The East Carolinian, September 7, 1993






MftMl
Going the distance
ECU'S cross country team began its
season last Saturday against
Wilmington and Coastal Carolina.
See story page 14.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 48
Circulation 12,000
Greenville. North Carolina
Tuesday, September 7,1993
18 Pages
Physics welcomes new chair yearbook staff
Photo by Cednc Van
Buren
Dr. Mumtaz A. Dinno, the new chair of the physics
department, looks forward to the challenges of his
new positions.
By Lisa Dawson
Staff Writer
Dr. Mumtaz A. Dinno has
begun work as chair for the
physics department at ECU. A
native of Iraq and an American
citizen, Dinno comes from the
University of Mississippi,
whore he worked as a professor
of physics and astronomy.
"I saw a challenge and felt
that I could contribute well to
ECU Dinno said.
"I am able to welcome
changes and believe that I will
be able to strengthen the phys-
ics department through my
various teaching and research
experiences
Dinno's career history in-
cludes a year as visiting profes-
sor of physics at the University
of London, a post as lecturer at
the University of Tripoli, Libya,
and several weeks in China
where he presented various lec-
tures and seminars.
Dinno researched and
taught in Baghdad before he
came to the United States. While
working at the University of
Louisville, he earned a master
o science and a doctorate de-
gree.
Dinno was also given a
Certificate of Teaching Excel-
lence from Virginia Tech Uni-
versity.
When asked about prob-
lems encountered at ECU,
Dinno said, "ECU, as a univer-
sity and faculty governance, has
so many rules and regulations
that fall in excess to what is
needed for an expeditious way
of doing things. It's nice to have
rules, but too many is crip-
pling
As new chair for the phys-
ics department, Dinno has many
iHpa that Vie would likp tr� �pp
enacted at ECU. He feels that
two ideas, in particular, need to
be enacted: special programs to
help undergraduates and
graduates contribute to society
and to themselves, and special
honors classes for exceptional
students.
A doctorate program in
biomedical physics is also
planned for the future.
"This program will be the
only one of its kind in North
Carolina, and the nature of the
program makes it the only one
of its kind in the U. S Dinno
said.
As the new chair, Dinno
encourages students to feel free
to visit or call, and asks all stu-
dents, whether physics majors
or not, to come and participate
with the Society of Physics Stu-
dents and Sigma Pi Sigma.
"Feel free to come by, for I
would like to hear from the stu-
dents, and coffee is always pro-
vided Dinno said.
anew
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
With new ideas and les-
sons learned from last year's ex-
periences, students enrolled in
"Special Problems and Commu-
nication have begun produc-
ing the '9394 "Treasure Chest"
video yearbook.
Executive producer
Stephen Lewis and advisor Greg
Brownare overseeing the
project.The "Treasure Chest"
crews attempt to cover as many
organizationsand events as pos-
sible, but they need to know
when and where the events are
to be held.
Lewis requests that orga-
ni7 tionsand university depart-
ments contact the "Treasure
Chest" staff in the Student Pub-
lications Building to discuss how
they would like to be repre-
sented.
Area schoolssuch as UNC
Greensboro and James Mason
University have also moved
from the old print yearbook to
the video yearbook.
The students on this yea r's
crew will develop format ideas
based on last year's video, vid-
eos used at other schools and
their own innovations. These
ideas will then be submitted
to Lewis and Brown, who will
select the format to be used.
When asked what to ex-
pect, Lewis said "the format
will not be the same as last
year's
The '9394 "Treasure
Chest" should be available in
mid- to late April, and stu-
dents may pick up their free
copy with an ECU ID. The spe-
cific dates and locations will
be announced in early spring.
Lewis described last
year's response to the new
yearbook as "OK, but not over-
whelming so only 5000 cop-
ies are being printed this
spring.
Like the former "Bucca-
neer" print yearbook, the
"Treasure Chest" receives
funding through student fees.
But the "Treasure Chest" is
less expensive to produce, so
more money is now available
for other student publications.
Anyone who saw last
year's yearbook can expect to
see something far improved
this spring because " after one
year of learning said Lewis,
"it's going to be better
ECU
sponsors strategies workshop
By Tammy Zion
Staff Writer
The ECU School of Business
will be sponsoring the workshop
"InvestmentStrategiesfortheCon-
servarive investor beginning
Sept. 7. The course targets people
who are not prone to take risks
and directs them to get the best
return on their investments.
Bill Freuler, a stockbroker
from a national firm, will speak on
issues such as retirement, estate
and tax planning. Participants will
also be taught the stocks, bonds
and mutual funds "language so
that investing will not be such a
mysterv to beginners. There will
be no obligation for any course
participant to invest.
The workshop has been of-
fered each spring and fall for the
past three years.
"Given the economic time,
saving is more important than ever
before said Betty Wilson, pro-
gram i .ganizer.
She suggests the program to
young couples wanting to protect
their savings, or start planning for
retirement. She also recommends
the course to parents who want to
save for their children's education.
Classes will be held in the
BB&T Center for Executive Educa-
tion, beginning on September 7.
The course will run for five
weeks, meeting from 7-9 every
Tuesday night. Fees are $39 for one
person, or �69 for two.
For further information and
to register, call Angela Williams in
the Office of Professional programs
at 757-6377.
The
doctor
will be
with you
soon ?
Two students
watch T.V.
while waiting
in the Student
Health
Services
lobby.
Photo by Cedric Van
Buren
Nations oldest public
university to turn 200
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)
�Andy Griffith, Bob Timberlake,
Dean Smith and Michael Jordan
will play roles in the 200th birth-
day of the nation's first public
university.
And the University of North
Carolina is on the "maybe list"
for a visit from President Bill
Clinton at the celebration's Oct.
12 kickoff, organizers said.
Revisiting the University of
North Carolina's rich ed uca tional
history might provide better vi-
sion in the years ahead, said Rich-
ard Richardson, chairman of the
University of North Carolina Bi-
centennial Observance.
"I think it UNC was
founded with the recognition that
there should be a public institu-
tion for the future of the nation
and the future of the state he
said. "We want to share the heri-
tage. We belong to everybody
The eight-month bicenten-
nial celebration is intended to re-
flect that sentiment with art, mu-
sic, scientific conferences, a reded i-
cation of historic buildings and
Syria's president backs plans for Palestinian self-rule
free lectures by top professors
throughout the state.
In addition to the hoped-for
visit by Clinton, activities will in-
clude:
� A special commemora-
tive symphony by UNC alumnus
and Broadway composer Richard
Adler, who wrote "Damn Yan-
kees" and "Pajama Game to
premiere Oct. 11.
� A U.S. postcard featuring
Timberlake's rendering of the
university's Playmakers Theatre.
� 13 public service an-
nouncements by Griffith, a UNC
alumnus, including one that fea-
tures a clip of Opie on the "Andy
Griffith Show" talking about his
goal of attending the University
of North Carolina.
� A ceremony in which
Smith, the Tar Heel basketball
coach, presents a seedling from
the historic Da vie Poplar to a sixth-
grader from each of the state's 100
counties.
The observance, which runs
See UNC page 5
DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) �
Syrian President Hafez Assad,
who wields influence over radi-
cal PLO factions that oppose a
peace agreement with Israel, en-
dorsed the landmark accord af-
ter a 6 12-hour meeting with
Yasser Arafat.
If the backing by Assad in
fact materializes, it would bol-
ster Arafat's chances to secure
backing for the agreement from
the PLO's ruling Executive Com-
mittee, where the Damascus-
based factions are represented.
The meeting could begin
this week. Israel has already ap-
proved the deal.
The Syrian leader's care-
fully worded statement Sunday
comes a day after King Hussein
of Jordan gave his support to the
agreement.
Jordan, Syria and Lebanon,
the other Arab parties, have all
chided Arafat for not consulting
them about the secret negotia-
tions that reached an agreement
for self-rule in the Gaza Strip and
the West Bank town of Jericho.
Assad's support was par-
ticularly in question. He has long
competed with Arafat for control
of the Palestinian movement, and
relations between the two have
rarely been tranquil.
In a statement after their
meeting in Damascus, Assad in-
dicated he would not oppose the
plan as long as Arafat can gain
the Palestinians' backing.
Spokes-
man Jibran
Kourieh said
Assad stressed
"Syria'ssupport
for the rights of
the brotherly
Palestinian
people, who, to-
gether with their
institutions,
have the right to mmmmmmumm
decide what
they see suitable
But Arafat, who also was
expected to visit thePersianGulf,
faced opposition elsewhere.
Radical Palestinian groups
and even members of his own
faction say the agreement con-
tains no guarantees for a Pales-
tinian state and avoids dealing
with the status of Jerusalem, Is-
raeli settlements and the 3.5 mil-
lion Palestinian refugees that live
outside the occupied territories.
Muslim fundamentalist
groups, meanwhile, oppose any
deal with Israel.
En route to Damascus from
his headquarters in Tunis, Arafat
struck an optimistic chord, tell-
ing reporters in Cairo: "We're on
the verge of
6 We're on the
verge of
finalizing this
agreement.
Yasser Arafat
finalizing
this agree-
ment
Israeli
officials
have said
the plan
could be
signed by
Sept. 13.
������ H u l
Arafat said
there "a re still some obstacles that
stand in the way" before the PLO
and Israel can formally recog-
nize each other, a key condition.
The PLO formally recog-
nized Israel in 1988, but Israel
has also insisted that it revoke or
amend its charter.
Israeli Housing Minister
Benjamin Ben-Eliezertold report-
ers Israel has demanded that the
PLO issue a clear-cut declaration
against terrorism and omit all
parts of its charter that talk
about the destruction of Is-
rael.
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres said on Israel radio,
"There is no reason for Israel
not to recognize" the PLO.
"But they have to meet
the conditions that will bring
this change
Activity on the Israeli
stock market was at a record
high Sunday, buoyed by hopes
for peace.
In the United States, an
administration official said
President Clinton sent letters
to leaders in Syria, Lebanon,
Jordan, Egypt, Kuwait, Tuni-
sia, Saudi Arabia, Morocco
and Yemen, asking them to
support the peace process and
the PLO-Israeli breakthrough.
In theGaza Strip, top Pal-
estinian negotiator Faisal
Husseini began the tough job
of selling the peace plan.
He promised supporters
that statehood was on the way,
though on Saturday, Peres
said Israel remains opposed
to a Palestinian state.





September 7, 1993
U.N. renews search for Aidid
Student sperm donors 'fruitful'
"Alex" never thought he'd be augmenting his college fund-
ing in such a fruitful way. But after seeing a student on "Donahue"
w ho was putting himself through couege by donating sperm, Alex
said he remembers thinking it sounded like an appealing idea. The
$25 or $50 Alex receives for a cupful of his sperm at University of
California-Davis isn't exactly going to solve a student's financial
worries, but it is a pretty simple way to earn a buck. Alex is one of
the many students whose participation as a sperm donor helps
supply semen for various ongoing research and fertility programs
operating out of the UCD Medical Center. The university regularly
buys sperm for purposes of artificially inseminating women who
cannot otherwise conceive a child, according to Dr. James Overs treet,
a professor in the division of reproductive biology and medicine.
Student insurance includes abortion
Abortion is now covered under a student health insurance
plan offered by the University of Florida Student Government
Association beginning this fall, a move that angered anti-abortion-
ists but won praise from those who support abortion. Dean of
Student Affairs Art Sandeen said that of the 35,000 students who
attend Florida, the student government sells between 3,000 and
4,000 health insurance policies a year. Many of the policies are sold
to older students who aren't financially dependent on their par-
ents, he said. The student government voted in April to have a new
insurance company sell insurance on campus, and chose
Scarborough Company Insurance.
Harvard tests male contraceptive
A male contraceptive that blocks the production of sperm
while preserving the libido has been tested and found successful
by Harvard medical researchers. The contraceptive, which is given
by injection, suppressed sperm production in over a dozen volun-
teers who reported no loss in sexual desire. When the injections
were terminated, sperm counts returned to normal within ap-
proximately 90 days, the Harvard Gazette reported. At this point
in the testing, volunteers had to submit to a daily injection, which
chief researcher Syros Pavlou termed "not practical He said,
however, that several laboratories were attempting to create a
longer-lived injection, a birth-control nasal spray or an underskin
implant.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP)
- The United Nations blamed an
ambush that killed seven Nigerian
soldiers on warlord Mohamed
Farrah Aid id, and a U.S. official
said the attack demonstrated the
need to quickly capture the fugitive
leader.
The attack was the deadliest
assault on U.N. peacekeepers in
Somalia since June, when 24 Paki-
stani soldiers died. Seven Nigerian
soldiers and a U.S. diplomat were
wounded Sunday. A Nigerian sol-
dier was also missing.
The Nigerian commander ac-
cused the Italian U.N. contingent of
not coming to his soldiers' aid.
LaterSunday,Somali fighters
fired on a U.N. airfield, and Ameri-
can troops in helicopters responded
by attacking the Somali mortar po-
sition with cannons and rockets, a
U.N. spokesman in Mogadishu said.
Spokesman Maj. David
Stockwell said he knew of no So-
mali or U.N. casualties. He said the
Somali fighters took cover in a
nearby building used as a hospital,
and the U.N. forces held their fire.
The seven Nigerians were
killed as they went to the aid of
other U.N. peacekeepers sur-
rounded by a mob of stone-throw-
ing Somalis.
Capt. Tim McDavitt, a U.N.
military spokesman, said the pla-
toon of Nigerian soldiers returned
fire for at least half an hour, but it
was not known if there were any
Somali casualties.
Somali bystanders said at least
30 of their countrymen were killed
or wounded.
McDavitt said that in addi-
tion to the seven Nigerians killed
and seven wounded, one was miss-
ing. Somali bystanders said one
Nigerian, a sergeant, had been cap-
tured.
An unidentified American
diplomat attached to the U.S. liai-
son office in Mogadishu was shot in
the chest after he andfivecolleagues
apparently stumbled onto the am-
bush, the official said. The diplomat
was later listed in fair to good con-
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dition at an American military hos-
pital.
In New York, U.N. Secretary-
General Boutros Boutros-Ghali de-
plored the deaths, and said they
demonstrated "the urgentneed" to
disarm all ot Somalia's factions.
Retired Adm. Jonathan Howe,
the U.N. special envoy to Somalia,
called the ambush a "wanton, un-
provoked and premeditated attack"
and blamed it on Aidid.
RobertGosende, the U.S. spe-
cial representative in Somalia, said
the attack emphasized the need to
quickly capture Aidid, who has been
waging an urban guerrilla war
against the United Nations for
months.
The commander of Nigerian
forces in Somalia, Lt. Col. Ola
Oyinlolo, heatedly accused Italian
troops of not coming to the aid of his
soldiers, underscoring divisions
within the 29-nation U.N. force.
Reporters visiting the scene
hours after the ambush occurred
saw Italian soldiers lolling behind
their sandbags, with the bodies of
four Nigerians clearly visible sev-
eral hundred yards down the road.
There was no immediate re-
action from Rome to charges that
Italian troops failed to offer aid to
the Nigerians. But Italian officials
suggested hard-nosed U.N. tactics
were to blame for the clash.
"The experience from today
demonstrates that some skill in
rapport with the population, skills
that ha ve been highly criticized, can
help said Foreign Minister
Beniamino Andreatta, the Italian
news agency ANSA reported.
The Italians, who share a com-
mon language with many people in
the former Italian colony, have
prided themselves on community
relations and have called for nego-
tiations to stop spreading violence.
Since the United Nations took
over the humanitarian effort in So-
malia from a U.Sled military coali-
tion in early May, 47 peacekeepers
have been killed and 175 wounded
in clashes with militia forces. Four
Americans have died.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
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Come One, Come All
To the ECU Student Stores
Computer Fair!
September 9th 9 A.M. to 5 P.M
September 10th 9 A.M. to 12 P.M
Wright Soda Shop, beside the
Student Stores in the Wright Building!
Come and join in the Fun Get a Great Deal on a computer
and computer software. Computer Lines to be represented
are:
Hardware:
Apple Macintosh
IBM
Dell
Hayes
and others
Software &
Accessories:
Adobe
Aldus
Broderbund
Claris
Lotus
Microsoft
Symantec
WordPerfect
and many
others
A4kVv
10 Discount on
Software and
Accessories
�dp1-





September 7, 1993
n Group supports day-care involvement
The East Carolinian 3
plot said to
be on tape
nong the - ble kid-
nap targets discussed by a gov-
ernment informer and the al-
; leader of a radical Muslim
terrorist plot, The New York Time
reported today.
Emad Salem, the infor-
mant, and Siddig Ibrahim Siddig
Ali talked about kidnapping in-
fluential Americans, including
the former president and his sec-
retary of state, according to law-
yers who have seen transcripts
of tape-recorded conversations
in the case.
The names were suggested
by El Sayyid A. Nosair, who is
in prison on a weapons convic-
tion stemming from the 1990
slaying of radical Rabbi Meir
Kahane, the unidentified law-
yers told the paper.
The hostage-taking plan
was aimed at winning the re-
lease of Muslims held in the Feb.
26 World Trade Center bomb-
ing, the Times said.
An indictment last month
charged that Nosair, Siddig Ali
and other members of a radical
Muslim ring conspired to assas-
sinate, bomb various New York
targets and kidnap to further its
aims across the globe. The fed-
eral indictment did not identify
the kidnap targets.
Salem and Siddig Ali had
just returned from visiting
Nosair at Attica state prison on
May 23 when the conversation
about kidnappings was secretly
recorded, the Times said.
Kissinger, contacted by the
Times on Sunday, said he was
unaware that he was an alleged
target. The Times said Nixon
could not be reached for com-
ment.
A con-
p that
m early
ipment pro-
� . is urging supporters
. ounty panels that
u the first dozen pro-
"Instead of sitting on the
sidelines and throwing stones,
people are saving wait a minute,
Maybe w e can be a partof this
said Susan Renter, president of
the North Carolina Familv Policy
Council. "We're not there to at-
tack, but we certainly have ques-
tions
The group, which argued
Smart Start could result in a loss
of religious freedom, has sent
4,500 mailers across the state urg-
ing its supporters to seek seats
on county panels drafting appli-
cations for 12 Smart Start pilot
programs.
Renter said her group
u ants thestate to provide vouch-
ers for parents to choose their
child's day care instead of decid-
ing which day care centers are
appropriate to fund. Vouchers
are not part of the Smart Start
program.
Smart Start, a plan to im-
prove education and day care
for young children, has led con-
servatives to warn that further
state involvement in child care
will result in an erosion of reli-
gious freedom, higher day care
costs and even government in-
tervention in parental authority.
The initiative proposes that
public agencies and private citi-
zens join on the local level to
develop plans to provide high-
quality day care to every child
who needs it.
The General Assembly ap-
proved $20 million to create the
North Carolina Partnership for
Children, a private-public part-
nership that will oversee the pro-
gram, and to fund 12 local pro-
grams statewide.
Groups seeking funding
must submit their applications
by mid-September, and the win-
ners will be selected in October.
Lari McDonald, a member
of Guilford Citizens for Respon-
sible Sex Education, said involve-
ment by conservatives on county
application committees was to
create public debate and better
understanding of Smart Start.
"We are in the system, but
not of it said McDonald, who
opposed the Smart Start legisla-
tion. "If it gets scuttled when the
public learns more about the del-
eterious effects, so be it
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September 7, 1993
izing
mam
David Brol-
not want
Brokaw sai
a I m.t
ice,
Villechaize made his wishes
known in conversations with his
longtime companion, Kathy Self.
The actor died of a selt-in-
flicted gunshot wound, Brokaw
said. He said Villechaize left a note
WRITER'S
WORKSHOP
5:00 p.m.
DON'T FORGET,
and
DON'T BE LATE.
tied for "Tatoo"
lent because
Ith but had given no
n he planned to take
. ! n was 3-foot-
dical problems be-
is undersized lungs and
ed of pneumonia a year
The actor plaved Ricardo
MontaJban's comic sidekick, Tat-
h �, on " Fantasy Island which ran
on ABC from 1978 through 1984.The
French-bom Villechaize was also a
supporting player onstage and in
films during the 1960s and 1970s.
Police homicide investigators
and the county Coroner's Office
were investigating the death, as is
routine in suspected suicide cases.
Clinton tries Bush tactics
NEW YORK (AP) � The
Clinton administration is eveing
some of the same methods George
Bush tried last year to boost the
economv without getting bogged
down in Congress, The New York
Times reported today.
The proposals would allow
President Clinton to use his discre-
tionary power to stimulate the
economy without changing the
overall national budget.
Options include speeding up
work on mili tary contracts and loos-
ening regulations on government
lending.
The beneficiaries of such a
plan would be selected industries,
groups of workers and regions. Sev-
eral officials told the Times thatCali-
fomia is a major target because the
state'shighunemplovmentratehas
affected the national jobless rate.
Among those reportedly dis-
cussing the ideas are Labor Secre-
tary Robert Reich; Laura D'Andrea
Tyson, the head of the Council of
Economic Advisers; and other rank-
ing aides.
During last year's election
campaign, then-President Bushhas-
tened Pentagon purchases of mili-
tary hardware in a move intended
to lift confidence and economic
growth.
The disadvantage of such a
plan is that the stimulus wears off.
Bolstering the economy in one quar-
� ter can hurt it in subsequent quar-
ters, analysts told the newspaper.
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417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown
752-1750
BUY � SELL � TRADE
Homemade
'CREAM
7P Ice Cream,
Yogurt &
Sorbet
Hank's Homemaaje Ice Cream
316 East 10flfe Street
within walking distance from ECU
758-0000
BUY ONE-GET ONE
FREE
1 Item Blend-In
coupon expires September 15,1993
Residence Hall
Conduct Board
THE DEPARTMENT OF RESIDENT
EDUCATION IS LOOKING FOR
INTERESTED STUDENTS TO SERVE
ON THE RESIDENCE HALL
CONDUCT BOARD.
REQUIREMENTS:
- MUST HAVE CLEAR JUDICIAL RECORD
- MUST HAVE AND MAINTAIN A 2.0 GPA
- MUST HAVE RESIDED IN A RESIDENCE HALL AT
LEAST ONE SEMESTER
- MUST BE PRESENTLY LIVING IN A RESIDENCE HALL
APPLICATIONS CAN BE OBTAINED FROM 100-A
FLETCHER RESIDENCE HALL.
APPLICATION DEADLINE IS SEPTEMBER 15, 1993.
FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 757-6100.
�If
j ft ij
�jii i
�sig
II!
Students Faculty & Staff Only
op to 807. off
n
Regular commercial Prices
Enter to Win
a Mountain Bike
and $100 Shopping Spree
ALDLSB.
Aldus PageMaker 5.0
� Absolute power id produce protessiona!
quality putxiccmons � Over 100 new or
entranced features delrver remarkable
advancements to control. integration
ond versatility
$199.00
� Aldus TcuchBaseDataBook Pro
for Macintosh
� Aldus SuperPaint 3.5 for Macintosh
� Aldus Personal Press for Macintosh
� Aldus Intellidrow for Macintosh
or Windows
�a Hot coupon
Your Choice ' $99.00
NJ
Lotus
1-2-3 for Macintosh 1.1
� The besl 3D grapns avaitoDie �
includes Adobe Type rvtanoger ana 13
typefaces � Supports System ?
$89.00
SmartSuite 2.0
� Trie new release of SmortSuite the
complete solution tor Windows desktops
� Five lull-featured Windows applicarons
1-2-3 AmiPro Freelance Graphics
Organizer and cc Man
$159.00
1-2-3 tor Windows
Release 4.0
� Pnenomenol new technology will ma
mize your productivity on your own or I
a workgroup � Provides tight integration
across the Lotus suite of apptcoticr&
NEW
release
$89.00
Adobe Illustrator 5.0
� The new major release offers superior
text handling and precise design control
� includes an intuitive interlace, plus a
has! of new easy-to-use features
NEW
release
$150.00
Adobe Photoshop 2.5
� Create. Clock & white or color images
on your computer � Duotones tritones
and Quodtones � Blend, layer or fill
multiple images tor varied effects � Full
controls 'or tour -color process proofing
ana seoatation
$279.00
SYMANTEC
Norton Utilities
for Macintosh 2.0
� The first Maanlosh utility software pack-
age to offer tuify integrated odvanced disk
repair ana recovery, automatic Dockup.
doia security productivity teds ana
system enhancements m one
easy-to-use product
$75.00
Norton Desktop
for Windows 2.2
� Provides essential functionality and
eose-of-use not round m Windows
$75.00
STDK. Diskettes
3.5" DSHD Diskette 1-Pack
$1.45
3.5" DSHD Diskette 10-Pack
$11.50"
fflrtayes
Optima 144 Fax 144
� Affordooie V 3?DisU 400 Dos ddto and Group 314.400
Dps FAX modem � v 42V 42DiS MNP 5 plus 9600 2400
1200 and 300 Dps data � Free Smartcom data and FAX
software ($126 value
$284.95
CentrdFbint Softwares
Safe a Sound cufr
for Macintosh 1.0 fNSr
� Keep you: files safe ana your Mac PtoV
happy � Automatically diagnoses and r iP
repairs 100 common disk problems ?fl1'
mduding axnmon viruses
$34.95
MacTools 2.0
� The only package that gives you
automatic ana complete data protection
guarrirg against wusdftatts. drsk crashes
toe deletions and much more � Lets you
outorxse rts most cnixftrt features
$74.95
PC Tools for Windows S.0
� A complete set ot utilities all integrated
to increase your productivity, protect you
dab. and boost system performance � An
innovative MultiOesk desktop manager
lets you set up Windows to work the way
you work
5
��
s
$75.95
Diskettes
3.5" DSHD with Free Storage Box
3.5" DSHD 1-Pack
with Tuition Sweepstakes
$1.50
Available at ECU Student Stores
COMPUTER FAIR ! !
Wright Place Soda Shop, beside the Student Stores in the Wright Building
September 9, 9am to 5pm
September 10, 9am to 12pm
1050 7 93 i O Campus Productions AM ftgrns Reserveo
Avs.iatity ana savings suoied to cnange wrrNxri notice
Svdent. tacutfy or start i D o institutional purchase oroer reovtred 'or purchase
I
��-





��' �' I u
September 7, 1993
The East Carolinian 5
W i
Continued from page 1
.istis a
toration of Old
first building at
. andOldWest,
(-r dormitory built in 1822.
In all, about 90 events have
been scheduled from 300 propos-
als, Richardson said.
"Some were wonderful, but
would have bankrupted the uni-
versity if we'd done them he
said. "We wanted things that
would be natural outgrowths of
our missions of learning, research
and outreach. We didn't want
them to be glitzy or
camivalesque
The Davie Poplar ceremony
is a perfect example. The sixth-
graders symbolize the rising UNC
class of 2000. The poplar seedlings
to be planted in every county sym-
bolize the outreach. And the cer-
emony has challenged many coun-
ties by asking them to bring their
own flags.
under theimpres-
iverybody had a flag. That
the first mistake said
a idson.
Sume counties complained
that they couldn't afford to create
flags. Others became embroiled in
disputes over what their flags
should be. But, gradually, things
came around.
"As the word goes around,
fewer and fewer are saying they
won't have one Richardson said.
"Most are making an effort to get
a flag
The University of North
Carolina also is taking stock of a
public image that has dimmed as
other schools have been founded
and new loyalties have evolved,
he said.
"We've assumed a continu-
ing knowledge of other people
about us. We've assumed a con-
tinuing commitment of other
people to us Richardson said.
"We've been negligent, mini-
mally, and arrogant, maximally
sometimes, about ourselves.
"I hope this helps turn that
around
Chancellors from each of the
15 other campuses in what is now
the University of North Carolina
System will be invited to sit on the
dais at the main ceremonies to
help ease rivalries, Richardson
said.
William R. Davie, who
helped frame the U.S. Constitu-
tion and found UNC, believed it
was essential to link democracy
with public education.
Richardson lamented that
the commitment to education has
fallen short in the lower grades,
with North Carolina among the
last in Scholastic Aptitude Test-
scores.
"1 don't think we ever made
the bridge between higher educa-
tion and lower education he said.
"The degree to which we've been
able to infuse the state with things
from this institution has always
been helpful. But I think it's sad
that we haven't been able to do a
better job
That should be among the
goals for the next century, he said.
"We need to take the univer-
sity out into the state again
Everyone
edsaPAAL
Slay protected with the
WAL. Quorum s Personal .Attack .Alarm
that blasts 103dB (min.) when you
simply pull the pin. Choose either the
standard or sports model. Carry it to
school, the mall, the park, wherever you
go. PAAL lets out a crv for help whenever
you need it And only Quorum gives
you that kind of tech- QuOtWl
nology and security. Searing We"
� - CullUKl Mir.gKfflM ndtfUTUpHIrhsmbtttr - �
Jerry & Lynda Kellis
1308 Yubinaranda Cr. .Cary.NC 27511
919-467-6675
RESTAURANTS
OPEN 24 HOURS
" "FREE BEVERrVGE"
w the Purchase of an entree
w College ID
VALID ONLY IN GREENVILLE, NC
808 S. MEMORIAL DRIVE-GREENVILLE, NC
757-1610
SHARKY'S
NOW ADMITTING 18 & UP
5m&
Sun.
Mon.
$ 1,50 Highballs
�it
Tues.
Wed.
LLAR NIGHT!
No Cover 'till 11:00
Dollar Domestics
i It
LLAR NIGHT!
Ladies Free 'till 11:00
Thurs.
� �
Fri. &
Sat
UBLE TROUBLE
$1.50 Natural Light Pitchers
$1.50 Margaritas
Weekend Party
Drink Specials
ifOCATtD ON 5TH 3TRI:J:T NEXT TO SPOKPiS
PAD � AVAILBIJE FOR PRIVATE PARTIES
CAI�: 757-3881
E31 i "Are you being served?"
J Episcopal
Student Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
�5
WEDNESDAY NIGHT SANITY BREAK FROM CAMPUS!
� 530 pm Student Eucharist
� Supper provided after service
�ProgramConversation after supper
� Add new friends to your life
� Bring a friend with you!
� Be a part of a faith community
Campus Minister Marty Gartman
home355-5731 wide 752-3482
St. Paul's Episcopal Church � 401 East 5th Street 752-3482
Cross 5th street in front of Garrett Hall, walk down Holly Street and you are there!
mwm
SEPTEMBER 7
SEPTEMBER 10
ActuafTryouts
MINfiES COLISEUM LOBBY
7:00 PM
For Information Call: 757-4672
Get special
low back-to-school prices
on selected
Apple Macintosh computers through
Oct. 15,1993.
Only students, faculty, and staff

Are Hem!
i
ECU Student Stores
COMTUTER FAIR
Thur. Sept. 9th, 9 A.M. to 5 P.M.
Fri. Sept. 10th, 9 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Wright Place Soda Shop, Wright Building
;�ijri'
mz
mux
w&
�TTlltfl�
'�- -&&LLA ��





Low Calories
&
Cholesterol
NOM.S.G. I
NEW YORK STYLE
LAM
cvr;
Delicious Chinese Food To Take Out'
(Cantonese, Szechuan, Hunan)
University Square Shopping Center rni -n Open Daily:
3124 East TenthStreft Tdl (919 830-59 Mon-Thurs. 11 am to 11 pm
Greenville, NC 27858 VVJ JJJ Fri. & Sat. 11 am to 12 am
Sunday 12 noon to 10 pm
i-
i -
2sMa Hv
(rLam s Garden
mi
UPive'sv Sq'ja's
Shc:c g Cenier
SPECIAL DISHES
Fried Half Chicken
Fried Chicken Wings (4)
Fried Fresh Fish (2)
Fried Pork Chop (2)
Fried Baby Shrimp (10)
Fried Scallops (6)
Fried Crab Meat Sticks (4)
Fried Jumbo Shrimp (5)
Spare Rib Tips Sm. 2.90
Chicken Gizzards
Lg.
Plain
2.75
2.10
2.70
3.20
2.70
2.30
2.80
3.85
5.70
2.65
w. French
Fries
3.40
2.90
3.20
3.80
3.30
3.30
3.50
4.65
3.55
3.40
w. Plain
Fried Rice
3.65
3.10
3.40
3.90
3.40
3.30
3.60
4.85
3.75
3.50
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
APPETIZERS
Egg Roll (each)
Shrimp Roll (each)
Fried Wanton
Bar-B-Q Spare Ribs
Roast Pork
Shrimp Toast
Steamed or Fried Dumpling
Teryiyaki Beef
Pu-Pu Platter (2)
SOUP
(w. Fried Noodles)
Wonton Soup
Wonton Egg Dried Soup
Egg Drop Soup
Chicken Rice or Noodle Soup
Hot ft Sour Soup
Young Chow Special Soup
Vegetable Soup
Sea Food Soup
1.00
1.10
(6) 1.80
(5)4.75(10)8.50
(Sm) 3.50 (Lg) 6.50
(4) 2.95
(6) 3.25
(4) 4.00
7.95
(W.
w. Chicken or
Pork Fried Rice
4.00
3.65
3.70
4.25
3.80
3.70
3.90
5.00
4.00
3.75
PORK
White Rice)
w. Shrimp or
Beef Fried Rice
4.40
4.00
4.15
4.75
4.25
4.25
4.40
5.50
4.50
4.00
Pt.
1.10
1.40
1.10
1.10
1.50
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
CHOW MEIN
(w. White Rice & Fried Noodles)
Pt.
2.80
2.70
3.50
3.50
2.60
3.00
3.50
Chicken Chow Mein
Roast Pork Chow Mein
Shrimp Chow Mein
Beef Chow Mein
Mixed Vegetable Chow Mein
Subgum Chicken Chow Mein
Subgum Shrimp Chow Mein
Special Chow Mein (Shrimp,
Chicken, Roast Pork)
Lobster Chow Mein
Qt.
2.20
2.70
2.00
2.00
2.90
3.50
2.75
4.00
Qt.
5.00
5.00
5.95
5.95
4.75
5.70
6.40
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
CHOP SUEY
(w. White Rice)
Roast Pork Chop Suey
Chicken Chop Suey
Beef Chop Suey
Shrimp Chop Suey
Lobster Chop Suey
Young Chow Special Chop Suey
FRIED RICE
Vegetable Fried Rice
Roast Pork or Chicken Fried Rice
Beef Fried Rice
Shrimp Fried Rice
Young Chow Fried Rice
Crab Stick Fried Rice
Lobster Fried Rice
LO MEIN
(Soft Noodles)
3.506.50
4.007.85
Pt.Qt.
2.755.25
2.955.75
3.806.95
3.907.50
4.508.50
4.257.75
Pt.Qt.
2.304.35
2.955.00
3.105.70
3.105.70
3.456.55
2.905.60
4.007.75
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
Vegetable Lo Mein
Chicken Lo Mein
Roast Pork Lo Mein
Beef Lo Mein
Shrimp Lo Mein
Lobster Lo Mein
Young Chow Lo Mein
Pt.
2.65
3.10
3.10
3.50
3.50
4.25
3.60
Qt-
5.00
5.65
5.65
6.75
6.75
7.65
6.80
EGG FOO YOUNG
(w. White Rice)
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
Roast Pork Egg Foo Young
Chicken Egg Foo Young
Shrimp Egg Foo Young
Lobster Egg Foo Young
Beef Egg Foo Young
Young Chow Egg Foo Young
Per Order
4.95
4.95
5.50
6.50
5.50
5.75
SIDE ORDER
fxtra Rice (Sm.) 0.75
Fortune Cookies (5 pcs.)
Almond Cookie
Crisp Noodles
French Fries �Jj
(Lg.)1.30
0.50
0.50
0.50
1
I
10 Off
EVERYTHING UNTIL!
91693
l
I
J
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
47.
68.
69.
70.
Roast Pork w. Chinese Veg.
Roast Pork w. Mushroom
Roast Pork w. Oyster Sauce
Roast Pork w. Snow Peas
Roast Pork w. Almond Ding
Roast Pork w. Broccoli
Roast Pork w. Cashew Nuts
CHICKEN
(w. White Rice)
Chicken w. Mushroom
Moo Goo Gai Pan
Chicekn w. Pepper & Tomato
Chicekn w. Oyster Sauce
Chicken w. Snow Peas
Chicken Almond Ding
Chicken w. Broccoli
Chicken w. Curry Sauce
Chicken w. Cashew Nuts
Boneless Chicken
Lemon Chicken
Pt.
3.25
3.50
3.40
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.50
Pt.
3.60
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.70
3.50
3.60
3.50
3.40
Qt.
6.00
6.45
6.40
6.65
6.60
6.75
6.75
Qt.
6.95
6.75
6.75
6.25
6.95
6.75
6.95
6.75
6.50
7.25
7.25
S 1
S 2.
S 3.
S 4.
S 5.
S 6.
S 7.
S 8.
S 9.
S10.
BEEF
(w. White Rice)
Si i
S12.
!S13.
IS14.
i S15.
S16.
SPECIAL CANTONESE DISHES
(w. White Rice)
HAPPY FAMILY 8 50
Fresh shrimp, crabmeat, scallop, chicken'roast
pork, beef blended w. broccoli, baby corn, straw
mushrooms & Chinese vegetable
SEAFOOD DELIGHT (Mandarin) 9.2 5
Lobster, fresh jumbo shrimp, scallops, king crab
meat & Chinese vegetables
FOUR SEASONS (Canton) 8 00
A savory blend of shrmip, chicken roast pork &
beef w. mushrooms, water chestnuts, bamboo
shoots & variety of Chinese veg. in season
HAWAII FIVE -O- (Canton) 9 90
Breaded shrimp w. lobster meal, scallop, roast
pork, chicken & Chinese vegetable
WOR SHU DUCK
With broccoli & Chinese vegetables
BUTTERFLY SHRIMP
Shrimp w. bacon & assorted veg. w
brown sauce
LAKE TUNG TING SHRIMP
(Canton)
Sliced jumbo shrimp, marinated w. broccoli,
mushrooms, bamboo shoots in wine sauce
DRAGON MEETS PHOENIX 8.75
Chunk of unshelled lobster, sliced chicken white
meat, sauteed w. Chef's sauce
SUBGUM WANTON 8.50
Served w. Mixed vegetables, shrimp, beef,
roast pork, chicken & crab meat w. 6 wantons
MOON SURROUND BY
SEVEN STARS t j 95
Sliced chicken (Moon) sauteed w. roast pork,
rose scallops & beef surround by prawns (Stars)
in special chef's sauce. Combined w. fresh
garden vegetables
HOUSE SPECIAL CHICKEN 8.50
Boneless chicken w. roastpork, chicken, shrimp
& assorted vegetable
HOUSE SPECIAL DOUBLE SEAFOOD8.9 5
TRIPLE DELIGHT 7 25
LOBSTER CANTONESE Seasonal
LOBSTER SZECHUAN STYLE Seasonal
SEAFOOD NEST g 95
7.95
8.75
special
8.50
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
Pt.
3.50
3.50
3.50
3.60
3.30
3.65
3.60
3.50
3.95
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
80.
89.
90.
91.
Pepper Steak w. Onion
Beef w. Pepper & Tomato
Beef w. Chinese Vegetable
Beef w. Mushroom
Beef w. Oyster Sauce
Beef w. Snow Peas
Beef w. Broccoli
Beef w. Curry Sauce
Beef w. String Bean
SEA FOOD
(w. White Rice)
Lobster Sauce
Shrimp w. Lobster Sauce
Jumbo Shrimp w. Snow Peas
Jumbo Shrimp w. Chinese Vegetables
Jumbo Shrimp w. Mushrooms
Jumbo Shrimp w. Oyster Sauce
Jumbo Shrimp w. Broccoli
Jumbo Shrimp w. Pepper & Tomato
Shrimp w. Curry Sauce
Shrimp w. Cashew Nuts (per order)
Jumbo Shrimp w. String Bean 4.30
Jumbo Shrimp w. Mixed Veg. 4.30
MOO SHU
(w. 4 Pancakes)
Pt.
1.70
4.15
4.75
4.20
4.30
4.15
4.30
4.20
4.15
92.
93.
94.
95.
Moo Shu Pork
Moo Shu Chicken
Moo Shu Beef
Moo Shu Shrimp
Qt.
6.50
6.75
6.75
6.95
6.25
6.95
6.95
6.75
7.25
Qt.
3.20
7.85
8.00
7.95
8.00
7.80
7.95
7.90
7.85
7.50
8.00
8.00
Order
6.25
6.25
6.50
6.50
WVVWvW
SZECHUAN & HUNAN STYLE
HOT SPICY
(w. White Rice)
H 1. GENERAL TSO'S CHICKEN
H 2. ORANGE FLAVOR CHICKEN
H 3. ORANGE FLAVOR BEEF
H4. SESAME CHICKEN
H 5. SESAME BEEF
He. HOT ft SPICY JUMBO SHRIMP
H 7. RUNG BO CHICKEN
H 0. � MING BO SHRIMP
H 9. HUNAN CHICKEN
H10. HUNAN BEEF
H11. HUNAN SHRIMP
H18. SZECHUAN BEEF
H13. � SZECHUAN CHICKEN
H14. "SZECHUAN SHRIMP
HIS. CHICKEN W. GARLIC SAUCE
H16. SHRIMP W. GARLIC SAUCE
H17. SCALLOP W. GARLIC SAUCE
HIS. BEEF W. GARLIC SAUCE
H19. SHREDDED PORK
W. GARLIC SAUCE
7.50
7.50
8.00
7.50
8.00
8.95
6.95
7.25
6.95
7.50
7.50
7.75
6.95
8.95
6.95
7.95
8.25
6.95
6.95
SWEET & SOUR
(w. Sweet & Sour Sauce)
96.
97.
98.
99.
Sweet & Sour Pork
Sweet & Sour Chicken
Swet & Sour Shrimp
Triple Sweet & Sour
Pt.
2.95
3.10
4.00
Qt.
5.95
6.00
7.50
8.00
VEGETABLES
(w. White Rice)
100.
101.
102.
Mixed Vegetables
Broccoli w. garlic Sauce
EfjplaM w. Garlic Sauce
Per Order
5.00
5.00
5.00
DIET & HEALTH FOOD
(w. White Rice or Fried Rice)
Steamed Chicken w. Broccoli
Steamed Shrimp w. Broccoli
Steamed Chicken w. Mixed Vegetables
Steamed Shrimp w. Mixed Vegetables
Steamed Mixed Vegetables
Steamed Broccoli w: Bean Curd
Served without Salt, Sugar, Cornstarch or M.S.G
5.00.
5.00"
5.00"
5.00.
4.75"
4.75 �
C1.
C2.
C3.
C4.
C5.
C6.
C7.
C8.
C9.
C10.
en.
C12.
C13.
C14.
C15.
C16.
C17.
C18.
C19.
C20.
C21.
C22.
C23.
C24.
C25.
C26.
C27.
C28.
C29.
C30.
COMBINATION PLATTERS
(Each Plate Served w. an Egg Roll & Fried Rice)
Chicken Chow Mein
Shrimp Chow Mein
Roast Pork Lo Mein
Sweet & Sour Chicken or Pork or Shrimp
Roast Pork Egg Foo Young
Moo Goo Gai Pan
Chicken with Broccoli
Beef with Broccoli
Pepper Steak with Onion
Chicken with Cashew Nuts
Mixed Vegetables
Boneless Spare Ribs
Spare Ribs
Roast Pork with Chinese Vegetable
Shrimp with Lobster Sauce
Shrimp with Cashew Nuts
Shrimp with Broccoli
Beef with Chinese Vegetable
Broccoli with Garlic Sauce
General Tso's Chicken
Hot ft Spicy Shrimp
Sesame Beef
Hunan Chicken
Beef with Szechuan Style
Sesame Chicken
Chicken w. Garlic Sauce
Bean Curd w. Chinese Vegetable
String Bean w. Garlic Sauce
Spare Rib Tips
Hot ft Spicy Beef
HOT & SPICY
We can adjust the degree of spiritless
according to your taste.
4.85
4.95
4.95
4.95
4.95
5.25
5.25
5.50
5.25
5.25
4.75
6.00
6.00
4.95
5.50
5.50
5.50
5.25
4.95
5.50
5.50
5.50
5.25
5.50
5.50
5.25
4.75
4.95
4.95
5.50
lit'�if
?'� -�����- ' 1





Septembe
$993
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 7
TuesdayOpinion
Hurricane Emily blows it
By Allan Freemont
Old adage 'Patience is a virtue' proves all too true
Storm sends thousands away
from Outer Banks and others
into fits of laughter
Hurricane Emily really bugged quite a
few people and I don't mean those living on
the edge of the Atlantic Ocean.
Let's think about this: Greenville is 70
miles inland. Granted, early reports plotted
Emily's path virtually right through down-
town, but did anyone really think that founda-
tions would be torn up and swept away much
like Dorothy's house in The Wizard ofOzYes,
we realize that was a tornado.
The point is, Greenville residents were
downright loony as eastern North Carolina
braced for Emily to strike. In retrospect, they
really had no reason to be. The center of the
hurricane got as close as about 20 miles due
east of Cape Hatteras late last Tuesday after-
noon and the eye wall�the region of stron-
gest wind around the calm eye�moved over
Hatteras Island. No part of the eye crossed land.
Newsanchors were in a panic, people
were running to Wal-Mart to stock up on
bottled water and Twizzlers and the darn
hurricane went skirting right up the coast.
Rumor has it that some brave Greenville resi-
dents were enjoying a midnight picnic Tues-
day night without even a lilting wind passing
through. Egads!
Greenville has now become a sort of vaca-
tion spot during hurricanes. Many vacation-
ers and residents who left the barrier islands
crowded into the Emerald City's hotels and
motels, causing our fair town to nearly burst
at the seams. And we were still trying to get
used to the influx of returning students and
freshpersons. The streets became even more
crowded than they were a week ago.
Not that any of this was a surprise. People
went far enough inland to avoid the danger-
ous winds and flooding that comes with hur-
ricanes. Greenville was fortunate enough to
receive those horrible semi-dangerous winds
(non-existent?) and light-flooding (did it even
rain?). Yes, we were fortunate.
So the people who flocked were pretty
smart after all. They came to a place where
nothing was happening. At least in the weather-
sense.
But there is a serious side to the other-
wise wacky Hurricane Emily ordeal. Some
residents actually stayed on the Outer Banks
and rode out the storm. Even though officials
ordered tens of thousands of residents and
tourists to evacuate, hundreds stubbornlv
decided to stay and keep an eye on homes and
businesses. How crazy can one get?
These evacuees were urged to take along
insurance policies, fuel their cars and gather
their pets (can't forget little Fluffy). They were
also advised to gather whatever cash they had
available before expected power outages dis-
abled automatic teller machines.
fhe next time a hurricane hovers over the
Atlantic, threatening to speed towards Greenville,
don't immediately run for the nearest bathtub.
Turn on the Weather Channel, sit back and be
glad you don't live on the Outer Banks. What are
those people thinking, anyway?
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Kelly Keilis, Account Executive Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hasseli, News Editor
Maureen Rich, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Tony Dunn, Business Manage
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst Layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
77ic East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg . ECU. Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
This week, I came fairly
close to throwing in the towel. I'd
had it up to "here (imagine me
vvrirhmyhartdabovemyhead, reach-
ing tor the heavens), and F wasn't
keen on taking it anymore. I won't
give all the details, but suffice it to
sav that a certain individual at work
was becoming a royal pain in the
patookus.
I suppose, looking back, I
overstepped my boundaries. But
conditions had required that 1 take
situations into mv own hands until
thesuperiors showed up (late, may I
smugly add). When the calvary did
arrive, I was reamed for taking over
and jeopardizing job positions,
money handling, etc. And surprise!
the reamer was none other than the
pain in the patookus I've previously
mentioned. Not that this was our
first encounter. We've butted heads
many times before. It's just mat this
time, I got mad.
Now, to fullysavor the irony
in this, one must realize ihat I am not
an angry person. To put it lightly,
I'm forgiving. Bluntlv, a wet noodle.
I'm the person who orders fries, gets
onion rings instead and apologizes
to the waiter for the mistake. When
the World Trade Center was
bombed, and the perpetrators were
asked to 'fess up, I turned myself in
because I felt guilty. I'm making that
part up, but you get mv point.
So I'm ready to cower un-
der the wrath of authority, w' ti
suddenly, like a booster shot of
adrenaline from Genghis Khan, I
found myself angry instead. In fact,
I was prepared toquitrightthen and
there, just for the sake of verbally
throttling the life out of my
antagonizes Fortunately, I wascalled
out on an errand. Once away from
the situation, I realized the conflict
with this person wasn't worthlosing
employment. What I really needed,
more than five minutes of old-fash-
ioned name calling, was a dose of
patience.
"Patience is a virtue the
old saying goes. As a child, the par-
ents constantly reminded me of mv
lack of patience. Personally, I could
never find a use for it. It was a waste
of time and effort. Now I realize
that's how the majority of people
view patience. We've been pushed
into wanting, needing things, with
no time to lose andor spare. Our
society is obsessed with time, how to
manage it and save it. Everything is
now, Now, NOW Very little time is
spent on the art of patience. Think
how much could be gained or sal-
vaged if everyone reigned in on their
temper.
Just think how silly I would
have looked had I quit my job. For
soon after the "incident" mentioned
above, I learned that my "friend"
was permanently leaving at the end
of the week. The only person who
would have lost in the end would
have been me. Thanks to a little pa-
tience, I saved myself a lot of embar-
rassment and job-hunting.
So, to honor the Virtue that
saved my patookus, I'm signing off
withapoem.I'mcertainlvno Emily
Dickinson and the only poetry I'm
capable of is the kind where the
words have to rhyme. Bu t then, I 'm
not asking for a critique, just a little
patience.
P- is for Putting, as in' put-
ting up
wi th A- pain in the Ah wel I
we'll say Patookus.
T- is for Temper, that's
better if bested,
(for wanton destruction
could get you arrested.)
I- is Insane, since at lanes
it's frustrating
to E- that's Endure, all the
time you've been wasting
N- is for Now, though we
seldom will get it,
but with C- for Control, vou
can learn not to sweat it.
and E-as in End, and don tit
make sense.
that you Earn more respect if
you just learn Patience.
QuoteoftheDay
If you can't win by reason, go for volume.
Bill Watterson
HefOfZE PATi�NJC��
fTZ(L PATEce T
V New, IMPROVED
WiTM footfuTAswrn:
its fWi easy, awdfwe
Letters to the Editor
Students encouraged to show support for Pirates
To the Editor:
I would like to encourage
all members of the ECU stu-
dent body to "fill Ficklin" sta-
dium Thursday night as we
open our 1993 Football season
against the 6th Ranked Syra-
cuse Orangemen. As you all
know, the game will be nation-
ally televised on ESPN.
The entire nation will fo-
cus on YOUR university. With
this in consideration, it will
be important for all students
to be in attendance and be in
the stadium when ESPN
takes the air at 8 p.m
To avoid waiting in
mile long lines before kick-
off, we are encouraging early
departure from the tailgat-
ing fields into the stadium.
With a capacity crowd ex-
pected, entering the stadium
will be a lot easier if there is
a steady flow of people rather
than an "all at once" attempt.
Sign making is encour-
aged by all students, so when
all eyes turn to Greenville
Thursday night, the nation
will know "we are proud to
say: ECU
Damon P. Johnson
Pirate Club Staff
Member
By T. Scott Batchelor
Garbage fee
trashes faith in
area recycling
Talk about a case of bad timing! Just
two weeks after the City of Greenville hit
me with a S3 garbage collection ;ee, Multi-
media Cablevision increased mv cable TV
bill by $2.32. That adds up to over $63 per
year in increases. The difference between
thegarbage fee and thecable TV payment is
the difference between rape and seduction.
WithMultimedia Cablevision, or any
other free enterprise, private sector busi-
ness, I don't liave to patronize that establish-
ment if I am dissatisfied with the pricing,
service,etc. Although I can't get cable televi-
sion from anyomerdistributormGreenville,
at least Multimedia isn't mandating that I
purchase their service.
The City of Greenville, on the other
hand, has me over a barrel with its garbage
fee. Greenville's administrators were wily
enough to include this fee on my monthly
utility bill, thus depriving me of the chance
to avoid payment; if I don't pay the bill, my
electric service will be discontinued. With-
out electricity I have no light, heat, air con-
ditioning, microwave oven, television or
any other necessities of life.
In speaking with personnel who ad-
miruter me dhs solid waste program, vou
cangetintoalotoftroubleconfusing"trash"
(or "refuse") with "garbage Asdefinedby
state statute, garbage is "all putrescible
wastes, including animal offal and carcasses
and recognizable industrial by-products,
but excluding sewage and human waste
Refuse is "all nonputrescible waste
Tom Tysinger, Director of the
Greenville Public Works Department, says
the city had a choice between an increased
property tax or a collection fee-to fund its
new solid waste management (read as "re-
cycling") program. Yet what is a govern-
ment-imposed, mandatory payment if no!
atax?Themonev Multimedia charges me
every month for trie use of their sen ice is a
fee. I can either pay that fee and watch cable
TV or decline the service and watch free
broadcast TV. The choice is wholly mine.
The so-called garbage fee is oornpul-
soryforevery household, whether you want
to pay or not. This is why the money paid on
the purchase of a product ox service isn't
called a "sales fee" instead of a "sales tax
According to Tysinger, the most im-
portant reason for implementing this new
fee was to cover expenses the city incurred
in complying with the state's new recycling
guidelines. Apartment complexes, which
don't have curbside or backyard refuse col-
lection, are supposed to be provided with a
specially marked dumpster for recyclable
materials. At my apartment complex, gar-
bage collection is the same. Yet I am ex-
pected to pay an additit mal S3 per month for
this partial service.
Another disturbing aspect is how the
city is using the increased funds. Tysinger
says the garbage fee hel ps su pplement taxes
which pay for garbage and trash collection,
mosquitocontrol and litter pickup Accord-
ing to Section 2 of North Carolina C ieneral
Statute 160A-317(c),a city may impose such
a fee for solid waste collection. I louev 11
the statute goes on to say that mis fee ma'
not exceed the costs of collection There-
fore, the total amount of the fees we have
been hit with must cover only me cost o)
collection and not be spent for litter pickup,
mosquitocontrol oranvothercitv program.





� .

TheEastCarottnian
September 7, 1993
For Rent
WYNDHAM COURT apartments.
New 2 bedrooms ready for fail semes-
ter. Now taking applications 5380'
395.IX) per month. Lease and deposit
required. Duffus Realty, Inc. 756-2675.
REEDY BRANCH APARTMENTS.
New 2 bedrooms on East 10th Street.
Ready for fall semester. Now taking
applications. $385.00 pm. Lease and
deposit required. Duffus Realty, Inc
756-2675.
HUGE ROOM with 2 closets and pri-
vate bath. Furnished, walk to ECU,
kitchen privileges, utilities included.
Prefer quiet female non-smoker. $230
mo. CaU 752-2636.
MF Roommate needed: 1 block from
campus, $150 deposit,150 mo utili-
ties. Private room. Leave message or
ask for Pat. 830-1765.
UPSTAIRS W1LLOUGHBY PARK 2
BR, 2 B A condo. $610month. Includes
cable and water. 9 mo. lease to respon-
sible nonsmokers. No pets. Call Mr.
Branch, 355-2000.
PARKING SPACE for rent. 1 block
from campus, $20 monthly. Call 830-
9125.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two bed-
room apartment across from campus.
Rent $325 and one year lease. Call 752-
2615.
Roommate Wanted
Classifieds
Page 8
ROOMMATE WANTED. Nice 2-bed-
room, partially furnished. $175mnth,
$175deposit, 12 utilities. Male pre-
ferred. 807College View Apts near ECU.
CaU Rich 758-6196 weekdays, (919)455-
0603 weekends.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Looking for
neat, organized person. Male or female.
Apt 1 yr old and fully furnished. $155
mo and 12 utilities. CaU 21-18217.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 BDRM in Tar River. $155 per
month . Private room, semi-furnished.
CaU for info! 752-8000!
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed at
Wesley Commons Apartments. 2 Bed-
room. $170 a month 12 deposit. Call
Angie at 752-9652.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom townhouse. On bus
route, patio, central air and heat. Good
neighborhood. Spacy end unit. $182.50
month 12 utilities. CaU 758-8921.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share apt, close to campus, $142.50 plus
12 utiUties. CaU 830-6166 fro more info.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY. Incredible house in a nice fam-
ily-oriented neighborhood. $187.50
mo plus 14 utilities. Students only,
please. Must See Phone 321-2390.
PIANO PLAYER NEEDED. Small
Christian Church near Greenville, Sal-
ary nog. Call 757-3207.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPT. is recruiting 12-
16 part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge of
soccer skills and have the ability and
patience to work with youth. Appli-
cants must be able to coach young
people ages 5-16, in soccer fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3:00 pm until 7:00
pm with some nights and weekend
coaching. This program will run from
September to mid-November. Salary
starts at $4-35 per hour. For more infor-
mation,pleasecall Ben Jamesor Michael
Daly at 830-4550.
SPRING BREAK '94 - Sell trips, earn
cash and go free Student Travel Ser-
vices is now hiring campus reps. Call 1 -
800-648-4849.
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVES
needed by Sportswear Company to sell
to fraternities and sororities. Average
$50 - $100 working one night per week.
Call 1-800-242-8104.
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! SeU only 8 trips and you go
free! Best trips & prices! Bahamas,
Cancun, Jamaica, Panama City! Great
Resume Experience! 1-800-678-6386!
$10-$400 WEEKLY. Mailing brochures!
Sparefull-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC
27705.
AA EARN $5,000Mo. GUARAN-
TEED! FAST Huge money-making
jobs and opportunities on your cam-
pus. Call today for complete details.
Free cruise! America's 1 Company!
919-929-3139.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
material provided. Send SASE to Mid-
west mailers, PO Box 395, Olathe KS
66051. Immediate response.
( All Positions 1
Available
Full & Part Time Positions
Flexible Hours
Apply M-F 2-4
golden
corral
i 504'S. Greenville j
SOCCER OFFICIALS NEEDED -
games on Saturday. Call 830-4240.
LEAGUE SUPERVISORS NEEDED
(soccer)- games on Saturday. Pay $6.00
and up. Call 830-4240.
ATTN LADIES. Looking for ladies to
work part-time for good money. For
details call 321-1817.
WANTED: CHURCH ORGANIST.
Salary Negotiable. Call mornings, 9-
12. First Baptist Church, RobersonviUe,
795-3601.
WANTED: PART-TIME VAN DRIV-
ERS: CTS Management Company is
looking for van drivers to operate the
PATS vans. PATS is a local paratransit
system for the elderly and handicapped
citizens of Pitt County. Some early
morning and afternoon hours, as weU
as midday. Duties include operation of
vehicle and some assistance of elderly,
handicapped, and disadvantaged pas-
sengers. Criteria for job: 1 - Positive
attitude. 2 - 21 years of age, 3 - Clean
driving record, 4 - Clean criminal
record. If you are a people person with
interest, please contact CTS Manage-
ment Company, Wlicar Executive Cen-
ter, Suite 107, 223 W. Tenth St,
Greenville NC 27834,830-1939.
SOCCERGOAL KEEPER: For fallsea-
son. Greenville F.C. Soccer Team is
recruiting a goal keeper for the faU
season. CaU 756-3879 after 6 pm.
2:30-9:30 PM HELP NEEDED to pro-
vide male quadriplegic with physical
assistance. Contact Marty at 830-0426.
FRIENDLY, ENERGETIC baby-sitter
wanted for preschoolers one day every
other weekend. Must be dependable.
758-4454.
PART-TIME SALES. Need 10 part-
time sales people fro number 1 com-
pany in number 1 industry. Work 8-10
hours per week with earning potential
of $1000 per month. Call Richard Rabin
at 758-0645 after 2:00 pm.
WASH PUB: Attendants needed for
morning and night work. Apply in
person 2511 E. 10th St.
CARPET BARGAIN CENTER: Help
wanted. Apply in person 1009
Dickinson Ave.
GET THE FALL SEMESTER under-
way with a part-time sales position
with Greenville's fashion leader.
Brody's is accepting applications fro
the JuniorMissy sportswear and
Men's departments. Earn extra spend-
ing money and clothing discount. Ap-
ply at Customer Service, Brody's The
Plaza Thursday Sept9,1993,12 to4pm.
EASYWORK! EXCELLENT PAY! As-
semble products at home. Call ToU Free
1-800-167-5566 ext. 5920.
FUND-RAISER: All it takes is a group
with a little energy and a lot of excite-
ment to earn top dollars in just one
week! Call (800) 592-2121 ext. 312.
THE OFFICE OF STUDENT DEVEL-
OPMENT, Dept of Athletics, is now
accepting applications for tutors. A
minimum 2.5 GPA is required. We are
especiaUy in need of tutors 7:30-9:00
am, M-F. Please call 757-4550 for more
information.
BABY-SITTER needed MWF after-
noon in my home. 4 mo. old boy. Prefer
experience with infants. Non-smoker,
must have transportation. Appreciate
references. 830-9452.
For Sale
EARLY AMERICAN OAK FINISH
bedroom suite. Includes fullqueen
headboard, 5 drawer chest and 2 drawer
nightstand. PracticaUy new, $225.00.
Call 321-1708. Leave message.
CERWIN VEGA speakers, 15" Woof-
ers, 405 watts, $400. Call 830-6665. Ask
for Josh.
286 IBM comp, with VGA, 40 mb hard
drive, 2400 Bawd modem, sound card
and printer. $700. CaU Todd: 758-8324.
COMPUTERFORSALE:AT&T6300,
with WordPerfect 1.0. $50. Call 321-
2229.
EARTH CRUISER: Dark green, needs
crank. $50 or best offer. Please call Steve
758-9904.
SPECIALIZED Hardrock Ultra. Less
than 1 yr. old. Excellent condition, like
new.Zoomstemand toe clips included.
$300 or best offer. CaU 355-0258 for
details.
LOFT FOR SALE. In good condition.
Sturdy, wooden, disassemblable, mat-
tresses also available. $100. Call 830-
1019.
MOUNTAIN BIKE, TREK 830. Black
frame, toe clips, bar ends and new tires,
20" frame. $300. Brian 355-2363.
FOR SALE - Panasonic stereo, dual
cassette, 24 preset, AMFM, turntable,
great for dorm. $150 or best offer. Call
Linda 931-9662.
18" DIAMOND BACK MTN BIKE.
Deore LX components plus XT shift
brake levers, smoke tires, Brahma bar,
purple anodized aluminum QR's. A
good bike for actual off-road riding,
not just scooting to class! Asking $425
but will haggle! CaU Jim at 756-2608
after 5:00 pm.
EH Services Offered
TRAVEL FREE! SeU quality vacations.
The hottest destinations in Jamaica,
Cancun, South Padre, Florida. Most
reliable Spring Break Company with
the easiest way towards free trip! Best
commissions! Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
TUTORING SERVICES Offered for
children in Kindergarten through sev-
enth grade in math andor reading.
Masters in Education. Call 752-5542.
GREEKS! CLUBS!
STUDENT GROUPS!
Hals as Much as You
Want In One Week!
$100$600$15001
Mo'kat Applcofiopi lot CNIbank
VISA. MCI. If AM. AMOCO ate
Call lot you' FREE T-SHIRT and to
qoalty lot FREE TRIP 10 MTV
� FRINO iREAK 94
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Mit� .c f I milk. I iit I K. r l.tx'H
FORT HENRY S ARMY NAVY
1501 S. EVANS STREET 756-8781
FRATS! SORORITIES!
STUDENT GROUPS'
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Want In One Week!
$100$600$1500!
Market Applications for the
hottest credit card ever -
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Call 1-800-950-1039, ext 75
Lost & Found
LOST DOG, "GRETTA Last seen
82793. Golden retreiver mix-white
spot on chest. Call 758-9497.
SSS Personals
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA CHAT-
TERING. Come join the fun! Septem-
ber 7th, 8th, 9th, 6:00 PM, Room C3011
Brewster. See you there!
LOSE WEIGHT: Doctor recom-
mended, FDA tested. 100 guaran-
teed, 100 natural. The only thing
you lose is weight. Call anytime, 756-
1166.
JOIN THE STUDENT PIRATE
CLUB TODAY! Have the best seats
in thestadium. Receive discounts from
local restaurants and nightclubs. Call
757-4540 and apply today.
the lead. Then go her way, find out
what she'll think today. Herself, she
may perplex. Her actions may be com-
plex. A game? Don't worry with her
games and pauses, give her time for
her pauses. Hate games? Then go your
way with what you know, it is experi-
ence, it you owe. To another, to her
say, hey, what's your name, where
you go, where you going, what you
know? Later, good luck, Jeff Jones.
BE Greek
RUSH DELTA CM!
PHI SIGMA PI - Brothers be ready to
tailgate on September 9 when ECU Pi-
rates beat the Syracuse Orangemen. Go
Pirates!
RUSH PI DELTA SORORITY! Sep-
tember 13-16. For more information call
756-9819.
TO PHI KAPPA TAU: Thanks for
Thursday night, we had a blast. Love,
Alpha Xi Delta.
SIG EP: Chi-O wants to thank you for
the great pref night We had fun with
Barney and the gang. Thanks from the
Chi-Omegas.
CONGRATULATIONS RAND1
JORDAN on your engagement to Sean
O'Brien. We are so happy for you both!
Love, your sisters & pledges from
DELTA ZETA!
PI KAPPA PHI - You guys gave us a
fantastic pref night! (So when are you
getting that recording contract?) Love,
the girls of Delta Zeta.
RUSH PHI KAPPA PSI - Party every
night? Drunk all the time? Then you're
NOT who we are looking for. Leaders,
scholars, men and athletes not afraid of
philanthropy, thaf s who we're looking
for. Create tradition and build on some-
thingnew. CaU Rich at 752-2573. RUSH
PHJ.KAPPAPSI14-16that508West5th
Street
CONGRATULATIONS to the Pi
Pledge class of Zeta Tau Alpha: Donna
Christian, Shelia Elliot, Stefanie Hippie,
IxraKim,KenclraLafley,rimLaMarca,
Audra Latham, Mandi Marcopulos,
Amy Moore, Vicki Moore, Katie
Mullarky,JeniferSeigel,Kathy Thomp-
son, Allison Wisser. We love you! The
Sisters of ZETA TAU ALPHA.
SOME WOMEN MEN SEEK. Some
are cosmo, so elle and vogue the mind
they blow. Women who run, swim
and bike. Surf, walk, play and hike.
Women men seek with sexy faces in
bars and classes, society places. What
to do? What to say? Walk in close to
her, say hay. What's your name, where
you go, where you going, what you
know? What you study, what you
read, do you retreat, take the lead?
Like this, that, there and those, busi-
ness, art, science or prose? She takes
CONGRATULATIONS We are so
proud of our fall '93 pledgedassof Delta
Zeta!WelcometoKatherineBailey,Car-
rie Ann Barnet, Debra Beaman, Mary
Ann Caprioni, Julie Cooper, Dana
Creech, Jennifer Eddleman, Jenny
Gallahan, Jill Johnson, Sara Leggett, Jes-
sica Midgett, Caryn Moser, Kristen
Napier, Jennifer Robinson, Janice
Santucci, Julie Skrupa, Martha Vaughn,
Teri Warren, Amanda Williams &
Delores Wood. You're an awesome
bunch of girls! Getready for an exciting
semester! We love you! The Sisters
Announcements
G AY COMMUNITY
GROUP
Greenville Area Bisexual,
Lesbian and Gay Community
Group. Discussions and activi-
ties, Speakers bureau available.
Meetings are closed. For infor-
mation, dial 757863,12:00-1:00
MWF or 758-8619.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
TheGreenville-PittCo. Spe-
cial Olympics is recruiting for
volunteer coaches in the fol-
lowing sports: soccer, basket-
ball skills, team basketball,
swimming, gymnastics, bowl-
ing, power-lifting and roller-
skating. NO EXPERIENCE
NECESSARY-JUST A WILL-
INGNESS TO WORK WITH
MENTALLY HANDI-
CAPPED CHILDREN AND
ADULTS. Special training ses-
sions for coaches will be held.
Last day to volunteer for fall
sports is September 28th. Vol-
unteer hours may be used as
part of practicum requirements
for several ECU courses. For
more information, contact
ConnieSappenfieldat83(M541.
BECOMING A SUCCESS-
FUL STUDENT
This five-part series is de-
signed for students who wish
to sharpen their study skills and
for students who wish to gain
the necessary tools for academic
success. The first session be-
gins Sept. 7. For more informa-
tion, please call or stop by the
Counseling Center, 316 Wright
Building, 757-6661.
FENCING CLUB
Orientation and club
meeting.Beginnersexperienced
fencers are welcome. 6:30pm
Thurs.Sept 9, Christenbury
gym 112 or call 7522-3052.
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
The Department of Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathol-
ogy (SLAP) will be providing
the speech and hearing screen-
ing for students who are fulfill-
ing requirements for admission
to Upper Division on Sept. 13,
14 and 15,1993 from 5-6 p.m.
each day. These are the only
screening dates during the fall
semester.
The screening will be con-
ducted in the Belk Annex (ECU
Speech and hearing Clinic) lo-
cated next to the Belk Building
(School of Allied Health Sci-
ences), near the intersection of
CharlesSt. and the264by-pass.
No appointment is needed �
please do not call their office for
an appointment. Waiting is out-
side the clinic waiting room,
sign-in begins at 4:50 p.m.
Screenings are conducted on a
first-come, first-serve basis.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman catholic
Student Center invites you to
worship with them. Sunday
Masses: ll:30amand 11:30pm
at the center, 933E. 10th St. Two
houses from the Hetcher Music
Building. For more info, con-
tact Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
WOMEN'S ULTIMATE
FRISBEETEAM
Anyone interested in
joining the team please call 752-
2520. Practices will be heldTue,
Wed, and Thurs at 4:00. No
experience is necessary-just the
desire to learn and have fun.
PERSONAL CARE ATTEN-
DANTS
Employment opportu-
nities are available to students
who are interested in becom-
ing Personal Care Attendants
ine
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less
Students
$8.00
Non-Students
Each additional word
$3.00
$0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of the East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
timesfreeof charge. Duetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Monday 4 p.m. for
Wednesday's edition.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10a.m. the day priorto
publication however, no refunds will
be given.
For more
information call
757-6366.
to students in wheelchairs,
READERS and TUTORS. Past
experience is desired, but not
required. If interested, call Of-
fice of Coordinator (919) 757-
6110orOfficeforDisabilitySup-
port Services (919) 757-6799.
ECU WOMEN'S SOCCER
CiVB
If you missed the orga-
nizational meeting for the ECU
Women's Soccer Team, and are
interested in playing, please call
752-7914 for information. All
skill levels are welcome.
CHOOSING A MAIOR
AND A CAREER
This five session work-
shop is the beginning step in
Career Counseling at ECU.
Take assessment instrument.
Learn how to do majorca-
reer research. Get a list of pos-
sible career fields that fit your
interests. Classes begin the
weeks of Sept. 6 and Sept. 20.
Limited enrollment. For more
information, a schedule, and
to register: stop by the Coun-
seling Center, 316 Wright
Building.
FREE VIDEO YEARBOOK
Attention Sopho-
mores, Juniors, SeniorsBe
sure to pick up you FREE video
yearbook, TheTreasureChest.
Tapes are available at the Me-
dia Board Office located in the
Student Publications Building,
down the hall from The East
Carolinian. Bring your ID. Sup-
pliesarelimited.Getyoursnow!
RFCREATIONAI SERVICES
Can you pick'em?
You'll find out when Rec Ser-
vices hosts its all new weekly
NFLECU Pick'em Contest. So
, if you're a football buff and
think you have what it takes to
pick the winning teams, come
to the Registration meeting on
Tues, Sept.7 at 10:00am in
Christenbury Gym 104. Show
off your knowledge and win
some prizes too! For more info,
call 757-6387.
��





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� !�� "� �� ih�wmmmr�
'mim�mmm0t�,� ��� � f .
The East Carolinian
September 7, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 9
Dave Matthews teaches Greenville lesson

.
2:
v
n
Photo courtesy of Coran Capshaw
Dai;(? Matthews Band
Clowes' comic
world explored
By Chris Kemple
Staff Writer
This is the second part of an
interview continued from Thursday
Kemple: Do people attach
meaning to your work that you
don't intend?
Clowes: Oh, yes one of the
ways I try to write is that I try using
ideas that come into my head on a
subconscious level, things I'm in-
credibly driven to draw but I don't
know why they have such meaning
to me. It's just like
my subconscious
outonpaper; mere's
all kinds of signifi-
cance there if people
really want to try
and figure it out, it's
just that there's no
conscious meaning
on my part. It's just
coming out of my
deep, dark psyche.
Kemple: So
you'rejusttryingto
take your subcon-
scious thoughts
and images and put
them in a concrete
form, one which
candepict those im-
ages as a story?
Clowes: Right. If I can get it
down on paper, as honestly as I can,
with the help of other people read-
ing it, I can figure some of these
elements out.
Kemple: Now, I'd like to shift
focus a little bit and talk about the
wayyoudraw,yourstyle.Whatare
its sources;whoareyou influenced
TKr o-Kiv vv) �o rtrAllv rF
arate -TsncTseK trcrmlne
iwat-it-ream -a � ftrmr-ite
trc. mwiw fercn&- a-r-c
all -fha-t jet W" M a rath
etiC faJio-n.4i�w at ire3C&
A.v.4. iA"h�les �V. vmuCe -H.fi
Panel from Clowes' story
"The Party
by?
Clowes: Well, it's little bits of
everything. I mean, I started ou t read-
ing the early issues of Mad Magazine,
looking at people like Jack Davis,
Wally Wood, and then I started pay-
ing more attention to earlier guys
like Harvey Kurtzman and Will El-
der. �
Kemple: How about under-
ground cartoonists?
Clowes: Oh yeah, Robert
Crumb, Jay Lynch, Bill Griffith, all
those guys. I'm also looking ata lot of
the famous illustrators of the 1890's
and a little later
KempleLike
Joseph Clement
Coll?
Clowes: Yeah,
guys like him and
others like George
Grosz.
Kemple: He's
really prevalent in
the way you exag-
gerate your carica-
tures. You're also,
I'venoticed,getring
more involved with
crosshatching and
fine lines in your
inking to depict
mass and volume,
whereas in the past
you relied a lot on zi pa tone.
Clowes: Yes, it's interesting you
mentioned that; the hatching is very
therapeutic for me; it's a lot of fun.
Kemple: Okay, here comes an
artsy-fartsy question, so get ready.
Would you classify your work as
being grotesque?
c
O
R
See CLOWES page 11
ADECD Press Your Best Shirt and Join
AJvbHK us
Tafce Advantage of
Career Days
N Would you like to meet representatives from companies
face-to-face? It may be possible at Career Days.
jp What Career Days Are: Career Services arranges these one-day
R events, when employers visit campus to set up displays that detail
available career opportunities with their companies. While this is not a
time for to interview, it is the ideal time to learn about lots of employment
possibilities.
Who May Participate in Career Days?: Any ECU student, graduate
or undergraduate, may attend. Although Career Days are organized
around particular majors, tike business, you do not have to be a business
major to participate. Often, companies that visit on Business Career Day
have jobs for liberal arts majors too.
When Can I Participate?: Career Services presently holds four
Career Days. Each is held at a different campus location and at a specific
time of yean
Career Days for Education, Business and Health Professions:
� Business Day is on the first floor of GCB on Sept. 21,1993.
� Education Day is at Mendenhall Student Center on Feb. 15,1994.
� Health Day is at the Allied Health (Carol BelkBuilding on Nov. 4, 1993.
� Hospitality Management Day is held in the Human Environmental Sciences
Bldg. in March ofl 994.
You can find out exact times for Career Days by calling Career Services or
consulting campus bulletins, instructors and The East Carolinian.
What Should I Wear?: Please dress in business attire. Men should wear
coat or sweater and tie, women should wear suits or businees dresses.
Choose conservative colors, minimal jewelry and inappropriate, well-
maintained shoes.
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Anyone who was absent from
last Thursday's offering at the At-
tic should produce a doctor's ex-
cuse, because they missed an im-
portant lesson in what music is all
about.
The Dave Matthews Band
played to a packed Attic crowd
delivering two amazing sets filled
with cultural diversity and prolific
songwriting. The four-man group,
fueled by the variety of its collec-
tive musical interests, has an eclec-
tic and creative approach that
blends the strength of its players
with the passion they feel about
their songs.
This passion is exemplified in
the band's leader and namesake,
Dave Matthews.
Matthews is a native of South
Africa and spent a great deal of his
childhood there. He credits his fam-
ily for instilling him with an inter-
est in many different styles of mu-
sic. Matthews has taken the com-
plex rhythms from many different
forms of music and incorporated
their common themes into his own
blend. According to Matthews his
music is about "lifting spirits
"It's a good focus he said.
"To try to bring people together
rather than to separate them
To help him bring this senti-
ment to the masses, Matthews has
"brought together" an all-star cast
of players. In most cases these mu-
sicians would be thought of as
sidemen, but not so in this group,
said LeRoi Moore, thegroup's saxo-
phonist. Moore, who comes from a
jazz tradition, said he enjoys the
freedom he gets from the group.
"I have plenty of space to im-
provise, to try new ideas said
Moore, who also serves as the
band's arranger. "It'salmostbetter
than a jazz gig
The Matthews Band's rhythm
section is a valuable compliment to
the group's arrangements. Drum-
mer Carter Beauford, like Moore,
comes from a jazz tradition and
has appeared regularly with
Ramsey Lewis on Black Enter-
tainment Television. Filling out
the section is 19-year-old prodigy
Stef f an Lessa rd w ho brings a rich
upright bass background to the
electric bass. Both musicians point
to the band's variety of styles
when talking about their group.
"The best thing about this
band is that you get this pot pourri
of different styles Lessard said.
Beauford is just as optimistic
about the band's diversity.
"There are so many different
elements in our music he said.
"You really can't put a label on it,
and that's why I love it so much
Perhaps the unsung hero of
the group is violinist Boyd
Tinsely. Originally a classical
player, Tinsley has performed
popular music since 1985. He said
he welcomes the spontaneity that
playing with the Dave Matthews
See MATTHEWS page 13
TOD A Y: the question of homosexuality
Answered by The American
Psychological Association
QUESTION: I think my room-
mate might be gay. My parents say
that homosexuals are sick people
who need to be cured. My friends
say they are perverts. I hear church
leaders say homosexuals are the rea-
son for the breakdown of the family.
Dctesanybodyknowanythingabout
homosexuality?
ANSWER: AnAmerican Psyclio-
logical Association Statement on Ho-
mosexuality. The following is an ex-
cerpt from a published statement,
January 26,1990, by Bryant Welch,
J.D Ph.D Executive Director for
Professional Practice with the
American Psychological Associa-
tion. Prior to joining APA, Dr. Welch
practiced on the mental health de-
livery system for 15 years.
The research onhomosexuality
is very clear. Homosexuality is nei-
ther mental illness nor moral de-
pravity. It is simply the way a mi-
nority of our population expresses
human love and sexuality. Study
after study documents the mental
healthofgaymen and lesbians. Stud-
ies of judgment, stability, reliability
and social and vocational
adaptiveness all show that gay men
and lesbians function every bif as
well as heterosexuals.
a
Homosexuality is not a matter
of individual choice. Research sug-
gests that the homosexual orienta-
tion is in place very early in the life
cycle, possibly evenbef orebirth. It is
found in about 10 percent of the
population, a figure which is sur-
prisingly constant across cultures,
irrespective of the different moral
values and standards of a
particular culture
Contrary to what
some imply, the
incidence of ho-
mosexuality in a
population does
not appear to
change with
new moral codes
or social mores.
Indeed, these re-
search findings suggest
thatefforts to "repair" homo-
sexuals is nothing more than social
prejudice garbed in psychological
accoutrements. All targets of dis-
crimination,be they blacks, women,
handicapped or religious sects, have
a uniquely horrible dimension to
their suffering. This is true for gay
men and lesbians as well. Psycho-
logically, sexuality and sexual ori-
entation represent life forces which
form the most sensitive bedrock of
our being. They not only shape our
attitudes and our passions, but they
are so fundamental to our personal-
ity structure that they, in large part,
determine our sense of personal co-
hesiveness and our level of comfort
in the world. They are the driving
force with which we love, work and
create.
For patients in
psychotherapy, the
societal assump-
tion that homo-
sexuality is sick
' andor immoral
creates an emo-
tionaLsensual,and
spiritual prison
where self-expres-
sion, love and the
deepestformsofhuman
connectedness are stultified
through anguishing guilt and self-
loathing. For those of us in psychol-
ogy who have had this kind of expe-
rience working with either gay men
or lesbians, the impact hasbeen quite
profound. For over two decades
now, the American Psychological
Association hasadvocated theelimi-
rtation of dismmina tion against les-
bians and gay men.
Finally, if one thinks aboutrhe
vast real problems confronting our
society and attacking our family
structure�problems such as fam-
ily violence, divorce, drug and al-
cohol abuse, child abuse,
homelessness, and isolation, it be-
comes clear that individuals who
are obsessed with how a minority
of our citizens express love and
sexuality, have indeed established
a most peculiar set of priorities,
both for themselves and for others.
Healthy and secure hetero-
sexuals do not feel threatened by
homosexuality. Healthy hetero-
sexuals don't need to oppress ho-
mosexuals. Healthy heterosexuals
don't need to "repair" homnseu-
als.
The real issue confronting our
society today is not why people
seek love and understanding as
they do, but why some seem so
unable to love and understand at
all.
Dr. Steve Dauer and
Dr. Sarah Shepherd
were the authors of last
weeks Health Column.
TEC apologizes.
Ian Moore's debut release 'smokin' hot
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
Ian Moore's self-titled debut al-
bum on the Capricorn label is, sim-
ply put, a beautiful thing. I mean, the
man must have fingers like a Gecko
Lizard the way he makes that guitar
ska-reem! Have mercy!
But seriously, Ian Moore plays
them hang-dog rockin' wailin' blues
likea true freighttrainof pain. Moore
grew up with the blues in Austin,
andhis guitar clearly echoeshisblues
roots. There's a picture of him on the
inside sitting in front of flyers for
blueslegendsMuddy Waters, Albert
King, Big Joe Turner and others. But
that don't make him good. The mu-
sic does.
And the music speaks for itself.
Ian Moore is big-time jammin' and
that's for real. The first track, "Noth-
ing starts with someof them smok-
ing blues riffs that make you think of
summer nights in Memphis and a
cold bottle of Dixie beer. "Revela-
tion" and "Satisfied" go on and take
a rockin' look at those women that'll
crush a guy's heart. I'll tell you, this
guy jams so much it hurts.
Try "Carry On a rockin'
smokin' number that'saboutlife and
nothing else. You've got to live, so
you may as well listen to good music
about living.
And look I could go on and on
about how I like this album and how
it smokes and the blistering guitar
licks and heart-breakin' riffs that'll
set the roof of your mouth on fire, but
I think it's clear I love it. And I do, you
See MOORE page 10
Yes, the picture
reminds us all of
an over zealous
hair freak, who's
more into the
way he looks,
than the music
he makes. One
listen to Ian
Moore's self-
titled debut
album will give
hungry ears
more than they
expected.
Photo courtesy of
Capricorn records.
Don't Run My Life &? fttetmd&�
I've been toparadise, but I've
never been to me.
I've been to public safety,
where I spent 70 bucks on a park-
ing sticker.
And so, let's say there's 16,000
students at ECU. If only 10,000 of
them buy a sticker, whether it be
Commuter, Resident, or Fresh-
man, that's $700,000. If all those
students buy two books from the
student store at 10 bucks a book,
that's another $200,000 (minus
$60,000 for the actual book cost)�
say $275,000 per academic year.
According to my tuition bill,
the state throws in about five
grand for every student en-
rolled�nine million clams�and
let's say the average tuition bill
for the year, including dorm rent
and meal ticket and those myste-
rious OTHER UNIVERSITY
FEES, is $1000 greenbacks. So
right there we have 52 million
dollars for the school year.
Now I'm not a mathematical
genius, but I gotta ask: why do
we pay $70 for a parking sticker
when there's hardly anywhere to
park and what precious little is
left is going to be bulldozed for
that piece of crap recreation cen-
ter and don't kid yourself about a
parking deck because I've heard
that song's been sung on this cam-
pus since 1984 W-h-hh-hoa
Nellie!
I'll tell you why. We pay $70
for a sticker and we pay a 300
mark-up on our text books be-
cause this university plans to be
totally bricked in by the year 1996
and we got to pay those hand-
some guys in the green trucks!
Bricks, baby, bricks! All those
bricks and all those concentric
brick-layer's patterns!
And all them guys in the
green trucks! Some with walky-
talkies!
Do the guys in green trucks
haul bricks or lay them down?
Why no, they don't! Exactly
what do they do then? That my
friend, is one of those myster-
ies, like Stonehenge.
It's like this. I used to date
this nab who put me down on
an hourly basis, and one day we
were tooling along the road and
I started feeling patriotic, so I
See CRANIUM page 11






September 7, 1993
ores the world outside Letterman
ateNight
m in i m NBC on
ebuted "i
tan on BS on
n hxk Shatter's quartet
with him, suggesting that Shatter
members to the group.
!K said it owned the band's
name, the Wcffld's Most Dangerous
Hand, so the name was changed to
the more mundane Paul Shaffer &
the CBS Orchestra.
There's also a new recording
out. The World's Most Dangerous
Party'by Paul Shaffer and the Party
Bo sot Rock n' Roll.onSBKRecords.
Producer Todd Rundgrencame
up with the idea to have Shaffer host
a party like Hugh Hefner did on his
rV show in the early '60s the Play-
boy House Party
'I've always wanted to parody
sas Shaffer, 43. "I
I was tiie funniest and hip-
pest
. ioing into a sultry "Playboy"
voice, he continues, "Hey, Lennie
Bruce is in the back and Sammy is
going to sing a little number later.
( ome on in. The Jacuzzi is on.
"That was sort of our motto
On Letterman's show, Shaffer
says he'll work the way he always
has.
"When a (music) guest is going
to come on, each musician takes his
record home and listens to it and
learns his own part. That's the way 1
think rock 'n' roll should be. For the
most part, we work by ear
Shaffer, who isCanadian,started
taking piano lessons at six, studied
classical music through high school.
"Once I heard rock 'n' roll, I
stopped practicing my lessons he
says. "I put in three or four hours a
day playing by ear and faked itatthe
lesson.Mytruelovehasalwaysbeen
rock 'n' roll.
' Asa kid, 1 listened toradioall the
time. ! learned songs so that I could
play them on the piano and in my
head re-create the sound of the whole
record. I'm doing the same thing now.
1 figured out how to make a living
doing it
1 le came to the United States in
1974.
"I was brought in by Stephen
Schwartz, the composer for whom I
had worked in the Toronto company
of 'Godspell he says. "1 was musical
director. It was my first real show
business job, if vou don't vvantto count
years of experience playing in night-
clubs and high schcxil and college
bands
That first job in New York was as
a keyboardist for "The Magic Show"
on Broadway. "1 did it a year, until
Lome Michaels from Torontocame to
town to start 'Saturday Night Live
Howard Shore, his band leader, also
Canadian, knew me and needed a
piano player
MOORE jg
know. It's just fabulous.
But there is a problem.
For all the great rockin' blues on
this album, Ian Moore wants to go
and ruin it with the cover and stuff.
I'm talking about him, now. It's not
enough for him that the music is
prime stuff, he wants to go and look
good, too. We get four (five counting
the air-guitar shot on the CD itself)
pictures of Ian Moore gazing
smugly�yet longingly�into the
camera.What's with that?
We get great music, but then we
liave to look at the guy with his hair
parted and swaying down to cover
one eye and a c'mon-ya-know-ya-
!ove-me look on his face!? Please, Mr.
Moore,don'trunaJonBonJovionus,
just give us the music! I was initially
put off the disc because of the trendy
I'm-cool-I'm-hip-I'm-sensitive-
chicks-dig-me cover. Rrrrretchhh!
So look, self-aggrandizing cover
aside,flHMooreisagreatalbum. This
guyrecommendsitwhole-heartedly.
Love ya!
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-m





September 7, 1993
The East Carolinian 11
3oho gallery pokes fun at glamorous art world
Kemple Now your latest issue
of E'jZw, it seemed a I ittlt'angrii r
than mime ot the earlier issues
Clowes: Is that right1
rlmmm
Kemple: Yes, well, that's the
impression I got from itwould you
agree with that?
Clowes; Well, I can't honestly
say one way or the other, but that's
interesting just because a couple ot
people have said to me that they
thought it was one of the "nicer"
issues I'd done.
Kemple: Really?
Clowes: Yes, so hmmmI
would say that in my opinion, each
issue is about the same to me in that
respect, beca use i t takes me so long to
do an issue that I would go through
numerous cycles of anger and bitter-
nessand then periodsof relative hap-
piness one right after the other that 1
think it all evens out in the end. Then
again, not all of those things are ex-
pressed in the comic, and it depends
on the type of mood I'm in when I'm
actually writing the comic, which
takes about a week. But that's very
interesting though; you're the first
person to say that.
Kemple: Well, I got that impres-
sion from reading stories like "The
Party" where the story is told from
your point of view, and each panel is
seen as though the reader is looking
through your eyes. Then you use
this format to examine people in a
scathing way, even yourself, in a
certain social context, and you're
studying the way they act, being
posers
Clowes Yeah, that's the kind of
story that works with an angry tone
to it; it's hard to do that kind of com-
mentary and be easy-going.
Kemple: Alright now, you've
done some advertising work, like
illustrations for magazines, album
covers,et cetera You even hand draw
and letter the ads for merchandise
that appear in EightballWhat role
does that kind of work play in your
priorities? Is it a way for you to
"legitimize" comic art by exposing
people to it�people who wouldn't
ordinarily read comics?
Qowes: rmprettyselectiveabout
what I do. The stuff I do is either for
magazines which I think have read-
ers who might be into the sort of
comics I do, or album covers ofbands
withanaltemativeaudience,because
those are the kind of people who I
think are out there in droves just
waiting to read these kinds of comics,
they just aren't really a v 'are of it. I do
that kind of work on one hand to
make money, and things like album
covers are easy for me to do and take
very little time
Kemple: And you don't seem
to compromise your style at all when
you do that
Clowes: Right. Ihavetobeable
to do exactly what I want, and I've
had a lot of trouble with magazines in
the past wanting me to compromise.
I've had just about every one call me
upandaskmetodostripsand they're
usually always rejected.
Kemple: Did you ever do any-
thing for Spy?
Clowes: No,Ineverdid,because
they wanted me to draw something
based on their ideas
Kemple: I must be thinking of
Drew Friedman. He always does art
for them, and if s never really that
funny, because theyre not letting
him write it His solo stuff is much
funnier
Clowes: Right, I mean, he's get-
ting paid well to do that, it takes care
of the bills, but I just want to do that
sort of thing to sort of indirectly ad-
vertise Eightball; that's ostensibly the
main reason. As long as I can do
whatever I want, 111 draw for any
band, whether I like the music or not;
if s fine wi th me, although I wouldn't
do it for anyone I disliked.
Kemple: Of course not Well
that about does it Thanks a lot,
Daiuyou've been a greathelp in the
ongoing effort to educate people
abroad about the intrinsic potential
of comics as an art form.
Clowes: It's been my
pk pleasureI'm all for that.
If you enjoyed this interview and
would liketoseemoreof DanClowes'
work, you can pick up copies of both
Eightball and Lloyd Ueiivllyn here in
town at the Nostalgia Newsstand,
919 Dickinson Ave.
F "Welcome
i esai halkboard
� i i Soho gallery
I ime Is lwavs Now.
mil ig thesignurges:
Passing a slow I town" marker
on the flooi one slows down to find
a table covered with free refresh-
ments: juke, soft drinks and cookies
(! varu his appeal
1 lere one has a question. Abum-
ing question. It's the question that
gallery owner Pete Tunnev says is
asked most often of him: "Who pays
tor all of this?"
He does.
The Time Is Always Now gal-
lery isa big, freewheeling playground
that spoofs the gallery scene�while
also, improbably, sparking the cre-
ative spirit. It has been open for little
more than a year.
"Art 101" begins on a personal
note. A framed self-portrait of the
gallery owner done in kindergarten
hangs beyond the greeting. On desks
scattered through the gallery, text-
txxiks abound: "Perception and Pic-
torial Representation "Georgia
OTCeeffe: A Life in Letters "ArtFakes
in America
In the center of the gallery, a
teacher's desk (with shiny red apple
on a stack of books) has been set up. It
overlooks another table where gal-
lery-grerssitbusilycreatingartworks.
Once again, brushes, crayons,
markers and paper are all provided
courtesy the Sugar Daddy, Tunney.
"One of the goals of the gallery
says Tunney, a 31-year-old invest-
mentbanker'istohavepeoplespend
a little more time in an art-filled set-
ting than they usually would. To get
people to spend two hours painting
instead of seeing Terminator 2' for
the second time
Whether resulting art works are
good, so-so, or incredibly bad, most
go up on the gallery walls. Some are
graded by the gallery owner.
"The only thing that gets an F is
something that isn't done at all he
says. In other words, no F's. And no
Ds, C's, or B's, either.
A drawing entitled "Woody
Allen On a Really Bad Hair Day"
See ART page 12
CRANIUM
Continued from page 9
asked her: "Have you ever thought
about how lucky we are to be
Americans?"
She looked at me and said
something bright like "Hunh?"
So I said, "Have you ever
thought about how lucky we are
that we live in America and we're
Americans and how lucky we
are?"
She looked at me with a dis-
dainful yet blank look and said,
"You're stupid
Now I know, I should have
stopped the car and put her out,
but I was young and I thought that
was how love was: you get your
ass kicked all the time. Another
time Journey's "Open Arms" came
on the radio and I made haste to
change the channel. That
sucks I intoned in a scholarly
yet nonchalant manner.
"THAT'S OUR SONG
she wailed and started bawling
as if I didn't love her anymore.
Well well well. Gentlemen,
there's a lesson there, and that's
how it is.
So look, if one of those guys
in the green trucks honks at you
or something, or someone you
think you love starts stompin'
all over you and brow-beatin'
you like a hurricane, grab him
or her by the kidney, pinch their
nose shut and holler right in-
side their ear, I mean right on
top of it, "DON'T RUN MY
LIFE
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
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Campus Residents Enjoy:
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September 7, 1993
Poetry contest sets deadlines
r land
d that
. on-
epiphany'Realit) is
ion and earns kudos from Professor
Tunney an A plu dor pretentious-
H hile tht gallon' does show and
formallysellarrvvorks(L-nrrentI thea'
are photographs by Antonio
Gucrione,aseriesofgraffiti-styl�dogs
painted by TeterMayerandbird paint-
ings by Hunt Slonem), it's a piece of
work itself.
There arecomfortablecouches to
recline on, and bales of hav stacked
around a television set showing a
Dutch film nonstop (one can cope
with subtitles while relaxing on a bale
of hay).
" Beca use we want to keep people
here more than a few minutes, we've
installed public bathrooms says
Tunney (and so he has, both of them
featuring hay on the floor).
The tall, mop-topped man,
dressed in striped shirt with plaid
pants, says he's been away from his
gallery recently because he's been
working intensely on a business deal.
To keep the gravy train running,
Tunney, who once worked at Paine
Webber, has reentered the world of
investment banking.
A glance through a gallery visi-
tors' book indicates that Tunney has,
to some degree, succeeded in his mis-
sion: to inspire creative thought and
criticism, toencouragea flow of com-
mentary:
'It's hot. The hay smells
"Why is this so important? Such
a beautiful space, the art belittles it
These sort of projects are a smoke-
screen � pretending to be comcept-
driven,coveringupforignoranceand
perpetuating art world elitism in the
guise of liberalism
"I agree with the above. This is
rumpus room kitsch at best. But the
un-stuck-uparmchereissomething
all galleries should learn from
Tie contest is open to every-
one, but seniors are particularly
welcome, and entry is FREE.
"Many of our previous win-
ners have come form the ranks of
senior citizens said Howard Elv,
contest director, "Maybe it's be-
cause they have had theopportu-
nitv toexperience the many things
in life which provide the 'raw
material' for artistic creation
Any poet, whether previously
published or not, can be a winner.
Every poem entered also has a
chance to be published in a de-
luxe, hardbound anthology.
To enter, send ONE original
poem, any subject and any style,
to The National Library of Poetry,
L1419C ronridge Dr PO Box 704-
Zl, Owings Mills, MD 21117. The
poem should be no more than 20
lines, and the poet's name and
address should appear on the top
of the page. Entries must be post-
marked by Sept. 30,1993.
A new contest opens Oct. 1,
1993.
Tomorrow is the day. Yes,
my beloved Lifestyle
writers, there will be a
meeting. 3:30!
Night
EveiyTuesday
�All well drinks and domestic beers are only
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�Anyone who comes in the door between
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��f
September 7, 1993
The East Carolinian 13
MATTHEWS
Band provides him and said that
performance with the group makes
him use even' part of his being.
When I'm really into the mu-
sic .my whole body, mv whole soul
is into it
rinsley's words also summed
up the reactions of the audience
Thursday night. It was impossible
to watch the group and not move
along to their music. The songs were
cast from a refreshing and undefin-
able mode, cluttered with no Se-
attle- type grunge, no janglv pop
sounds or bashing drums. This
band imitated no other, but at the
same time blended parts of many
different types of music
Moore and Tinsely burned
wi th technical brilliance as they laid
down scorching solos over
Beauford and Lassard's rhythmic
colors. Matthews held down lead
vocalist chores while playing com-
plex and intricate chords on his
Do you know how
much a cubic foot of
water weighs?
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Continued from page 9
acoustic guitar. The band combined
apopsensibilty with Ailman Broth-
ers and Grateful Dead-style impro-
visations.
The band won over the audi-
ence with "Granny"and the Bovd-
penned "True Reflections the
technical brilliance of the band, and
Tinsely in particular, dropped
mouths throughout the show and
the energy of the music had feet
moving and bodies swaying on the
Attic floor. According to band man-
ager Coran Capshaw, this is a phe-
nomenon that has crowds packing
clubs "from Nantucket to Ala-
bama
"The band is constantly mov-
ing forward Capshaw said. "It's
music that appears to a wide range
of people
Capshaw said the group had
caught the eye of major record la-
bels and is curren tly working on an
independent recording project.
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The East Carolinian
Scoreboard
Wednesday, Sept 1
Volleyball (0-4)
st Jo North Carolini
15-11,15-3
Saturday, Sept. 4
Volleyball (0-4)
� lost to Georgia Tech: 13-3,
15-9,15-2
� lost to Coastal Carolina: 15-
13,15-9,15-9
� lost to Davidson: 3-15,15-8,
16-14" 4-15,15-13
Cross Country
men (0-2):
� lost to Coastal Carolina: 6-18
� lost to UNCW: 8-13
women (1-1):
� lost to Coastal Carolina: 10-11
� beat UNCW: 8-13
Sunday, Sept. 5
Volleyball (0-5)
� lost to Georgia Tech: 15-6,
15-4,15-8
Soccer (1-0)
� beat Barton College: 3-1
What's On Tap
Wednesday, Sept 8
Volleyball (0-5) versus UNCG
in Minges at 7 p.m.
Soccer (1-0) versus North
Carolina in Chapel Hill at 7
p.m.
Pirate Notes
� East Carolina's football
squad worked out for three hours
Thursday afternoon, in prepara-
tions for the Pirates'season opener
on Sept. 9 against Syracuse.
"The goal of today's practice
wastocorrect mistakes madedur-
ing last night's scrimmage said
ECU coach Steve Logan. "We've
madesome improvements today,
but we still have a way to go.
We'll come out again tomorrow
and hopefully, continue to im-
prove
The Pirates will practice once
a day until the Sept. 9 game against
the Orangemen in Ficklen Sta-
dium
� Two games will on the East
Carolina University men's bas-
ketball schedule have been
switched.
The games involve Old Do-
minion and William and Mary.
ECU was originally set to host
ODU on Feb. 16, but will now
play them on Feb. 12. ECU will
hostWilliam and Mary onFeb. 14
rather then play the previously
released date of Feb. 12. Both
games will tip-off at 7 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum
� ThePittCounty PirateClub
will be holding its Eighth Annual
Auction on Fri Sept. 10, begin-
ning at 6:30 p.m underneath
Ficklen Stadium.
Items to be auctioned in-
cludes a framed, autographed
New York Jets jersey of former
Pirate Jeff Blake, a framed
Carlester Crumpler ECU football
jersey and a framed Pat Watkins
ECU baseball jersey. Also avail-
able for auctioning are two round-
trip tickets for travel anywhere in
the continental U.S. In all, over
300 items are set to be auctioned
Robert McDuffie will provide
entertainment. The cost for ad
mission is $7 per person. For more
information and to purchase tick-
ets, contact the Pirate Club at 757-
4540.
�The Third Annual East
Carolina University "Ladies
First" Golf Classic will be held
Fri Oct. 15 at the Brook Valley
Country Club. Play will begin
with a shotgun start at 9 a.m.
All proceeds from this event
will go towards funding scholar-
ships for women's athletics
throughout the Pirate Club
The cost of the event is $45
per person. For more informa-
tion, contact the Pirate Club at
Sports
September 7. 1993
Volleyball team loses first five games
File Photo
The Pirates have one of their youngest and
lifetime against the Tarheels of North Carol
most talented teams ever. However, ECU fell to 27-1
ina last Wednesday.
(Staff and Wire Reports) �
ECU'S volleyball team lost to
Georgia Tech on Sunday (6-15,
4-15,8-5) to move it's record to 0-
5 for the season.
Gwynn Baber led with seven
kills, aided by Sarah Laurent's
15 assists. Barber added seven
digs and two solo blocks in the
Buc effort. The Pirates take a 0-4
record home from the Georgia
Tech Invitational in Atlanta.
In game one on Saturday,
the Yellow Jackets crushed ECU
in straight sets (15-5,15-9,15-2).
Melanie Richards led the offense
with eight kills, and Sarah
Laurent handed out 16 assists.
Staci Winters led ECU with six
digs.
TheBucsfacedoffwithCoastal
Carolina in game two and lost (15-
13,15-9,15-9). Once again Richards
led in kills with 15, while Laurent
set up her teammates with 27 as-
sists.
ECU played better in the third
match of the day, but lost in five
games to Davidson (15-3,8-15,14-
16,15-4,13-15).
The duo of Richards and
Laurent paved the way again.
Richards led with 15 kills, and
Laurent recorded 30 assists.
Freshman Carrie Brne had 17
digs, and Tarra Venn had three
solo blocks.
"We just aren't together
yet ECU Head Coach Martha
McCaskill said. "This is a young
team, and they just haven't
come together as quickly as I
would have liked them to. I'm
still positive about this team
because I know we have more
talent than we have ever had.
"What can you say. We just
have to keep working
UNC-CH beat ECU in the
season opener, Wednesday,
Sept. 1, in Minges Coliseum (15-
8, 15-11, 15-3). The Tarheels
moved their record to 27-1 life-
time against the Pirates.
"We played real well for
two games, but in game three
we just didn't execute
McCaskill said. "Definitely, we
See VOLLEYBALL page 18
RS offers 'Natural
Life' to residents
(RS) � "Divein movies,
belly flop contests, hot dog and
marshmallow roasts, lots of prizes
and more, Natural Life is bursting
with fun.
What is Natural Life?
Natural Life is a series of
monthly special events especially
for ECU Residence Hall students.
This program is co-sponsored by
the Residen t Education and Recre-
ational Services (RS). Natural Life
is designed to provide unique al-
ternatives for residents right here
on campus.
The first event, Cruise into
Christenbury, is on Friday, Sept.
10 from 7-11:30 p.m. at the
Christenbury pool. There will be a
Dive-in movie featuring "The
Abyss Viewers can relax
poolside or float in inner tubes
during the show. After the movie,
D.J. Johnny Miller, a crowd pleaser
from Rocky Mount, N.C. will host
a Shag Contest in the gymnasium.
Free food from ECU Campus
Dining, water games and fantastic
prizes are offered throughout the
evening.
Friday, Oct. 1 from Q p.m. to 9
a.m. is the "Camp Out On The
Mall This will be held at central
campus and will be an all night
event. Activities include volleyball,
night games and ghost stories.
Roasted hot dogs, followed by hot
marshmallow treats will carry you
through the late night munchies.
"Halloween Hayride and
Haunted Halls" will round out
October. A hayride will be offered
to carry brave souls around to each
of the Haunted Residence Halls.
The thrills will begin at 7 p.m. on
Friday, Oct. 29.
Last, but not least, we are of-
fering "Holiday Bingo You can't
buy your way into this Bingo game,
you must bring a can of food for
the needy in order to get in on the
fun. Lots of prizes will be on hand
to give away to those who have
Lady Luck on their side.
As an extra service, there is a
Natural Lifeline phone number
that features program updates and
phone in registration for each of
the events. This number is 931-
R&R4U (7748). Donna Allen will
be monitoring this line and she
looks forward to hearing from you.
Everything that is sponsored
through the Natural Life series is
free of charge and open toall Resi-
dence Hall students. Resident Edu-
cation and the Recreational Ser-
vices are seeking students who
believe that a fun time is the bot-
tom line.
ECU finds new punter
By Misha Zonn
Staff Writer
Last season during ECU's 5-6
football campaign, the Pirates were
hurt numerous times by giving
the opposing offense good field
position. The overly generous field
position would be a direct result of
either a Pirate turnover or a weak
punt that would
usually coincide
with inaccurate
coverage. Steve
Logan and his re-
cruiting team knew
that they needed to
go out and get a
quality punter and
kicker to be com-
petitive with a
tough schedule.
The problem
was immediately
sewn up with the
arrivals of place kicker Chad
Holcomb and punter Bill Wilson.
Wilson was already a part of a
championship caliber team out at
NE Oklahoma A&M in Miami
Oklahoma. The Norsemen were 9-
1 in 1992 and college national
champions in 1991. In 1992 Wilson
was named honorable mention
All-America, thus catching the eye
of division one schools.
Wilson felt that since there was
Bill Wilson
X-Country starts season
Teams face off with UNCW and CC
By Kerry Nester
Staff Writer
On Saturday, East Carolina's
men's and women's cross country
teams competed in dual meets
againstCoastal Carolina and UNC-
Wilmington.
The men dropped both races
againstCoastal Carolina.The team
of Eric Adamski and Mark Mathis
placed first for the Pirates and fifth
overall with a combined score of
30:49. Coastal Carolina won the race
with a score of six to ECU's 18.
Finbarr Egin and Graham Alig led
the way forCC with a time of 29:40
on their way to a first-place finish.
Adamski and Mathis placed
fourth against the Seahawks as the
Pirates fell by a score of eight to 13.
Jason Gibbs and Jason Adamski,
with a time of 31:38, had a fifth-
place finish.
With the forma t of the race bet-
ter suited for sprinters, the ECU
men were at a disadvantage, as
their talents are geared more for
endurance races.
"I was extremely happy with
the way our kids ran Assistant
Coach Charles Justice said. "But
with the type of team we have,
we'll do better when we get into the
regular format of 5K meets
The women faired better as
they split their races by beating
Photo courtesy of SID
The 1993 men's cross country team will miss runner Tony Chadwick
(in front) but have many new challengers for his spot in the lead.
an immediate need for a punter at
ECU, then he could be one of the
pieces that ECU needed in order to
have a successful season.
"There was an immediate
need in the kicking game Wilson
said. "That was one of the main
reasons that I chose ECU. I also
have a great respect for coach Steve
Logan and the rest of the coaching
staff
Fans were obvi-
ously looking for-
ward to the improve-
ment in the kicking
game after last sea-
son, and showed their
enthusiasm by giving
Wilson's booming
punts at the Purple
Gold scrimmage the
loudest applause of
the day.
Wilson said that
he was forewarned
about the reaction from the fans.
"There was a great reaction Wil-
son said. "People had told me that
that was going to happen. It was
still very impressive
The art of punting can be a lot
more than just a change of posses-
sion in a game. Wilson feels that it
can change the entire strategy of a
gameattimes. "If done correctly, it
See WILSON page 18
UNC-W and falling to Coastal
Carolina by one point.
"I was impressed with our
team today Justice said. "We got
great performances fromour fresh-
men, Tara and Dava Rhodes and
Cyndi Szymanski. Also, Cathrine
Norstrand, Theresa Marini and Jes-
sica Montgomery all had strong
legs
The team of Norstrand and
Rhodes placed first against the
Seahawks and second against
Coastal Carolina with a time of
35:27. The all-freshmen team of
Szymanski and Rhodes placed sec-
ond against UNC-W and third
against CC with a time of 35:28.
Overall, theearly season meet
was a huge success for all schools
involved giving their runners the
chance for early season competi-
tion in an unusual format where
teams of two run for one mile
before tagging their partner. Each
participant runs three, one-mile
legs to complete the six-mile re-
quirement
ECU prepares this week for
the Pembroke State Invitational
in Lumberton, N.C, as the regu-
lar season gets into full swing.
Bandwagoners bother true fans
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
All aboard, all aboard, every-
one who is jumping on the band-
wagon, it will leave in five minutes.
There are two types of sports
fansoutin the world. There are your
true dedicated fans and those who
just root for the team that is doing
thebest,knownbetter as bandwagon
fans. A clear definition of band-
wagon comes from Webster's dic-
tionary: "to climb or jump on the
bandwagon, to join a party, cause,
movement, etc that appears to be
gaining support
There are many bothered, faith-
ful fans out there who get annoyed
that some people just start rooting
for teams that win Super Bowls,
World Series, Stanley Cups or any
kind of championship.
Take, for instance, the Dallas
Cowboys or the Atlanta Braves. All
of a sudden�because these teams
have fared well recently � there
seem to be more people rooting for
these teams. These bandwagoners
never stick through all of the tough
times that every team goes through.
Your typical bandwagon fan is
the guy who is going to pull for one
team when it is doing well, switch
when it is no longer the best and
start rooting for the new best team.
You might ask someone, "Who is
yourfavoritecollege football team?"
and he or she might say, "Well, it
used to be Miami, but I'm really a
Florida State fan now These are
your typical everyday guys who
hop on the bandwagon with the
team that is No. 1 at that particular
time.
"I wouldcall a bandwagonper-
sonafair-weather fan said WNCT-
TV9 Sports Director Brian Bailey.
"When things are going well, that's
the guy thathopson thebandwagon
and wants to be known as Mr. At-
lanta Braveor Mr. ECU Pirate. When
things go bad, if he hops off that
bandwagon, then that's the same as
a fair-weather fan Your true fan is
the person who roots for the Marlins
when they ha ve a losing record and
keepsonrootingfor them, then all
of a sudden, five years from now
when they're in a playoff chase,
they're also there
Fans must follow their team
through all of the best and worst
of times. It can take a long period
of time for a team to be successful.
Teams face obstacles such as new
players, coaches, injuries and
sometimes just plain luck. Bailey
also points out that you can't be a
fair-weather fan because you're
not going to have success every
year.
Let's take the Braves, for ex-
ample: They ha vebeen a bad base-
See FANS page 16
x





September 7. 1993
� im yTfcdl�" iW'iw ' ' " i
The East Carolinian 15
Pirates win soccer
opener against Barton
opener, 3-1 �
Sophomore
midfielder Dan
Staton had a
hand in every
Pirate score. He
tallied the first
two goals and
assisted senior
midfielder Jus-
tin Finck for the
third score of the
day-The Pirates
out-shot the
Bulldogs 28-15.
Buc goal keeper
Brian Deweese
had eight saves.
ECU'S next
game is against
UNC in Chapel
Hill, Wednes-
day, Sept. 8, at 7
p.m.
File Photo
ECU out-shot the Bulldogs 28-15
and won, 3-1.
A year's 2-14
: rot urns
e juniors and
Seven recruits
and two
transfers fin-
ish off the ros-
ter.
Drew
Racine was
named first
team All-
CAA in 1992,
and Marc
Mullinledthe
Pirates in
scoring last
year.
ECU will
face six teams
currently
ranked na-
tionally: ACC
teams North
Carolina,
Duke, Wake
Forest, and
Third-year Head Coach N.C. State and CAA teams Will-
ScootyCareyneedsonlytwowins iam & Mary and James Madison.
Plan a h
Physical
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and the Air Force. Launch now-call
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September 7, 1993
FANS
Continued from page 14
mal ball uni-
rthepastcoupleoi
years and it had a lot to do with the
World s lidhaiiton Rich-
ardson, an employee at Overtoil -
sporting goods store.
There are numerous Cowboy
fans out there as well.
It seems that since thev started
to play like the Cowboys of old,
there have been many resurfacing
fans who have hopped on their band-
wagon since last season's Super
Bowl.
There are people everywhere
wearing Cowboy clothes.
"Last year we couldn't keep in
anything in Cowboys strictly because
they won the Super Bowl
Richardson said. "I don't know if
people are dedicated to begin with
or if they're just rolling with the
wins. A lot of people, if their teams
are winning, will wear their team's
logo, and if they're not doing good,
they won't wear it
Richardson, a senior, admits that
he used to be a North Carolina
Tarheel basketball fan until they
played ECU in the first round of the
NCAA toumamentlastyear. Hesaid
that beca use he went to school here,
he just felt it was natural for him to
pull for the Pirates.
Surroundings can also make a
person switch teams. Richardson
said he knew friends who were dedi-
cated Duke fans and ended up be-
coming Tar Heel fans after they
started to attend college at Chapel
Hill. Itwas the atmosphere thatkind
of swayed them into a different di-
rection.
Of course, there are people who
wear other teams' logos just because
itis the "in thing" or they have "cool"
colors or designs. The new expan-
sion baseball teams, the Horida Mar-
lins and the Colorado Rockies, set
ernalia
I me.
the new coloi schi i
m guilty of that be-
. enl toCoio-
ind bought me a Rockiehatso
I wore it around for awhile just be-
cause it was black with a purple 'C
and on it, and nobody else had
one, so I wore it around for a little
bit"
The dedicated fan will also get
annoyed with cithers when people
pull torrw o teams in the same sport.
It seems that they will pull for what-
ever team is doing better than the
other.
According to ECU student Bill
Campagna, he had a roommate last
year who pulled for the Cowboys
and Vikings. When the Vikings
started to slip, his roommate be-
came an all-out Cowboy fan when
they started to plav well.
Campagna felt frustrated when
his roommate boasted all the time
that the Cowboys had won the Su-
per Bowl. Campagna was irritated
because he has been a Steeler fan
since he was young and has always
stood behind them 100 percent.
Perhaps the biggest of all band-
wagon teams is the Chicago Bulls.
Michael Jordan might be the most-
loved athlete in all of sports history.
From young kids to senior citizens,
there seem to be Bulls fans every-
where. Were these fans round
cheering for Chicago before the
Michael era? No, 1 do not think so. It
would be alright to be a Bull fan if
they liked Mike since his college
daysatUNC
Jordan has been marketed so
much, especially by Nike shoe com-
pany, that you can not flip through
your T.V. channels and not see a
Jordan commercial, or walk
through the mall and not see Jor-
dan apparel.
"A lot of people like Michael
Jordan since he left N.C. and
people started liking them a little
bit, and when you win a champi-
onship, everyone hops on that
bandwagon Bailey said. "That's
a long bandwagon now because
they won three championships in
a row
It is a shame that a band-
wagon fan will never receive that
great feeling of victory that dedi-
cated fans would if their teams
won championships.
Quality Furniture
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To Lead
Or
Not to Lead
That is the
Question
Saturday
September 11, 1993
9 AM - 3 PM
Mendenhall Student Center
Free Lunch
SPONSORED BY ECU DlNING SERVICES
Free to ECU Students
Register by September 8, 1993, Call 757-4796
Conference coordinated bi
Here are a few dates with fun from ECU Recreational Services
September Sport Shorts
Facility HighlightChristenbury Gym
"Registration meetings will be held in BIO 103 unless noted
� Tues Sept. 7
�Mon Sept. 13
� Tues Sept. 14
�Wed Sept. 15-16
�Tues Sept. 21
� Thurs Sept. 30
Christenbury Swimming Pool
Mon.WedFri 6:30am-8:30am
� NFLECU Pick'em Contest
� 2 Player Golf Meeting
� Co-Rec Volleyball Meeting
� Frisbee Golf Singles Tourney
� Co-Rec Basketball Meeting
Official's Clinics
Volleyball - Brewster D-105
10am-CG104
5:00pm
5:00pm
3pm-Disc Crse
5:00pm
Tues. & Thurs
MonFri
MonThurs
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
6:30am-8:00am
11:30am-1:30pm
3:OOpm-6:30pm
3:00pm-6:00pm
12noon-5:00pm
l:00pm-5:00pm
Christenbury Gymnasium
Mon.Wed.Fri 12noon- 1:00pm
Mon.& Wed
Tues. & Thurs
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
3:00pm-6:30pm
4:00pm-6:30pm
3:00pm-6:00pm
12noon-5:00pm
l:00pm-5:00pm
Drop-in, show your I.D. and have fun!
Volleyball each Wed. at 5:00pm
Adventure Opportunities
Registration for all fall adventure trips and workshops begin 825. Pre-
registration prior to Pre-Trip Meeting required.
Trips
Windsurfing Trip
HangglideWindsurf
Fall Break Trek
Beach Horseback Riding
Swamp Thing Excursion
Hiking Adventure
Adventure Workshops
Orienteer MapCompass
Climbing Workshops
Date
Sept. 16 - 3pm
Sept. 24-26
Oct. 8-12
Oct. 24
Oct. 30
Nov. 13
Location
Whichard's Beach
Nags Head, NC
Shining Rock. NC
Cedar Island, NC
Goose Creek, NC
Medoc Mt NC
Time Location
4:00pm CG 117
Dates Location
98; 914; 105; 1021 Climb Tower
Workshop Costs: $5.00Students & $10 FacultyStaff
All Climbing Workshops begin at 3:00pm. Come by the ROC for Drop-In
Climb times; Climbing Pass purchase, & Group Climb info.
Cruise into Christenbu
FREE T-shirts & Muggers
FREE Tropical Refreshers
Friday, September 10 I)ive.in Movic: Thc xh
For residence hall students only and 1 guest.
. Resident I HiH.itHift Ml .Hnpt
Felt it
Met it
Rapped it
Held it
Pumped it
Some things can't be
learned in the classroom.
Climb the Hard ROC Tower.
FREE Saturday, September 18
10:00am - 1:00pm
Call Recreational Services at 757-6387 for more details.
1
?
fl






September 7. 1993
The East Carolinian 17
Hard hitters find
success at U.S. Open
'You d have th.it
much of a chance to get into a
riwthm'Mats Wilander said Sun-
day after being ousted by heavj
hitter Cedric Pioline of France
On Sunday. the biggest prac-
titioners of the big serve theory
were 6-foot-5 Richard Krajicek of
the Netherlands, 6-3 Boris Becker
of Germany and the t-2 Pioline.
"The points with Richard are
so quick and so repetitive because
he hits such big serves and aces
6-6 Todd Martin, a big-server him-
self, said of Krajicek, who came
out on top of their marathon battle
6-7 (4-7), 4-6, 7-7 (11-9), 6-4, 6-4.
"It's hard to say which ace came
where and when
Pioline ousted 1988 U.S. Open
champion WOander 6-4, 6-4,6-4.
"He hits a couple of aces and
a few winners and it just takes a
minute per game Wilander said.
Others moving into the fourth
round in the men's draw were
top-seeded Jim Courier, No. 8
Andrei Medvedev, Magnus
Larsson of Sweden and two Aus-
mandWally
� i men sNo. 1
pol in the
; iabriela
and two upset winners:
llth-seeded Manuela Maleea-
Fragniere of Switzerland and
Japan's Kiniiko 1 ite
The bottom half of the
women's draw completed the
fourth round as No. 2 Arantxa
Sanchez Vicario, No. 3 Martina
a ratilova.No 12HelenaSukova
and No. 14 Nathalie Tauziat won
matches.
Wilander assumed the world's
No. 1 ranking when he won the
title on the hardcourts of the Na-
tional TennisCenter five years ago.
ThepressuresofbeingNo. 1,how-
ever, proved too great and he even-
tually left the tour.
times have changed greatly
since he dominated tennis, he noted
after his loss.
"It is very d iscouraging for me
to be playing against guys that
can hit backhand winners at 150
miles an hour Wilander said.
"Sometimes I walk around and say,
'This guy can't play at all and
then bang, bang, bang, he breaks
See OPEN page 18
You're invited to the 4th Annual
STUDENT PIRATE CLUB
Kkk-qffSocud
Tuesday, September 7 at 7.00 p.m.
Pirate Club Social Room
(Behind the Press Box side of Ficklen)
Guest Speaker:
Athletic Director Dave Hart
Free Refreshments and Door Prizes
Call 757-4540 for more Information
'Greenville's ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
We now Offer
Limousine
Service!
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Nkjhtfor Female Dancers 11 pm-1 am
CASH PRIZE
'Contestants need to cmI & refitter in advance. Must arrive by 8X).
THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS
SilverBullet'sFemale'Exotic" Dancers
Dancers wanted
We do BittMtyt, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00OFF Admission Any Night withthiscoupon
Doors Open 7:30pm StageTime9:00pm
Call75r6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Ploklnson Avm.
(behind John's Convenient Man)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
TETj
Student
Organizations:
Organization Registration Forms are Due
September 15,1993
in 109 Mendenhall Student Center
Registration Forms are available in the
Student Leadership Development Programs Office,
109 Mendenhall Student Center.
Call 757-4796 for more information.
STUDENT UNION IS MOW UP
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
SEPTEMBER FILMS
(SS
From ihi Diricior
oi "Darkman"
Trapped in time Surrounded by evii
Low on vns
ARMiV
DARKNESS
&Mr
SEPTEMBER 22 & 26
GOLDEN GLOBE NOMINEE
REST ACTRESS-Susan Sarandon
,r m!a
"The Best Film
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Lorenzo's On'
Is An Astomshiv;
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"TuoThimbsIp
NK.K
NOLTE SARANDON
LorenzOs Oil
((THE ONE MOVIE EVERYONE Will BE TALKING ABOUT
PROVOCATIVE DARING. DON'T MISS IT' THE FIRST REAL MOVIE OF THE 90s.ll
MICHAIL DOUOLAI
Tk. odv.ntvrti of an ordinary man
at war with Hw M.nrdoy world.
mil Mi?l
�MM MO
SEPTEMBER 23 - 25
A N0110 BE MISSED TREASURE
loaded with talent and memorable characters
Ci'ue Wiry KMC-TV
,TMlLf
K�s
0�
H.
C'W3M(Tr0GOiOWVN Kun�K Ai, Wiffl WlWwg
The Visual Arts Committee Presents.
Watercolor and Still Life Paintings by
i
and
u-Ching
a
"A Cultural Awareness Week Exhibit"
September 26 - October 23
Artist's Reception:
Monday, October 4th
7:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Gallery
SEPTEMBER 29
& OCTOBER 3
SEPTEMBER 30 - OCTOBER 2
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW
BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE
POSITION OF DAY-STUDENT REPRE-
SENTATIVE FOR THE STUDENT UNION BOARD
OF DIRECTORS. FOR MORE INFORMATION,
CONTACT THE STUDENT UNION AT 757-4715.
ALL FILMS START AT 8:00 P.M AND ARE FREE FOR STUDENTS,
FACULTY, AND STAFF WITH VALID ECU ID. CALL 757-6004








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FROM THE FOLKS WHO BRING YOU BAREFOOT
�HHMBHMMIP'iMnM!
� Hi�I���� � ��� "��W.iJgyj� i.�llWjLMt��W-WrlWa�B





September 7, 1993
VOLLEYBALL
Continued from page 14
iph overpowered
in that last game
us
lid "For the most part, !
thought we played and commu-
Bucs to nicated real well as a team, but
WILSON
we did lose our focus a little too possesses .i lot of potential
often McCaskill said. "They're easily
Brne recorded seven kills capable of being the best team
and seven errors in the Pirate I've ever had here
effort. ECU's next home game is
"This team is very young and Sept. 8 versus UNC-Greensboro
Continued from page 14
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can give the defense something to
work with Wilson said. "It you
give the opposing offeruse bad held
position, then it really helps out
you're defense
Wilson says that one of the
most embarrassing moments that
can come out of punting is getting
a punt blocked. "Getting a punt
blocked is embarrassing, but there
is reallv nothing that you can do
about it Wilson said. "It can kind
of break your concentration, so that
the next time you art not sure if
vou are going to get it off or not.
The main thing is that if I get the
punt off in 2.0 seconds or less from
the time that I catch the ball, then I
should never get blocked
Since timing is one of the ma-
OPEN
jor elements in punting, Wilson
says that working together with
the punting unit is one of the im-
portant things that goes on every-
day in practice. The unit includes
red shirt freshman Edward
Crabtree and Chad Holcomb. The
chemistry that this punting team
produces could either make or
break the Pirates in the close ga mes.
Continued from page 17
EHBMTA
vou and you wonder what hap-
pened
Pioline slammed 15 aces past
Wilander, who should feel lucky.
Krajicek had 24 aces, Martin
10 in their five-set match.
Morgan hit 21 aces, while
Medvedev had 15 and Becker 11.
Courier, known more for his
big groundstrokes, hit nine aces
and Masur had eight.
The women may not pound
out aces, but they ha ve a few power
hitters in the lineup. Two of the
biggest hitters are Graf and Mary
Pierce, paired on Stadium Court.
"I don't think I could have
played much better than that Graf
said after crushing Pierce 6-1, 6-0
in 48 minutes.
Pierce won only nine points in
the first set and eight in the sec-
ond.
"I can play as well as any
player Pierce said. "But when I
have to, I can't. It must be mental,
because physically I have the
game
Saba tini, who won here in 1990,
set up a quarterfinal against Graf
by outlasting first-year pro Lind-
say Davenport, a big hitter, 6-7 (7-
1), 6-4,6-4.
Davenport, a 6-2,17-year-old
Califomian, used her bruising two-
fisted backhand and strong serve
to overpower Sabatini in the first
set, but was undone by errors in
the second and third sets amid in-
creasing pressure from Sabatini.
Davenport saved five match points
in the final set before yielding on
the sixth with a wide crosscourt
backhand.
Wimbledon finalist and No. 8
seed Jana Novotna committed 33
unforced errors against Date, who
won 6-4,6-4. Date, who previously
beat No. 9 Anke Huber, became
the first Japanese quarterfinalist in
a Grand Slam semifinal since
Kazuko Sawamatsu was here in
1975.
Maleeva-Fragniere, who ear-
lier announced this would be her
final U.S. Open, ousted fourth-
seeded Conchita Martinez of Spain
1-6,6-0,6-2.
Courier advanced with a 6-4,
6-4,6-2 victory over Mali Vai Wash-
ington. The winner broke in the
ninth game in both the first and
second sets, then held to capture
the set.
The Australian Open cham-
pion and runner-up at both the
French Open and Wimbledon,
Courier dominated the final set,
winning five of the first six games.
Brian Olson, TEC assistant sports editor
now offers a weekly trivia quiz. Look for it in
Thursday's paper.
501 E. 11th St.
757-0888
758-4805

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Friday, September 10
7:00pm - 11:00pm
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Dive-in Movie (shown in the pool) at 7:00pm
featuring "The Abyss"
D.J. Johnny Miller plays beach music
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 7, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 07, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.957
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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