The East Carolinian, August 31, 1993






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di
ur tickets now!
tr's Pirate
Go by Mendenhall
See story for
Lifestyle
Hilell encourages participation
Hilell, the Jewish Student
Organization at ECU, gives
Jewish students a forum to
let their voices be heard.
See story page 7.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 46
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, August 31,1993
14 Pages
NC residents brace for hurricane Emily
NAGS HEAD, N.C. (AP) �
Officials ordered as many as
100,000 residents and tourists to
evacuate Dare County and coastal
areas of Currituck County Mon-
day as Hurricane Emily twisted
on a path toward North Carolina.
Surf was 3 to 4 feet Monday,
although surfers enjoyed waves
up to 9 feet Sunday, and forecast-
ers warned waves would begin to
build all along the East Coast.
Gale-force wind also could reach
North Carolina Monday.
"Nobody's going to be ar-
rested for not leaving, but they're
probably going to be asked for
their next of kin said Ray Sturza,
a spokesman for Dare County.
"Use common sense � and then
go-
South of the Outer Banks,
Carteret County was expected to
ask tourists to leave Bogue Banks,
the islands off Morehead City,
Monday afternoon, said Tom
Hegele of the North Carolina Di-
vision of Emergency Manage-
ment.
The mandatory evacuation
designation allows state officials
to prevent traffic headed toward
the beaches from using the two
bridges connecting the Outer
Banks with the North Carolina
mainland.
Sturza estimated Dare
County's population at 100,000
people�three-quarters of them
tourists.
Officials ordered about
2,500 people to leave Ocracoke
Sunday. Ferries, that give the is-
land its only access to the main-
land, ran through the night. There
were few people around to leave
the island this morning.
NationalParkServicecamp-
groundsatCape Pointand Frisco
on Hatteras Island are also being
evacuated.
Hegele warned tourists and
local residents against riding out
the storm on the state's fragile
Outer Banks.
"If Emily picks up strength
and intensifies, they may not be
able to survive it he said.
AtOcracoke Monday morn-
ing, the sky was blue with light
clouds and water along the coast
was relatively calm, but people
knew that might not last.
Jean Fletcher, who runs a
bed and breakfast inn on
Ocracoke, said she had reserved a
spot on the ferry for Swan Quar-
ter on the mainland. She found
out today that ferry reservations
had been cancelled, and had to
wait in line with others evacuat-
ing the island.
"You get the feeling
nothing's going to happen she
said today as the sun rose on a
relatively cloud less day over calm
coastal waters. "But a good run is
better than a poor stand anytime
The National Hurricane
Center in Coral Gables, Fla is-
ECU professor featured on PBS
By Richard Holt
Photo courtesy Susan Askew, ECU News Bureau
Dr. Stan Riggs stretches his legs after a three-hour dive in the
JOHNSON SEA-LINK submersible at Onslow Bay.
Staff Writer
A research project led by
Dr. Stanley Riggs of the ECU
geology department will be fea-
tured on a PBS program to be
broadcast August 31. The pro-
gram, SEARCH, will air at 7:30
p.m. on University of North
Carolina Television.
The program contains a
segment dedicated to the re-
search project begun by Dr.
Riggs and colleagues from sev-
eral universities during 1991.
The project entails the
studying of the continental shelf
and mid-shelf areas off of the
coast of North Carolina. Spe-
cifically, the analysis of
rockbottom sea floois on the
continental shelf is an attempt
to determine their viability to
sustaining artificial and natu-
ral rock reefs.
The project was initiated
after a significant decline in the
North Carolina reef fish popu-
lation. These reefs are impor-
tant as they attract many fish,
as well as the huge North Caro-
lina sportfishing industry.
"It is estimated that
sportfishing represents $120-
200 million of North Carolina's
economy says Riggs.
Because of the large
amount of revenue that
sportfishing tourism generates,
many coastal states are inclined
to create artificial reefs in an
attempt to attract fish.
"The government spends
a great deal of tax money on
reef building by dumping gar-
bage such as old barges and rail-
road cars Riggs said.
A problem exi- 3 when
there is no responsible manage-
ment in creating these reefs.
"Instead, we should be cul-
tivating and developing the sea
bottom instead of irresponsible
dumping of waste he said.
"There needs to be manage-
ment as far as what and where
to dump certain things, to un-
derstand the dynamics of the
(reef) system
The problem of pollution
can occur when old ships are
used as artificial reefs.
"Dumping old ships can
reveal a legacy of toxic things
such as petroleum residues
Riggs said.
The research that has been
done by Dr. Riggs and his col-
leagues reveal insight into reef
formation.
"Drifting sands keep
many organisms from adhering
to hardbottom rock surfaces
he said. "Also, different kinds
of rocks influence growth of
reefs and organisms. Not all
rocks are the same as far as fish-
ing potential
The research party ana-
lyzed different kinds of rocks
as well as the different chemi-
cals and nutrients in their im-
mediate environment. All of
See PBS page 2
Magazine receives grant and design awards
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
The "North Carolina Liter-
ary Review a literary magazine
based at ECU, recently received a
$5,000 grant from the North Caro-
lina Arts Council, in addition to
two national awards for publica-
tion design.
According to Alex Albright,
editor of "NCLR" and nonfiction
writingprofessoratECU,the grant
was given to increase the pay for
writers who will publish material
in the third and fourth issues of the
magazine.
Although some literary
magazines do not offer money to
writers, Albright said thathehopes
such compensation will help at-
mKSmoreprofessional writers. The
grant will nearly double the pay
received in earlier editions of the
magazine.
The Spring 1993 issue re-
ceived two design awards. The
American Center for Design will
include mat issue in its 16th annual
"100 Show which opens in Chi-
cago in September, 1993, and will
tour throughout the United States
during 1994.
"Print" magazine presented
the second BfffjBjff
award. The
cover of the
"North Caro-
lina Literary Re-
view" received
recognition in
"Print's" an-
nual competi-
tion which
drew more than
35,000 entries.
Eva Rob-
erts, a faculty ������������
member of the ECU School of Art,
designed theaward-winningissue.
The cover featured a drawing by
Catherine Walker, also with the
School of Art.
The "NorthCarolina Literary
Review" is published semi-annu-
ally by the North Carolina Literary
Albright said he
hopes such
compensation
will attract more
professional
writers.
and Historical Association and the
ECU Department of English. Its
premiere issue was published in
the summer of 1992 and was the
only university-produced maga-
zinehonored by the Society for Pub-
lication De-
signers in a
competition
among 7,000
items.
The third
edition of the
magazine will
be published
early in 1994
and will in-
clude two the-
matic sections.
mmm The first is de-
voted to Paul Green and the 100th
anniversary of his birth. The sec-
ond will include literature about
the period from the Civil War until
the turn of the century.
"North Carolina Literary
Review's" fourthedition will focus
onBlack Mountain College and the
sued a hurricane watch Sunday
for the mid-Atlantic coast from
Cape Romain, S.C northward to
Fenwick Island, Del.
"The watch area is still the
same hurricane specialist Ed
Rappaport in Coral Gables said.
"A portion of that area may have
a warning posted later today
Monday
At 11 a.m. Monday, the cen-
ter of the storm was located about
325 miles to the southeast of Cape
Hatteras. At 9 p.m. the storm was
located at latitude 32.2 degrees
north and longitude 73.0 degrees
west. The storm's highest sus-
tained winds were near 95 mph
and some strengthening was
likely during the next 24 hours.
60th anniversary of its founding.
Although the next two edi-
tions of the magazine will have spe-
cial sections, Albright said that he,
along with associate editors and
colleagues Bertie Fearing and John
Patterson, is still interested in manu-
scripts on other topics. Persons
interested inpublishing their manu-
scripts in the "North Carolina Lit-
erary Review" should send copies
to 101 English Annex, ECU.
Albright said that one reason
for the magazine's success was the
hard work by the student interns
and writers. The 13 students cur-
rently working are excellent work-
ers who get to learn how a maga-
zine works.
Copies of the "North Caro-
lina Literary Review" are available
atindependentbookstores through-
out North Carolina, or by subscrip-
tion for$15. Individual copies may
be purchased for $9.50, postpaid.
Mail orders should be senttoNCLR,
Department of English, ECU,
Greenville, N.C. 27858.
"I mink the odds favor it
gettinga little stronger because
of coming over warmer wa-
ter, traversing the Gulf
Stream meteorologist Joe
Pelissier said during an emer-
gency management meetingin
Raleigh today. "The upshot is
that, yes, it will probably get a
little stronger, but, no, it won't
become a Hugo or an An-
drew
The storm was expected
to turn gradually back to the
northwest within 12 to 24
hours, Rappaport said. De-
pending on how extreme mat
turn was, the storm could miss
See EMILY page 4
Allied Health
celebrates 25 years
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Throughout the 1993-94
year, the School of Allied Health
Sciences will celebrate its 25th
anniversary. Featured events to
commemorate the anniversary
include a national conference on
health reform and a banquet and
research day in the spring.
According to Dr. Steve Tho-
mas, professor and director of the
25th Anniversary Steering Com-
mittee, the major event will be a
one-day conference to be held
during National Allied Health
Week. The conference will begin
with a keynote address Tuesday,
September 28 at 7:30 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium.
Thomas is currently work-
ing to obtain Dr. Ira Magaziner,
chair of the National Task Force
on Health Care Reform, todeliver
the address. Previously, Thomas
tried to get First Lady Hillary
Rodham Clinton, but her sched-
ule conflicted with the dates for
the conference.
"I feel like Dr. Magaziner
will be able to make it They like to
send out people to support one
program or another Thomas
said.
The address is to be entitled
"National Health Reform: Direc-
tions for the'90s" and will beopen
to the public.
On Wednesday, September
29, the conference will convene at
8 a.m. for registration at
Mendenhall Student Center. Al-
lied health professionals, stu-
dents and alumni will make up
the majority of the conferees.
The day-long conference will
be entitled "The Future of Al-
lied Health: Reform, Resources,
and Roles
The morning keynote,
"Future Resources for Allied
Health in Education, Research
and Service will be followed
by four concurrent sessicris that
further address resource issues
in the following settings: 1) ru-
ral, 2) hospital-based, 3) private
(third party), and 4) public ser-
vice (local, state, federal).
"Basically wearegoingto
be focusing on what we need to
dointhefieldtoimprove'Tho-
mas said. "We expect a good
crowd
A second event to com-
memoratethe25th Anniversary
isabanquettobeheldonThurs
day evening April 14, and a
research day scheduled for Fri-
day April 15,1991 in the Belk
Building. This will involve fac-
ulty, staff, students and alumni
from all departments of the
school.
"WewiD honor pastdeans
and look atthe pastaccomplish-
ments of the school as well as
the future of the school Tho-
mas said.
Both the conference and
research day will be free of
charge; however, due to lim-
ited space, participants wiUneed
See HEALTH page 3
The
happy
Bard
A singer from
New Life
Christian
Ministries
performed in
front of
Mendenhall on
Friday.
Photo by Cedric
Vsn Buren
U1J1LUL JillUUU.
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August 31, 1993
Music School hosts drums r
By Richard Elkins
Students freed from Bosnian prison
Two University of Nebraska-Lincoln students working as
relief volunteers in Croatia were released this summer after being
held in a Bosnian detention center for about 18 days. The two
students, who are natives of Pakistan, were distributing supplies
from a relief office in divided Bosnia when they were captured.
Arshad Syed, information systems manager for the College of
Business Administration, went to Croatia in July to help negotiate
the students' release, said his wife, Lucretia Syed. Syed convinced
the American Embassy in Croatia to assist in the rescue effort after
much persuading, his wife said. Through Syed's efforts, the two
students were safely released.
Feminist art project was student idea
Officials at the University of Maryland say a feminist art
project that caused a firestorm of protest on campus was initiated
by the students and not the professor. Fliers stating, "These men are
potential rapists and listing the names of thousands of male
students appeared throughout the campus on April 30 during an
event called Art Attack. The.project, created by nine women
students enrolled in the course "Issues in Feminist Art" also
included building a wall that included the names of about 15,000
male students. The artwork outraged many members of the stu-
dent body, brought a statement of censure from university Presi-
dent William Kirwan and put the school in the national media
spotlight that included a harsh editorial in US A Today newspaper.
Professor Josephine Withers, who led the class, came under fire for
her participation in the project. After an investigation by the
university, however, it was determined that the project was not a
class project and was not included in Withers' syllabus.
Wartburg College cooks up mom's meals
In an effort to make students feel at home, the Wartburg
College cafeteria staff has been dishing up home-style cookin' with
dozens of "comfort food" recipes gathered from students' own
homes. To rouse student interest at the Waverly, Iowa institution,
the college food service flooded dorms with fliers asking them to
get beloved family recipes. After several dozen recipes were col-
lected, whipped up by the Wartburg chefs, and sampled by student
diners who gave them a "yea" or a "nay it was clear that
competition was stiff. Only culinary delights with the highest
ratings were elevated to the illustrious permanent cafeteria menu.
The recipe contest, according to officials, is another way for the
college to keep its No. 1 ranUig for food service among college
campuses, which it earned in 1991.
Compiled by Maureen Rich. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Staff Writer
On Friday and Saturday,
August 27 and 28, the ECU
School of Music played host to a
festival of marching percussion.
Members of the ECU drum line
and members of drum lines from
five high schools participated
in the two-day festival.
The festival featured two
clinicians who work with drum
lines for DCI Drum and Bugle
Corps.
Since 1984, Bret Kuhn has
been on the staff of the Cava-
liers Drum and Bugle Corps, the
1992 DCI world champions. He
is an alumnus of the Cavaliers,
and currently teaches at a Chi-
cago-area high school and
PBS
Northern Illinois University,
while his summers are spent
with the Cavaliers. Kuhn
worked for 45 minutes with each
of the high school drum lines
and had two separate rehears-
als with the ECU Drum Line.
Scotty Sells has been the
instructor and arranger of the
DCI Santa Clara Vangaurd pit
percussion section. Sells is noted
for his participation with the
Vanguard and Spirit of Atlanta
corps. He was the 1990 winner
of the DCI solo competition on
timpani.
Sells, now holds a gradu-
ate degree from the University
of Miami, but he received his
undergraduate degree from
See MUSIC page 3
Continued from page 1
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these factors were compiled in
hopes of determining growth
factors for reef formation.
One essential element of
the research involves being at
sea thirty to forty days a year.
"Sea time is extremely ex-
pensive says Riggs.
Different kinds of ships are
used including a submersible
and a smaller 110 ft. platform
that acts as a homebase.
Another essential element
of the project includes diving
on a daily basis. "There are four
dives per day that last 30 to 50
minutes per dive, close to three
hours per day for each diver
says Riggs. Two of the divers
are Keil Schmid and Bob Wyrick,
both ECU geology graduate stu-
dents.
"The act of diving was the
most valued thing to be gained
from this experience says
Wyrick.
"A lot of teamwork as well
as hard work is involved
Schmid said. "Not everything is
as cut and dry as you learn in a
classroom
The four-year project is in
its third year. The $500,000 study
is funded through several
sources. These include The Na-
tional Undersea Research Cen-
ter at UNC-Wilmington and the
N.C. Sea Grant College Pro-
gram. Both agencies are headed
by the National Oceanic and At-
mospheric Administration
(NOAA). The other financial
source is the Cooperative Insti-
tute for Fisheries and Oceanog-
raphy which is part of the Na-
tional Marine Fisheries Service.
The other researchers be-
sides Dr. Riggs include Dr. Will
Ambrose, an ECU biologist;
Martin Posey, a UNC-W biolo-
gist; Dr. Scott Snyder, an ECU
geologist; Steve Snyder, a N.C.
State geochemist; and Dr. Bill
Burnett, a Florida State Univer-
sity geochemist. In addition,
some ECU graduate and under-
graduate students worked on
the project as well.
The research will be fea-
tured again on the PBS program
"Return to the Sea" during the
coming year.
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August 31, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
center offers
mental relief
Staff Writer
The Counseling
available at East Carolina of
wide variety of programs and
counsel. Over 25 cost-free services
and workshops are offered
through the center.
Programs range from indi-
vidual help with academic deci-
sions, to crisis and drug counsel-
ing, to support groups. These
groups cover topics such as stress,
eating disorders or coping with
death. Students are encouraged
to call 757-6661 or to stop by to
register for counseling or to leam
more about the services being of-
fered.
East Carolina's Counseling
Center is accredited by the Inter-
national Association of Counsel-
ing Services. The center adver-
tises its programs through flyers,
posters and media. However, not
many students at East Carolina
are aware that a counseling center
is available, or where it is located.
Located in 316 Wright (en-
trance left of the Student Stores),
the counseling center has a staff of
five professional full-time coun-
selors, two that work part-time
and two practicum students. Al-
though the service has a small
staff of around 10 people, volun-
teers help toeasethe burden. The
counseling staff is small in com-
parison to the 18,000 students at
ECU. If the counseling staff were
doubled, claims Wilbert Ball,
counseling center director, the
office would still be very busy.
A counseling program be-
gan in 1964 with an emphasis on
helping academic achievement.
This all changed, however, in the
late '60s and throughout the 70s
for several reasons, one being
drugs.
The center has since ex-
panded to offer a comprehensive
variety of services. It tries to reach
out to all students.
In another branch of the
center's Counseling Service, two
clinical psychologists are located.
This makes the third year the
mental health services have been
available. Close contact is main-
tained by the two services through
weekly meetings.
U.S. Soldiers
raid U.N.
MOGADISHU,Somalia (AP)
� It sure looked good.
Elite American troops under
thecover of darknessdropped from
helicopters on ropes. They tied up
people inside and forced them to lie
on the floor. It was quick, precise,
thestuff of a recruiting commercial.
There was just one problem.
They raided the wrong target. In
fact, they raided a building housing
U.N. personnel.
Three foreign U.N. workers
and five Somali employees were
briefly detained today in what the '
chief UN.militaryspdcesrnan,Maj.
David Stockwell, nevertheless de- '
scribed as "a successful operation
"They were searching a place I
they had every reason to believe
was hostile and they acted appro-
priately until they determined oth-
erwise Stockwell said.
The building's entrance is f
marked by a sign identifying it as a
project office of the U.N. Develop-
ment Program, one of many U.N.
agencies operating in Somalia.
Stockwell said the building was in
an "unauthorized area
Stockwell declined to charac-1
terize the objective of the mission,
which involved more than a dozen
helicopters, U.S. Rangers and sol-
diers from the Army's Quick Reac-1
tion Force.
Asked if he would categori-
cally say that the objective was not
the capture of fugitive warlord f
Mohamed Farrah Aidid, Stockwell
replied, "No, what I'm saying isi
that I will not go into detail on the j
purpose of our operation
But he declared it "a textbook
example of how these operations I
should go" using "lightning speed
and overpowering force
An Egyptian woman, whol
would identify herself only as the
MUSIC
Cont'd from page 2
ord coordinates
ion activities in the
: Musi He is an active
r noted for mallet per-
n. Ford is also an alum-
: ECL and served as coor-
dinator of the weekend festival.
Scott Harris is a graduate
student in percussion at ECU,
where he currently serves as stu-
dent assistant to the Marching
Pirates, and aids with the Drum
Line. His undergraduate degree
is from the University of Massa-
chusetts, and while he was in
attendance there, he toured with
the Star of Indiana Drum and
Bugle Corps, the 1991 World
Champions.
High school drum lines
participating in the festival were
Greenville Rose, West Carteret,
White Oak, Roanoke Rapids and
Trinity high schools.
The Marching Pirates are
directed by a new conductor this
year, Chris Knighten.
Cont'd
HEALTH page 1
to register in advance.
"We are excited about our
anniversary celebration and hope
rheeventswillhelpdevelopabetter
understand ingamongdepartments
and greatervisibility across thecam-
pus, the community, and the state
Thomas said.
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V
mi 5S55 -i
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FTFrTrTJVj
s3
Q&
Call Today!
757.4540
Welcomes New & Returning Students
1. Croup Seating at Pirate Football & Basketball games.
2. Priority in purchasing Bowl tickets.
3. Full membership in the Pirate dub at the Crew level for oniy halt the cost
4. The "Purple Report: monthly newtetter.
5. Bumper sticker, window deal, membership certificate, membership ard
and key chain.
6. Invitations to Pirate Club social events.
7. Priority points that accumulate over time.
8. Special Student Pirate Oubactivites(Pre-cjamescMk,coo
coaches socials, plus many other exciting events).
9. Special discounts from local businesses supporting the Student Pirate dub.
iJUJL�I
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See SOMALIA page 4
llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll





�?
August 31, 1993
EMILY
Continued from page 1
"It was something else yes-
terday, thenicest it's been all sum-
merCharles Iriain said. "I surfed
in the morning and it was four or
five feet. Then I moved last night
and it was just giant, line eight- or
nine-foot faces coming in. Nice,
clean waves.lt was good
Thain decided against riding
out the storm.
"I'm worried enough, I'm
getting off the island he said. "I
would hate to be stuck here and
have the ferry service get cut off
Evacuees were urged to take
along insurance policies, fuel their
cars and gather their pets. They're
also being ad vi sed to gather what-
ever cash they have available be-
fore expected power outages dis-
SOMALIA
able automatic teller machines.
' Money is going to talk once
the power goes out Sturza said.
Construction barges used to
double the width of the two-lane
Wright Memorial Bridge leading
to the Outer Banks will be sunk to
prevent them from crashing into
the bridge and damaging it, Sturza
said.
Sturza said the evacuation
of Dare County is taking place in
two directions. Those located
south of Whalebone, including
Hatteras Island, will be directed
onto U-S Highway 64 west from
N.C. 12, which is dangerously
prone to flooding. Those north of
Whalebone, including Kitty Hawk
and Kill Devil Hills, will be di-
rected along state route 158.
The American Red Cross
was setting up shelters at Rocky
Mount Senior High School in Nash
County, at Fike High School and
Continued from page 3
Toisnot Middle School in Wilson
County and at Tarboro High
School in Edgecombe County.
Carteret County was closing
schools at 1 p.m. and setting up
shelters at several elementary
schools and West Carteret High
for people leaving the beaches,
including the Cape Lookout Na-
tional Seashore. The Marine Corps
Air Station New River may move
its 150 helicopters to inland today
if conditions along the south-cen-
tral coast worsen, said Chief War-
rant Officer Hartman Slate.
Base residents are unlikely
to move, and service families
forced to evacuate homes along
the coast are being encouraged to
go to the base, he said.
"Military bases by their na-
ture are set up as good shelters, so
an evacuation of the air station is
an extreme move Slate said.
Eight two-hour sessions designed to prepare you
for the format and content of the
October 16,1993 GMAT Exam
fJu
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
GMAT
administrative officer of the raided
U.N. compound, said she and other
foreign employees were tied upand
forced to lie on the floor.
"They just told us to behave
properly, to keep flat on the floor
she said. "Then we started telling
Kthem who we are and they said it
KWould be alright, don't worry, but
we have to do our thing and that's
it"
She said three colleagues�a
. Canadian, Irishman and Belizian
� were taken away by the raiding
"troopsalongwithfiveSomalihouse-
' hold employees. They were later
released.
No one was hurt in the action,
and the woman said the troops
"acted properly although she ac-
knowledged being terrified.
Reporters visiting the walled,
two-story villa found several empty
shotgun shells on the floor of the
entrance, windows blown out, the
telephone and radiodestroyed and
vehicles damaged by gunfire. At
least two muffled explosions were
heard, butno gunfire. The raid came
after an earlier mortar attack by
Somali militiamen on Mogadishu's
old international airport, now a
lAistlmgU.N.miUtaryerKarnpment.
Stockwell said three Rangers
were slightly injured by flying
gravel from the explosions, treated
at a field hospital and released. It
was the latest in weeks of almost
nightly harassing attacks on U.N.
positions. The raided building is in
an area of southernMogadishu long
considered a stronghold of Aidid,
wanted by the United Nations for a
series of ambushes on June 5 that
killed 24 Pakistani peacekeepers.
Review
1 mwm m mm
�Fresii Saltwater Rsti � Parateets Cadtatets � Rnches � Smal Anmais
� Supples & Tanks Cages
rparakeels $9951
ii
HOURS Men-Sat 12-8
903 Stokes Highway
(2 Miles from Burroughs Wellcome)
758-0777
Show ECU ID for 10 Discount!
Course
Course Schedule:
TuesdaySeptember 14
ThursdaySeptember 16
TuesdaySeptember 21
ThursdaySeptember 23
TuesdaySeptember 28
ThursdaySeptember 30
TuesdayOctober S
ThursdayOctober 7
Course Time:
6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
ONLY $149
Cost includes
all instructional fees
and two popular GMA T
review manuals
Verbal and Math Topics to Be Reviewed:
? Sentence Correction
? Reading Compreheasion
�S" Critical Reasoning
? Problem Solving (AriUimetic. Algebra, Geometry)
? Data Sufficiency
Location:
General Classroom Building, Room 1017
Instructors:
Dr. Patrick Bizaro, Associate Professor, English
Dr. Mark A. Coffin. Assistant Professor, Decision Sciences
Texts:
The Princeton Review: Cracking the System: The GMAT
The Official Guide for GMAT Review
(indudes at-ruul GMAT questions with solutions)
REGISTER AT:
School of Business � Professional Programs
1200 General Classroom Building
(919)757-6377
Highlights
Perms
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t
Professional
Designers
Listed in journal
Magazine as "top
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Coloring
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Consultations
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By
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830-5593
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NEWMAN CTHQLJC STUDENT CENTKR
;Locafe953E 10th St(bottom ofCoUegehiU & the east end of campus
757-3760757-1991
AlVTNTefYf TMtfTC AnnuaJ�Backto School
ITNrN WfJINliTO: opfm HOUSE & PIG PIOaN1
VT
WheniWed Sept. 1,1993,4:00pm-7:30pm
H Fr. Paul Vaeth Chaplain & Campus Minister
Si
EADERS!
TITDENT
Learn from
XPERIENCE
The Council of Student Organization Leaders
presents:
Congresswoman
Eva Clayton
Wednesday, September 1,1993
4pm MSC Great Room
for more info call 757-4796
Sponsored by Student leadership Programs

Expressions Mm
UlrifJ
O
Be a part of an award-winning team that has won critical acclaim
over the past several years from the American Scholastic Press
Association and the Associated Collegiate Press.
We are now accepting applications.
Positions Available:
� Business Manager
�Advertising & Circulation Director
� Associate Editor
� Copy Editor
� Typesetter
� Staff Writers
� Art Director
� Staff Illustrators
� Ad Reps
We will meet at 3:30 Tuesday, September 7th.
If you would like to see a job description for a particular position, please
call the office at 757-6927 and arrange an appointment.
Our office is on the second floor of the Publications Building.
DAY STUDENTS DO YOU
WANTTOMAKE
A DIFFERENCE?
Apply now for position of
Day Student Representative on the EOU
Media Board. (A student living off campus
and not a member of a fraternity or sorority.)
Help set policies for operation of WZMB,
The Rebel, The East Carolinian,
Expressions & The Photo Lab.
Apply in The Media Board Office 757-6009
2nd Floor Publications Building.

� " i' "i.jiii��
-





August 31� 1993
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
Help Wanted H Help Wanted
For Sale
IE Services Offered
I717T7
Personals
WIN
REEDY BRANCH APARTMENTS New
2 bedrooms on East 10th Street. Readv for
fall semester. Now taking applications.
$385.00 pm. Lease and deposit required.
Duffus Realty, Inc 756-2675.
HUGE ROOM with 2 closets and private
bath. Furnished, walk to ECU, kitchen privi-
leges, utilities included. Prefer quiet female
non-smoker. $230mo. Call 752-2636.
FURNISHED ROOM for rent. Utilities in-
cluded. Across from campus Phone 758-
2585.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Two bedroom
apartment across from campus. Rent $325
and one year lease. Call 757-3191.
FEMALE CHRISTIAN roommate to share
2 BR, 1-12 bath townhouse. Rent $140
(includes water, sewer and cable) and 13
utilities. Call 321-4931.
2-BEDROOM APT - Roommate needed.
$150.00 mo12 util. Central air and heat,
bus route, deck, cable included in rent.
Mature student or grad preferred. Nice
neighborhood; must like animals. Call 830-
1293 and ask for Kelly.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a
2-bedroom apartment. 3 miles from cam-
pus, $175 per month, 12 utilities, Christian
non-smoker, non-drinker preferred. Call
321-0812.
2-BEDROOM, 2 full baths, furnished
townhouse close to campus. 4 person ca-
pacity, $495mo. On site laundry mat and
pool. Call 752-6953 days, 823-7067 nights.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-265
LEASED PARKIN AyA J p,
$15 PER MONTH.
LOCATION: BEHIND CLEMENT
DORM. THE CORNER OF READE
DICKINSON
CALL 752-8585 TODAYl
Roommate Wanted
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
to fill one of three bedrooms in a large house
located near the intersection of Charles &
10th Streets. Rent is $150, location is superb
(approx. 1 2 mile from campus). Call Mark
or Trey at 752-8927 today
ROOMMATE Need FM for2 bd. 2 bath. 2
blk from ECU. $225 rent. $225 dep. Mature,
Responsible. 830-9595 or 830-3702. Drop a
note in box 51 Biol graduate office.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED. Non-
smoking. Furnished Courtney Squareapart-
ment wwasher & dryer. Thru May. $160
month plus 13 utilities. 321-1876.
ROOMMATEWANTED.Nice2-bedroom,
partially furnished. $175mnth , $175de-
posit, 1 2 utilities. Male preferred. 807 Col-
lege View Apts near ECU. Call Rich 758-
6196 weekdays, (919)455-0603 weekends.
E'l Help Wanted
PARTNERS NEEDED- Recreational Ser-
vices is hiring individuals for the Partners in
Well-Being Adapted Recreation Program.
Individuals experienced in working with
disabled populations in fitness activities, ie.
swimming, weight training, are encouraged
to apply in 204 Christenbury Gym. Call Kari
Cleveland at 757-6387 for more details.
BABYSITTER NEEDED Thurs. mornings.
One year old boy. References appreciated
and muM have transportation. 355-2088.
PIANO PLAYER NEEDED. Small Chris-
tian Church near Greenville, salary neg.
Call 757-3207.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEFT is recruiting 12-16part-time
youth soccer coaches for the fall youth soc-
cerprogram. Applicants mustpossess some
knowledge of soccer skills and have the
ability and patience to work with vouth.
Applicants must be able to coach voung
people ages 5-16 in soccer fundamentals.
Hours are from 3:00 pm until 7:00 pm with
some nights and weekend coaching. This
program will run from September to mid-
November Salary starts at $4.35 per hour.
For more information, please call Ben James
or Michael Daly at 830-4550.
THEGREENVILLE RECREATION AND
PARKS DEPT. is seeking certified soccer
officials for its Fall Adult Soccer League.
The league runs Saturdays and Sundays
from mid-September till mid-November.
For more information, please contact
Michael Daly at 8304550.
WANTED: Female to care for 4 children, 6
hrswk, flexible schedule, $5hr. Must be
non-smoker, have had CPR. Prefer early
childhood ed. major or nursing. No house-
work involved. Call 355-8223.
SPRING BREAK '94 - SeU trips, eam cash
and go free Student Travel Services is now
hiring campus reps. Call 1-800-648-4849.
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS! Brady's
is accepting sales applications for the fall
semester. We have part-time availabilities
to fit everyone's busy schedule: 10to2,12to
9, or 6 to 9. We offer good salariesclothing
discounts. Apply at Customer Service,
Brady's, the Plaza, Monday and Thursday 1
to 4 pm.
WANTED: PART TIME VAN DRIVERS:
CTS Management Company is looking for
van drivers to operate the PATS vans. PATS
is a local paratransit system for the elderly
and handicapped citizens of Pitt County.
Some early morning and afternoon hours,
as well as midday. Duties include operation
of the vehicle and some assistance of eld-
erly, handicapped and disad vantaged pas-
sengers. Criteria for the job; 1-Positive Atti-
tude, 2-21 years of age, 3-Clean driving
record, 4-Clean criminal record. If you are a
people person with interest, please contact
CTS Management Company, Wilcar Ex-
ecutive Center, Suite 107, 223 W 10th St,
Greenville NC 27834,830-1939.
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVES needed
by Sportswear Company to sell to fraterni-
ties and sororities. Average$50 - $100 work-
ing one night per week. Call 1 -800-242-8104.
NEED AFTER SCHOOL caregi ver to care
for 2 children (1st and 3rd grades), 230-
5:30. M-F near Univ. Area. Mature, respon-
sible wreliable transportation; Child de-
velop or education background preferred.
Refs required. 757-1378.
MOTHER'S HELPER Needed to transport
toddler to from preschool. Tues and Thurs,
Aug-May, 8-9 am (to) 12-1 pm (from). Will
payperhourplusgas. 756-3224 evenings or
leave message.
LAW FIRM needs mailroom messengers
part-time 2O30 hours wk, 5 day s per week.
Mornings 7:30 to 12:30. also, Microfilm op-
erators morning or afternoon. Applications
from Receptionist. Ward and Smith, 120
West Firetower Road.
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS for sales per-
sons and secretarial jobs, pply between 2-
5 pm: SDF computers, 106 E. 5th St (near
Cubbies) Greenville 752-3694.
PROFESSORCCOOLSRestaurantisnow
accepting applications for waitstaff posi-
tions. No phone calls - apply in person 2-4
pm daily. Located behind Quincy's at 605
Greenville Blvd.
ST. TIMOTHY'S Episcopal Church needs
nursery worker (male or female) each Sun-
day 8:30-12:30. References required. For in-
terview call Winston Kobe, 756-9507.
EXPERIENCED babysitter wanted to care
for two young children (ages 1 and 3) in my
home on Wednesdays from 8:30-5:00. Own
transportation and references required. Call
756-0941.
HELP WANTED: Students to clean cars at
car dealership. Flexible hours. Call or apply
at Lee of Greenville, 3200 Bismark St,
Greenville, NC 756-6905.
DELIVERY DRIVERAVhse worker. Appx
20 hrs per week. Flexible scheduling. Must
havecleandrivingrecord and handle heavy
freight. Applv in person at R.E. Michel Co
309 W 9th St'
PART-TIME SALES. Need 10 part-time
salespeople for number 1 company in num-
ber 1 industry. Work 8-10 hours per week
with earning potential of $1000.00 per
month. Call Richard Rabin at 758-0645 after
2:00 pm.
FACULTY MEMBER needs responsible
babysitter for 8-yr old two days a week,
Monday and Wednesday or Thursdav,3:00-
5:30. 7-9394 after 6:00.
ENTHUSIASTIC hard workers wanted to
join the wait staff at Ryan's Family Steak
House. Eam above average income! Apply
during non-meal hours. No wimps needed!
PART-TIME telephone callers for credit
verification needed. Flexible hours, between
8-5, perfect for energetic student Good tele-
phone voice and great personality required.
Apply in person at: Equifax Credit Bureau
of Greenville: 1206 S. Charles Blvd
Greenville, NC between 8-5 Mon-Fri.
EARN $2500 & FREE SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! SeU only 8 trips and you go free! Best
trips & prices! Bahamas, Cancun, Jamaica,
Panama City! Great Resume Experience! 1-
800-678-6386!
$10-5400 WEEKLY. Mailing brochures!
Sparefull-time. Set own hours! Rush
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham NC 27705.
AA EARN $5,000Mo. GUARANTEED!
FAST Huge money-making jobs and op-
portunities on your campus. Call today for
complete details. Free cruise! America's 1
Company! 919-929-3139.
STOCKSALES person wanted. Apply at
Youth Shop Boutique, Arlington Village.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Eamextracash
stuffing envelopes at home. All material
provided. Send SASE to Midwest mailers,
PO Box 395, OUthe KS 66051. Immediate
response.
SOCCER OFFICIALS NEEDED - games
on Saturday. Call 830-4240.
LEAGUE SUPERVISORS NEEDED (soc
cer)- games on Saturday. Pay $6.00 and up.
Call 830-4240.
JBOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOW! USED CD'S
on each end, 2 years old - perfect condition,
$600 or best offer. Call 355-3993.
BIKEFORSALE: 19 inch Schwinn Frontier.
Excellent condition! $130 or Best Offer. Call
752-9633, ask for Heather.
CERWIN VEGA speakers, 15" Woofers,
405 watts, $400. Call 830-6665. Ask for Josh.
LOFT FOR SALE:Great for dorm lifeor just
an apartment. Great condition. $5OB0. Call
758-6363. Ask for Kevin.
FOR SALE: 1985 Honda CRX-SI. Perfect
Mech. Condition - Sporty car. $3200.00.830-
4910.
DORM CARPET - Various sizes and colors
- from $10 up. Wilcar Executive Center,
Room 101 (Manager's Office), 233 W 10th St,
M-F, 9:00 AM -4:00 PM, 752-8072.
FOR SALE - Contemporary style couch and
matching chair. Beigetan color - goes with
everything. Call 757-9681.
286 IBM comp, with VGA, 40 mb hard
drive, 2400 Bawd modem, sound card and
printer. $700. Call Todd: 758-8324.
FOR SALE: Men's 26" Takara 12-speed.
Red. Very good condition. $125. 752-3345.
Ask for David.
FOR SALE: MOUNTAIN BIKE. Ladies'
Huffy Rough Rider. Seldom used, like new
condition. Grea t campus transportation! $70
neg. 752-0820. Leave message.
MOPED. Excellent condition, only 2,000
miles, complete with helmet and basket, no
license required, 100 m.p.g $400.756-9133.
COMPUTER, Macintosh SE, 1 MB RAM, 30
MB Hard Drive, 2 floppy drives, imagewri ter
printer. $500. A great word processor. Call
752-2261 after 5 pm.
COMPUTER FOR SALE: AT&T 6300. with
WordPerfect 1.0. $50. Call 321-2229.
COMPUTER: IBM compatible 386SX, 14"
SVGA, 3.5 & 5.25 FDD, 85Mb HDD, 2 Mb
RAM, DOS 6.0, mouse, wp 5.1, Lotus 123,
Nortons, Windows 3.1, Norton's antivirus.
Reflex 2.0, Printshop. $875 firm. Call 830-
4824.
ZENITH Z-320SX computer w83 MB
Hard disk, 3.5 in. 1.44 floppy, 4 meg RAM,
super VGA, 28 dp color monitor, keyboard,
mouse, DOS 5.0, Windows 3.1, Word Per-
fect 5.1. Quattio Pro 4.0 spread sheet, 2-D
and 3-D mathematics plotting software,
chemistry tutor. Like new, software un-
opened. $1500. Call 757-6087 day or 758-
3330 evening.
14CT. Italian Gold by the Gram.
Ropes, Herringbones, links, Rings,
Watches, Diamonds, RrecJous Stones
and work.
Call Tim 758-3425
& Deluxe Orthopedc Mattress Set
in Factory Box. Cant Use Cost
750, Sooifioe $385 Cash,
White, Iron & Brass
w 2 Twin Size Orthopedic Mat-
tresses & Rollout Popup Trundle
Never Used, In Box. Cost $700.
$310Cash.
(919)637-2645
For Sale B3 Services Offered
BOOKS FOR SALE. Stats 3228 $15, Music
3018 and recorder $20, Psych Nursing 3800
$20. Call 758-6363 (Jeff).
DORM FRIDGE FOR SALE - Perfect for
dorm life. Paid $100, Sale $40 firm. Call
Suzanne at 758-0700.
CONTEMPORARY L-shape sofa, recliner
PAINTBALL: 100 pure adrenaline rush.
Anyone, regardless of your size, strength or
physical abilities, can be successful at
Paintball. Have a blast Call 752-8380.
PAINTABLL: It's the most intense and elec-
trifying sport you will ever play. Call 752-
8380 for information and reservations. WE
BREED EXCITEMENT!
Announcements
PAINTBALL: That's right, Paintball is here
in Greenville Come by yourself or with a
group. Come and feel the excitement. Call
752-8380.
PIRATE PAINTBALL: We are on the cut-
ting edge of high energy entertainment.
Call 752-8380 for reservations and informa-
tion.
PIRATE PAINTBALL: Great for clubs, or-
ganizations and groups. We can organize
tournaments, and company or group pic-
nics. Call 752-8380 for info and reserva-
tions. WE BREED EXCITEMENT
TRAVEL FREE! Sell quality vacations. The
hottest destinations in Jamaica, Cancun,
South Padre, Florida. Most reliable Spring
Break Company with the easiest way to-
wards free trip! Best commissions! Sun
Splash Tours 1-800-426-7710.
LOOK YOUR BEST for the brand new
year. Call Kimberly at 931-7863 for your
persona! fitness training.
PARTY WITH MMP! Mobile Music Pro-
ductions is on the road again to jam the
biggest, best Greek socials. Top 40, Dance,
Alternative, Rap, Beach, Classic Rock and
Country. Call Lee at 758-4644 for booking.
TUTORING SERVICES Offered for chil-
dren in Kindergarten through seventh grade
in math and or reading. Masters in Educa-
tion. Call 752-5542.
ATTENTION
RAGWEED
SUFFERERS:
108 Volunteers needed
September 18th and 19th
(all day) to help test two
investigarjonal medications
for the treatment of allergic
rhinitis. Age 12 or older. Male
or female. If interested, please
call East Carolina University
Asthma & Allergy Clinic at
816.3426 or 816.3424
($180.00for completed study)
10 Off Alterations
Fast Service
Quality Work
Elvie s Specialty
Sewing
2609 B East 10th St.
SBS Personals
JOIN THE STUDENT PIRATE CLUB TO-
DAY. Have benefits of Pirate Club Mem-
bers, receive benefits from local businesses
and nightclubs. Call 757-4540 or 758-7005
and apply today.
TO: LAURA, who I met at UBE with Mary
on Thursday 819, I lost your number
Please give me a call at 355-33835. Bob.
WRITERMUSICIAN and poetic soul
seeks like-minded lady for friendship
and fun. Send photos and correspon-
denceto: KANE, POBox8663,Greenville,
NC 27835
IF YOU go to ECU. why do you live in
B-M F"K Brasswood???
SOME WOMEN to figure will be com-
plex. And on some men will place a hex.
A mystery they are as we all search for
clues. To up our hand and kill our blues.
Some women around they will bewitch.
And by us, but not all, they will be labeled
a bitch. It's in the sex and in the mind. The
two will cross and you will find their
dilemma with the men of three. One's for
sex. Two's for love. Threes a real friend.
One's for a night, two's for a year. Three's
a friend. Ones are different. Twos get old.
Three's a friend who may be told of her
confused mental thoughts between ones
and twos. One's for flirting, two's for
hurting. Ones are kept ready, twos are
kept steady. One's discarded, two's re-
garded. Ones are different, twos the same.
And threes are friends she cannot blame
for her confused mental thoughts be-
tween ones and twos. Ones, she means
nothing, two she means something. And
three will always be a friend. Think like a
man, she think's you 're not. Some women
you meet will like you a lot. Jeff Jones.
IQ
Greek
CONGRATULATIONS to all the new
officers of Pi Delta Sorority for 1993-94!
This is going to be our best year yet girls!
SUSAN & ELIZABETH FALK - Thanks
for the "Welcome Back" get-together to
kick off the new semester! Love, your Pi
Delta Sisters.
THANK YOU ANN SELDEN for a won-
derful Rush. All of your hard work paid
off with the most awesome pledge class!
Love, your Sigma Sisters.
THE SIGMAS would like to welcome
everyone back to school
CONGRATULATIONS to the 1993
Sigma Sigma Sigma Pledgeclass, Cynthia
Bell, Robin Brickley,ColleenCarey, Crys-
tal Chase, Dorothy Darrow, Elissa Earl,
Julie Farmer, Paige Gantt, Kathy
Harrison, Kate Hartnett, Elizabeth
Holliman, Jenny Johnston, Sarah
Koerselman, Susan Laird, Amy Lamb,
Cindy Langston, Melanie Lee, Laura
McCabe, Kelli McCartney, Jennifer
McKeon, Chandra Martin, Tracy Maurer,
Christine Rogers, Meredith Ruark, Amy
Schellhaas, Jennifer Sutton, and Kristi
Usilton. Love, the Sisters.
PHI SIGMA PI Brothers- First meeting
of the 93-94 school year will be held
Wednesday September 1, 1993, in GtB
1028. Hope to see everyone there
PI DELTA-Wants to welcome everyone
back and have a great semester!
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like to
congratulate and welcome all the new
members: Monica Arnold, Melanie
Burke, Caren Cantrell, Heather Edmonds,
Jennifer Gorka, Sloan Hawley, Jennifer
Lane, Jenny Lucas, Ashley McAlexander,
Maureen McKenna, Stephanie MinkcjVe,
Jude Nagle, Anne Rossiter, Kristen
Sierocki, and Nan Woods.
�USEDCOMPUTERS �NEW& USEDCOMPUTER FURNITURE
�DESKS-CHAIRS
COME AND SEE US AT BUSINESS EQUIPMENT RENTAL AND SALES. WE ARE
LOCATED WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE EROM CAMPUS.
FREE DELIVERY LOCALLY.
"Your Offia Furniture Piaa,
752 6585601 Reade Circle Greenvllle.NC
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics is recruiting for volunteer
coaches in the following sports: soccer,
basketball skills, team basketball,
swimming, gymnastics, bowling,
power-lifting and rollerskating. NO
EXPERIENCE NECESSARY-JUST A
WILLINGNESS TO WORK WITH
MENTALLY HANDICAPPED CHIL-
DREN AND ADULTS. Special train-
ing sessions for coaches will be held.
Last day to volunteer for fall sports is
September 28th. Volunteer hours may
be used as part of practicum require-
ments for several ECU courses. For
more information, contact Connie
Sappenfield at 830-4541.
COURSE FOR CMA EXAM
A review course for the Certified
Management Accountant(CMA)exam
will be held at East Carolina Univer-
sity , beginning on October 2nd, from
8-5pm. The review will be held on
eight consecutive Saturdays, ending
on November 20th. The review is be-
ing sponsored by the East Carolina
Chapter of the Institute of Manage-
ment Accountants and will be taught
by instructors from ECU. For more
information please contact Carolyn
Caslow, Director of CMA Programs,
at 919 321-2474.
EXCEL COURSE
The Department of Decision Sci-
ences will offer a non-credit EXCEL
course at no cost. Classes are 2-4 p.m.
Fridays from Sept. 3 - Oct. 1, 1993.
Enrollment is limited; preference will
be given to students who received
transfer credit DSCI 2223 (Introduc-
tion to Computers). To register, call
(919) 757-6893 by Sept. 2, 1993. EX-
CEL is the spread sheet and graphics
package used in business courses.
BECOMING A SUCCESSFUL
STUDENT
This five-part series is designed
for students who wish to sharpen their
study skills and for students who wish
to gain the necessary tools for aca-
demic success. The first session be-
gins Sept. 7. For more information,
please call or stop by the Counseling
Center, 316 Wright Building, 757-6661.
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
The Department of Speech-Lan-
guage and Auditory Pathology
(SLAP) will be providing the speech
and hearing screening for students
who are fulfilling requirements for
admission to Upper Division on Sept.
13,14 and 15,1993 from 5-6 p.m. each
day. These are the only screening dates
during the fall semester.
The screening will be conducted
in the Belk Annex (ECU Speech and
hearing Clinic) located next to the
Belk Building (School of Allied Health
Sciences), near the intersection of
Charles St. and the 264 by-pass. No
appointment is needed. Waiting is
outside the clinic waiting room, sign-
in begins at 4:50 p.m. Screenings are
conducted on a first-come, first-serve
basis.
HONORS PROGRAM
Interested faculty from all schools
are reminded of the opportunity to
propose honors seminars to be taught
spring or fall semester 1994. All pro-
posals for spring 1994 need to be sub-
mitted to David Sanders, co Honors
Program, GCB 2026, by Mon Sept. 6.
Please call the office by Fri Sept. 3.
The Honors Program Committee will
make the final selection. Call 6373 for
information.
EAST CAROLINA FRIENDS
East Carolina Friends is a Big
Brother BigSisterorganization. We pair
undergraduates, graduates and faculty
with children between the ages of 6
and 12. A positive adult role model
could change a child's life. Interest
meetings are being held in Brewster
B305 Aug. 30,31 and Sept. 1 at 5 p.m.
LDS INSTITUTE
LDS Institute will begin Sept. 2
6:30 p.m LDS church at 307
Martinsborough Rd. and will be on
Thurs. evenings. Lew Williams is the
new CES instructor (523-1755). This
year's study is D&C and Church His-
tory. Members or non-members are
welcome (age limit 18-30).
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Get crowned this semester! Rec
Services will be naming its annual King
and Queen of the Halls on Wednesday,
Sept 1 at 4pm at the bottom of the hill.
Come out and show some residential
pride and maybe even get crowned
King or Queen. For more information,
Call Rec Services at 757-6387. Free t-
shirts and prizes while supplies last.
LAMBDA DELTA SIGMA
LDS sorority (Lambda Delta
Sigma) will be held immeidately after
LDS institute class 8-9 p.m. First meet-
ing will be Sept. 1 at the LDS church.
Contact Niki Jenkins for info. (753-
3286). All single women 18-30 are in-
vited to join.
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND A
CAREER
This five session workshop is the
beginning step in Career Counseling
at ECU. Take assessment instrument.
Learn how to do majorcareer re-
search. Get a list of possible career
fields that fit your interests. Classes
begin the weeks of Sept. 6 and Sept. 20.
Limited enrollment. For more infor-
mation, a schedule and to register,
stop by the Counseling Center, 316
Wright Building.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Get flagged this semester! Rel
Services will be hosting its annual Flag
Football season. To find out more in-
formation, there will be a regristration
meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 31 in Bio
103. CallRecreational Services at 757-
6387 for more information.
ECU LACROSSE CLUB
ECU Men's La Crosse Club will
hold a meeting for interestedand re-
turning players Aug. 31. at 5:00 pm
in Christenbury 102. Call David
LeSage at 752-7641 for more details.
WOMEN'S SOCCER
If you missed the organizational
meeting for the ECU Women's Soc-
cer Team, and are interested in play-
ing, please call 752-7914 for informa-
tion. All skill levels are welcome.
ECU WATERSKI CLUB
Join the ECU Waterski Club!
Beginners are welcome. Meetings are
every Tuesday nights from 9-10 p.m.
in Mendenhall room 14. For more
information, call Jason or Thomas at
758-8215.
DISABILITY SUPPORT
SERVICES
Employment opportunities are
available to students who are inter-
ested in becoming personal care at-
tendants to students in wheelchairs,
readers and tutors. Past experience
is desired, but not required. If inter-
ested, contact either of the follow-
ing: Officeof Corrdinator, 103Greene
Hall, (919) 757-6110 or Office of Dis-
ability Support Services, Brewster
A-116 or A-114, (919) 757-6799.
.�





The East Carolinian
TuesdayOpinion
Recycling imperative
Greenville adopts a residential
recyclins program as ECU
continues promotion 5
At the center of every environmental issue
lies a problem: whether to appeal to the heart or
the head�whether to urge people to make sac-
rifices on behalf of the planet or to accept that
they will not and instead fix it so that the
general public finds it rational to be environ-
mentalists. In other words: make it so that they
have to do it.
It is no longer merely enough to accuse
environmental wrong-doers of selfishness or to
morally shame them into action. Lately, the
trend has been to impose laws that require said
wrong-doers to shape up or literally pay the
price.
In part, it seems to be working.
Across this vast land, a similar noise can
be heard. Ah, yes, you know the one; that beau-
tiful melody that American ideals were founded
on; the sound of the cash-register: ka-CHING
The city of Greenville has recently im-
posed an additional "refuse fee" on residents'
monthlv utility bill. Area residents can expect
to pav S3-S4 a month for residential recycling
which began this month. With this program,
traditional trash bins will be replaced with ad-
equate reevciing containers.
Closer to home, the dorms will once again
promote aluminum can recycling, in add.tion
to recycling in the dorms, students are encour-
aged to use recycling sites across campus. 1 here
has even been some discussion of moving to a
one-container site where all recyclables can be
dumped, but an adequate facility has vet to be
discovered.
But until that happens, recycling facilities
will be located on College Hill (Monday 8 a.m
Tuesday 4 p.m.), outside Greene Hall (Wednes-
day 8 a.mThursday 4 p.m.) and on the Cam-
pus Mall (Friday 10 a.mMonday 8 a.m.).
To make things easier for the collectors,
campus recyclers ask that students place card-
board boxes outside the recycling bins, since it
is illegal to dump cardboard in landfills. Also,
bottles and cans should be emptied before plac-
ing them in the facilities.
So, what's the big deal about recycling?
Obviously, environmentalists are convinced of
its importance. Some people may say that it
tends to get a little out of hand at times. But a
very fair question to ask is "Why me?" Why -
should little 'ole you care about what happens
to your garbage?
The answer is quite simple: you're not the
only one inhabiting this planet. And every day,
hundreds of billions (evenbazillions) of people
around the world make just as much garbage.
Add it all up, and we have quite a mess.
Recycling allieviates some of the garbage
crunch. Yes, it can be time consuming and an-
noying every so often, but certainly the planet
that has sustained and nurtured human life for
thousands of years deserves to be nurtured and
coddled itself.
Really consider it. And then recycle that
soda can, beer bottle, magazine and (most im-
portantly) this and every issue of The East Caro-
linian.
Remember: you're a part of this planet. Try-
not to screw it up.
Opinion
Page 6
By Alex Ferguson
NASA accomplishments eclipsed by mishaps, accidents
Well, it's happened again.
something like this
transpires .ill I can think ot is
Oliver WendelJ rtes.thecomputer
hacker from �' �oin8
"AAARRGGI II1 w rule venting
his frustrations out on poor( pus
tin' Penguin via pummeling. 1 am,
oficourse, referring to the Mars
Observe! fiasco th.it has blos-
somed this past week. Haven't
been following? rooengrossed on
who Michael ackson's been fon-
dling as of late? Let's review.
Back in September ot 1992
(( uid, how time flies), NASA sent
(deep breath) a $980 million satel-
lite tostudy Mars. Yes, that's right,
$980 million. Last week, while
using rockets to reduce speed and
place it's clunky carcass into orbit,
the Mars Observer stopped talk-
ing. So now, NASA has no way ot
knowing it the probe is orbiting
Mars, streaking out towards space,
or (and this is my personal favor-
ite) spending its final days in what
the experts eloquently call "bitty
little pieces Who savs scientists
can't wax poetic1
There are those at NASA
who are hopeful communications
can be restored, although, with
each passing day, the chance of
salvaging this mission fizzles like
day-old Coke. Most have resorted
to therapeutic screaming. Some,
trving to forget the pain, have
turned their eyes towards the
Galileo probe, another satellite
zooming towards a rendezvous
with Jupiter in 1995.Sure,it'smain
antennae is jammed, photos taken
of passing asteroids take longer to
develop and deliver than K-Mart,
but at least it's not trekking
through space in "bitty little
pieces
Pile on top of these blun-
ders the Hubble Telescope'scan-
dal and the Challenger disaster
(not to mention all the bad jokes),
and NASA seems less like a repu-
table, proud-to-be-American-and-
on-the-moon organization these
days and more like, well, the
Fxxon's Valdez Fiasco in Space!
And darn it! It makes me
mad! They haven't done any
wrong. It's time that NASA got a
break. For with every mishap, the
public grows more wary of over-
hyped promises of stations in
space, perfectly formed spacecrys-
tals and boldly going where no
one's gone before! (Personally, I've
never understood all those space
crystal experi ments, seeing as how
we're up to our necks in cheesy
novelty shops selling crystals al-
ready.)
All kidding aside, I think
NASA is in some trouble here.
Grumbles of dismantling the Mis-
sion to Mars program and cuts in
NASA's funding have been circu-
lating for years, increasing with
each effort that goes awry. Every
year, mounds o' money are poured
into research and development.
And what did we get1 A robotic
arm that could do dexterous ma-
neuvers and tie boy scout knots
blind-tolded, yet couldn't grab a
damaged satellite. And the sad
thing is, the mistakes and
accidents really are just mistake
and accidents, a cruel joke of Fate
and nothing more.
But these women and
men are really trying. Thanks to
them, we've conquered gravity,
danced on the moon and waved
enthusiastically at a twinkling
spread of lights that hold secrets
untold and unimagined. Their
lives have been spent pushing
towards this New Frontiei, ot
which we know nothing about.
And will continue to know noth-
ing about if we allow this move-
ment to die or become entangled
in the webs of bureaucracy.
Besides, I think we owe it
to ourselves to forge ahead, so
that one day we can say "Warp
speed�ngage" and really mean
it.
QuoteofthcDay:
Nature never did betray the heart that loved her.
William Wordsworth
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The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Gregory Dickens, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Maureen Rich, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Brian Olson, Asst Sports Editor
Amy E. WirtZ, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley Copy Editor
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Jennifer Jenkins, 4 count Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Cin ulation Managi
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Awi Layout Manag
Tony Chadwick, Creative Directoi
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Stafl Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Managi
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
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KEMPL6 3
Letters to the Editor
Recreational opportunities kept from students
The East Carolinian publishes i 2.HK copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion ol ihc
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters tor
publication. Letters should be addresed to The Editor, Tin East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg. ECU. Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. F:oi more informa-
tion, cafl (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
100
i re
papei
To the Editor:
When I left ECU over
one year ago, the recreational
facilities for students were
less than adequate. With very
limited facilities such as bas-
ketball courts and swimming
pools, a student trving to es-
cape from the pressures of.
academic life could easily be-
come frustrated. As I re-
turned to campus for some
post-graduate work at the
beginning of the second, sum-
mer session, I found that the
situation was even worse.
A good deal of the fa-
cilities we do have are taken
apart, closed or otherwise
made unavailable to the stu-
dents. What right does the
administration or whoever
is in charge of such facilities
have to take down the bas-
ketball goals on College Hill?
These four goals were
the only goals which can be
used after 5 P.M. and now
they are not open. Don't
summer school students pay
for these services, too? There
is a gross discrimination
against students who choose-
to take classes in the sum-
mer.
The problem of vandal-
ism is a well documented
one in our society But
should students who pay-
tuition and fees be forced to
suffer for the action of oth-
ers7 The city of Greenville
uses reinforced rims that
will withstand the pressures
administered by the van-
dals. Whatever the solution,
punishing students is not
acceptable and should not
be tolerated.
Tom Woerner
(Ireenville resident
By T. Scott Batchelor
Enrollment
increase creates
annoyances
The University Book Exchange smells
like a locker room. 11 takes 15 minutes to walk
from the third floor of Brewster to the General
Classroom building and I have to wait in line
20 minutes to buy a Coke at Wright Soda
Shop. What do all of these peeves have in
common? They are all problems resulting
from overcrowding here at ECU.
The ECU administartion estimates an
enrollment of about 18,000 students this fall,
and that's about 13,000 too many.
One of the problems with my outlook
on ECU'sswelling student population comes
from being surrounded by friends who went
to small private colleges. One went to
Harvard; the other to Wake Forest. Both
schools have populations one third or less the
size of ECU's. I didn't get a chance to visit fair
Harvard,but Wake Forest's campus is nice. It
just looks so "collegiate Dignified, even.
ECUisadifferentstory. Although main
campus isn't very large, there is a surplus of
students crawling around. When I first came
to ECU in the fall of 1985, enrollment was
around 13,000. In less than eight years, that
number has shot up by 5,000 students. If the
pirates win another bowl game, ECU will
have to build a second campus.
This rise in enrollment comes inspiteof
an increase in academic selectivity. The aver-
age SAT score for this fall's freshman class
was up a significant amount. This is a good
thing, but it needs to increase more, to per-
haps 1300 or 1,400. Then we could be called
the Harvard of the South, actstuck up, move
the campus to New Jersey, shout silly things
like "Boolah, Boolah" at football games, md
Well, mavbe raising SAT scores mat much
isn't such a good idea after all.
tfnomingelse.asimplerefreshercourse
in etiquette would help conditions. People
cannot stroll four abreast along a walkway
that is onlv four feet wide without running
on-coming pedestrians into the grass Side-
walks and other paed walkways a re not tl it-
proper spot for groups to stop and talk about
how much beer they drank last night or who
has the stupidest professor. Common sense
should tell vou not to stop at the bottom of a
crowded stairwell and conduct meetings.
There are 18,000 other students trying to get
up or down the stairs, so be courteous.
Yet all of these qualms related to ECU s
increased enrollment are insignificant com-
pared to the real problems that exist. The
inadequate space and resources in loyner
Library hasbeenaround tor quite some time.
While the student population has increased
over the past several years, additions to the
1 library have been on hold due to budgetary
constraints. Fortunately it looks like ECU will
be receiving state money to fund the much-
needed renovation of Joyner.
While having a large number of stu-
dents on campus can be a major inconve-
nience, overcrowding in the classroom is a
more serious aspect of ECU's growth. Semi-
nar-style classes and classes based tin work-
shop formats, which should contain 10 or 15
students, suiter when overloaded This may
bean inaccurate perception, but it seems like
the ratio of class sections offered to the num-
berof students who need to take thoset lasses
is inordinately high.
In short, having enough applk ants to
select from is a good thing on the whole. Yet
when thenunirxTSbeetmea detriment to tIn-
individual student, new priorities shoul I be
addressed.





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
Chong to exhale on Attic
'Reefer Madness' sure to infect Emerald City.
By Danial Willis
Photo courtesy of the Attic
Tommy Chong, seen here in 1989's 'Far Out Man to play at the Attic
on September 1st. Tickets on sale at Quicksilver Records.
Staff Writer
Tommy Chong, best known as
half of the Cheech and Chong duo
with CheechMarin, has hitthecom-
edy circuit during the past couple
years.
Together they made such far
out films as "Up In Smoke and
"Still Smokin They also re-
corded six gold albums, includ-
ing one Grammy winner, "Big
Bambu "Big Bambu" is consid-
ered one of the biggest-selling
comedy albums of all time.
During the 70s and early 80s
Cheech and Chong represented a
burned-out counter culture. They
split up in 1985 because Cheech
wanted to change this image. In
an interview with the Grand Rapid
Press Chong replied: "Cheech
wanted to get away from me. He
didn't want the doper image. He
wanted to go straight.
Two years later, Chong de-
cided to get involved in the stand-
up comedy circuit. Chong real-
izes that the comedy circuit is
more suited for him than it once
was. "Comedy now is much more
acceptable Chong said to the
Grand Rapid Press. "When I first
started out, there just weren't
many clubs
Chong has been successful in
creating fans with his off-color
'Hard Target7 considered
artistic, witty but predictable
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
I must make some confes-
sions.
First, I rarely spend time
watching martial arts films and
canr.ot remember ever reviewing
one. Occasionally I will succumb
to the mindless, derivative sto-
ries that pass as entertainment
and usually feel somehow hol-
low when the credits roll�like I
should have been using my time
more constructively.
Secondly, I have never seen,
nor had the desire to see, a Jean-
Claude Van Damme film. Most
reviews of his films emphasize
the "bv-the-numbers" plots.
Thus, nothing compelled me to
spend time watching Van Damme
battle some nefarious villain.
The drawing card of the lat-
est Van Damme vehicle, Hard
Target, was the film's director,
John Woo. Woo recently
Emigrated from Hong Kong to Los
Angeles, fearing the imminent
changes there when China re-
gainscontrol in 1997. Woo gained
manv admirers while working in
the Hong Kong film industry be-
cause of his stylized ultra-vio-
lence, most notably in The Killer.
While I was aware that the
storv in Hard Target lacked origi-
nality, the prospect of seeing
Woo's first American film proved
too great a temptation and I went
to see it.
The plot of Hard Target has
been repeated countless times be-
ginning in 1932 with The Most
Dangerous Game, which was itself
an adaptation of a story by Rich-
ard Connell.
The story this time, takes
place on the streets of New Or-
leans instead of on an island like
in the original. A businessman
named Emil Fouchon (Lance
Henriksen) arranges hunts for
wealthy patrons. The quarry are
homeless veterans living on the
streets of New Orleans.
A glitch occurs when a wrong
man gets hunted. The man hap-
pens to have a family. When his
daughter, Natasha Binder (Yancy
Butler, looking radiant but con-
fused) starts looking for him,
questions begin to surface. Be-
cause Natasha knows little about
Today: Sexual Abuse
Question: How can a history
of childhood sexual abuse affect
my current life?
Answer: Sexual abuse of
young children and adolescents is
recognized to be a common prob-
lem in our society, and a number
of both female and male college
students continue to suffer from
past experiences of sexual abuse.
Forms of sexual abuse range from
sexualized remarks or inappro-
priate displays of affection, which
cause feelings of discomfort, to
fondling or intercourse. The of-
fender may bea family member or
stranger, and the event may occur
once or repeatedly over a period
of years. In many cases, there is a
lasting impact on abused
children's or adolescents' percep-
tion of themselves and their reac-
tions to others. This is both di-
rectly due to the abuse and indi-
rectly to their learned responses
as well as their attempts to adapt
to psychological trauma.
Some survivors of sexual
abuse may perform quite well aca-
demically but create high levels of
stress for themselves through ex-
cessive perfectionism. Others may
underachieve as a result, because
they lack confidence in them-
selves. Often, they gravitate to-
ward careers in education or in
helping professions, such as nurs-
ing or social work. Despite exter-
nal appearances, however, many
feel that they are only projecting a
facade of normality. Whatever
their actual accomplishments may
comedy style for the past 20 years
and he doesn't plan to stop any
time soon. As reported by the
Vie St. Thomas Times, he replies
"I'll be doing this until I'm like
George Burns- except I'll be do-
ing it with an unlit joint
Three years ago, Chong re-
leased a movie called "Far Out
Man which he wrote and di-
rected. His daughter Rae Dawn
was also featured in the movie.
But since then most of his
time has been dedicated to stand-
up. He once said in the Review
Journal , " One of the reasons I
went back is that I realized no
body was doing what we were
doing. We always had our little
niche and I kind of missed it. No
one's gonna do it until I do it. It's
really great, because a lot of clubs
I worked at had this 'no dope
joke' policy until I walked in. I
walked in there and that's my
whole act
He's performing two shows
at the Attic Wednesday Septem-
ber 1st at 7:00 and 10:00 p.m.
If you are in the mood for some
pretty off- the- wall, not to mention,
famous humor�check it out.
Tickets are on sale now at
Quicksilver Records for $12. For
more information about this or any
upcoming event, at the Attic, call
752-7303.
Hillel invites I
students to join
New Orleans, she hires another
homeless man, Chance
Boudreaux (Van Damme), to help
her.
Luckily for her, and the plot,
Chance turns out to be an expert
in self-defense and in aggressive
offense. He almost single-
handedly uncovers the opera-
tions�and almost single-
handedly kills every man who
tries to stop him.
The trite story merely pro-
vides a backdrop for Woo to craft
his art. Admirers of this film genre
will be treated to a first-rate artis-
tic experience and will still be
entertained.
Woo uses slow-motion as a
way to accentuate the action, to
create a mood or to highlight the
violence. Motorcycles move in
slow-motion as do jaws that are
being kicked and bullets that are
being loaded.
Concomitant with the slow-
motion are loud noises that serve
to increase the intensity of the
motion. Grating sounds, blaring
music and reverberating gun-
See TARGET page 8
Answered by Jennifer Philips
Student Health Service
be, they sense that they are inter-
nally defective and different from
others.
Sexual abuse survivors fre-
quently have difficulty with rela-
tionships. Their shame and guilt
about their past, together with
their lifelong habit of keeping se-
crets, will cause them to fear that
others will not like them if they
find out what they are "really like
Not wanting to reveal themselves
or to become vulnerable, they keep
others at a distance, which can
add to their feelings of disconnec-
tion and isolation.
Their insecurity may lead
them to attempt to control others
or to avoid conflict, preventing
them from meeting their own
needs. Sexuality may be problem-
atic as a result of anxiety about the
past. Thus, the abused may be
hypersensitive to a partner's ac-
tion, use of sex to gain approval,
orsexual inhibition based on early
See ABUSE page 10
By Laura Wright
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Hillel,a Jewish rabbi who lived
100 years before the common era,
stated the golden rule before Jesus
Christ. Hillel wanted to teach all Jews,
not just an elite few. It is appropriate
that Hillel is also the name of the
Jewish StudentOrganization at ECU.
"There is a core group of stu-
dents admitting that they're proud
to be Jewish said Hillel's faculty
advisor Adam Schonbrun. Now tl ie
goal is to reach the rest of ECU's
Jewish population. Schonbrun esti-
mates that there are several hundred
Jewish studentsat ECU and he hopes
that by becoming involved in Hillel,
they will be able to help provide a
voice for their overlooked minority.
Last spring, the organization
hosted thedebutof the film TheShvitz
and this year Hillel hopes to bring
Jewish-American poet Milton
Kessler to speak at ECU. Kessler co-
founded the creative writing pro-
gram at SUNY, Binghamton, with
John Gardner. The Jewish Student
Organization also has informal
monthly meetings and social events
such as bowling, pizza parties, pic-
nics and movie outings.
"It's a chance to socialize with
people from our own tribe
Schonbrun said. He hopes to teach a
Hebrew language class at ECU in
the not- to- distant future in order
to help preserve and to transmit
that aspect of Jewish culture.
Schonbrun claims that Jews
have a long history in the south
and he notes that since he has
lived in North Carolina, he has
experienced very little anti-
Semitism. He hopes that Jewish
students will embrace their past
and not be ashamed of their heri-
tage.
Schonbrun stresses that stu-
dents have to make the first move
because, unlike other minority
groups, Jewishness is not out-
wardly visible�it is not based
upon some physical attribute like
skin color. The Jewish population,
is often excluded from minority
affairs discussions because it does-
notlooclikeaminority.Hopefully
Hillel will raise awareness and'
provide a voice for an overlooked
community at ECU. Presently
Hillel has about 20 members.
If you are interested in join-i
ing Hillel or finding out more about
the organization, call Adam
Schonbrun at 757-6781 (office) or
758-4871 (home). Also, students;
are invited to share dinner and
HighHolidayserviceswirhmenv
bers of Greenville's Jewish com-
munity. If you are interested, call
Carmela Zionit at 756-7821 for
more information.
Photo courtesy of Dahli Llama
Charlotte-based Dahli Llama finally brought their tunes to Greenville. They made their debut with Dillon
Fence last Friday at the Attic. This quintet hopes to capture the hearts of East Carolina music-lovers.
Dahli Llama moving upward,
expanding audience appeal
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Since their forming in 1991,
Dahli Llama has expanded their
repertoire and fan base.
Although their appearances
in our part of the state, including
the Research Triangle, have been
few, the band is a popular attrac-
tion at the beach and college
towns of the Carolinas, Georgia
and Tennessee.
This past Saturday night was
their first appearance in the
Greenville area as an opening act
for Dillon Fence at the Attic.
Dahli Llama's sound is a mix-
ture of retro-sixties psychedelic,
blues, metal and a hefty helping
of soul. Their music is quite dis-
tinct and even has some gothic
elements although the band says
their heaviest influences are from
the 60s and 70s psychedelia.
The group is made up of mem-
bers that had played in previous
bands of the Charlotte area that
vary in sound and style, yet they
all work together well. Bill Kirch,
guitarist, and Ann Johnson, key-
boards, both previous members
of The Wake, were the two
founders of the band. The quintet
was completed by vocalist Tara
Busch, bassist Jason Ramirez and
drummer Trey Walker.
Their lyrics have a political
and social edge that is reminiscent
of the era from which they draw
their inspiration.
There is even a Pink Floyd
type multi-media mixing in the
song " How Do You Sleep?" with a
sampling from a speech by George
Bush on the Cold War.
The band has accumulated
a large fan base who return loy
aily for their live shows. Their
live performances are heralded
as their forte, an experience of
energy and passion that their
music creates. Vocalist Tara
Busch has been compared to the
late Janis Joplin, which is prob-
ably stretching it a bit, but you
can't deny her obvious talen;
There has been a big "buzl�'
about this band since their first
show at the 13-13 Club in Char-
lotte back in 1991. Not since
Fetchin' Bones have the hopes
of success for a local band been
so high.
The future looks good for
Dahli Llama, so keep an eye out
for their first full- length CD and
try to catch one of their live
shows if you can.
Governor Hunt to Address Greenville.
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
Governor Jim Hunt and two of
the top education leaders in the
country will address East Carolina
University'sChancellor's Forum on
September 16.
The theme of the annual forum
is "Supporting Community Lead-
ers' Initiatives forQuality Sessions
begin at 10 a.m. in ECU's
MendenhallStudentCenterandare
open to the public.
Appearing with the North
Carolina governor will be Or. Emest
Bover, president of the Carnegie
Foundation for the Advancement
of Teaching, and William F. Winter,
the former governor of Mississippi.
Winter holds chair positionson
both the Commission on the Future
of the South and the Southern Re-
gional Education Board. Bover. the
former U.S. Commissioner of Edu-
cation, leads the advisory group on
School Readiness for the National
Education Goals Panel.
Bover will give the opening
address. A response bv Dr. Cha rips
Coble, dean of the ECU School pf
Education, will follow.
Governor Hunt will speak at
noon and will field questions from
the audience after completing his
prepared remarks.
Winter's address is at 2 p.m.
See HUNT page 10





August 31, 1993
TARGET
Continued from page 7
0
R
N
E
R
AREER jakv Advantage of
Career Services
ptions,
;h your resume and interviewing skills, research part-
time and summer jobs and register for comprehensive
career planning sen ices'
Career Services, ot course.
Whatever your student classification, ou"ll lind
invaluable aids to plan your career at Career Services.
Career Decisions Room: Visit our On-campus Interviews: Register tor
Career Decisions Room if you are our services to receive newsletters and
undecided about a major or career path; participate in on-campus interviews h ith
it offers lots of information add two whh companies from across the United
computerized assessment tools. States.
Career Days: Join your classmates at Summer and Part-time Jobs: Gain
one of our Career Days where you can leads on pan-time or summer jobs;
meet personally with represntatives from review our job boards and register. It's
employers like Xerox, Duke Medical painiess.
Center and various school systems.
Employer Information Room:
Investigate panicular employers by
visiting our Employer Information Room.
Workshops and Mock Interviews:
Fine-tune your resume and job-
interviewing skills. Attend our
workshops or arrange for a videotaped
mock interview.
All these benefits and more are available through Career Services.
Why not visit us at Bloxton House to plan your career strategy?
shots till the theater. This aural
flamboyance deviates from the
usually visual experience of cin-
ema . The effect jars the viewer and
allows, the audience to view the
violence as an intense form of po-
etry.
Woo creates many memorable
scenes.
One shot is combined with an
edit in order to signal the viewer
that the hero, Boudreaux, will
evince little vulnerability and will
be more akin to Superman than to
any human.
Woo places Van Damme in
front of a car after he saves Yancy
from being robbed. The sunlight,
reflecting off the car's windshield,
creates a halo effect around the
hero. The very next shot is of an
American flag in full frame. The
overt symbolism is difficult to mis-
interpret.
The violence in Hard Target
occurs often and explicitly. Yet
the excessiveness tends to
downplay the seriousness. The
few deaths in Unforgiven disturb
the viewer much more than the
multitude of deaths in Hard Tar-
get. In Hard Target, the killing oc-
lS2l
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J7 Episcopal
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Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
rtAy r cc miracle - 'p oP �J4k
WEDNESDAY NIGHT SANITY BREAK FROM CAMPUS!
� 530 pm Student Eucharist
� Supper provided after service
�ProgpmConversation after supper
� Ada new friends to your life
� Bring a friend with you!
� Be a pan of a faith community
Campus Minister. Marty Gartman
home 355-5731 work 752-3482
St. Paul's Episcopal Church � 401 East 5th Street 752-3482
Cross 5th street in front of Garrett Hall, walk down Holly Street and you are there!
SEPTEMBER 7-8
SEPTEMBER 10
Actual Tryouts
MIMES COLISEUM LOBBY
7:00 PM
For Information Call: 757-4672
curs in comic-book manner, with
lots of flash and style, but with
little emotion. '
Woo evokes comparison to
Paul Verhoeven and Sam
Peckinpah (whom many critics
cite when writing about Woo).
Woo, like Verhoeven (Robocop,
Total Recall), fills his film with so
much violence that the audience
comes to expect it as natural,
much like an audience expects
characters to spontaneously
break out in song for no reason
in a musical. Woo's artistry
sculpts the violence in Hard Tar-
get into surrealistic beauty.
Films like Hard Target will
not appeal to everyone. But any-
one who can appreciate style,
grace and wit in a film genre so
often filled with stagy and dull
violence will marvel at Hard Tar-
get.
On a scale of one to 10, Hard
Target rates a seven.
Welcome Students
CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN
"Those Dirty Clothes'
Jarvis Student Laundromat
Wash .750
Dry 250 (for 20 Mln. Smatl Dryers)
Hours 7 am -10 pm Every Day
Located near college on Jarvis
Street, off of 5th Street!
Carolina
Friends
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Interest Meetings:
August 30th, 31 st
& Sept 1 st
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Grand prize Tripjur Two to Cancun!





� '
�-�� �III
August 31, 1993
The East Carolinian
know your
to say, even your
states!
In fact, not a single TV series
on the fall schedule is set in any
one of more than half of the United
States That means one-third of
the population won't have a
single home-state TV show to call
its own. This, according to a new
survey called "Hometowns of
Prime-Time TV compiled by the
N.W. Aver advertising agencv.
Numbers crunchers there
concluded that in the fall lineup,
urban areas remain vastly over-
represented. Only 16 percent of
all the nation's residents are city-
dwellers, yet cities are the site of
44 percent of all regular series,
says the report.
id dishonest on
of site cities
S will
V ork City
irea. Ninearesetin
en in Chicago.
Meanwhile, much of the na-
tion. Including a wide swath of
the heartland, will be out of sight
and out of mind � on the net-
works, that is.
Onlv one series has ventured
across the sea: "Cafe Americain"
is set in Taris.
And'seaQuestDSV" � well,
that show takes place in the sea.
In the past, TV shows whose
locale didn't matter were set in a
generic netherworld in some uni-
dentified Midwestern state. And
funny how often the town names
ended in field ("Leave it to
Beaver" took place in "May
"Father Knows Best" took place
in "Spring)
On the other hand,
Bostonians were, and probably
always will be, proud to claim the
highly indigenous "Cheers
Change American money?
NEW YORK (AP) � Could
you picture Elvis Preslev's famous
sideburns on every U.S. quarter?
What's that? Not a chance?
Critics of the designs on U.S.
coins have argued for years that
the standard icons � eagles,
former presidents, various monu-
ments � are archaic at best and
boring at worst.
It's time for a change, says
Alan M. Stahl, curator of medi-
eval coins and of medals at the
American Numismatic Society.
"Our coins represent the aes-
thetics and ideology of Ameri-
cans before World War II he
says. "It's time to do something
The last time the U.S. Gov-
ernment tried to tinker with its
currency, in 1979, was an unmiti-
gated disaster.
Half the 857 million Susan B.
Anthony $1 coins that were struck
now sit uncirculated in the U.S.
Mint and Federal Reserve Banks.
"The Susan B. Anthonv fiasco
illustrates the problem, not the
solution says Stahl, noting that
the coins were too close in size
and shape to a quarter to be dis-
tinguishable. "There's no ques-
tion that a SI coin is an absolute
necessity
Stahl says it doesn't make
sense to stick with coin designs
that date back to the beginning of
the century, when President
Theodore Roosevelt successfully
pushed for major changes.
But there's a major sticking
point: what would the new coins
look like?
"I'm not absolutely sure, if
we take off all the dead white
males, what we would put on
them instead he says.
"Native flora and fauna is
about the only thing we could
agree on
Hey Pirates
Do you need a little cash?
Put your spare time to work!
Now interviewing and accepting
applications for full and part time
positions at the
WORLD'S NEWEST MCDONALD'S
located at Bell's Fork in Greenville
McDonald's
Apply at McDonald's by Wal-Mart
on Wed & Thurs. between 2-5.
See TV page 10
Now Open!
wm
101 IB Charles Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27858
919 752-0551
East Carolina's Trail & Nature Shop
"Our Trails Are Also On the Water"
Patagonia
LA
ewiunie
fmstian
SJr
-F
Come join us every Thursday night at
7:00 in the General Classroom Bldg.
Room 1018.
Everyone is welcome for fun fellowship
and Bible study!
For more information contact
Eddie Billiard at 830-6814
WELCOME
BACK STUDENTS
HAMCS
Old-fashioned
Homemade
CREAM
7A& Ice Cream,
Yogurt &
Sorbet
Hank's Homemade Ice Cream
31G East 10th Street
within walking distance from ECU
758-0000
BUY ONE-GET ONE
FREE
1 Item Blend-In
coupon expires September 10,1993
All Lifestyle writers must show up
Wednesday at3:30 for the meeting
or well file your teeth down.
Our Eyeglass Packages
Include A Few Things
You Cant See.
FREE
ULTRAVIOLET
PROTECTION
Sometimes whatyoucantseeCAN
hurt you! Research has shown that
ultraviolet radiation can cause skin
cancer as well as cataracts and other
eye disorders. The Doctors at Doc-
tors Vision Center believe that ultravio-
let protection is no longer an option in
a pair of glasses, but necessary for
long term vision health. So, with the
purchase of any pair of glasses at
Doctors Vision Center, you receive
bothultravioletprotectionandascratch
DodorsV
FREE
SCRATCH RESISTANT
COATING
resistant coating at no extra charge. Just
part of what we call Total Vision Care.
So whether you choose one of our
Doctors Value Packages starting at
$79.95 or a Christian Diorframe from our
fashion collection you receive the same
high quality lenses with built in ultraviolet
and scratch resistant protection all at
prices guaranteed to be the lowest.
Doctors Vision CenterWe Put The
Doctor in Vision Care.
OD
PA
Drs. HoHis, Watson and Glendenning
499 E. Greenville Boulevard
756-9404
Schoiakmk Available
QjARANIEED JOBS
ATTENTION:
ECU Math Computer Science, Physics, and Nursing Majors. Air Force
ROTC has second and third year scholarships available!
Requirements
At least a 2.65 GPA(full time status).
Pass Air Force Officers Qualifying Test, medical exams, and fitness test.
Enroll in AFROTC.
Scholarship Benefits
Pays tuition, most fees, books and $100 per month tax free.
After Graduation
Receive commission as Second Lieutenant in the Air Force. Starting salary
over $25,000, rising to over $41,000 in just four years (does not include tax
break worth thousands annually). Free medical and dental benefits.
THESE BENEFITS ARE WAITING FOR
THOSE WHO QUALIFY!
GET ON THE GROUND FLOOR!
For more information, contact Captain Steve Cooke
307 Wright Annex 757-6597
Leadership Excellence Starts Here






August 31, 1993
IUN
(.jjyt:
ABUSE
tunitv tor busii vemment,
education and community leaders
to discuss issues and concerns oi
eastern North Carolina.
Dr. Henry I 'eel, a School ot Edu-
cation faculty member, is serving as
the forum's director. For more in-
formation, call 919-757-6862.
. m Cont'd from
TV Page9
omething
ied by
itmares; some
. Jo �hol, drugs,orfood
imb their pain.
mily relationships typically
remain troubled, involving pro-
found feelings ol loss and sadness
for the happy family and child-
hood that they never had. Their
continuing wish to change how-
things are (and were) may inter-
fere with the normal development
Continued from page 7
of a survivor's identity and inde-
pendence during college.
If you find yourself reflected
in these descriptions and would
like to learn more about issues
faced bv survivors of childhood
sexual abuse, you may want to
attend a workshop offered jointly
bytheECL'CounsehngCenterand
Mental Health Services. For an in-
dividual appointment, call either
the Counseling Center (757-6661)
or Mental Health Services (757-
6795).
The East Carolinian is now
accepting applications for Sports
Writers, TEC is located across
from Joyner Library in the
Student Pubs. Building.
Now that it's off prime time, Se-
attle residents are surely ready to
embrace its new spinoff,
"Frasier Never mind that both
series claim their real home in a
Paramount Pictures soundstage
in Hollywood.
But then, the state for most
series locations is only a state of
mind. For instance, of New York
City'sbig 13, only one�the gritty
"Law & Order" � is actually
filmed on its mean streets.
The new "Against theGrain"
is set in Sumpter, Texas, and has a
sun-kissed, rura 1 look. (It's filmed
in L.A.) "Picket Fences" is set in
Rome, Wise, and has a warm,
homey feel. (It's filmed in L.A.
"Murder, She Wrote" is set in
Cabot Cove, Maine, and looks so
real it makes you hungry for lob
ster. (It, too, is filmed in L.A.)
Not that cameras never ven
ture out of studios in Tinseltown
for location shooting. Sparta,
Miss comes to life in Covington,
Ga where "In the Heat of the
Night" is filmed. Willow Springs,
Ga which as everybody knows
is "Matlock's" hometown, is ac-
tually Wilmington, N.C.
"Northern Exposure" has
been a double feature, bringing
almost as much attention to Wash
ington State, where that show is
filmed, as to Alaska, where it's
set.
INTERVARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Every Weanesaay Night
at 7:00 pm In G.C. 1032
It's a ran thing:
with skits, music ana
irienas!
EVERYONE IS
WELCOME
SOCIETY
FOR ADVANCEMENT
OF MANAGEMENT
Right now, while you're in college you can
� gain management experience
� make valuable business contacts
� strengthen your resume with a weil respected
professional credential
� meet with students and professionals who share
similar interests
It can all happen to you when you join your local
camp-s chapter of S A M
If you are considering membership in SAM, please attend an informal meet-
ing and refreshments on Tuesday, August 31, at 3:30 pm in GCB 1028.
SAM is open to all majors interested in management
For more information about membership, please contact
Paula Cuthrell 355-8023
or
Dr. Rick Herbert GCB 3108,757-6582
Chapter V.P. Membership
DISTINGU
MEMBER
LIVE
AND
LEARN.
We've made it a lot easier.
Your biggest concern as a student should be your studies � not the cost of a checking
account. East Carolina Bank has taken care of that expense for you.
With our University Club Checking account, any full-time student ts eligible tor a
checking account which provides unlimited 24-hour banking at any automatic teller machine at
no extra charge, no-fee traveler's checks and a free order of 50 checks.
If you maintain a $100 minimum balance in the account, there are no service charges.
We also don't limit your checkwriting or ATM withdrawals.
Make life easier. Try University Club Checking.
'Hie
East Carolina Bank
Comer of Arlington Boulevard 6 Red Bankb Road
(919) 355-8200
�Minimum balance required is100 or average balance ofW0 If balance requirement is M .t
met, fees assessed are: $5 per month and $.35 per debit.
Member FDIC
ULTIMATE
Eye Exam, Fitting & Contact Lenses
Includes a comprehensive eye exam by our family doctor of
Optometry. You will be fit with a three month supply of SUREVUE
contact lenses or ACUVUE disposable contact lenses (12
lenses). As an added value, you receive a three month OPTI-
FREE Solution Kit byAlcon.
m
00
OPTOMCTNC
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Superoptic Service In One Hour!
No Other Discounts Apply � Brand Names You Trust
Walk-ins Welcome � Offer For A Limited Time
-���.). H'SH��M'IL�'M�
-I �tJ).vji.iJM�WW" w
. � i mm
�r�"





The East Carolinian
Sports
Page 11
Offense and defense display consistency
MnJI
Logan happy with team's progress
Photo by Cedric Van Buren
Freshman quarterback Marcus Crandell controlled the ba
for 205 yards, one touchdown and no interceptions.
II well in Saturday's scrimmage. He threw
(SID) � East Carolina's foot-
ball squad underwent a 110-play,
two-hour scrimmage Saturday af-
ternoon in Ficklen Stadium.
Pirate coach Steve Logan
seemed pleased at the consis-
tency of his squad after the work-
out, played in mid-90 degree tem-
peratures.
"I was pleased with our per-
formance, especially the consis-
tency, on both sides of the foot-
ball said Logan. "On offense,
we were able to take care of the
football, and on defense, we did
not give up any big plays
Headlining the scrimmage
was redshirt freshman quarter-
back Marcus Crandell. The
Robersonville,N.C, native com-
pleted 23 of 38 passes for 205
yards with one touchdown and
no interceptions. Crandell took
most of the sna ps at quarterback,
with true freshman Perez
Mattison attempting the next
most passes with six.
Crandell's touchdown was
a 4-yard pass to senior Morris
Letcher, who caught six passes
for 46 yards on the afternoon.
Crandell also rushed for a
touchdown on a 5-yard run.
Junior running back Junior
Smith led all rushers with 67
yards on 17 carries, including a
5-yard touchdown run. Smith
also had one fumble, the only
turnover in the scrimmage for
the Pirate offense.
"This scrimmage shows me
that we have improved during
the last several weeks said
Logan. "With the consistency
shown in this scrimmage, I feel,
with the eight practices we have
left, we can increase our level of
play even more
Junior college transfer Willie
Brookins, a defensive end, suf-
fered a sprained ankle during
the scrimmage, the only major
injury during the workout. Jun-
ior running back Damon Wilson
has been suffering from
tendonitis in his knee and sat
out of the scrimmage.
Sophomore running back
JerrisMcPhail had another good
afternoon catching the football.
TheClinton, N.C native led all
receivers with seven catches for
44 yards.
Freshman Chad Holcomb
connected on one of three field
goals, one a 37-yarder. Junior
college transfer Bill Wilson av-
eraged 38.4 yards on five punts.
Defensively, Sean Turner
recorded two tackles for losses
and a pass deflection and Jeff
Cooke also had a sack and
tackle for loss. Lamont Burns,
Brian Williams, Morris Fore-
man and Bernard Carter also
had tackles behind the line of
scrimmage.
ECU will work out today,
before itsnext major scrimmage
on Wednesday night in Ficklen
Stadium. It will be the last ma-
jor scrimmage before the l'irates
open the season Sept. 9 against
Syracuse.
Student football tickets available
(SID) � The 1993 East Caro-
lina football season is right around
the comer and many students
have questions concerning tick-
ets.
Each student has the oppor-
tunity to get a free student ticket
by showing their ECU ID when
picking up tickets at Mendenhall
Student Center (11 a.m. - 6 p.m.)
and Athletic Ticket Office (8 a.m.
- 5 p.m.) in Minges Coliseum.
Students may present their
ID and one other valid ID when
picking up student tickets during
the designated student pickup
days. Student tickets are distrib-
uted on a first-come, first-serve
basis until student allotments are
exhausted.
Student guest tickets are avail-
able at half-price on a first-come,
first-serve limited basis. Once the
half-price guest ticket supply is
exhausted, all purchased tickets
will be available at full price.
For the Sept. 9 nationally-tele-
vised (ESPN) Syracuse game,
regular student pickup dates are
Fri Sept.3,Tue Sept. 7and Wed
Sept. 8. Group pickup day is Thu
Sept. 2.
Regular student pickup days
for the Central Florida, Memphis
State, Louisiana Tech and Tulsa
games will be Tuesday through
Thursday of game week. Monday
will be group pickup day for these
games.
Any student tickets not
picked up during these desig-
nated days will be available to be
purchased by anyone beginning
on the following day.
If student allotments are ex-
hausted during student pick-up
days, students may have the op-
portunity to obtain a free ticket
with a valid ECU ID on the morn-
ing of the gameif any unsold tick-
ets remain available.
For away games, tickets can
also be purchased at the Athletic
Ticket Office.
All students are reminded
that ECU IDs will be checked at
the stadium gates as you enter the
stadium on game day. Ficklen Sta-
dium gates will open two hours
prior to the scheduled kickoff.
Linebacker quits
football team
(AP) � Eric Myers, a senior
and projected starteratlinebacker
for East Carolina in 1993, left the
program last week.
No reason was given for
Myers' departure.
Myers was a starter on the
defensive line at the start of the
1992 season, but a knee injury in
the South Carolina game benched
him for the year and earned him
an extra year of eligibility.
The 6-foot-4, 248-pounder
cametoEastCarolinafromGrand
Rapids Junior College in Michi-
gan prior to the 1991 season. In
'he Pirates' 1991 season, he had
14 tackles as a linebacker and de-
fensive tackle. In his three games
last vear, he had 10 tackles.
Tarheels stomp USC
Eric
Myers
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) �
Southern Cal is seeking a return
to the national spotlight. North
Carolina's program wants it for
the first time.
Between them, the two
schools have produced the most
1,000-yard rushers in college foot-
ball history. Butthe biggestnames
� O.J. Simpson, Marcus Allen,
Charles White, Mike Garrett �
went to Southern Cal.
Two North Carolina tailbacks
named Johnson � Leon and
Curtis � are out to change that.
They helped No. 20 North Caro-
lina to a 31-9 victory over the
18th-ranked Trojans in the Pig-
skin Classic on Sunday night.
"Hopefully, this victory goes
a long way in giving us the re-
spect that we feel we deserve
said Leon Johnson, UNC's lead-
ing rusher with 94 yards on 10
carries. "We came into Southern
Cal's backyard and beat them
The Tar Heels spoiled John
Robinson's return as USC coach
after a 10-year absence.
The loss was USC's second
straight at Anaheim Stadium.
Fresno State defeated the Trojans
24-7 in the Freedom Bowl last sea-
son, which led to Larry Smith's
firing and Robinson's return.
"We expect to get back to the
top Robinson said. "We obvi-
ously have some problems, but I
think a lot of these are solvable
North Carolina coach Mack
Brown wasn't sure who would
replace tailback Natrone Means
when the 1,000-yard rusher en-
tered the NFL draft after his jun-
ior year.
Curtis Johnson was used spar-
ingly last season behind Means.
Leon Johnson came to UNC as a
quarterback, moving to tailback
when Means departed. The
Johnsons are not related.
"There was a lot of pressure
See UNC page 12
Baseball swings more than bats this summer
(AP) � Being involved in a
basebrawl this season means
never having to say you're sorry.
Listen to what two of the
three managers serving suspen-
sions for taking part in separate
incidents had to say over the
weekend:
"It just proves again, turn
the other cheek and the other
cheek gets slapped Oakland's
Tony La Russa said.
"I won't let these kids get
abused. I won't let them run over
these voungkids. The Pittsburgh
Pirates Jim Leyland went out
of his way to make clear, "will
not be intimidated
To be completely fair about
it, Leyland did allow a moment
later that he was "embarrassed"
bv the suspension and how, while
Never'is a bad word, I doubt it
will ever happen again
La Russa, for his part, may
not have been thinking about re-
taliation when he updated the
biblical line about turning the
other cheek. But it popped up in
the middle of a long harangue
that started with the inequality
of American League justice, and
ended with the suggestion that
Milwaukee's B.J. Surhoff, who
got hammered pretty good in the
A's-Brewers confrontation that
earned the
ballplayers who work for them,
has become the rule and not the
exception.
Beginning with spring train-
ing games and stretching into last
week, baseball's tight schedule
put boxing's heavyweight divi-
sion to
u
suspensions,
got what he
deserved.
The atti-
tude that
comes
through both
conversa-
tions � fight
first, let the
league offices
sort out the
casualties �
is the same,
and it's the mimmm
wrong one, especially from men
who are supposed to be cooling
things down, not heating them
up. The troubling thing is that
the attitude espoused by La Russa
and Leyland, and most of the
J
shame.
This is the
first season
anyone can
remember
where you
n e e d e d
your fin-
gers AND
toes to keep
count. And
file cards to
properly
document
��1�"� the really
weird ones And medical charts
to keep track of the increasingly
destructive ones.
There was old Nolan Ryan
raining noogies on young Robin
entura's head. There was Kan
It just proves
again, turn the
other cheek and
the other cheek
gets slapped.
Tony La Russa
Okland As
sas City's Brian McRae, son of
Royals manager Hal McRae,
breaking from tradition and
storming into the Texas dugout
to get at opposing manager Kevin
Kennedv. There were the two
bench-clearing brawls between
the Pirates and Phils on the same
day, followed bv a Pirates-Cubs
extravaganza the very next day.
And then there was the distance-
going affair between Baltimore
and Seattle in which the Mari-
ners' Chris Bosio injured his col-
larbone and the Orioles' Cal
Ripken wrenched a knee badly
enough to consider ending his
consecutive-game streak.
The explanations for this out-
break have been almost as var-
ied:
An increase in the number of
batters leaning over the plate-
while trving to hit the ball the
other way. An increase in the
number of pitchers throwing in-
side. An increase in the number
See A's page 14
Smith rushes to
meet challenges
By Brian Olson
Assistant Sports Editor
It is not very often that you run
across a running back like Junior
Smith. He is proof that determina-
tion and hard work can pay off if
you reallv want it to, no matter how
big or small you are. He is a good
example for many young people to
lcxik up to.
Smith stands at only five feet,
six inches tall and stands a chance at
being an All-American standout in
only his junior year. Most players at
his position are typically six feet tall,
but there are some exceptions like
professional Barn Sanders, who
Smith admires.
Smith makes up for his size
with his incredible strength and
speed. 1 leonly weighs 174 pounds
and can bench press 325 pounds�
almost twice his body weight. The
average person should be able to
bench their own weight. He squats
more weight than most lineman
can. His 630 pounds is an all-time
best forECT. running backs.
1 lis physical condition is one
reason he gained 1,037 yards rush-
ing (5.b v a ids per carry) last season.
1 le was (he first Buc to rush for over
,(XXl yards in a season since 1W.
However, conditioning alone
can not litt someone to the level
Smith has reached.
"1 work hard and pay the price
because I know th.it hard w arkpays
off Smith said. I always believe
that if vou want something you
have to be totally dedicated and go
after it 100 percent
"My father and mother really
motivated me a lot when I was
younger and told me that if set
vour goals early, you can do any-
thing you want. Thev kept push-
ing me and 1 had Cod in my life
Now, Smith derh es motiva-
tion from another source
"I'm dedicating thisseason to
my son Smith said. "He keeps
me going. When I talk to him, he
makes me want to go out and do
the best I can provide tor him. I
want to make him proud of me
like my father did for me
Smith was a standout at 11
Smith 1 ughSchooI in Fayette ille,
N.C. He lettered three seasons in
football and track. 1 le led the state
inaLshing.is,wnior,gaining2,454
yards and scoring 2M IDs. It was
the second highest rushing total in
state history.
The transition from high
school to college seemed ease for
Smith.
"It was one ol my goals to
come in and play as a freshman
atul it waon nationally television.
It was a great feeling
I ast season, Smith said, the
Pirateshadproblemswithplayers
who werqustconcemed for them-
selves and their individual statis-
tics. There was not enough coop-
eration for ECU to be successful.
See JR page 13
P





August 31, 1993
Continued from page 11
Sports writers meeting today at 3:30 p.m.
Be litere or beware.


e w�: w ere
tryouts
n believed a
man, alsovictory1 pro ide a huge
caught foui passes for 35. CurtisLxxiM Ui his school's rising pro-
Johnson gained 78 yards on 17gram.
tad some big plays from
our tailbacks, which was a con-
cern coming in Brown said.
Southern Cal's running game
was dealt a major blow when its
best rusher, Dwight McFadden,
broke his left ankle late in the first
quarter. He'll undergo surgery
and be out for three months. The
sophomore gained 44 yards on
seven carries.
Losing McFadden puts a snag
in Robinson's plan to reinstitute
the ground game that helped make
the Trojans famous.
Scott Fields, Deon Strother
and freshman David Dotson were
rotated in as replacements. Dotson
finished as the Trojans' leading
"Hopefully this game will
give us national recognition he
said. "At North Carolina, people
talk about tradition, and we have
trouble getting our name men-
tioned in that group
After Sou thernCal control led
the first quarterbehind McFadden,
the remainder of the game be-
longed to North Carolina. Fields
fumbled on a hit by Ray Jacobs,
who recovered. Marcus Wall fol-
lowed with a 6-yard TD run that
gave the Tar Heels a 21-3 lead.
Tripp Pignetti kicked a 26-
yard field goal on the first play of
the fourth quarter and William
Henderson scored from 8 yards
out as North Carolina took a 31-3
lead.
Ivlcr Cashman gave South-
ern Cal a late TD when he caught
a 5-yard pass from Rob lehnson.
Cole Ford's point-after was
blocked by Troy Barnett.
The Johnsons staked the Tar
Heels to a 14-3 halftime lead.
Leon scored from 19yardsout
early in the second quarter for a 7-
0 lead.
Curtis took a pitchout from
lasonStanicek and ran three yards
for their second touchdown.
A penalty killed the Trojans'
chance to tie the game midway
through the quarter. Rob
Johnson's 16-yard passtojohnnie
Morton in the end zone was nulli-
fied due to an ineligible receiver
downfield.
Southern Cal settled lor a 27-
vard field goal by Ford.
Another Trojan left the game
in the first quarter. Safety Mike
Salmon, brother of California An-
gels outfielder Tim Salmon,
bruised his left shoulder and did
not return.
The loss reminded Robinson
of his debut as Southern Cal coach
in 1976. Missouri trounced the
heavily favored Trojans 46-25, re-
sulting in immediate criticism. He
eventually had the last word as
the Trojans went on to win their 11
remaining games and the Rose
Bowl.
Of his second debut, Robinson
said, "It was fun for a while, but it
got less fun as it went on
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n





JR
August 31, 1993
Continued from page 11
Smith said We are starting to get the
brotherly feeling around he
our team conceptand thatsthf
to take us all the way
"In the off-season, 1 tried to de-
velop into a man and become dedi-
cated and try to become a leader on
the team. I feel I can be a role model
(for)theteamand set good examples
Example: on a fourth-and-short
yardage play in the team's scrim-
mage on Saturday, the offense was
pulled off and replaced by the kick-
ing team.
Smith was agitated and yelled
outa "Come on" to the coaches to go
for the first down. He did not get
what he wanted, but unveiled confi-
dence in himself and the offense.
"He wants to stay on the field
Todd Berry, running back coach, said.
"Wecontinually challenge him. He's
a good team leader for us. On and off
the field
Off the field, Smith achieved
honor roll status last spring. His aca-
demic major is physical education
and hopes to pursue a career in fi-
nance after his football career has
ended.
Srnith'spathwaysarenot always
easily paved on the field. Much of his
due to the other players
together.
Si rve 1 had a pretty good season
iistyear,alotoffcxut-hasbetnonme
and some of my offensive lineman
and my other teammates have been
left out Smith said. "1 want to give
them the recognition that they de-
serve and not it all be focused on me.
All my success has come through
them, too
Smith imp: ;ved other areas of
his game since last season. He im-
proved his blocking and passing to
form the complete back.
Even with a new quarterback
thus season, it seems the Pirates will
still go with their all-out offensive
attack.
"We should keep the same of-
fense even though Crandell is com-
ing in as a freshman Smith said.
"The concept for our offense is to
score a bt of points and it is just time
for him to take over the role
Smith seams to be the ultimate
weapon for the Pirates from the looks
of some pre-season scrimmages. He
ran for 130 yards on 31 carries.
"This season the team will look
to me for some key roles on offense
wretherit'sblocking,catdningpasses
or running Smithsaid. "Everything
I do, I owe it to my teammates. I have
to do it for myHeammates because
there counting on me
Central
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The East Carolinian 13
Coleman's childish
antics cost him a job
NEW YORK (AP) � The
New York Mets wanted fast mo-
tion. Instead, all they ever got
from Vince Coleman was com-
motion.
He verbally attacked coach
Mike Cubbage on the field in
1991. He shoved manager Jeff
Torborg and was suspended last
year. HehitDwightGooden with
a golf club this year.
But when Coleman threw a
powerful firecracker at fans last
month and charged with a felony,
the Mets had seen enough. On
Thursday, they said Coleman will
not return to the troubled team
this season, and co-owner Fred
Wilpon vowed the 31-year-old
outfielder would never play for
them again.
"We have been plagued by
embarrassing problems Wilpon
said. "It is ownership's resolve to
bring an end to any further non-
sense on and off the field
The Mets, picked by some to
win the NL East, have the worst
record in the majors at 44-83.
There have been lots of lowlights,
including Anthony Young's 27-
game losing streak, Torborg's fir-
ing and numerous injuries.
It's been just as bad in the
clubhouse during the worst sea-
son in the team's 32-year history.
Bret Saberhagen admitted put-
ting a firecracker under a table
where reporters were interview-
ing Young; in a separate incident,
Saberhagen ad mitted he sprayed
bleach on writers. Before that,
Bobby Bonilla threatened a re-
porter who co-wrote a book on
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T





UI
August 31, 1993
Continued from page 13
ase in tes-
tosterone levels. Before a mound
got charged in the past, the batter
getting plunked had to have some
standing or the pitcher doing the
plunking some flimsy excuse. No
more.
Suddenly, thin skin is in and
an attitude is as indispensable a
part of a player s repertoire as a
smooth stroke or a good arm.
People with inflated notions
of self-worth are imagining too
many slights, reading too many
meanings into glares, taking um-
brage too quickly, and settling
too often on frontier-style jus-
tice.
man contributed to the
when he swung a golf
club and hitGooden in the shoul-
der, knocking him out of a start.
His latest antics, however,
landed him in court. Prosecutors
in Los Angeles said he threw an
M-100, which has the equivalent
power of a quarter-stick of dyna-
mite, from a car as he left the
Dodger Stadium parking lot on
July 24. A 2-year-old girl was
among three people injured.
Coleman eventually said he
was sorry during a carefully
staged press conference with his
family, although he never used
the word "apologize He has
said he will not contest the crimi-
nal charge, which carries a pen-
alty ranging from probation to
three years in prison.
"Obviously, Coleman was a
big part of the mix with all the
problems Mets manager Dal-
las Green said. "To put a team
together, you have to have 'we'
guys. That wasn't Vince's first
goal
Wilpon said Coleman will re-
main on "administrative leave"
with pay until his arraignment
Oct. 8 in Los Angeles on a felony
charge of possession of an explo-
sive device. Coleman played
three games after the incident,
then left the team with permis-
sion Aug. 3.
Coleman still has one year
left on a four-year,11.95 million
contract. Wilpon did not say how
the Mets will get rid of him after
the season, only that Coleman
will be gone.
"We have the right to act �
release him, trade him or fight
him on the contract Wilpon
said. "It's in the best interest of
the Mets that he never wear a
Mets uniform again, even if he is
cleared of the criminal offense.
He'll not play here again as a
Met, with pay or without pay
Coleman signed with the
Mets as a free agent on Dec. 5,
1990, shortly after Darryl Straw-
berry left the team for the Los
Angeles Dodgers.
At the time, the Mets said
they wanted to shift their offen-
sive emphasis from power to
speed.
But Coleman, who set NL sto-
len base records in St. Louis, was
slowed by injuries in his first two
years with the Mets, was on the
disabled list five times and played
a total of only 143 games.
The Mets made an attempt to
trade Coleman before this season
began, but found no takers.
Coleman is leading the NL with
38 steals this year and is batting
.279.
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'93
-1� -�7" fHlEli& ill





Good Luck East Carolina Football Squad
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We
to





Rany fans will only be able to
recognize the 1993 Pirate football team be-
cause of the uniform. And Head Coach Steve
Logan wants it that way.
TEAM. me.
"Come Thanksgiving, I want to be able
to say I had a TEAM Logan said. "You are
either a part of the East Carolina football
team or you are not
Line backer Tony Davis is not.
Quarterback Michael Anderson is not.
Anderson was said to have left school
because of academics. However, he met ECU
and MCAA academic standards.
Some insiders believe it was because of
a conflict with Logan � possibly over the
"TEAM, me philosophy.
Anderson's roommate lastyearwas run-
ning back Junior Smith.
"Last year people were kind a jealous
Smith said. "People talk about what they did,
even if we lost. Everybody has the same goal
now and (won't) get jealous of what someone
else does
After several off-season
losses to graduation and aca-
demics, as well as several play-
ers changing position, nearly ev-
ery slot on offense and defense
has a new face. The new-look
Bucs, like Ficklen Stadium, are
renovated with expansion in
mind. The Big East is just around
the corner.
A winning record this year
will add the needed credibility
necessary for adoption into such
a successful conference if the
Big East expands. Being in this
conference is the only way ECU
will be able to step to the next
level.
Until then, Morth Carolina
State and north Carolina, both
ACC teams, will continue to have
the upper hand among the state-
supported schools.
Playing top-notch programs is another
key in acceptance to the Big East. ECU takes
its first trip to the West Coast against their first
PAC-IO opponent, the Washington Huskies.
Also on slate, again, are the Syracuse
Orangemen. Both teams have received top-
ten votes during the preseason. Washington
has been ranked 12th, 11th and eighth. Syra-
cuse has been voted 10th, fourth and ninth.
The season-opener against Syracuse will
be the second nationally televised game from
Ficklen. Last year Southern Miss beat ECU 38-
21 in the first nationally televised game from
Ficklen.
1993 SEASON PPEVIFW tOBEOSr
Booty'93
n
Williams, a freshman, eases the loss of
sure-handed Clayton Driver. Before Williams
leaver ECU he may become the best wide
receiver to ever play for the Pirates.
Letcher runs a 4.48 40-yard dash (fourth
on the team). He was 12th in the nation in all-
purpose yards and 15th in punt returns.
Logan said Letcher was better than former
ECU standout Dion Johnson as a junior.
Backs Smith and McPhail � the "J-
Crew" � will be used in a two back set.
Smith, a junior, rushed for over 1,000 yards
last year and was 24th in the nation in yards
per game. He is the first Pirate to gain over
1,000 yards in a season since Tony Collins in
1979. Smith only needs 845 yards to be
ranked in the top ten career list.
McPhail, whooriginally signed with Wake
Forest, runs a 4.45 40-yard dash (T2nd on the
team) according to the 1993 Media Guide. He
runs a 4.18 according to some of his team-
mates. McPhail will be expected to run, catch
and block to fill the void left by Cedric Van
TEAM Offense
Do not expect the air show from last
year. Or the interceptions.
The Pirates were picked off 27 times
last year � compared with 10 the year be-
fore. ECU turned the ball over a total of 16
times, resulting in 55 points, on their way to
a Peach Bowl victory, and 37 times last
season, resulting in 91 points.
Freshman quarter back Marcus
Crandell shoulders the weight of pulling ECU
out of last year's nose dive. How fast he
matures as a player is how much the Pirates
will improve. He has the arm to drop bombs
- and the receivers - but not the experience.
Several targets will be open all season:
tight end CariesterCrumpler, flanker Morris
Letcher, wide receiver Alien Williams and
halfback Jerris McPhail.
Each catch Crumpler makes this season
will raise his position in the NFL draft. "Crump"
has been named the top tight end in the nation
n almrwst- �vprv nrp-seasnn nuhliration.
Buren.
Because of these speed merchants,
Crandell will not be passing into squadrons of
defensive backs, like Anderson was made to.
Smith and McPhail give the Pirates more
options on offense.
Speaking of options, Crandell runs well
enough to draw comparisons to former Logan
prodigy Jeff Blake, now a quarterback with
the new York Jets. Crandell will not be chained
to the pocket the way Anderson seemed to
be, but Logan is hesitant to let a freshman
take the battering of running the football too
frequently.
"We're not going to (run the option)
much at all Logan said. If the option is
called, it will likely be in goal-line situations.
The threat of the Pirates' newly discov-
ered ground game will help Crandell ease
into his role. Opposing defenses will be forced
to watch for the run instead of locking in on
the air attack.
However, the result of a lessened air
attack makes running the ball more difficult.
Instead of Smith running through defensive
backs looking for a pass, he will deal with
linebackers looking for his number.
The offensive line's job is, therefore,
more crucial than last year. They must give
Crandell enough time to throw and make
holes for Smith. If they fail, the team fails
because Crandell and Smith will not be able
to succeed.
Only four players return at the same
position from last year on offense � seniors
Crumpler and Letcher, senior right guard Ken
Crawford and junior center Derrick Leaphart
On the offensive line, senior Daryl Tay-
lor takes over nick Wilson's position at right
tackle after playing defensive tackle last year
and former left guard Terry Tilghman, a
senior, fills the enormous hole left by Tom
Scott at left tackle.
Tilghman tore his Anterior Cruciate Liga-
ment in April. The recovery time for an ACL
tear, after surgery, is usually nine to 12
months. He was cleared to play in the middle
of August.
" (Thilghman's recovery) is nothing short
of a miracle Logan said. "And the determi-
nation displayed by that young man is �
we've got something special there with that
young man
Senior Greg Floyd, a two-year starter at
cornerback, has been moved back to offense
as a halfback. Floyd came to ECU as a running
back, so the switch will not be to difficult.
Sophomore Derrick Batson moves
from halfback to flanker and is listed behind
Letcher on the pre-season depth chart. Last
season against West Virginia, Batson returned
a punt 97 yards for a touchdown,
setting a school record.
TEAM Defense
"Defensively we're on a mis-
sion Logan said. "Larry Coyer
was my most important recruit
Jk Logan describes Coyer, the Bucs
� new defense coach, as a born
leader. Coyer will also be the brains
behind the brawn.
Last year's defensive squad
often looked confused in their sets
and did not work well as a unit, now,
because of Coyer, the whole is
greater than the sum of its parts.
The unit was ranked 105th in the
nation in 1992 despite talented play-
ers.
Junior delensive tackle Walter
Scott and senior right cornerback
Travis Render are the only players
on defense to return to theirstarting
roles.
Outside linebacker Bernard Carter
seems tailor made for his new position. He
has the potential to be better than Robert
Jones. He is also exceptionally quick and
intelligent and capable of being an enforcer.
Jones was more of a rock who never missed
a tackle. Carter is explosive.
Already, Carter holds the ECU career
sack record with 20-12 and the single sea-
son record of 11, which he set last year at
defensive end.
Enter freshman Lamont Burns. He
moves from OLB to Carter's old position at
DE. Burns' name has buzzed around cam-
pus all summer as someone with unlimited
potential. The six-foot-five-inch, 245-pound
19-year-old is probably still growing and will
certainly get stronger over the next four
years.
Morris Foreman, a sophomore, has
moved from safety to outside linebacker. At
six-feet, 210 pounds he will compensate for
his size with excellent speed. Last season, as
a true freshman. Foreman was talented
enough to take time at safety away from Ail-
American candidate Greg Grandison.
Garrett Beasely and David Hart will
battle for Foreman's old position. Beasely,
who shared punting duties with Michael
Jacobs in 1992, set a record for defensive
backs by benching 375 pounds.
Special TEAMs
In 1992, ECU advertised in The East
Carolinian for help kicking the bail. The Bucs
experienced their second worse punting per-
formance over the last 20 years and kicked
only two field goals. Punter Bill Wilson and
kicker Chad Holcomb responded to the ad
and will provide immediate relief.
A junior college transfer, Wilson aver-
aged 43.4 yards per punt with about 4.5
second hang time in spring drills. John Jett
averaged 42.2 in his best season with ECU
and is now punting for the Dallas Cowboys.
Last year, ECU'S net average per punt
was 32.4 yards, 88th in the nation. Wilson
will be a great help to the defense by
forcing the opposition into worse field po-
sition.
Holcomb has good range and took the
startingjob from transferee Stephen Padgett
in spring drills. Holcomb sends 80 percent
of his kickoffs into the end zone and is the
first recruited scholarship kicker for ECU
since 1989. ECU'S two field goals in 1992
were on seven attempts and from inside 31
yards.
TEAM Summary
Logan has addressed the weaknesses
of last year's team very well. The defense and
special teams are both improved. Opponents
averaged 33.4 points per game last season,
but this should drop significantly � mainly
because of Coyer.
However, the offense will be hard
pressed to score as many points as they did
a year ago. The Bucs averaged 26.3 points
per game, T33rd in the nation and ECU was
18th in the nation in total offense with 421.1
yards per game. It is doubtful this year's
squad will come close to that but with Logan
in control of the offense it is still possible.
Since Logan was hired as offensive co-
ordinator, ECU has averaged almost 400
yards and 28.2 points per game.
However, the most important factor is
turnovers and the ball will be better pro-
tected from defenders in 1993. Crandell will
not be expected to throw the ball as much as
Anderson and this alone will help reduce the
interceptions.
Anderson was 1 I th in the nation in total
yards and it is unfair and unrealistic to expect
Crandell to produce those numbers�yet. He
is not lacking talent and may develop into
one of the best QBs ECU has ever had.
Last season, ECU scored an average of
32.8 points and allowed 23 points in their
five wins. In their six losses, they averaged
20.8 and allowed 42.
34 points, as Logan said last season
after the loss to Bowling Green, should be
enough to win a football game. With the
Pirates improved defense it will be enough.
But, how often will the offense put 34 points
on the board?
Crandell will take his first college snap
on national television against one of the best
programs in the country.
"He's going to have butterflies Logan
said. "If he doesn't, he's probably dead
A forgiving second-half schedule (al-
though mostly on the road), an improved
defense and special teams could translate
into seven wins. But there are too many "ifs
If Crandell is spectacular.
If the offensive line protects him and
gives the "J-Crew" holes to run through.
If the defense improves.
If each key player stays healthy � (last
year the Pirates suffered through a rash of
broken thumbs).
Seven wins are possible if every "if"
turns into "yes
In the most likely scenario, expect flir-
tation with a winning record again.
In the worst case scenario, ECU sal-
vages three victories in 1993.
Robert S.
Todd,
Editor





Central Florida, p. 4 lrst Down Pirates p.12. Southern Miss p. 13
Cincinnati, p. 17Kentucky, p. 161 Syracuse, p. 3
Coyer, p. 10 i1 Memphis State, p. 61 Tulsa, p. 15
Crandell, p. 18 11 Logan, p. 91 Top 10, p. 20
Crumpler, p. 18I Louisiana Tech, p. 8J Virginia Tech, p. 14
Eakin, p. 19 jSouth Carolina, p. 7Washington, p. 5
Booty 93
- Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager �
- Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director �
Joseph Horst, Managing Editor
- Robert S. Todd, Editor. Layout St Design-
Brian Olson, Assistant Editor
Burt Ay cock. Layout Manager
2
Friday 8.27.93
PUNIER
14 Bill Wilson
10 Michael Jacobs
o
RUNMNGBACK
35 Junior Smith
26 Damon Wilson
34 Greg Floyd
31 Eric Blanton
o
QUARTERBACK
5 Marcus Crandell
8 Chris Hester
12 Orlando Whitaker
o
HALFBACK
23 Jerris McPhail
87 Ronnie Williams
37 Carlos Blake
o
PLACE KICKER
24Chadrtolcomb
- Stephen Padgett
o
WIDE RECEIVER
85 Allen Williams
27 Lamont Edwards
o
LEFT TACKLE
78 Terry Tikpman
79 Chad Averette
LEFT GUARD
74 Tom Coleman
71 Reuben Jones
73 Jake Gilray
CENTER
58 Derrick
Leaphart
63 Kevin Wiggins
RIGHT TACKLE
52 Ken Crawford
69 Greg Smith
- Vince Scroggins
RIGHT TACKLE
55 Daryl Taylor
61 RonSuddith
77 Mike McCall
72 John Schlager
o
o
o
TIGHT END
88 Cariester Crumpler
83 Dwight Linvflle
90 Scott Richards
86 Sean Richardson
FLANKER
4 Morris Letcher
25 Darrek Batson
82 Mitchell Galloway
MiHHIII)lllllllllHirHHf��H�MII�
o
o
M 'ii '�i" �'� WWW
X
CORNER BACK
3 Emmanuel McDaniel
17 David Crumbie
X
X
OUTSIDE LINEBACKER
80 Bernard Carter
91 Willie Brookins
TACKLE
96 Walter Scott
70JeffCooke
59 Jamie Gray
FREE SAFETY
13 Hank Cooper
22 David Mart
6 E.J. Gubthro
pe
X
X
MIDDLE LINEBACKER
41 Reggie Robinson
84 Leonard Graham
NOSEGAURD
97 Derek Taylor
94 Dealton Cotton
95 Sean Turner
WILLIE LINEBACKER
81 Mark Libiano
44 Mike Sweat
X
TACKLE
56 Lamont Bums
99 Charles Boothe
66 Jeff Griffith
STRONG SAFETY
20 Qarrett Beasley
21 Daren Hart
X
X
OUTSIDE LINEBACKER
7 Morris Foreman
47 Brian Williams
X
CORNERBACK
9 Travis Render
15 Robert Tate
IIMIIHIMHIIHUtUIIIIH'lllillHHiillMMnillll UIII�W�
i� ,





ATfKjMN 9:01 PA
r.
ttPACUSt
$
I he word "Miracle" comes to mind.
So does the word "Upset, but Syracuse is one
of the best teams in the nation and has won
five straight bowl games.
The Pirates are no match for the
Orangemen and are not likely to catch them
off guard as they have done in the past.
Quarterback Marvin Graves is a legiti-
mate Heisman Trophy candidate and was the
second rated passer behind Heisman Tro-
phy winner Qino Torretta.
Against the Pirates in 1992, Graves
threw for 213 yards, completing 11-17 with
three touchdowns and no interceptions.
The loss of wide receiver Quadry Ismail
hasn't hurt a bit.
Meet Shelby Mill.
After playing in the shadow of "The
Missile" and former Orangemen Rob Car-
penter, Hill, a senior, is All-American calibre.
After contemplating turning profes-
sional after last season, he decided to finish
his career at Syracuse and is expected to be
a first-round draft pick at the end of the 1993
season. Hill took three passes for 65 yards
last year in Ficklen Stadium.
The Orangemen's defense ranked fifth
in the nation against the run in 1992 and
return six starters.
If SU stops run-
ning back Junior
Smith and his
backfield partner
Jerri's McPhail,
Crandell will be
forced to air the ball
out frequently in his
first collegiate game
� which happens to
be on national televi-
sion.
How Crandell
handles himself un-
der the pressure sets
the tone for the re-
mainder of the sea-
son.
SU's core of de-
fensive backs are ex-
perienced and
should rarely give up
a long-yardage pass
play.
At linebacker,
Dan Conley will lead
the defensive unit. Conley was credited with
7 1 tackles last season.
Marvin Graves
the last 10 years,
home favorite, they
Defensive
end Kevin
Mitchell was
voted Defensive
MVP in the Fi-
esta Bowl and is
fourth on SU's
career sack list.
J He will
earn Lombardi
�. and Outland
Trophy votes in
the post-sea-
son.
This will
be, by far, the
biggest home
game of the
year.
However,
the Bucs may
be better off
playing this
game in the
Carrier Dome.
As. road
favorite over
Syracuse is 24-5-2. As
are 22-20. Astheunder-
Dan Conley
dog, ECU has a better record on
road than at home
� Robert
7- f
ECU Football Records: The Power (lean
the
S. Todo,
Editor
Greg Smith (left) and Jeff Cooke are the all-time leaders. All active players in bold face
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14
Friday 8.27.93
fiyit'AiiniJM
AT E1CKUN 4:0Cp.m1
I ake Centra! Florida very seriously.
The last time these teams met was in
1991 the year the Pirates won the Peach
Bowl. ECU capitalized on seven UCF turnovers
and won 47-25. Only four teams (Illinois.
Syracuse; Tutane and P1.C. State) scored more
points against the Bucs that year. Also, the
Knights were able to march up and down the
field for 497 net yards that day � three more
than ECU.
Again, take this team very seriously.
In 1992. Central Florida was the East
Carolina of Division l-AA. The Knights man-
aged a record of 6-4 by scoring 37.3 points per
game, despite 36 turnovers. However, UCF's
defense ranked 81st last season. All offense.
Mo defense.
Quarterback Darin Hinshaw returns al-
ter throwing for 2.505 yards and 24 touch-
downs. The Knights also welcome back two
1,000-yard rushers and their entire offensive
line. Running backs Qerod Davis, only a
sophomore, and Willie English may be the
main source of frustration for ECU.
Receiver David Rhodes, who caught 51
passes last year for 1,005 yards, flinshaw and
English played against Robert Jones and com-
pany two seasons ago.
Rhodes got his hands on six passes for
116 yards. Hinshaw, one of three quarter-
backs used, threw for 100 yards on nine of
17 passing, with one touchdown
interception.
and one
English rushed for 114 yards on 19
carries. He sat out 1992 after blowing-out his
knee in the season opener. Davis took over
where he left off. Both are back. Both are
expected to play. Both will do damage.
There is some question in scheduling I
AA schools. A win is meaningless in the polls
and a loss is devastating. rl.C. State learned
this the hard way every year against Marshall
(defensive coordinator Larry Coyers alma
mater).
The Pirates will be forced to prove they
are the better team. Also on the Knights' side
when they meet: the Pirates have a losing
record (8-9-2) as a home favorite over the last
10 years.
A loss to UCF would devastate the team
more if they are coming off a loss to Syracuse
in the opener. Little hope for the season would
remain if ECU travelled to Washington in week
three with losses to, perhaps, the best and
worst teams on the schedule.
If they do not win against Central Florida,
ECU could find themselves 0-4 after the Mem-
phis State game, with five of their last seven
games on the road.
� Robert S. Todd,
Editor
D
Cole (left) is the all-time leader. All active players in bold to
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ATHUSKItSTADlUM3:39PJL.
I he Washington Huskies were on
the verge of replacing Miami as the elite
program for the '90s.
Now, Head Coach Don
James is gone, along with
their image as a model pro-
gram because of NCAA sanc-
tions.
When quarterback Billy
Joe Hobert was suspended
for excepting illegal loans
totaling $50,000. Washing-
ton was undefeated and No.
1 in the country.
The program was
shocked and lost two of
their last three games �
and their 22-game winning
streak. They ended the sea-
son with a 38-3! loss to
Michigan in the Rose Bowl
and a final ranking of 12th in the polls.
Despite their trouDles, they will again field
one of the best teams in the country. Their
offense is still tremendous, but their defense
is weakened from last seasons' losses.
Kunningbacks Beno Bryant and Napoleon
Kaufman may be the best backfield in the
nation.
3tt&
.
Napoleon Kaufman
Helping them move along is an experi-
enced line, although the loss of two-time All-
American tackle Lincoln Kennedy (drafted 9th
overall by the Atlanta fal-
cons) will hurt.
As a sophomore,
Kaufman rushed for over
1,000 yards and averaged
6.5 yards per carry. Bryant
missed nearly all of 1992
afterhelpingthe Huskies to
their National Champion-
ship in '91 by running for
943 on 6 yards per carry.
Both will split playing time,
but the ground attack will
be increased from last sea-
son.
The Washington QB
situation is similar to ECU'S.
Inexperience at the posi-
tion may hurt them, hut
sophomore Damon Huard is being hyped as
one of the best talents the Huskies have ever
had.
Washington's defense returns very few
starters but should have little trouble keeping
the Bucs in check. Outside linebacker Andy
Mason is a Lombardi award candidate who
racked up eight sacks and 14.5 tackles for a
loss last season. The new UW defensive backs
have the biggest shoes to fill, but are talented
enough to do so.
ECU will have a tough time making this
game respectable. But the Pirates have a
history of surprising top-ranked teams.
From 1980 to 1990, ECU regularly played
one of the toughest schedules in the country.
The Pirates faced off with Miami eight
times, Florida State seven times. Auburn and
Penn State twice and Florida and Georgia
once.
In 1983, the Pirates went 8-3. Their only
losses came against FSU by one point, Florida
by a touchdown and Miami by five. 13 points
separated ECU from an undefeated season
and, probably, a national championship.
It's 1993 and Miami has been replaced on
the schedule by Washington and the Semi-
noles by the Orangemen. Thankfully. Florida
has been replaced with Central Florida.
Washington is 31-5 over the last three
years. Do not count on their sixth loss coming
at the hands of ECU. However, the Huskies will
be ripe forpickingatthe handsofan underdog
if they cannot recover from the loss of their
coach, James.
� Robert S. Tood,
Editor
ECU loot ha II Records: The Din
Booty'93
S
Quarter-
backs
45
O. Whitaker
1993
Running
Backs
71
S. Sherman
1992
Wide
Receivers
60
R. Williams
1993
Defensive
Backs
95
R. Tate
1992
Fullbacks
52
D. Major
1992
Tight
Ends
46
C. Crumpler, Jr
1992
Robert Tate (left) is the all-time leader. All active players in bold face.
Defensive
Line
51
W. Scott
1993
Series Record:
First Meeting
Location:
Enrollment:
Nickname:
Conference:
Stadium:
Surface
1992 record:
Primary off:
Primary def:
Seattle,
Washington
34,000
Huskies
PAC-10
Huskie
Stadium
(72,500)
Astro Turf
9-3 (6-2)
One-back
3-4
Offensive
Line
37
B. Arnold
1992
Linebackers
61
R. Robinson
1992
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B
5
Friday 8.27.93
HXUi.WKHM
AT flCKUN 12:09 P.M. 1
y the time week four of the sea-
son rolls around, the Pirates could very
likely need a win to reach the .500 mark. It
will be no easy task � the Memphis State
Tigers will be visiting Ficklen Stadium look-
ing for a repeat of last year's game in
Memphis. ECU received a beating in the
season finale, 42-7.
When you think of the Tigers, the first
thing that comes to mind is defense.
The MSU defense was the third best in
the country last year behind national cham-
pion Alabama and Arizona. They were stingy
enough to only allow 3.6 yards per play.
Many key defensive players were lost, but
linebacker Danton Barto will be returning
with his team-leading 128 tackles and four
interceptions.
The offensive line lost four starters
and could be weak up front. Senior free
safety Jeremy Williams also returns with
91 tackles and three interceptions. Barto
and Williams are serious All-American
candidates.
Theoffenseisgeared behind lefty quar-
terback Steve Matthews.
He was the first player in the school's
Quarter-
backs
Steve Matthews
history to throw for over 2,000 yards in a
season and was ranked 1 2th nationally in
passing efficiency. He completed 61 per-
cent of his passes to go along with 18
touchdowns.
The passing attack is well comple-
mented with
tailbacks Larry
Porter and
John Martin, a
pair who
rushed for a
combined
1,295 yards
and lOTDslast
season.
Senior
wideout Isaac
Bruce, 39
catches and
532 yards,
should be a
prime target for
Matthews. The
offensive line
will return three
starters.
The Tigers
have another
All-American in senior place kicker Joe
Allison, nephew of the late NASCAR driver
David Allison. He picked up the Lou Qroza
Award last season as the nation's top place
kicker.
The stats speak for themselves, 23-of-
25 field-goal attempts and 32-0f-32 point
after attempts. The team will try to replace
punter Jeff Buffaloe, 44.6 yard average,
with sophomore Andy McWilliams.
The question marks for Memphis State
fall on the defense. It will be very tough to
rebuild the defensive line and defensive
backfield to be the team they were just a
year ago.
With such a powerful defense, MSU
only finished with a 6-5 record last season.
The offense will have to put more points on
the board for the Tigers to be successful
and it appears they will.
Look for the Pirates to try and run the
ball against a new defensive line, but stay
away from LB Barto.
The key for the ECU defense will be to
keep QB Matthews from airing out the ball
to Bruce and containing running backs Por-
ter and Martin.
This home game will be critical for the
Pirates to keep a decent record before they
head to South Carolina the next week.
The game will be televised on the Pirate
Sports Network.
� Brian Olson,
Assistant Editor
ECU Football Records: The Verticil'lump
33.5"
M. Crandel
1993
Running
Backs
38"
J. Smith
1992
Wide
Receivers
38"
C Blake
1992
Defensive
Backs
40"
R. Tate
1993
Fullbacks
32.5"
D. Major
1992
Tight
1 Ends
36"
C. Freeman
1989
Defensive
Line
34"
J. Cooke
1993
Offensive
Line
33"
B. Maxwell
1988
Linebackers
41"
J.Singletarv
1989
' J. Singletary (left) is the all-time leader. All active players in bold face.
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ATWILLIAM-5BIG100P $QJ CAflOOttfr
Booty'93
1
i
kcordingtothe flCAA, South Caro-
lina played the nation's toughest schedule in
1992. After losing their first five games, the
Gamecocks turned things around and closed
out the year going 5-1 to firsh 5-6 overall.
ECU unleashed running back Junior Smith
for the first time against South Carolina last
year, arid slipped by with a two point victory,
20-18, on a muddy field. The win marked the
second in a row for the Pirates against USC
after losing the first eight games of the series.
South Carolina returns most of their of-
fense. Quarterback Steve Taneyhill finished
fourth in the Southeastern Conference in pass-
ing efficiency as a true freshman. He will
choose from wide receivers Toby Cates, Asim
Penny and true-freshman Calvin Owens.
Cates and Penny averaged 17 yards per
catch, but Owens may be the one to watch. He
was touted as the best in the state and may
make an immediate in.pact.
The Gamecocks have two solid running
backs in Brandon Bennett and Rob Deboer.
Last season, they combined for over 1,000
yards, but Bennett will carry the ball more this
season and may reach that mark on his own.
However, Deboer gained 88 yards on 15 car-
ries versus ECU last year. Bennett rushed I 1
times for 34 yards in the same game.
The defense returns nine starters and
held opponents to 14.3 points over the last six
games of 1992. Strong safety Tony Watkins
leads the re-
turning group
with 94 tack-
les. Free safety
Norman Green
is second with
83. Safeties
leading the
defense in
tackles points
to why they al-
lowed 188
yards rushing
per game last
year � they
had no defen-
sive line. How-
ever, the de-
fense kept it together enough to finish 34th in
the nation against the pass.
ECU'S Junior Smith and Jerris McPhail are
probably iooking forward to thte game more
than quarterback Marcus Crandell. The chick-
ens' defensive line and line backers must
improve or expect ECU to run them into the
ground.
The South Carolina series began in 1977
with a Buc loss, 19-16. Their next meeting was
in 1984 and the
Gamecocks
routinely
thrashed ECU
by an average
of 29 points per
game every
year until 1991
when Jeff Blake
led the Pirates
to a 31-20 vic-
tory.
Last year
South Carolina
kicker Mart
Simpson
missed two
field goals in
the final seconds that would have won the
game. One was blocked, from 36 yards out,
and recovered. The next, from 37 yards out,
was wide right.
� Robert S. Todd.
Editor
Series Record
USC leads 3-1
Location:
Enrollment:
nickname:
Conference:
Stadium:
Surface
1992 record:
HeadCoach:
Primary off:
Primary def:
Columbia,
S.C.
25,613
Gamecocks
SEC
Williams-
Brice
(50,000)
Grass
5-6
Sparky
Woods
Multiple
Multiple
ECU Football Records: The Incline
QuarterbacksRunning BacksWide ReceiversDefensive BacksFullbacksTight EndsDefensive LineOffensive LineLinebackers
245 M. Crandel 1993295 D. Wilson 1993260 R. Williams 1992300 G. Grandison 1992315 D. Major 1992255 K. Seekford 1992325 Da Taylor 1993325 Gr. Smith 1991315 R. Robinson 1992
Daryl Taylor (left) and Greg Smith are the all-time leaders. All active players in bold face.
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' I
1,
8
Friday 8.27.93
iniiKUNAitru-
AT HCKLEN 2:00P.M.
'o ECU, Louisiana Tech may seem
like a gift. All the Pirates should have to do is
unwrap them. You will only find out what's
inside after the game, but it feels like a
shutout. What a gift that would be! ECU has
not shutout an opponent since Oct. 23,1982
against Illinois State � a streak of 115 games
(and possibly 120 by the time these two
teams meet.)
The Bulldog's offense has lost a lot of
bite. Tech departed with 18 lettermen from
the offense, including offensive lineman Willie
Roaf. Me was selected eighth overall by the
New Orleans Saints. Tech also lost their offen-
sive coordinator Pat Tilley.
The quarterback position is up for grabs.
Vying for the spot is Aaron Ferguson, Arkan-
sas transfer Wade Hill and redshirt-freshman
Jason Martin. Ferguson completed 54 per-
cent of his passes last year but connected for
only one touchdown pass while throwing
seven interceptions. Hill may get the starting
nod.
Runningback Jason Cooper gained 733
yards (4.3 yards per carry). He is a capable
runner, but the loss of Roaf will hurt his totals
unless the offensive line improves.
Defensive troubles are everywhere. Eight
starters are gone from a defense that held
opponents under 17 points nine times. Na-
tional Champion Alabama managed only 13
points against the Bulldogs.
Losing linebacker Myron Baker may have
done more damage than the loss of Roaf.
Baker totaled 132 tackles in 1992 and the
returning leader, linebacker Fred Price, had
little more than half that with 74.
Opponents averaged only 257 yards of
offense last year, but the loss of eight starters
on defense will cost them a respectable sea-
son.
The last time ECU played Louisiana Tech
(1990), the Pirates won 27-17. The previous
season Tech forced a tie, 29-29, on a field
goal with 16 seconds left. Later, the game was
forfeited by Louisiana Tech for using an ineli-
gible player. Both teams faced off in the 1978
Independence Bowl in Shreveport, La. The
Bucs won 35-13 and held the Bulldogs to 12
yards rushing.
� Robert S. Todd,
Editor
ECU Football Records: The 40-Yard Dash
QuarterbacksRunning BacksWide ReceiversDefensive BacksFullbacksTight EndsDefensive LineOffensive LineLinebackers
4.51 R. Jones 19864.41 G. Franklin 19864.33 C. Blake 19914.49 E. Dillahunt 19864.60 D. Daniels 19894.71 C. Freeman 19894.70 W. Bryant 19864.66 B. Michel 19874.48 E. Teliafarro 1987
h Carlos Blake (left) is the all-time leader. All active players in bold face.
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II,
ow did the
team look after
spring practice?
Steve Logan,
ECU'S head foot-
ball coach:
Based on what
I've seen, I think
we have a chance
to have a better
football team, and
by that I mean all
three units (of-
fense, defense and
special teams)
complementing
each other.
Last year, be-
cause of some deficiencies we had on the
defense and the kicking game, it got to where
if we didn 't outscore somebody, we wouldn 't
win the football game.
We have brought in a new junior college
punter by the name of Billy Wilson, who has
punted the ball extremely well this spring.
I've brought in a new assistant head coach
and defensive coordinator. Coach (Larry)
Coyer. He's got a personality that has begun to
take root on the defensive side of the football.
think (this) year we can realistically punt
the ball and expect to play some defense.
That is a football team, those are three
units complementing each other, the offense
not turning the ball over, the special teams
punting the ball effectively and the defense
going down there and putting a stop to 'em so
we can get the ball back.
From that aspect I think we have a better
team.
Coach, you mentioned that Coach
Coyer's personality has taken over on the
defense. How so? Is he more aggressive?
Coach Coyer is an experienced and pro-
fessional football coach in the sense that he's
got 30 years of coaching under his belt.
That is exactly the kind of man I wanted to
bring in the program.
Larry came in here and just over the
course of spring ball, there has been a very
aggressive attitude injected into the kids, a
unity that hasn 't been here in sufficient quan-
tities previous to him being here.
I think that if we II continue to foster that
personality as a group, our defense will be a
much improved unit next year.
Who has stepped up on defense so far?
think when you look at individuals, and
quite honestly we've tried to downplay indi-
viduals this year� we had some individualism
last year that I think hurt our football team.
Everything we've done this year is team,
team, team, team, team.
That's all we've talked to our kids about.
But I know that there are times when you have
to look at individuals and as far as the defense
goes, I think Bernard Carter has the chance to
be a 'bellcow' for us .
I think that where Bernard goes, our de-
fense may go along with him, so to speak.
I think that Morris Foreman also has the
chance to improve upon a real solid freshman
year. I think those two kids will be good
football players.
Our talent on the defensive side of the
football is sufficient enough for us to be
competitive.
I believe that and I have always believed
that and I expect Coach Coyer to draw that
out of us.
What did you learn from last season?
Well, everything and nothing.
I learned that there are a lot of different
angles to everything you're doing as a head
�VrVVAr!WJVWVVUVVWrtVVV,L
coach and yet that all the situations are so
much like the situations you dealt with
before.
It's kind of like what Solomon said,
"There's nothing new under the sun. I've
become very sensitive to image because,
sadly enough, I've found that image is
stronger than truth. That's one of the sad
things about coaching.
What is effective about Steve Logan
as a disciplinarian?
When I became the head coach, some-
one asked me about discipline and I said
that my style of discipline concerns natural
consequences.
The most stern disciplinarian on the
earth is natural consequences. If you tell
the child not to touch the hot stove, they do
and they get burned, they won't touch the
hot stove anymore because the natural .
consequences are very strict.
I have stronger disciplinary measures
in place for my football team right now than
at any other time that I've been here at ECU.
They know that the natural consequences
of acting like a fool in an offampus social
situation will mean that they won't be part
of my football team.
They know that the natural conse-
quences of not going to class will be that
they won r be part of this program I don't
take any prisoners concerning discipline. I
tell my players it's a privilege to play, and a
privilege to be part of my program. It is not
their right. If they blow tiiat privilege, they're
gone.
As a freshman, Marcus Crandell is
performing well for the team. . . how
would you compare his style Jeff Blake's?
Our offensive system is not simplistic
at all. It takes a lot of thin king under center.
I've always been frightened of having one
guy and then that guy gets injured and the
other guy comes in without ever taking a
snap. That's not smart. I always try to have
both guys so I don't have to worry about the
disasters.
How did it feel to have Jeff Blake
coming back to the campus for the
spring game this summer?
Jeff is a young man who is very dear to
my heart. In the course of coaching, there
are a few relationships that go beyond
player-coach. Jeff Blake became a close,
personal friend of mine.
I had the opportunity to coach Jeff for
three years and watched him grow from a
young man to a real man in every sense of
the word. 1 watched Jeffsupport a child and
a wife. I think Jeff is one of the special
things that happen to you every once in a
while in college coaching.
� Warren Sumner,
Staff Writefi





c
0 iiuailui tenr tCHHE
haracter is sometimes easy to spot.
It kind of jumps out at you and makes an
impression. Some of the time you can tell
someone has character by the way they walk
and talk, by the way they look at you or how they
smile or frown. In some, it's the sound of their
voice or the way they dress. But you know
immediately they have it, and that having it
distinguishes them from the crowd.
That's the way it is when you first meet
Larry Coyer, East Carolina's new defensive coor-
dinator. Just by his demeanor, you can immedi-
ately tell that this man knows exactly who he is
and exactly what he wants to do. Coyer minces
no words and says ex-
his
Lr:
actly what is on
mind.
Mis hoarse voice
iscontradicted by eyes
which reflect a bright
energy and he is armed
with his customary
pipe dangling from the
right side of his mouth.
The stark white smoke
seeps from the pipe to
complement the
coach's hair which is
bleached white by the
rigors of a 29-year ca-
reer in coaching.
A veteran of the
defensive coaching
trenches, Coyer has
been named by Pirate
coach Steve Logan as
his "best recruit
Coyer, 49, coached
Ohio State's defensive backfield for the last two
seasons and has professional experience with
the former USEL to go along with numerous
other universities. Under Coyer, the Buckeyes
were rated 13th in the nation in pass efficiency.
Coye- has been placed, by Logan, in the
unenviable task of turning around the Pirate
defense. He must improve upon a dismal '92
defensive season that found the Pirate defense
105th in the nation. Me must instill a hunger into
his defensive unit to prevent the long gains of
opposing offenses that was so frequent last
year. He must mold a group of inexperienced
players with the veterans on the squad to lead
them towards team unity. Coyer calls this unity
a "Mad Dog Defense
"The Mad Dog' philosophy is pretty
simple Coyer said. "You're not really afraid
whenonedogcomesafteryou.butifyouget 11
of em after your butt, you tend to get nervous.
We've got to be relentless, coming after you all
the time, always playing hard
Coyer said he analyzed last year's game
films and noticed the Pirates' biggest problem:
a lack of consistency.
"Last year, the one thing! noticed from the
defense was that there was too much 'up and
down There were too many games where they
just didn't play as hard as they were capable.
"I mean no disrespect to any opponent,
but you just don't let yourself get blown out by
Duke
Coyer said that he felt that while the
defensive unit was rich with physical talent, the
mental capacity of the players would ultimately
determine their success.
"We may have talent enough to have a
great yearbut the one thing that'sgonna deter-
mine how your team will be is willpower. That's
where the rubber meets the road. We also don't
want to let the environment of the game control
us. We want to play the same way if we're ahead
or behind
Coyer said he plans to test that willpower
by setting the Pirates into a slightly different
defensive structure than that of last year. Coyer
&a&
said the unit will be "pressure oriented" with the
main concentration of the Pirate defensive
scheme focused on the opponent's ground
attack.
He said the unit's goal was to hold oppos-
ing offenses to 17 points or less and keep their
rushing games below 150 yards.
Coyer will have a tough time achieving
these goals in the Pirates' opener against Syra-
cuse on Sept. 9. The Orangemen are rated as
high as fourth in the nation and with quarterback
Marvin Graves at the helm, the Syracuse offense
will have incredible potential to put big yardage
marks in the stat-books and points on the board.
Coyer said
that he understands
the difficulty of start-
ing the season off
against such a pow-
erful opponent but
also views it as an
opportunity for his
defense to gain
credibility.
"Our defense
doesn't have (cred-
ibility) yet. You gain
credibility in games
against good oppo-
sition. (Playing Syra-
cuse first) would be
a tough task for any-
body
Coyer said
that he is happy to
have the defensive
staff he has under
him to help him
meet this task and has high praise tor their
abilities.
"Lord, yeah we have a great defensive
staff. (Defensive back coach Chris) Thurmond,
(Outside linebacker coach Chuck) Pagano and
(Defensive line coach Theo) Lemon have all
been coordi nators and (1 nside linebacker coach
Bob) Babich has Big 10 experience
According to Pirate linebacker Mark
Libiano, Coyer's strongest attribute as a coach is
his straight-shooting manner of dealing with his
players
"He's definitely not afraid to tell you what
he thinks Libianosaid. "He doesn't yell, but he
definitely lets you know how he feels
"I think we have to be straight-up with each
other Coyer said. "Communication has to go
two ways and 1 want my players to feel that they
can talk to me about anything
Coyer, tanned from the Pirates outside
practices, classifies himself as someone who
loves the outdoors, but is not an outdoors man.
Me said while he enjoys being outside workingin
the yard and workingonhisgolf game, adventur-
ous wilderness pursuits don't interest him.
"My idea of camping is at the Milton he
said. One "camping companion" Coyer will bring
with him is his pipe.
"It's a bad habit Coyer said. "It's just like
sucking your thumb. 1 guess it just kind of
relaxes me. It's kind of like my Valium
"Greenville's a hell of a little town Coyer
said. He said he hopes to remain in the Emerald
City for a long time. Perhaps given some time.
Coyer could begin a new era in Pirate defense.
"We think we really have a chance to be a
good football team Coyer said. "In the time to
come, defense will be very important at East
Carolina
Customary with Coach Logan'sTEAM phi-
losophy this year, Coyerreplied, "Ijusi wantthe
Pirate fans to thinkof ECU as a real good football
team
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Zo you're looking at M m and the taste is very grown-up.
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It's a zecret recipe.
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These ingredienz are a closelv
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at make
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z323iret
I
� mom n
ideas
l irking with Eastarolina football is
� done he
g in tin life
� er the game the job turns
nt. It's terrifii working with
s speak. , i eopl from our
. salS(. hoo People lik rkman and
Charles are always .1 1 . . help
Moore mentioned (ti.ii the sporting staffs
Syracuse Pitl and Temple were al
si Down , ts but thestafl fromthel niversitj
1 M ami was tin- worsl he d evei worked
sith. It was like the wen a fa
annour er Jh being there
tingthesiMoore has one son John ill who is
attending ECl . Uuuk- said thai his son Ins
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ideasts
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AT fICKLtN
ni tm ! uiiiwvwv uu
t
&
l evenge will be on the minds of ECU players and fans alike. Last season,
Southern Mississippi embarrassed the Pirates on the first nationally televised
game from Ficklen Stadium,
38-21. Five interceptions and
two fumbles helped the lowly
USM offense to such a high
total.
The Golden Eagles are
searching for something re-
sembling an offense.
If they find what they are
looking for, you will see them
in the top 25. But for now,
quarterback Tommy Waters
is only decent with nobody to
throw to and SMU has no real
threat in the backfield since
losing tailback Michael Welch.
Last year, Welch burnt the
Bucs for 169 yards on 27
carries.
However, USM is not
likely to put the offensive
Their 7-4 record last season is credit to a Golden Eagle defense
returning nine starters. Last season, they were ranked 27h in scoring
defense and eighth against the pass.
Inside Linebacker Tyrone iix
1137 tackles) will lead the unit,
whose only weakness is against the
run.
Hello, Junior Smith.
Smith rushed for 150 yards
against USM a year ago. That game
also saw Charles Smith run for 112
yards on 10 carries.
Defensive backs Terry timer
and Perry Carter combined for 11
interceptions on the season and will
give fits to quarterback Marcus
Crandell. Linebacker Bobby
Hamilton recorded six sacks last
season and will be watched closely
by ECU'S offensive line.
Good defense always beats
good offense. How Bernard Carter
and the rest of the Purple People
Series Record
USM leads 14 4
Bobby Hamilton
pieces together well enough to make the most of their rock solid defense. Eaters play will determine the outcome
The Eagles finished 93rd in the nation on offense. Not only was the offense
bad, but USM's punt returners finished last (107th) in the country.
� Robert S. Todd,
Editor
Location:
Enrollment:
Nickname:
Conference:
Stadium:
Surface
1992 record:
HeadCoach:
Primary off:
Primary def:
Hattiesburg,
Miss.
13,00
Golden
Eagles
Ind. (1FA)
M.M. Roberts
Stadium
(33,000)
Grass
7-4
Jeff Bower
Pro-1
4-3
ECU Football Records: The Mile
4QuarterbacksRunning BacksWide ReceiversDefensive BacksFullbacksTight EndsDefensive LineOffensive LineLinebackers
5:28 M. Anderson 19925:21 S. Sherman 19925:08 P. Zophy 19915:13 R. Tate 19925:57 K. Smith 19895:18 L. Fisher 19915:49 J. Holmes. Z. CunmuUaj 1989, 19925:50 B. Maxwell 19845:23 R. Snow 1992
Peter Zophy (left) is the all-timeleader. All actii�e players in bold face.
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V
"11 rrt
Friday 8.27.93
VlUCINiA TCCU
AT LANf STADIUM loo pa
a Tech. had a lot ot -ear
held fourth quarter leads
n seven of I 1 ga � et ion on
ieason. VT also
:losing minutes of their game and finished the
. 12-8-1.
u're fired was heard � .era times
rom Head Coach FranK Beamer ana nc
ias a new cast of assistant coaches. And new
iefensive schemes.
Kies have converted to a standard
i � ise from their wide tackle-six forma-
jrcingoutside linebackers Kevin Brown
tnd P.J. Preston to new positions.
iwn, who recorded 82 tackles 5 for
3sses moves to inside linebacker. Preston,
he team s returning leader in tackles with 89
5 foi iossesi, will be tried at defensive end.
TheTechmen were particularly pooragainst
he pass last season and do not seem to have
mprcved much. They allowed opponents to
.omplete 57 percent of their passes and aver-
ige 229 yards per game through the air in
;992.
Speaking of air, quarterback Maurice
ieShazo will not worry when he takes snaps
rom his center. Jim Pyne has played 1,879
naps w ithout allow ing a sack and earned All-
nerican honors last season. Me is looking for
itland Trophy this year.
� iiokie offensive line returns all five
rt( rs and will accommodate DeShazo by
ig him all the time he needs to continue
ing.
"Maurice got better every game he played
st season Beamer said. "With experience,
e better decisions and called audibles
lat put us in positions for big gains
How true.
The Hokies averaged A65 yards of offense
over their last four games. They will be very
potent again this year despite losing tailback
Von Hebron, who rushed for 128 yards against
ECU in 1992.
However, no one has stepped up as an
adequate replacement, so the ground game
may suffer a bit.
Through the air, DeShazo found wide re-
ceiver Antonio Freeman 32 times last year for
an average of 22 yard per catch. Freeman is a
deep threat the Pirates will have to play close
attention to.
VT was better than 2-8-1 and will prove it in
1993. They scored an av erage of only one point
less than their opponents last season and will
be looking for redemption when ECU arrives in
ECU Football Records: The Sit I
Series Record
SU leads 3-1
Dwayne Thomas
Blacksburg.
ECU beat the Hokies, 30-27, with 42 sec-
onds to piayon a Michael Anderson-to-Carlester
Crumpler touchdown pass last year in Ficklen
Stadium.
The hard luck Hokies of 1992 will be
replaced by an angry team dishing out hard
knocks and the Pirates must be prepared.
� Robert S. Todd,
Editor
Location:
Enrollment:
nickname:
Conference:
Stadium:
Surface
1992 record:
HeadCoach:
Primary off:
Primary def:
Blacksburg,
Va.
23,000
Hokies
Big East
Lane Field
(51,000)
Grass
2-8-1
Frank
Beamer
Multiple
4-3
Quarter-
backs
C Hester
Running
Backs
Wide
Receivers
S. Sherman
P. Zi.phv
Defensive
Backs
110
R. Tate
1493
Fullbacks
D. Major
1W2
Tight
Ends
101
K.Seekford
10Q2
Defensive
Line
92
C. Boothe
1993
Offensive
Line
N.Wilson
1992
Linebackers
P. Hurley
143
i Sherman (left is the all-time leader. All active players in bold face.
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AT flCKLEN uopa
T,
tots
Booty'93
ts
he illustrious memories of both
Cast Carolina and Tulsa are one full season
in the past.
The Golden Hurricanes came out of
the 1991 season finishing 21st and the
Bucs came away with the ninth spot.
Both teams are taking their first steps
on that long ladder to get back on top.
Tulsa and East Carolina could consider
last season a rebuilding year. The Hurri-
canes finished with a dismal 4-7 record.
Losing to Hawaii, 38-9, was their most embar-
rassing defeat of the season � and it came in
the last game of 1992.
1993 looks to be another full year of
rebuilding for the Canes. The Tulsa ath-
letic program is coming off a year in which
the NCAA banned the school from
postseason play.
The Pirate defense must stay alert to
handle Tulsa's no huddle offense.
Head Coach Dave Rader goes with a
pro-set, no huddle attack and expects his
quarterback, Qus Frerotte, to throw at least
30 times a game.
Frerotte will return at the helm for the
Hurricanes after starting most of last sea-
son. He did not handle the hurry up offense
too well last year (47 percent passing, six
TD's, and 1 1 intsi and five of his passes
were returned for touchdowns.
Frerotte's targets will be flanker Gary
Brown and split end Chris Penn. Penn missed
last season because of academic reasons,
but will return with his enormous speed and
ability to make the big play.
Lamont Headd will return as the start-
ing tailback coming off a solid year (827
yards rushing and 4.8 avg.l.
The offensive line returns only two start-
ers and could very well benefit the aggres-
sive defensive style of new ECU defensive
coordinator, Larry Coyer.
Tulsa and ECU shared one thing in
common last year: the inability to stop the
run.
The Hurricane defense yielded five yards
per rush last season. This year's defense
does not look much better with the loss of
seven starters which included the top six
tacklers.
The team will miss linebackers Barry
Minter and Chris Bratcher which combined
for 253 tackles. Tackle Cory Lax is the big
body up front applying pressure to the QB.
Defensive end Sedric Clark will line up
along the line with his added 15 pounds of
muscle during the off season. Free safety
Dennis Hickey will team up with three-year
starter James Blake to make a solid safety
duo.
The Pirates' special team focus might
be on kick returnerwide receiver, Penn. He
looks to improve on a 22.9 kick return
average of two years past. Punter Mark
DeLozier was very effective last year and ex-
pect nothing less this time around.
Freshmen Solomon White is trying to pry
into position at tailback. His Spring workouts
were impressive.
By the time the Hurricanes blow into
Greenville in week nine, rookie QB Marcus
Crandell should have a good amount of
experience under his belt and be able to
pick up the win.
The Pirates defense must handle the
hurry up offense, stay alert in the secondary
and not give up the big play.
Look for RB Junior Smith to have a big
game against a weak Tulsa defense. This
contest should prove one of the easier
games for the Pirates. .
� Brian Olson,
Assistant Editor
Chris Penn
ECU Football Records: The Bench Press
Quarter-
backs
C. Libretto
1989
Running
Backs
415
VV. Lewis
1989
Wide
Receivers
345
D. Batson
1992
Defensive
Backs
G. Franklin
G. Beaslev
I486. 1993
Fullbacks
4S5
D. Daniels
1990
Tight
Ends
405
G. Willis
1985
Defensive
Line
480
.Pegues
1983
' Terry Lorig (left) is the all-time leader. All active plavers in bold face.
Offensive
Line
550
T. Long
1983
Linebackers
465
M.Washington
1990
Scholarships
Available
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has two-through four-year scholarships that can
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Contact Captain Steve Cooke
307 Wright Annex
757-6597'
Leadership Excellence Starts Here





16
Friday 8.27.93
mmxr
K
entuckv is a bad team. If ECU wins only
ie game all season, this should be the one.
The Wildcats have only one starter re-
irning to the offensive line. Unfortunately
r UK, it does not really matter � they have
d running backs and no receivers. Only
jpes.
They hope wide receivers Tim Calvert
id Alfonzo Browning have hands of glue,
istyear, they both averaged 20.6 yards per
ception. But they only caught the ball a total
' 28 times all year and averaged only 52
irds per game combined. They are medio-
e at best.
"The only bright spots for the Wildcats on
Tense are quarterback Pookie Jones and
ansfer Randy Wyatt.
Jones set a school record with 1,729
irds per game in total offense in 1992.
jwever, he threw eight interceptions and
ily five touchdown passes.
Wyatt, who came to UK from rival Louis-
lie, will be used like ECU'S Jerris McPhail. He
II be expected to run the ball, catch passes,
turn kickoffs and block. Wyatt is quite
ipable.
Back Matt Riazzi averaged 8.1 yards per
irry, but only gained a total of 243 in 1992.
s average is iikeiy an aberration. He could
t manage the same average if he ran the
ill more often.
Kentucky's defense has switched to a 4-
from a multiple front, riew defensive coor-
jo2for Mike Archer has put his hopes in
c
ir PHJ
r tujtijA FlHyH
BW"�3�&M
�BjL - 3WiHUI
SnH AfhiL. dDiBI$jL
� W �
wKm

Ik
L
rfeflra'JMmWJi
AT COMMONWtAlTW STADIUM 1:00 P JL
Series Record
First Meeting
Marty Moore
inside linebacker Marty More.
Moore has led the SEC in tackles the last
two seasons. He racked up 148 tackles in
1992, in part because no other Wildcat could
get their hands on the person with the ball.
The defense will also feature redshirt fresh-
men Chris Ward and Eric Wright. They both
have talent, but are inexperienced and will
need time to mature.
ECU should have little trouble running or
passing in Lexington and could win big.
� Robert S. Todd,
Editor
99t
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Location:
Athletics
Director:
Enrollment:
Nickname:
Conference:
Stadium:
Surface
1992 record:
HeadCoach:
Primary off:
Primary def:
Colors:
Lexington,
Ky.
CM.
Newton
24,000
Wildcats
SEC
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wealth
(57,800)
Grass
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AT NIPP02T
�ijuimi
Booty'93
i,
42
he Bearcats had their claws in the Pirates
and let them slip away last year. Sooner or later they will
break their 0-7 drought against ECU.
To do that, quarterback Lance Harp needs to im-
prove. He had more than twice as many interceptions 116
than touchdown passes (7) last year and completed just
over 50 percent of his passes
Cincinnati does have other options.
Running back David Small gained 104 yards on 26
carries in f icklen last year and rushed for a team leading
780 yards 13.7 yards per carry). Also "turning are several
subs for Small: Craedel Kimbrough. Mike Britford and
Darrell Harding, none reached the 400-yard mark, but
combined they bettered Small's performance: 814 yards
on 147 carries for a 5.5 average.
Wide receiver Marlon Pearce caught 56 passes for
891 yards. If Harp avoids interceptions, Pearce could
have another big game against ECU. Last year, he soared
for 148 yards on 10 receptions.
Cincinnati Head Coach Tim Murphy turned the of-
fensive reins over to Harry Hienstand, but Murphy may not
be able to resist from calling a few of his favorite plays.
Last year Hienstand was the offensive line coach.
Murphy is also starting new with Tom Roggleman as
defensive coordinator. Last season, opponents averaged
25.1 points pergame and gained 362 total yards. ECU has
averaged 40.9 points per game with a 19.9 average
margin of victory in their seven contests against the
Bearcats. The worsi beating Cincinnati received was 56-
28 in 1987. The Pirates won 56-32 in 1990.
The defense returns its starting defensive backs
along with linebackers flate Dingle and Jason Coppess.
Dingle recorded six sacks and 54 tackles (five for
losses). He is a powerful linebacker and his numbers are
expected to improve after a season of strength training.
He had less than half the tackles of Coppess, but nad
twice the sacks with six. This linebacker duo is dynamic.
They will take every opportunity to disrupt ECU quarter-
Series Record
ECU leads 7-0
Lance Harp
back Marcus Crandell's train of thought.
Coppess recorded 112 tackles. 8 for losses, with
three sacks. He is a linebacker in the same mold as Robert
Jones. He is not as good but, his style of play is similar �
he rarely misses a tackle.
Coppess' sure hands are important in the Bearcats'
Multiple-50 defense which relies on linebackers to do
most of the work.
Free safety Alan Fletcher is a hard hitter who racked
up 72 tackles and picked off four passes. Comerback
Jocelyn Borgella is the returning team interception leader
with five. Expect them to play well and cause havoc with
ECU'S offensive schemes.
The Pirates are not likely to put 42 points on the
board with an improved Bearcat defense and a weaker
ECU offense. Cincinnati is in the same boat. Their offense
does not seem to have improved much, while the Buc
defense is looking stronger.
� Robert S. Todd,
Editor
Location:Cincinnati,
Ohio
Athletics
Director:Rick
Taylor
Enrollment:36,000
nickname:Bearcats
Conference:Ind. (IFA)
Stadium:Nippert
(35,000)
SurfaceAstro Turf
1992 record:3-8
HeadCoach:Tim
Murphy
Primary off:Multiple
Primary def:Multiple
50
Colors:Red and
Black
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18 tfPOtlLE:
VAiKMK
�lJi�!I
L ife as an East Carolina football
Iayer is rarely easy. You are forced to
:ontend with the pressure of high expecta-
ions on the field and in the classroom.
iome make it, some don't. A simple look at
XU's football roster will prove that.
When a player is successful in his ath-
etic and academic endeavors one would
hink that the pressures would alleviate,
)ut that is not the case. Often success
rings more responsibility coupled with
jreater taxations. Improve-
nent is not just expected,
t is demanded.
Crumpler knows these
ressures well.
fie has been named as
he nation's best tight-end
n nearly every national
ootball publication and
,aid that he isn't greatly
othered by these circum-
.tances.
"I don't see it as pres-
.ure, 1 see it more as a
:hal1enge" Crumpler said.
You can't worry about what newspapers
ind magazines might say Crumpler said
le had always received support from his
lad. "He doesn't ever put pressure on me
. . he's already been through it
Crumpler is deserving of that support,
iccording to his father, because of the fact
hat he has accomplished what few student-
ithletes are able to, a four-year degree in
usiness.
"As a parent, I'm extremely proud of
lim Crumpler Sr. said. "On the field you
lave 10 to 12 coaches to push you, but the
:7assroom is often a different story. I think
hat the fact that Carlester already has his
degree is remarkable considering the cur-
rent trend (a five-year degree) in athletics
The most prominent of the on-field
"pushers" is Head Coach Steve Logan, who
has many words of praise for Crumpler's
work habits both on and off the field.
"Carlester is a class act both on and off
the field Logan said. "He is an excellent
student and is working extremely hard to
prepare for the season
Crumpler said that his off-the-field ex-
periences have taught him that as a general
rule athletes such as him-
self are badly stereotyped
about their classroom hab-
its and intellectual devel-
opment. Crumpler said
these stereotypes are a
cause of distress for him.
"Some of the guys I've
met on the team are some
of the brightest people I've
ever known Crumpler
said. "Some people think
athletes are not willing to
work in the classroom and
that s wrong. By graduat-
ing, I feel like I've accomplished some-
thing. It is very much a sense of pride for
me
Crumpler said he dreams of a profes-
sional football career, but is making prepa-
rations to enter the professional world by
working on his MBA.
Crumpler said that he would be satis-
fied with whatever road he takes after com-
pleting his education.
"Hopefully I'll be a success at whatever
I do he said.
� Warren Sumner,
Staff Writer
w,
hen the Pirate football team
marches into Ficklen Stadium in Septem-
ber to face the Syracuse Orangemen, there
will be many questions facing the team
about the game and the season.
Will there be an early defensive break-
down like there was in last year's opening
game against Syracuse?
Will some of the inexperienced players
at the wide receiver spot be able to handle
the offensive load created by ECU'S pos-
session route oriented of-
fense?
Despite the many ques-
tions floating around be-
fore game time, the spot-
light will inevitably be fo-
cused on one player.
That one player win be-
Marcus Crandell.
Crandell was officially
handed the reins of the
ECU offense after last
year's quarterback,
Michael Anderson, left
school for undisclosed aca-
demic reasons. Crandell, a redshirt fresh-
man, spent last season leading the scout
team in simulated game situations in order
to better prepare the ECU defense for the
next week's opponent. This year, it will be
the real thing.
To most, it might seem as if ECU'S high
tech offense would be a burden to a young
quarterback. However, Crandell said that
the big time passing attack was one of the
things that first attracted him to ECU when
he was being recruited at Robersonville
High School.
"One of the things that I really liked
about the ECU program was the offense
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Crandell said. "Other schools weren't
recruiting me as a quarterback. ECU gave
me an opportunity to play QB in an of-
fense with a lot of passing. In high school,
the offense was a lot different because I
didn't get to pass as much as I will here.
The offense is pretty complicated, but
I'm getting use to it
Crandell will probably be passing a
lot when he makes his debut in front of
the home crowd at ficklen, as well as the
national ESPN audience.
Crandell says that he is not trying to
concentrate on all the
added pressures. He is
only focusing on going
out and doing his job.
"1 feel that if I go out
there and take it one
game at a time, 1 can put
some doubts to rest
Crandell said. "I look at
the idea of coming in im-
mediately as an opportu-
nity more than anything.
I just need to go out there
and prove myself
Crandell's style of
play should prove to be exciting for Pi-
rate faithful. Some might find his style of
play and physical abilities to besimilarto
that of former ECU quarterback Jeff Biake.
Crandell said that he could see where
some people might make comparisons,
but that in the long run there were many
differences.
"I'm the type of quarterback who is
more comfortable scrambling he said.
"1 (would) rather do that than stand in the
pocket. On the field, I don't talk very
much. I just try and lead by example, and
Continued on page 21, see Crandell
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K�ffi�M
1UIWUU
i��;iuu
L ife as an East Carolina football
)layer is rarely easy. You are forced to
:oritend with the pressure of high expecta-
ions on the field and in the classroom,
iome make it, some don't. A simple look at
XL's football roster will prove that.
When a player is successful in his ath-
etic and academic endeavors one would
hink that the pressures would alleviate,
tut that is not the case. Often success
jrings more responsibility coupled with
ireater taxations. Improve-
nent is not just expected,
t is demanded.
Crumpler knows these
ressures well.
Me has been named as
he nation s best tight-end
n nearly every national
ootball publication and
.aid that he isn't greatly
mothered by these circum-
.tances.
"1 don't see it as pres-
,ure, 1 see it more as a
ihallenge Crumpler said.
You can't worry about what newspapers
md magazines might sav Crumpler said
le had always received support from his
lad. "He doesn't ever put pressure on me
. . he's already been through it
Crumpler is deserving of that support,
lecording to his father, because of the fact
hat he has accomplished what few student-
ithletes are able to, a four-year degree in
usiness.
"As a parent, I'm extremely proud of
lim Crumpler Sr. said. "On the field you
lave 10 to 12 coaches to push you, but the
:Tassroom is often a different story. I think
hat the fact that Carlester already has his
degree is remarkable considering the cur-
rent trend (a five-year degree) in athletics
The most prominent of the on-field
"pushers" is Mead Coach Steve Logan, who
has many words of praise for Crumpler's
work habits both on and off the field.
"Carlester is a class act both on and off
the field Logan said. "He is an excellent
student and is working extremely hard to
prepare for the season
Crumpler said that his off-the-field ex-
periences have taught him that as a general
rule athletes such as him- :
self are badly stereotyped
about their classroom hab-
is and intellectual devel- j
opment. Crumpler said j
these stereotypes are a j
cause of distress for him.
"Some of the guys I've j
met on the team are some
of the brightest people I've
ever known Crumpler
said. "Some people think
athletes are not willing to
work in the classroom and
that's wrong. By graduat-
ing, I feel like I've accomplished some-
thing. It is very much a sense of pride for
me
Crumpler said he dreams of a profes-
sional football career, but is making prepa-
rations to enter the professional world by
working on his MBA.
Crumpler said that he would be satis-
fies with whatever road he takes after com-
pleting his education.
"Hopefully I'll be a success at whatever
I do he said.
� Warren Sumner,
Staff Writer
w,
hen the Pirate football team
marches into Ficklen Stadium in Septem-
ber to face the Syracuse Orangemen, there
will be many questions facing the team
about the game and the season.
Will there be an early defensive break-
down like there was in last year's opening
game against Syracuse?
Will some of the inexperienced players
at the wide receiver spot be able to handle
the offensive load created by ECU'S pos-
session route oriented of-
fense?
Despite the many ques-
tions floating around be-
fore game time, the spot-
light will inevitably be fo-
cused on one player.
That one player will be-
Marcus Crandell.
Crandell was officially-
handed the reins of the
i ECU offense after last
! year's quarterback,
, Michael Anderson, left
school for undisclosed aca-
i demic reasons. Crandell, a redshirt fresh-
man, spent last season leading the scout
I team in simulated game situations in order
to better prepare the ECU defense for the
next week's opponent. This year, it will be
the real thing.
To most, it might seem as if ECU'S high
tech offense would be a burden to a young
quarterback. However, Crandell said that
the big time passing attack was one of the
things that first attracted him to ECU when
he was being recruited at Robersonville
High School.
"One of the things that I really liked
about the ECU program was the offense
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Crandell said. "Other schools weren't
recruiting me as a quarterback. ECU gave
me an opportunity to play QB in an of-
fense with a lot of passing. In high school,
the offense was a lot different because 1
didn't get to pass as much as I will here.
The offense is pretty complicated, but
I'm getting use to it
Crandell ill probably be passing a
lot when he makes his debut in front of
the home crowd at Ficklen, as well as the
national ESPN audience.
Crandell says that he is not trying to
concentrate on all the
added pressures. He is
only focusing on going
out and doing his job.
"I feei that if I go out
there and take it one
game at a time, 1 can put
some doubts to rest
Crandell said. "I look at
the idea of coming in im-
mediately as an opportu-
nity more than anything.
I just need to go out there
and prove myself
Crandell's style of
play should prove to be exciting for Pi-
rate faithful. Some might find his style of
play and physical abilities to be similar to
that of former ECU quarterback Jeff Blake.
Crandell said that he could see where
jome people might make comparisons,
but that in the long run there were many
differences.
"I'm the type of quarterback who is
more comfortable scrambling he said.
"1 (would) rather do that than stand in the
pocket. On the field, I don't talk very
much. I just try and lead by example, and
Continued on page 21. see Crandell
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"rate fans around the nation
received very good news on June 5 when
Richard Eakin, the Chancellor of East Caro-
lina University, was named chairperson of
the College Football Association. Eakin was
promoted to the post after
a two-year term serving on
the board of directors.
The CFA, comprised of
67 member institutions, has
banded to represent most
major Division 1 football pro-
grams around the country,
with the exception of foot-
ball programs affiliated with
the Pacific Athletic confer-
ence and the Big Ten con-
ference.
The Association repre-
sents those member institu-
tions in their efforts to de-
velop television contracts
with major networks for the
purpose of airing college
football games.
The airing of ECU'S Sept. 9 game with
Syracuse is a direct result of work done by
the CFA to bring the Pirates and the
Orangemen together.
The chairperson position was formerly
held by Dr. E. Roger Sayers, the president of
the University of Alabama, who held the
position for the previous two years.
Every year, the need to elect a new chair
is analyzed, therefore, Eakin will serve a
one-year term, with an opportunity to be re-
elected next year.
"The CFA would be interested to look
into the future of college football as it relates
to other intercollegiate sports Eakin said.
"We will also be handling issues of equal
opportunity and fundingof collegiate athlet-
ics
Eakin's policy on his CFA position will
be one that shows no favoritism.
"It definitely doesn't hurt ECU that I
have this position, and I
think ECU should be rec-
ognized, but 1 do not
intend to use that posi-
tion to get an advantage
for our program.
"My job as chairman
of the board is to repre-
sent all the member in-
stitutions
One issue that Eakin
and the CFA will have to
deal with in the future is
the current system for
college post-season play.
With much of the national
bowl picture mandated
in the preseason, many
independent schools,
such as East Carolina, are
hurt by the non-availability of bowls. Eakin
said that he does not foresee the situation
with post-season bowls changing any time
soon.
"I don't anticipate any changes to the
current bowl system Eakin said. "When
the idea of a national championship was
introduced to Dick Shultz, who heads the
NCAA, he reacted favorably, but quite frankly
there is little grass-roots support for such a
tournament. This emphasizes the impor-
tance of ECU aligning themselves with a
conference
Richard Eakin
� Warren Sumner.
Staff Wbitef
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2Q TOP ITCT
?i,i�f.iw�i.
zuutriM
'�"�����-
Att.
36,500
36,000
35,121
35,100
35,047
3-1,511
34,126
8. 33,857
9. 33,810
10. 33,786
N'ote: Ficklen
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Opp.
Syracuse
Pittsburgh
Virginia Tech
Virginia Tech
Date
Sept. 5,1992
Oct. 26,1991
Sept. 12,1992
Oct. 22,1989
South Carolina Oct. 26,1985
Miami, Fla. Oct. 5,1985
Cincinnati Oct. 17,1992
West Virginia Sept. 13,1986
Virginia Tech Sept. 15,1990
West Virginia Oct.8,1988
Score
21-42 L
24-23 W
30-27 W
14-10 W
10-52 L
15-27 L
42-21 W
21-24 L
23-24L
10-30L
Record
5-6
11-1
5-6
6-5
2-9
2-9
5-6
3-8
5-6
3-8
Stadium was filled to 93.7 percent capacity during last season's home games.
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21
get the job done
As Crandell attempts to get the job
done on the field, he will have many vet-
eran ECU players at his side helping him
along the way. One of those players, senior
tight-end Carlester Crumpler, said one of
the main things young players like Crandell
need is encouragement.
"You just have to go with you're God-
given abilities Crumpler said. "Michael
was the type of player who could stand in
the pocket and see everything. Marcus,
because of his height, is going to be a
better player when he's moving around
and scrambling out of the pocket
Coach Steve Logan believes that a first
year quarter back must be given some
guidance as well as encouragement. Logan
remembers the trials of young players sue
as Jeff Blake and Michael Anderson in th
ECU offensive system were not always s
easy.
"If there are some ways that I can kee
Marcus out of some difficult situation
concerning interception potential, then
will Logan said. "(An interception! mor
than anything can devastate a young quai
terback
for now, Crandell says that he is nc
really worried about where he or the ECl
program will be in four years. His onl
concern for now is preparing himself fo
the first game of the season so that h
will finally have the opportunity to prov
himself under the lights of ficklen Sta
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 31, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 31, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.955
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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