The East Carolinian, August 25, 1993






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to get facelift
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WELCOMES BACK
ECU STUDENTS
Lifestyle
Back as the Bat
Batman 500 debuts a
new Batman with a new
costume. See story
page 21.
v
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 45
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, August 25, 1993
54 Pages
Women abducted from local parking lot
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
Two women were abducted
from Chico's parking lot at gun
point at approximately 12:30 Sat-
urday night, August 14.
The
Photo by Cedrlc Van Borer.
Students should remember that even in open areas downtown, such as this parking lot, crimes can fake
place. Two women were abducted around this area Saturday, August 14.
women, in
their mid-
twenties,
were leaving
the restau-
rant when a
white male
entered their
vehicle. He
forced one
victim to
drive around mmmmmmm�
town, while
he got into the back seat with the
other woman.
According to" Green ville De-
tectiveSergeant Janice Harris, the
suspect made some type of ges-
ture towards his clothing, but at
that point did not attempt to as-
sault either one of the women.
The woman in the back seat
jumped out of the moving vehicle,
and the woman driving soon fol-
lowed. Neither woman was
physically injured.
The man fled with the ve-
hicle, which was later recovered
on Porter Town Road, approxi-
m a t e I y
one mile
away.
The
suspect is
described
as a white
male, me-
d i u m
built, pos-
sibly in his
thirties or
, forties.
No ar-
rests have been made in this inci-
dent.
Although the victims were
not ECU students, the incident is
a reminder to all students to be
alert to possible danger. While
women may be more vulnerable
to assaults, men are not exempt
from violent attacks.
" Trust your instincts.
If people look
suspicious, be
careful.
Cheryl Tafoya,
Crime Analyst
Students owe more
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
ECU students can expect
another tuition bill soon because
of an increase passed by the
General Assembly of North
Carolina.
While the House of Repre-
sentatives and the Senate were
divided on the actual increase
amount, they finally reached a
decision based upon a compro-
mise.
This year, in-state students
will be charged an additional 3
percenton theiroriginal tuition
bill. Next year, the increase will
be 3.5 percent.
Out-of-state students will
be expected to pay a 6.5 percent
increase both this and next year.
Jim Johnson of the Appro-
priations Committee, Fiscal Re-
search Division, located in Ra-
leigh, said that although there
will be an increase, North Caro-
lina still ranks low in tuition
costs with only a few states of-
fering cheaper tuition.
Enrollment for fall
estimated at 18,000
By Molly Perkins
Special to The East Carolinian
The Admissions Office at
ECU expects fall 1993 enrollment
to be around 18,000 students.
Enrollment figures project that
2400 new freshmen and nearly
1700 transfer students will be
attending ECU in the fall. The
figures are only projections and
actual numbers will not be avail-
able until all students have ar-
rived and paid fees.
SAT scores of incoming
freshmen will climb for the fifth
straight year, reaching a 20-year
high for the university. The av-
erage SAT score of this year's
freshman class is 923, whereas
last year's average was 900. The
23 point increase from 1992 is
ECU's largest single-year in-
crease in SAT scores ever. Since
1988, ECU's average SAT score
has jumped 60 points.
Gerry Clayton, assistant d i -
rector of admissions at ECU, says
that the university has been rnak-
ing an effort to improve the qual-
ity of students attending ECU.
Increased applications allow the
university to be more selective
in the admissions process.
ECU has grown from
14,878 students in 1987 to the
r projected 18,000 for 1993. Uni-
versity officials say the growth
spurt over the past five years
will slow considerably through-
out the decade, as admissions
tries to bring expansion under
control.
The university will try to
level off expansion over the next
eieht vears bv keeoine erowth
to about two percent annually
until the year 2000, when ECU
should have 20,000 students.
Dr. Ronny Van Sant, direc-
tor of the North Carolina Teach-
ing Fellows Program at ECU, re-
ports that 44 students chose to
attend ECU under the Teaching
Fellows Program. The average
GPA for this class is 3.6 and the
average SAT score is 1080.
Among the 33 females and 11
males are 37 whites, four blacks,
two Asians and one Native
American.
One of the main objectives
of university officials over the
last few years has been to in-
crease the number of minorities
enrolling in the university. The
number of minority applicants
has increased 12 percent over
the past two years, although the
number of this year's applicants,
906, is very close to last year's
numberof912. Minority admits
represent 8.2 percent of all ad-
mits, just as they did last year.
The May 20, 1993 edition
of Black Issues in Education lists
ECU as 26th among all the
nation's predominantly white
schools in the number of bacca-
laureate degrees conferred upon
African Americans. Also, East
Carolina is 15th in conferral of
education degrees upon African
Americans and 10th in conferral
of health sciences baccalaure-
ates.
The crime analyst for the
Greenville Police Department,
Cheryl Tafoya, offered some
precautions when people are
out, especially in the down-
townarea: Do not go out alone!
There should be at least two
people in your group, prefer-
ably more. Be sure to stay in
well-lit areas. Make sure that
your keys are ready so that
you do not have to fumble for
them when you reach your car.
The most important
thing you can do is to be con-
scious of the people around
you, especially if you do not
know them.
"Always be alert
Tafoya said. "Trust your in-
stincts. If people look suspi-
cious, be careful
Tafoya also offered a good
driving safety tip. When you
stop at a red light, leave some
space between your vehicle and
theoneinfrontofyou. If some-
one approaches your vehicle,
you have room to move for-
ward to avoid the person.
Student store renovations complete
Months of hard work finally pay off
By Greg Sember
Staff Writer
Photo by Codrlc Van Buren
This pirate, a vinyl-tiled mosaic,
was unveiled at the reopening.
After months of hard
work, renovations to the Stu-
dent Store are virtually com-
plete. The result of this hard
work is a new and exciting place
where everyone can shop for
school supplies and Pirate mer-
chandise.
The manager of the Stu-
dent Store, Michael Coston, said
that the main reason for the
renovation was simply because
the store had not been reno-
vated for 20 years.
He also wanted students
to be able to walk in and realize
that this is their store. To this
end, students were surveyed to
determine what they wanted in
a "new" store before any con-
struction began.
The cost of the renovation
was $354,000, but none of this
will be passed on to the stu-
dents at anytime in the future.
"All of our revenue goes
back to the students in the store
or for scholarships Coston
said. "We have saved money
for five years to do this and we
will not have to raise prices
In fact, his feeling was that
a modern and exciting store
would generate more interest
and sales; therefore, prices
would go down.
The Student Store also
plans to expand its selection
of merchandise.
While school supplies
and required readings are
currently well stocked, look
for a larger selection of books
in the general reading sec-
tion, more, magazines, news-
papers and Greek merchan-
dise in the future. By theend
of the fall, videos may be
available for renting.
Almost all students are
pleased with the renovation
and the new variety.
"I think it is splendid
said Dennis Wilhem, a phi-
losophy graduate. "I only
wish it could have been reno-
vated sooner
Bookstore holds reopening for faculty
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
ECU Student Store held
its grand-reopening for faculty
and staff on August 19. During
the ceremony, Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin cut the yellow rib-
bon donning the entrance to
the bookstore
During the ceremony, stu-
dent store employees unveiled
an inlaid vinyl-tiled mosaic Pi-
rate on the floor in front of the
door.
"I'm excited to see the new
store open and to see all the
students coming back said
Mike Coston, director of retail
services at the Student Stores.
Coston said the store has
expanded its clothing depart-
ment, added a few novelty
items such as a stuffed Pirate,
and greatly developed its gen-
eral reading section. The store
will also resume carrying peri-
odicals and is currently look-
ing into offering more of the
nation's major newspapers such
as The Neiv York Times.
"I love it said Eakin. "I
said to someone, it looks like a
real honest-to-goodness colle-
giate bookstore now! It has a
wonderful pattern, the way it's
laid out. It's so attractive and
easy to use.
"I hope the students ap-
preciate what we've done here,
because it's for them, obviously.
It's a much improved facility.
Students
crowded into
the newly
remodeled
student store
as classes
resumed.
Photo by C�drlc
Van Buran
It's much brighter, lighter. It
feels good here. I watched this
process sort of day by day dur-
ing the summer. It was kind of
fun to see
The bookstore remained
open during the renovations,
which, for the most part, took
place over the summer.
The store will con-
tinue to operate with the
same hours: 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Monday through Thursday,
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday
and 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sat-
urday.
Recycling programs increase cleanup of Greenville and ECU
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
With the help of ECU stu-
dents and Greenville residents,
the grass may soon begin to
grow greener in Greenville.
Groups across town are
implementing various recycling
programs in an effort to clean
up Greenville and control pol-
lution and excess trash prob-
lems.
"The citizens participating
are the key said Joy Hudson,
county recycling coordinator.
Those who live off-cam-
pus may have noticed an addi-
tional "Refuse Fee" on their util-
ity bill. Off-campus residents
can expect to pay $3-$4 a month
for residential recycling which
will begin this month. Tradi-
tional trash bins will be replaced
with adequate recycling con-
tainers.
Once again this year, cam-
pus dorms will promote alumi-
num can recycling. In addition
to recycling in the dorms, stu-
dents are encouraged to use re-
cycling sites across campus.
There has been some discussion
of moving to a one-container
site whereall recyclablescan be
dumped, but an adequate facil-
ity has yet to be discovered.
"No one container will sat-
isfy every area said George
Armistead, hazardous waste
manager and recycling coordi-
nator for ECU.
Armistead also men-
tioned a concern for safety in
the halls, especially with bro-
ken glass.
"We are looking at a
way to move more materials,
and maintain safety in the
dorms Armistead said.
Again this year, recy-
cling facilities will be located
on College Hill (Monday 8
a.mTuesday 4 p.m.) outside
See CLEAN page 2
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Hi





August 25, 1993
ther
Campy
$es
A
CLEAN
Cont'd
from
P9-1
Yearbook
sues univiM'iiU
: al Southwestern
. : mi .1 federal i ourt, alleging
that the institution infringed n Ins I irst Amendment rights In
firing hi in from his job. Jeffrey Gremillion, a recent graduate from
tht- school, was removed from his position alter the 199 US1
yearbook Fhel Vcadien published a pictureof a bare breasted
woman in bed with a scantily dressed man Another picture
featured the university's bulldog mascot sitting on an American
flag. Gremillion is seeking $7500 in back paw according to
Gremillion's attorney. Gremillion has been accepted to the gradu-
ate school m journalism at Columbia University in New York.
Campus paper cites administrator for censorship
Sidelines, the campus newspaper for Middle Tennessee
State University, has been on the warpath against an administra-
tor for removing papers from a news rack in an apparent attempt
at censorship. The Sidelines staff charged the associate dean of
students with removing newspapers from a special table set forth
to showcase the paper to orientation students. Smith admitted to
removing the papers citing problems with an article about a
Customs Student Orientation Ambassador who allegedly robbed
a local bank. Smith said the article was "embarrassing to the
university Several national legal leaders have dubbed Smith's
actions as criminal. " State schools are prohibited from censoring
student expression said Mark Goodman, the executive director
of the Student Press Law Center in Washington, DC. " Confisca-
tion of papers is something that does not occur in free societies
Students award $10,000 in grants
Graduate; udent at the' niversity of California-Berkeley
were assigned to give $10,000 in grant funds to three California
non-profit groups. In a class project, students taking "Topics in
the Management of Non-Profit Organizations" reviewed 37
grant proposals from non-profit groups and determined which
should receive grant funding provided by the San Francisco
Foundation. One of the recipients uses computer technology to
help disabled children learn to play like non-handicapped chil-
dren; another is a mentoring and tutoring program lor minority
children. The third program chosen wasa student-run volunteer
medical clinic that serves the homeless.
Compiled by Warren Sumner. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
(ireene I lall (Wednesday 8
.ini I ftursday 1 p.m.) and on
theampus Mall (Friday 10
a -iii. Monda v s a. m.)
Armistead said these contain-
ers always reach then maxi-
mumapa( itv; the ret ore, a bet-
ter solution needs t be de-
ised.
I he one-container re-
cycling idea known as "com-
mingling" is in the works, but
nothing definite has been de-
( uled upon.
Campus recvclers ask
thai students place cardboard
boxes outside the recycling
bins because it is illegal to
dump cardboard in landfills.
Also, bottles and cans should
be emptied before placing
them in the facilities.
At the beginning of Oc-
tober, students can begin recy-
cling magazines such as Time,
Cosmopolitan and Playboy
(those with slick, glossy cov-
ers). I low ever, no mail cata-
logs will be ac( rated.
ECU Student Stores
have also played their part in
recycling. Last summer, the
stores introduced a 20 oz. re-
cyclable cup with inexpensive
refills. This June, a 34 oz. cup
was also made available. Since
last summer S,000 cups have
been soiu.
Vi
have notice
duction in cup purchases be-
cause people are refilling the
recyclable cups said David
Bailev, marketing manager for
Dining Services.
Other businesses
throughout Green vi 1 lea re par-
ticipating in recycling pro-
grams. For example, used fish-
ing line can be recycled at Wal-
Mart to reduce injury to water-
fowl. Jay Hudson with Pitt
County Clean Sweep can pro-
vide additional information
(830-6391).
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Students help renovate old lodge
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
teams oi EC U students have
contributed over 700 hours of
work toward renovating an old
hunting lodge in the
Mattamuskeet Notional Wildlife
Refuge. Owned by the I .S I ish
and Wildlife Sen ice, the lodge is
being renovated for use as an edu
cational facility and field station
for several 1I departments.
A total of 59 people, most
from tin' Aquatic Sciences club
and the biology department, have
spent the last weekend of every
month volunteering at the lodge
�-itc. riic manager of the Wild-
hit' Refuge, Don Temple, gives
up his weekend as well to su-
pervise the work.
See LODGE page 3
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August 25. 1993
The East Carolinian 3
roi
science education reform
ence o dents i s-
tablished at
commended in Maj
oi Eixcelknee" by the Soi
Regional Vision for Education
(SERVE).
The project has 18 certified
ECU consultants wh have been
working with 6th-8th grade science
teachers from across thestate. These
consultants are conveying a new
philosophy of teaching which pro-
vokes thought processing in chil-
dren instead of memorization.
"Rather than having kids
write a lab report and start on some-
thing new the next day, these are
new teaching methods which ask
their lessons to
iund thorn said
rdinator Jerry L.
week seminars are
giver al 1 ast Carolina to science
rsfn m seven pilot schools.
C urrontlv. 12 other field test sites
are till experimenting by using
the reform project in a portion of
classes.
Dr. Charles Coble, dean of
ECU School of Education and
project director, has taken an active
role in pushing the project forward.
Eisenhower grants, targeted for
teacher development, have funded
thesuccessof thisprogram. SERVE,
based in Tallahassee, Florida, also
awarded ECU $3,000 along with a
commendation of excellence.
The division of SERVE lo-
cated at the University of Greens-
boro has been active in evaluating
LODGE
the North Carolina Project for Re-
form in Science Education. By stay-
ing in close contact with the teach-
ers who are using this new philoso-
phy in their classrooms, SERVE is
able to monitor student test scores;
the results have been positive. Stu-
dents in the pilot and field sites
have been meeting and exceeding
evnectations.
The idea for a reform in sci-
ence education began in 1988 with
an article written by the executive
director of the National Science
Teachers Association. Thisassocia-
tion, funded by the National Sci-
ence Foundation, provided a grant
to North Carolina as well as five
other states for the purpose of a
grade school science reform. The
need for a reform in science, accord-
ing to Everhart, is because of a lack
of effective science teaching in the
'60s and 70s.
Continued from page 2
"The students have been
here four or five Saturdays in the
Spring to help out Temple said.
"They did some basic clean up,
painted four different rooms and
did some minor repairs. They
made it more decent looking that
it had been
According to biology pro-
fessor Dr. Roger Rulifson, ECU is
in the process of signing a Memo-
randum of Understanding with
the Fish and Wildlife Service to
cohabitate the building under the
Partnership for the Sounds pro-
gram.
"The Partnership for the
Sounds is a private-state enter-
prise to foster eco-tourism and
environmental education in the
region Rulifson said. "The
Mattamuskeet Lodge will be one
of three core facilities from which
this program will be based
The Lodge itself will be used
for the pursuit of higher educa-
tion as well as a tourist display
area and environmental education
programs.
"The state's thrust toward
environmental education and eco-
tourism fits in very well with the
long term goals for ECU Coastal
Studies Rulifsonsaid. "ECU will
develop a program to blend in
with what is already there
Restoring the old lodge will
take both time and money, as well
as a bit of hard work.
"It needs a major face-lift, in
addition to various minor repairs
and cleaning up Temple said. "It
definitely needs new wiring; the
wiring there now7 is really ancient.
Also in the plans are heating and
air to make it more tolerable on
hot August nights
Long-term plans include re-
placing some of the steel support
bea ms and some of the brick work.
This work will have to wait until
some of the $3 million requested
from Congress is delivered.
The ECU College Democrats
seem to like the lodge even in its
dilapidated state. Several mem-
bers of the group spent a night
there over the summer as part of
golden
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their environmental awareness
trip.
"We had a great time in spite
of the cold showers and several
group members want to return to
help Mr. Temple clean up Col-
lege Democrat President Thomas
Blue said.
The Mattamuskeet Lodge
was originally built as a pumping
station in 1914-15 in an effort to
drain the lake for farming. The
last owner sold the station along
with almost 50 thousand acres of
land to the federal government in
1934 for use as a refuge for water-
fowl. The Civilian Conservation
Corps converted the pump sta-
tion into a lodge and contracted it
out for hunting and fishing. The
lodge closed in 1974 for economic
reasons and remains unoccupied.
"We eventually hope for the
Albemarle-Pamlico ecosystem to
be a place much like the Ever-
glades. The Lodge will make an
excellent place to go and study, to
do research or to write Rulifson
said.
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August 25, 1993
ECU offers variety
By Laura Allard
July 75
j 58p.m.
CU polia .ailed to investigate a report of someone
Holding a knife around the teller machines at Mendenhall. The
fe was found in the possession of a 21-year-old white male.
Police confiscated the weapon.
10:24 p.m.
Campus police were called to investigate a trespassing inci-
dent at Joyner Library.
July 16
4:45 p.m.
An unknown person reached through the window of a vehicle
and stole a pair of sunglasses valued at $150.
July 20
7:30 a.m.
An unknown person broke into a desk drawer at the Brody
Science Building and removed a file from the desk. The
estimated value of the file folder was $3.
7:35 a.m.
Tlie same person apparently made off with an umbrella in
room 726 of the Brody building. The umbrella was valued at
$10.
5:00 p.m.
ECU police were called to investigate a breaking and entering
at the Brody Sciences complex and a report of a stolen VCR.
The VCR was removed from a shelf of Brody's writing room
and apparently stolen. The value of the videocassette recorder
was set at $279.20

July 21
12:10 p.m.
A subject was caught trying to conceal a textbook from the
Student Stores and remove it without paying for it. The
shoplifter was charged with the crime.
Compiled by Warren Sumner. Taken
from CPS and other campus newspapers.
Staff Writer
Are you new in town and
looking for a way to get involved,
or have you been here a while and
realized there's a lot going on at
East Carolina that you are miss-
ing?
It's never too late to find the
organization for you at ECU. The
university offers programs for
politicians, athletes, those look-
ing to meet new people, serve the
community or learn more about
their major.
The Student Government
Association is the governing body
for students. Simply by becom-
ing a student at ECU, you have
become a member of the SGA.
For students who prefer a
more active political voice, the
SGA will hold elections on Sep-
tember 22. Each class chooses two
representatives, except for the se-
nior class, which elects four rep-
resentatives.
One representative will also
be elected by each dorm of under
350 students and two from each
dorm with more than 350 stu-
dents. Elections for approxi-
mately 45 day-student represen-
tatives will also be held at this
time.
Students may also apply for
appointed positions on the Hon-
ors Review Board and the Fac-
ulty Senate. All interested stu-
dents must fill out an application
at the SGA office in room 255 in
the Mendenhall Student Center.
Recreational Services will
conduct intramurals throughout
the fall semester. Students may
register for wiffle ball and flag
football on August 31 at 4:30 and
5 p.m. respectively. Registration
will be held throughout Septem-
ber for two-player golf, co-rec
volleyball and co-rec basketball.
Register is in room 103 of the
Biology building.
Recreational Services is also
taking several trips this semester.
The first is a windsurfing trip to
Whichard's Beach on September
16.
A hang-gliding
windsurfing trip, a fall break ca-
noe trek, a beach horseback riding
trip, a "swamp-thing" excursion
and a hiking adventure are sched-
uled to follow.
Pre-registration will begin
on August 25 at 3 p.m. in GC117,
and a pre-trip meeting will be
scheduled before each adventure.
Specific try-outdates are not
announced for varsitv sports, so
interested students may contact
the coach of the sport they are
interested in playing. The num-
ber of walk-ons permitted for each
sport is limited, but according to
Charles Bloom, director of Sports
Information, these limits are
rarely met.
Fall sports include football,
cross-country, women's volley-
ball and soccer.
For everyone interested in
watching the Pirates in action
rather than joining them on the
field, students receive one free
ticket and may purchase one half-
price ticket.
Tickets are available at the
Athletic Ticket Office in Minges
Coliseum from 8-5 the Monday
preceding each home game for
groups of 25 or more students.
Tickets are available Tuesday
through Thursday at Minges from
8-5 and at Mendenhall Student
Center from 11-6.
Tickets for away games are
available at full price at the Ath-
letic Ticket Office on a.first-come.
first-serve basis.
Social fraternities are hold-
ing a formal rush during the eve-
nings of September 14-17. Rush-
ees are invited to visit any frater-
nity house during this time. Any-
one who has already determined
which fraternity is best for him
See ECU page 8
TODAY IN HISTORY
(AP) Today is Wednesday, Aug. 25, the 237th day of 1993.
There are 128 days left in the year.
Today's Highlight in History:
On Aug. 25,1944, Allied forces liberated Paris, ending four
years of German occupation. The surrender of Major General
Dietrich von Choi titz�who had disobeyed Adolf Hitler's order
to level the city � set off wild celebrations.
On this date:
In 1718, hundreds of French colonists arrived in Louisiana,
with some of them settling in present-day New Orleans.
In 1825, Uruguay declared its independence from Brazil.
In 1835, Ann Rutledge, said by some to have been the early
true love of Abraham Lincoln, died in Illinois at age 22.
In 1875, Captain Matthew Webb became the first person to
swim across the English Channel, traveling from Dover, En-
gland, to Calais, France, in 22 hours.
In 1900, philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche died in Weimar,
Germany.
In 1916, the National Park Service was established within
the Department of the Interior.
In 1921, the United States signed a peace treaty with
Germany.
In 1943, 50 years ago, U.S. forces overran New Georgia in
the Solomon Islands during World War II.
In 1950, President Harry Truman ordered the Army to
seize control of the nation's railroads to avert a strike.
In 1985, Samantha Smith, the schoolgirl whose letter to
Yuri V. Andropov resulted in her famous peace tour of the Soviet
Union, was killed with her father in an airliner crash in Maine.
Ten years ago: The United States and the Soviet Union
signed a $10 billion grain pact under which the Soviets were
required to buy at least 9 million metric tons of American grain
each year for five years.
Five years ago: In his sharpest attack yet on the Reagan
administration's drug policies, Democratic presidential nomi-
nee Michael Dukakis criticized U.S. dealings with Panama's
military leader, Gen. Manuel Noriega, saying they were crimi-
nal.
One year ago: Hurricane Andrew thrashed the Louisiana
coast. President George Bush and Democrat Bill Clinton ap-
peared separately before the American Legion in Chicago; Bush
cited his World War II military service while Clinton sought to
bury the controversy over his Vietnam-era draft status.
Today's Birthdays: Former U.S. arms control director Eu-
gene Rostow is 80. Actor Van Johnson is 77. Actor-producer Mel
Ferrer is 76. Actor Don DeFore is 76. Former Alabama Gov.
George C. Wallace is 74. Actor Sean Connery is 63. Actor Tom
Skerritt is 60. Actress Anne Archer is 46. Rock singer-actor Gene
Simmons is 44. Rock singer Elvis Costello is 39.
'lUMT
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IN






August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 5
ilty gathers for fall convocation
ed the annua lunmi
Awards to
two tacultv honorees. Chancellor
Richard Eakin addressed the
group.
Newly-elected chair of the
faculty, Dr. Patricia Anderson,
opened the event by expressing
thanks to her predecessor, Dr. John
C. Moskop, for "a job well done
She presented Moskop with a
plaque commemorating his two
years as chair.
Vice Chancellor for Aca-
demic Affairs Marlene Springer
then spoke about the budget and
the curriculum.
"The budget picture is look-
ing up she said, and she pledged
a "thorough review" of under-
graduate curriculum. "We haven't
done that in 19 years she said.
After reading aloud a want
ad from The Wall Street Journal that
detailed a long list of requirements
for a job applicant, Springer talked
of the mission of the university.
"We try to provide people
with a modern liberal education
with modern skills. We need to
break the poverty cycle in eastern
North Carolina, and we must
break the cycle of intolerance
Dr. James Hallock, Vice
Chancellor and Dean of Health
Sciences and the School of Medi-
cine, spoke next about current is-
sues facing his department and
the medical profession.
"We will have health care
reform soon. The Clinton health
care plan will be a straw man for
the states. It will not pass Con-
gress. Oh, bits and pieces of it will
pass, but it will be left up to the
states to use the Clinton plan and
then form their own.
md i a v on-
ie in
imeone who
Jlock said 1 think
ink chalkboard and
g for someone with a
lent Keith Dyer
spoke next, calling the faculty "a
sharp group of educators willing
to work with students to develop
policy
"I'm going to tell you all
something f've always wanted to
sayWe look up to you in a very
big way Dyer said.
Former ECU Alumni Volun-
teer of the year Dave Englert next
presented the teaching excellence
awards. The Robert L. "Roddy"
Jones award was presented to
Assistant Professor of Decision
Sciences Dr. Brenda Killingsworth,
while the Robert and Lina
Worthington Mays award was
given to Associate Professor of
Sociology Dr. Linda Mooney. Both
professors received a $1000 sti-
pend anJ an engraved pewter tra-
Englert also recognized four
other finalists for the awards. As-
sociate Professor of Chemistry Dr.
George Evans, Assistant Profes-
sor of Management Dr. Judith
Hunt, Assistant Professor of Po-
litical Science Dr. Carmine Scavo
and Associate Professor of English
Dr. Gay Wilentz were given en-
graved pewter Jefferson cups.
Chancellor Eakin then con-
cluded the awards by announcing
the recipients of the Outstanding
Academic Advisor Awards. Pro-
fessor Judy B. Baker of the School
of Health and Human Perfor-
mance and Associate Professor of
Biology Dr. Susan T. McDaniel
were named Outstanding General
College Advisors. Assistant Pro-
fessor of Foreign Language and
Literature Dr. Manolita F. Buck
and Dr. McDaniel again were
named Outstanding Declared
Major Advisors. Each winner re-
ceived a $250 stipend to be used
toward educational research.
Dean interacts with students on their turf
Eakin concluded the convo-
cation by reporting the success of
the previous year and issuing a
challenge for the coming year.
He said that ECU will re-
ceive $7.1 million from the Gen-
eral Assemblv and money for 58.6
new faculty positions as well.
Eakin also reported success
forhisShared Visionsfundraising
campaign. He said the university
has raised $29 million towards the
$50 million goal, with $24.5 mil-
lion allocated for endowments in-
cluding scholarships and profes-
sorships.
The largestcontributorso far
is Wachovia Bank which gave $667
thousand. Eakin also noted that
Burroughs Wellcome had contrib-
uted $390 thousand to create fel-
lowships in chemistry.
According to Eakin, SAT
scores are up for ECU students.
"In 1988, the average SAT score
for incoming freshmen was 857.
This fall it is 920, a 20 point in-
crease from last year
Eakin closed by stressing the
importance of the statewide bond
issue for the renovation of Joyner
Library and the acquisition of the
formerj.H. Rose High School. "We
must educate the public of the
vital importance of these bonds to
higher education in general and
ECU in particular
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
Relax, that wasn't your dad at
the Elbo Sunday night. While he
does have two children who call
him Dad, his official title is Dean.
ECU Dean of Students, that is.
" I have counterparts who say,
Tou couldn't pay me enough to go
to the Elbo but I respond by say-
ing I think it's a part of my job
Ronald Speier said.
Speier began his position as
Dean of Students during the sum-
mer of '84, and since thenhasestab-
lished a practiceof keeping in touch
with his students, staying aware of
their needs, and making himself
available to help out in any way he
can.
"My prioritv time is spent with
person contact Speier said. "Nota
day goes by that I don't leave my
office and walk over in front of the
Student Stores and see students
Despitea latenightattheElbo,
a popular dub downtown, Speier
will consistently appear between 9
and 10 a.m. each morning to keep
up with student life on campus.
"That's very important to me
I have a unique way of working
with students. Students appreciate
it, and it works well if I can help a
student, that's what's important to
me
Speier hasn't always worked
withsomanystudents. Beforecom-
ing to ECU, Speier was Dean of
Studentsat LaRocheCollege in Pitts-
burgh, Pennsylvania. At ECU,
Speier monitors 5,400 students liv-
ing on campus. At LaRoche, that
number was considerably smaller.
Size isn't the only difference be-
tween the two schools.
"ECUisastateschool,sowe
get a very diverse population be-
cause of our admissions process and
our commitment to Eastern Caro-
lina Speier said. "There's some-
thing happening here every day"
Speier sounds like a proud
father when he speaks of watching
a student graduate whom he has
somehow helped along the way.
However, Speier said that road to
graduation sometimes has sev-
eral obstacles.
The office of Student Ser-
vices, from which Speier works,
sees a variety of cases pass
through, ranging from students
looking for excused absences to
more serious disciplinary prob-
lems.
See SPEIER page 8
Sleep is just
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The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
WednesdayOpinion
ECU receives face-lift
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
Summer proves to be prime time
for renovations and additions to
many campus buildings
In the spirit of this entire, larger-than-life-sized
newspaper: WELCOME BACK! For those of you who
haven't been here, it has been a long, semi-productive
summer. Aren't they all? It's kind of been one of those
summers where you 're ready to start back to school, bu t
you'd really like to continue waking up late and worry-
ingabouta maximum of rwoclasses. News flash: WAKE
UP! SUMMER IS OFFICIALLY OVER! REAL LIFE
MUST BEGIN AGAIN!
Ahem. While some of you were in other areas of
the country or state (Oh, how we envied you), some of
us were attending classes and a handful of us were
working hard at putting out an edition of The East
Carolinian every week. As we look back, we find that
.quite a few things have happened at ECU in your
collective absence. Who better to fill you in on all that
you've missed than your faithful, friendly Opinion
Page?
As if anyone needs to be told this, enrollment is up.
It is evident in that walking to class is reminiscent of a
jaunt up Park Avenue at lunch hour (Park Avenue is a
street in New York City, folks. Put your imagination
caps on). Total enrollment this semester is estimated at
18,000. While this is very good for the university, it isn't
so great for the parking problem, class availability or for
just finding a quiet place to eat or talk. Having elbows
shoved into your side can get tiring awfully quickly. Is
this what they feel like at Chapel Hill?
Various buildings have been renovated or built.
The area around the Graham Building received a well-
deserved face-lift and some additional lighting. Todd
Dining Hall (on the Hill) has sprung up suddenly"and
is growing as fast as dandelions do (dandelions grow
Very fast). Not to be outdone, the Mendenhall Snack Bar
has also upgraded its food selections and its layout is a
little more aesthetically pleasing. The Student Store in
the Wright Building is more like a real bookstore and
carries a wider selection of extra-curricular reading
materials. So all in all, ECU looks better than ever.
To elaborate on the real issues, in the year's first
faculty meeting, Chancellor Richard Eakin spoke pas-
sionately on the greatest challenge of the university: the
passage of the bond referendum. It is scheduled to be on
the November 2 ballot and would provide $28.9 million
for additions and renovations to Joyner Library. Kudos
to Chancellor Eakin for keeping this very important
issue alive in the heads and hearts of the faculty and the
community. As students, this is imperative to our fu-
ture and for those who come after us.
However, most distressing of all is the fact that
tuition has been raised. Granted, it wasn't a very large
increase in comparsion to other schools, but there are
many people here who just scrape by. Any tuition
increase is bound to adversly affect someone. While we
at ECU have one of the lowest overall tuition rates in the
cpuntry, it would be nice if it could stay that way. Here's
to keeping it under $700.
l O.K so you didn't miss that much. ECU got along
fine without the 18,000 or so students that it has now
and Greenville once again proved that it isn't just a
college town.
It pains me to use this analogy but�it's like when
you miss a week of your favorite soap opera. For a
couple of days you have no idea what's going on, but
eventually you catch up.
Once again, welcome back! Be sure totune in to The
East Carolinian on Tuesdays and Thursdays beginning
next week. Remember, a little stress never hurt anyone.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Joseph Horst, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive Jennifer Jenkins, Account Executive
Brandon Perry, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, .Mews Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. News Editor
Julie Totten, Lifestyle Editor
Laura Wright, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Misha Zonn, Asst. Sports Editor
Any E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amelia Yongue. Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Margie O'Shea, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. Vie East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
mSL.
w
100� recycled
paper
Government ignores importance of 'Home Sweet Home'
Have you over watched one
of those cheesy TV movies where
some old person's home is going to
be taken away for whatever rea-
son, and said old person comes
running out with a shotgun every
time someone steps on her prop-
erty? I've seen a few of them my-
self, and I always thought it was
kind of funny and really stupid.
"Just move and deal with it, lady
I would always think to myself,
"It's not that big of a deal
Now it's happening to my
family and I find that it really is a
big deal.
Is anyone out there familiar
with the words "imminent do-
main"? These are not cool words,
kids. Well, actually, they do sound
pretty cool together, but what they
stand for really sucks.
In a nutshell, imminent do-
main means that the government
has complete legal rights to swoop
down and seize my family's prop-
erty by paying us "fair market
value such as it is, to be deter-
mined by their appraisers.
Just like that, we're out of
house and home, whether we like
it or not. The house that three gen-
erations of my father's family has
lived, worked and played in, the
house where I grew up, will soon
be a pile of rubble to be quickly
covered with asphalt in the name
of the Route 222 Highway Expan-
sion Project. A highway is claim-
ing my house arid there's really
nothing we can do about it.
The thing that makes this so
very annoying and hopeless is the
fact that we have no control over
the situation. We can't decide that
we don't like the amount that
they're offering, because we are
literally in no position to negotiate;
whatever they feel like offering us,
we are forced to accept� and leave.
Such is my understanding of
this whole mess. There may be
other options hidden somewhere,
but no one seems to be pointing
them out to us. The legality of the
whole affair will be lost on me and
I really have no desire to under-
stand why they are able to force us
to sell our property.
Consider for a moment that
you own a 1968 Ford Mustang,
cheery red and in mintcondition. It
didn't start out that way, but you
spent long hours in the garage fix-
ing it up to get it to showroom
condition. Now, you get married,
you have a kid and you need some
extra cash. You decide to sell your
car. Some guy offers you $500 and
you laugh in his face and telling
him to try an AMC Pacer dealer for
that kind of money.
With the Mustang, you have
control over your property as well
as its selling price. With our house,
there is no such control.
Why, you ask? It's so the gov-
ernment can construct a hugely
expensive and wholly unnecessary
"loop" to alleviate a traffic prob-
lem that I never would have known
existed had they not told us that it
was there. When the government
ran crush the ultimate dream of
home ownership under its big,
ugly, bureaucratic heel and tell
you not to cry about it, it some-
how seems like a travesty of jus-
tice and a blemish on the Ameri-
can Way.
Many others in my neigh-
borhood feel the same way.
They've all lived here their whole
lives as well and none of us are
too hip to the idea of putting our
lives into U-Hauls and starting
over somewhere that isn't home.
Now we're biding our time until
the government finally feels like
giving us the money, because they
won't buy when we want to sell,
only when they're damn good
and ready.
Who knows. The next RtM
may come to you from the same
Smith-Corona sitting on the same
kitchen table,but it may also come
from a different kitchen in a house
that will never quite be Home.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza and watch
some cartoons
A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a
single step.
Lao-tzu
Letters to the Editor
SGA addresses keg ban, future of tailgating
To the Editor:
Over the summer, there
was a decision made by the
University to ban kegs during
tailgating activities. Over the
past two years, the university
has seen a rise in alcohol-re-
lated problems in the parking
lots before games. They have
attributed these problems to
kegs and subsequently, banned
them from ECU games. What
this means is that tailgaters can
still drinkalcohol, butnotfrom
a free-flowing source.
This rule applies to Pirate
Club members, young alumni,
etc not only to students. The
SGA has designated three
people to patrol around to
make sure the ban is not being
limited to students. If there are
any inconsistencies, the Uni-
versity will be informed.
In the past few years,
University administrators ha ve
strived to work closely with
the student leadership. How-
ever, the final decision to ban
kegs was made without stu-
dent representation. A commit-
tee met with student leaders in
late May to inform the students
of the new ban; however the
decision has already been
made. The keg topic had come
up before in meetings between
student leaders and university
officials, and the students made
good points on why a ban on
kegs would create a host of
other problems. These officials
took notice of the points and
said they kept them in mind
while creating the new rule, but
felt the decision to ban kegs
was the best decision under the
circumstances.
In reaction to the ban, the
SGA passed a resolution in op-
position of the new rule. Any
other actions, such as boycott-
ing games, was not taken sim-
ply because boycotting a foot-
ball game to protest a ban on
kegs would reflect badly on the
student body.
The main goal of the SGA
is to make sure this ban is not
the beginning of a series of
steps to be taken by the univer-
sity which will end tailgating
for students or move students
to a new tailgating area. These
ideas have been discussed by
University officials with stu-
dent leaders. These sugges-
tions have generally been ada-
mantly opposed by students,
but more student leaders need
to voice their opinions. An-
other important part of main-
taining the current tailgating
location and atmosphere is to
tailgate responsibly and work
with the Athletic department
and Public Safety to create a
safer atmosphere. This chal-
lenge to students is much like
the Halloween challenge. We
rose to the occasion last year
and guaranteed the Hallow-
een celebration for this year.
Let's do the same for tail-
gating next year.
A. Keith Dyer
SGA President
Letters to the Editor must be signed and accompanied
with a working phone number. Students must also provide
class rank and major. All letters should be addressed to: The
East Carolinian, Attn Opinion Editor, Student Pubs.
Building, Second Floor, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
By Alex Ferguson
Technology
essential to
daily existence
Before getting started, I wanted to say
that this is a story that reveals my own weak-
ness. Any moral or message that may be
perceived is because of the reader's discre-
tion and or the writer crossing his fingers in
a frantic effort to get a response.
As most stories do, this one started out
simple. In fact, it started with only two par-
ents and two words: "Get out No, better
make that five words: "Get out, you worth-
less bum See, already things are getting
complicated. So I got out. Yes, those words
were for me, and there were lots more after
that, but it's not nice to print ugly comments
on the Opinion Page (we leave those to the
News Department).
I also got an apartment and a job that
paid decent wages. Because I worked hard for
such serious goals (italicized ones at that), this
past week I got 'strep throat. So I'm at home
now. Cough. Feeling miserable. Sniff. Won-
dering how I can milk this illness for all it's
worth. Wheeze. When suddenlyPOP!
BEEEEYYEEeeww.Thepowergoesoff. Now,
I'm not alarmed, since Greenville is known
for it's occasional power outages. They usu-
ally happen at four in the morning to ensure
that no one's alarm clock goesoff. Ialsoknow
Greenville. So I give the utility people a call.
After a riotous bout of Telephone Tag
with Engineering, Control, Crisis Control,
Remote Control and some woman named
Wilma, I found out that: my power was
turned off. (Duh) By accident. (Ditto duh)
Sorry! Then the infamous, "Well have itback
on in no time
For those of you who are new to this
line, "back on in no time" means "whenever
we dam well feel like it They obviously
didn't feel like it for six hours. Within those
hours, I learned something mortifying. I am
a slave to technology, or more simply, elec-
tricity. There isn'tone area of my life that isn't
somehow affected by it.
For instance, I had to open all of my
shades and doors so that I could see to take a
shower, flashing the neighborhood in the
process. Scratch watching television. My ra-
dio was dead. No air conditioning either, but
couldn't I turn on a fan torats. Can't cook
anythingeither.MyGod,Iwas going to dieof
starvation, heat exhaustion and sheer bore-
dom before the day was over!
Then I stopped panicking and tried to
rationalize the situation. This was ridiculous!
I wascertainlynotgoingtodie. Humanshave
survived for thousands of years without the
aid of electricity. Why even Davy Crockett
(my childhood hero) carried on without a
fridge and CD player. I forget that what I
sometimes consider a godsend is nothing
more than a tool concocted by humankind.
So, when the utility manfinally dropped
by, I greeted him casually, in control. I was by
an open window, enjoying a cool breeze,
reading a book. Without the aid of electricity.
One small step for me. Of course, once my
modem conveniences were back on line, I
embraced them like an old friend presumed
dead. I'll still use them. But I'm wary of them,
too. Maybe modem conveniences have be-
come a bit too convenient.
Between you and me though, I'd like to
see just how fast Mister Crockett heads back
to the wild frontier after a day of basking in
our air conditioning.
wmmmmtm





B
August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian7
Joe of All Trades
By Joseph Horst
����������������
By Gresory Dickens
Children exploited,
used as lures for
various purposes
Children are being used as lures for myriad purposes.
They represent the new trend in movies (Home Alone I
and , Free Willy, Searching for Bobby Fischer, The Secret Garden,
Dennis the Menace) in competition for our money. Scenes of
children are used as bait for international policy-makers. For
example, the furor over one baby named Irma has renewed
media interest in Bosnia-Herzegovina when wHe-spread eth-
nic cleansing and mass rapes have affected hundreds of thou-
sands of people for over a year. The press attempts to curry
empathy for Somalia by showing not the deaths of our troops
or war correspondents, but the starvation of children despite
our presence there.
What is truly disturbing, however, is the use of children
here in the United States for recondite legal debates.
In the past months, a plethora of custody battles have
permeated the news in areas that redefine the rights not only
of parents, but of the children themselves. The infamous Baby
Jessica case in Michigan strengthened the claim of biological
parents to the children they entrust to adoption services (I'm
hesitant to say "give up" now, because parents apparently are
determined to keep privileges regarding the child). A Ver-
mont Family Court judge decided that a father is entitled to
broad visitation rights with his child, who is now adopted. In
Florida, Kimberly Mayes argued against her natural parents'
right to visitation after a highly-publicized baby swap 14 years
previous. Children's rights can be taken too far.
A 13-year-old legally divorced his mother, when a judge
decided that he had legal standing to do so. The same judge
blocked the adoption procedures by George Russ, the teenager's
lawyer.
More and more, the argument of liberalism versus con-
servatism is being waged not in Congress, but in the commu-
nity. Children are being exploited for the sake of civil liberty
disputes or aged traditionalism in an evolving society.
This has been a year of thorough concentration on child
welfare. A rash of reports on parents leaving their children
"home alone" while they worked led to accusations of im-
proper child care. Later, stories of child deaths�due to acci-
dents while being left alone�led to an investigation of local
social services. These agencies were established under the
auspices of "checking up" on who may or may not be fit
parents. A Wisconsin agency has determined that children
must be a minimum of nine years old to be left alone at home.
The inevitable reaction of parents is to insure their pro-
priety by attempting to strengthen their legal basis of claim
and choice of upbringing. Hence the adoption controversies.
When does the welfare of the child conflict with the rights of
the parent? Which is more important? Should biology super-
sede psychological well-being? Such decisions should not be
left up to a judicial system influenced by the personal morals
of individual judges.
A Pennsylvania judge prohibited the adoption of a baby
by two adults who were not married, even though the child
had lived with them for years. This same judge decided nearly
a decade ago that a teenage girl could not abort the pregnancy
caused by rape by her mother's live-in boyfriend.
These are not cases to be left to the luck of the draw for
judge- availability; nor should they be left to the whim of that
judge, where personal morality may be imposed on the life of
a child and the parents who will raise himher.
Between the fight for abortion (choosing whether or not
to bear a child, the most basic of parental decisions) and
multicultural and sex educations (what the child will learn
and when), parents are on slippery legal ground. The emotion-
less rhetoric and jargon of dust-covered la wbooks should not
be able to stifle the changing face of the American family.
Neither can legal abstraction be put on the shoulders of
children for what amounts to social experiments. We tend to
make examples out of the worst possible incidents and use
them as bases for specific law. The results oftentimes are
obsolete regulations or impossibly-achieved agendas. They
may be fine for Congress or organizations but not inside the
most necessary of institutions: the home.
Stress begins to permeate all facets of modern life
Stress.
Oh, that wonderful word
that means so much, while being
spelled so little. That time in your
life when you start to look long-
ingly at co-worker's necks, all the
while thinking how easy it would
be to break them. The time when
walls seem to just cry out to be
punched, when doors are just beg-
ging to be slammed.
Of course, this also the time
when others thank God that there
is a five-day waiting period to
purchase machine guns in this
country.
Contrary to popular belief, a
person does not experience stress
in a job that they hate. Stress is
what happens when a person takes
on too much work or responsibil-
ity.
Now, who do you know
takes on more work in a job they
hate? Au contraire, mon fraire, a
person experiences stress � or
that other lovely word, burnout
� when they work too much on a
job they love. Irony, what bitter
taste thou hast!
Stress can be dealt with in a
variety of ways. Some people lis-
ten to relaxing music, some take
short walks to clear their head.
Others may resort to masochistic
practices like exercise or self-flag-
ellation (whipping oneself �
thank you, Mr. Webster). A per-
son will pretty much'do anything
� short of getting arrested or
physically harming someone �
to rid that monkey that clings so
tightly. You know the one, your
friend and mine � (drum roll,
please) STRESS!
How might I, your humble
and lowly editorial columnist, deal
with stress, you might ask? Well,
to be perfectly honest with you (as
all journalists are, of course �
HAHAHAHAHA sorry, I'm
alright now), I write. Yes, you
heard me, I write. How does that
combat stress, you ask, O gentle
reader? Well, it takes a certain
mindset to relieve stress this way.
You have to have a peculiar qual-
ity about your person, you need
that ye nc sais auoi that elevates you
above the rest. That quality, that
extra little quirk, what is it? It's a
bird, it's a plane, no, it's SAR-
CASM!
A mild-mannered reporter
by day turns into a fighter of evil,
the costumed crusader � SAR-
CASM. With his trusty sidekick,
Cynical Man, SARCASM (yes, it
has to be in caps) swoops through
the night bashing the heads of idi-
ots and dullards everywhere in a
constant battle against stupidity
and for common sense.
(I, the columnist, would like
to ask the reader to ignore (he
preceding outburst above this
paragraph. For a short while, my
evil twin was in possession of my
fingers and wrote such obvious
drivel and tripe. The real colum-
nist would, of course, never have
stooped to such levels just to keep
readers interested. Again, I apolo-
gize and ensure you that no fur-
ther outbu accckkkI said,
no further grkkk, cllk
Ha, ha, I've got the tapes
and nobody's messing with me
now! (Acknowledgments to
Robin Williams and Richard
Nixon. Copyright infringement
and all that, you know.) Back I
say, back! I will take what is right-
fully mine and none shall oppose
me! Shut thy trap, women, do not
speak unless spok
Ahem, as I was saying, no
further outbursts will be toler-
ated. To ens are this, I will now
close with the following poem:
Rose are redviolets are
blue I'm not schizophrenic and
neither am I. (Again, a nod to Bill
Murray.)
�MPi5 15
By Laura Wright
Humans misdirect their obsessions
I heard on the radio the
other day that the world is
overcrowded and that if
something isn't done about
it soon, we could be in for a
serious food shortage. We are
simply running out of farm-
land. Hearing this didn't re-
ally surprise me. I mean, I
see signs of overcrowding in
my own little corner of the
world every day.
For example, as I write,
my downstairs neighbor's
stereo is causing the floor be-
neath my feet to vibrate and
I am having violent thoughts
about storming down there
and hurling a brick at his
woofers and tweeters.
You see, there is more
at risk here than simply run-
ning out of Big Macs ana bar-
becue sometime in the near
future.
People have spatial
needs which differ from cul-
ture to culture. Allow me to
pontificate. Have you ever
been talking to someone and
suddenly you notice that
you're backing away from
them and they are moving
toward you and you feel sort
of suffocated? Americans
usually are uncomfortable
talking at less than an arm's
length from others.
If you're new on cam-
pus, see if you don't feel like
there are people breathing
down your neck as you hurry
to class. See how many times
someone steps on your heel
before you take off your shoe
and fling it at them.
I don't know how much
space is needed between
apartment dwellers, but I
feel certain that the guy
downstairs must be too
close. He's got every right to
play his music (even if it is
Jimmy Buffet), but when I
can hear it, it invades my
space and I get angry. What's
really at stake here is the
frightening fact that being
too close causes violent
thoughts.
Rats will kill each other
when they are not given
enough space and human
beings seem to be prone to
do the same thing. Inner city
violence seems to be related
to the tension that results
when humans must live too
close to one another.
American culture is in-
credibly afraid of decrease.
While population growth is
much more severe and prob-
lematic in countries other
than America, Americans
have a phobia about their
own mortality.
O.K so what does this
have to do with running out
of food? Maybe nothing, but
the human desire to keep
producing life got me think-
ing about our reactions, as
human beings, towards
death. Again, like space re-
quirements, feelings about
death are culturally influ-
enced.
American medical re-
search has eliminated rrvany
diseases that were once fafll
and improvements in our di-
ets and work conditions
have caused us to live longer.
Abortion, euthanasia and
suicide are met with increas-
ing moral opposition (heck,
there are people out there
that are so opposed to these
forms of "death" that they'll
kill doctors to save lives. I
find this a bit confusing, how
about you?).
On top of these medical
and moral debates, we learn
that death is sad; funerals are
a time to wear black and cry
and there is often a lot of
pain involved.
To make things more
frightening, various reli-
gions teach that if we're
good, we will be rewarded
after we die. But if we're bad,
we will burn for eternity.
Burning doesn't sound so
great and there seems to be a
lot of ambiguity about what
must be done to avoid it. Fear
of what happens after death
makes the subject taboo.
Finally, we are con-
stantly presented with our
own state of denial: we see
movie heroes that are inde-
structible; plastic surgery
keeps us from aging; athletes
become godlike as they tower
above us (and even fly).
We believe that we are
immortal, because it's too
hard to admit that in spite of
all of our accomplishments,
we will cease to exist and
none of us are sure about
what happens afterwards.
Perhaps it is necessary
to rethink our views about
death in order to deal with
the abundance of life that
may pose a threat to our ex-
istence. Life is dependent
upondeath and neither is less
valuable than the other.
By Stacy Van Peterson
Meditation
provides
needed escape
Life is moving too fast.
For just a minute, forget about get-
ting fat, irunimum wage, technology, ul-
cers and where you will be in ten years.
Instead, take time to relax. Think about
yourself andor yourself�that's right�
meditate. Meditation with all of the con-
fusion that surrounds it can be a per-
sonal and non-harmful escape from the
pressures of daily life and it requires
only 10 minutes of your day.
Ah, the smell of brand new official
ECU shirts and baseball caps. The smell
of fall in Greenville. Is it just me, or did
this fall form like a frozen pond sliding
under our feet? Summer is getting tired,
but it gave in too early this year.
Today, as I attempted to perform
my own 10-minute mental hacking, I
could not help but think about how fast
life is living us. Go to class, go home and
change clothes, go to work (it definitely
is not the Eighties), study, find time to
eat (but prepare the right foods), exer-
cise (the Surgeon General said it is im-
portant) and if you are lucky�sleep.
Today our society expects more from
our generation than any other genera-
tion. Our generation will also be the first
generation in American history to earn
less than our parents. They call us slack-
ers.
By meditation, I do not mean fly-
ing off to India and hiring a personal
guru. Nor do I want to form a 1-900-
yoga-friends-network. I use the word to
refer to mental health. Mental health is
just as important, if not more important,
than physical health. The best aspect of
meditation is that no one can tell you
how to do it.
Some people choose to pray, some
choose to find a quiet time and concen-
trate on their favorite place. Others
choose to sit, relax and not think about
anything. The only way to meditate cor-
rectly is to make yourself happy. Even if
you live in a dorm (a place where quiet
can not be domesticated), you can use
the time in the shower to meditate.
After all, the bathroom has always
been a sanctuary away from intense
thought and illusion. The sound of the,
water can even drown out some of the:
noise. Imagination will live longer than
rock-n-roll.
Technology is also moving too fast. -
It seems that now, more than ever,
everyone needs a computer, but I can't
afford one. Even if I could buy a com-
puter, no one can guarantee that it will
not be obsolete tomorrow.
Do I really want to see who I am
talking to on the phone? Will phone com-
panies take over the cable industry and
the world along with it? Will we have to
use virtual reality to feel human emotion
in the year 2050?
If you are thoroughly confused at.
this point, do not be. These ideas are
merely ideas that our generation will
have to deal with. All of this rolled into
this ball we call Earth can cause enough
stress to grow grey hair on a bowling
ball.
Until technology can develop a way
to soak the brain in lukewarm salt water,
I will spend my 10 minutes a day in my
own personal escape from the swift
spanking hand of stress.
They call us slackers.
.�





August 25, 1993
Continued from page 4
SPEIER
Continued from page 5
gust 30 through Septeml
any time in Whichard
enables fraternities to contact stu-
dents prior to or during rush.
ECU Friends is a service or-
ganization that pairs college stu-
dents with children throughout
Greenville. The program pro-
vides the children with role mod-
els and each partner with a new
friend. Interest meetings will be
held Monday, August 30 through
Wednesday, September 9 in
Brewster B-305 at 5 p.m.
Students have the choice
between many different religious
organizations on campus.
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship
and Campus Christian Fellow-
ship (CCF) are two inter-denomi-
national organizations.
The first Intervarsity meet-
ing will be held on August 25 at 7
p.m in GC 1032. One large meet-
ing is held weekly and small Bible
study groups are open to any in-
terested.
CCF is a student-run orga-
L I.
id everyone is
n on other reli-
ns may be found
hone Directory.
Anyone who has decided
on a tield of stud) may contact
that department tor information
on clubs for specific majors.
For further information on
the various organizations located
throughout campus, students
ma) attend the "Get a Clue on
Life" program. Between 40 and
60 booths will be set up on the
mall tomorrow from 4-7.
"All campus activities and
departments from recreational
services to student unions will
pass out information on activities
for this semester marketing di-
rector jeanette Roth said.
A round-trip airline ticket
anywhere in the U.S a free Apple
Computer, free dinner for two
and free fitness classes are among
the prizes being handed out
Thursday.
"We will try to do the pro-
gram every year from now on
Roth said.
A day of gloom instead
of triumph for NASA
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) �
On a day that was supposed to
mark NASA's triumphant return
to Martian skies, gloomy scientists
worried about the fate of the silent
Mars Observer spacecraft and its
$980 million mission.
"We're obviously disap-
pointed, but we still haven't given
up hope completely said Bill
Boynton, a University of Arizona
planetary scientist in charge of one
of the unruly spacecraft's instru-
ments.
Mars Observer was to be the
first U.S. robot explorer to reach
Mars since 1976. Since its radio
transmissions stopped on Satur-
day, no one knew for sure if the
craft would fire its thrusters and
start orbiting the Red Planet as
scheduled this afternoon, or sim-
ply go whizzing past on an expen-
sive trip to oblivion.
Engineers at N AS A 's)et Pro-
See NASA page 19
I v student's situation
poses a dilemma Speier said.
'When you're in this job, you're
making a decision on somebody's
future.
It tears my heart out to have
to send somebody home from
school in a disciplinary way, but
one thing I tell them is that they can
almost always come back and
we'll be happy to take them back,
once they've met all the conditions
of re-enrollment, and they'll get a
tresh start Speier said.
"It's a disappointment, it's
very difficult, but I try to approach
it from a positive standpoint, and
that is that they just need time outof
here, thev need to fix what's wrong,
and here's what it takes to fix it from
our standpoint
Although such student inter-
action is discouraging for Speier, he
has had a great number of reward-
ing experiences, and he manages to
uphold a positive attitude.
"One of my real satisfactions
here has been working with the
Greek system. I think we've grown
a lot, matured a lot Speier said.
Speier takes pride in the fact
that the number of fraternities and
sororities at ECU has risen and that
the system offers something for ev-
eryone.
"We pay a lot of attention to
our African-American group orga-
nizations, and I think that's differ-
ent than it is on most campuses.
Ours is an emerged system, a very
positive system
Speier attributed thestudent
faculty conflict at UNC-Chapel Hill
to a lack of communication. Stu-
dents there are trying to have a
multi-cultural center built, and the
administration is refusing this re-
quest.
"What they have over there is
like a Texas Stand-Off Speier said.
"Every day I go out and work the
streets. I see students every day,
and that's importantbecause when
there's a problem I've got to find
those same students
Speier strongly believes that
such stalemates can be overcome
positively by maintaining open
communication lines, and working
at improving studentfaculty rela-
tions.
"One of the biggest miscon-
ceptions of our students is that they
can't go and ask the faculty ques-
tions,and they can'tapproach them
for advice and help, and I've found
tha t our facul tv are more often avail-
able than at other schools I've been
at Speier said.
Speier stressed that the stu-
dents need to take advantage of
their advisors because, for the most
part, they are more than willing to
assist.
Outside of busy office hours
and frequent visits to the Student
Stores, Speier enjoys spending the
majority of his time with his family.
Speier and his son are very
active in the sports card ("and only-
sports cards, we're not interested in
that other stuff) collecting and
trading business.
A game of golf usually in-
cludes Speier's son, as his wife is
less enthusiastic about the sport.
" Bu t we'd be willing to include her
Speier added.
Speier attended both the
Peach Bowl in Atlanta, Georgia, and
the NC AA Basketball Tournament
in Winston-Salem with his son, but
their loyalties extend beyond the
big-name sports.
"We try to go to all the home
games we go to the non-revenue
sports functions because I see those
students, too Speier said.
Speier'scommitmenttosports
carries on to commitment to the
new recreation center planned for
the future.
Speier enthusiastically pulled
out a recent USA Today front-page
story to support the need for this rec
center.
The article unveiled a new sta-
tistic that students looking at col-
leges now list physical facilities as
their 3 priority.
"I think we need a new rec
center desperately Speier said.
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"It's a social thing � that's
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social outlet Speier said.
Speier dismissed the conten-
tion that the new rec center will
pose a parking problem.
"I think we have a parking
problem whether we build the rec-
reational center or not Speier said.
"We have to address the parking
situation differently than we have
Another issue Speier hopes
ECU will focus on in the near future
is the condition of Joyner library, an
apparent source of strife for Speier.
"I think we desperately need
to do something about our library. I
think our library is woefully inad-
equate for a school a third of our
size, much less the size we are
Speier said.
"I think the addition of the
planned renovation of Joyner and
the rec center will place emphasis
on the two important things that
we value Speier said a top-
notch library where students can
do research, and a fitness center
where students can be fit and pre-
pared to be better academically
Speier lauded every aspect
of ECU'senvironment, and easily
described ECU as offeringa small
school atmosphere with big school
opportunities.
"Students can be proud of
what they accomplish here
Speier said. "They're not just a
number
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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
h
ECU chancellor prepared to take school into the future
Nsistan! News Editor
The business of higher edu-
cation is a big one. To adapt to a
society driven by economies, ev-
ery college and university in the
United States must attempt to
achieve a "bottom line" that can
keep the university strong and
allow it to build for the future.
This "bottom line" forces the
university system to adopt eco-
nomic standards not terribly un-
like those which govern large cor-
porations. And like those busi-
nesses, there must be a "CEO" to
keep close watch of the successes
and failures of the university en-
terprise, someone to deny its cred-
its and bear the responsibility of
its failures.
EastCarolina University has
such a person in its chancellor, Dr.
Richard Eakin.
In his sixth year at the top of
the EastCarolina mountain, Eakin
has been witness to a great num-
ber of changes in the university.
He has bore the pressures inher-
ent to his position, attempting to
solidify the interests of the uni-
versity while simultaneously wag-
ing a public relations war to rally
support for those interests. To
Eakin, it is all part of the job.
"Public relations is an im-
portant part of what I do Eakin
said. "I bear an important respon-
sibility to be a spokesperson for
this university
The site of Eakin's latest pub-
-tne-
n'ted to
ittlefield is the
siontoaddastate-
irt recreation center pur-
est approximately S18
million. Ground-breaking for this
facility isexpected totakeplaceas
early as September or October of
this year, and the decision to con-
struct this facility has generated a
wave of fury from some elements
of the university community.
This anger stems from the
loss of parking spaces construc-
tion will require as well as the
center's high price tag. However,
Eakin takes this all in stride, de-
fending the worth the facility will
have to the university when stu-
dents are able to take advantage
of the recreational opportunities
the building will offer. (Plans for
the center include a large indoor
track, fully-equipped Nautilus
weight center, aerobics rooms,
basketball courts, a massive pool
and a nutrition center.) Eakin said
that he understands the concern
and takes the initial backlash as
part of being chancellor.
"You probably don't take
this job unless you realize that
decisions will have to be made
where there will be people who
will be less than happy about it.
Thatjustcomes with the territory
If the chancellor is anything,
he is prepared. In defending him-
self against his detractors, Eakin
said that part of the center's plan-
ning phases included a strategy to
revamp the deplorable parking
decisions the university is plagued
with, and a strategy for dealing
with the center's consumption of
space. He said the university had
consulted an engineering group'
from the Research Triangle Park
in Raleigh regarding the efficient
use of all of ECU's available space.
Eakin said the group found
that a concentration on fringe
parking and converting to a "pe-
destrian campus" would help
solve the parking dilemma.
Fresh from the "persuasion
battles Eakin has his facts to-
gether and is quick to answer even
the most controversial questions
about university policy.
Got a question about the ris-
ing cost of North Carolina educa-
tion?
"North Carolina citizens do
a great service to students by do-
nating a large amount of tax dol-
lars to the state for education. Only
the state of Texas has a lower tu-
ition rate
How about the amount of
funding the university contributes
to athletics?
"ECU is a member of the
College Football Association, an
organization that represents 63
member institutions. These 63 in-
stitutions represent most of col-
lege football. As compared to these
institutions, we are in the very,
Chancellor Richard Eakin
very bottom as to what we spend
on our football program (by far
the most expensive athletic pro-
gram at this university). It is a
credit to this institution that we
have been able to compete like we
have with a relatively modestbud-
get
The quality of ECU educa-
tion?
"Of the 13 institutions avail-
able to receive new academic pro-
grams from the state of North
Carolina, ECU received exactly
one-fourth of themWe have also
improved our overall SAT score
bv 50 points andhave collaborated
with a very fine faculty. We have
moved a great deal along the aca-
demic spectrum in the last
decadeWe have made signifi-
cant strides to reinforce the qual-
ity dimension of this university
The most powerful ammu-
nition Eakin has in his public rela-
tions arsenal is the university's
new fundraising campaign
"Shared Visions This attempt to
raise $50 million by 1995 for cam-
pus renovation is Eakin's biggest
time-consumer. The campaign has
been a tremendous success in its
early stages, as over $27 million
has been raised. Should the cam-
paign be successful, its implemen-
tation will produce significant
changes to the university's appear-
ance and academic quality.
When Eakin discusses the
campaign, it is simple to see the
passion he has for the program.
His eyes seem to radiate a light
akin to the beaming of a four-
year-old who has found a red
fire truck under the Christmas
tree. Eakin is not shy about shar-
ing his optimism for the uni-
versity and the changes "Shared
Visions" will make.
"I'm incredibly proud of
this school and community
Eakin said. "We should all take
great pride in the way this uni-
versity has interacted with east-
ern North Carolina. This uni-
versity has served very well and
has made an outstanding effort
to do things to benefit this re-
gion.
"The most exciting thing
about being here is that this
university and this region has
an incredible capacity to better
itself. That's one of the things
that brought me here
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i
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;





-�- I
August 25, 1993
ECU officer focuses
on crime prevention
Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Walt Whitman once said,
'When I give, I give myself I
found this motto to bo true of
ECU'S Crime Prevention Pubik
Information Officer Keith Knov
As Knox talked of his 20-some
years of service in various police
and sheriff organizations, what
struck me the greatest is his ded i-
cation to the students and faculty
at ECU.
It is no surprise that Green-
ville residents are close to Knox's
heart. He was born in Pitt County
and raised in Robersonville, a
short drive north from Greenville.
In fact, Knox liked Pitt County so
much that he only spent a few
years away. Today, he, his wife
and three children live in
Winterville.
After Knox graduated from
Robersonville High School, he
began school at Pitt Technical In-
stitute (now Pitt Community Col-
lege). During his two years of
Police Science education at Pitt,
Knox was the Vice-President of
SGA, worked full-time and be-
came active in other student or-
ganizations.
When he was 18 years old,
Knox was sworn in as Deputy
Sheriff in Martin County, which
borders Pitt County. Knox left
his position in his hometown for
Wake County where he stayed
with the Sheriff's Department for
18 months. When opportunity
knocked, Knox was back in town
at theCity Council Identification
Bureau of GreenvillePitt
County. There, in 1975, he intro-
duced a "Rape Kit" toPittCounty
Memorial Hospital. According to
Knox, the kit was used to collect
physical evidence from victims.
Police officials liked the idea of
Wachovia endows ECU with large donation
Keith Knox
the kit because it standardized
their procedures during rape in-
vestigation.
Knox started the Crime Pre-
vention Program in Farmvi lie af-
ter leaving the GreenvillePitt
County Identification Bureau.
"Crime Prevention is the antici-
pation, recognition and appraisal
of a crime risk and the initiation
of some type of action to reduce
or eliminate that particular risk
Knox said.
Most crimes on campuses
and communities are crimes of
opportunity. In the crime triangle,
there is criminal intent, a victim
and an opportunity. By remov-
ing the opportunity, the crime
can be prevented from occurring.
"It is being pro-active and
not reactive to criminal activity
he said.
Knox showed concern over
our current incarceration proce-
dures where prison is no longer
seen as a threat because many
times it is more pleasant than
See KNOX page 12
By Warren Sumner
Assistant News Editor
Shared Visions, Easl Carolina
I m ersirj 's $50 million fund-rais-
ing campaign, was given a tremen-
dous boost last week when the
Wachovia Corporation endowed
the institution with a $667,01X1 gift.
The corporation's endowment will
be matched by state funding to ere
ate a $1 million gift and to help
create a teachers' program at the
school.
Wachov ia s endowment is the
largest corporate gift to Shared Vi-
sions to date, and the program
implemented by their funding will
teach leadership skills to public
school teachers. The corporate gift
pushes the level of Shared Visions
funding over the i29 million mark.
Chancellor Richard Eakin said that
the funds would have a great effect
on North Carolina public schools.
"We are indebted to Wachovia
Bank for its farsightedness and its
willingness to make such a signifi-
cant investment in the young people
of North Carolina Eakin said.
Wachovia's regional vice
president, William C. Baggett, said
that his corporation had a commit-
ment to the future of North Caro-
lina schools in mind when the deci-
sion was made to grant the school's
endowment.
"Wachovia is committed to
improving the quality of education
in North Carolina he said. "We
have repeatedlv witnessed the value
of empowering front-line associates
through the development of lead-
ership skills. That experience at-
tracted ustoEastCarolina'steacher-
leader concept
The Shared Visionscampaign,
announced on March 20, had al-
ready acq uired over half the needed
funding before its public unveiling
and is moving steadily towards its
goal of $50 million by December
1995. The campaign aims to im-
prove every facet of campus life
including an addition to Joyner Li-
brary, improvements to ECU's
medical complex, expansion and
renovation of Ficklen Stadium and
Minges Coliseum, implementation
of merit-based scholarships and
graduate grants, and campus beau-
fification.
Eakin, in a June interview
about the campaign, said he was
encouraged by theGreenville's will-
ingness to improve itself and was
optimistic about the future of Shared
Visions.
"The most exciting thing
about being here is that this univer-
sity and this region has an incred-
iblecapacity tobetteritself hesaid.
"That's one of the things that
brought me here
"We should all take great
pride in the way this university has
interacted with eastern North Caro-
lina This university has served
very well and has made an out-
standing effort to do things to
benefit this region
PTIOtO COiin��y oi �.u mm ouiaau
Dr. Charles Coble, Chancellor Eakin and William C. Baggett (Wachovia)
at Thursday's meeting, announce Wachovia's gift of $667,000.
r
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WELCOME BACK SPECIAL
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DILLON FENCE 101
A Syllabus of Sound
Class meets
DILLON FENCE
CHRISTMAS
ROSEMARY
OUTSIDE IN
en

IN
Late Nite M-W-F, Prof. Martha Preston, Ph.D.
Pl.s.s .Schedule
(Weeks 1-3) Originally released in 1989 and out
of print until June of this year, Dillon Fence's
debut is a textbook example of clean, jangly,
straightforward pop. Be prepared to discuss in
class the two-guitar dynamic featured in
"Something For You" -and "Frances
(Weeks 4-6) Mammoth Record's first Dillon Fence
release is significant not only for its
seasonality, but also for its strong melodies
and catchy hooks. Note the evolution of Greg
Humphrey's vocal style. Essay question: What is
the role of the pop band in the information age?
(Weeks 1-9) Eleven songs under a groove,
Rosemary features "Daylight "Hey Mockingbird"
and "I Will Break Our study of Rosemary will
address the interplay between bassist Chris
Goode and drummer Scott Carle. Assignment: Learn
words to record and catch the band's live show.
(Weeks 10-12) Released during their U.S. tour
with Flat Duo Jets, the five-song Daylight EP
contains two tracks from Rosemary plus the smash
"Sugarcane a brilliant cover of Blondie's
"Dreaming" and an acoustic version of "Sad
Inheritance View Daylight video for extra
credit.
(Weeks 13-15) This amazing second album expands
on the pure pop foundation discussed earlier in
the course while adding a more immediate and
spontaneous sound. Note guitarist Kent Alphin's
vocal contributions and the band's movement
towards a more guitar-driven sound. Watch MTV's
120 Minutes for a visual supplement and prepare
for the release of the new EP "Any Other Way" in
October.
3mi
mUr�� .ri�i� Available at the Following Locations;
East Coast Music
1109 Charles Blvd.
Quicksilver
200 E. 5th St.
Catch Dillon Fance Aug.
mammQth
CD Alley
108 E. 5th St
Record Bar
East Mall
27th at the Attic
CARR MILL 2ND FLOOR
CARRB0R0. NC 27510
919-932-1882
Scholarships Available
Guaranteed jobs
ATTENmON:
ECU Math Computer Science, Physics, and Nursing Majors. Air Force
ROTC has second and third year scholarships available!
Requirements
At least a 2.65 GPA(full time status).
Pass Air Force Officers Qualifying Test, medical exams, and fitness test.
Enroll in AFROTC.
Scholarship Benefits
Pays tuition, most fees, books and $100 per month tax free.
After Graduation
Receive commission as Second Lieutenant in the Air Force. Starting salary
over $25,000, rising to over $41,000 in just four years (does not include tax
break worth thousands annually). Free medical and dental benefits.
Thirty days annual vacation with pay.
v
THESE BENEFITS ARE WAITING FOR
THOSE WHO QUALIFY!
GET ON THE GROUND FLOOR!
For more information, contact Captain Steve Cooke
307 Wright Annex 757-6597
rA�CrOKfc
Leadership Excellence Starts Here
�� ���. ���,��.�
Utf" JMHWIJU-IIIMIJI:





i m� �
August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 11
nn yx "T
STUDENT
Recreational Services
The following
Student Activity
programs are
offered through
the ECU
Division of
Student Life.
Recreational Services offers faculty, staff, and students a wide variety of sports activities, fitness opportunities,
outdoor adventures, special campus events, and hours of drop-in recreational play. Visit 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium (next to the Brewster Building) for specific program information or call 757-6387.
Here are a few exciting events coming this fall!
i-f
Fall Facts
Special Events
� King & Queen of the Halls , September 1
� Natural Life, B.Y.O.T. "Cruise into Christenbury September 10
� Natural Life, B.Y.O.B. "Camp Out on the Malr, October 1
Intramural Sports
� Whiffleball Tournament registration , August 31, 4:30pm, Bio 103
� Flag Football registration, August 31, 5:00pm, Bio 103
� Fallsports include: Co-rec volleyball, frisbee golf, co-rec basketball,
team tennis, volleyball, soccer, bowling, kickball, billiards.
Fitness Classes
� Registration Dates: August 31-September 7, $10 for 12 classes.
� FREE Fitness Fizzicals for students in 113 Christenbury Gym.
� New Fitness Clubs with FREE memberships include: 100 Fit Club;
Just Do It Club; Club Ped
Outdoor Adventures
� Registration for all trips begins: August 25.
� HangglideWindsurf Trip will be held September 24-26 at Nags Head.
� Climb the Hard ROC Tower for only $5.00 a workshop, $1.00 for a
daily pass purchased in 204 Christenbury Gym.
Weight Room Hours
Garrett & Aycock Halls - The Pipeline Pumphouses
M-TH 1:00-8:00pm
1:00-5:00pm
1:00-5:00pm
F
SU
Minges Coliseum
M & W 2;00-8:00pm
TU & TH 2:30-8:00pm
F 2:00-5:00pm
M
F
SA
SU
Christenbury Weight Room
TH
6:30am-9:00pm
6:30am-6:00pm
12:00-5:00pm
1:00-5:00pm
1
. 4
Equipment Room Hours
M-TH 10:00am-9:00pm
F 10:00am-6:30pm
SA 12:00-5:30pm
SU 1:00-5:30pm
University Unions
i -v
! S�
The Department of University Unions plays host to a number of cultural, social, and recreational activities. The
Performing Arts Series provides students with culturally rich experiences such as the Bolshoi Svmphony Orchestra
and Lar Lubovich Dance Company. The Travel-Adventure Film and Theme Dinner Series allows students to
explore the world through a showcase of beautiful travelogues. The ECU Student Union will begin their FREE film
series on Wednesday, September 22. The fall movie schedule includes: Last Action Hero, Sliver, Untamed Heart,
Lorenzo's Oil, Indecent Proposal, and Benny and Joon. You can call the MSC Program Hotline at 757-6004 for
movie synopses and information about upcoming events.
Fall Facts
The following is only a sample of the exciting events and activities planned for you by the Student Union.
� Chinese Illustrators Art Exhibit, September 27 - October 23
� 70's Rock: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, October 19
� College Bowl Campus Tournament, November 13-14
In addition, Mendenhall Student Center provides the following services and facilities:
I
Art Gallery
Banking Machines
Cafeteria and Snack Bar
Central Ticket Office
Loaner Service
Mail
Music Listening Center
Newspapers & Magazines
Reservations for conferencemeeting rooms
RidesRiders Board
Student Government Association
Television
TTY Phone
Video Games
Student Judicial System
The ECU Student Judicial System resolves issues involving student conduct. Students interested in leadership
opportunities in student judicial matters are encouraged to apply for Honor Board and Review Board positions
through September 16 in the Student Government Association Office at Mendenhall Student Center, and the Dean
of Students Office in 209 Whichard. For more information call 757-6824.
Fraternities
ECU Fraternities foster brotherhood, development, and unity among it's members. To learn more about the
fraternity system visit any of the open houses held during rush periods.
Fall Facts
� Currently 22 social fraternities representing 12 of the male student body.
� Rush: September 14-17.
� Historically African American fraternities rush later in the semester.
� For more details, contact the Dean of Students Office at 757-6824.
Sororities
ECU Sororities promote leadership, high scholarship, exemplary conduct and lifelong friendships. All sororities
sponsor philanthropies which are supported with fundraisers and through caring projects.
Fall Facts
� Currently 12 active sororities.
� Formal rush: August 15-20.
� Historically African American sororities rush later in the semester.
� For more details, contact the Panhellenic Office at 757-4235.
qptumpw ����-
4mnvi'






i
August 25, 1993

Continued from page 10
ago, Knox spent three ears
as the W LntervilleC hiei of Police.
l hen he came to ECU, Knn said
he wore three hats: c rime Pre-
vention Officer, Investigator and
Trainer. Today, ECU Police have
separated the three positions to
allow for more specialization.
While Knox was enthused by the
growth of the Crime Prevention
Program, he was discouraged by
the budget for the program. "I
have had tp obtain funds from
other places to get things accom-
plished he said. Although the
budget is limited, the funds have
covered a third of the university's
total lighting project and have
doubled the number of emer-
gency blue-lights on campus.
Knox spoke of several goals
he has for ECU. Included in his
goal, is a Residence Hall-Liaison
program where specific officers
will be assigned to residence halls
so the residents can get to know
their officers and feel comfort-
ith prob-
u ouid like t
rstt) become a one-card
us i ike Duke University,
ouid have a single com-
I ird which would be
� meal card, residence
hall ki and could be used to gain
. ess io buildings after hours (if
permissible).
I le showed some concern
over the large shrubbery on cam-
pus because it poses a security
problem. He also said he would
like the Beaurification Commit-
tee to take security into consider-
ation when devising landscape
plans.
We discussed the hazards
of his line of work and whether
he wanted to get out before it got
anymore dangerous. "No, I have
chosen this as my profession and
could make a lot more money
doing other things, but I feel I can
make the biggest contribution in
the area of Crime Prevention he
said. He added that over the years
he has been hurt while working.
WTe talked about the deci-
sion by the Football Safety Task
Force to ban kegs from all univer-
sity locations, including fields
where tailgating takes place.
Knoxsaidhewas the person who
instigated the ban because he has
seen the effects from students so-
cializing around kegs.
"The keg situation has
grown out of control to the point
where we were having numer-
ous fights almost every game, all
revolving around kegs Knox
said.
In addition to fighting, Knox
was concerned about alcohol poi-
soning because kegs promote con-
tinuous drinking.
"We won't have the 'buffet-
line'drinking, "he said. "The kegs
is I ike ana ll-you-can-drink situa-
tion He feels that banning kegs
would create additional trash
problems. We can always clean
up parking lots. We can't replace
lives
In addition to numerous
other organizations, he has been
a member of the Pitt County Law
Enforcement Officers Association
in 1986, was 1991 Law Enforce-
ment Officer of the Year, and in
August he will be installed into
the Board of Directors of the N.C.
Crime Prevention Officers Asso-
ciation. In his personal time, Knox
enjoys fishing and coaching com-
munity basketball
Knox says he is very con-
tent at ECU and plans to see his
goals for the university followed
through. "Right now, there are
some things I want to see happen
at ECU
Campus renovations continue into fall
By Richard Elkins
Staff Writer
The summer months at
ECU were a busy time for con-
struction and renovation crews
on campus. Numerous projects
were undertaken and completed,
while others continued on to-
wards completion.
"The summer period may
be slow for some on college cam-
puses, but here at East Carolina,
it's a busy time in preparing our
facilities for the following year
Vice Chancellor for Business Af-
fairs, Richard Brown said. Many
residence halls, unoccupied dur-
ing the summer, underwent
renovations, and several trans-
portation projects which re-
quired road closings inconve-
nienced fewer students than they
would have if they had been done
during the fall or spring.
One very noticeable
change on campus is the area
around Graham Hall, home of
the Department of Geology. Gra-
ham hall itself received a face lift
with cosmetic repairs done
mainly to the windows. The front
and sides were re-landscaped
with additional lighting and a
place for a clock paid for largely
by a donation from the senior
class of 1993.
The green barn between
the General Classroom Building
and Tenth Street was torn down
because it was an eyesore. Auto-
mobile repair operations were
moved to the Auto Repair Shop
of the old J.H. Rose High School.
The University is leasing these
facilities from the Pitt County
Schools for $1 per year.
The Wright Building's
Student Bookstore renovations
which were begun in the spring
were completed over the sum-
mer. Its last update was between
15 and 20 years ago.
The original section of
bleachers on the south side of
Ficklen Stadium was replaced
becauseof decay to the structure
which dates to approximately 30
years ago. The rest of the sta-
dium underwent cosmetic refur-
bishments. Total cost of stadium
repair was S2.2 million.
The culvert at the bot-
tom of College Hill Drive had to
be replaced over the summer af-
ter heavy rains last spring caused
the entire structure to be washed
away. This replacement has been
on the University's list of projects
for several years.
A new lot on Reade St. is
adding 157 new parking spaces.
Like other parking on Reade, ad-
jacent to downtown, this lot will
not be paved in the near future.
Todd Dining Hall on
College Hill continued construc-
tion over the summer, with the
current projected date for open-
ing being either the summer or
Photo by Scott Pope
Renovations outside the Graham Building began during the summer.
The site will eventually hold a new clock tower.
fall of next year. Plans had for-
merly been to have the facility
open by January.
Bidding has begun on
the renovation of Umstead and
Slay Residence Halls. The build-
ings will be linked to each other
providing handicap access to all
floors. The buildings will be air
conditioned and are scheduled
to reopen by Fall 1995.
According to Inez
Fridley, all of the residence halls
underwent or are about to soon
undergo some form of renova-
tion. Asbestos ceiling and floor
tiles were removed from four
residence halls. Aycock received
new pipe fittings to make clear-
ing them easier. More than 20,000
square yards of carpet were laid
down in hallways and rooms.
1,370 locks were replaced in
seven halls. Roofs on three high-
rises were weatherproofed, and
Clement's was replaced.
In total, over 5,000 new
pieces of furniture were placed
in the residence halls, and close
to $1.5 million was spent. Most
of the work was completed by
in-house maintenance crews and
student staff.
Projects were not only
completed on the University's
main campus, but also at the
School of Medicine Complex. A
new surface parking lot was
added to ease parking conges-
tion.
WELCOME BRCH ECU
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August 25, 1993
77f East Carolinian 13
ining hall namesake leaves legacy
fessor emeritus of histoiy al
for 27" years and an active mem-
ber of the Greenville community
tor 43 years held that position in
the hearts oi students, faculty,
family and friends.
Dr. "odd, who passed away
July IS, at 78, possessed charac-
teristics that individually might
be found in many people, but to-
gether, belong to a precious mi-
nority.
His unselfish concern for
others, his devotion to helping
whomever he could, and his ado-
ration for his family, especially
his wife, affectionately called
"Sweetheart" by family and close
friends, set Dr. Todd apart from
many.
Todd looked upon life and
people with an inspiring, genu-
ine optimism. Todd did not
merely shake your hand in greet-
ing, he welcomed you with a
heartv hug and more than one
encouraging, kind word.
I was privileged enough to
meet the Todds, and spent two
evenings talking with them about
their lives, his career and the spe-
cial bond they formed with ECU
students and faculty. The men
and women affiliated with Phi
Sigma Pi were especially dear to
the Todds. Todd held the honor
fraternity's faculty adviser posi-
tion for the entirety of his teach-
ing career at ECU.
This story is meant to pro-
file the man for whom the new
dining hall on College Hill Drive
is named, but the challenge is that
so many students will never have
the opportunity to meet him or
listen to him speak. He was filled
with life lessons from years of
experiencing life to the fullest.
When you meet a person
such as Dr. Todd, you tend to re-
evaluate vour own life and your
own priorities. Witnessing such
generosity and unselfish presence
invokes great ideas in people, in-
spires dreams that might be ful-
filled and coaxes bravery to try
new things.
Perhaps a mini-series could
adequately illustrate Dr. Todd's
accomplishments, goals and
dreams. He touched many stu-
dents' lives. In the four short
hours I spent listening to the
Todds reflect on the best and
worst times in their lives, I learned
a lesson about human potential,
the capabilities of generosity and
consideration that we can all con-
� .ssibly
- of the
gnitude
.
students. Listing
;tine, position held, re-
ganizations
to which the I odds have donated
time and financial support would
� a picture (it their dedica-
tion, but would lack their person-
alities, both beingvery individual
and strong.
Dr. Iodd's desire to help
others was born long before he
was financially capable to carry
out tiis dreams.
Born in 1 ancaster, Pa,Todd
grew up the youngest in a family
of 12 children. Taught to work
hard, 1 odd's high school accom-
plishments earned him a position
in the freshman class of
Millersville State University in
Pennsylvania. Quickly becoming
a basketball star, Todd admitted
he wondered when he had time
to pick up a book, but that whirl-
wind college life came to a som-
ber halt.
In his second year at
Millersville, Todd's father died.
Unable to pay the tuition, Todd
went to his basketball coach to let
him know that college was no
longer in his future.
That coach sat Todd down,
gave him a little talking to about
life lessons and moving on His
coach then found him a job ad-
equate enough in salary to keep
Todd dribbling up-court and
studying hard.
That experience stayed in
Todd's mind and he vowed to
himself that he would always re-
member how one person helped
him pursue an education, and that
one day he would offer that same
assistance to as many students as
he could.
Soon after that, Todd met
the woman he would one dav
many. One afternoon, young
Clauda Pennockand her brother,
on their way home, strolled by
the Todd residence. Young Dick
waved a hello, and commented
on the weather.
Sweetheart reflected: "I said
to my brother, Who is this fel-
low7' and my brother said, 'Oh,
that's Dick Todd � everyone
knows him 'Well, I don't said,
'But I want to And that's how it
started.
The Todds shared the same
generous concern for others, and
made sure they followed with ac-
tion.
"We made a commitment
that if the good Lord saw fit, work-
ing in his vintage desered me to
i ta ve more than what I or my wife
or family needed, I would be very
grateful if he would grant me the
opportunity to share it with oth-
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Croats agree to allow
U.N. convoy in Mostar
SARAJEVO,
Bosnia- Sachs, a U.N. spokeswo1
Herzegovina (AP) � Bosnian
Croats have given in to U.N. de-
mands and agreed to let aid reach
tens of thousands of Muslims
trapped in Mostar who desper-
ately need it.
Alemka I isinski, a U.N.
spokeswoman in Zagreb, Croatia,
said 19 trucks with 200 tons of
food and medical aid would ar-
rive in Mostar later today. She
said the agency received the go-
ahead from the Bosnian Croat
militia overnight.
The food was expected to
last about a week, said Lvndall
Sarajevo. The convoy was
bound only tor the Muslim en-
clave and would not dish ibute
food in the city's Croat sector.
"We ha e to follow this
convoy up ery quk kh with
more convoys said Sachs, who
described the situation in the
Muslim enclave as desperate.
About 55,000 Muslims
have been under siege in
em Mostar for weeks. Several
thousand more Muslims li eoi
the west bank of Mostar, con-
See CROATS page 19
Photo by News Bureau
Dr. and Mrs. Eakin stand with Dr. Richard Cecil Todd in front of the
model of the new Todd Dining Hall, currently under construction.
ers, Todd said.
"And we never forgot that
we just enjoy giving so much
Todd explained, "it's a joy. It's
just -o gratifying to see what you
can do with young people
The Todds always held the
utmost respect for each other, and
together made decisions that
would affect their lives, and ulti-
mately so many others.
While pursuing his Ph.D. at
Duke University, Todd received
an offer to become president at
another school.
" We had seen so many other
graduates leave their almost-
completed dissertations for posi-
tions at other schools, and al-
though they said they would re-
turn to finish, they never did
Sweetheart said.
The Todds decided to re-
main at Duke until Mr. Todd be-
came Dr. Todd. That decision left
them open to East Carolina Uni-
versity in 1950.
Refusing the life of a profes-
sor who would rarely see a class-
room in order to work at being
published. Dr. Todd eagerly ac-
cepted the professorship at ECU.
"I knew ECU would even-
tually grow and be such an im-
portant school Todd asserted,
and patting my knee added, "This
is what I wanted to work with
So the Todds became mem-
bers of the ECU community, at
first living in a dorm on campus
with eight other families and only
one bathroom!
"1 don't know how we all
could have become closer the
Todds laughed.
At that time, a tragedy oc-
curred that would forever change
the value of the Todds' loyalty to
the Greenville community.
Sweetheart fell ill and was
See TODD page 14
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August 25, 1993
TODD
Continued from page 13
of a b.
nately, the hos
the needed blood, and Pr rodd 's
only chance to save his wife's life
was to approach his own stu-
dents, and hope that someone
would donate blood.
What transpired was
termed by one hospital nurse as
the most exciting thing to ever
happen at the Greenville hospi-
tal.
"Students stretched from
5th Street down to the old hospi-
tal off of 3rd Todd remembered,
as tears filled his eyes. ECU stu-
dents saved Sweetheart's life, and
this was a deed not soon to be
forgotten.
Denied their own children,
the Todds immediately adopted
the ECU students as their own, as
well as the Greenville commu-
nity that had given them so much.
"I have always tried, in my
own mind's eye, to bring us closer
together as a family Todd said.
Family is what the group quickly
became.
Teaching led to Todd's po-
sition as faculty adviser for the
Tau chapter of the Phi Sigma Pi
honor fraternity, and the Todds
wholeheartedly delved into the
task of surrounding their lives
with the lives of ECU students.
In 1977, Sweetheart became
the first woman in the nation to
be initiated as a member of Phi
Sigma Pi.
"We held a rninimum of two
meetings a month in our home
rid in due time girls
dthi cture. Always, two-
the way through the
ing, there would be a rap at
the kitchen door
Whoever sat closest to the
door would open it to
Sweetheart's apple pie a la mode,
cherry pie or special fudge pie.
"Anything I made, they
liked Sweetheart beamed.
"Yes, those kids were
smart Todd laughed. "Smart,
smart kids mmammmmmmm
"It's been a good
life he said quietly.
"I'm just so sorry it's
coming to an end
The
Todds were
equally
popular
with their
family and
friends from
home in
Pennsylva-
nia, and of-
ten joked
that a sign ������i������
reading 'This Way to the Todds
hung at both the Rocky Mount
and Wilson turn-offs.
"Families showed up all the
time Sweetheart said and
stayed until they were tired of
us
No one ever found them-
selves turned away from the
Todds' front door, and rarely was
their front stoop vacant of stu-
dents, faculty, and neighbors
stopping by to say hello.
Devoted to those students,
Dr. Todd remained firm in his
opinion of just how professors
should treat their positions, and
wi 11 inglv offered them strong ad-
vice.
"If you don't like the chil-
dren, and you don't want to teach
them, get off the campus. You
don't belong here Todd em-
phatically insisted.
"So many of the professors
didn't want students to contact
them, call them at home
Sweetheart said with an aston-
ished tone.
"We are a fast-moving Uni-
HHMHH e r s i t y , "
Todd said
proudly.
"There are a
lot of good
people, and if
you look for
the best in
people, you'll
get the best
out of them
Indeed,
he Greenville
Dr. Richard Cecil Todd
community received the best of
everything from the Todds. No
task appeared too big, no obstacle
in the path of any student too
monstrous for the couple to help
in some way.
Responding to the Todds'
years of strife and service, ECU
honored the couple in several
ways.
In 1976 the Richard Cecil
Todd, Phi Alpha Theta Room,
with a portrait, was dedicated by
the Phi Alpha Theta International
Honor Society in History. The
room is located in the D wing of
the Brewster Building.
In 1977 the Richard Cecil
Todd , East Carolina University
Flag Pole, with a marble marker,
was presented and dedicated by
friends and members of the Tau
Chapter of the Phi Sigma Pi Na-
tional Honor Fraternity.
On October 15,1992, ground
was broken for the new Richard
Cecil Todd and Clauda Pennock
Todd Dining Hall on College Hill
drive. .
Dr. Todd last traveled to
Millersville State University for
the naming of a new Admissions
Building in honor of Dr. and Mrs.
Todd.
Watching Greenville and
the ECU campus transform into a
developed city surrounding a
full-fledged University brought
great pride to the couple, al-
though in some ways they missed
the simpler way things used to
be, when people took more time
to share their lives with others,
but this hardly dimmed the glow
in Dr. Todd's eyes as he remi-
nisced.
"It's been a good life he
said quietly. "I'm just so sorry it's
coming to an end Touching
thousands of lives throughout his
lifetime, his focus on students
never faltered, and he missed onlv
four days from his 27-year teach-
ing career.
Dr. Todd's fantasy world?
"A community filled with love
but let everyone do their own
thing, regardless of color, race,
creed, gender
The Todds' commitment to
student lives on through the Ri-
chard Cecil Todd and Clauda
Pennock Todd Endowment, which
the couple established for ECU in
1984. Ultimately, this endowment
will contribute to every aspect of
ECU's curriculum, and will gen-
erate a minimum of $1 million
each year.
Dr. Todd's death came as a
shock to many, and the empti-
ness will be felt across the cam-
pus, across the city and down the
east coast for many long days
to come. While a memorial ser-
vice held July 21, 1993
prompted an opportunity for
many to express their love and
appreciation for all that Dr.
Todd added to each life, Dr.
Todd's life and work will far
outlive the memories of fond
words.
"The best thing a teacher
can do is be a role model Todd
said. "A positive role model to
encourage and inspire, and
show interest � sincere inter-
est, and they will go far. And
they'll never forget you
Truly, we will never for-
get. As this story goes to print,
Sweetheart remains hospital-
ized at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital with a broken collar
bone, after a recent fall. Our
best wishes and hopes for a
quick recovery are with her.
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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 15
Troops sent to Somalia
Ihe
Clinton administration is sending
at least 400 additional American
membersofaneliteranger
unit, into Somalia to reinforce L S.
troops there, administration officials
say
A defense official said late
Monday the soldiers from the
Armv's75th Ranger Regiment were
being sent to help deal with "the
level of violence in Mogadishu" af-
ter three separate attacks on U.S.
soldiers this month and an attack
on a U.S. troop convoy Sunday.
A mine exploded beneath a
truck carrying American soldiers,
but none of the six was seriously
injured, officials said.
The troop reinforcement sym-
bolizes the dramatic change in the
U.S. military's role in recent months
as fightingbetweenU.N. forces and
a Somali warlord has persisted in
the East African nation's capital.
Last week, U.N. Secretary
General Boutros Boutros-Ghali re-
quested 3,000 more troops for So-
malia and vowed to press military
operations to disarm fugitive So-
mali warlord Mohamed Farrah
Aidid.
The Army rangers join a 1,200-
member U.S. quick-response force
that is under U.S. command in So-
malia.
There also are 4,000 Ameri-
can support troops under U.N. com-
mand in the country.
Administration officials,
speaking on the condition of ano-
nvmitv said the additional rangers
would be sent later this week.
One official, who spoke on
the condition of anonymity, denied
that the additional troops were be-
ing deployed asa result of Sunday's
incident, saying the decision to send
the troops had been in the works for
several weeks.
The decision to send more
troops is likely to draw fire from
congressional critics of President
Clinton's policy in Somalia.
Senate Minority Leader Bob
Dole, R-Kan has said it may be
time to reassess the U.S. role there,
and Sen. Robert Byrd, D-W.Va the
Appropriations Committee chair-
man, last month called for with-
drawal of U.S. troops from Somalia.
When thousands of Ameri-
can troops landed in Somalia last
Dec. 9 as part of "Restore Hope it
was for humanitarian assistance.
The Pentagon stressed their
job was to secure relief supplies to
feed the starving nation and get out.
Care was taken to avoid military
confrontations.
The U.S. contingent grew to
nearly 26,000 in mid-January, but
by early May most of the Ameri-
cans had departed and all.N. force
took over officially.
Since then Aidid's forces have
waged a series of hit-and-run am-
bushes against U.N. troops, often
appearing to target Americans.
At least 39 U.N. soldiers, in-
cluding four Americans, have been
killed and more than 165 wounded.
WorldNews
Bosnian Muslims and Croats learn to share a room
SPLIT, Croatia (AP) �
Bosnian Croats and Muslims, al-
lies turned foes, are having trouble
sharing a country. In this Adriatic
city's main hospital, far from the
frontlines, their wounded are
learning how to share a room.
Asim Fetic and Elmin G. are
Muslims wounded by Muslim fire
while digging trenches for Croat
captors.
Their roommates, Naned
Rajic and Stipe M are Croats
wounded when Muslim forces
took over part of central Bosnia.
Like many in war-torn
former Yugoslavia, they were re-
luctant to give their full names.
Hospital director Goran
Dodig proudly stressed that there
is no ethnic discrimination in his
hospital, which he said at one point
housed 70 percent Muslim pa-
tients.
There was clearly bitterness
in the ethnically mixed rooms. The
Croats were especially upset over
what they perceive as intema tional
indifference to the plight of tens of
thousands of Croats pressed for
months by government forces in
central Bosnia.
The Muslims "lie here with
us, and our people are suffering in
central Bosnia because Muslims
do not want to allow anyone to
help them said Rajic, who was
wounded in fighting near his na-
tive Kiseljak.
Rajic was one of some 30
Bosnian Croat patients who were
on their fourth day of a hunger
strike aimed at pressing interna-
tional organizations to evacuate
wounded Croats from central
Bosnia.
"I can stand being without
food said Rajic, 26. "In central
Bosnia, Croats are (also) forced to
live withoutfood and needed medi-
cal treatment by a Muslim siege
The tension in the hospital
room reflects the about-face by
Bosnia's Croats, who until recent
months were allied with Muslims
in opposing Bosnian Serb plans to
create a "Greater Serbia" at the
expense of both Croatia and Bosnia.
Now Bosnia's Croats, sup-
ported by Croatia, favor the ethnic
division of the republic sought by
the Serbs.
World attention is focused
on Muslim suffering in the south-
western Bosnian city of Mostar,
which the Bosnian Croats want as
the capital of their mini-state.
About 55,000 Muslims
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trapped in an enclave in the city for
two months are in desperate straits,
and the United Nations is pressing
the Croats to allow aid convoys
through.
The Croa ts here claim an even
greater number of their people are
at the mercy of government forces
in central Bosnia.
Wi th the shock of war behind
them, somecivility appeared. Rajic,
attempting to help Elmin G. get
out ofbed, explained, almost apolo-
getically, "He's Muslim, but
wounded is wounded
Most thoughts appeared to
dwell on past wrongs.
Elmin, who lived all his 23
years in Mostar, recalled how he
was captured in June by Croat
forces who said they were protect-
ing him from vigilante attacks by
individual Croats.
He was wounded by Mus-
lim schrapnel while being forced
to dig trenches for the Croats in
Mostar. The long time needed
for recovery "suits me, because I
do not know what to do after-
ward he said.
Fetic, 44, wounded under
similar circumstances in central
Bosnia, said he understands why
fellow Muslims shot him despite
being aware of the situation: "We
were fortifying Croat positions,
which(theMuslims)didnotwant
� this is the war
Stipe M 30, who surren-
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ing wounded four months ago,
said he saw prisoners being
beaten and taken to work on the
frontlines by Muslims, too.
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FOR ADVANCEMENT
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If you are considering membership in SAM, please attend an informal meet-
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For more information about membership, please contact
Paula CuthreD 355-8023
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Dr. Rick Herbert GCB 3108,757-6582
Chapter V.P. Membership
H�HHMMMP' '





i?
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August 25, 1993
WELCOME BACK ECU!
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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 17
National News
Militaiy drinking remains high
failed, iind alcohol abuse remains
a serious problem, says a studv
of American service personnel.
The prevalence of heavy
d nnking is down to about 15 per-
cent from 22 percent in 1980. But
virtuallv all of the drop is due to
an influx of older, better-edu-
cated recruits who are more
likely to be married, said Robert
Bray, who directed the research
project for the Pentagon.
Such people are less prone
to heavy drinking, he said. Once
their impact is removed, heavy
drinking rates stayed almost the
same since 1980, he said.
Heavy drinking was de-
fined as having five or more
drinks on a single occasion at
least once a week during the prior
30 days.
Bray, of the Research Tri-
angle Institute in Research Tri-
angle Park, N.C presented the
work Monday at the annual
meeting of the American Psy-
chological Association with col-
leagues from the institute and
Brandeis University in Waltham,
Mass.
The data shows th mili-
tar) has been unsuccessful in
fighting heavy drinking, said
Cmdr. Ralph Balls, senior policy
analyst for alcoholism and men-
tal health issues in the on. :e of
the assistant secretary of defense
for health affairs.
"Where we're at right now
is getting military leadership
aware of this continuing prob-
lem, so we can then devise more
specific intervention programs"
targeting heavv drinkers, he
added in an interview.
The new study included
16,395 active duty personnel
serving around the world who
filled out anonvmous question-
naires in April and May of 1992.
Participants were chosen to give
a representative sample of per-
sonnel in the Army, Navy, Ma-
rine Corps and Air Force.
Results were compared
with the outcome of similar stud-
ies done in 1980,1982,1985 and
1988.
The new study found 7.6
percent of personnel had experi-
enced serious consequences of
heavy drinking within the prior
year. These included being court-
martialed, kept of f duty at least a
week because of illness, hurt in
an accident or arrested for driv-
ing while intoxicated.
The number was down
from 17.3 percent in 1980, said
James Luckey of the institute.
In addition, 16.4 percent of
personnel said their job perfor-
mance had suffered because of
alcohol, down from 26.7 percent
in 1980.
The military rate of heavy
drinking could not be compared
directly with civilian rates be-
cause of differences in demo-
graphic makeup between the two
populations.
But when statistical analy-
sis was done to take that into
account, heavy drinking by per-
sonnel stationed in the United
States was shown to be substan-
tially higher than the corre-
sponding figure for civilians,
said Mary Ellen Marsden of
Brandeis.
The overall study also
found that rates of illicit drug
use in the military within the
preceding 30 days had fallen to
about 3 percent from 27 percent
in 1980. Smoking rates had de-
creased to around 35 percent
from 51 percent in 1980.
Schools face dismissal from loan
Overall defaults decreasing because of tough collection methods
WASHINGTON (AP) �
More than 900 colleges and trade
schools stand to lose their eligibil-
ity to participate in the federal stu-
dent loan program because too
many of their students have de-
faulted.
The Education Department
was releasing figures today show-
ing the default rates for every school
in the United States that partici-
pates in the Federal Family Educa-
tion Loan program, formerly called
the Guaranteed Student Loan pro-
gram.
Most of the schools in danger
of losing their eligibility are one-or
two-year, profit-making career
schools. They commonly have
much higher default rates than
more traditional academic institu-
tions.
The Education Department,
armed with a 1989 law designed to
drivedown the numberof defaults,
has been dropping schools with
default rates of at least 30 percent
for three consecutive years from
federal aid programs, including the
Pell Grant program. The cutoff de-
fault rate drops to 25 percent next
year.
In 1991, taxpayers lost an es-
timated $3.6 billion on bad student
loans.
The department announced
last month that overall default rates
were decreasing because of the
tougher collection methods.
The number of defaults de-
clined from 22.4 percent in the 1990
fiscal year to 17.5 percent in 1991,
the latest year for which figures are
available.
Last year,about 1,000 schools
were handed sur oensions, which
can last a year or more depending
on the school's corrective actions.
The government bases a
school's default rate for a particu-
lar year on the number of borrow-
ers scheduled to begin paying on
their loans who defaulted either in
that year or the following year.
Students apply for loans
through the schools, which verify
the student's eligibility.
The government pays the in-
terest on the loan while the student
is in school. If the student defaults,
one of 47 guarantor agencies re-
pays the lender and then tries to
collect. If they are unsuccessful, the
government pays off the loan.
Schools, faced with the loss
of a major � sometimes primary
� source of revenue, have been
using collection agencies to go af-
ter the delinquents.
It is the stuffing of history
WASHINGTON (AP) �
What Is Past Is Prologue says the
chiseled legend at the National
Archives, which received some
800,000 pages of documents on the
assassination of John F. Kennedy,
thanks la "gely to the exertions of
film maker Oliver Stone.
Maybe so, but in this case
what is past is prologue to a whole
lot more bewilderment on the who-
killed-KennedyquestionthatStone
answered his way and that others
answer other ways.
Primarily as a result of Stone's
sensational movie, "JFK and the
theory it propounded � that
Kennedy's killing in 1963 was gen-
erated by a massive conspiracy
within the U.S. government �
Congress passed the JFK Assassi-
nation Records Collection Act of
1992.
The law requires every gov-
ernment agency with a relevant
scrap of paper to ship it to the
Archives building on Pennsylva-
nia Avenue, excepting only those
needed to conceal the identities of
intelligence agents or sources.
At first glance, what was re-
leased Monday, in a chilly research
room filled with 90 assassination
buffs, historians, tourists and jour-
nalists, was unlikely to change
many minds or shed much light.
If, going in, you believed that
the murder was the work of the
CIA, or the Mafia, or the Team-
sters, or Fidel Castro, or the Mar-
tians, your belief would not be
shaken by this new salvo of raw
material.
If you thought that a psy-
chopathic Lee Harvey Oswald,
acting alone on instruction of his
inner voices, killed Kennedy, you
will find here no reason to think
otherwise.
The Archives got a hodge-
podge.
Here was a biographical
sketch of Oswald's mother. Here
was a CIA analysis of Soviet press
reaction to the shooting. Here
See STUFF page 19
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August 25, 1993
Murder suspect
kills himself
one uj art him-
; in the head, a hospital spokes-
woman said
The airman, Douglas Albert
Terek, 24, died at Pitt Memorial
Hospital in Greenville. He shot
himself in the side of his head with
a .22-caliber handgun Monday as
officers tried to arrest him, police
said.
Terek is the only suspect in
the death of Michelle L. Terek, 21,
Maj.J.M. Warrickof the Goldsboro
Police Department said Monday.
Warrick described the case
as "the worst I've seen in 25 years
Mrs. Terek's remains were
found in several garbage bags
stuffed inside the refrigerator of
the couple's duplex at the Air Force
base, said Goldsboro Police Chief
Chester Hill. Her body was sent to
the state medical examiner's office
in Chapel Hill, but the cause of
death was not disclosed.
Police said they found a three-
page letter describing some of the
events surrounding the dea th taped
to the refrigerator door after base
police received a call Sunday night
from a man they believe to be Terek.
"He directed them to his on-
base residence and told them his
wife's body would be in the
kitchen said Maj. Wes Davis, the
base public affairs officer.
Police say the Tereks were
last seen together Saturday night
irdavan
Mill -aid the reader
tkiy and apparently had beencare-
tuilv cleaned after the body was
dismembered. Police found some
knives that might have been used
in the dismemberment, Warrick
said.
Local police and sheriff's
deputies began looking for Terek
shortly after discovering his wife's
body. The airman called base po-
lice Monday morning and arranged
to meet officers, Davis said.
Base investigators, citv po-
lice and Wayne County sheriff's
deputies metTerekatthearranged
site on U.S. 70 at Walnut Creek,
about 10 miles east of Goldsboro,
Davis said.
Terek was sitting in his
parked pick-up truck when offic-
ers arrived.
After a depu ty told Terek him
to put his hands out the window,
"he took his pistol and shot him-
self in the head Warrick said.
The Tereks were from Norti i
Huntingdon, Pa and had moved
to Goldsboro from Texas, Hill said.
Terek was a maintenance
specialist with 344th Air Refueling
Squadron. He does not have a
criminal record and there is no in-
dication the Tereks had a historv of
domestic problems, Warrick said.
Warrick said shooting deaths
on the Air Force base are so rare he
can't remember the last one.
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BICYCte
StateNews
Hogs infect workers
NTON.NX P)�MosJ
� orkers w ho slaughter pit;s
sampson County processing
� have been exposed to a rare
- thata mies from freshly killed
animals, federal health investiga-
tors said.
The Centers for Disease Con-
trol hasalso informed 47workersat
the "kill floor" of Lundy's Packing
that blood tests indicate they may
have contracted brucellosis, 77k
XcrcscVO'SiVi'tTof Raleigh reported
yesterday. The illness causes se-
vere flu-like symptoms that can lin-
ger for years.
In all, 129 of the 156 slaughter-
floor workers have been exposed to
the brucellosis bacteria, the CDC
said. The study is continuing.
The state previously had iden-
tified 23 Lundy workers diagnosed
withthediseasesincejanuary 1992.
Those cases alone made up nearly
one-third of the swine brucellosis
case reported nationwide during
that time.
"The brucellosis occurring
among the workers at Lundy's is
unfortunatesaid Lee Hunter,state
public health veterinarian. "We are
doing our absolute best to try and
stop this
Lundy's president, Annabelle
Fetterman, was unavailable for com-
ment Monday. She has said she is
cooperating with investigators, but
that she could not fill her orders if
she had to limit her buying to herds
certified as brucellosis-free.
The A ttomey General's office
has begun investigating whether
the state can force the huge pig
slaughtering opera tion to takestron-
ger steps to protect employees, the
newspaper reported.
A state Department of Labor
investigation into possible viola-
tions of worker safety laws also is
under way.
Officials of a union trying to
organize the plant have faulted the
state for failing to take stronger ac-
tion against Lundy's. The possible
new cases detected by the CDC
prove the disease was not the result
of an isolated shipment of infected
hogs, said Jackie .Nowell of the
United Food and Commercial
Workers Union.
"They continue to slaughter
infected hogs she said. "This is
notjusta bad batch of hogs from last
summer
The U.S. Department of Agri-
culture is trying to determine why
so many cases of the illness have
turned up at the plant, which pro-
cesses 8,000 animals each day.
In June, staff members from
the CDC's National Institute for
OccupationalSafetyand Health vis-
ited Clinton and took blood samples
from slaughter-floor workers, said
Douglas Trout, a CDC investigator
in charge of the study.
The blood tests, which are not
100 percent conclusive, indicated
that 129 of the workers had been
exposed to the brucellosis bacteria.
Not everyone who is exposed de-
velops the illness, Trout said.
"Some people will beexposed
and not get it he said. "Some
people will be exposed to a lesser
extent and get it
The agency notified the ex-
posed workers last week and sug-
gested that they seeadoctar togeta
definitive diagnosis, Trout said.
Prosecutor alleges murder
planned for profit
GREENSBORO (AP) � A
prosecutor depicted a Gaston fit-
ness entrepreneur as a ruthless
businessman who grew para-
noid, then lethal, during a
struggle for control of a sports
drink.
"This defendant coldlv
planned, carried through and
collected on this diabolical
scheme Prosecutor Rick Glaser
told a federal jury Monday.
Joey Caldwell planned the
murder of the man who bought
his business with "diabolical"
precision, Glaser said on the
opening day of the trial.
Glaser said Caldwell
waited until the second of two
"key man" life insurance poli-
cies worth a total of $2 million
kicked in, then drove to Ham-
let and shot Maceo McEachern
and his 83-year-old mother
Vela to death.
The money went to pay
off court judgments against a
business owned by Caldwell
and his wife and to start a
new company, Nutrin Labs,
See DRINK page 19
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fi






August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 19
DRINK
Continued from page 18
I to .1 drug store to
ipt with tlie time on it.
Glasei 'Light two tick-
ets to a movie her husband had
already seen � just in case in-
vestigate! s asked about the plot
of the film he didn't watch that
night.
Caldwell wasn't arrested
until nearly two years after the
1991 killings, when his wife fi-
nally came forward.
NASA
orney
iry to
irbar Iwell's
. ompare her an-
imony with what
she told previous grand juries
� that her husband was inno-
cent, The Charlotte Observer re-
ported.
Since Barbara Caldwell
owned the biggest stake in the
couple's company, Gymbags
Inc she gained the most from
the life insurance payouts.
"It was in her best interest
to get rid of Joey Caldwell, to
put him aside, by telling the gov-
ernment that he was the one who
Continued from page 8
killed Maceo McEachern
1 lewitt said.
Prosecutors won a key stra-
tegic victory Monday when U.S.
District Judge William Osteen
ruled that Joey Caldwell
couldn't block his wife from tes-
tifying.
Knowing that she is the key
to the case, authorities decided
against charging her husband
with murder.
Murder cases are almost
always tried in state courts, and
under state law, spouses usu-
ally can prevent each other from
testifying.
In federal courts, there is
pulsion Laboratory have worked
around-the-clock trying to raise
Mars Observer. They sent new
computer commands telling it to
switch to a backup clock and make
suie its antennas were hooked up
and pointed the right way, among
other things. Attempt after attempt
failed.
Nobody really could be cer-
tain that the spacecraft even ex-
isted.
The loss of contact started as
the fuel tanks were being pressur-
ized, and there was a possibility
they might have blown up. Project
manager Glenn Cunningham
called that higrV orst-
case scenario.
"We go on the presumption
these kinds of problems are caused
by simple little things, probably
not a whole conglomeration of ex-
otic problems, but one simple little
problem Cunningham said.
"What we need to do is figure out
what that simple little problem is
If the spacecraft is lost, it
"would be a greatblow to the plan-
etary science community he said.
Also Monday, controllers at
the National Oceanic and Atmo
spheric Administration were try-
ing to re-establish contact with the
nation's newest weather satellite.
The satellite was launched Aug. 9
and had worked fine until commu-
nication was lost Saturday, offi-
cials said. Two older weather satel-
lites remain in operation.
Mars Observer was launched
Sept. 25 to start its 11-month, 450-
million-mile voyage. It was de-
signed to give scientists their best
look yet at the terrain, seasonal
change and weather on a planet
that has long inspired human
imagination.
Boynton tried to find a bright
side to the possibility of mission
failure.
"People should realize the
reason NASA spends nearly $1 bil-
lion for a mission like this is not just
so I can understand what Mars is
made of, but to develop technol-
ogy that will help the economy
he said by phone from Tucson,
Ariz.
"It's important for the tax-
payer to realize that they still have
gotten a large fraction of the return
on their investment
V rs Ob; s e v asdesignet
to spend more than two months
maneuvering into a 234-mile-high,
near-polar circular orbit, then un-
dergo a month of testing before
taking at least 687 Earth days, or
one Martian year, to study the
planet.
Four U .S. Mariner spacecraft
reached Mars in the 1960s and
1970s. Two others failed, as did
most of the 15 to 17 Soviet Mars
missions. Twin Viking orbiters
circled the planet in 1976 and sent
landing craft to the red-orange sur-
face, where they scooped up soil
but failed to find life.
CROATS
an exception to that rule � if the
spouses were involved in a con-
spiracy together, one can't be
stopped from testifying about
their joint involvement.
Eecause of that difference,
Caldvvell was charged with
breaking federal laws, includ-
ing six counts of mail fraud, two
weapons charges, one count of
obstructingjusticeand 50counts
of money laundering.
That's enough to send
Caldwell to prison for the rest
of his life, if he is convicted.
Both sides agree the case is re-
ally about who killed the
McEacherns.
Continued from page 13
trolled entirely by Croats until the
Muslims established a bridgehead
there last month.
U.N. peacekeepers who
reached the Muslim area Satur-
day said residents were on the
verge of starvation and hospital
conditions were desperate.
Some operations were being
performed without anesthesia,
and 60 percent of the buildings
were uninhabitable, they said.
Croats and Muslims each
made up some 42 percent of
Mostar's pre-war population of
130,000, and lived in peace. They
united earlier this year to oppose
E . ' n Serbs, but their alliance
disintegrated a few months ago.
Bosnia's Croats want Mostar
to be the capital of a Croat-domi-
nated republic. Fighting between
the city's Muslim and Croat com-
munities broke out in May.
There were different ac-
counts of fighting Monday be-
tween Muslims and Croats in
Mostar.
The Belgrade-based Tanjug
news agency, citing reports by Serb
commanders on hills around the
city, said heavy fighting raged,
and many buildings were on fire.
Lt. Col. Patricia Purves, a
Weekend College
Pitt Community College
Will Offer A Selection of
Weekend Classes This Fall!
Business Courses:
Accounting
Business Law
Computer Courses:
Multimedia For Instruction
Other Courses: �
Oral communications
Grammar & Composition
Medical Terminology & Vocab.
General Psychology
Human Relations
Principles Of Sociology
Personal & Community Health
Call An Admission Counselor
At 355-4245 For Course Information
Fall Quarter Registration August 31
An Equal Opportunity Affirmative Acton Institution
PITT
Community College
U.N. spokeswoman in Sarajevo,
said today that the fighting had
been light and sporadic, although
there were some heavier clashes
to the south.
Meanwhile, Bosnian Presi-
dent Alija Izetbegovic returned to
Sarajevo from peace talks in
Geneva and called a peace plan to
divide Bosnia into three ethnic
regions unacceptable.
Under the plan supported
by Serbs and Croats, Serbs would
get about 52 percent of Bosnia,
Muslims 31 percent and Croats 17
percent under a weak central gov-
ernment. Muslims, who no con-
trol only about 10 percent oi
Bosnia, want at leasi 40 percent
and demand that Serbs aren't
given land where they forcibly
expelled Muslims.
STUFF
Continued from page 17
were nine folders listing telephone
calls Lyndon Johnson made be-
tween Nov. 22 and Nov. 30,1963.
Here were the names of nurses on
duty that day at Parkland Hospital
in Dallas. Here were tickets to a
dinner Kennedy was to have at-
tended that night in Austin.
Here was a CIA memo from
an informer saying that Oswald's
Russian wife, Marina, worked in a
Minsk bar frequented by foreign-
ers and, "source insists must have
been a KGB informant "since, in
his firm opinion, employees of such
bars are ipso facto obliged to report
to the KGB
Here were the wounded John
Connally's replies to get-well mes-
sages. Here were records from a
Soviet hospital that treated Marina
at 5 p.m. on April 15, 1960, for
lacerations on three fingers of her
right hand.
What becomes most evident
is that a document written in ex-
citement 30 years ago grows no
more informative with time. Straws
grasped then remain straws. The
JFK Assassination Record Collec-
tion Act had the effect of a vacuum
News
writers
rjneejting ?
Thursday
at 2 p.m.
cleaner. The accumulation is
more impressive than illumina-
tive.
What it shows mainly is
how the government accumu-
lates.
Here from the CIA is an
"official routing slip" addressed
to Julia Last Name Blacked Out.
Someone has typed: "The at-
tached does not pertain to our
office; I would think that the ac-
tion office would take care of
this?"
And Julia (but signed
"Julie hmmmm) has written:
"CI Staff had the responsibility
for answering this cable. Do you
want it in Oswald's 201?"
The next sheet is a "confi-
dential" "Routing and Record
Sheet" to CI:
"Cables forwarded here-
with have not been integrated
into the DO record system. If you
feel they should be classified into
a DO file, please indicate filenum-
ber (and other necessary process-
ing) and return to Sender
No indication of how re-
cipient felt.
CLARK
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�" �'i ���. -mc
m
August 25, 1993
v hat iz it ?
Zima ClearMalt is, let's
seeit's lightly carbonated
but not filling like beer
(even though it is brewed)
and it's urn, zophisticated
tasting but lighter than a
mixed drink, and urn, eazy
drinking but not so zweet
(gaaaaack!) like a wine
cooler; and it's clear,
Jfcsfr
�1993 ZIMA Beverage Co. Memphis TIM Beer
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and check out what's going
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it (very important) and
what else? You can drink it
straight or on the rockz.
i So it's sort of like
different from ahh
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WWWWBSMPMHBRIBIBB





The East Carolinian
Au
Lifestyle
Page 21
New Batman comic grips uncertain future
By Cliff Coffey
DC Comics
unveiled the
new Batman
costume last
week, finishing
lhe21 -part
storyline called
"Knightfall
Staff Writer
DC Comics pulled off a mar-
keting gem last year by killing
Superman. This year's DCs sales
tactic includes a revamping of
Batman.
DC started its rumors of "kill-
ing" Batman on the heels of the
death of the Man of Steel in Feb-
ruary. In April, the "Knightfall"
story line was started in the pages
of Batman and Detective Comics.
The final is-
his arch enemies. Bane, a new
nemesis for the Dark Knight, freed
Batman's foes from their prison
in Arkham Asylum, including the
Joker, the Riddler, Killer Croc,
Zsasz, Two-Face, Firebug, Scare-
crow, Scarface and the Mad Hat-
ter. Batman felt that it was his
responsibility to bring the crimi-
nals back into police custody, and
so he did, without ever stopping
for a break. This resulted in a
very tired Bruce Wayne. That's
when Bane decided to face
Batman.
Art work courtesy of
DC Comics
sue of
"Knightfall"
was said to
be Batman
500, with 21
parts in be-
tween.
Like the
Superman
story, the
Batman
story
started with
little interest, but now that it only
has a two issues left it has a lot of
momentum and everybody that
became a Batman fan after seeing
the movie (then losing interest in
Batman after the second movie)
is once again a fan.
The story so far has carried
Batman through many battles of
This is the first time
the Dark Knight's
costume has been
changed, ever.
Bane
attacked
while
Gotham's
Guardian
was in the
worst
possible
shape.
Bane
broke
Batman's
back in
Batman 497. This issue is only a
month old, but is bringing in a
$10�$15 dollar price tag. Earlier
issues in the "Knightfall" story-
range from $15�$4.
So, is DC going to kill
Batman? NO. That'd be too
"trendy They like the contro-
versy, but they don't want to kill
Bruce Wayne off. DC wants to
bring in a new Batman, Valley.
Jean Paul was introduced a year
ago in a Batman related limited
series called Batman: Sxvord of
Azreal. Vally is Azreal, who is
going to debut as the new
Batman wi th a new Batman cos-
tume in Batman 500. The Sword
of Azreal issues (there are four)
can cost $50�$65 dollars now,
once Vally becomes Batman, the
price could double.
Azreal will mix his costu me
with Batman's for a new cos-
tume. Both Azreal's and the
new Batman suit were designed
by Joe Quesada, artist on the
Azreal limited series.
This is the first time the
Dark Knight's costume has
been radically changed, ever.
What the future holds for
Gotham's newest guardian is
uncertain, what will happen to
Bruce Wayne is anybody's
guess, how the new Batman
will interact with Robin is an-
other of the unanswerable
questions that will be asked.
The answers will come in fu-
ture issues of Batman, snudow
of the Bat, and Detective Comics
in the story line called,
"Knightquest: The Crusade"
and "Knightquest: The Search
Porno for Pyros charms Raleigh
By Julie Totten
Lifestyle Editor
Around 9:45, the lights went out
and the fireworks began (literally).
Sparkles skidded across the stage
and yellow lights came up on Porno
for Pyros.
the show began on a theatrical
note with a ballerina dancing around
to the tune " Orgasm " and Civic Cen-
ter security going absolutely crazy.
For the rest of the show, Perry
(vocals), Peter DiStefano (guitars),
Martvn Le Noble (bass), and Stephen
Perkins (drums), bombarded theau-
dience with smiles, dancing and the
sound of alternative music (from an
essential creator).
The band shows their political
views through their music, but it is
essential to see Perry and the
showgirls and guys to fully under-
stand.
"Cursed Female the fourth cut
of their CD, was reenacted by two of
the showgirls. They were up on a
platform in thong lingerie, touching
and seductivly dancing around one
another. The band does not use this
tacticinadistasteful way, it's used as
a slice of reality.
Farell would probably be the
nrstto tell anyone how he teelsabout
homosexuality and interracial rela-
tionships.
The live show created an atmo-
sphere of tolerance and a little un-
derstanding on the part of all hu-
manity.
About halfway through the
show, I noticed about a fourth of the
crowd was not really moving (in-
cluding myself). 1 looked around
and all I could do was smile.
So many people were com-
pletely in awe
"You know I think Perry Farell
looked each and every one of us in
the eves tonight. It doesn' t seem hu-
manly possible, but somehow I think
it is. I was very touched said
Catherine Whiticker, a UNC gradu-
ate.
The intro to "Black Girlfriend"
was vocally delivered by Perry. He
began his little "talk" by explaining
that it hasn't been "that long since
the black man wasn't free in
America
A strange silence filled the Civic
Center, and he went on, "But you
know that's one of the beautiful
thingsabout thiscountry. Wechange
things. The world follows us. Ablack
man and a white woman can be
together nowand they make the
most beautiful children. The world
will change� America will lead
Wow.
Not even two seconds after he
finished talking, the song began and
he dug into the first three lines with
"Farrell passion "Ever since the
Playhouse cooks
up exciting year
Porno for Pyros
riotsall i really wanted wasa black
girlfriend
The encore performance of
"Porno for Pyros" left the audience
hungering for more and more and
more.
One showgirl breathed fire and
tossed around burning sticks. Fire-
works began shooting off again and
Perry frantically jumped all around
the band.
After four minutes of giddy
chaos, they said "goodnight" and
took their well deserved bows. On
the way to the car tnat iugut, meit-
was only one thought in my mind.
Wow.
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Start with two of the most recent
award�winning plays, mix in a dash
of comedy and a splash of
Broadway's finest. Remember to toss
in a smidgen of proven quality in
dance theater, stir well, and what do
you get?
The recipe for another season of
fine drama at the ECU Playhouse.
"The new ECU playhouse sea-
son is a theatrical feast said John
Shearin, chairman of theTheater Arts
department. "This blockbuster sea-
son encompasses a paragon of the
Broadway musical theater, a bona
fide comedy classic and two of the
most recent award�winning plays
of two of the finest playwrights in
the English�speaking theater to-
day
Opening up the 1993�94 sea-
son will be
Frank Loesser's
ECU
'Heart and Souls' creates mini treasure
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Heart and Souls, the newest film
by director Ron Underwood City
Slickers), exemplifies the better as-
pects of Hollywood.
Like It's a Wonderful Life and
Heaven Can Wait, this supernatural
melodramatic comedy blends sly
humor with grand moments of
emotional power. If these moments
seem just slightly too coincidental
and contrived, it could hamper the
emotional payoff in most films but
in a drama like Heart and Souls,
these moments add a certain
charming touch. After all, the oc-
currences are supposedly guided
by a divine hand so that even the
most improbable circumstances
can be rationalized.
Heart and Souls begins with a
survey of five lives, four of which
are about to end and one which is
set to begin. Thomas Reilly is born
in a car only minutes after a bus
crashes in front of it. The bus crash
ends the lives of four people before
they were slated to die.
Harrison Winslow (Charles
Grodin) aspires to sing profession-
ally, yet he gets stage fright when-
ever he confronts a listening audi-
ence.
Julia (Kyra Sedgewick)
struggles with a critical decision:
She enjoys living and working in
the city yet, she loves a man whose
only desire is to own a ranch.
Penny (Alfre Woodard) works
tirelessly to raise three children
single-handedly while working
nights as an operator.
Milo (Tom Sizemore) steals for
two-bit hoods, yet he feels com-
pelled to go straight after he steals
valuable stamps from a child.
Each of the four victims leaves
unresolved issues in their lives. De-
See HEART page 33
Alfredo's celebrates fourth anniversary in August
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
On August 29, 1989, Alfredo
Coughlin decided to move his pizza
business from The Plaza to Down-
town on Fifth Street, a brilliant busi-
ness move. This week will mark the
fourth anniversary of hisdowntown
location.
According to Alfredo, he was
the firstpizza eatery tosurvivedown-
town for any extended period of
time. "Boli's, Milano' s, and so many
others came after me, but it never
hurt my business says Alfredo. His
motto is "ECU's Favorite Pizza and
if you were to go for a slice about 2
o'clock on a Friday night, you would
see that the slogan rings true.
Alfredohails from Staton Island,
New York; he is a displaced Yankee
but has grown quite fond of Green-
ville and the ECU scene in general.
He is a big fan of the football pro-
gram and attends all thehomegames.
Alfredo attributes his delicious
success to the pizza expertise of his
mother, who taught him everything
he knows.
He glowed with pride in trying
to describe his method, an amalgam
of secret spices that was handed
do wn by his mother and her mother
before her and soon, laying his claim
to fame.
He continued to describe the
aspects of his pizza that make it su-
perior: The Neapolitan crust, the
gargantuan size of each slice, the
special recipe, the pure mozzarella
cheese, and, of course, the authentic
New York taste.
You will probably find very little
advertisement for Alfredo's outside
of ECU students; he really doesn't
need it, the students alone are busi-
ness enough. On good nights, he
will serve 1100 people between the
hours of 10pm and 3pm, and that is
a lot of pizza.
Most of the time you can find an
art student or two working behind
the counter, or if you are lucky,
Alfredo himself will serve you with
a smile that was handed down from
hLs mother along with the special
spice recipe.
Next time you visit the late night
festivities of downtown Greenville,
take notice of the numerous white
paper plates scattered about; you
will know that many people have
gone home drunk and well fed.
smash hit,
"Guys and
Dolls Pro-
duced in con-
junction with
theECU School
of Music, "Guys and Dolls" is a mu-
sical in every sense of the word�
memorable tunes ("If I Were a Bell
"A Bushel and a Peck "I've Never
Been in Love Before"), delightful
characters and a plot that can stand
on its own away from the music.
ThemostrecentrevivalofGuys
and Dolls" has been running on
Broadway since 1992 and promises
to continue for many months tocome.
ECU'sproduction will runfromSept.
30 to Oct. 5 at 8 p.m with a matinee
performance on Oct. 3, at 2 p.m.
To conclude the fall semester,
the Playhouse will host Athol
Fugard's "The Road to Mecca Re-
nowned for his plays concerning
human strife, Fugard displays a bril-
liant empathy for all of his charac-
ters�from protagonists to antago-
nists. "The Road to Mecca" portrays
a woman whose soul, life and talent
are being fought over�by a priest
who wants her put into a home and
her only friend who wants her to live
her life out in dignity.
"The Road to Mecca" promises
a heart-wrenching look at the mys-
tery of unrequited love. Perfor-
mances will run from Nov. 18 to the
23rd, with a curtain time of 8 p.m.
The matinee performance will open
on Nov. 21 at 2 p.m.
Opening the spring season will
be Carlo Goldoni's comedy, "The
Servant of Two Masters Written
over 250 years ago, this play still
retains much of its original humor
UPCOMING
EVENTS
FOR
PLAY �
H�USE
and high vitality. Mistaken iden-
tities, vying affections and mis-
chievous antics all combine to
throw the audience into fits of
laughter. "The Servant of Two
Masters" is a master in itself, di-
recting the audience to take a good
look at its own foolishness.
"The Servant of Two Mas-
ters" opens on Feb. 10 and runs
through Feb. 15, with a matinee
performance on Feb. 13. All
nightly performances open at 8
p.m and the matinee opens at 2
p.m.
Brian Friel's "Dancing at
Lughnasa" concludes the drama
portionof the 1993�94 ECU Play-
house season. Winning virtually
every award for Best Play of the
1991�92 Broadway season,
"Dancingat Lughnasa" combines
Irish Christianity with intricate
family portraits to produce a play
of imminent
high caliber.
As Frank
Rich of The
New York
Times said,
Danrinaaf
Lughnasa'
does exactly what theater was
born to do, carrying both its char-
acters and audience aloft on those
waves of distant music and ec-
static release that let us dance and
dream. It strikes deep chords that
words cannot begin to touch
"Dancing at Lughnasa" will
open March 24 and run through
March 29, with a matinee perfor-
mance on March 27. C urtain times
are 8 p.m. nightly, and 2 p.m. for
the matinee.
Theseasonwillend theschool
year with the state�wide ac-
claimed EastCarolina Dance The-
atre. Faculty and guest artists from
the ECU Dance department will
choreographstudentsinpiecesof
ballet, jazz and modern dance.
Always a night to remember, the
Dance Theatre promises a history
of excellence in the study of hu-
man motion.
East Carolina Dance Theatre
will open April 21 and close on
April 26, with a matinee on April
24.Curtainsopenat8p.m. nightly,
with a 2 p.m. curtain for the mati-
nee.
Season tickets may be pur-
chased for37.50 until Oct 5 by
mail, telephone or stopping by
the McGinnis Theatre box office
between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday. Individual
ticket prices and other informa-
tion can be obtained by calling the
box office at (919) 757-6829.






August 25, 1993
Hendrix Theatre
gets needed facelift
Machines of Loving Grace release 'Concentration'
By Laura Wri3ht
Assistant ' :festyle Editor
I Cl s one campus movie
theater has no seats.
In fact, it doesn't even have a
movie screen. Hendrix Theater, in
the Mendenhall Student Union, has
been closed since May for remodel-
ing and will reopen (new seats,
screen andall)sometime in the latter
half of September. At present, the
new seats are in boxes and the floor
is without carpet, but workers are
busily making repairs so that stu-
dents will be able to see movies in
October.
"We are totally refurbishing the
entire theater said Betty Hardee,
Associate Director of Operations. She
is very excited about the changes
that are being made and she has
fabric samples on hand.
This is the theater's first renova-
tion since it opened in 1974. Hardee
claims that the theater appeared to
be in pretty good shape for its age
and she attributes this to the house-
keeping staff and to the fact that
repairs have been made as they have
been needed. Repairing individual
seats as they break has helped to
reduce theamountof apparent wear
and tear on the theater.
Snacks are available in the Stu-
dent Union, but food and drink are
not permitted in the theater. This
has also helped to preserve the the-
ater and has "added to the life of it
said Hardee.
In spite of its appearance, age
has taken a toll on the theater. Dry
rojthadruinedthecurtainsand when
wprkers pulled them down, "they
fell all to pieces Hardee said. Also,
Walls in the theater's entranceways
were carpeted and fire codes no
longer allow this. The orange carpet,
which also covered the walkways,
has been removed and the walls
have been papered. A new more
"mellow" colored carpet will cover
the walkways.
rhecolorschemeinl lendrix,
which consisted mainly of yellow,
orange, and gold has been up-
dated to match other renovations
in Mendenhall. Hie theater w ill be
redone in more subtle blues,bur-
gundies and grays. New wine col-
ored curtains have already been
hung on the walls. Along with the
new upholstery, seats and cur-
tains, the theaterhasbeen painted,
the stage has been refinished and
a new completely retractable
screen will be installed to replace a
stationary one. According to
Hardee, the old screen was in re-
ally bad shape. The new screen
will allow for more stage space to
be available to speakers and other
non-movie programs that take
place hi Hendrix.
Hendrix Theater serves ECU
primarily asa movie facility where
popular movies are shown for stu-
dents during the academic year,
but it is also used by community
organizations and summercamps.
Its stage space is not large enough
fortheatricalpnxluctions and even
with the new retractable screen,
there will not be enough room for
stage sets. ECU has a auditorium
that is used for theatrical produc-
tions so Hendrix is free to show
movies. The theater is also used
forspeakerswhenlargeaudiences
are anticipated.
Inpastsummers,movieshave
been shown to freshman orienta-
tion groups, but remodeling made
summer movies impossible this
year. Students will have to wait
until October to use Hendrix The-
ater, but judging from the renova-
tions that are being made, it will
definitely be worth the wait.
October's movies include Vie
Lost Boys,Uist Action Hero and Sliver
to name a few. Admission is free
withcurrentECU I.D.and all films
start and 8 pm. For more informa-
tion, call Mendenhall Student
Union at 757-6004.
Blues Traveler
H.O.R.D.E. Festival swings
through Walnut Creek
Allgood, Blues Traveler and others play to
small, but dedicated crowd.
By Julie Totten
llifestyle Editor
The second annual
H.O.R.D.E festival brought its
bandwagon of bands to a cozy
crowd on Thursday, August 12.
Media hype and MTV cov-
erage have given this tour phe-
nomenal reviews, but in Raleigh
only a few thousand turned out
for the festivities.
Dave Matthews and
Georgia's own Allgood opened
the show to a few dedicated fans.
The mood was beginning to
take shape for the festival around
- 3:30. Clothes began disappear-
ing, yellow flowers from the
J Creeks mini gardens began deco-
1 rating bags and hair, and finally
la little dancing began.
Aquarium Rescue Unit took
- the stage around this time and
- pleased the audience with tunes
: from their debut album, Mirrors
� of Embarrassment.
Bighead Todd and The
Samples offered the crowd long
(almost sinister) jams. Semi-
drunk people walked around
only when their beers were al-
most empty.
Someone next to me began
talking about this festival and
comparing it to Woodstock. This
tour and Lollapalooza have both
been labeled "the Woodstock of
the '90s
A larger group of people
joined into this young girls' con-
versation and soon we were hav-
ing a panel discussion on this
music.
"1 don't like to think our
generation is back tracking,
we'redoingour own thing said
Angel Honeywitt, an ASU se-
nior.
Well put.
The highlight of the show
was definatly Widespread Panic.
These Capricorn recording art-
ists taunted the very drugged
crowd with their latest release
Everyday.
Festivities began to slow at
this point for me. Every song
seemed too long and flighty, but
there was still a cool magic in
the air for Blues Traveler.
Woodstock�no. Horizons
of rock developing every-
where�maybe.
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Dark lyrics concerning the un-
derbelly of contemporary culture,
drum machines, samples and mini-
mal guitar licks are the main
ingrediants of "Concentration the
latest mi'sical concoction from Ma-
chines of Loving Grace.
MLG first came together in 1989
inTucson,Arizona.Theirfirstsingles
"Burn like Brilliant Trash" and "Rite
of Shiva" helped to establish them in
clubs and college radio. After their
first album they began to tour with
such acts as The Swans, The
WolfgangPressandPeterMurphy.
Their latest release gives the
impression of a watered down
NitzerEbboranextremelysedated
Ministry.
Their songs tend to lean to-
ward the repetitive rhythmsof ma-
chinery and the lead singer's not�
so�scary voice help to take the
punch out of what ever sinister
message they are trying to convey.
See MACHINES page 33
Restaurant Box
Name
Alfredo's
Address
218 E. 5th St.
A Matter of Taste
658 Arlington Blvd.
Andy's Cheesesteaks
The Plaza
Annabelle's
The Plaza
Applebee's Restauarant
202 SW Greenville Blvd.
Barbecue Barn
RFD 14
The Beef Barn
400 St. Andrew's Dr.
Bistro
207 SW Greenville Blvd.
Bojangles Restaurant
911 S. Memorial Dr.
Boli's 5th St. Pizzeria
123 E. 5th St.
Boulevard Bagel Shop
327 E. Arlington Blvd.
Burger King
Captain 1
T7
3016 E. 10th St.
626 S. Memorial
Carolina Grill
Checkers
907 Dickinson Ave.
703 SE Greenville Blvd.
Chic-Fil-A
The Plaza
Chico's Mexican Rest.
521 CotancheSt.
China Town Express
Christine's Fine Dining
218 E. 5th St.
115 Red Banks Rd.
Cliffs Seafood Bar
Clyde RicharcPs"
Hwy.33East(IOthSt.Ext.)
103 Eastbrook Dr.
Crabby Sam's
Crusty's Pizza
710 N.Greene St.
1414 Charles Blvd.
Cubbie's
DarrylVMW
501 S. Evans
800 E. 10th St.
Deli Kitchen
Denny's
103 Raleigh Ave.
808 Memorial
Dino's Pizza
Domino's Pizza
1414 Charles Blvd.
1201 Charles Blvd.
Ernie's Famous Pizza
Famous Pizza
911 Memorial Dr.
100 E. 1 Oth St.�
Filibuster's
114 E. 5th St.
Final Score
2816 E. 10th St.
Fizz Bistro
Fosdick's "1890" Rest.
110 E. 4th St.
2903 S. Evans St.
Golden Corral
Golden Dragon
109 E.Greenville Blvd.
Hwy. 11, Carolina East Cntr.
Gumby'
315 SE Greenville Blvd.
Hardee's
2907 E. 10th St.
Harvey's
817 Memorial Dr.
Hickory Hams
803 Red Banks Rd.
K&W Cafeteria
Carolina East Mall
KFC
600 W. Greenville Blvd.
King Sandwich
512 E. 14th St.
Kwa-San Sandwiches
The Plaza
Little Caesar's
Mandarin Restaurant
323 Arlington Blvd.
2217 Memorial Dr.
Marathon Restaurant
560 Evans St.
Margaux's Restaurant
706 S. Evans St.
Mazatlan Mexican Rest.
608 SW Greenville Blvd.
McDonald's
301 E. 10th St.
Mike's Deli
810 E. 10th St
Milano's
213 E. 5th St.
Ming Dynasty
Rivergate Shopping Center
Monkster's Grill
103 SE Greenville Blvd.
Omar's Express
Papa Oliver's
206 E. 5th St.
314 E. 10th St.
Parker's Barbecue
Peking Palace
2020 E. Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Mall
Peppi's Pizza Den
Pizza Hut
421 Greenville Blvd.
2661 fi.l Oth St.
Pizza Inn
1840 E.Greenville Blvd.
Pizza Transit Authority
S. Charles St.
Professor O'Cools
605 SE Greenville Blvd.
Quincy's Steakhouse
603 Greenville Blvd.
Ragazzi'
109 SE Greenville Blvd.
Red Lobster Rest.
3501 S. Memorial Dr.
Riverside Steak Bar
Ryan's Steak House"
315 Stantonsburg Rd.
Memorial Dr.
Saffron's (Ramada Inn)
203 W. Greenville Blvd.
Santa Fe Jac'
1414 Charles Blvd.
Sbarro's
The Plaza
Shabop's
14th and Charles
Shoney's
803 Memorial Dr.
Smoke House
703 SE Greenville Blvd.
Sonic Drive-In
Staccato's
Greenville Blvd.
505-C Banks Rd.
Substation II
215 E. 4th St.
Subway Sandwiches-
208 E. 5th St.
Szechuan Express
Szechuan Restaurant
The Plaza
100 E. 10th St.
Taco Bell
319 E.Greenville Blvd.
Three Steers Restaurant
Tom's Restaurant
Tar Landing Seafood
105 Airport Rd.
2725 Memorial Dr.
West End Circle
Venter's Grill
Mumford Rd.
Villa Roma Restaurant
2713 E. 10th St.
Waffle House
306 E. Greenville Blvd.
Warren's Hot Dogs
325 Arlington Blvd.
Watertree Terrace
702 S. Memorial Dr.
Wendy's Hamburgers
501 E. 10th St.
Western Sizzlin'
2903 E. 10th St.
Wok's Chef
Buyers Market
Phone
752-0022
Bar BeerWine Delivery
157FT-
355-1111
N
321-0588
N
756-0135
355-2421
752-3000
N
756-1161
N
355-5000
757-3456
N
752-2654
355-3311
Y
IT
752-9776
758-6761
N
"FT
752-1188
321-6779
N
7T
355-4529
757-1666
N
Y
757-1183
355-9500
N
"rf
752-3172
752-1413
N
T
752-0090
758-2233
N
"FT
752-6497
752-1907
N
T
752-5339
757-1610
Y
TT
758-2233
758-6660'
N
"FT
752-4388
757-0731
N
"FT
758-4888
757-1122
752-5855
756-2011
N
756-4412
N
756-3844
N
321-4862
N
752-7822
N
758-1084
N
756-0805
756-7577
N
N
756-6434
N
752-1005
N
756-4787
N
756-7256
756-87
N
752-0326
N
752-7566
N
355-3737
N
752-1119
N
830-6686
N
758-9550
N
752-7111
N
756-3993
N
830-0588
75&-6600
N
IT
758-9215
756-1169
N
N
756-0825
752-4445
N
IT
758-6266
N
757-1955
N
355-2946
756-7888
N
321-1976
756-4000
752-5001
355-3111
Y
355-8300
N
758-5225
N
355-4929
N
752-1955
N
752-7572
N
355-2211
N
756-9190
350)064-
N
T
752-2183
N
758-7979
N
355-8228
757-181
N
N
756-8231
N
758-0327
N
756-2414
756-1012
N
N
752-2767
N
758-1042
N
756-7441
N
321-1000
N
758-3401
N
758-5535
N
758-2712
N
32I-H83
N
N
N
N
N
TT
N
N
T
N
Y
T
Y
Y
T
Y
TT
N
TT
N
"FT
Y
TT
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
T
N
Y
N
T
Y
T
N
N
Y
TT
N
N
T
N
N
N
T
N
Y
T
N
N
Y
TT
N
N
N
N
N
N
TT
N
N
N
-w
N
N
N
N
"N
N
"FT
N
TT
N
N
Y
TT
N
IT
N
N
TT
N
TT
Y
T
N
N
N
73"
N
N
N
IT
N
N
N
N
N
Y
"FT
N
N
N
TT
N
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N
N
N
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N
TT
N
T
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
IT
N
"FT
N
"FT
N
N
N
"FT
N
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N
"FT
N
N
N
N
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N
N
i.imii (?�
�oMnai
MIHWIWI (II Jl"





August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 23
Today: HIV Infections
mifer Philips, Student Health Services
i ard that
� k tor con-
ng 1 MV it you are drunk. Is
this true1
Answer: I lu' risk of acquir-
ing HIV or nx other
sexually transmit- 1
ted disease �
(STD) i-
greater when 4,
people mix w
alcohol with
sexual activ- m
ity.
This is
true tor several
reasons. When
people have had
too much to drink,
judgment is impaired
which leads to poor decision
making. For example, a person
who is reallv intoxicated may en-
gage in a sexual situation that
she or he might later regret. Most
col lege students are familiar with
the term "beer goggles"�when
a person drinks to a point where
anyone looks sexually appealing.
The basic premise of beer gog-
gling is best summed up by the
popular phrase, "Go to bed at 2
o'clock with a 10 and wake up at
10 o'clock with a 2" (this phrase
applies for both genders). The
problem with beer goggles is that
people may end up in a sexual
situation with someone who is
unfamiliar and of an unknown
STD status. Acquaintance rape
is also more likely to occur when
one or both of the partners has
been drinking.
Secondly, when people are
reallv drunk, it is less likely that
contraceptive de-
vices such as con-
doms will be
f used
correctlyif
at all. Ab-
sence of con-
traceptives
puts both
parties at risk
forpregnancy
and STDs. Here
is a sobering sta-
tistic: Women stand a
1 in 5 chance of encounter-
ing a sexual partner infected with
genital warts or chlamydia
(source: Student Insurance Di-
vision, Health News, May 1993).
When alcohol is used in ex-
cess, it compromises the immune
system. A compromised im-
mune system makes the human
body more vulnerable to dis-
eases, including HIV disease.
Finally, alcohol is a depres-
sant that hinders sexual perfor-
mance. Some people report that
they feel more of a desire to par-
ticipate in sexual activities when
they are drunk. The reality is
that alcohol impairs the ability
to reach orgasm for both men
and women.
Eight two-hour sessions designed to prepare you
for the format and content of the
October 16,1993 GMA T Exam
CAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
GMAT
Review
Course
Course Schedule:
TuesdaySeptember 14
ThursdaySeptember 16
TuesdaySeptember 21
ThursdaySeptember 23
TuesdaySeptember 28
ThursdaySeptember 30
TuesdayOclober 5
ThursdayOctober 7
Course Time:
6:30 p.m. -8:30 p.m.
ONLY $149
Cost includes
all instructional fees
and two popular (i.MA T
review manuals
Verbal and Math Topics to Be Reviewed:
? Sentence Correction
? Reading Comprehension
Critical Reasoning
4" Problem Solving (Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry)
? Data Sufficiency
Location:
General Classroom Building, Room 1017
Instructors:
Dr. Patrick Bizzaro, Associate Professor, English
Dr. Mark A. Coffin, Assistant Professor, Decision Sciences
Texts:
The Princeton Review: Cracking the System: The GMAT
The Official Guide for GMAT Review
(includes actual GMAT questions with solutions)
REGISTER AT:
School of Business � Professional Programs
1200 General Classroom Building
(919)757 '6377
Volunteer program offers rewarding experiences
Judy Baker, volunteer coordinator, encourages ECU students to get invovled.
By Danial Willis
Staff Writer
ECU has a very successful vol-
unteer program which is headed
by Judy Baker.
Manv people throughout this
community are interested in vol-
unteer work. Often, they have no
idea what they want to do or how
to get invoked.
"I understand that a lot of
peopledon't know how togoabout
volunteering, but anybody is free
to give me a call or come by my
office. I'd be glad to tell them about
the many opportunities that are
available inGreenville'Bakersaid.
Shestarted the program in 1988
with four agencies and no volun-
teers. Now she has 700 volunteers
and is in contact with 43 agencies.
The program has been funded
by various grants. The first two
years a federal grant provided sup-
port. Last year, funding was pro-
vided by a grant from RJ. Reynolds.
The most recent request is for
the university to finance the project.
Baker speaks very optimisti-
cally about the future of the pro-
gram with or without the financial
support of the university.
"We'll absorb the cost of the
program even if the university can't
provide funding she said. "Our
volunteers just mean so much to
our community. Certain Commu-
nity service agencies in Greenville
wouldn't be available if it wasn't
for the support of our volunteers
One of the major things that
Baker emphasizes is that volun-
teers benefit . "Peopledon't under-
stand how much the actual volun-
teers benefit she said. "If some-
body can gain a certain degree of
self-respect, or practical experience
in, a field they are interested in
then everybody benefits
Lifestyles is hiring interesting,
serious, creative writers. All
majors welcome. 2.0 G.P.A.
Fill out application in the
Student Publications Building
(across from Joyner Library)
ASAP. Poetastors need not
apply.
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Offers Expire Salt. 25
Baker has received numerous
awards on the behalf of her volun-
teer program. Some are national
awards such as the Points of Light
Award and the Most Outstanding
Collegiate Award.
Baker sits in her small office
wihtoutairconditioningon thesec-
ond floor of Christenbury and says,
"Now I have all these awards, and
there's nowhere to put them. It's
kind of funny, but that's hardly a
problem
When asked what motivated
her to get involved in volunteer
work Baker was very quick to an-
swer: "I've raised two children in
this community and I feel very close
to the vouth around this area so it
really does bother me when
people try to project the younger
people as negative figures be-
cause they do so much for the
city of Greenville. These pro-
grams are essential to the com-
munity and they represent the
youth positively
If you are interested in do-
ing volunteer work, don't hesi-
tate to get in contact with Baker.
Her office is located at 201
Christenbury, and her phone
number is 757-6432.
She'll tell you what oppor-
tunities are available and whom
to contact.
Southern Living fust Off Campus!
4 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, Dining room, 1934 Sq. Ft, Deck,
Extremely Private Back Yard, priced at $85,900 with a
possible Lease Purchase!
For all you real estate needs, call Cindy Hoblitall
at 1st Choice Properties
321-2700 or 830-5217
COME OVER
TO HARLEY
DAVIDSON:
We'd like to invite you to visit
J&E Harlcy-Davidson. Sec the brand-new
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Har ley-Davidson motor clothes, collectibles,
and genuine accessories.
j&E Harlcy-Davidson
1008 Dickinson Ave.
(Intersection of 10th St. and Dickinson Ave.)
Greenville, NC 27834
919-757-1345
I ���.� 11,11 I DM.I
I Ml.II ill I s. .
- ��





August 25, 1993
j
onsidered best summer film
ernan.
i ii i ni
n d
i Kimble is confronted
with on his road to possible vin-
n All of the gaps get filled
ind this allows the audience to
tness the genius, and the pain,
thai Kimble experiences.
Harrison Ford is one ol the
few a tors who has yel to make a
ite flop since becoming a star. He
ne carefully chooses his scripts and
ly he can be relied on to play con-
e, vincing men in crisis situations
that range
from Han
Ia i'i! t�
i is wrong-
ring his
ik thai
shuttled
Kiml
nes a fugitive
tely attempts
to find the one-armed man who
murdered his wife, Helen (played
in a flashback by Sela Ward).
le fights with the man who
murdered Helen but the killer
leaving Kimble to ex-
plain why his fingerprints are all
over everything in the bedroom
and no trace of an assailant could
be found.
Upon Kimble's escape,
Deputy U.S. Marshall Samuel
rd I tommy I ee Jones) gets
. iment to recover the tu-
ve.
Witty and wise, Gerard pur-
sues Kimble with admirable
aplomb. Gerard's controlled
chase parallels Kimble's frantic
hunt for the real killer. The two
chafes are destined to run head
long into each other like power-
ful locomotn es.
gy to
a tired hi-
jackin g
stO! �
last
year's
U h d e r
No film this summer
possesses the artistic
sensibility displayed
in 'The Fugitive
H avis
c o m -
bines his impressive skill with a
top-notch screenplay by JebStua.t
and Da id Twohy.
Davis has been called an un-
compromising director and one
scene in his current film bears
this out. Davis needed to stage a
train crash and refused to use
models to do it. He took an old
bus and retired train cars and
staged one of the most exciting
crash scenes ever seen on cellu-
loid. It the crash looks real, these
exists a good reason for that real-
ism�Andrew Davis demands it
One of the most refreshing
aspects of The Fugitive is its real-
ism. Rarely does the screen fade
to black as Kimble wanders
around after his escape. The cam-
era makes sure to capture every
d l a n a
ones to
John Book
(in Wit-
ness, his
onlyOscai
nominated
p e r to r-
ma nee) to
mammmmmmmammm Jack Ryan
(in one of
last
summer's best films, Patriot
Game).
Though the script has sparse
dialogue for Kimble, Ford can tell
more with his eyes and gestures
than many lesser actors can with
an entire page of oration. Ford
anchors the film and gives The
Fugitive its heart.
Tommy Lee Jones gives the
film its soul. His Deputy Gerard
elicits nearly as much compas-
sion as Kimble. The audience
conies to respect his professional-
ism and his calm in the face of
adversity. Jones brings life to a
role that could have quickly be-
come staid. With many fine per-
formances on his resume, Jones
could now become a major star.
One scene involving the death
"58$sm$?
of another fugitive exemplifies
ones'ability. Gerard has to shoot
a felon while the criminal holds
one of Gerard's men hostage.
When the agent later tells Gerard
that he could have killed him,
Gerard asks to see his ear He
says: "Can you hear this?" The
agent slowly nods. Then Gerard
punctuates each word and tersely,
quietly says: "I don't, bargain.
Did you hear that1 I don't bar-
gain
Jones' demeanor throughout
the scene raises the scene and the
entire film above the tired con-
ventions of the thriller. Deputy
Gera rd is green a I i fe by Jones and
is remox ed from the trappings of
conventional law enforcement of-
ficers.
The big films this summer
have been remarkably good, ex-
cepting Jurassic Park which was a
dino-disappointme.u. I he Firm
riveted audiences and In the Line
of Fire provided a well-crafted
Hollywood cliche. Still, The Fugi-
tive outshines them all.
No film this summer pos-
sesses the artistic sensibility dis-
played in The Fugitive. From dark
tunnels where shadows loom to
dizzving overhead shots of Chi-
cago to remarkably taut chase se-
quences, not one aspect of this
film lets the viewer down.
No film this summer warrants
the repeated viewings that Tlie
Fugitive does.
Knowing the story only di-
minishes part of the fun. Just
watching the cat and mouse
games in which Kimble and
Gerard engage provides reason
enough for another viewing.
On a scale of one to HI, The
Fugitive rates a nine.
20OFF
ALL ACCESSORIES
WITH
PURCHASE OF
TANK COMBO.
422 Arlington Blvd.
(located behind Animal House)
355-8250
Greenville's Most UNUSUAL
Gift Selections
SALE
Buy Two Pieces of Jewelry &
Get The Third FREE!
Many in -Store Sales Also!
'Downtown' � the place
where memories are made
By Julie Totten
Lifestyle Editor
1 or as long as ECU has been on
the map, this school has been noto-
rious tor its downtown scene.
Whoever ou are or whate er
vou like- there's a social gathering
place somewhere. Downtown is the
perfect activity forde-stressification,
unwinding, and meeting new, fresh
faces. Probably some of your fond-
est college memories, will include
the wind "downtown
Wherever you end up on those
chilly, Thursday, November
nights�make a few new buddies,
spread a smile, and act responsibly.
Attic
Music lovers agree this legend-
arv club has by tar the best sound.
orth Carolina ("local"bands),such
.is Sex Police mmS Hootv and the
Blowfish draw enormous crowds
to shows. Finicky musical taste
will be pleased at the Attic and a
different atmosphere is present at
every show. Nationally known
bands such as Widespread Panic,
Blue OysterCult, and Drivin and
e ryin have rocked Greenville
through many nights.
O'Rocks
For the alternative, leather
wearing, hippie bead bearing,
freak in us all. Umm. Sounds
pretty weird. Well, it isn't. This
ultra laidback club is a nice es-
cape from the downtown hype.
local favorites such as Breed 13
and Fountain of Youth take
centerstage almost monthly, de-
livering delicious runes and fun.
Although the club is small, there
See DOWNTOWN paqe 33
WE NEVER
forget that
you're the
Customer.
s Centura Bank
Member FDIC
Armani Shoe Store
Located At:
Greenville Square Shopping Center
(next to K-Mart)
(919)756-8182 g

We Offer A Large Selection of
Ladies Name Brand
Shoes & Accessories.
Also The Areas Largest Selection of
Metallic & Frogskin Handbags.
Present This Coupon And Receive
An Additional DISCOUNT!
13 25 OFF I
�� Your Purchase !
valid until SEPTEMBER 11, 1993
Must present coupon at tinic of purchase. Not valid with any other offer.
Welcome Back
ECU Students and Faculty
Open 7 Days
11:00am- 1:00am.
L-unch Specials
$3.95
Mon-Fril 1am-3pm
Dinner Specials
$5.95
inday-Thurs after
12 Price Appetizers
Sun-Wed After 9 pm
Hungry Pirate
Specia
$3.45
Mon-Fri 2-5pm
Sat-Sun 11am-5pm
Drink Specials
Sun-Thurs
All ABC Permits
1
� V-1.JL
-Ar
521 Cotanche St
Greenville, NC
757-1666
University Center
Next to
Harris Teeter
DENIM SHIRTS
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Wed-Saturday with Student ID Extra
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Wed 25-Fri 27





August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 25
ECU students bid
Greenville goodbye
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
While most of students will
spend the fall and spring semes-
ters in the flatlands of the coastal
plain, another group of ECL stu-
dents will study in places far, far
away.
Twenty-one students from
ECU will participate in the Na-
tional Student Exchange (NSE)
and the International Student Ex-
change Program (ISEP) beginning
next fall. An equal number of stu-
dents from other United States
and foreign schools will also at-
tend classes at ECU.
Students in the NSE program
will go to other U.S. campuses as
close as Raleigh and as far away
as Manoa, Hawaii. Students in
the international program will live
on campuses in such places as
Australia and Togo in western
Africa.
"The advantage is in expand-
ing the student's horizons and get-
ting access to courses that may
not be taught a t their regular cam-
puses said Stephanie Evancho
of the ECU International Pro-
gram
Under the terms of the pro-
gram, the students pay an applica-
tion fee and their regular tuition at
home. 1 hey pay room and hoard
kvs charged by the schools thev
attend.
The ECL students get credit
for the hours they complete at the
other campuses and the credit
counts towards their graduation.
An equal number of students
from other campuses ha . e selected
ECU for studv next year. Some of
the U.S. schools sending students
to ECU include the University of
Maine, the University of Wiscon-
sin, Illinois State and the State Uni-
versity of New York (SUNY). For-
eignstudentsexpected on campus
next fall will represent Vaxjo Uni-
versity in Sweden, LUISS in Italy,
University of Salvador in Argen-
tina, MSTI Angers in France and
the University of Marburg in Ger-
many.
ECU became a member of the
NSE in 1989. More than 90 other
U.S. campusesare participating in
the program by encouraging stu-
dents to exchange places with stu-
dents at other member campuses.
Wilmington artist colors movie screen
U 11 MINGTOR N.C. (AP)�
Andre Mitchell hasa hard timecall-
ing attention to himself.
I e talks softly and sighs un-
comfortably when asked to discuss
his artwork.
1! he had his way, he would just
l a try i n quietly, paintinand work-
ing as a scenic artist on film produc-
tions.
I Hher people won't let him.
Mitchell's father, Alfred, thinks his
son has talent and brags about his
earliest efforts. His supervisors on
theset of the film Inkwell must agree.
Mi tchell's a rtwork is being used
throughout the movie; and he was
commissioned to paint a portrait of
BookerT. Washington, blackeduca-
tor and leader, for the film. Inkwell,
directed by Matty Rich (Straight Out
of Brooklyn), is the storv of a black
boy coming of age during the sum-
mer of 1976 in Martha's Vineyard.
The movie is being filmed in
Wilmingtonand the Fort Fisher area.
Mitchell, 34, of Wilmington
started his production career spack-
ling sets. He has worked in the fiber-
glass, construction and paint depart-
ments on Teenage Mutant Ninja
Turtles, Billy Bathgate, Houscheld
Saints and Simple Justice.
He decided he wanted to be a
scenic artist and has worked toward
that goal.
"I paid close attention to what
they were doing and I said That's
what 1 want to do right there he
said.
Mitchell has been interested in
art ever since he got his hands on his
family album.
"I drew Frito Bandito mus-
taches on ail-of the pictures in the
album hesaid. "Insecond grade,
I did a papiermache turtle. From
that day, when I made the turtle in
second grade, each year I had an
See ARTIST page 33
Censorship gurus lose
NEW DELHI, India (AP)�A
city judge has refused to ban a
popular new movie that has of-
fended some moviegoers because
of its suggestive theme song,
"What's Beneath the Blouse
The Hindi song is sung to a
gyrating dance sequence by the
buxom actress Madhuri Dixit, but
the answer to the title question is
an innocent, "There's a heart be-
neath my blouse
New DelhiJudgeS.M.Chopra,
saving the song is not indecent,
Romantic dress predicted for Fall fashion
AP�Women are going to be
just dandy this fall, fashionably
speaking.
Silhouettes in the stores are
decidedly feminine�with soft
shoulders, long flowing skirts and
little waists. The closest anything
comes to last season's menswear
look on women is Edwardian: tap-
estry frock coats and crushed vel-
vet smoking jackets.
"The customer is reacting
strongly to softer, romantic looks
says La Velle Olexa, vice president
of fashion merchandising at Lord
& Taylor in New York.
One of the most romantic looks
is a ruffled blouse, which Chris-
tine Gentry calls the first and most
universal must-have
"We're seeing it across the
board from most every designer,
and it's the perfect way to update
last year's suit, favorite jacket or
trousers to make it look very fall
'93 says Gentry, regional public
relations director for
Bloomingdale's in New York.
She recommends white or
ivory in cotton, rayon or silk with
an oversized ruffled collar and
French cuffs.
Add to it an English-style
country riding jacket, fitted and
feminine. Important details, Gen-
try says, are wider lapels, brass
buttons and turned-back cuffs.
She's placing her bet on Ralph
Lauren's double-breasted military
jacket in burgundy crushed vel-
vet.
Apropos velvet, it's every-
where.
"It's very difficult to talk about
fall without talking about velvet
Olexa says. "There's hardly a clas-
sification that it doesn't cover
You'll find it on Chesterfield
coats and Edwardian jackets, for
sure. You'll also see it adding tex-
tural interest to sportswear; long,
full skirts; dresses, even accesso-
ries such as hats, scarves, gloves,
shoes and boots.
"Velvet hasn't been so impor-
tant for day for a long time Olexa
says.
Nor for evening. The after-five
item to have is a long, romantic
dress-in velvet
"It's a Juliet dress, empire,
ankle-length, with long sleeves and
a streamlined silhouette says
Gentry of Bloomingdale's. "It'sthe
must-have �vening dress for fall
and holiday, soft, feminine and very
elegant in its simplicity
if you don't fancy it in black,
you'll likely find one in the season's
jewel tones, such as emerald, sap-
phire or ruby.
Pants remain major players�
full or flared, soft and sweeping,
says Becky Bailey, corporate public
relations manager for Dayton's,
Hudson's and Marshall Field's in
Minneapolis. "They're part of the
new romantics, heavily influenced
by the Edwardian era, in luxurious
fabrics such as sueded silks and
See FASHION paoe32
WHOLLY
jggEHome & Garden Showplaces
f MX
-�
i
WSi& Ml 1 W C W W WV WiA W
isiuLi
1 $
Straight out 1 Oth: Si East 5 miles past
Hastings Fordjpn Hwy 33 East
10 Discoyhl w ECU ID on
nonrsate items.
M-$aff30-6:00,
Sun 1:efe6:00 j
We Are Now
Frl-Stf
WSai
S1.aKaM
ECU STUDENTS SI 79Game
MONTHUR
9pm Midnigtit
V
Year Old!
And To Celebrate AMF East Carolina Bowl Presents
ran ��
75C HOT DOGS
Daily from August
Zlst-SuptPOi
tewt mw Ml bv iimn1 ven we mew
n V VW ��� M MMN JJM f WWW I WMill
�mi � k�
75C DRINKS
AMF East Carolina Bowl
700 Red Banks Road Greenville, NC
355 5510
rejected a request by a lawyer who
was embarrassed when his 3-year-
old daughter sang the lyrics in a
shopping mall.
The lawyer, Ram Parkash
Chugh, had tried to ban the song
from the music market even be-
fore The Villain was released on
Aug. 6 but lost that plea too.
Bombay's film industry
churns out 850 movies annually,
mostly aimed a t a semi-literate au-
dience that enjoys violence and
titillation.
Help save
the planet
Please Recycle
The East Carolinian
when finished.
NEWEST BARS IN TOWN
"BARS THAT WON'T GET YOU IN TROUBLE WITH THE UW"
Students receive free beverages w ID
758-2712
SiflHay-Tlnrsday
11:00-9:30
Friday-Saturday
11:30-10:00
Delicious
Chopped Sirloin
with mushroom gravy or peppers & onions
-includes choice of potato and hot Texas toast
FREE SUNDAE BAR
"EATINONLV
I-w i: POTATO HAK
Limit 4 persons per coupon. Must
present coupon when ordering.
Coupon expires September 15, 1993.
Not valid with any other discounts or
specials.
Good at Greenville locations only.
2903 E. 1001 St.
ALFREDO'S 752-0022
We deliver to Dorms & Apartments
WELCOME BACK to ECU'S Favorite Pizza Place
Pick -Up SPECIAL
"Terminator"
36 SLICES 1 Topping
$099
FREE DELIVERY
liUSCH
PITCHERS
SUn-MDNTVES
2 LARGEI Topping
1 LARGE1 TOPPING
$549
EVERY NIGHT 'TIL MIDNIGHT
GO PIRATES! ECU38 SYRACUSE29

mm
SZECHUAN GARDEN
� LUNCHEON SPECIALS. MON-FRI � SUNDAY BUFFET
� PRIVATE BANQUET FACILITIES � ALL ABC PERMITS
2
m
jB.
VISK
TAKE OUT ORDERS
757-1818
OPENING HOURS
M-THU 11:30-9:30
F R I 11:30-10:30
SAT 5:00-10:30
SUN 12:00-8:30
B
909 S. EVANS
GREENVILLE
w �
i
09 5
�s
5 6

5 E
m
s �
E i
00
-VcJw'
GORDON'S
GOLF & SKI
�1003 E Greenville Blvd
Largest Snow Ski Shop
East of Raleigh
We Sell 8 Rent
Inline Skates





AlMJU
1993
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 26
For Rent
E3 Hcfp Wanted I E3 Help Wanted
For Sale
WD Services Offered
Personals
WYNDHAM COIR I
REEDY BRANCH APARTMENTS.
New 2 bedrooms on East 10th Street.
Ready tor tall semester. Now taking
applications. $385.00 p m. Lease and
deposit required. Duffus Realrv, Inc
756-2675.
HUGE ROOM with 2 closets and pri-
vate bath. Furnished, walk to ECU,
kitchen privileges, utilities included.
Prefer quiet female non-smoker. 5230
mo. Call 752-2636.
FURNISHED ROOM for rent. Utili-
ties included. Across from campus.
Phone 758-2585.
ROOM AVAILABLE. $80month, 1
4 utilities. Call Bill ASAP. 752-6947.
ATTENTION STUDENTS. Two bed-
room apartment across from campus.
Rent $325 and one vear lease. Call 757-
3191.
FEMALE CHRISTIAN roommate to
share 2 BR, 1 -1 2bath townhouse. Rent
$140 (includes water, sewar and cable)
and 13 utilities. Call 321-4931.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bednxim &
Efficiency ApartmenLs.
CALL 752-2865
LEASED PARKING AVAILABLE!
$15 PER MONTH.
LOCATION: BEHIND CLEMENT
DORM. THE CORNER OF READE
DICKINSON
CALL 752-8585 TODAY1
Roommate Wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for apartment 1 2 block from Artbldg
3 blocks from downtown and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great fro art stu-
dents. Call 757-1947.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY to fill oneof three bedrooms in
a large house located near the inter-
section of Charles & 10th Streets. Rent
is SI 50, location is superb (approx. 1
2 mile from campus). Call Mark or
Trey at 752-8927 today!
ROOMMATE: Need FM for2bd. 2
bath. 2 blk form ECU. $225 rent. $225
dep. Mature, Responsible. 830-9595 or
830-3702. Drop a note in box 51 Biol
graduate office.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
Non-smoking. Furnished Courtney
Square apartment w washer & dryer.
Thru May. S160month plus 1 3 utili-
ties. 321-1876.
H Help Wanted
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call toll
free 1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
PARTNERS NEEDED-Recreational
Services is hiring individuals for the
Partners in Well-Being Adapted Rec-
reation Program. Individuals experi-
enced in working with disabled popu-
lations in fitness activities, ie. swim-
ming, weight training, are encour-
aged to apply in 204 Christenbury
Gym. Call Kari Cleveland at 757-6387
for more details.
BABYSITTER NEEDED Mon Wed,
Fri mornings. One year old boy. Ref-
erences appreciated and must have
transportation. 355-2088.
PIANO PLAYER NEEDED. Small
Christian Church nearGreenville, Sal-
ary neg. Call 757-3207.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPT. is recruiting 12-
1 r. part-time youth soccer coaches for
� fall youth soccer program. Appli-
cants must possess some knowledge
soccer kilk and have the ability
and patience to work with vouth. Ap-
plicants must be able to coach young
peopleages 5-16, in soccer fundamen-
tals. Hoursarefrom3:00pm until7:00
pm with some nights and weekend
coaching. This program will run from
September to mid-November. Salary
starts at $4.35 per hour. For more
information, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550.
THE GREENVILLE RECREATION
AND PARKS DEPT. is seeking certi-
fied soccer officials for its Fall Adult
Soccer League. The league runs Sat-
urdays and Sundays from mid-Sep-
tember till mid-November. For more
information, please contact Michael
Daly at 830-4550.
COMMUNITY BIBLE STUDY, A
women's Interdenominational Bible
Study, meeting at Oakmont Baptist
Church, Thursday mornings, 9am to
11:30am needs several young women
to work in our nursery area to pro-
vide patient, loving care toour young-
est participants. Church nursery ex-
perience preferred, references re-
quested. Must provide own transpor-
tation and be able to make commit-
ment through Dec. 9. Call Mrs.
Stansell, class coordinator at 756-0842.
WANTED: Female to care for 4 chil-
dren, 6 hrswk , flexible schedule,
$5hr.Mustbe non-smoker, have had
CPR. Prefer early childhood ed. ma-
jor or nursing. No housework in-
volved. Call 355-8223.
SPRING BREAK '94 - Sell trips, earn
cash and go free Student Travel Ser-
vices is now hiring campus reps. Call
1-800-648-4849.
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!
Brody 's is accepting sales applications
for the fall semester. We have part-
time availabilities to fit everyone's
busy schedule: 10 to 2,12 to 9, or 6 to
9. Weoffergood salariesclothing dis-
counts. Apply at Customer Service,
Brody's, the Plaza, Monday and
Thursday 1 to 4 pm.
WANTED: PART TIME VAN DRIV-
ERS: CTS Management Company is
looking for van drivers to operate the
PATS vans. PATS is a local para transit
system fdr the elderly and handi-
capped citizens of Pitt County. Some
early morning and afternoon hours,
as well as midday. Duties include op-
eration of the vehicle and some assis-
tance of elderly, handicapped and dis-
advantaged passengers. Criteria for
the job: 1 -Positive Attitude, 2-21 years
ofage,3-Clean driving record, 4-Clean
criminal record. If you are a people
person with interest, please contact:
CTS Management Company, Wilcar
Executive Center, Suite 107, 2223 W
10th St, Greenville NC 27834, 830-
1939.
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVES
needed by Sportswear Company to
sell to fraternities and sororities. Av-
erage $50 - $100 working one night
per week. Call 1-800-242-8104.
FREEHOUSINGfor serious studen t.
Now - Sept. 30 in exchange for 16 hrs
housework. Serious students only.
Also free beach weekends in Emerald
Isle. 355-1399.
NEED AFTERSCHOOL caregiver to
care for 2 children (1st and 3rd grades)
, 2:30-5:30. M-F near Univ. Area. Ma-
ture, responsible w reliable transpor-
tation; Child develop or education
background preferred. Refs required.
757-1378.
MOTHER'S HELPER Needed to
transport toddler tofrom preschool.
Tues and Thurs, Aug-May, 8-9 am
(to) 12-1 pm (from). Will pay per hour
plus gas. 756-3224 evenings or leave"
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL
HONOR SOCIETY
Golden Key Members - We're
back Get involved now! Call your
V.P Lori, for info - 355-2654. Pizza
Party Sep 15.
ORIENTATION TO CAREER
SERVICES
The Career Services Office in-
vites seniors and graduate students
who will graduate in Dec, 1993 or
MaySummer 1994, to attend an ori-
entation meeting at 3:00 PM, in
Mendenhall, room 244. Graduate stu-
dent s who have completed 12 hours
are also encouraged to attend. The
staff will give an overview of career
services and distribu te forms for stu-
dents to register with Career Ser-
vices. They will also discuss the pro-
cedures for establishing a creden-
tials file and participating in em-
ployment interviews on campus.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt Co. Special
Olympics is recruiting for volunteer
coaches in the following sports: soc-
cer, basketball skills, team basket-
ball, swimming, gymnastics, bowl-
ing, power-lifting and rollerskating.
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY-
JUST A WILLINGNESS TO WORK
WITH MENTALLY HANDI-
CAPPED CHILDREN AND
ADULTS. Special training sessions
message.
noon. Applications from Reception-
ist. Ward and Smith, 120 West
Firetower Road.
NEEDED: People to lose weight.
100 natural, 100�o guaranteed. Call
758-7231.
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS for sales
persons and secretarial jobs. Applv
between 2-5 pm: SDF computers, 106
E. 5th St (near Cubbies) Greenville
752-3694.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS Restaurant
is now accepting applications for
waitstaff positions. No phone calls -
apply in person 2-4 pm daily. Lo-
cated behind Quincy's at 605
Greenville Blvd.
ST. TIMOTHY'S Episcopal Church
needs nursery worker (male or fe-
male) each sunday 8:30-12:30. Refer-
ences required. For interview call
Winston Kobe, 756-9507.
EXPERIENCED babysitter wanted to
care for two young children (ages 1
and 3) in my home on Wednesdays
from 8:30-5:00. Own transportation
and references required. Call 756-
0941.
For Sale
BOOKS FOR SALE. Stats 3228 $15,
Music 3018 and recorder $20, Psych
Nursing 3800 $20. Call 7588-6363 (Jeff).
DORM FRIDGE FOR SALE - Perfect
for dorm life. Paid $100, Sale $40 firm.
Call Suzanne at 758-0700.
FOR SALE: Macintosh SE, 20 HD, 1
MB Memory with Keyboard and
Mouse. $650 Call 758-4300 from 9.00
AM to 5:00 PM and ask for Susan.
TWINN BED, good Condition. Mat-
tress, box springs and frame for $50 or
best offer. Please call 752-9482 ASAP.
CONTEMPORARY L-shape sofa, re-
cliner on each end, 2 vears old - perfect
condition, $600 or best offer. Call 355-
3993.
EARLY AMERICAN Oak finish bed-
room suite, includes fullqueen head-
board, 5-drawer chest and 2-drawer
night stand. Practically new $225.00.
Call 321-1708, leave message.
405 BILTMORE ST. YARD SALE.
Round table and chairs, good clothes,
knick knacks, jewelry and much more.
7 AM-1 PM Sat August 28.
FORSALE:ContemporaryStvlecouch
and matching chair. Beigetan color-
goes with everything - call 757-9681.
GENERAL HOUSEHOLD furniture,
desk, tables, sofas, lamps, chairs, di-
nette set, swivel rockers, dishes and
much more. Moving, must sell. 830-
3988.
2 DORM REFRIDGERATORS for
sale. $50 a piece. Good condition. Call
758-2021. Leave a message if no one is
home.
BIKE FOR SALE: 19 inch Schwinn
Frontier. Excellent condition! $130 or
Best Offer. Call 752-9633, ask for
Heather.
Catcli TheEmt Camlmktn
� ooiball Txhlmd Apjpeari tig
Frklav 27,1993!
CERWIN VEGA speakers, 15" Woof-
ers, 405 watts, $400. Call 830-6665. Ask
for Josh.
DORM-SIZE REFRIDGERATOR,
excellent condition, used only 1 aca-
demic year. Per'ect for keeping all of
the necessary things COLD! Asking
$60, but will negotiate. 752-4627.
LOFT FOR SALE: Great for dorm life
or just an apartment. Great condition.
$50.00. Call 758-6363. Ask for Kevin.
FOR SALE: 1985 Honda CRX-SI. Per-
fect Mech. Condition - Sporrv car.
$3200.00. 830-4910.
DORM CARPET - Various sizes and
colors - from $10 up. Wilcar Executive
Center, Room 101 (Manager's Office),
233 W10th St, M-F, 9:00 AM -4:00 PM,
752-8072
FOR SALE - Twin size loft with mat-
tress. Ideal for dorm or apartment.
S100 Negotiable. Call 919-946-2161.
igjgggggQueen SkewFrame
& Deluxe Orthopecic Mattress Set
in Factory Box. Cant Use Cost
$750, Sacrifice $285 Cash.
�2jH9� White, Iron & Brass
w 2 Twin Size Orthopedic Mat
tresses & Rollout Pojxp Trundle
Neva Used In Box. Cost $700.
$310 Cash
(919)637-2645
K3 Services Offered
PAINTBALL: 100 pure adrena-
line rush. Anyone, regardless of
your size, strength or physical
abilities, can be successful at
Paintball. Have a blast Call 752-
8380.
PAINTABLL: It's the most in-
tense and electrifying sport you
will ever play. Call 752-8380 for
information and reservations.
WE BREED EXCITEMENT!
Watch Doctor
' ' ' , 214D East AriingtonBlvd
OT) (919)756-9290 f
� Open Moo-Sat. 10-6 l
Across from the Bike Pest
beside First Union
Full Service Watch Repair
Replacement bands & Batteries
CMzen, Bulova, Pulsar, and Relic
Pearl and Bead stringing
We buy and sell ROLEX watches
WebuyGOLD
Visa, MC, andAinex accepted
Full line ofPromaster watches
PAINTBALL: That's right,
Paintball is here in Greenville.
Come by yourself or with a group.
Come and feel the excitement.
Call 752-8380.
PIRATE PAINTBALL: Weareon
6.1 Back Packs. Hammocks. Canteens Tenls
Cook Sets. Netting. Cots. Ammo Cans, Sizes
2-60-Military Clothing Boots. Shoes. Rainwear.
Sleeping Bags, Trunks. Foot Lockers. 4.000
Different Items, Browsers Welcome
FORT HENRY'S ARMY NAVY
15W S. EVANS STREET 756-8781
Announcements
IIXTIfVlATE .
appareI
Romantic Ensembles for
Special Evenings
plus sizes available
M-S10-6pm
756-6M6
Arlington Village
909 Red Banks Rd.
the cutting edge of high energv
entertainment. Call 752-8380 for
reservations and information.
PIRATE PAINTBALL: Great for
clubs, organizations and groups.
We can organize tournaments,
and company or group picnics.
Call 752-8380 for info and reser-
vations. WE BREED EXCITE-
MENT
TRAVEL FREE! Sell quality va-
cations. The hottest destinations
in Jamaica, Cancun, South Padre,
Florida. Most reliable Spring
Break Company with the easiest
w-ay towards free trip! Best com-
missions! Sun Splash Tours 1-800-
426-7710.
DON'T DELAY, EXPERIENCE IS
ONLY A PHONE CALL AWAY:
Professionally typed term papers,
reports, dissertation papers,
manuals, forms, charts, spread
sheets, graphics and more. All
work created on WP5.2, Harvard
Graphics, or Lotus 123 (Windows
Application) and printed from
LaserJet 4. Color graphs and
charts available. All at an afford-
able price. Call todav 355-2523 or
931-5452, ask for Angela.
LOOK YOUR BEST for the brand
new year. Call Kimberly at 931-
7863 for your personal fitness
training.
JOIN THE STUDENT PIRATE
CLUB TODAY. Have benefits of
Pirate Club Members, receive ben-
efits from local businesses and
nightclubs. Call 757-4540 or 758-
7005 and apply today.
TO ANA V. , TEC, P.T. and PHI
SIGMA PI welcome back! I hope all
of you have a good year and a kickin
time. Hope to see you around the
town. From your friendly campus
newspaper. (L.F.)
TO: LAURA, who I met at UBE
with Mary on Thursday 819,1 lost
your number Please give me a
call at 355-33835. Bob.
HEY AMBASSADORS! Welcome
back to Emerald City. Join us at our
first town meeting on Wednesday,
August 25 at 5:00 pm in Menden
Hall.
Lost & Found
MISSING CAT. Neutered male. Grey
wblack stripes. Taken by someone
on 5-5-93. Avery StRiver area. Any
info. I just want Charlie home. Days
3355-9423, nights & weekends 752-
6975. Reward.
in
Greek
New Place?
Don't Pay
Full Price
For
FURNISHINGS!
We've Got
ThemdSED!
� FURNITURE
� Men's Clothing
� Dorm Refrigerators
� Microwaves
� Stereo Equipment
� Miscellaneous Items
We're Buying Tool
If you arc selling you must be
18 with a picture ID.
s
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
752-3866
EVANS STREET MALU
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
MON-FRI 10am-5pm
SAT 10am-2pm
ALL CAMPUS. The Sisters of Alpha
Phi would like to welcome everyone
back and wish them luck on the fall
semester!
CONGRATULATIONS to the Beta
Omega pledge class of Alpha Phi.
Laura Bald, Wendy Ballard, Jenny
Bullard, Christin Cadle, Melissa
Chesnut, Laura Eddin, Jessica Gibson,
Kim Hite, Jackie Kirby,Stacey Klatsky,
Kimberly Laughery, Tristan Lee,
Heather Mann, Pam Miller, Katy
McNiff, Nicole Nicosia, Angie Nix,
Young O, Nan Patterson, Olivia
Plymale, Livia Ritch, Courtney
Scanlan, Julie Smith, Amanda Spruill,
Robin White, Michelle Whitehurst,
Kristin Wolf. Love, The Sisters of Al-
pha Phi.
ADPi-Can'twaitfor Friday. Pref Night
will be something to remember Hope
you like full throttle! Love - The Pikes.
THE PIKES want to welcome all in-
coming freshmen to ECU, and con-
gratulate the Sorority Pledges of '93-
'94! A note to the freshman men of
EastCarolina: Make thebiggest choice
of your life-RUSH PIKE
y EC� Come and See Us at Business Equip-
Ai MpSf menr Rental and Sale! We are Located
VtUtrlHtn i within Walking Distance From
ni3TF7TTFiJLa Campus. Free Delivery Locally!
752-8585
GOIReade
Greenvite,
a BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS!
-BENT
"YourOffia
FurniturePbux,
New & Used"
ECU Pwpfc Smitmm Side CUn$45.00� -an
Computer Dolo Swfw) iicst Chain$75.00 $30.00PLEAS
So�m$190.00
Bookcaae$75.00Large Office Furniture
Lamps WorkTaUo$19.95Showroom in Euccm
$45.00North Carolina.
Hey Pirates
Do you need a little cash?
Put your spare time to work!
Now interviewing and accepting
applications for full and part time
positions at the
WORLD'S NEWEST MCDONALD'S
located at Bell's Fork in Greenville
Apply at McDonald's by Wal-Mart
on Wed & Thurs. between 2-5.
for coaches will be held. Last day to
volunteer for fall sports is Septem-
ber 28th. Volunteer hours may be
used as part of practicum require-
ments for several ECU courses. For
more information, contact Connie
Sappenfield at 830-4541.
FALL SOFTBALL MEETING
The Greenville Recreation and
Parks Department is now making
preparations for the upcoming adult
men's open and coed fall Softball
leagues.
There is limited registration and an
entry fee is required. For more infor-
mation, please call Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550or 830-4567.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�AH ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeofcharge Duetothelimitedamount
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Wednesday's edition.
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August 25, 1993
rimes mystery
packed with twist
ECU Science Education
recieves 'Excellence Award'
the nitvo-
ractei ,not
solved
lent Richard jury,
on vacation from Scotland Yard,
goes to ir-it fenny Kennington in
Stratford-on- - on. Whatshe means
to him or what she once meant isn't
recounted. MaybeC Irimesexplained
it in a previous book.
Then Jury goes to Long
Piddkton, where his rich friend
Melrose Plant lives.
Vivian Rivington, who lives
there, is about to leave to visit her
Italian fiance Somebody loves her
and wishes she wouldn't go�it's
probably Plant but it might be Jury.
Nobody does anything about it.
In Baltimore, where there's a
pub called The 1 torse You Came in
On, author-instructor Ellen Taylor
has some kind of emotional attach-
ment to Plant.
A fter the read er fee! s 1 i ke he has
en tered a bewildering circle of long-
time friends who act like they ex-
pect to live 200 years, the story moves
to America. Plant. Jury and Sgt.
Wiggins flv to Baltimore, where a
homeless man has been murdered.
A Barnes Foundation art curator
een murdered in rural Penn-
da. A Johns Hopkins gradu-
ate student, who thought there was
a link between them, improbable
though that sounds, was murdered
in Baltimore, on Edgar Allan Foe's
birthday.
Plant and Jury go around talk-
ing to everybody they can think of
connected to those three. Jury is there
u repay a favor to a an old friend of
the curator's aunt. Wiggins is with
him. Plant's presence wasrequested
by Taylor, who taught the murdered
student in three classes at Johns
lopkins.
For a long time, nothing impor-
tant seems to be getting said. Fi-
nally, the brains of Plant and Jury
make some connections.
"The Horse You Came in On"
has portions of other books within
it, including a Poe find or forgery,
and snippets by other authors and
amateurs.
There is also the tracing of some
British ancestral titles, a lot of meaty
characters, with a cabbie and a little
girl in Baltimore who are especially
rich, and one thread deliberately left
untied. Plant figures out how to
thwart a writer who's bugging Tay-
lor by copying her style, but he
doesn't explain.
The denouement is a real
twister.
Grimes has done it again.
Marvelous.
By Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
The North Carolina Project for
Reform in Science Education, based
at East Carolina University, is get-
ting high marks and national recog-
nition for its work to improve sci-
ence teaching.
The project was named as a
"Program of Excellence" by the
Southeastern Regional Vision for
Education (SERVE). Dr. Charles R.
Coble, dean of the ECU School of
Education and the project's direc-
tor, made the announcement.
In addition to the recognition
given to the project, Coble said the
SERVE organization awarded ECU
$3,000.
A national publication for edu-
cators will also feature the N.C.
Project for Reform in Science Edu-
cation with 13 other outstanding
teaching projects and programs in
the southeastern states.
The ECU-based project is part
of a nationwide effort to provide
more meaningful science instruc-
tion for young people. The project is
Scottish heritage explored
Staff Reports
developing methods and training
teachers at seven pilot sites and con-
ducting field tests at 12 other sites
around the state. The new methods
combine science concepts with prac-
tical applications to teach biology,
chemistry, earth science and physi-
cal science to students in grades 6-8.
Jerry L. Everhart of ECU, one of
the project coordinators, said inter-
ests in finding better ways to teach
science grew out of the failures of
science teaching during the '60s and
70s. He said studies made during
the 1980sshowed that students must
also process what they learn rather
than just get the materials and
memorize the facts.
"We have to come up with a,
new product rather than an adapta-
tion of whatalready exists he said.
The University of North Caro-
lina at Greensboro is evaluating the
projectby interviewing teachers and
students and collecting science test
scores.
Some early test score results,
according to the project coordina-
tors, show that the students meet or
pxcppH expectations.
iiaiunuBimniBiBi
The East Carolinian
The city of Fayetteville is the
site for the award-winning Scot-
tish Heritage Symposium, Sept.
24-26.
Sponsored by the Division of
Continuing Education and Sum-
mer School and the Museum of the
Cape Fear, the event is for people
interested in Scottish history and
culture. Sessions will be held at
the Holiday Inn 1-95.
The symposium will focus on
the cultural and historical contri-
butions of the Scots in North Caro-
lina. The first large group of High-
land Scots, the Argyll Colony, mi-
grated to the upper Cape Fear re-
gion in 1739.
Successive waves of High-
landers and Scotch-Irish emi-
grants left "distinctive cultural
attributes" on several regicns of
North Carolina, according to the
conference organizers.
Visiting experts on Scottish
history will discuss the Sotch-
Irish migration to the Carolina
back country.
They will also discuss
Presbyterianism, the loydists,
Flora MacDonald, Scottish castle
design and Scottish Culture in
the South.
Some of the guest spejkers
include: Michael R.G. Fry cf En-
See SCOTS page 31
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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 29
ML ft
r. world undergoes change
m. and it's heaven,
ho left the helm of
Slow" tor his new
� saner�I think. I'm
realh just enjoying the ability to
sleep in and have a little bit more of
a persona life
Zuckerwas26whenhebecame
executive producer of "Today" in
1992, and therehemighthavestayed
until, oh, the ripe age of 30 or so.
Then his predecessor at "To-
day Steve Friedman, was tapped
iident Michael
pa magazine show
toadd to "Dateline
ter the fiery "Dateline
toppled Gartner, in-
- President Andrew
kdecided Friedman was needed
back at today Lack put Zucker
in the project.
Zucker inherited a staff of 70
producers, associates, assistants and
correspondents�"basically every-
thing but the concept of the show
and the three people who were sup-
posed to anchor it he said.
What Zucker devised, formally
titled "Now with Tom Broka w and
Katie Couric uses the "Nightly
News" and "Today" presenters
backed by correspondents Fred
Francis, Mike Boettcher, Noah
Nelson and NBC newcomers Chris
Hanson, Dana Adams and Eliza-
beth Vargas.
"Tom and Katie automatically
allow us to stand apart Zucker
sa id, "and we can be one of the most
flexible of any of the shows on the
air. One week, we might be totally
like 'Nightline' and do a totally live
show. One week, we might be like
'48 Hours' and do one topic for that
hour. One week, we might be totally
like 'PrimeTime Live' and do a tra-
ditional magazine show
"In the end he said, "what I
hope will set us apart is a little
unpredictability, a little spontane-
ity and a flexibility that doesn't exist
in the other programs
Nintendo brings art of gambling to
home video entertainment market
Recycled art establishes new genre
NEW YORK (AP) � Imagine
a heroic sculpture of Lenin re-
cycled as a slot machine, or en-
dowed with a laser eye and used
as a lighthouse, or transformed
into the Lenin drinking fountain.
Perhaps a statue of the leader
turned housecleaner, draped with
carpets, his inspirationally
outflung arm wielding a vacuum.
With cheerily savage inven-
tiveness, artists have responded
to a call for suggestions of what to
do with the monuments of the
late unlamented Soviet regime �
Communism's clunky art relics,
ideological discards.
The artists' concepts have
been collected for a creatively
iconoclastic art show.
"I believe this may be the be-
ginning of a new movement said
Vitalv Komar who together with
his artist-partner Alexander
Melamid got the whole thing go-
ing.
"Save History they cried.
They proposed that the pon-
derous legacy of "Monumental
Propaganda" be recycled. That's
the title of the exhibition on show
simultaneously at the Courtyard
Gallery in Lower Manhattan and
in Moscow under the auspices of
the Institute of Contemporary Art.
Next spring the exhibit: in, or-
ganized bv IndependentCurators
Inc will begin an extensive tour
of other cities, and a book about it
will be published.
Back in 1991, Komar &
Melamid � as they're usually
known � began publishing ar-
ticles about their opposition to
the destruction of Soviet Social-
ist-Realist statues and buildings
following the collapse of the re-
gime.
Last year, Artforum magazine
published their invitation to Rus-
sian and Western colleagues to
"collaborate with history" and
come up with new uses for the
monuments.
The response was over-
whelming.
The exhibition features a se-
lection of 150 drawings, sketches,
photographs and written propos-
als bv artists from the United
States, Russia, Canada and Eu-
rope.
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"A second phase of the project
will submit these proposals to the
Russian government with the
hope that they will allow us to
implement some of these ideas
temporarily or even perma-
nently said Komar & Melamid.
They think this new move-
ment has wide potential, maybe
worldwide.
"Next show we're going to
do will be about American monu-
ments added Komar.
"We believe the future of art
lies in how art is done � here we
have a show done by many
people. You can all participate,
too � do your drawings about
what to do with Russian art of-
fered Melamid, referring to the
sketchbook at the show for visi-
tors' suggestions.
"What I like about the project is
that it's to use a statue itself as raw
material for a new work It's a
special way to make your mark as
an artist said Zigi Ben-Haim, a
New York artist-sculptor.
His drawing, in its kitschy
See LENIN page 32
AP�What is it about people
that drives them into gaudy, garish
hotels in the middle of the desert
and forces them to wager their hard-
earned money on games of chance
thev can't win?
Well, I don't have the answer,
but I can suggest that if you like to
gamble, vou bet a couple of bucks
on Nintendo's VegasStakes(S49.95
for Super NES) and go make-be-
lieve broke in the comfort of your
own home.
In Vegas Stakes, you and four
computer-selected friends journey
to Las Vegas, hole up at the ficti-
tious Golden Paradise Hotel and
Casino and proceed to sample the
games.
You start your quest for for-
tune with a stake of $1,000. Grab
one of your friends and head for
the casino.
Start off at theslots. These whir-
ring gizmos, which originated in
San Francisco around the turn of
the century, are aptly called "one-
armed bandits" because it's un-
likely you'll leave the casino with
as much as you went in with if you
stick to these babies.
You may play from $1 a spin at
The Hideaway to $1,000atThe Lau-
rel Palace. Tell the machine how
much you want to bet and hit theX
burton. The three reels of fruit, num-
bers and bars spin just like the real
thing.
Then, move on to more com-
plicated games; blackjack is next.
This is the popular card game,
also called 21, in which you try to
get closer to 21 than the dealer with-
out going over. More than 21 is a
bust, and you lose. You can play all
the popular permutations, includ-
ing double down and split.
Roulette should be your next
stop. There are unusually detailed
instruction booklets laying out the
most popular bets, such as select-
ing a single number, betting odd or
even numbers, all the numbers in a
column or a "dozen" bet, in which
you select the first, second or third
dozen numbers on the play ing field.
Craps is the back-alley dice
game, cleaned up for
casino high rollers.
But it's the same
� your bet
wins or loses
based on the
numbers that
come up when
the dice are
tossed.
Last but not least is
seven-card stud poker. In this
game, you are playing against four
other gamblers. You get two cards
down and one face up. High card
up bets first. After the first
round, you get an
other up card, and
the betting begins
again.
Finally, when
you have seven
cards � the last one
is face down � there's
a final round of betting, and the
best five-card hand wins.
The game is designed to be
compatible with Nintendo's
Mouse, but I found it easier to
play with a standard control
pad. You can play with
up to three friends, and
your bankroll can be
stored in a battery-
powered memory.
One cute addi-
tion is the folks
whowillcomeup
and talk to you
during your game.
Some are sincere,
some are con men who will
try and talk you out of your
money. Let the player beware.
There are other gam-
bling-based
games, but Ve-
gas Stakes is at
the top of the
heap. I liked
the poker game
best, but all are
entertaining �
especially if you win.
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FOR THE STYLE OF YOUR LIFE





August 25, 1993
shots or
David Bowie
Four American artists on exhibition
spite the � - flown
Messer and throe others to Phila-
delphia from London for a maga-
artk le
Messer's solution: take advan-
tage of the free concert tickets to
sneak a camera in and finish his job
by taking the photo.
"So I broke it down sniper-
stvle. and 1 worecowbov boots so I
could stick the body down one leg
and the lens in the other Messer
said.
He got his photo, a perfect ex-
ample of how Messer thinks pho-
tographers have to grab their shots.
"I was brought up in the early
days of the music press where vou
had to get the picture. If you got
that moment to shoot the picture,
you better not pass it up. Do what-
ever vou want to do to yourself
later, but you've got to get it be-
cause you've onlv got one mo-
ment Messer said.
He knows what he's talking
about.
Messer has photographed mu-
sicians in fields ranging from rock
and country to classical, in a career
spanning 25 years.
His subjects have included the
Beatles, Andy Williams, Andre
Previn, Henry Mancini, Minnie
Pearl and johnny Cash. He's also
done several hundred album cov-
ers, with other work featured in
magazines like Rolling Stone and
Spin.
A recent exhibition of" his work
was timed to coincide with the
Country Music Association's Fan
K -and Nashville's Summer Lights
arts and music festival.
Based in Nashville since 1978,
Messer is currently sifting through
his work for a retrospective book.
A release date hasn't been set �
Messer says he'll finish the book as
soon as he finds time.
"The biggest problem is it's a
Steamroller, and it never stops. I
keep saving 'Let's take a year off
and put this book together' and
then something else comes up, an-
other project. You just keep going.
"I'm in no rush. Let's do it
whenever. I can't stop shooting the
opportunities that are there every
dav he said.
small
ting kea vvirt-
young
, - against the
if a larger canvas; thunder-
ous M,vk-v;iYi clouds glower over
sullen waters in a seas ape.
Each painting is striking enough
to attract a viewer's attention. But
each is also part ol a unique sell-
portrait of American art and history.
The u c ii ks a re by American paint-
ers Albert Bierstadt, William Merritt
Chase and George Bellows, respec-
tively. They are among a selection
from its own permanent collection
thattheNational AcademyotDesign
is showing in a current exhibition �
American Treasures: 19th-century
Paintings from the National Acad-
emy Collection
The "treasures billed by the
academy as some of its finest, reflect
medistincnvecharaeterofthe institu-
tion thathouses them. Itwasfounded
in 1825 as an honorary association of
artists; almost from the beginning
membership has required donation
of a member's work.
"Whatdefinestheacademy'scol-
lection is that it is curated by its mem-
bers � it reflects the importance the
artists gave to the organization which
would house their work forever ex-
plained curator Dita Amory.
Today, the academy still func-
tions as an association of artists, a
school of fine arts and a museum,
ensconced in a handsome Fifth Av-
enue beaux-arts mansion.
Die museum's current exhibi-
tion consists of about 55 landscapes,
portraits and still-life paintings em-
bracing a sharply contrasting variety
ofstyles iiu ludingAmericanlmpres-
sionist and Hudson River School
paintings.
Die latter form tine ot the high-
lights of the exhibit � i 7 landscapes
that open up the walls of the quiet
gallery with panoramasof mountains
and water, clouds and tax's, mostly
from the 1830s.
"1 realized we really had a won-
derful collection of the Hudson River
school so we devoted a whole gallery
to it said Amory
"It's the first time a showing of
the school has been assembled she
commen ted. Sheexplained that some
of the works had never been shown
before, and others, benefiting from
conservation work, had never been
shown in such pristine state.
Thescenesare mostly American,
with John Frederick Kensert's well-
known "Mountain Stream: Bash-Bish
Falls" an example. But there are a
coupleofexotics�the lush "Sceneon
the Magdalene bv Frederic Edwin
Church, and William Stanley
Haseltine's glowing "Sunrise at
Capri
Another gallery houses 10 por-
traits trom the academy's holdings.
"We have one of the largest col-
lections of portraits in the country
because of the requirement for new
members to give a portrait Amory
said.
The rule, not as strictly enforced
now, was that the portrai t required to
be submitted by an artist to confirm
election as an associate member
should be a self-portait.
Inventor-artistSamuelFB. Morse
wasone of the founders of the organi-
zation and its first president. He's
represented in merxHtraitsection with
his livery painting of poet William
Cullen Bryant Robert Yonnoh por-
trayed his wife, the sculptor Bessie
Potter V'onnoh.
The third section of the exhibi-
tion consists of landscapes, still lifes
and genre paintings. These include
the Chase "At Her Ease" and Bel-
lows' "Three Rollers Other works
range from a diminutive "Croquet
Plaver"bv Winslow Homer toa force-
fully impastoed "The Miraculous
Haul of the Fishes" by Henry Ossawa
Tanner.
Theexhibition is on show through
Nov. 14.
ECU Students
We Invite You
to Our Services.
Sunday
Sunday School
9:30am
Morning Worship
10:30am
Evening Service 6:30pm
(1st Sunday of thf month only)
Wednesday
Evening Service
7:30pm
John Zabawski - Senior Pastor
� We are a Spirit-filled church that exalts Christ through worship,
praise, preaching and teaching.
� We are an evangelistc church both at home and to other nations.
It you would like to know more about us oi oui campus
ministry, Campus Challenge, pleaseall oui chtin h ofni e at
$55-662 1 Ii you are in need ot a ride to the Sunday morning
service please c all the oi e by 12:00 noon on I rtdays.
Located across trom the Boys & Girls Club on Fire Tower Rd.
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1993
J.V. CHEERLEADING
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Learn Material & Practice.
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Picture this: No shakes
AP�When you first started tak-
ing pictures, one of the basic rules
vou learned was that you must hold
the camera steady. Sounds simple,
right? Well, as simple as it sounds, it
the camera moves during an expo-
u re vou can get camera shake. The
result: a blurred picture.
Usually, camera shake occurs
when vou are hand-holding
a camera and shooting
atashutter speed
that is too long
for the lens in
use. What's too
long? Simple:
Shooting at a
shutter speed
that is longer
than the focal
length of the
lens. For ex-
ample, if you are shooting with a
250mm lens, don't shoot below a 1-
250th of a second. If you are using a
500mm lens, shoot at 1-500th of a
second or faster.
It's important to note that fol-
lowing this rule will not guarantee a
sharp picture. Remember, you still
need to press the shutter release
button gently and hold the cam-
era steady.
If following theshutterspeed
rule is riot possible, you need to
either switch to a higher speed
film or support your camera with
a tripod or other camera support.
Tripodscome in all sizes, from
small camera bag-size mod-
els to models
that weigh sev-
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Small models,
some only 6
inches tall, of-
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are limited in
use due to their
size. For ex-
ample, you can't
take an eye-level
picture with a small tripod. Larger
models, on the other hand, offer
features like a tilt-pan head and
adjustable legs. Most also have a
movablecentercolumn. These fea-
tures give you virtually unlim-
ited flexibility when composing a
See CAMERA page 31
THREE STEERS
RESTAURANT
Join us
for our country breakfast served
Mon-Fri 611 am, and
Sat and Sun 7-11 am.
Open 7 days a week for lunch 6
dinner. It's down home cooking
made to order every time with
you in mind.
282G Memorial Dr.
756-2414
Newinan Catholic Student Gintier
953 E. 10th St.(2nd house from Fletcher music: Bldg.)
757-3760757-1991
t r ry 1 Jt 1 SUN: 11:30 AM and 8:30 PM
Mass Schedule: wED 5& pm
All Masses are at the Center.
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain & Campus Minister
eresa Lee, associate Campus Minister.
l-or mote information about these and other programs, call or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am and 11 flOpm
r

HOURS
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August 25, 1993
Continued from page 28
rtire h
confereru e
I he symposium is the recipi-
ent of the National University, on-
cirtuingl ducarion Association Ex-
emplary Program Award.
l�'i additional information
hon to North and to register for the program,
call the E( I Division of Continu-
ing! ducationandSummerSchool
M 919-757-61 -H or 1 -800-767-9111.
� I ni-
bookabout
h 1 ieritage Center,
s Presbyterian College
Highland Presbyterian
i sponsors for the
CAMERA
scene.
fyoudon'twant to lug around
a bulky tripod, there are many
monopod models from which to
choose. A monopod letsyouchange
position relatively quickly because
it has only one long adjustable leg
(and sometimes an arm brace for
added support). The drawback to
using a monopod is that you still
need to hold the camera relatively
steady to get a sharp picture. In
most cases, nn tnopods ft ld to a small
size and can be stored in a large
camera bag.
A hand) i amera support tor
photographers who like to drive
around in the great outdoors is a car
window support I his support has
a sturdy damp that attaches to a
car'sopen window,enabling pho-
tographers to get sharp scenic pic-
tures in low light situations � in
the comfort of their car. A tar win-
dow support canalsocomeinhandv
it you are lucky enough to be on
safari in a I and Rover.
A variation of the car window
support is a C-clamp support with
small accessory legsfwhich unscrew
Continued from page 30
and fit inside the tripod). This type
ot mount not only supports a cam-
era to a tar's window, branch or
fence post, but it can also be used as
an ultra-mini tripod that stands on
its own.
Bean bags are another means of
supporting a camera I or low-level
shooting, such as when a photogra-
pher is photographing flowers with
a macro lens, a bean bag offers ad-
equate support. In addition, bean
bags ca n be placed on a car's hood or
root, fences, large rocks, tables and
other solid objects.
Fancy footwork saves desperate outlaw
CHARLESTON vvw a pa , . . L
CHARLESTON, U.Va.(AP)
Jesco White has crooned from the
roof of a doghouse, boogied acn ss a
sw'ayingfootbridge,and tap-danced
down the double-line of a two-lane
mountain road.
He swears dancing and Cod
saved him "from the Devil him-
self a low-down life of sniping,
sniffing and stealing in the poorest
of Appalachian hollows.
"I have a criminal record and
I'm no angel, but I'm making up h r
it with my movie White says.
White, 37, is the hero of a half-
hour television documentary first
broadcast in 1991. "Thesedaysbcxit-
legged videotapes of the program,
"DancingOutlaw are being passed
among white-collar professionals
well beyond Appalachia.
�hasa devoted following
in Philadelphia says It. Col.
Ceorge Finnerty, a Marine Corps
recruiter. "I've been around the
world and haven't seen anvthingas
wild as that. I didn't know people
like Jesco really existed.Itshould be
in video stores
"Jesco is famous everywhere
savs ulie Cooper, assistant to Los
AngelesTop4l)radio host Rick Dees.
"It's the most hilarious thing I've
seen A triend of mine in New York
had a fifth-generation copy from
someone in South Carolina. It's be-
come a cult classic
Cultciassicor no, White getsno
money from his videotape, and isso
impoverished financiallv he recently
could not afford to travel 21 miles
from his home in BooneC ountv for
a personal appearance in Charles-
ton.
In the documentary, White
proudly proclaims, "Give me a 20
and I'll rock for vour party
These days, he admits, he will
dance for pizza and a sixpack of 7-
Up.
White says he has given up
drugs for dancing, but even his
father's best tap shoes, now more
than 10 years old, are wearing thin.
"My father taught me to dance
to stay out of trouble White says.
"It didn't work, but it kept meoutof
the cemetery for 37 years
Car wrecks, feuding and sui-
cide have claimed five of White's 14
brothers and sisters. Last month,
See OUTLAW page 32
georges
hair designs
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� tanning
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Mon-Sat9:30am-9pm Mon-Fri 9am-8pm
Sunday lpm-6pm Sat 9am-6pm
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The East Carolinian 31
AUGSEP
1993
ATTIC
EVERY
TUESDAY NIGHT
� UNPLUGGED-
$1.50 Imports
$1.50Hiballs
$1.50 32 oz. Draft
AUGSEP
1993
THURSDAY
COLLEGE NITE
99tf Hiballs
99 32 oz. Draft
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expires Sept. 23, 1993
???? WELCOME BACK ECU ????
25 WED WRQR COMEDY ZONE (S1.50 HIBALLS &S1.50 TALL BOYS)
����EGYPT (FORMER LEAD SINGER OF 24-7 SPYZ)
DILLON FENCE ($2.00 32 02. draft)
THE STEGMONDS ($2.00 32 oz. draft)
WED WRQR COMEDY ZONE CONCERT 13 OnySi
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3 FRI �THE FUNK-A-BILLIEZ ($2.00 32 oz. DRAFT)
4 SATSEX, LOVE & MONEY ($2.00 32 oz. DRAFT)
6 MON MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL (50c PONY'S, $1.50 TALLBOYS)
8 WED WRQR COMEDY ZONE ($1.50 HIBALLS & $1.50 TALL BOYS)
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15 WED WRQR COMEDY ZONE ($1.50 HIBALLS & $1.50 TALL BOYS)
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20 MON MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL (50c PONY'S, $1.50 TALLBOYS)
22 WED WRQR COMEDY ZONE ($1.50 HIBALLS & $1.50 TALL BOYS)
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24 FRI EVERYTHING ($2.00 32 oz. DRAFT)
SATEGYPT (FORMER LEAD SINGER OF 24-7 SPYZ)
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29 WED WRQR COMEDY ZONE ($1.50 HIBALLS & $1.50 TALL BOYS)
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(JOE TRONTO)
(JEFFCOBB) 752-7303 (STEWART CAMPBELL)
209 E. 5TH STREET . GREENVILLE, NO





�mmm
August 25. 1993
Continued from page 25
� imantk dressii i
for thf first time in several sea-
. an enormously important krut
dressing story Bloomingdale's
Gentry says. "It's knits from head
to toe-dresses, ests, jackets, pants.
In wools, silks, acrylics, cashmeres
and blends
Vests are a staple. They range
from last year's menswear look to
the newer dandified versions that
fall just below the waist. Tapestry
or damask brocade will do. Other-
wise they're long, flowing A-line
ilar because
suited to today's pro-
,w ork designer
hat makes this season par-
tuularh wonderful is the combi-
nation ot different lengths in one
outfit, such as the shorter vest, the
longer tunic and pants underneath,
either narrow or full she says.
A favorite from her collections
is a lean, scoop-neck wool knit vest
that stops mid-calf with slits on
both sides.
"You can throw it over just
about anything to make it look
new� over your stirrups that you
may have had for a couple years or
over full pants or a long straight
skirt she says. "With a turtleneck
underneath, it gives that new sense
ot proportion that's happening
The season's accessories are
hei rk xm-inspired�icon necklaces,
cameos, feathered velvet portrait
hats, and old opera pearls.
"Embellishment is the key
word for accessories says Bailey,
with lace and tapestry among the
newest trims.
Footwear focuses on boots.
"It's really not a season for
pumps or even flats Gentry says.
"Almost every important look is
accessorized with boots, whether
they're lace-up granny boots, riding
boots or hiking boots
They look especially up-to-date
with a heavy lug sole.
"They're the next step Gen-
try says, "for the lady who's ready
to go on from platforms
LENIN
OUTLAW
frame, presents "I Was Here a
reductive view of a well-known
statue � just the clothing with no
Lenin inside.
American artist Mac Adams
went further�his concept
dumped the figures in the famous
statue of Marx and Engels, leav-
ing the "dialectical space" be-
tween them floating over the
monument's base.
"I've mixed together Ameri-
can and Russian images to make a
new image said Leonid Lamm,
another New York artist.
He's created "Dollar a
gilded metal sculpture, inverting
one hammer-and-sickle motif
onto another to form "a new rep-
Continued from page 31
resentation ot the American dol-
lar More symbolism: It's set on
a square red base decorated with
a bar code.
There's a working model of
Komar & Melamid's own offer-
ing titled "Mausoleum
It's a small-scale, shiny-red
version of Lenin's tomb livened
with a flashing sign running
around it, Times-Square style.
Messages, they say, could be news
updates, weather forecasts and
soon.
Art Spiegelman's idea is to
reduce the pedestal under the fig-
ures on the "Worker and Peas-
ant" statue, so that they look as if
they're taking a flying leap off it.
Continued from page 29
Gary Beeber and Deborah
Freeman thoughtfully point out
that "slides will be accepted
since shipping costs for the origi-
nals would be prohibitive" for
their proposed "Museumonthe
Moon
Here, history could be "ex-
iled, aired out, time-blasted and
re-evaluated for future genera-
tions
Les Levine suggests a
"Fallen Idol Theme Park Rob-
ert Beckman sees "The Gamble
That Didn't Pay Off: Lenin Slot
Machine
By the time you've
toured the exhibition, you get
the idea.
three cousins died mysteriously af-
ter a party. Authorities say all three
died from an overdose of the same
drug-
White's father, D. Ray White, a
legendarv dancer in these hills, was
gunned down in the dirt in front of
his shack in 1985 when a neighbor
toting a shotgun came down their
hollow to settle a score with Jesco's
brother.
His slayer was sentenced to five
to 18 years for the killing and 30
more for armed robbery, White says.
"That shows you what kind of law
we got
The "Dancing Outlaw" docu-
mentary was produced by Jacob
YoungatWNPB-TVinMorgantown
as part of theBBC's "Different Drum-
mer' ' series featuring offbeat Appa-
lachian characters.
It played at the New York Docu-
mentarv Film Festival and at an in-
ternational public television confer-
ence in Dublin, Ireland.
Young says it has won seven
major awards, including an Emmy
from the Cincinnati Television Arts
and Sciences and an a ward from the
American Film Institute. It was
named the best public television
program in 1992.
The video shows White's deso-
late surroundings, where mobile
homes shelter hundreds of moun-
tain people, and abandoned cars
and discarded trash clash with the
natural beauty of the hills.
Throughout, White shows off
his unusual combination of flatfoot
and tap, and tells about growing up
right over the hill from Twilight, the
adoring son of" the king of tap danc-
ing.
"D. Ray would take me into
beer joints White says. "He
wouldn't have a dime in his pocket,
but he'd come out drunker than
hell. They'd set me up on the bar
and I'd dance and they'd give me
pop. As little as I was, I wanted one
of the beers to drink like D. Ray
White dropped out of school
after the sixth grade. From age 10
until just a few years ago, White
says, he stayed high on a deadly
mixture of alcohol, lighter fluid and
home-grown marijuana.
After his father was gunned
down, White says, "The Lord
showed me in Satan's world you
end up 6 feet under
White's mother, Bertie Mae,
gave him his father's dancing shoes,
agleamingpairofblackpatentleath-
ers with old-fashioned jingle taps.
"My Daddy left me something
that'll keep me out of jail. I'm the
only one that can fill his shoes
White says.
Soil, White doubts he will ever
match his father's moves.
"D. Ray knew 52 steps more
than any other dancer he says.
Young said it is mostly passed
from friend to friend, but bootleg-
gers have even tried to sell him a
copy.
"One day I'm going to go and
have my picture made with Jesco
White.iflcaneettoBooneCountv "
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
L
Deli Kitche
frometype, Qoolom
Daily Special $3.80
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Present ad for free dessert win meal
Corner of Dickinson and Raleigh Ave. 752-5339
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of the numbers below
Skip Lilly - President:
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Lutheran Campus Center
756-4852
WHERE
Our meetings are held at the Annex of Our Redeemer
Lutheran Church The Church address is: 1801 S. Elm
Street. Between 14th St. and Greenville Blvd.
WHIN ?
LSM meets most Sunday evenings at 6:00 PM while
ECU is in session. A special euchurist service will be
held once a month.
WHY ?
Christian Fellowship: We enjoy the company of other
students and members of Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church. The LSM students are very active in the church
and are a part of the congregation.
Adoot-A-Plr�U; Any student who is interested can be
"adopted" by a family from thechurch congegation Is
great to have someone to talk to when you can't be home.
Discussions and Bible Study; Informal and structured
discussions relating to special interest materials.
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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 33
DOWNTOWN
depending on the type
ofmusk bangperfbrmed. rhesmall
Sta geallowsiniimacy with the band,
which is hard to come by in a lot ot
clubs.
El bo Bogies
These are Greenville's two
danceclubsthatentertainhundreds
of students nightly. The danceclubs
aren't as mellowed out as the rest of
downtown. Top 40 and popular
dance music please many students
and both clubs always have lines
out the door. If dancing is your tiling,
these clubs are worth checking out.
Sharkey'sSplashSports
Pad
These three connected clubs
round out the list of downtown
places that only allow "of age" pa-
trons. Pool tables galore and fine
drinking choices make these three
clubs worthy of a visit.
Alfredo's
When you think of downtown
Greenville, this is one name that
instinctively pops in your head. This
landmark serves up huge slices of
pizza to thousands of hungry stu-
dents each year. The atmosphere is
very friendly and is a definite an-
swer to those late night munchies.
MACHINES
Continued from page 24
Vtiianos
. rut is lo-
in street from
ntsfindthem-
ejit at home sitting on the
outside picnk tables hatting or re-
; grueling week. A juke-
box blasts tunes every night of the
week�promising fun times and
good, affordable food.
Omars
You can smell this restaurant
from the street. Believe me, if you
are hungry, you will know when
vou are passing by. The service is
fast, dependable and friendly. Many
students plant themselves at the
tables for the night, indulging in
wonderful food, conversation and,
of course, pitchers.
Sub Station II
You may have to wander
around a bit to find this establish-
ment. Located on Reade street (be-
hind downtown), Sub Station D
gives Greenville nice priced beer,
outside picnic tables and the best
juke box music money can buy. Just
as many of the other "eating places
Sub Station is usually crowded and
famous for it's comfortable atmo-
sphere.
Boli's
This mouth-watering pizzeria
will please all sorts of sports fans.
Boli's has two TVs that cover major
sporting events. It's especially nice
to take a trip to this restaurant for a
lunchtime treat.
Continued from page 2
I think MLG has actually come up
with a new genre, Industrial pop.
On their song "Albert Speer
MLG even takes a stab at sacrilege
(JesusChrist Sononice Sleep with
the mother fuckin' fishes tonite). The
mixing of (his type of subject matter
with a whispery pop sensibility just
dosen't work. How about leave the
blasphemy to someone who knows
what to do with it, like Slayer?
"We're constantly in search for
meaning amidst media
psychobabble comments Benzel
(lead singer), "trying to find a bal-
ance between the organic and the
inorganic, nature and technology
You need to search a little harder
fellas; the ship of originality is leav-
ing and your bags aren'teven packed.
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L
HEART
Continued from page 21
cause of the abrupt end of those
!i es, the victims are each given a
chance to achieve closure enlisting
the aid of a Living person.
The person to whom all four
victims are assigned is Thomas
Reillv (Robert Downy, Jr.), the child
whoenters the world only moments
after the four victims pass from it.
Unfortunately, for 30 years, thebus
occupants do not know they can
use Thomas to help them resolve
the last conflicts in their lives.
When they do learn about the
bargain, they find that they have no
time left in which to do it. They
concertedly convince the angel
(David Paymer), who happens to
be the same driver who crashes the
bus that killed them, to let them
stay. Harrison, Julia, Penny and
Milo convince the driver that he
owes them compensation for end-
ing their lives and they coerce him
into stalling for time so they can all
resolve their conflicts.
Heart and Souls telegraphs all
of its punches, but in a film of this
nature, that actually serves as an
asset. The simpler the story, the
better. The tricky part of a film like
Heart and Souls is finding a director
with the right touch and actors with
the right timing. Luckily, those two
elements are combined perfectly in
Heart and Souls.
All four victims prove compel-
ling and each story is touching.
Hollywood producers call
those moments of protracted emo-
tional highs "going over the top
Heart and Souls is filled with these
types of moments. Normally, this
desire to please the audience un-
dermines an otherwise artistically
inspired film. But because Heart
WE
RECYCLE
SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS
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� Charles Brvd Shoppes Greenville 830-JAVA I
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and Souls plays with that super-
natural force, these moments seem
completely happy even though
their contrivances appear obvious.
Robert Downy, Jr. uses his gift
for physical comedy to his advan-
tage, yet he does not overplay that
aspect of his character. He may lack
the expressiveness of Steve Martin,
as he ably displayed in All of Me,
but Downy's restrained style fills
the role nicely. He gives Thomas
both a heart and a soul.
Elisabeth Shue plays Thomas'
girlfriend who he seems on the
vergeof losing until Harrisonjulia,
Penny and Milo show up. She has a
small, but important, role that she
handles adeptly.
That the actors all perform mar-
velously impinges, in a large part,
on the director. Underwood mas-
terfully orchestrates his cast to get
inspired performances from all. He
accomplished the same feat in City
Slickers, another Hollywood film
that managed to please audiences
without being condescending. This
seems to indicate that he possesses
a knack for these types of film.
Heart and Souls provides charm-
ing, magical entertainment that
should please even the most
grumpy curmudgeon. To leave the
theaterwithoutabroad grin would
require an intense desire not to be
entertained.
Thoughsugar-coa ted films like
this should not become a staple of
Hollywood (the mind, like the
body, needs real nourishment), for
an intellectual snack you could not
pick a more appealing film than
Heart and Soul
On a scale of 1 to 10, Heart and
Souls rates an 8.
Utere will be a writer's
meeting this Wednesday at
3:30 for all returning
Lifestyle cronies.
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ARTIST
Continued from page 25
art class
He went hack to the album,
though, selecting photos and draw-
ing them as lifelike as possible. His
father bought him a watercolor set
and challenged him to paint some-
thing better than he did.
Since then, Mitchell prefers to
work from photographs or his
memory, rather than having the
person in front of him. He likes us-
ing acrylic paint, starting right away
with the brush, rather than making
a preliminary sketch. Hepaints land-
scapes and portraits.
"I try to get as much a likeness
as possible Mitchell said. For por-
traits, he focuses on the eyes and on
facial lines to emphasize individual
characteristics,
"I find older people are a lot
easier to draw because the features
are more pronounced, the skin goes
out, bones protrude he said. "It's
easier to do someone I know. Seems
like the better I know you, the better
the painting
It was Mitchell's portrait of his
daughter that caught the eye of Phil
Snyder, head of Inkwell's scenic de-
partment.
"She put on her mother's vest
and a big hat he said, describing
theportrait. "Therewerethesepolka
dots on the vest and she had on her
striped nightgown. She sat there and
posed for about an hour and a half.
Mitchell took the portrait to
work with him while moving sev-
eral pieces to the home he's build-
ing.
His supervisor took the portrait
to the art department.
The production ended up us-
ing eight of his p intings and com-
missioning a portrait.
The selected works include a
sceneof Fort Fisher,his daughter's
portrait and a scene of some fish-
ermen pulling in nets.
Despite the enthusiasm of
family, friends and co-workers,
Mitchell has a hard time seeing
what others see in his work.
"I'm not really satisfied with
my art work he said. "I can't
look at a painting and say 'Wow,
this is it I guess I like other people
to look at it
The portrait that Mitchell is
painting on commission sits in his
living room, propped against the
wall on a table littered with tubes
of paint and a well-worn photo-
copy of Washington's picture.
"In my free time, I like to paint
without commission Mitchell
said. "Paintfromtheheart,Iguess.
Painting on a set is different than
portraits. You can't fall in love
with what you're doing. It'll be
thrown away or destroyed. It's
temporary. A portrait has more
sentimental value
The East Carolinian
is currently accepting applications in
the award-winning Editorial
Department for a
MANAGING EDITOR
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Applicants must possess at least
a 2.0 GPA, be very familiar with
Macintosh software and be
enrolled as full-time students.
Interested persons should stop by
The cast Carolinian and fill out an
application ASAP. Offices are
located on the second floor of the
Student Publications building, in-
between Joyner Library and
Mendenhall Student Center
Apply at The East Carolinian
2nd floor Student Pubs building
757-6366
EAST
CAROLINIAN
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STEAK BAR
315 Stantonsburg Road, Greenville, NC
752-5001
Banquet Facilities Available
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ECU Transit and Greenville Area Transit,
Working Together for You!
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8
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Your answer to
Late Night
Campus Travel!
Hop on the silver van
for safe and conve-
nient transportation
throughout the ECU
Campus. Sunday-
Thursday
8pm-l 2:15am

IS PARKING A PROBLEM?
RIDE THE BUS!
The All New Commuter Shuttle
ECU Transit provides bus service
for All fee paying students to
and from
campus.
Schedules and
maps are
available at the
infomation
Desk in
Mendenhall
Student Center.
GREATO
Greenville Area Transit
Welcome Aboard! The Greenville Area Transit System invites you to Ride
our buses often. It's easy, convenient, and a bargain.
"te a GREAT way to get around
Serving areas such as:
Carolina East Mall, ECU
School of Medicine, Pitt Memo-
rial Hospital, Plaza Mall, Pitt
Community College, The
Hilton, East Coast Bowl, Gre-
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Park, Downtown, Eastern
Elementary and many more!
ECU Students may purchase
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2:00 a.m. and every 20 minutes
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The Greenville Area Transit
ated by the City of Greenville
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Call 830-4532
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The East Carolinian
5, 1993
Sports
Page 35
Ficklen, Minges facing renovation soon
File Photo
Ficklen Stadium (above) seated 20,000 when it was dedicated in 1963. Expansion in 1978 allowed a
capacity of 35,000. Sell-out crowds over the last two years have made additional expansion necessary.
(SID) � Ficklen Stadium will
see a major facelift in the upcoming
years. Plans call for a new press box
and an upper deck on the south side
of the stadium. These plans will in-
crease the sea ting in Ficklen Stadium
from 35,000 to 50,000.
The project is part of the Shared
Visions Campaign, which will raise
S50 million for EastCarolina Univer-
sity.
Of that amount, $9 million will
go to the Ficklen Stadium project.
Included in the new press box
will be club seating for 1,500, which
willalsoholdaconcessionandvend-
ing area, coat check room and have
three elevators.
The press facilities will include
working space for 90 writers, two
television booths, two radio booths,
a workroom, a darkroom, a lounge
and concession area and various
other booths.
"The plans for the Ficklen Sta-
dium press booth make it one of the
most modern and functional facili-
ties in the country said Charles
F31oom,Sports Information Director.
"With the tremendous growth of
our football program, the improve-
ments and additional space in the
press box is very timely and excit-
ing
To make it happen, ECU needs
thesupportofitsalumni,friendsand
fans.
ECU has initiated a $50 million
campus-wide Shared Visions Cam-
paign to raise funds for endowed
scholarships, academic expansion,
faculty development, student pro-
grams and facility improvements.
Included in the $50 million goal
is $14 millionneeded for ECU athlet-
ics. The Pirate Club, one of the
university's three non-profit foun-
dations, is now in the midst of solic-
iting the funding necessary to meet
the school's athletics needs.
Three components have been
identified within the "workingblue-
print" for this fund-raisingcampaign;
� Enhanced athletic facilities to
accommodate more fans and meet
the needs of a growing, vibrant pro-
gram.
� Endow scholarships to attract
and retain gifted student-athletes.
� Endow the student develop-
ment program to insure that athletes
get strong support in academic, per-
sonal and career development.
To reach these goals, ECU has
established these financial targets:
� $9 million for facility expan-
sion and renovation
� $1 million to help endow ath-
letic scholarships
� $1 million to endow a student
developmentprogramforstudent-
athletes
� $3 million in annual scholar-
ship funding.
The renovationand expansion
of facilities such as Minges Coli-
seum andFicklenStadiumarecru-
cial to the future financial health of
athletics at ECU.
Dedicated in 1963 with a seat-
ing capacity of 20,000, Ficklen was
expanded toitscvirrent35,000back
in 1978. Two sell-out crowds of
over 35,000 in 1992 and a record
a veragea ttendance mark over bet-
ter than32,000 made a new expan-
sion necessary.
Expansion plans call for the
addition of a new two-story press
box facility on the south side of the
stadium, from end zone to end
zone.
An enclosed, climate-con-
trolled seating area will occupy the
second floor of the facility. Service
to this seating area will be via three
elevators. Concession facilities and
bathrooms will be included in this
seating area.
Following this expansion
phase, decking of the southside of
FicklenStadiumisplanned, which
will bring stadium capacity to ap-
See FICKLEN page 52
Clubs offer more than known
By Brian Olson
Staff Writer
Have you ever wanted to play
underwater hockey or take a shot
at Goju Shorin Karate? Well, these
and many other activities can be
found in the East Carolina club
sports program. If they do not
have what you are looking for,
you can even start your own club.
Many students do not realize
ECU has so many successful clubs
and sometimes they get confused
with varsity programs. Some club
sports include rugby, lacrosse, la-
dies soccer and cycling. These
clubs are not considered varsity
sports by the university so the
students must raise 40 percent of
their team's funding and the uni-
versity will supply the other 60
percent required if they believe
there is enough interest.
"A dub is a group of people
with a similar desire according
to Pat Cox, assistant director of
club sports. "A club can be en-
tirely sports-related like rugby,
lacrosse, martial arts, and be a
special interest like hackey sack.
They have to show demonstra-
tive interest and get enough
people interested in doing it. For
my needs in terms of numbers to
start a club, there has to be enough
people to compliment that activ-
ity. Hacky Sack really only takes
two people to kick a hacky sack
around and that's fine, but your
obviously really not going-to do a
whole lot in competition. On the
other hand, for lacrosse, they prob-
ably need a minimum of 22 people
to play the game because of the
type of sport
Some clubs have really pro-
gressed and grown over the years.
The underwater hockey club is
only four years old and in their
second year they held their re-
gional tournament in Minges Coli-
seum and attracted over 15 teams.
Woman's soccer has taken a
big step forward in recent years.
The team accepted their first invi-
tation to play in the state tourna-
ment last year and came away
with a second place finish. The
team has been very successful and
could be soon recognized as a
varsity sport.
Since these are clubs, they are
required to help raise their own
funds. The teams go about raising
their 40 percent in different ways.
Some have car washes or sell T-
shirts. The ECU rugby team has
been very successful since it
started in 1975. They raise their
money from player dues and
alumni contributions. They hold
an Annual Alumni Game every
season and all the alumni and
ECU's ultimate
frisbee has
enjoyed much
success over the
years as a club
sport. The team
is continually
ranked among
the nation's
best.
rile Photo
players come back together for
the game and afterwards have a
cookout. The team usually re-
ceives about $15-$20 from each
alumni. The team tries to keep in
touch with former players and
keep good contacts according to
team player and leader Jay Keller.
"Money depends on equip-
ment for the team because we will
help purchase equipment for the
team said Jeannette Roth, mar-
See CLUB page 52
WZMB's Pirate
talk returns to air
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
WZMB, ECU's campus ra-
dio station, has something for
sports fans. They had it last year,
too. You didn't know that, did
you?
Every Sunday at 12:30 p.m.
you can tune in to 91.3 FM and
listen to Pirate Talk, a half-hour
show devoted to ECU and na-
tional athletics.
"We like to make it a format
where even if you're not a seri-
ous sports fan you might still
enjoy listening to it Kevin Hall,
WZMB Sports Director, said.
"You'll hear things on Pirate
Talk that you won't here or see
anywhere else. It's opinionated
but it's informed opinion
Pirate Talk provides listen-
ers with an alternative to lim-
ited local-television coverage.
Often, the talk is hilarious and
insightful. Pirate Talk also pro-
vides quotes from players and
coaches which may not be
availible anywhere else.
Each Sunday, Hall and his
staff will review ECU football
games and preview the upcom-
ing contests. They will also give
their NFL picks.
WZMB will air a pre-game
show for ECU football 10-15
minutes before kick-off. The
show includes quotes from
players and coaches as well as
prognostication. Updates will
be given at the end of each quar-
ter and each game will be fol-
lowed by a five-minute post-
game show.
"We're all committed to
sports�much more than your
average person Hall said.
"Myself, I'm a sports nut. I al-
most live for it and a lot of the
people on the staff are the same
way
In addition to Pirate Talk,
sports fans can tune in to
WZMB for sports updates at
9:30 a.m 12:30 p.m 4:30 and
7:30. The updates offer both
ECU and national coverage.
Play-by-play of women's
basketball games will be aired
for almost every home appear-
ance.
Currently, WZMB is work-
ing on airing some men's bas-
ketball and baseball games.
Call WZMB at 757-4751
with any questions regarding
their program schedule.
Payne inks one of Easfs best classes
(SID)�The defending Colonial Ath-
letic Association champion, East Caro-
lina Pirates, will play 12 home games as
part of the 1993-94 schedule, announced
school officials on Wednesday.
The Pirates host two exhibition games
� Nov. 18 against Court Authority and
Nov. 23 against the Moscow Dynamo
Sports Club � before the start of the
regular season.
Coach Eddie Payne's squad opens
the season at UNC Charlotte on Nov. 29.
The home opener at Minges Coliseum is
slated for Dec. 6 against Campbell.
1 he CAA opener is on Jan. 8 in Minges
Coliseum against American.
"We look forward to a challenging
year in the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion said Payne. "The league has im-
proved tremendously over the last sev-
eral years. Every team in the league this
year should be competitive
The Pirates will also participate in
two in-season tournaments. ECU will
play in the Mount St. Mary's Tip-Off
Tournament in Emmitsburg, Md Dec.
3-4, and at the Great Northern Classic,
Dec. 30-31, in Green Bay, Wise.
"We had our best success in tourna-
ments last year Payne said. "This year,
we have scheduled two in-season tour-
naments that we think will prepare us for
the conference season and the conference
tournament
The Richfood-Colonial Tournament
will be held in the Richmond Coliseum,
March 5-7.
Helping this year' squad are recruits
Chuck Jones, a 6-6 forward from Kinston,
Chuckle Robinson, a 6-8 forward from
Charleston, S.C, and Tim Basham, a 6-5
1 2 forward from Roanoke, Va. All have
signed national letters of intent to play
basketball for the ECU Pirates.
Jones comes to ECU from Fork Union
Military Academy, where he played dur-
ing the 1992-93 season. Jones had a stellar
career for Coach Paul Jones at Kinston
High School before enrolling at Fork
Union.
"Chuck has the benefit of playing for
two of the best coaches around� Paul
Jones and Fletcher Arritt said Eddie
Payne, ECU's men's basketball coach.
"He's an aggressive player�the type we
need. Chuck also has verv good athletic
skills. We're real pleased to have him in
our program
Robinson played the last two sea-
sons at Howard County College in Big
Spring, Texas.
"I am very familiar with Chuckie
(Robinson) said Payne, who coached at
South Carolina for five seasons. "One of
his greatest assets is that he plays consis-
tently hard. He is quick off his feet and
Lester Lyons
has become more physical. Chuckie is
capable of helping us right away
Last season, Basham averaged 10.2
points and 9.4 rebounds per game for the
St. John's Prospect Hall Vikings (Md.),
coached by Stu Vetter. The Vikings fin-
ished 23-2 last season and were ranked
eighth nationally by USA TODAY and
See PAYNE page 52
Hart holds high aspirations
and sets lofty goals for Bucs
Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Ever wondered what Captain Ahab
felt like clinging to the back of Moby Dick?
Ask Dave Hart. He probably has a
good idea.
Hart, the Director of Athletics at ECU,
is quite familiar with riding
"the great white whale" of
Pirate athletics. He must try
to steer this program through
the stormy seas of conference
affiliation, national television
contracts, stadium renova-
tion, athletic fund-raising and
publicre!ationsnosmall feat
considering the high aspira-
tions held by the athletic de-
partment and its boosters.
While gaining national
prominence for ECU athlet-
ics must always remain a team
effort, it is Hart that the ad-
ministration and Pirate club supporters
charge to get results. Hart said that keep-
ing all these "constituencies" happy is a
requirement for his position.
"I think the job as athletic director is a
very high profile one with a lot of built in
'constituencies' if you will Hart said.
Dave Hart
"You have to be sensitive to the student
body, the athletic staff, the media, the
alumni, the athletesthe list goes on and
on
Hart has worked in the athletic de-
partment since 1983 and was named to
his current position in 1987. During his
tenure, Hart has made revolutionary
improvements to the de-
partment. He has been in-
strumental in the imple-
mentation of a Student De-
velopmentprogramforall
student athletes at ECU,
has facilitated improve-
ments to Ficklen Stadium
and Minges Coliseum
through fund-raising ven-
tures and has worked tire-
lessly to promote the ECU
athletic programs to ma-
jor conferences, most no-
tably the Big East.
"We have spent a lot
of time and energy with the Big East
Hart said. "We have done a great many
things to represent ourselves in a very
professional manner to that affiliation
and I would say that we have earned
See HART page 53
MM�
- � �






August 25, 1993
iketball needs minor league system
soph Chris Webber of Michigan,
who is not old enough to drink, left
the Fab Five after two straight trips
to the NCAA finals. Add Anfemee
(lardaway of Memphis State and
Rodney Rogers of Wake Forest to
the long list of players taking an
early exit from college.
Ail three never had much of a
choice about the next level of com-
petition when they graduated from
high school. College is the on lv rou te
to the NBA, with very little excep-
tion, and their only intention was
i in naci weooerDeen
ss Ibasketball
looLand hisscholar-
lave gone to someone
u ho had more desire to earn a di-
ploma College is not for everyone.
Baseball plucks budding super-
stars from high school every year,
rhis year it was shortstop Alex
Rodriguez, selected by die Seattle
Mariners with the first pick of the
draft. In the two years prior, the top
picks were high school pitching ta rs
BrienTavlorandToddVanPoppel.
In 188 the first pick was ox ' -
fielder Ken Gritfev, Jr. from Moelk '
H.S. in Cincinnati.
A minor league system for bas-
ketball players would also help
schools increase their graduation
rates. Pla vers who are more serious
about an education would take ad -
antage of scholarships while ath-
letes u ho have no intention of
graduation could begin to earn a
living in theminors. This would, in
turn, curb the corruption that has
gripped the NCAA.
College baseball enjoys much
less corruption than other sports
because money is not usually a
motivating factor. The re enuecol-
lege football and basketball brings
in each year has become vital for
most universities And the athletes
have no sav in their exploitation.
Former ECU outfielder Pat
Watkins is now playingbaseball for
the Cincinnati Reds. He left school
as a junior. The applause for
Watkins' success should be loud.
His story is not the cliche of a
dumb jock cashing in his education
for a pro career that will chew him
up, spit him out and leave him pen-
niless withoutsomething to fall back
on. Hewasa North Carolina Scholar
at Garner H.S indicating
education's importance in his life.
Still, hedid not hesitate to leave
school.
"He'scertainly made a finede-
cision and we are very happy for
him, " said Garv Overton, ECU's
head baseball coach. "Pat and I
talked throughout the year, and as
the season began to unfold, it was
quite apparent he was going to be
drafted. We didn 't expect him to go
so high. The key (to the decision of
turning pro) is twofold.
" Following a player's third year
in school, that individual will likely
come back and finish. It's an easier
opportunity to come back and fin-
ish . The other factor is the round the
individual is drafted
Being chosen in the second
round of the Major League Baseball
See UNDERGRADS page 49
Pressley wins Chevy 250
LOUDON, N.H. (AP) � While
44 drivers started the New England
Chevy Dealers 250, it was apparent
early that the cars driven bv Robert
Pressley and fix? Nemechek were the
ones to beat.
That's how it came out.
Nemechek, the pole-sitter and
defending champion, and Presslev,
who started third, led 231 of the 250
laps that comprised the NASCAR
Busch Grand National race.
In the end, Pressley edged
Nemechek bv.75 seconds after aver-
aging 99560 mph around the 1.058-
mileoval at New Hampshire Inter-
national Speedway.
"Joe was running real good
and so were we. We just knew we
had to be patient said Pressley,
who won for the third time this
year and the 10th time in his career.
Nemechek, who had topitlate
to get a rear-end cooling belt re-
paired, was satisfied with the fin-
ish.
See CHEVY page 45
Evans keeps students in
step with aerobic classes
By Misha Zonn
Assistant Sports Editor
While most ECU students are
taking it easy during the summer,
watching TV or bar hopping down-
town, Dionne Evans keeps up a rig-
orous athletic schedule as a fitness
instructor. For any student who is
interested in getting off the couch
and shaping up, classes will be avail-
able all throughout summer school
at Christenbury Gym.
Dionne Evans says she became
interested in fitness at an early age.
"At first, I started teaching dance
and gymnastics classes. Then, at the
age of 16,1 began teaching aerob:cs.
Shortly after that, I went through the
Seminoles
ranked No. 1
TALLAHASSEE, Ha. (AP) �
Horida State's players had one Cling
on their minds after learning this
weekend they would begin the sea-
son as the nation's top-ranked team
for the third time in six years.
Kansas.
That was the response from
nearly all Seminole players, who
expected to be No. 1 heading into the
season and Saturday's date in the
KickoffClassicagainsttheJayhawks.
' 'This game will show the world
that we are either contenders or pre-
tenders defensive end Toddrick
Mdntosh said.
See COLLEGE page 45
SAMS
LOCK & KEY
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processofgettingofficially certified
Evans said.
Now Evans teaches a wide
variety of classes that integrate all of
the different athletic moves that she
has learned in the past. Classes range
from beginner routines to the ad-
vanced workouts thatinvol ve longer,
high impact work outs. The list of
options includes a basic class, high
impact, a high-low impact mix that
involves both high and low impact
equally, and an aqua tic aerobics class.
A popular step class is also offered,
in which participants use a stabi-
lized step in order to transform a
normal aerobics routine into high
See EVANS page 50
A�ter Downtown's Been
MOppill
& You Need a Ride
Sports Restaurant
& Spirits
2516 E. 10th Street
Greenville, NC
757-1122
15 TVs THROUGHOUT
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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 37
Sports Medicine program rising to top
in ECU's athletic program. The
program is not only an invalu-
able part of Pirate athletics, but is
also a strong academic program
for aspiring trainers.
The Sports Medicine Division
of ECU is working on its 23rd
year of involvement with the ath-
letics department. Started by Rod
Compton in 1970, the division
also instructs its students in the
academic background they need
to help them become athletic
trainers.
Acting Director Mike Hanley
stresses the importance of the re-
lationship between the student's
practical work and classroom re-
quirements. "Many people see the
student trainers at various ath-
letic events, but don't realize that
they also have academic require-
ments they have to fulfill in the
classroom Hanley said.
There are three levels of
achievement for those involved
with the program: rookie, curricu-
lum and staff positions. When stu-
dents enter the program, they are
already on the rookie level. This is
the stage where the student ob-
serves, handles routine duties, and
gets acquainted with the program.
Prospective trainers decide at this
level whether or not sports medi-
cine is for them.
Bloom directs sports
information department
By Warren Sumner
Photo courtesy of Sports Medicine
The average ECU student trainer spend between 2,300 and 2,500 hours in practical, hands-on
training. The minimum requirement is 800 hours over a two-year period.
Students who choose to take
the next step advance to the cur-
riculum level. At this point, stu-
dents have decided to become
more involved in the program and
are on the road leading to their
certification as an athletic trainer.
If the first part of this road is
traveled with success, the stu-
dent advances to the final and
most prestigious level. Only 12
students are selected for "staff"
positions. "They are the best of
the best" according to former di-
rector Rod Compton.
Best of the best in ECU's
sports medicine program is re-
ally an accomplishment. Students
learn from certified athletic train-
ers who are working within their
field on a daily basis.
This opportunity is seen as
an advantage because "many
programs don't even allow their
student trainers to talk to their
physicians according to
Compton.
Another big advantage for
ECU's student trainers is the
number of hours they spend on
their hands-on training. The Na-
tional Athletic Trainers Associa-
tion (NATA) requires a minimum
of 800 hours over the two-year
period of a student's junior and
senior year. The average ECU
student trainer spends between
2,300 and 2,500 hours in practical
hands-on training. "This is a great
advantage for our students
Hanley said.
ECU's Sports Medicine Divi-
sion is only getting better. NATA
is in the process of delegating
part of the accreditation process
to the American Medical Asso-
ciation (AMA).
"This (move) will provide
accredited programs such as ours
with greater recognition, and
even more respect Hanley said.
Staff Writer
Charles Bloom, ECU's sports
information director, is a man who
likes to surround himself with suc-
cess. A glance at his office walls,
lined with service awards and
plaques, reveals a shrine con-
structed to remind him of the value
of hard work and self-
motivation.
Bloom, in his fifth
year as sports informa-
tion director, is the
university's liaison to
the media for ECU's
many athletic pro-
grams. He is in charge
of setting up media in-
terviews with players
and coaches, keeping
statistical da ta on Pira te
games, and keeping the
media informed of ECU
athletic events. Given the size and
emphasisofEastCarolina'sathletic
department, Bloom's job is no easy
task.
His office's decor includes a
merit award for work at the 1984
Olympics in Los Angeles, a book-
case filled with the biographies of
successful business figures and
sports personalities, and textbooks
on the art of public relations and
media management. There is a
"Young Man of the Year" award
on one side of his desk, balanced
by photographs of Bloom stand-
ing next to Robert Jones and Tom
Scott on the other. Directly across
from his desk, next to his degree
from the University of South
Carolina, is a script of Bear
Bryant's speech, "What It Takes
to be Number One
Bloom en-
tered his field
while in college at
the University of
Nevada at Las
Vegas, where he
served as editor of
his college news-
paper. When a
friend told him of
an opening in the
sports informa-
tion department,
Bloom began
work there as a
student assistant. Bloom partici-
pated through his sophomore
year until he transferred to South
Carolina and entered their de-
partment.
When his superior at South
Carolina moved to Louisiana
State to head the sports informa-
tion program there, he drafted
Bloom as his assistant. Bloom left
See BLOOM page 47
Charles Bloom
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I





August 25, 1993
Edwards bats and catches for ECU teams
File photo
I he ECU disc golf course is located adjacent to Harrington Field and
Bunting Field, the ECU track. Tournament play begins on August 28.
Disc golf tourney flies in August
ByWamsnSumner
Disc golfers from Virginia and
the Carolinas will compete August
28 and 29 in four rounds of disc golf
at the East Carolina University disc
golf course. Professionals will com-
pete for a cash purse, while ama-
teurs will be awarded trophies and
other merchandise. Proceeds from
the tournament will benefit Camp
Needles in the Pines, a camp for the
diabetic children of Eastern North
Carolina.
Disc golf provides an interest-
ing variation on an old theme.
Played in a fashion similar to ball
golf, disc golf uses a flying disc to
negotiate the course in the shortest
� amount of strokes. Much of thesame
terminology is used in both disc
golf and ball golf. Players "drive"
' from the "tee make "approach
shots" and "putt A score of three
is "par while "birdies "bogeys"
. and "aces" note scores above or
below par. A hole is completed
when the player's disc comes to rest
in the "pole hole a basket-like tar-
get. Tournaments, such as this one,
encourage plavers to sharpen their
skills, and bring the sport to the
public eye in its most exciting form
� competition.
While the tournament pro-
motes the sport of disc golf, it will
also benefit a very worthy charity.
Camp Needles in the Pines gives
diabetic children the opportunity
to take part in a wide variety of
recreational and educational oppor-
tunities. Children atcamp learn self-
reliance while learning how to man-
age their disease. The camp is staffed
bv doctors, nurses and other health
professionals from Pitt County Me-
morial Hospital and the ECU School
of Medicine.
The ECU disc golf course is
located adjacent to Harrington Field
and Bunting Field, the ECU track.
Tournament play will begin at 11
a.m. on Saturday, August 28, for
two rounds of 18 holes. Play will
resume at 10 a.m. on Sunday, Au-
gust 29, for the final 36 holes, fol-
lowed by the presentation of
awards.
Staff Writer
ECU outfielder Lamont
Edwards is much like any other
student-athlete at ECU. He goes to
class, goes to practice and plays in
games, just like any other athlete in
the ECU program. What separates
Edwards from many other athletes
is the fact that he does all of these
things during the
course of two differ-
ent atltletic seasons.
Edwards, a na-
tive of Clinton, N.C
plays both football
and baseball at East
Carolina.
While playing in
his freshman year of
baseball eligibility,
Edwards is simulta-
neously practicing
hard in ECU football's
spring practice drills
as a receiver.
Edwards, an extremely versa-
tile athlete, has experience adapt-
ing to different sports from his high
school days, as he was an all-confer-
ence player in football, basketball
and baseball. Edwards said that this
experience prepared him for par-
ticipating in both sports, but things
are a little tougher on the college
level.
"College sports are a lot harder
togetused to Edwards said. "The
level of competition is a lot higher
Steve Logan has asked
Edwards to return to the Pirate foot-
ball team early this spring, to help
The East
Carolinian - it's
not your father's
newspaper!
shore up weaknesses in the receiv-
ing corps. Edwards will have to fill
a position at the wide-out slot and
adapt to the intricacies of a Pirate
offense adapted to fit a two-back
set.
Rumor has it that Logan was at
firstdispleased with Edwards' par-
ticipation in baseball, but Edwards
said that it was just Logan's con-
cern blown out of proportion.
"He only
wanted me to play
baseball if 1 got
(playing time)
Edwards said. "He
didn't want me to
split my concentra-
tion if I didn't get to
play" Edwards
said that being a
part of ECU foot-
ball this year was a
grea t experience for
him,butadmits that
he was nervous, de-
spite his lack of playing time.
"Even though I didn't get to
play that muchit was still exciting
to be on the field. To have all those
people in the stands screaming can
make you a little nervous. There's a
big difference between seeing
around 100 people in the stands for
baseball, and 30,000 for football
However exciting ECU football is
for Edwards, it is quite apparent
Lamont Edwards
that his first love is baseball.
Edwards was coached by
Jimmv Raynor, a former pitcher for
the Los Angeles Dodgers, at Clinton
High School. He said that the em-
phasis put on getting an education
at Clinton has prepared him for the
commitment that he said ECU has
for its athletes.
A computer science major,
Edwards said he hopes to work for
a technical organization like IBM
when he graduates from college,
but he still harbours a dream for
going pro.
"I don't want to rely on going
pro because a lot of players get
bounced around in the pros, but it is
definitely my dream to play in the
big leagues Edwards said.
Edwards said that his
athleticism and speed may provide
him with an advantage when the
professional scouts look his way in
a couple years, but right now he is
concentrating on "giving 100 per-
cent" in both sports and hopes he
can gain success in each.
"It would be a big fantasy of
mine to help ECU football win a
big bowl game, and then turn
around and win a NCAA baseball
championship
Given Edwards' potential at
both sports, avid fans of ECU ath-
letics can expect to see much more
of him in the future.
Crumpler
heads list of
football
stand-outs
Tight end Carlester Crumpler
has been named to virtually ev-
er' .Ml-America Team in pre-sea-
son publications.
The 6'6, 245-pound senior
was a first-unit selection in Foot-
ball Digest, Undy's, Athlon and
NCAA Football Preview. He was a
second-team selection in Lee
Corso's College Football, only be-
cause the magazine did not list a
tight end on the first team.
Crumpler was listed on the
second-team on The Sporting
Nnvs, Football Neics and College &
Pro Football Newsiveekly. He was
an honorable mention All-
America in Street & Smith's.
Last season, Crumpler
caught 38 passes for 524 yards
with four touchdowns. During
his three-year playing career,
Crumpler has 50 catches for 613
yards and four touchdowns.
Crumpler has already earned
his bachelor's degree (business)
from ECU and is enrolled in
See PIRATE page 50
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�s
August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 39
Bailey leads pack of local sportscasters
from a i
prerrutji sj
The walls are covered with
memorabilia, autographs, plaques
and photos of Bailey with Harry
Carey, the Hall-of-Fame Chicago
Cubs Announcer, former DallasCow-
boy coach Tom Landn, Michael Jor-
dan and Richard Petty.
Bailey is the consummate sports
fan, whether it is riding donkeys or
playing golf at Pinehurst. Unfortu-
nately, being a sportscaster is not all
glory.
"We had to do a donkey basket-
ball game for charity Bailev said.
"Some were really easy to ride and
some would just dump vou off. Right
when I got in the game I hopped on a
donkey and tried to be real gutsy
about it Hop on mis donkev and go
after it. And right when I got on, he
dumped me. I landed right on mv
back and thought I was paralyzed. 1
thought this is the wav to go. I'm
going to be paralyzed from the waist
down because I fell off a damn don-
key But it turned out it was just
bruised really bad
He has had his moments in the
spotlight, though. Shooting a round
at Pinehurst with Gary Overton,
ECU'sbaseballcoach, Bailey teed-off
the 257-yard "Hall-of-Fame Hole"
No.4 withplayerson the green. After
his swing, the players on the green
waved a towel at him. Bailey apolo-
gized for leaving his ball onlylO feet
away from the pin and interrupting
their game. He scored an eagle.
"That might be my most glori-
ous moment in everything Bailey
said.
After graduating from Old Do-
minion University in 1984, he began
workasthesportseditorofanewspa-
perinFranklin, Va. Hequittwo weeks
later because he had to do the obitu-
aries every morning. After a short
tenure at a sporting goods store, he
came to Greenville and has been
working for WNCT ever since.
Bailey begandoingnewsreports
and sports on the weekend, but
quickly found himself at the reins of
sports cast. For the past
: i' has honored Bailey
tw as the best sports cast.
Bailey describes the award as a total
team effort, much like the team effort
iired to win in sports.
As a child, Bailey, like all other
sports casters, fell in love with athlet-
ics.
"When you get into the fifth or
sixth grade, you make the decision
you want to be an a thlete and you get
to junior high school and you're not a
great athlete and vou've got to do
something else he said. "I knew I
wanted to be a sports writer or sports
caster
Bailey played offensive tackle in
high school and is a member of a
growing list of stars who attended
Indian River in Chesapeake, Va He
was a teammate of William Fuller,
now playing with the Houston Oil-
ers. NASCAR driver Rickey Rudd
also went to Indian River and, most
recently, Alonzo Mourning.
Bailey's sports background has
helped light the path to his success
today, and sports are very much a
part of his family's life, as well. He
and his wife have a daughter and son
(named RyneafterChkagoCubs sec-
ond baseman Ryne Sandburg).
"My wife wouldn't go for Roger
(as a name) Bailey said. His child-
hood hero was Dallas quarterback
Roger Staubach. "He was 'H' num-
ber one
Unfortunately, being on air ev-
ery evening has drawbacks. He must
spend less time with his family and
sometimes finds it difficult to enjoy
sporting events the way he would
like.
Football season proves to be the
most challenging time of the year,
"becauseonFriday nightswedoa 15-
minute show Bailey said. "1 begin
working on that the Sunday before
that Friday. We send out seven or
eight different crews to maybe 14 or
15 games. The hardest part is the
organization"
Through all the stress of organi-
zatdonandmespeedwithwhich tele-
vision operates, Bailey maintains his
cool and overcomes the stereotypes
of TV sports casters.
"I think a lot of sports writers
give TV sports casters a bum wrap
The East
Carolinian is your
source for sports!
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Montana resurrecting
career with Kansas City
(AP) � Kansas City went for
the big names at the skill positions.
San Diego opted for linemen and
linebackers. Any questions about
how the top two teams in the AFC
West will go about their duties this
season?
The Chiefs have Joe Montana
seeking one last soaring moment
and Marcus Allen looking to show
up the Raiders for dumping all over
him, then dumping him. Thev are
the glitzy guys. Yes, right there in
the heartland, a big dose of Califor-
nia cool just might take Kansas City
back to the top.
Coach Marty Schottenheimer
is counting on it, scrapping his two-
back, power offense for a 49ers-
style attack based on short, precise
pass routes, three-step quarterback
drops and plenty of variety.
Why?
"Because we're not playing in
the Super Bowl and that's where
we want to be Schottenheimer
says.
This means Montana will be
throwing to ah assortment ofbacks
that includes Allen, who fell into
disfavor with Raiders owner Al
Davis and was buried on the bench
the last two seasons.
New offensive coordinator
Paul Hackett, once Montana's
quarterback's coach in San Fran-
cisco, has installed most of the
elements of the 49ers' splendid
system.
That should create a comfort
zone for Montana. So will having
a solid corps of running backs.
Fullbacks Christian Okoye and
Barry Word must show they can
catch as well as crunch, while Allen
and Harvey Williams should be
See AFC page 49
Brian Bailey
AQUA GOLF CENTER
Bailey said.
"See, we're more of a headline
service. Wedon'thave time togo into
detail. I respect newspaper writers
for going into that detail. I read the
paperevery day, too. But I don't think
they should be disrespectful of us
because we're a headline service. Do
peoplewantto see Michael Jordan go
upforaslamorreadhehad43 points?
That's the difference
BaUeyseparateshimselffromthe
flock by writing a column for The
Pirates Oiest and says he loves put-
ting his ideas on paper. He is also
quite the prognosticator. Before the
NBA finals began, he correctly pre-
dicted a Bulls win in the opening
game and expected them to take the
senes in six.
Never one to turndown requests
from the public and charities if he can
help it, Bailey feels the responsibility
of being a role model
"I'm not an angel for sure he
said. "But I mink it's part of thejob. If
I go to the mall and someone says,
Hey,arerityouBrianBaileythesports
caster?' and I turn my nose up, then
they say, 'Yeah, he's a sports caster,
but he's also a jerk
Greenvillesportsfanswouldfeel
the loss should Bailey leave for a
larger market. He has the love for
sports that is necessary to succeed.
"Anyone can get up there and
read thescores Baileysaid. "You've
got to have your ownpersonality and
inflectyourownflavorinto the sports
cast And that he does.


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"Outdoor Concert" featuring
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Thursday, August 26th 11-lpm outside of
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August 25, 1993
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August 25, 1993
LKo
as No. 2
The East Carolinian 41
started out No. ! in 1988 and 1991,
received 42 of 62 first-place votes
jnd 1,522 ota possible 1,530 points
in the nationwide survey of sports
vvritersand broadcasters. TheSemi-
noles also are No. 1 in the USA
Today-CNN coaches' poll.
"Why me?" coach Bobbv
Bowden said. "It definitely puts
more pressure on you when you're
No. 1. It means everybody's out to
get you
Defending national champion
Alabama is second in the AP poll,
getting 14 first-place votesand 1,472
points. Michigan is third with three
first-place votes and 1,413 points,
while Texas A&M is fourth with
1,261 points.
Miami, whose bid for a fifth
national title was halted by Ala-
bama in the 1993 Sugar Bowl, be-
gins this season at No. 5. Rounding
out the Top 10 are Syracuse, Notre
Dame, Nebraska, Florida and Ten-
nessee.
Syracuse received two first-
place votes. The other first-place
vote went to No. 15 Stanford.
Although Florida Sta'e has an
explosive offense featuring versa-
tile quarterback Charlie Ward, the
Seminoles won't have an easy path
to the national title. Their schedule
includes three Top 10 teams (Mi-
ami, Notre Dame and Florida) and
three other ranked schools (No. 20
North Carolina, No. 23 Clemson
State).
unt Kansas,
' it in the
28. The
i 11 the most votes
im nol in the Top 25.
. bt No. l,butwedon't
national championship
Bowden said. "When
you have to play six nationally
ranked teams, you better have a
great team oryou'rein big trouble
Still, Bowden's team is excited
by its No. 1 status.
"It feels good defensive line-
man Toddrick Mclntosh said. "All
we've got to do is go 13-0 and we'll
stay No. 1. It's no surprise, no pres-
sure
It's the fifth time in the last six
years that a team from Florida has
topped the preseason poll. Miami
did it in 1990 and 1992. Michigan
was No. 1 in 1989.
The last preseason No. 1 to win
the national championship was
Oklahoma in 1985. Since the pre-
season poll began in 1950, seven
teams have started and finished No.
1.
Colorado is 11th, followed by
Washington, Georgia, Arizona,
Stanford, Perm State, Ohio State,
Southern Cal, BYU, North Caro-
lina, Boston College, Oklahoma,
Clemson, Mississippi State and
North Carolina State.
All teams in the preseason Top
25 were ranked at the end of last
season except Arizona, Penn State,
Southern Cal, BYU, Oklahoma and
Clemson.
Alabama has its highest pre-
season ranking since 1980, when
the Tide a lso were second. Syracuse
hasn't started this high since 1960,
when the defending national cham-
pions were No. 1.
Gill up for grabs in Charlotte
CHARLOTTE, NC. (AP) �
Charlotte Hornets PresidentSpencer
Stolpen said the team can't ensure
where Kendall Gill will play next
year, and neither can the shooting
guard.
'It's one of those things that's in
nobody's hands Stolpen said.
"Kendall doesn't have full control
and we don't have full control"
Gill, a 6-foot-5 guard out of Illi-
nois, became a restricted free agent
last month. He has spent much of the
summer talking with other NBA
teams, including the Clippers, the
Knicks, the Lakers and the
SuperSonics. The most likely sce-
narios remain a trade with the Clip-
pers involving forward Danny Man-
ning, a trade with Seattle, or Gill re-
turning to the Hornets.
"They Hornets are trving to
figureoutiftheycanmakeanydeals
said AmTellem,Gill'sagent. "What's
holding this up is not Kendall. It's
more that Charlotte has to make a
decision about what it wants
Gill said recently he would be
willing to return to the Hornets. The
club has publicly maintained its will-
ingness to re-sign the three-year NBA
veteran.
Tellem said until recently the two
sides have not been able to agree on
what Gill's market value may be. He
reportedly was seeking a long-term
deal worth an average of $3.5 million
to $4 million a season.
"He would seriously entertain
staying with the Hornets said
Tellem. 'It's a great team and a nice
city. As he's gone through this pro-
cess, one thing he's learned is that he
would like to be part of a winning
team. That has become a primary
factor in his thinking'
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Associated Press top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press 1993 preseason college football poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, 1992 record, total points based on 25 points for a first place vote
through one point for a 25th place vote, and ranking in the final 1992 season poll:
Record
1. Florida St. (42)11-1-0
2. Alabama (14)13-0-0
3. Michigan (3)9-0-3
4. Texas A&M12-1-0
S.Miami11-1-0
6. Syracuse (2)10-2-0
7. Notre Dame10-1-1
8. Nebraska9-3-0
9. Florida9-4-0
10. Tennessee9-3-0
11. Colorado9-2-1
12. Washington9-3-0
13. Georgia10-2-0
14. Arizona6-5-1
15. Stanford (1)10-3-0
16. Penn St.7-5-0
17. Ohio St.8-3-1
18. Southern Cal6-5-1
19. Brigham Young8-5-0
20. North Carolina9-3-0
21. Boston College8-3-1
22. Oklahoma5-4-2
23. Clemson5-6-0
24. Mississippi St.7-5-0
25. N.Carolina St.9-3-1
Pts
1,522
1,472
1,413
1,261
1,245
1,180
1,137
1,050
998
976
961
890
725
695
660
598
470
436
323
322
299
269
262
165
162
Pvs
2
1
5
7
3
6
4
14
10
12
13
11
8
18
19
21
23
17
Others receiving votes: Kansas 83, San Diego State 73, Fresno State 72, Mississippi 70, Texas 69, Baylor 44
Arizona State 39, Louisville 23, UCLA 23, Wisconsin 23, Iowa 16, Washington St. 16, Georgia Tech 15, South
Carolina 15, Oregon 11, Southern Mississippi 11, Illinois 9, Michigan State 8, Auburn 7, Bowling Green 6,
Hawaii 6, Maryland 5, Texas Tech 5, West Virginia 3, Houston 2, Memphis State 2, Rutgers 2, Toledo 1.
.A.AAAA.AAAA
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August 25, 1993
1993 PIRATE FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

RecordSite Time
1-3-0FICKLEN 8:01p.m.
pt. I S RID 6-4-01-0-0FICKLEN 4:00p.m.
Sept. 2 at Washington9 3-0()-()-()Seattle, Wash. 3:38p.m.
Oct. 2 MEMPHIS STAi6-5-02-1-0FICKLEN 12:08p.m.
Oct. 9 atSouthCarolina5-6-02-8-0Columbia, S.C. 1:00p.m.
Oct. 16 LOUSIANA TECH5-6-02-2-1FICKLEN 2:00p.m.
Oct. 23 at Southern Miss7-4-04-14-0Hattiesburg, Miss. 6:00p.m.
Oct. 30 at Virginia Tech2-8-14-3-0Blacksburg, Va. 1:00p.m.
Nov. 6 TULSA4-7-00-2-0FICKLEN 1:30p.m.
Nov. 13 at Kentucky4-7-00-0-0Lexington, Ky. 1:00p.m.
Nov. 20 at Cincinnati3-8-07-0-0Cincinnati, Ohio 1:00p.m.
All times Eastern. Kick-off times subject to change due to TV opportunities.
1992 Results (record:5-6) Date Opponent Sept. 5 SYRACUSEScore Attend. 21-42 L 36,500 (SO)Site FICKLENECU'S home
Sept. 12 VIRGINIA TECH30-27 W35,121 (SO)FICKLENopener
Sept. 19 at South Carolina20-18 W60,030Columbia, S.C.against Syracuse will be televised
Sept. 26 at Bowling Green Oct. 10 at Duke34-44 L 14-45 L12.512 34,100Rowling, Ohio Durham, N.C.
Oct. 17 CINCINNATI Oct. 24 at Pittsburgh42-21 W 37-31 W34126 25,766FICKLEN Pittsburgh, Pa.
Oct. 29 SOUTHERN MISS.21-38 L33249FICKLENnation-
Nov. 7 at West Virginia28-41 L41,139Morgantown, W. Va.ally on ESPN
Nov. 14 ARKANSAS STATE35-18 W25,072FICKLEN
Nov. 21 at Memphis State07-42 L17,345Memphis, Tenn.
Jordan getting on with life
LEESBURG, Va. (AP) � After
spending much of the past week in
seclusion, Michael Jordan is gradu-
ally returning to the public eye.
One day after making his first
public appearance since his father's
bodv was positively identified Aug.
13, Jordan politely declined all re-
quests for autographs on the second
day of a charity golf tournament in
suburban Washington.
"Michael sends his regrets, but
he's a little tired this morning tour-
nament executive director Rose El-
der said after Jordan failed to show-
Sunday for an early-morning news
conference.
In a brief meeting with reporters
on Saturday, Jordan said only that he
wascopingwith the tragedy through
the help of friends and family mem-
bers.
Jordan'sappearanceatthe two-
dav Rose Elder Invitational tourna-
ment came two days after he Issued
a written statement thanking law
enforcement officers for their han-
dling of his father's case and casti-
ga ting some members of the media
for suggesting a connection between
business dealings or his gambling.
James Jordan'sbodywasfound
floating in a creek near McCollS.C,
on Aug. 3, twelve days after he
disappeared. Two 18-year-old
North Carolina men are in custody
on charges of first-degree murder
and armed robbery in connection
with the case.
Atrhe tournament, Jordanwas
part of a five-plaver group that in-
cluded Kathryn Crosby and pro
See JORDAN page 53
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For $3.50 a month, (free during the summer) you can
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JPCHOVIA





August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 43
Ditka making use of spare time
'tup 1 h.ld whi'II
1 h ista) in tune
ntheleagueto
iei people know
wise what you thought you
�� a v Hut IKnow, you might not know any
play to it! don't are whatmore").
people heard! tt s,i fact! All they cot�) (AM MORI i roucH
to do is play with me).WIIIIIIM 11 UNCS
2). WATCHED A LO! OFiI'm not mad at anybody. 1 had
FILMS) great run. Football was my whole
("A lot Football? What else?life, pretty much, for the last 32 years.
Hut not anymore. At this point, I
really don'tmiss itOf course, open-
ing day might go by and I'll realize
miss the heck out ol it. Or that fiist
week will goby andlllstartwonder-
ing what tile heck I've done).
Some people never change,
which is why it's hard to get too
much of Ditka. He Lsstill a wonderful
See DITKA page 44
1993-94 ECU Men's Basketball Schedule
Nov. 18Court Authority (Ex.)7 p.m.
Nov. 23Moscow Dynamo Sports Club (Ex.)7 p.m.
Nov. 29@UNC Charlotte7:35 p.m.
Dec. 3-4@ Mount St. Mary's Tip-Off Tourn.
Dec. 3Columbia v. ECU6 p.m.
Central Conn. St. v. Mount St.Mary's8 p.m.
Dec. 4Consolation Game6 p.m.
Championship Game8 p.m.
Dec. 6Campbell7 p.m.
Dec. 16Furman7 p.m.
Dec. 18@ Campbell2 p.m.
Dec. 22Appalachian State7 p.m.
Dec. 30-31@ Great Northern Classic
Dec. 30Eastern Michigan v. ECU7 p.m.
Wisconsin-Green Bay v. East.Wash.9 p.m.
Dec. 31Consolation Game7 p.m.
Championsh ip Game9 p.m.
Jan. 3Western Carolina7 p.m.
Jan. 8American7 p.m.
Jan. 10George Mason7 p.m.
Jan. 15@ Old Dominion2 p.m.
Jan. 17Fairfield7 p.m.
Jan. 19@ William & Mary7:30 p.m.
Jan. 22@ Richmond7:30p.m.
Jan. 26James Madison7 p.m.
Jan. 29UNC Wilmington7 p.m.
Feb. 2@ Furman7:30 p.m.
Feb. 5@ George Mason7:30 p.m.
Feb. 7@ American�V7:30p.m.
Feb. 12William & Mary7 p.m.
Feb. 16Old Dominion7 p.m.
Feb. 19@ James Madison7:30p.m.
Feb. 23Richmond7 p.m.
Feb. 26@UNC-Wilmington7:30p.m.
Mar. 5-7@ Richfood-Colonial TournamentTBA
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James Jordan
lives on in
family's lives
(AP) � He wanted what ev-
ery father everywhere wants for
his kids: the best of everything.
Long after that was assured, some-
one asked James Jordan what he
still wanted for himself.
"You just hope he replied,
' 'that when the ship comes to dock,
you can say, 'Damn, we had a
good time
Though darkness envelops his
household today, it was hard to
walk away from a conversation
with James Jordan and not feel the
least bit lightened. Or not know
the man you had just left behind
was having a good time. A damn
good time. All the time.
He was hardly a saint, but
then he never pretended to be.
James Jordan came to like all the
fine things and high-priced pur-
suits that went with the station he
arrived at late in life � sleek cars,
silk shirts, big events, exotic lo-
cales, celebrity, good food and
long nights at the gaming tables.
He was also com mon in a way
that few men who have seen
fortune's smile close up are apt to
be. Never more so than when the
talk turned to his part in fathering
the greatest athlete of our time.
The question had been asked
so often that he had it down to a
routine. First, he would shrug and
light up that mischievous grin, or
else a cigarette he had bummed
from somebody nearby, and then
exhale slowly for effect. Then he
would say with practiced indif-
ference:
"I think God just sat Himself
down one time and said, 'I'll cre-
ate myself a perfect basketball
player
Nothing is quite that simple,
of course. And with a little bit of
prodding, or maybe another
smoke, James Jordan would un-
fold Michael's child hood in words
See JAMES page 50
1993 ECU MEN'S SOCCER
Sept. 5Barton College4 p.m.
Sept. 8@UNC7 p.m.
Sept. 11-ECU TournamentTBA
Sept. 12(VMI, Marsnall, UNC-W)
Sept. 1 5@Duke7 p.m.
Sept. 17George Mason Univ.1 p.m.
Sept. 19James Madison Univ.1 p.m.
Sept. 22Virginia Commonwealth4n.m.
Sept. 25@ Univ. of Richmond7 p.m.
Sept. 30@ Wake Forest Univ.4:30 p.m.
Oct. 2@ Campbell Univ.2 p.m.
Oct. 9@ UNC-Wilmington4 p.m.
Oct. 14Methodist College4 p.m.
Oct. 18Elon College4 p.m.
Oct. 23@ Old Dominion Univ.7:30p.m.
Oct. 27@ NC State3:30p.m.
Oct. 29@ American Univ.3 p.m.
Oct. 31@ Univ. of Maryland E.S.1 p.m.
Nov. 4-7CAA TournamentTBA
BACK & LIMB
CLINIC
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL THERAPY, ECU
Outpatient Physical Therapy Services
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The Wmen's Studies Minor offers courses that examine the influence of
gender, raceethnicity, class, political structures and social systems on women's
experiences and contributions. The offered courses identify, critically examine
and evaluate historical and cultural assumptions about women. The Women's
Studies program offers an undergraduate minor (24 hours) and a graduate
minor (9 hours).
The Women's Studies Program will offer
�ANTH 3200 Women's Roles in Cross-
Cultural Perspective
(001) 11:00-12:00 MWF (Mathews)
�CDFR 5300 Sex Roles
(001) 9:30-12:30 TTh (Tyson-Rawson)
� ENGL 3100 World Literature
(001) 8:00-9:15 TTh (Wilentz)
�ENGL 3260 Black Literature in America
(001) 9:30-10:45 TTh (Watson)
(002) 9:30-1045 TTh (Wilentz)
(003) 11:00-12:15 TTh (Watson)
(006) 2:00-3:15 TTh (Watson)
�ENGL 3300 Women and Literature
(001) 1:00-2:00 MWF (Fan)
(002) 12:30-1:45 TTh (Wang)
(003) 2:00-3:15 TTh (Wang)
(004) 2:00-3:00 MWF (Farr)
�ENGL 6390 Special Studies Seminar:
World Literature in English: Vie Woman's
Voice
(001) 9:30-10:45 TTh (Bizarro)
(002) 3:30-4:45 TTh (Southard)
(003) 6:30-9:30 W (TBA)
the following courses in the fall:
�FREN5521 Special Topics: Women in
French Literature (taught in French)
(001) 6:30-9:30 T (Aronson)
�HIST 3110 History of African Americans
(001) 9:30-10:45 M (Dennard)
(002) 9:30-10:45 TTh (Dennard)
� PSYC 5350 Psychology of Sexual Behavior
(001) 11:00-12:15 TTh (McCammon)
� WOST 3910,3920,3930 Directed Reading
in Women's Studies'
(001) TBA (McCammon)
� WOST 4000 Senior Seminar in Women's
Studies'
(001) 18:30-21:30 M (Farr)
�WOST 4500 Internship in Women's
Studies
(001) TBA (McCammon)
� WOST 5000 Advanced Seminar in
Women '$ Studies
(001) 18:30-21:30 M (Farr)
�Prerequisites: WOST 2000, 2200 or 2400;
or instructor's permission.
Call 757-6268 for more information
� " I �HIU�.II.I





August 25. 1993
VIMMING SCHEDULE
5 p.m.
3 p.m.
rBA
2 p.m.
Drcy
Dec. 4
Jan. 3
Jan. 15
Jan. 22
Jan.25
Jan. 29
Feb. 16-
Feb. 19
Mar. 3-5
Mar. 17-
Mar. 19
Mar. 24-
Mar. 26
VVlJ M.II'N
College ol
(iharleston
American Univ.
" Nl: Missouri St. U.
1 Duke University
a Richmond
North Carolina
@ UNC-Wilmington
CAA Champion.
(Swimming, Diving)
ECAC Champion.
Women's NCAA Champion.
Men's NCAA Champion.
' p.m.
I p.m.
I p.m.
1 1 a.m
2 p.m.
2 p.m.
5 p.m.
2 p.m.
All day
All day
Continued from page 43
Kobayashi wins second
buncUeof contradictors, fiicticnand
comedy and plain talk sparking off
him in every direction.
It will be a ample more weeks
before a button-downed Mike pops
upon your screen every Sunday be-
hindacleskastriecenierpieceofNBC's
revamped "NFL Live No one
should have any trouble recognizing
him. I lellbetheomeryone.Theguy
who looks like he's going through
withdrawal I iis official title will be
"studio analyst but Ditka figures
that means he can do or say pretty
much whatever he wants, whenever
he wants. Which ispretty much what
he'salwaysdone: been Mike. NBC is
gambling a large chunk of money
that lie will be enough to sack former
SteelersquarterbackTerryBradshaw �
and 'TheNFLToday"inthescramble
for ratings.
In a recent telephone interview
from his suburban Chicago home,
the former Bears coach sounded
tanned, rested and ready,asexcitable
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Corner of 5th andReade Streets in Downtown Greenville
and as opinionated as ever, often re-
versing field in the span of a few
sentences.
When he formally tcxik the job
last April, Ditka told � eporters that a
sabbatical of still-to-be-determined
length from the sidelines might actu-
ally make him see the game better.
Then again, he might just have been
bustingchops: "Maybe when you're
sittingon yourbutt Ditka said at the
time, "your mind's working better
Still, he said nothing that's hap-
pened in the nearly four monthssince
lias caused him to change that opin-
ion.
"The main things I wanted were
to cut down on travel and not be
spea king to coaches. I didn't want to
be close to the games. I wanted to see
what they're like from a distance. I
wanted tostayawayforatleastayear
and see how that felt. Maybe I'll stay
away for the rest of my life he said.
"Maybe I won't. But that was my
thinking for this year
BROOKLYN PARK, Minn.
(AP) � Hiromi Kobayashi would
like to challenge Ayako Okamoto
for the title of Japan's best female
golfer. If the 30-year-old Kobayashi
keeps winning, she may have a
chance.
Kobayashi won her second
LPGA event in six weeks, beating
Cindy Rarick in a playoff Sunday
at the Minnesota Classic.
The duo ended regulation at
11-under 205 at the par-72, 6,141-
yard Ldinburgh USA. Kobayashi
knocked in a 3-foot putt to match
paron the 18th hole, then watched
Rarick push a 5-foot par try wide.
Kobayashi earned $67,500
from the $450,000 purse, upping
her season earnings to $319,613,
which is fifth best. Her first tour
victory came on July 18 at the JAL
Big Apple Classic in New Roch-
elle, N.Y
Kobayashi also vaulted into
the top five in the race for Player of
the Year, an honor Okamoto won
in 1987.
"She is really a big influence
for the Japanese people
Kobayashi said of Okamoto, who
left her native Japan to join the
LPGA in 1981. "I'm trying to reach
where she is
On Sunday, Kobayashi
proved she could handle adverse
conditions. She had fivebirdieson
the back nine whilea constant rain
saturated the course.
She beat par with birdie putts
of 36 and 30 feet on Nos. 9 and 11,
respectively, and forced the extra
hole with an 18-footer on No. 18.
Her 7-under 65 matched a course
record set by Barb Bunkowsky in
1990.
"This day I was trying to make
a good score said Kobayashi,
who has been learning English
since she joined the tour in Octo-
ber 1989. "But 1 wasn't thinking
about a 65
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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 45
NNIS SCHEDULE
CHEVY
Nov. -1
Women's
Sep. J4t-
Oct. 8-10
Oct. 21
Oct. 22-24
TBA
itational
al Indoor Tournament
Lady Pirate Invitational
University of North Carolina
Barton College
ODU Invitational
Rolex Regional Indoor Tournament
Continued from page 36
I think we're getting that mon-
key oil our back now said
Nemechek, the defending Grand
National points champion who has
yet to win this year. "I'm happy.
1 lopefully, we'll start getting some
good finishes now
Bobby Hotter, driving a
Chevrolet, finished third, followed
by current points leader Steve
(. .lissom in a Chevrolet and Tommy
1 ouston in a Ford.
Five-time Winston Cup cham-
pion 1 Sale Famhardtstarted seventh,
but collided with rookie Hermie
Sadlerbetween tumsoneand two on
the first lap and sustained steering
damage. He dropped out after 36
COLLEGE
laps.
Since the track opened in 1990,
no Winston Cup racer has won a
Grand Nationalevont at New Hamp-
shire. The best finish among the four
Winston Cuppers in Sunday's race
was Bill Elliott, who came in 15th.
Winston Cup racer Terry
Labonte, who started second, had
steering probterxeand completed 155
laps. Hut Stricklin had engine prob-
lems and dropped out after 38 laps.
The race oftentimes resembled a
demolition derby. There were 12 cau-
tion flags and many accidents. By the
end, only six cars were on theleajd lap
and 25 still were running.
Pressley blamed drivers of
Continued from page 36
slower cars for the problems.
"They just wouldn't give a bit of
room he said. "The slower cars put
a lot of good cars out today
Nemechek, who set a qualifying
record by turning in a lap of 124.875,
and Pressley managed to avoid the
trouble. They traded the lead for the
first 146 laps.
Jack Sprague sneaked into the
lead on lap 147 after Pressley and
Nemechek pitted, but liis time at the
top was short. Sprague sustained
front-end damage on a restart and
never was able to get back in conten-
tion. He finished 20th.
Pressley opened an 11-second
lead on Nemechek following a re-
start when Nemechek's belt prob-
lem became apparent.
Thefinalcaution period�from
laps 214 to 218 � gave Nemechek
time to fix the problem, but not
enough time to catch Pressley.
"This was probably the easiest
race we've run here said Pressley,
who finished second in last year's;
race. "The car just drove by itself
Grissom's finish allowed him'
to keep thepoints lead. Daid Green,
who finished ninth, held on to sec-
ond position, while Pressley re-
mained third and Nemechekmoved
into fourth.
The victory was worth $33,875
and was Pressley's biggest payday.
"This game is the first rung on
the ladder senior wide receiver
Kevin Knox said. "We can't be de-
toured
The Seminoles. who have fin-
ished no lower than fourth in the last
six seasons, were a dear favorite in
the preseason balloting of b2 w riters
and broadcasters on AP's panel to
win their first national title.
Horida State received 42 of 62
first-place votes and 1,522 of a pos-
sible 1,550 points.
Defending national champion
Alabama ranked second with 14first-
place votes and 1,472 points. Michi-
gan followed in third with three first-
place votes and 1,413 points, while
Texas A&M was fourth with 1,261
points.
Unlike Florida State's 1988 and
1991 teams, this year's club seems
more comfortable handling the No.
1 preseason ranking as it prepares
for a tough schedule.
"We know that each and every
game we have a target on our chest
quarterback Charlie Ward said. "It's
been that way since I've been here
Ward, the school's single-sea-
son record-holder in total offense,
will have an experienced line and a
stable of gifted receivers and backs
returning to an offense that aver-
aged more than 600 yards and 61
points in its final three games last
season.
"Basically, wejustexperimented
with that offense last year fullback
William Floyd said. "It's going to be
wide open and fun to watch. I think
I can even see the gleam in coach
Bowden's eyes
Horida State's schedule, which
features seven of the nation's top 26-
ranked schools and three in the Top
10, does concern Bowden who nev-
ertheless likes to take on all new-
comers.
"We've made our name play-
ing tough schedules, and if we ever
win a national championship one of
these years,noone will beable to say
we backed into it Bowden said. "If
we end up doing it, it will be with a
great ballclub
Thesched ule includes three Top
10 teams (Miami, Notre Dame and
Florida) and three other ranked
schools (No. 20 North Carolina, No.
23Clemson and No. 25 North Caro-
lina State).
Miami, whose bid for a fifth
national title was halted by Alabama
in the 1993 Sugar Bowl, begins this
season at No. 5. Rounding out the
Top 10 are Syracuse, Notre Dame,
Nebraska, Florida and Tennessee.
Syracuse received two first-
DONT SMOKE CRACK!
This public service announcement has been brought toyou by TJie East Carolinian
place votes. Theotherfirst-placevote
went to No. 15 Stanford.
Colorado was ranked 11 th, fol-
lowed by Washington, Georgia, Ari-
zona, Stanford, Perm State, Ohio
State, Southern Cal, BYU, North
Carolina, BostonCollege, Oklahoma,
Clemson, Mississippi State and
North Carolina State.
All teams in the preseason Top
25 were ranked at the end of last
season except Arizona, Perm State,
Southern Cal, BYU, Oklahoma and
Clemson. Kansas just missed theTop
25.
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ABOUT ECU
Get a Clue about organizations and
activities available to all East
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groups will be on hand to answer
your questions about campus life.
While you're there, be sure to
complete your "Clue Card" and
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enter the drawing for these great
prizes!
Grand Prize:
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� FREE Hard ROC Tower semester pass
� Apple Stykwriter printer
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For your entertainment
Jazz by "Spiral"
Folk music by Mike Hamer
Roving artists
And enjoy
hot dogs, hamburgers, and ice cream from Campus Dining
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Minority Student Affairs - Whfchard 204
Student Development Office - Whfchard 211
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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 47
I some-
times even
with it. Bloom smili ability;
to him it is all in a da) s work
"I'm a historian Bloom said
' 1v job says that I'm the historian.
I look at my job as: I service the press
corps, whatever they need, I find
out for them. There's some things
that you look up so many times that
you memorize; like how man v yards
Jeff Blake threw for during his se-
nior year, I've typed it so many
rimes; 1 think it's 3,073, but I'm not
realiv positive about that (A glance
in the 1992 Pirate football media
: pecomes
nthusiastsince
ids this stat-keep-
. et ot hi job, but not
. i most Bloom said
ith tht' student-ath-
at the university that makes
him happiest, despite the difficul-
ties he faces while ECU strives for a
higher profile in athletic circles.
"We' e just got so manv great
people in our organization in terms
of our student athletes It's such a
pleasure to work for them. When
Robert Jones was here, his fresh-
man year was mv first year here,
when it became known that he was
going to be pretty good, I worked
with him very closely for four
yearsand Jeff Blake � what a su-
per human being. Success realiv
didn't go to his head like it would
have fora lot of peoplehereatEast
Carolina, we have to do so much
more tor our student athletes than a
Florida State or a Miamiwe have
to make more phone calls and send
more letters because people just
don't know about us. To me, Jeff
Blake was the best player in college
football his senior year. It was just
difficult to get people to see that
Bloom said he feels one aspect
ot the work his office does with
ECL's student-athletes is just as
important to their careers as what
they doacademicailv: teaching them
communication skills.
"When recruits come here, I
talk to them and tell them that
through my office, you do one of
the most important things in your
life, and that's communicate. You
could be the best scientist, the best
writer, the best golfer; but if you
can't communicate with other
people, you're going to fail
Bloom said he has faced frus-
rra tion over seeing ECU players lose
awards to other players solely from
their school's bigger football repu-
tations. He lists Robert Jones' loss of
the Lombardi award to a Michigan
player as a prime example.
"It's real tough to break this
because you've got p ipleoutthere
who have never heard of EastCaro-
lina. In my office we have to do a
hard sell, we have to send all the
personal letters and make all the
phone calls that a Miami may not
have to. We have todo anything we
can. But it's getting a little easier
Bloom lists possible conference
affiliation as an important devel-
opment for ECU's national public-
ity.
He feels that a future expan-
sion of the Big East may include
East Carolina, which would pro-
vide the football program with
scheduling security improved re-
cruiting and better opportunities
for bowl appearances.
Bloom said that basketball, the
other high-revenuesportat this uni-
versity, must pick up the pace to
keep track.
"We need the student bodv to
come to our home games, we need
alumni to follow us around to avvav
games. If people want a big-time
basketball program, it's going to
take a commitment from
everybodyI think the commit-
ments already been made in foot-
ball, but basketball just needs to
step it up a notch (This interview-
was conducted before the Pirate's
CAA championship and resulting
NCAA berth).
Bloom said the exciting nature
of ECU athletics makes selling the
Continued from page 37
university's athletics much
easier, particularlv the football
program. He said he believes
this dramatic tendency, com-
bined with the loyalty of local
fans, will push ECU into a higher
level of success.
"Last year we were 5-6 and '
we still broke attendance
records. You can always bring �
them in when vouwin,but what
are you going to do when you
stumble? It's easy to follow a
winner, it's easy to stand in line
to buy Peach Bowl tickets, but
will people wait in line toseeaS-
6 football team? I hope that our
fans will continue to answer the
call
1993 VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE
Sept. 1UNC-Chapel Hill7 p.m.
Sept. 4-5@ Georgia Tech TourneyTBA
Sept. 8UNC-Greensboro7 p.m.
Sept. 10-@ Virginia CommonwealthTBA
Sept. 11Tourney
Sept. 14N.C.State7 p.m.
Sept. 17-@ UNC-Greensboro TournevTBA
Sept. 18
Sept. 21@ Coastal Carolina6 p.m.
Sept. 24-@ Loyola College-MDTBA
Sept.25Tourney
Sept. 28UNC-Wilmington7 p.m.
Oct. 1Mt. Olive College7 p.m.
Oct. 5North Carolina A&T7 p.m.
Oct. 8-9ECU Invitational TourneyTBA
Oct. 13@ UNC-Greensboro7 p.m.
Oct. 15Virginia Commonwealth7 p.m.
Oct. 2 2@ American Univ.7:30p.m.
Oct. 23@ George Mason Univ.1:30 p.m.
Oct. 29James Madison7 p.m.
Oct. 30William & Mary7 p.m.
Nov. 2@ UNC-Wilmington7 p.m.
Nov. 5-6@ Navy Forrestal Classic TBA
Nov. 10@ Campbell Univ.7 p.m.
Nov. 20-CAA TourneyTBA
Nov. 21
PeppVs
Pizza Den
Welcome ECU Students!
��.��� i m.n.r , �
Join us at Peppi s Pizza Den.
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756-0825
WELCOME
BACK STUDENTS
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within walking distance from ECU
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August 25. 1993
BASKETBALL SCHEDULE
Dec.
1
Dec. 29
Dec. 30
Dec. 31
Jan. 5
Jan. 8
Jan. 14
Jan. 16
Jan. 20
Jan. 22
Jan. 24
Jan. 27
Jan. 30
Feb. 3
Feb. 9
Feb. 11
Feb. 13
Feb. 18
Feb. 20
Feb. 24
Feb. 27
Mar. 2
Mar. 6
Mar. 10-12
hih
IV.
11. Tourn.
Alabama
I INC. ken Lucky, ECU, Radlord
Florida St Richmond:
Duke Univ.
@ Western Carolina
George Mason
American
@ William & Mary
UNC-Charlotte
@ Old Dominion
@ Richmond
James Madison
UNC-Wilmington
N.C. State
@ American
@ George Mason
William & Mary
Old Dominion
Richmond
@ James Madison
@ UNC-Wilmington
Appalachian State
@ CAA Tournament
TBA
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Courier takes over Number 1 spot
Sampras lookins forward to time off,
rest is major priority
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) �
Wimbledon champion Pete
Sampras was searching for an-
swers Saturday, reluctantly tak-
ing an early vacation before he
heads to the U.S. Open minus the
world's No. 1 ranking in men's
tennis.
Sampras will be ranked sec-
ond behind American rival Jim
Courier , and the switch in posi-
tions will also be reflected when
the draw for the U.S. Open is made
on Thursday.
Saturday's combination of
Courier'squarterfinal victory over
Cedric Pioline and the shocking 7-
6 (8-6), 6-7 (3-7), 7-6 (7-5) upset of
Sampras by 20-year-old Patrick
Rafter of Australia produced the
change.
Sampras was seeking his third
consecutive U.S. Hardcourts title,
having brought a 20-2 tournament
mark into the event.
He saw some benefit to the
loss.
"I will have some time off now
before the Open. It has been four
straight weeks (of competition) for
me, which I think is a bit too much.
I don't think I'm going to do this
schedule again Sampras said.
Rest is his major priority.
"Take a couple of days off,
start working out again, work on
a couple of things down in
Florida he said when asked what
he'd be doing since he didn't have
to play in Saturday's semifinal.
"Physically and mentally, my
body feels fine. I haven't had any
problems with my shins in the last
four weeks he said.
"Mentally to play every day
in the heat, it can get a bit tiring.
It is a bit too much tennis for
me
Courier, seeded second be-
hind Sampras here, expressed
no glee over reclaiming the No.
1 ranking after his 6-3,6-4 win
over Pioline.
"I am indifferent. I am glad
to win this match said Cou-
rier, who takes over the top spot
for the fourth different time on
Monday. 'That is the only thing
that is important to me right
now
Earlier in the tournament,
which he won in 1988, Courier
said he was only concerned with
year-end rankings.
"I've said it all along, I will
keep saying it, that the ranking
counts at the end of the year.
That is when it goes into the
books Courier said.
Student Leaders!
Learn from Experience
The Council of Student Organization Leaders
presents:
Congresswoman
Eva Clayton
nnlBrfi
Wednesday
September 1,1993
4 pm
MSC Great Room
For more info call 757-4796
Sponsored by
Shunt Leadership Devhjopmeot Programs


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August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 49
Continued from page 36
1 tepartma
Athletic
rom the
rest of th
entity tocarry on its business sepa
pa rate
that pit
to vvea
versify
sevsvv
AFC
Cont'd
from page
39
particularly dangerous carrying
Montana's tosses.
Although he won't find any
Jerrv Rice, John Tavloror Brent Jones
on hand. Montana'sreceiversaren't
bad. Tim Barnett, J.J. Birden and
Willie Davis have modest creden-
tials, but thev were working with
Dave Krieg last year, not the mas-
ter. Davis led the league with a 21.0-
vards-per-catch average.
The offensive line is son .ewhat
unsettled on the right side. Center
Tim (Jrunhard and left tackle John
Alt are solid.
Withalltheattentionbeingpaid
to the offense, Kansas City's de-
fenders might get peeved about the
lack of notice. Getting Derrick Tho-
mas, Neil Smith, Kevin Ross, Albert
Lewis, Dino Hackett and Dan
Saleaumua riled up is not a good
idea.
Kansas City ranked fifth in de-
fense last year, second against the
pass. Montana will enjoy that, too,
along with excellent special teams.
Given all that, the division still
can't be given to the Chiefs in a
walk. The Chargers should push
them all the way.
The first team to win a division
after starting a season 0-4, theCharg-
ers are a gutty, grind-it-out group.
Fullback Marion Butts rams his 248
poundsatopponentsbehindahefty,
relatively experienced line led by
veteran tackles Harry Swayne and
Stan Brock.
For reinforcements, they
drafted 245-pound Natrone Means.
For speed, they have Ronnie
Harmon, the team's MVP last year.
Other than Anthony Miller,
however, the receiving corps is
mediocre.
Stan Humphries guided the
1992 turnaround and, according to
coach Bobby Ross, "showed me as
much guts as anyone has" by play-
ing two playoff games with a dislo-
cated left shoulder. Humphries
made good on his first opportunity
as a starter after sitting in Washing-
ton.
San Diego's defense, which was
better than Kansas City's last year
and blanked the Chiefs in the play-
offs, might have gotten even better
with the signing of linebacker Jerrol
Williams and the drafting of
cornerbackDarrien Gordon. A sea-
son-ending knee injury to second-
ary star Gill Byrd will hurt.
Junior Seau has been hearing
comparisons to Lawrence Taylor
lately and linemen Leslie O'Neal
and Burt Grossman are terrific.
Watch for a big season from free
safety Stanley Richard.
The Broncos, Raiders and
Seahawks don't figure to keep up
with the top two and won't contend
for wild-card slots.
The preseason focus in Denver
has been on how happy John Elway
and his teammates are that Wade
Phillips is in charge and Dan Reeves
is in New Jersey. Happiness helps,
but better performances on the de-
fensive line and a few more receiv-
ers and runners would help a lot
more.
In Elway, the Broncos have the
game's most dynamic offensi vecre-
ator. Except for the emerging Shan-
non Sharpe and Arthur Marshall,
he doesn't have much established
aid. Second-round pick Glyn
Milburn could see plenty of run-
ning and receiving action at half-
back.
The Raiders should be the fast-
est team in the NFL, especially if
they get Rocket Ismail. They also
will be one of the oldest, with 11 key
players well into their 30s.
Seattle'sdefense,anchored
by 1992 Defensive Playerof the Year
Cortez Kennedy, might be good
enough to contend.
PREDICTION: 1, Chiefs,
11-5; 2, Chargers, 11-5; 3, Broncos 8-
8; 4, Raiders 7-9; 5, Seahawks 3-13.
Mike
� million
th Nike. Nike
� 'ars the s �
mt Hill and the
ars the shoes
e pla1 ea piece ot
�. they are the unes who have
r the shoes. When the L'ni-
o! Michigan sells team jer-
th o.4on the front, thev are
ng Webber.
I his is exploitation, and it hap-
pens every year all over the coun-
try.
C allege athletes in revenue
earning sports are not likely to ever
receive what they deserve. The
NCAA is afraid to establish an em-
ployer-emplo) ee relationship with
athletes becauseofthe Internal Rev-
enue Service.
The IRS does not tax schools for
the millions of dollars in revenue
generated bv television and gate
receipts. Therefore, the NCAA will
not provide any type of stipend
payment to its employees on the
field, and the IRS will not treat col-
lege a thletics as the business it surely
is.
While education offers a safety
net to a torn anterior cruciate liga-
ment, so does a few hundred thou-
sand dollars.
However, the decision to play
college baseball, and enrollment at
a college, means a player is not
eligible to be drafted again until he
Ls 21 years old.
This is an MLB rule, not a Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Associa-
tion rule.
A free education is valuable.
But scholarships are not fair com-
pensation insituationssuch as these.
The NCAA will, at some point, have
to acknowledge reality and give in
to the IRS.
College baseball has avoided
the hypocrisy of most college ath-
letic programs because MLB drafts
players from high school and tutors
them in the minor leagues. Players
who have less interest in school, but
are talented enough to play profes-
sionally, don't waste a school s time
or money. Therefore, the term "stu-
dent-athlete" is less likely to be an
oxymoron.
Given options, such as a minor j
league, the playground legends of !
New York may not have been just i
tall tales on a basketball court. They ;
may have been tall, wealthy young
men making contributions to soci-
ety.
Book Rush
Saturday August 21 thru Saturday August 28
Sat. 9:00 - 6:00, Sun. 1:00 - 6:00,
Mon. - Wed. 8:00 - 9:00, Thur. 9:00 - 8:00,
Fri. 9:00 - 6:00





I
August 25, 1993
i page 36
JAMES
Continued from page 43
it and
ins teaches
tudents,butshe
that the men
numbers is the
step da Not thatmanyguystake
the classes. Most of the ones that do
come out go to the step classes be-
cause it is more muscle oriented
work Evans said.
changed
attheo
PIRATE
i and
;oing
ling to keep in
uallv, attitudes
Affirstsome of them were
this i- going to be a joke.
But then, they realized how hard it
really is. Ihey end up liking it, and
theii attitudes end up changing a
lot Evans said.
For more information on
aerobics classes ottered by ECU'S
Recreational Services Department,
call at 737-6387 oi drop by room 204
inChristianbury Gymnasium.
Continued from page 38
so vivid that you halt-expected
the accompanying pictures would
be pulled from his wallet at any
minute.
He would admit to being a
fair basketball player in his day �
"better than some and no worse
than most was the way he put it
� but lames knew better than to
claim that the ability to walk on
air could be passed on through
genes, recessive or not.
lames would, however, take
credit for carving half a basketball
court out of caked dirt in the front
yard of their North Carolina home,
and then adding a second basket
after looking out the window one
day and seeing two dozen kids
gra d ua te school (business ad minis-
tration).
Other preseason All-America
mentions in magazines include: J un-
ior Smith (All-Independent, Lee
Corso's College Football; Best of the
Rest, Athlon), Bernard Carter (All-
Independent, Lee Corso's College
Football; Ranked 10th among defen-
sive ends, NCAA Football Previezr;
Best of the Rest, Athlon; Ranked
12th among defense ends, Lindy's)
and Morris Letcher (All-Indepen-
dent, Lee Corso's College Football;
Ranked 9th among all-purpose
players, NCAA Football Previeio; Best
of the Rest, Athlon).
When National Football
League training camps started, 14
former ECU student-athletes will
try to make rosters for the upcom-
ing season.
The list includes: Jeff Blake
(New York Jets), Earnest Byner
(Washington Redskins), Jerry Dillon
(Washington Redskins), Luke
FLsher (Minnesota Vikings), Chris
Hall (Dallas Cowboys), John Jett
(Dallas Cowboys), Robert Jones
(Dallas Cowboys), George Koonce
(Green Bay Packers), Ernie Logan
(Cleveland Browns), Tootie Robbins
(New Orleans Saints), Junior
Robinson (Detroit Lions), Tom
Scott (Cincinnati Bengals), Vinson
Smith (Dallas Cowboys) and
Walter Wilson (Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers).
Recruiting analyst Bob Gib-
bons has ranked the 1992-93 ECU
men's basketball team recruiting
class 14th in the East.
In his poll, the ECU class ranks
as the best in the Colonial Athletic
Association, just ahead of Rich-
mond and James Madison.
During the recruiting season,
Coach Eddie Payne and his staff
signed five student-athletes. The
list includes 6'5 forward Tim
Basham, 6'6 forwards Chuck Jones
and Louis Moore, 6'4 guard Skipp
Schaefbauer and 6'8 forward
Chuckie Robinson.
According to Gibbons, the top
20recruiting classes in the East look
like this: l)NorthCarolina,2)Duke,
3) Connecticut, 4) Villanova, 5)
Maryland, 6) Seton Hall, 7) Miami,
8) Florida State, 9) Massachusetts,
10) Virginia, 11) St. John's, 12) West
Virginia, 13) Duquesne, 14) East
Carolina, 15) Richmond, 16) Provi-
dence, 17) Syracuse, 18)JamesMadi-
son, 19) N.C. State and 20) Niagara.
lounging around waiting for the
next game.
He would tell you how he
drove his own kids and every-
body else from the neighborhood
all over the county from one game
to the next. He might let on that he
had, on occasion, separated
Michael and his older brother,
Larry, when the games got too
intense.
He might even talk about how
he beat Michael at pool, game af-
ter game, mercilessly, and then
talked a little trash to him after-
ward to toughen him up.
As far as charting a specific
course for his famous progeny,
that was pretty much it.
"To tell you the truth, it's best
you don't notice your child is spe-
cial he said. "Because if you feel
your child has even the remotest
chance of going in that direction,
then vou start steering him in that
direction � and you screw him
up.
"Let it happen. If it's going to
happen James added, "it'll hap-
pen
Of course, it wasn't quite that
simple, either.
Michael's sublime skills with
a basketball may indeed have been
a gift from above.
It was the gifts bestowed on
him under James and Deloris
Jordan's roof, ultimately, that
w
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lifted him out of the realm of
sports. It was there that he
learned patience, determination,
respect and grace; there that he
inherited a quick mind, a keen
wit, a penchant for mischief and
an indomitable spirit.
"My personality and my
laughter come from my father
Michael once explained. "My
business and serious side come
from my mother
He will need all of those
qualities, now and in the future,
more than ever, not simply to
persevere, but to carry on the
way James Jordan would have
wanted him to: having a good
time.
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The East Carolinian 51
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August 25, 1993
npage 35
FICKLEN
Continued from page 35
thine

re into leagues and
unions Vccoi Keller, the
rugb team belongs to the North
Carolina Rugby Football Union
and they play all up and down the
east coast. The university helps
support their travel money.
The students must be very
dedicated to the sport and it takes
PAYNE
thing
illy do
erent and
. it e en
thi y arwill
nev martial
arts i lub will be added to make a
totalof22activedubsatEasK an
Una.
The li'l Club sports program
is action-packed for all students,
faculty and staff. Qubsportmanu-
als on how to start a club can be
picked up in Pat Cox's office in
Christenburv.
Continued from page 35
OOOseats
, ithl h klcnAlingest oh-
seumisschukforamajorfacelift.
had a taste of success with
PiratebasketballlastseasonvvtthBClJ
making its first NC A A loumament
appearance in 20 yeaisafter winning
theotonial Athletic Association
roumament
Renovations to the 26-year-okJ
MingesColiseum v ill make it mote
attracts e tor mk cess. Hie capacity
will be 7,800 with seats to be tixed-
back chairs with arms
rherenov ation will also include
air conditioning, i new playing sur-
face, new cont esskxi areas and new
locker rooms
When it comes to athletic schol-
arship funding, the Pirate Club is
frying to bxxist its endowment fund
lo the S2 million mark so it can maxi-
mize aid hi every varsity sport. EC L
alsowantstofullyendowitscompre-
hensie student development pro-
gram w ithin theathleticsdepartment.
In addition, one million dollars is
Ix-ingraisodtoenhancewomen'sath-
letks within the "I tidies First" I ,im-
paign effort, which was developed in
1990.
The university s Shared Visions
Campaign has structured a five-vear
payment plan with numerous giving
levels. There are also several naming
opportunities tor campus facilities
and programs. A SI million gift, for
example, would allow the donor to
FSPVsScbolasticSports America.
"Tim is an outstanding col-
lege prospect Vetter said. "He
has a great attitude and work ethic.
He should be able to make a sig-
nificant contribution to the ECU
basketball program. Both Tim and
1 were impressed with Coach
(Eddie) Payne and the positive
direction of the East Carolina pro-
gram
Basham was a pre-season hon-
orable all-america by Blue Ribbon
College Basketball Yearbook last sea-
son.
"Tim Basham has, what I call,
a complete game Pavnesaid. "1 le
does everything well and nothing
poorlv. Tim will be a solid addi-
tion to our program. He comes
from winning programs and has
the winning mentality we want to
develop in our program
Louis Moore, a 6-6 forward
from Rock Hill, S.C Jones,
Robinson and Basham join early
signee Skipp Schaefbauer as the
Pirates'recruiting class thus far in
1993. Schaefbauer earned Mr. Bas-
ketball honors in Minnesota this
past season, averaging 21.4 points
for Elk River High School.
Americans win without Lewis
STUTTGART, Germany (AP)
� Who needs Carl Lewis?
The American 4-x-lOO relay
team showed thatemphaticallySat-
urdav as Jon Drummond, Andre
Cason, Dennis Mitchell and Leroy
Burrell matched the world record
of 37.40 seconds during a semifinal
heat at the World Championships.
It was a stunning performance,
considering it was the first time the
relay record ever had been broken
or tied other than in a final. It was
done without Lewis, who had run
anchor on the six teams � either
representing the United States or
his Santa Monica TrackClub�that
had matched or bettered the record
in the past 10 years.
"We don't need Carl Lewis on
the end of a 400-meter relay team to
run a world record � and we just
proved it said Cason, who ran a
sensational second leg. "This is a
dream relay team
See CHAMPS page 53
add his W her name to Ficklen Sta-
dium.
Major ifts with naming Oppor-
tunities range trom $100300 to $1
million, jnd will Iv used for specific
taulitv improvements, plus scholar-
ship and student development pro
gram endowments. Gifts of $100,000
and under are applied entirely to
Ficklen Stadium and Minges Coli-
seum expansion and renovation.
TheShared VisionsCampaign is
the first external fund-raising effort
that involves all three of the school's
non-profit foundations. Along with
the PirateClub, the BCD Foundation
and the Medical Foundation of ECU
are involved.
A total of $2(i million was com-
KWC-X-WC
mitted during the tvvo-veaf silent
phase" of the campaign. Chancel-
lor Richard R. Fakin says the $50
million mark willbepassed bvTXv.
31, TWS, when the three-yearpublic
phase concluc es.
Robert A. "Bob" Ward and
1 fenryG. Willianusonareservingas
thecampaign'sco-chairmen. Ward
is executive vice president of Fi
nance and Administration at Unifi,
Inc in Greensboro, N.C.
Williamson is president and
chief operating officer of BB&T Fi-
nancial Corporation, and chief op-
erating officer of BB&T in Wilson,
N.C.
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���
�'3m'
August 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 53
Continued from page 35
itinue to cum-
urrent level of fund-
"v. Our athletic bud-
get is about two percent of what
other budgets are. We have been
very- fortunate that we have been
so successful with the amount we
have spent. We can't continue to
pull rabbits out of the hat
Hart is optimistic about the
changes already being imple-
mented at the university, but par-
ticularly those called for in the
Shared Visions campaign. This
CHAMPS
will pnve very
ruits as
l lart
this . ampaign is itaJ to
tgram as well as the
i�t the university.
"Shared Visions will be the
most important thing to happen to
this university since the medical
school
Hart said that the Pirate club,
the major source of alumni contri-
bution to the university, must
double its membership over the
next two years, a difficult proposi-
tion, butone Hart has faith in. Hart
believes that despite the pessimism
of outside forces, the alumni will
come through.
"ECUalumni havea quality of
Continued from page 52
being battler- We have been cast
in the role of the underdog. You
always ha ve people who say things
can't be done. Those people need
to get out ot the way and make
1I x mi for the pei ple who are doing
them
Hart said that like any other
job, his has its frustrations, particu-
larly the slow pace at which things
take place because of funding, but
the rewards he has seen far out-
weigh the disappointments.
"The (1992) Peach Bowl victory
culminated, in my mind, the most
incredible period of eventsl'veever
witnessed. You could go 11-1 any-
where, but not with the series of
events it took to achieve that. To top
that season off with a comeback in
the Peach Bowl was incredible. To
witness the success of our basket-
ball team in the post-season was
also a sense of pride.
"At the beginning of the sea-
son, 1 told Eddie (Payne, basketball
coach) that we would move this
program forward if it killed me. I
thinkourbasketball team reached a
peak and gained our program re-
spect
Hart said he is sure that the
future for ECU athletics will be an
extremely bright one, but there is a
great deal of work to be done. That
is something tha t doesn 't scare Hart.
"I like challenges. 1 think that
East Carolina provides a tremen-
dous opportunity for success with
a tremendous challenge. People
like to be identified with success
and want (the program) to be suc-
cessful but want to do it the right
way.
"We've done a lot of good
things here, we have a lot of good
people who are committed collec-
tively to bringing about success.
We're achieving a lot of things that
people have said we couldn't do
JORDAN
fossional David Graham. They fin-
ished in a three-way tie for sixth.
PGA Tour veteran Jim Thorpe
won the individual crown for the
third straight time, shooting 132, in-
cluding a 64 on Sunday that tied the
Continued from page 42
course record he set last year.
The event, now in its 23rd year,
benefits tlie Elder Scholarship Fund,
which provides internship gran ts to
students pursuing sports-related
majors in college.
"I can't believe they're going to
make us run again tomorrow Sun-
day in the final the histrionic
Drummond said. "We had no in-
tention of going out and breaking
the record
The record-equalling perfor-
mance by the U.S. relay team and
the Americans' verbal jousting with
the British team over sprinting su-
premacy carried more impact than
Saturday's six finals, including a
world record.
Russia's Ana Biryukova de-
stroyed the record in the women's
triple jump, soaring 49 feet, 6 14
inches, surpassing the mark of 49-1
1 2 set by teammate Yolanda Chen
this year.
mother women's finals, Junxia
Wang led a 1 -2 Chinese finish in the
rough-and-tumble 10,000 meters,
winning in 30:49.30, a world junior
record and the fastest in the world
in 1993. Cubans finished 1-2 in the
high jump, with Ioamnet Quintero
winningat6-614, then dedica ting
her victory to Cuban leader Fidel
Castro.
In the men's finals,
Switzerland's WemorGunthorwon
his third straight world shot put
title, throwing 72-1, the farthest in
the world this year; Kenyans Moses
Kiptanui and Patrick Sartg were 1 -2
for the second straight champion-
ships in the 3,000-meter steeple-
chase, with Kiptanui timed in
8:06.36, the year's fascest. Spain's
Jesus Garcia took the 50-kilometer
(31.2-mile) walk in 3:41:41, also the
year's best time.
After the relay race,
Drummond put on a show for the
capadtycrowdof52,200atGottlieb-
Daimler Stadium who had cheered
wildly for theco-record holders. He
fell to the ground in a mock faint,
staggered around like a drunk and
jokingly gestured to the fans.
Lewis finished third in the 20C
meters and fourth in the 100.
The U.S. team appeared on its
way toward a possible sweep in all
four relays, as all four American
teams won their semifinal heats.
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August 25, 1993
Student Stores
Welcomes you back to campus with
our great Back-To-Campus Specials
EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
Over 1 half million used Text Books!
This Coupon is Good For
$5.00 Off
ANY PURCHASE OF $75.00 OR MORE!
Expires 90793
FILLER PAPER
100CT98
200 CT$ 1.65
500CT$3.95
Recycled to help save
our environment!
M
T-SHIRTS
$10.50
700 COTTON TEES
with colorful screens.
COMPOSITION
BOOK
120CT$1.49
100CT99
College ruled with
pockets & 50 re-
cycled paper.
RUSSELL
SWEATSHIRTS
$19.95
Nu Blend crewneck
sweatshirt with "East
Carolina" screenprint
SHOP THE STUDENT STORE
FOR THE LOWEST BOOK
PRICES AND A LARGE
SELECTION OF USED BOOKS!
OXFORD
AMERICAN
DICTIONARY
$1.00
OFF
WITH COUPON
EXPIRES 93093
20 OFF
Wearing Apparel
with Coupon
exp. Sept 4,1993
Located inWright Building � 757-6731 � Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 25, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 25, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.954
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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