resides, he has a dubi-
ous reputation because of his
reclusiveness and because of his
burn scars. The townspeople of-
ten refer to him as " the freak" and
concoct wild storiesabouthis past.
Eventually McLeod's tutoring
becomes common knowledge
and the townspeople begin to
worry aboutCharles' safety. This
leads to accusations and threats.
These proceedings prolong the
film.
This last third of the film con-
cerning the town's reaction to
McLeod's tutoring darkens an
otherwisebrightpicture. Byesca-
lating the tension in this other-
wise fine story, the filmmakers
See MEL page 12
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
In recent years, Hootie and
the Blowfish have plaved regu-
larly at college clubs all across the
southeast. On the 18th of this
month, they're plaving at the At-
tic.
Hootie was formed in 1986,
when singer Darius Rucker, bass-
ist Dean Felber and guitarist Mark
Bryan all met at USG A few vears
later, they added Jim "Soni"
Sonefeldasthepermanentdrum-
mer.
As far as musical taste, each
band member comes from a dif-
ferent school of thought. The front
man, Rucker, prefers soul and
R&B. Feebler enjoys listening to
progressive alternative music
from the '80s and Soni prefers
country music. But in an inter-
view in Entertainment Sports and
Previews, Bryan said, "all the guys
like good rap music and cross-
over to d ifferent styles of music
Strangely enough, these four
guys have combined to form a
bluesy-progressive pop sound.
Most people would categorize
their music as a college sound,
LOWFISH
Hootie and the Blowfish
although they don't necessarily
appreciate this distinction. In the
rimes News Bryan said, "Labels
-Milk. We just try to write our
music and make it sincere We
were in college together when we
started out. So I guess that has a
lot to do with the audiences we
See HOOTIE page 10





September 9, 1993
Rh I I llNB
?d from
page9
HOOTIE
Continued from page 9
me-
lave
5 ime-
� ork.nu
friend.
1 on know those stats like every
three minutes someone is stabbed or
shotorraped or something? Do we
have one for masturbation? Do we
need masturbation cops? The point
is, before PeeWee, Mr. Rogers was a
victim. These heinous cyclical at-
tacks on our children's friends must
cease! Whvdon't these weak-kneed
milk-sop scaredv-cat tough-guy
hacks pick on someone their own
size?! Grrrr.
And that's what I'm talking
about. People are bullies. Remem-
ber that Christmas movie, the one
about the kid shooting his eye out
with the Red Rider BB gun? Re-
member how they screamed and
ran from the bully? That's how it is.
Bullies pick on defenseless victims.
All those cartoonists and columnists
and TV people who mock Mr.
Rogers, Peewee and Barney are bul-
lies.
They won't pick on someone
who can fight back. Why not bash
rapartists? Whataboutlawyersand
the American judicial system? What
about � dare I say it � the Presi-
dent? Sure Mr. Rogers wears cardi-
gans and he's soft-spoken, what can
he do? And Barney, he's not even
real! What can he do? And PeeWee,
well he masturbates, so he's obvi-
ously in no position to defend hisself
because he masturbates and that is
bad bad bad.
I hate a bully, dammit. This is
America. Wasn't this country
founded on freedom from bullies?
Don't we all hate bullies? Teachers,
flunk'em! Firemen, bum'em! Little
nerds who have repressed your rage
all these years, kill'em! Good God
rmhongry! Gimme a Slim Jim!
Kids of America, unite! Take
your lunch pails and your stuffed
Barneys and your little tigers that
roar when you squeeze them and
your Super Soaker 50's and your
Barbies and the next time you see a
big ol' bully, club him or her til the
blood flows freely and scream
"Don't run mv life
"fore writing original
material, the band played R.E.M.
and classic rock covers in small
5 and fraternity houses
across the Southeast.
Recently, they've released
Kootcliuvop, the band's first EP
with Fischo records. It features an
interesting combination of five
original songs. The first song, "The
Old Man and Me was influenced
by an unfortunate confrontation
Rucker had with a homeless per-
son. Rucker sarcastically refused
to give him any money. The next
morning, he woke up and wrote
a fictitious conversation about
the old man's life, which turned
out to be "TheOld Man and Me
It also features love songs
such as "Only Want to Be With
You and "Hold My Hand
Altogether, Kootchypop is a
pretty good EP, but the band feels
that they're ready for a bigger
project. "Recording Kootchypop
was a lot of fun Rucker said.
And he added, "It made us want
to go into the studio and do a
major product. I hope some-
body hears it, thinks it's great
and wants to give us that
chance. We could do OK on a
larger scale
"Watch
Out
Sparky hangs his
mouth open in
disbelief as he
watches a Pirate
Ride take a corner
carelessly,
demolishing his
favorite fire
hydrant.
File photo
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY'S
STUDENT UNION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
IS TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR A
DAY-STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE
FOR THE 1993-94 TERM
RESPONSIBILITIES:
QUALIFICATIONS:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving Committee Chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting Policy for the Student Union
� Full time Student
� Resides Off Campus
� Independent
DEADLINE TO APPLY: WEDNESDAY, SEPT 22
APPLICATIONS CAN BE PICKED UP AT THE STUDENT
UNION OFFICE - ROOM 236 MENDENHALL
Central Book & News
Janet
is Naked!
Come Get the Newest Rolling Stone
Mon-Fri 8:30-9:30pm
Sat & Sun 9:00-9:30
Greenville Square Shopping
Center (next to Kmart)
756-7177
j"l6dFFl
EVERYTHING
except magazines & Newspapers �
I with Student ID
! expires 93093 J
Country Cookin
CrmmxvfBm Square � Kmart Area
(Old Arby'a Building)
355-2211
BREAKFAST:
�Cheese Biscuits
�Cheese Biscuits
with Bacon, Ham or Sausage
�Pork Chop Biscuits
�Biscuit and Gravy
�Breakfast Plates
�Country Omlets
Et�ITEMS: i 12 PRICE LUNCH &
�Tenderized Ham
�BeefTips&Rice
�BBQ Chicken I SffCtiS
�BBQ Pork Chops I �. " � ' �
�Country Style Steak I �tnoke tH &fou
-Chicken & Pastry I
r
i
I p DINNER
1 Purchase any lunch entree mad 2
beverage, at the regular price and
receive the second one (ofequal or
71
1 KINC'IIM. 1 S
I) K I i
m i: n
K S I ! C
IF YOU THOUGHT COLLEGE WAS
EXPENSIVE, TRY PUTTING YOURSELF
THROUGH RETIREMENT.
Think about supporting yourself for
twenty-five, thirty years or longer
in retirement. It might be the greatest
financial test you 11 ever face. Fortunately,
you have one valuable asset in your
favor. Time.
Time to take advantage of tax-deferral.
Time for your money to grow.
But starting early is key. Consider this:
ifyou begin saving just $ioo a month at
age thirty, you can accumulate $172,109
by the time you reach age sixty-five.
Wait ten years and you'd need to set aside
$219 a month to reach the same goal.
At TIAA-CREF, we not only under-
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FEATURING
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HURSDAY SEPT 16th
ALL CAMPUS MALE STRIP-OFF
1st Prize $125
2nd Prize $50
3rd Prize $25
Ladies Only from 9-10:30
Admission $200 Members
$300Guests
$10G House Highballs
$1�� Domestics
Free Champagne for Ladies
DOOR PRIZES!
Entries Sign Up
at The Elbo or call
7 5 8 � 4 5 9 1
Wliiij WIF





MNi
"THE BROTHERHOOD OF
A LIFETIME"
SPRING RUSH '93 SIGMA SOCIAL '93
WHERE: Kingston Place Club House
WHEN: September 14,15,16,17
TTMES:8-11pm
TUESDAY: Seafood Festival
WEDNESDAY: Mexican Fiesta
THURSDAY: Wing-It
For Ride
Information Call
752-6027
or
758-5284
���wmpshpsbwi
.�





WANG TV
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By Manning & Ferguson Phoebe
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THlKiK HB FSBLS IT.
Adventures Of Kemple Boy
By Kemple
Seigfried and Barth
by Murphy
Attention Ya Cartoonist Bums!
That's right, you devil-may-care pedote blossoms, it's
time for the first of many cartoonist meetings for Fall '93.
All presently employed and newly hired cartoonists must
come to the offices of 77? East Carolinian next Thursday,
Sept. 16, at 6:00pm. Attendance is mandatory. If you
4 don't show up, don't expect to see your strip on this page.
I mean bidness! If there is a scheduling conflict, contact
Chris Kemple or leave a message at 758-8824 and have
a written excuse signed by your mommy. But I know
you'll all be there; it'll be more fun that a Monster Truck
show! And you might just learn something. Hot cha!





�in
September 9, 1993
The East Carolinian 11
NEWS
Continued from page 9
I'd ht
iwer liber-
luring last year sGOP
wen explained young
vote apathy like thi Reagan came
into his presidency withakot of youth
support, but one of his main mes-
sages was anti-government, and you
shouldn't necessarily let the govern-
ment take care of you, and Bush con-
tinued that, so I think we'vegrown up
with peopletellingusthatthegovem-
ment is not going to take care of you,
which is why they feel aliena ted from
voting Thev haven't had any pro-
grams like the Great Society or the
Peace Corps, programs directl v asso-
ciated with their young lives We're
apathetic because we lack our own
massive government programs? Call
us the Handout Generation.
On MTV "News Soren's un-
challenged flowerchild biases gave
young viewers nothing new except
R.E.M. music in the background and
freneticedi ting and camera work. The
reporting was unoriginal cliche, the
kind of liberal couch-potato analysis
thatradiatesfrommagazineslike Time.
"George Bush's first major decision
that would shape his presidency was
choosing his vice president during
the next four years, Quayle bloopers
wouldbecomemorewell-knownthan
anything else about the man Soren
"reported
Soren labeling Quayle as a naif is
surely the pot calling the kettle black
Neiv York Times media writer Eliza-
beth Kolbert noted that during an
interview with Bill Clinton, Soren
failed to recognize a crowd of ap-
proaching U.S. Senators, including
Rhode Island Democrat Claiborne
Pell, chairman of the Foreign Rela-
tions Committee. Soren isn't held to
the same standards of intelligence as
the networks and neither is MTV.
But NBC announced with great
fanfare that Soren would be an occa-
sional contributor to NBC News, as-
signed to the twentysomething beat.
On the December 15 'Today" show,
theory of voung
I his generation grew
up under administrations that be-
lieved government was not an agent
of social change What this genera-
tion sa w on T' w as the unraveling of
their parents' ioftv idealism Soren
interviewed four voung people: a
Clinton campaign worker, fashion-
ably leftish rapper M.C. Lyte, a cynic
wearing a "Bush: I Am Satan" Tshirt,
and a guy claiming Clinton 'has
tapped into something almost spiri-
tual in me To prove the depth of this
MTV-style report, an on-screen
graphic read: "71 percent of 20s think
Clinton would throw a better party
than Bush
Someone watching this cfory
would come away with the imp-es-
sion that the entire generation�or at
least those cool enough to be inter-
viewed on MTV�wears Clinton-
Gorebuttonsoristoocynicalorsquare
to care. But even worse than the
Clinton-groupie reporting is the edit-
ing. In one case, they changed camera
angles on Soren, who w as standing in
front of the Capitol, four times in one
16-second sentence: "Bill Clinton is
coming to Washington wrapped in
the mantle of idealism edit and
swarms of young twentysomething
dedicated Democrats edit are rush-
ing here to be part of the first admin-
istration whose president edit not
only remembers where he was when
JFK was shot, but where he was when
John Lennon was killed
What's most disturbing aoout
Soren is how her journalism, all lib-
eral cracks and liberal spokesmen, is
hailed for is professionalism. Rolling
Stone media critic Jon Katz, a former
producer for CBS "This Morning"
has hailed the dawning of the "new
news" (quirky, decidedly slanted,
market-niche news) over the "old
news" (boringhe-said,she-said,sup-
posedly objective). Katz acclaimed
Soren: "Tabitha was the perfect ve-
hicle to marry MTV with Its new
political mission. She was the voice
through which MTV established its
credibility People magazine quoted
ABC'sCatherineCrierwhoapplauds
Soren as "on the cutting edge of pre-
senting information to the younger
generation
That's the problem: much like
the "new journalism" of the 1960s,
reporters like Soren are more praised
for being hip (or "cutting edge") than
beinginsightfulorinvestigative.MTV
News gains "credibility" through its
attraction of a young audience, not
the integrity of its news product.
FJizabethKolbertof77it'Ntw York
Times was one of the few to give a
modest assessment of Soren's skills,
writing, "It is still too early to tell,
though whether her style�still some-
thing of a work in progress�will suc-
ceed on network television. After all,
what seemed smart next to Down-
town Julie Brown may not seem so
savvy next to NBC White House
reporter Andrea Mitchell
ButSorenhasenoughegotocom-
pete with the network stars, even if
shedoes lack theirnominal talent. She
has bought into her own media no-
tices, minkingherfast-food,hey-dude
news reporting makes her the next
Waiter Cronkite.
She told 77k New York Times she
does not want to be "a little Katie
Coouric I don't want to look like a
little network news anchor. I think
peoplelikemebecausermnot"When
TVGwafeaskedher if Murphy Brown
was her role model, Soren replied:
"No, unlike Dan Quayle, I realize
she's a fictional character. But I do
identify withherbecauseshe'sasmart
woman who isn't always under-
stood
IfTabitha Soren really represents
the best and brightest of our genera-
tion, and if MTV News speaks to us in
the only languagewecan understand,
then the country is in bad shape.
More likely, however, is that Tabitha
Sorenand her bubble-headed cohorts
are a caricature of our generation.
What the supposedly serious media
see when they look through their new
bifocals at the people growing up
behind themareaSoren-esquecollec-
tion of addled brains, raging hor-
mones, and vague, inarticulate leftist
politics: 60s Lite.
IIIIIIIII1IIII1IIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
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Prices in Ihe Ad Effective Thursday September 8, Trough Tuesday September 14, 1993. In Greenville Store Only. We
reserve the Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.
mmm
NMIHMMmHIRHMnmiMi







September 9. 1993
MEL
teron
of the pupil-te.
from
page 9
vh it h.is
l
Jim
Despite the unappealing turn of
events near the conclusion, Gibson
must be commended for The Man
Witftouta Face He handles thedirect-
ing chores ably, if not artistically. He
most notably extracts worthy perfor-
mances from himself and the rest of
the cast.
Gibsoncreatesa wonderful mood
by havingcandlesburningall around
while Justin and Charles act out the
denouement of "The Merchant of
Venice" in an otherwise darkened
room.
When McLeod reads Shylock's
speech in which Shylock claims that
being a Jew is no reason for hostility,
theaudience senses thatMcLeod takes
the oration personally. "If you prick
us, do we not bleed?" reads McLeod,
referringasmuchtothestoryasabout
hisown plight. Gibson demonstrates
that prejudice appears in all forms
and at all times. What Shakespeare
wrote nearly 400 years ago still ap-
plies today.
Gibsonalsoknowshowtoaccen-
tuateenvironmental beauty. The New
England coast provides a beautiful
setting in which to tell a tale of the
dissemination of knowledge.
Gibson wants to center on the
teaching. The thrill of watching a stu-
dent gain a firm grasp on what was
once incomprehensible material ob-
viously enthralls Gibson and he con-
veys thatsenseofaweto theaudience.
To see a young man pass from a
fascination with comic books to a fas-
cination withShakespeareinonesum-
mer propels the story and gives it
depth.
In a time when films too often
deal with violence and death or ro-
mance and sex, The Man Witlwut a
Foceprovidesa well-intentioned, well-
crafted alternative. MelGibsonneeds
to be commended.
On a scale of one to ten. The Man
Without a Face rates a seven
Shooter came back strong,
return1 ith .i comk called Val-
iant i hough it had a quiet start, it
didn't take long before the entire
country was talking about Valiant's
titles and their sky-rocketing back
issue prices. Shooter had risen from
the ashes. Things were going well,
however, before "creative differ-
ences" forced him away from Val-
iant.
Shooter didn't disappear this
time, though. He immediately be-
gan to start a new comic company,
HIS Comic Company. Shooter
would no longer be forced out of his
position. In August, Defiant's first
title, Plasm, was released. By the end
of the year Shooter plans on having
at least four titles out with several
more on the horizon for the begin-
ning of '94.
Continued from page 9
The big difference between
Shooter's move to Defiant and his
resurrection of Valiant is that, at
Valiant, he came into a working
company and salvaged it single-
handedly as a writer and editor for
every title Valiant had. He acted as
both talentscoutand accountant for
them. At Defiant he's the editor of
the books.
Shooter doesn't have to write
all of the books, he's hired other
proven writers to work with, in-
cluding Steve Ditko (co-creator of
Spider-Man), Mike W. Barr (Batman
writer) and Chris Claremont (the
man that made the X-Men The X-
Men). Shooter's also brought many
people from Valiant. So watch out
for Plasm, and watch out for Defiant
Comics. While he only salvaged
Valiant, Shooter is Defiant.
Love Mother Earth -
don ft forget to recycle
milk jugs.
ECU'S NATURAL FOODS
SOURCE
NcturalOrganic Groceries - Produce
Vitamins - Supplements
Bulk Foods, Herbs and Spices
HealthBeauty Products - Cosmetics
Books and Magazines
Close to Campus in Downtown G'vllle
405 EVANS ST.
758-0850
Hours 10-6, M-Sat.
3
TUDENT
OVERNMENT
SSOCIATION
FALL ELECTIONS 1993
FILING DATE SEPTEMBER 13-20
ACTUAL ELECTIONS SEPTEMER 29,
9 AM-6 PM
LOCATIONS
1. Mendenhall
3. Croatan
5. Belk Building
7. General Classroom
9. Bottom of College Hi
2. Student Store
4.Health Science Library
6. Jones Cafeteria
8. Joyner Library
10. Between Jarvis & Jenkins
Positions Available:
� Dorm Representatives
� Day Student Representative
� Class Officers
BRING YOUR STUDENT ID &
MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
Any Questions Call 757-4726
GHOST
Continued
trom
page 9
and "Wichita Lineman" are three of
the better songs on this 14-song al-
bum.
These guysdohave promise and
talent they are young, so maybe their
best is yet to come. There is some
potent lyricism on some of the songs,
especially on "Country where the
problems of Northern Ireland are
addressed�you know, the IRA, car
bombs, etc. "It has a lot more to do
with money rather than religion
says McKay.
Ghosts of an American Airman
will be heading outon the road again
for a U.S. and European tour in sup-
port of their new album. If you like
the Connels, you probably will like
these guys. Support voung talent.
Highlights Perms Cuts Coloring
Listed in Ladies Home journal Magazine as
"As one of the top Salons in U.S
If
Professional
Designers
Free
Consultations
Professional Products
By
appointment
only
830-5593
830-5597
Go Pirates
Go Pirates
Go Pirates
Go Pirates
Go Pirates
1011 B Charles Blvd. .Greenville, NC 27858 � 919-752:0551
East Carolina's Trail & Nature Shop
"Our Trails Are Also On the Water"
patagonia pfflK
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications for
Creative Director.
This is a paid position that will teach you to work with a team. You'll gain a valuable
reference source and experience applicable to future employment. Macintosh skills
are required and any student can apply. The East Carolinian is located on the second
floor of the Student Publications Building.
757.6366 or 758.8616
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ATTIC
752-7303 1 209 E. 5th St.
� TV
CoMecfif
Greenville, NC
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
Live Music"
EVERY 1987�1988�19e9�1990�1991.1992
WEDNESDAY GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLlI
Thursday Sept. 9
D�flN DOUAR BAND
ECU vs. Syracuse on 15 ft. Screen
99C32 oz DRAFT � 99C HIBALLS
ay Sept,
$2.00 32 oz DRAFT
Saturday Sept. 11
CHAIRMAN
OF THE
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99C HIBALLS � $2.00 32 oz DRA
COMING SOON
September 21st
WIDESPREAD PANIC
October 5h
WWWWHWf1WWII'
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- �
'�rmsr mi
T
5&r. f,mr
il
THE BROTHERHOOD OF
A LIFETIME"
SPRING RUSH '93 SIGMA SOCIAL '93
WHERE: Kingston Place Club He
WHEN: September 14,15,16, 1
TIMES: 8-11 pm
TUESDAY: Seafood Festival
WEDNESDAY: Mexican Fiesta
THURSDAY: Wing-It
For Ride
Information Call
752-6027
or
758-5284
�4 i
'
� .�.





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Adventures Of Kemple Boy
By Kemple
r
Seigfried and Barth
by Murphy
Attention Ya Cartoonist Bums!
That's right, you devil-may-care pedote blossoms, it's
time for the first of many cartoonist meetings for Fall '93.
All presently employed and newly hired cartoonists must
come to the offices of The East Carolinian next Thursday,
Sept. 16, at 6:00pm. Attendance is mandatory. If you
don't show up, don't expect to see your strip on this page.
I mean bidness! If there is a scheduling conflict, contact
Chris Kemple or leave a message at 758-8824 and have
a written excuse signed by your mommy. But I know
you'll all be there; it' 11 be more fun that a Monster Truck
show! And you might just learn something. Hot cha!
�v ��





The East Carolinian
September 9, 1993
Sports
Page 15
F"a Orangemen storm Ficklen tonight
Football �U))
tsSj racuse (ESPN) at 8:01
p.ni. in Ficklen Stadium
Friday, Sept. 10
Volleyball (0-5)
at Virginia Commonwealth
Toum Richmond, Va.
Saturday, Sept. 11
Volleyball (0-5)
at Virginia Commonwealth
Toum Richmond, Va.
Soccer (1-0) Toumampnh
versus VMI
and winner of UNCW and
Marshall match, 2 p.m.
Cross Country
at Pembroke State Invit
Pembroke, N.C.
Scores
Volleyball
versus UNCG, Late
Soccer
versus North Carolina, Late
Intramurals
The 1993 Flag Football,
according to Rec Services
top picks for this Fall sea-
son will be as follows:
Men's Gold
1. Pray For Rain
2. Super Ho's
3. Need More Beer
4. Northern Pride
5. Team X
Women's
1. All the Right Moves
2. The Terminators
3. The Rec Girls
Men's Purple
1. Nine Guys & Willie
2. Reality Check
3. Snapper King
4. Rough Necks
5. Cavemen
Sororities
1. Alpha Delta Pi
2. Alpha Phi
3. Delta Zeta
Fraternity Gold
1. Sigma Phi Epsilon
2. Theta Chi
3. PIKA
Fraternity Purple:
1. PIKA B
2. Sigma Phi Epsilon B
3. Pi Kappa Phi B
The Department of
Recreational Services
and the Intramural
Sports program will
begin the new academic
year with the opportu-
nity to participate.
The sport of Whiffleball
has increased in popu-
larity both within the
state, the nation, and
now the campus of
ECU.
The top picks for this
hot new sport are the
following:
1. Suns of Thunder
2. Naturals
3. Untouchables
4. U-idiots
5. Hit men
Photo courtesy of SU SID
ByRobert STodd
Sports Editor
Syracuse is one of the best
teams in the nation and has won
five straight bowl games. The Pi-
rates are no match for the
Orangemen and are not likely to
catch them off guard as ECU has
done in the past.
Win or lose, this game will set
the tone of the season. The Pirates
will be exposed and everyone will
know wether or not to believe the
hype. A victory here is not neces-
sary for a successful season � if
ECU keeps it respectable, it will be
a moral victory.
If Pirate quarterback Marcus
Crandell avoids mistakes, he will
be successful and so will the team.
300 yards passing is not as impor-
tant as keeping the INT column
blank.
Ball State lost to the
Orangemen last week, but ran the
ball better than expected. ECU's
ground attack should enjoy much
success. Runningback Junior Smith
and Jerris McPhail could put up
big numbers.
The Buc defense will have its
hardest test of the year. If they give
up less than 42 to the Orangemen
they have improved on last year.
SU quarterback Marvin
Graves is a legitimate Heisman �
Trophy candidate was the second
rated passer behind Heisman Tro-
phy winnerGinoTorretta. Against
the Pirates in 1992, Graves threw
for 213 yards, completing 11-17
with three touchdowns and no in-
terceptions.
The loss of wide receiver
Quadry Ismail hasn't hurt a bit.
Meet Shelby Hill. After playing in
the shadow of "The Missile" and
former Orangeman Rob Carpen-
ter, Hill, a senior, is All-American
calibre. He contemplated turn-
ing professional after last season
but decided to finish his career at
Syracuse and is expected to be a
first-round draft pick at the end
of the 1993season. Hill took three
passes for 65 yards last year in
Ficklen Stadium.
The Orangemen's defense
ranked fifth in the nation against
the run in 1992 and returned six
starters. If SU stops running back
Junior Smith and his backfield
partner Jerris McPhail, Crandell
will be forced to air the ball out
frequently in his first collegiate
game�which happens to be on
national television. HowCrandell
handles himseif under the pres-
sure sets the tone for the remain-
der of the season.
SU's core of defensive backs
areexperienced and should rarely
give up a long-yardage pass play.
The loss of linebacker DanConley
will hurt the defensive unit tre-
mendously. Conley was credited
with 71 tackles last season.
Defensive end Kevin
Mitchell was voted Defensive
MVP in the Fiesta Bowl and is
fourthonSU'scareersacklist. He
will need to step up.
This will be, by far, the big-
gesthomegameof the year. How-
ever, the Bucs may be better off
playing this game in the Carrier
Dome. As road favorite over the
last 10 years, Syracuse is 24-5-2.
As home favorite, They are 22-20.
As the underdog, ECU has a bet-
ter record on the road than at
home.
To win, ECU will need the
lead athalftime. TheOrangemen
have lost only two games over
the last 81 when going into the
locker room ahead.
Pirate gridiron notes
ECU INJURY UPDATE -
Redshirt freshman quarterback
Chris Hester will miss the Syra-
cuse game due to a broken right
thumb. He will likely miss the
first 3-4 games. The injury was
suffered in the Pirates' first fall
scrimmage.
Junior running back Damon
Wilson will likely miss the Syra-
cuse game due to
tendonitis in both
knees. He has satout
ECU's last two fall
scrimmages. He
may miss 1 -2 games.
Junior defen-
sive end Willie
Brookins sprained
an ankle in ECU's
second scrimmage
on Aug. 25 but
should be able to
play against Syra-
cuse.
Senior defensive tackle Jeff
Cooke suffered a sprained toe in
practice and then dislocated a
thumb later in drills. However,
Cooke should play against the
Orangemen.
PIRATES vs. BIG EAST -
This season, ECU will play two
BIG EAST football programs -
Syracuse and Virginia Tech.
Last season, ECU played
four BIG EAST teams, defeating
Pittsburgh and Virginia Tech
and falling to Syracuse and West
Virginia.
The Pirates have a 12-28
record against schools currently
in the BIG EAST. However, 16 of
Damon Wilson
those losses are against West
Virginia and Miami (Fla.).
East Carolina is 4-3 against
Virginia Tech, 2-2 against Pitts-
burgh, l-3againstSyracuseand
5-4 against Temple. ECU has
never played against Rutgers
and Boston College.
LATE OPENING DATE -
The Sept. 9 opening date is the
latest opening date
since 1982, when
ECU played N.C.
State on Sept. 11.
The Pirates played
on Sept. 9 against
Bowling Green in
the season opener
during the 1989 sea-
�b son.
J�B INDEPEN-
DENTFOOTBALL
ALLIANCE - The
Pirates, for the sec-
ond straight year, are members
of the Independent Football Al-
liance. Members include South-
em Miss, Memphis State, East
Carolina, Tulsa and Cincinnati.
This year will be the first for
full round-robin scheduling be-
tween the alliance schools.
Last year, Southern Miss
went through the rotation un-
defeated while Memphis State
was 3-1. ECU was 1-2 against
UFA schools last season.
The IFA will be featured on
two consecutive ESPN Thurs-
day night performances. On
Sept. 2, Southern Miss hosted
Pitt, and ECU will host Syra-
cuse the following Thursday. j
Holcomb cruises into ECU
By Ashley NeaI
Staff Writer
SinceAug.7ChadHolcombhas
beenpreparingforkickoff.Holcomb,
ECU's place kicker, will make his
debut on ESPN when the Pirates
take on Syracuse.
On the sidelines, Holcomb can
easily be spotted.He is theone wear-
ing different colored shoes. This
ritual of wearing a black pant shoe
and whitekickingshoedatesback to
high school.
"I love to have mix-matched
shoes cause I like to be myself
Holcomb said. "I want everyone to
notice I'm an individual
Although he expresses himself
as an individual, Holcomb said he
realizes it takes a team effort to win a
football game.
His style is exhibited off the
field as well. On ECU's campus,
students walk, ride bikes or drive
to class. This freshman said he
opts to ride a scooter to be differ-
ent.
"Most people ride mountain
bikes, but with my scooter, people
say, There goes Chad Holcomb
said.
Aside from football and scoot-
ers, Holcomb enjoys a broad spec-
trum of other pastimes, including
tennis, golf, snow skiing and snow
boarding. He enjoys snow board-
Photo by ECU Photo Lab
Chad Holcomb, ECU's place kicker sports different colored
shoes on the field and rides a scooter to class.
ing, especially, because the sport re-
mains a novelty in most circJes.
Of his position, Holcomb says,
"Asaplace kicker, youcan'tbeemo-
tionally distracted. It's toughbecause
the position requires me to be calm
when I'd rather be fired up
Inadditiontokeepinghisemo-
tions enact, Holcomb aspires to be
ECU's leading scorer and break the
school record for the most PATs
See HOLCOMB page 16
Kegs banned for good of school
Bull may be headed for HOF
DURHAM (AP) � The Bull
spent five seasons in Durham and
it's ready for retirement.
The question is whether the
next stop is the Baseball Hall of
Fame.
The wooden, smoke-sneezing
beast that's been a fixture above
the right field fence in Durham
Athletic Park is ready to come
down as the Class A Durham Bulls
move to a new $12 million sta-
dium.
Hall of Fame officials said
Monday they want to give
baseball's highest honor to the
mascot Hollywood set builders
created in 1988 for the movie "Bull
Durham
It was designed to last only for
the brief time that Kevin Costner
was in town filming the flick.
It isn't aging very well.
"The first guy to hit the bull
with a home run this year took off
a piece of his ear said Leisha
See BULLS page 18
Byltobert S. Todd
Sports Editor
Kegs are alters of worship at
most social functions where alco-
hol is available. However, over
the summer, kegs were banned
from tailgating on ECU property
in an attempt to reduce over-con-
sumption of alcohol, improve
ECU's image and reduce the
university's liability in the event
of an accident (a 16-year-old girl
almost died from alcohol poison-
ing last season).
Bringing kegs onto ECU prop-
erty will result in the confiscation
of the keg, which will then be
returned to the distributor, and a
possible citation. Anyone caught
may also be wri tten up, sent to the
dean and banned from football
games.
After kick-off the lots will be-
gin to be cleared and people who
are obviously intoxicated will not
be allowed to enter the stadium.
Over-consumption is the is-
sue, not kegs. Irresponsible drink-
ers and kegs combine and ruin
what should be an athletic event.
"We are not going to allow
(tailgaters) to bring in truck loads
of beer said Keith Knox, crime
prevention officer of ECU's Pub-
lic Safety. "If that's why they came
to an ECU athletic event the need
to go somewhere else if all they
want to do is party. (Tailgating) is
not a place to come and party and
see if you can get drunk Knox
also said virtually all fights and
disorderly conduct revolved
around kegs. He cited public
urination, passed-out minors
and foul language as results of
the free-flowing kegs.
"We had to call the rescue
squad at least two, three or four
times a game to the areas
where the kegs were because of
fights Knox said. "If a big situ-
ation got out of hand out there.
. . we have a serious security
problem
Student opposition surfaced
as news of the ban spread. How-
ever, the ban applies to every-
one, in spite of rumors that the
Pirate Club is exempt.
SGA passed a resolution in
See KEGS page 17





� �
September 9, 1993

on trial since
book publication
night,
1
jlreadv
Nothing is .is good as it
seems and nothing is a bad as it
seems. Somewhere in between
there reality tails he said. "I
say that quite often. I've been
saying it to myself more than
anybody.
Holtz' brooding, philosophi-
cal ramblings might have seemed
out of place in a mid-week news
conference that was supposed to
be about Notre Dame football,
but under the circumstances, it
was understandable. As if every-
one in America didn't know be-
forehand, it should have been
obvious by the end of
"Nightline" Tuesday night that
Holtz has a lot on his mind. In
order, those things seemed to be:
� The lingering matter of
his team playing crummy in a
season-opening win last week-
end over Northwestern.
ak he continued to
as principal target of a book
with a long and damning title,
I nder the Tarnished Dome:
Hame Betraved Its
deals tor Football Glory
� The prospect of facing a
tough, veteran Michigan team
with his dream for a second na-
tional title ending before it really
began.
Indeed, so gloomy did Holtz
appear at moments that specula-
tion had it he spent all of Sunday
worrying what Notre Dame fans
thought about him after Satur-
day. And that he spent all of Mon-
day worrying what the rest of the
world would think about him af-
ter Tuesday.
Keeping in mind that the rest
of the week has already been re-
served to worry about this com-
ing Saturday, this hasn't left Holtz
much time for fun. Or for read-
ing, apparently.
"I have not read the book. I
do not plan to read the book. I'm
not going to comment on the
book he said, repeating what
See HOLTZ page 17
HOLCOMB
Continued from page 15
(Points After Touchdowns).
Holcomb attributes his athletic
motivation to two things: his father
and a desire to someday play profes-
sional I v. Concerning his focuson foot-
ball, Holcomb said his father had the
most influence by encouraging him
to "think football" whenever he had
free time. Another motivation gen-
erator regarding football stems from
when he thinks of how far he has
come (from high school to college)
and where he wants to be after his
college career.
"To see kickers go from high
school to college and on to the pros,
when I have doubts that makes me
want to go to the pros Holcomb
said.
Bob Babich, ECU's inside line-
backer coach, became interested in
Holcomb after iewing ideo foot-
age and attending one of the place
kicker's high school games.
"He had the ability to kick the
ball for us to play winning football
Babich said.
"Ever since then (the game),
coach (Babich) has liked what he's
seen defensive back, Hank Cooper
said. "We needed a kicker-a voung
kicker-so Cliad was one of our top
picks
Holcomb credits Cooper and
-isitationwithhisdecisiontoplayfor
the Pirates.
"When compared tootherplaces
I visited, East Carolina was more or-
ganized Holcomb said. "Also, the
coaches got along like friends and
that makes a difference
Duskinfrontofthesrudentstore
offers nothing more than students
trickling in and out of the air-condi-
tioned lobby and mosquitoes buzz-
ing frantically overhead. Holcomb
pauses, scans the future placed be-
fore him as far as possible and quietly
says he wants to be remembered as,
"someone who tried hard on and off
the field
Not for riding a scooter to class.
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$11.99
�pS
J






September 9, 1993
The East Carolinian 17
HOLTZ
Continued from page 16
taken by the university to end
tor students
A typical 15 gallon Log is the
equivalent of lb3.2 12 02. cans or
�ses, prompting fear of exces-
sive trash and broken glass. How-
ever, everyone entering the tail-
gating area will be given trash
bags and the clean-up crews will
recycle bottles and cans, accord-
ing to Knox.
The local beer industry mav
feel effects as well. Patel Dinesh,
manager of the Pirates' Chest said
he expects the ban to hurt quite a
bit, but he will not know for sure
until after the first game.
A local Anheiser-Busch
distributer expects the loss of keg
revenue to be made up in package
sales.
"Our local stores will take
a loss, where, in turn, the grocery
stores should do excellent said
Wes Tinkham, a Budweiser rep-
resentative. "I don't think the ban
was appropriate, because there
are a simple few who are in col-
lege and can't drink responsibly
so that it ruins an ECU tradition
for all the rest
The tradition of kegs at
taigating is something that may
have been tarnishing the
University's image.
"When you consider only 20
percent of the student body is of
legal drinking age Knox said, "it
docs not look good for the univer-
sity to condone kegs and buffet-
type drinking situations. And, we
are the only university that even
allows (kegs) in those types of
areas.
"After two or three games
people won't even think about
it
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otball players a
m going to do
. ittort I can
To his credit, Holt was not
ne humor.
When someone asked
whether he planned to exploit a
relatively inexperienced Michi-
gan line, Holtz replied, "I have a
couple of guys who just found
out last Saturday that we wore
blue
And when someone else
asked if his team, like Michigan
and preseason favorite Florida
State, should be considered part
of the still-emerging national
championship picture, Holtz
wondered whether he'd heard the
question right.
"Who, Michigan?" he said.
"No the questioner re-
sponded, "you
"Us?" Holtz said. "I think
we're in the nation.
"But no he added a mo-
ment later, "no national hunt. I
don't believe so. No, not at all.
We got too many problems right
now that we've got to get re-
solved. We've got a lot of con-
cerns
The way things are going in
South Bend right now, Holtz
could have been talking about
concerns over his offense or his
special teams or, if the book ever
generates as much light as it has
heat, his reign at Notre Dame.
One of the co-authors of the
book said on "Nightline" that
image means more to Notre
Dame than the reality of the situ-
ation.
But Holtz, who chose not to
appear alongside some of his ac-
cusers, knows even better that
winning means at least as much
to Notre Dame as either.
And that, he said a few hours
before the show was aired, was
the only thing that really con-
cerned him at the moment.
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1'in.sw umw " ��- '� -
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"��
�� �-r
September 9, 1993
sport current!
consecutive winning
seasons?
�jxnsuo i.xiuoj jiff si
Hvqjsug 'juods fiflSJixi VfUSl
�4- Tlio F'Wlff C Five points are awarded far predicting the winner and three 1
DtXlI lilt: LLXptliD . additional points are given to the person closest to the spread. � � � plSO l"1 VVciLTin.
Robert Todd
Sports
1 ditor
SU14, 35-21
"Syracuse isone
of the premier
programs in the
country. ECU
may surprise
them with new
talent
Brian Olson
TEC Assistant
Sports Editor
SU 17, 38-21
"Syracuse is in
a class of the
their own com-
pared to the in-
experience and
youth of the Pi-
rates"
Kevin Hali
WZMB Sports
Director
Brian Bailey
WNCT-TV
Sports Director
Chris Justice
WCTI-TV
Sports Director
Brad Zaruba
WITN-TV
Sports Director
SU 4,35-31 SU 11,35-24 SU 12,33-21
"Pirates put up "Crandell and "ECU can stay
good struggle, Letcherhookup close early be-
but they're too for a couple of cause of all the
inexperienced big plays, but
Graves is too
much for Pirate
defense
Currently, all participants are deadlocked at ZERO.
exdtement, but
Syracuse is too
strong
SU 16,26-10
"It is going to
take a while for
the Pirate of-
fense to gel
Demetrius Carter
ABLE President
ECU1,28-27
"I have faith in my
fraternity broth-
ers, No. 20 and 25
and I pick us to
win in a thriller
Keith Dyer
SGA President
SU14,42-28
"Ifllbeatough
test but a good
learning experi-
ence. We'll gain
confidence
through the
loss
U.S. Open lost most top-notch stars early
NEW YORK (AP) � In the
beginning, the top half of the
men's draw of the U.S. Open
read like a Who's Who of tennis.
Now it looks like a Who Was.
Jim Courier, the world's No.
1 player and the topseed, is gone.
So, too, is Boris Becker, the
1989 winner and this year's
fourth seed.
No. 5 Sergi Brugera, No. 10
Richard Krajicek, No. 11 Goran
Ivanisevic and No. 13IvanLendl.
Gone, gone, gone and gone.
Still in the title chase today
in the year's final Grand Slam
tournament are giant-killers
Cedric Pioline of France and
Magnus Larsson of Sweden,
Wally Masur of Australia and
eighth-seeded Andrei Med vedev
of Ukraine.
Oh, what a Tuesday it was!
Courier was the first to de-
part, driven out by the scintillat-
ing stroke production of Pioline,
the tournament's 15th seed, 7-5,
6-7 (4-7), 6-4,6-4.
"I was just more consistent
and I played very good on the
important points, the key
points said Pioline, emulating
theeffort in 1927 of Rene Lacoste,
one of the famed Four Muske-
teers, who beat No. 1 Bill Tilden
in the 1927 U.S. Open final.
After Steffi Graf, the
women's top seed, escaped
Gabriela Sabatini 6-2,5-7,6-1 in a
lengthy battle, Becker followed
Courier to the sideline, falling to
Larsson 6-2,6-3,3-6,7-5.
Those were the headline-grab-
bers.
But Masur made news when he
came back from a 5-0 fifth-set deficit
to outlast Jamie Morgan 3-6,4-6,6-3,
6-4, 7-5 and Medvedev eliminated
Krajicek 6-4,3-6,6-1, 7-6 (7-4).
With all the upsets, the top two
men'sseeds left in the tournament�
No. 2 Pete Sampras and No. 7 Michael
Chang � faced each other last night
in a quarterfinal matchup.
Graf and No. 11 Manuela
Maleeva-Fragniere will face each
other in a women's semifinal. The
latter advanced by stopping the
remarkable run of unseeded
Kimiko Date of Japan 7-5,7-5.
Befuddled by Larsson's pres-
sure and his own mistakes, Becker
had no problem understanding
why he's on the ou tside looking in.

IL1FA
Rush dates are September 13-16.
Come join us at 8 pm in Belk Hall
basement Monday and Tuesday
evening. Wednesday and Thursday
locations will be announced.
For more information or for rides
please call
756-9819 or 752-9103.
Hope to see you there!
BULL
Continued from page 15
Cowart, a team spokesman.
"It's in bad shape said Bulls
General Manager Al Mangum.
"Our thought is wherever it goes it
needs to be preserved
Someone with the Bulls called
the hall of fame and asked if there
could be a spot for the old bull there,
said Ted Spencer, the Hall's cura-
tor.
"We found out how big it was
and said it would be nice to have,
but we don't have room for it he
said Monday.
That changed.
Mangum said the museum was
interested in the bull for a new base-
ball-in-the-movies exhibit.
There are details to be worked
out, such as who would take the
bull down from its perch, who
would handle its transportation to
Cooperstown, N. Y and whether
it would ever be allowed to come
home for a visit.
"We may decide we want to
put it on loan and then it would
have to come to Durham
Mangum said.
"One of the other options is
the bull would be put in the new
ballpark, not on the right field
fence, but somewhere
in in in in sn y.n y.n vn
M
M
a
M
M
RUSH
SIGMA PI
ALPHA DELTA PI
SORORITY
HOUSE
Sept
14-17
757-0707
752-0184
M
a
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in in in in m in in in
You've jusjif set the record
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SJjJGLE
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DAY. TH
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ONG ANli
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YOU WANTED. AND NOW YOU'R
SUPPOSED TO OPEN A BANK ACCOUNT7.
The Wachovia College Account.
We know you've got a thousand and one things on
your mind. So we'll make this quick. You're going to need
a bank account. Why not get one that makes life easier?
For $3.50 a month, (free during the summer) you can
write up to 10 checks a month and get money out of the
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It's as simple as it sounds. Of course you can get
other things like overdraft protection, Phone Access,8"
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We could go on. But we realize reading about
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 9, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 09, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.958
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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