The East Carolinian, July 14, 1993






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Lifestyle
'Sleepless in Seattle'
Tom Hanks and Meg
Ryan combine to
provide a film that is
magic for movie-goers.
See story page 3.
Today

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The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 42
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, July 14,1993
8 Pages
Minority cultural center expands services
, . ii4n ak;io avritvA ahnnt the wav UNC handled its fac
By Warren Sumner
Assistant New Editor
ECU students will soon
have a new place to express and
learn about minority cultures
when the Ledonia Wright Afro-
American Center moves to the
Bloxton House across from the
Mendenhall Student Center.
The center will alter its
name to the Ledonia Wright Af-
rican-American Center, and will
feature a great number of changes
that have campus minority lead-
ers and ECU administrators ex-
cited.
The relocation of the center,
a part of ECU's effort to effec-
tively redistribute its campus re-
sources, will provide much-
needed space and a more central
location for the housing of mi-
nority educational materials.
While details of the relocation
are still sketchy, the center will
house a small library specific to
minority cultures.
Dr. Brian Hayes, the direc-
tor of ECU'S Minority Affairsde-
partment, said that while the cen-
ter will carry the African-Ameri-
can in its name, it will not ex-
clude any culture and will adopt
an "open arms" philosophy.
"There is a big misconcep-
tion by some people when they
encounter a minority center
Hayes said. "People assume that
it's only about that culture, which
is definitely not true. While the
center does serve the purpose of
educating students about their
own culture, it also provides op-
portunities for other cultural
groups to learn
Hayes said that while the
specifics of the center are still not
decided, he thinks the center will
house art exhibitions and paint-
ings relevant to minority heri-
tages as well as serve as a social
"hangout" for students and a
meeting place for campus groups.
Dr. Alfred Matthews, Vice
Chancellor of Student Life, said
that accommodating these
groups was among the reasons
for the center's relocation.
He said that the current lo-
cation near Joyner Library was
hard to maintain and the Bloxton
House was structurally in better
shape.
While excited about the
move, Matthews said the reloca-
tion is just a natural progression
in campus renovation.
"I guess 1 don't view it as
such a drastic step to change any-
thing, but I am glad about the
new focus in recognition the fa-
cility will receive Matthews
said.
Hayes said that he is happy
about the way ECU has handled
the relocation plan and that the
cooperation between campus
groups in bringing about this
change is a sharp contrast to the
way UNC handled its facility.
The lack of student in-
volvement in the decision of a
site for the Chapel Hill facility
caused furor and protests from
minority and campus groups.
Hayes said there has been
a much smoother process so far
at ECU, and he plans to involve
students even more in the final
planning of this facility.
"What we're seeing here
at ECU is a classic example of
what happens when you pull
students and administrators to-
gether for a common good
ECU Board of Trustees
swear in new members
New members of ECU'S Board of Trustees took the oath of
Board consists of people selected by the Board of Governors and the governor
Photo by Ccdric Van Burn
office on July 8. The
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
ECU's Board of Trustees
welcomed four new members in
a brief ceremony J uly 8, and im-
mediately set to work introduc-
ing the entire board to the vari-
ous duties they will focus their
attentions on for the next year.
"We're looking forward
very much to working with the
new members said Chancel-
lor Richard R. Eakin I think
they will bring a considerable
amount of strength to this
board
The new members that
were administered the oath of
office represent diverse parts of
both North Carolina and the rest
of the country.
Ronald Eugene Dowdy
from Orlando, Florida, Louis W.
Sewell from Jacksonville, NC,
H.E. (Gene) Rayfield from
Burlington, and Phillip R. Dixon,
a resident of Greenville, each
received formal initiation as new
Trustees.
The Board of Trustees con-
sists of eight people selected by
the Board of Governors of the
University of North Carolina,
four members selected by Gov-
ernor Hunt and an ex-officio, in
this case Student Government
Association president Keith
Dyer, Eakin said.
The four people sworn to
office include two re-elected
Board of Governors members
and two appointments by Gov-
ernor Hunt.
Currently, the entire Board
of Trustees are ECU graduates,
which heightens Eakin's confi-
dence in the board's future
progress. "They obviously have
a great deal of interest in East
Carolina Eakin said. "I am
very pleased with the obvious
dedication these new mem-
bers have already shown to this
board
The board proceeded with
an intense meeting familiariz-
ing the new members with
many diverse areas of interest
concerning the ECU commu-
nity and campus. Renovations
presently taking place and fu-
ture plans were outlined and
briefly described.
Chancellor Eakin's report
divulged the increased incom-
ing freshman class size at 2,400,
and Eakin proudly announced
an increase in average Scholas-
tic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores
to 923, up 23 points from last
year's 900 average.
Eakin described ECU as a
See TRUSTEES page 2
Women
outnumber
men at ECU
By Molly Perkins
Staff Writer
Male ECU students are in
luck this summer. According
to enrollment numbers re-
leased by the registrar's office,
there have been from 700 to
1,000 more women than men
taking classes during the sum-
mer sessions.
Enrollment for first se-
mester, 6,550 students, was
down slightly from last year's
number of 6,600 students. First
session's statistics included
5,414 undergraduates and
1,136 graduate students.
Despite the decline in the
total number of students, there
is an increase in the number of
students enrolled on a part-
time bais. There were 1,643
part-time students in first ses-
sion as compared to 1,530 in
first session of 1992.
On the other hand, the
number of students braving the
notorious Greenville heat and
humidity and attending sec-
ond summer session increased
this summer by 90 students.
The registrar's office reported
that 5,431 students are enrolled
in the second term of summer
school.
This number includes
4,363 undergraduates and
1,068 graduate students. There
are 3,094 women and 2,337 men
enrolled in second session.
Second session began
June 24 and will end on July 30.
Macedonian residents react with
caution to the arrival of U.S. troops
SKOPJE, Macedonia (AP) �
The government of this small and
obscure country is grateful for the
arrival of U.S. troops whose aim is
to prevent fighting such as that
which has ravaged much of former
Yugoslavia.
Not so for many suspicious
Skopje residents.
The 300 troops, the last of
whomarrived Monday,arethefirst
U.S. combat unit to wear the blue
berets of U.N. peacekeepers.
The 700 Scandinavian troops
who have been in Macedonia since
January have a similar mission: pa-
n-oiling the border of Macedonia
and Serbia, the dominant province
of what's left of Yugoslavia.
That frontier has been quiet
but Macedonian and Western ana-
lysts agree on the need to deter
possible aggression against a re-
gion thatSerb nationalists consider
"southern Serbia
Macedonia seceded peace-
fully from the crumbling Yugoslav
federation in 1991. But it has failed
to gain international recognition
tecauseof Greece'sobjections to its
name, and government officials
hope that the arrival of the Ameri-
cans will help speed recognition.
Athens claims that the name
Macedonia implies territorial pre-
tensions toward thenorthemGreek
province of the same name. Al-
though in April the United States
supported Macedonia's member-
ship in the United Nations, it has
also not officially recognized the
new state.
"The arrival of the troops
makes U S. recogni tion much more
certain President Kiro Gligorov
said in a recent interview.
This event shows that the
international community has finally
verified the status of Macedonia as
a peace-loving nation declared a
commentary on government-run
Macedonian television.
But not all Macedonians ap-
peared happy with thedeployment
of the Americans.
Most vocal in their opposi-
tion were representatives of the
republic's ethnic Serb minority.
Serbs account for about 20,000 of
Macedonia's 2 million people.
"The claim that the threat to
this republic comes from the north
isentirely unacceptable to us said
Stevo Stojanovic, secretary of the
Serbian Union of Macedonia. "We
consider the arrival of the Ameri-
cansas completely unnecessary and
See MACEDONIA page 2
More computer
equipment stolen
Floods!
Yesterday's
floods inundated
parts of ECU and
Greenville. This
parking lot near
Mendenhall was
no exception.
Photo by
Cedric Van Buren

f-
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
While students were head-
ing back into classrooms Tuesday
July 6, after an extended holiday
weekend, university police inves-
tigated yet another break-in in the
Student Publications Building, lo-
cated across from Joyner Library.
The target office of the most
recent of three break-ins was the
Print Shop.
According to Public Safety
officials, the incident occurred
sometime between late Monday
July 5, and early July 6. The cul-
prits stole a Syquest drive which is
an external hard drive capable of
storing vast information. The
Syquest holds 44 and 88 megabyte
cartridges. Three floppydisks were
also stolen. Campus police offi-
cials estimated the value of the
stolen property to be $958.50.
BobHarlow,DirectorofCen-
tral Printing, said that the Syquest
disk contained a large job for the
School of Medicine Bulletin. Al-
though it caused some turmoil in
the Print Shop, Harlow said most
of the information has been recov-
ered.
Harlow also said the perpe-
trator entered through the front
door by breaking the glass and
turning the lock. Nothing else in
the Print Shop was disturbed and
Harlow felt as though the thief
knew where the Syquest drive was
located.
"They knew exactly what
they wanted and knew exactly
where it was Harlow said.
m �- �luiimiwi
While campus police have
made no arrests, their investiga-
tion continues.
"We gave mem (Public
Safety) several ideas, but they
are short handed this summer
Harlow said.
Twoconsecutive break-ins
occurred on April 6 and 7. Over
$8700worthofcomputerequip-
ment was stolen from the offices
of Greg Brown, Student Media
Advisor, and Yvonne Moye, sec-
retary for the Media Board.
Four months later, cam-
pus police have still made no
arrests, but investigation con-
tinues with possible suspects, a
Public Safety official said.
Like Harlow, Greg Brown
was working on a long assign-
ment which was stored on the
hard drive in the computer sto-
len from his office.
"I was working on a 105-
page handbook that was on the
hard drive Brown said. "Un-
fortunately , I didn't have all of it
on back-up disks
Harlow was concerned
abou t the repercussions this type
of activity will have on the uni-
versity and the people who ex-
pect services from the PrintShop.
He added that he suspected
someone acquainted with the
Print Shop was responsible for
the break-in.
"I think it is pretty bad that
someone familiar with the Print
Shop was involved Harlow
said. "We are here to support
the academic endeavors of the
various departments





July 14, 1993
TRUSTEES
Continued from page 1
person tried
-timated the
damage to the dt
June 21
7:45 a.m.
An unknown person broke into the equipment room at
Ficklen Stadium and stole $1,030 of power tool equipment.
June 23
10:03 p.m.
An unknown person peeled the parking sticker off a staff
vehicle at the parking spaces north of Fleming Hall.
June 24
5:00 p.m.
An unknown person broke the passenger side mi rror frame
of a car parked at the southwest parking lot. The object used in the
breakage is unknown.
10:19 p.m.
A 16-year-old offender was caught using the spray mist oi
an Arid deodorant spray can to ignite a cigarette lighter. The
resulting flame set off a false fire alarm in a dormitory bathnxim.
June 25
11:18 a.m.
ECU police called to Belk residence hall to respond to a
dispute between a resident and another person. The known
suspect communicated verbal threats to the victim's property,
threatening to damage her car.
6:00 p.m.
A suspect communicated verbal threats to a 44-year-old
victim at the parking lot of Belk Hall.
9:30 p.m.
An unknown person broke into 302 Fletcher dormitory and
stole $1700 worth of property from residence. ECU police were
called to investigate.
Compiled by Warren Sumner. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
i iity oi Ai cess" when he
� an expected 1700 new
fei students for the '9394
academic year.
Dr. Valeria O. Lovelace,
han of Academic Affairs and
Student Life, reported that the
graduate and returning student
rates are "on par with public in-
stitutions
Lovelace reported that
while 15 percentof ECU students
graduate in four years, as many
as 49.6 percent take six years to
fulfill graduation requirements.
Among proposed plans
was a "Creenway Agreement
a plan that will ultimately pro-
vide pedestrians and bikers a
new, easier-access strip of prop-
erty through parts of the ECU
campus.
While the board listened to
MACEDONIA
the elaborate structural improve-
ments hoped for ECU's future,
Charles D.Phlegar, associate vice
chancellor for institutional ad-
vancement and director of the
Shared Visions Campaign, de-
livered a reality check.
Inanenthusiasticand posi-
tive report,Thlegar projected the
means by which $50 million dol-
lars will be raised. This monev
will be used for campus renova-
tion and student development.
Phlegar stressed the neces-
sity of commitment and dedica-
tion by the entire board in order
for this fund-raising goal to be
met.
While the board of trustees
looks ahead to many challenges,
they were encouraged by a re-
ported 21.3 percent dollar in-
creaseof grantsand scholarships.
Continued from page 1
The News
Department
is looking for students interested in
writing for the Welcome Rack issue on
August 25. Come and apply at our
offices in the Student Pubs Budding.
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counter-productive
Some Skopje residents sus-
pected that the U.S. administration
had ulterior motives in sending its
soldiers to Macedonia.
"I will be very happy to have
the Americans here, but only if they
remain within the framework of the
United Nations said travel agent
Hristo Filip. "It would not be good
if they came in order to use
Macedonia asa platform for attacks
on other states
Many people appeared con-
cerned that the U.S. military pres-
ence would be seen as a provoca-
tion by Serbia's hardline President
Slobodan Milosevicand would only
make matters worse for Macedonia.
"For Milosevic, they will be
what a red cape is to a bull said
Ljupce Lalevski, an unemployed
economist. "And if the bull charges,
it will suddenly turn out that the
U.S. soldiers donot have a mandate
to defend us
Macedonian defense officials
concede their small army of 14,(XX)
inexperienced recruits would be
unable to prevent a determined
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The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 3
Sleepless in Seattle' considered 'magic'
� torn
from Baltimore
attletell a woe-
ful tale of his deceased wife and his
inabihtvtkneajjjain. She instantly
tion to the man.
The radio host dubs the caller
"Sleepless in Seattle" and thus the
fiJm in which the broadcast occurs
gets its title.
The woman, Annie(Meg Ryan),
who hea rs the progra m thinks a bou t
her fiancee (Bill Pullman) who,
thoughstableand secure, possesses
no emotional depth. Annie feels
compassion for this man talking to
a telephone 3,CXX) miles away.
hal heloved
� the mar
talks about how ut
i rhand to get out oi
was magic He obviously cared
deeply about her and cares deeply
about his son like Annie, the viewer
can virtually feel Sam's pain.
Annie not only feels sympathy
for Sam, she wonders why no
"magic" is in her relationship with
her fiance. Though the viewer
senses the pull toward Sam instan-
taneously, Annieonly slowly grows
to realize that she needs to meet
Sam no matter what the ast.
Most of Sleepless in Seattle de-
tails the twists and turns experi-
enced by this fortunatecouple who
aredestined to meet. Though watch-
ing Annie and Sam wade through
life until they eventually meet pro-
vides much enjoyment, as much, if
not more, enjoyment is derived from
watching how this Hollywood ro-
mance acknovviedges its magical,
mythical premise. The film seems
to say tha t the story is so fa r-fetched
that only inHollywood do romance
like this occur.
The way that Sleepless in Seattle
writer and director Nora Ephron
(who also wrote When Harry Met
Sally) accomplishes this artfulness
is by employing a film to parallel
theromanceofAnnieandSam.The
prototypical Hollywood romance
she chcxises is An Affair to Remem-
ber, which stars Cary Grant and
Deborah Kerr. (Miss Kerr's spel ling
is correct so that when the con ver-
sa tion arises in the filmasto whether
the actress was Deborah "Carr or
Kerr you will already know.)
In An Affair to Remember, about
which you will leam by seeing Sleep-
less in Seattle, Grant and Kerr ar-
range to meet on top of the Empire
State building on Valentine's Day.
When Kerr gets hit by a taxi, she
cannot make it, and Grant is too
proud to find out why. Though ev-
erything works out in the end, the
denouncement proves heart-
wrenching asevidenced by the tears
shed when Suzy(RitaWilson,a.k.a.
Mrs. Tom Hanks), one of Sam's
friends in Sleepless in Seattle ,relates
the plot of An Affair to Remember.
Thisextremelyperceptjvesoene
'Last Action Hero' provides
little motion, many rumors
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The rumors have now been fly-
ing for months about how Arnold
Schwarzenegger's new film, Last Ac-
tion Hero, would bomb at the box
office.Thoughitappearsthatthefilm
will perform well, though not spec-
tacularly(especially when compared
toumssic Park), Last Action Hero will
probably be remembered asa disap-
pointment.
Thissituati on seems tohave been
caused almost completely by the
press. So often, a film becomes
doomed even before being released
because of a word called "buzz If
the buzz proves favorable, then a
small film like Sleepless in Saiffieopens
to bignumbersatthe box office. If the
buzz is negative then a big film like
Last Action Hero opens without much
fanfare.
Most of the time, the Hollywocxj
press hits the mark with their buzz,
although sometimes the grist mill of
rumors turns unchecked and some
decent movies get crushed in the pro-
cess.
Last Action Hero is certainly not a
greatfilm. Itlacksa tautstoryline,and
its jokesareoften very obvious. Some
would say the film is too self-serving
andself-promoting.Cthersa)mplain
that Last Action Hero, despite its title,
contains very little action.
HadLastActbnHerobeenasmaW
film, along the lines of The Player, this
witty story that satirizes action films
mightha vegarnered Hollywood sup-
port Since Last Action Hero is a huge,
big-budget, Hollywood production,
many onlookers have been anxious
to see it fail.
The story takes place in two fo-
rums. The first arena the audience
sees is the fil m world. Danny Mad igan
(AustinO'Brien)watchesrusfavorite
action star, Jack Slater (Arnold
Schwarzenegger), in the confines of
an old New York City theater. The
audience knows they are witnessing
a film within a film, because the first
shot of Last Action Hero showsa movie
screen. Then the camera zooms in to
fill up theen tire frame with the movie
occurring within the movie.
Later in the film Danny gets a
chance to see a sneak preview of the
newest JackSlaterfilm,daringly titled
jack Slater 1V. Danny's friend (Robert
Prosky) works at the theater and al-
lows Danny to see the picture the day
before it opens. He also gives Danny
a magic ticket that once belonged to
Houdini.
The ticket allows Danny toenter
the film world of Jack Slater N. Once
inthemovie,Dannyquicklvbeames
friends with Jack. Danny tries to ran-
vincejack thatheisina movie, butthe
movie world is all jack knows so he
does not believe Danny. Sanny tries
to convince Jack knows that Jack's
real name is Arnold Schwa rzenegger
by taking him toa video store to show
him all of the Schwarzenegger mov-
ies. All Danny finds is a Terminator U
stand-up display with a picture of
Sylvester StaJlone on it.
Most of the best gags take place
whileDannytriesdesperateJytoccn-
vince Jack that he is in a movie. When
he tells Jack that an animated cat
would not be working on the police
force in real life, Jack's boss tersely
tells Danny that the cat "is one of my
best agents
The villain, Benedick, in JackSIa ter
TV is marvelously played by Charles
Dance. Benedick has one glass eye
Photo courtesy ot Columbia Pictures
Austin O'Brien (left) and Arnold Schwarzenegger star in the summer
film, 'Last Action Hero
tha t he changes throughou t the fil m.
Once the eye is a red cross hair; once
it is a menacingly greenish-yellow
coior;another time it isa smiley face.
Benedick finds Danny's ticket and
crosses over to the real world, where
he discovers that "the bad guys can
win
In the course of chasing Benedick
into the real world, Jack and Danny
meet the real Arnold Schwarzenegger
and hiswifeMariaShriver. The scene
leaves theaudience slightly bedazzled
and greatly amused. Last Action Hero
See ACTION page 4
Fox, Lauper make comeback in Mikey
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Michael J. Fox has established
himself as an endearing wise-guy in
many films. His latest effort, Life with
Mikey, provides him with one of his
most solid vehicles to date.
Life with Mikey tells the tale of a
washed-up child star who has be-
come a talent agent for children.
Michael Chapman (Michael J. Fox)
used to star in a sit-com called "Life
with Mikey"abouta bra try, butador-
able, elementary school child. One of
Mikey's trademarks involved look-
mg mefully sorry after ha vingmisbe-
haved and sheepishly asking about
the possibility of "getting time off for
good behavior
Judging from the similarities of
Mikey Chapman and Michael J. Fox
(even their names are the same), one
could assume that Life with Mikey
presentsa case of art imitating life. At
one point Mikey congratulates a cli-
ent fordoinga great cookiecommer-
cial. He says: "You were great! People
have won Emmys for less than that 1
should know, I did
Lines like these allow the viewer
a chance to smile along with the star,
knowing that life and art often be-
come intermingled.
Although the resemblances be-
tween star and cha racter p irtend an
emotiorially saccharine film, Fox
O Touchstone Pictures. All Rights Reserved
'Life with Mikey the tale of a washed-up child star who has become a
talent agent for children, stars Michael J. Fox and Cyndi Lauper.
nanages to create a well-rounded
screen persona. Life with M ikey, while
acknowledging thelikenesses, works
diligently to create a satisfying story
without relying on superficialities.
Mikey now ownsa talent agency
with his brother (Nathan Lane). The
two barely make a living partly be-
cause Mikey cannot bring himself to
take the job seriously. The first time
theaudience meets Mikey he ison the
street playing street hcxikey with a
group of children. As the story un-
folds, Mikey's immaturity bec mes
more evident. He lives alone in an
apartmentthatherarely leans,sh ws
up late tor work and spends his free
time watching reruns of "Life with
Mikey
Mikey's life changes when his
wallet gets stolen by a spunky 11-
year-old named Angle Vega (Chris-
tina Vidal). Mikey later sees the same
girl being accosted by a group of
people. Angie relates a woeful, con-
trived tale to the crowd about her
family life as an excuse for having to
steal. Mikey sees talent in her acting
and eventually convinces her to try
out fi ra part in a cookiecommerrial.
Most of the film chronicles the
relationship between Angie and
Mikey. Surprisingly,despite the 91 jv
timentality evident in the plot, the
filmne'erbecomescloing.Theemo-
tionally powerful scenes have no
swelling music nor expansive histri-
onic outburst for theaters. These
scenes play a pleasantly low-key part
of the film. They speak for themselves
without the manipulative intrusions
of the filmmakers.
Life with Mikey, while being a
charming story, also has plenty of
laughter associated with it. In one
especial ly hilarious scene, Angie and
Mikey eat breakfast together. Angie
brings fresh orangejuiceand muffins
from a local store while Mikey rum-
mages for some cereal and mil k. The
milk he pours out contains lumps,
and the audience can virtually sense
theodor. While Angie munchespleas-
antly on her healthy meal, Mikey
stubbornly eats a spoonful from his
bowl. The expressions on his face
should delight everyone in theaudi-
ence.
Cyndi Lauper plays Geena, the
secretaryatthetalentagency,andshe
also provides a few giggles. Lauper
plays the dizzy secretary to perfec-
tion. In one scene the director, James
Lapine, focuses on Geena's fake fin-
gernails while a letter Ls being dic-
tated. One fingernail falls off, and
Geena struggles to fix it while telling
Mr. Chapman that he is going tixi
fast.
See FOX page 4
highlights one of Ephron's strong
points: She clearly understands the
superficial differences between the
maleandrhefemalesexes.Herscript
for When Harry Met Sally proved
that as it asked the question about
whether a man and woman can
havea relationship wirhoutsex ever
entering into it.
In the aforementioned scene in
Sleepless in Seattle,Sum and hisfriend
look at the teary-eyed woman
dumbfoundedly, unable to under-
stand why memories of a movie
would reduce her to uncontrollable
sobs. The only way they know to
react is to joke about how they cry
every time they see the end of The
Dirty Dozen. They carry on for sev-
eral minutes going into excruciat-
ing detail about the film. They do
this to overcome their discomfort
concerning the woman's emo-
tional outburst and, in the pro-
cess, make her uncomfortable.
Ephron writes and directs the
scene perfectly. The emotions ex-
perienced by the characters are
those with which most viewers
will identify.
At one point in the story,
Annie's best friend tells her that
Annie wants a Hollywood ro-
mance, not a real life romance.
The audience can practically see
the smirk on the actresses' faces as
well as on the faces of the entire
film crew. By letting the audience
See SEATTLE page 4
'Hey Zeus is
grunge's latest offer
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
For those of you who don't
know, there was a punk-rock ex-
plosion in L.A. in the 1980s. It
helped produce the likes of the
Red Hot Chili Peppers, the ever
wondrous Jane's Addiction and
an incredibly influential band
called X. This type of music re-
mained underground until just
recently with the success of Pearl
Jam, Nirvana and
those other
grunge folks. But
forget those
people for now,
we are talking
about X.
The band has
quite a history,
five albums re-
leased in the '80s,
including the
titles "Los Ange-
les" and "Ain't
Love Grand
Their members remain the same
� John Doe (bass, singer,
songwriter), Exene Cervenka
(singer, songwriter), Tony
Gilkyson (guitar) and D.J.
Bonebreak (drums). After a four
year sabbatical, theband went back
to the studio and produced "Hey
Zeus
On "Hey Zeus X has ex-
plored new ground musically,and
morenoticeabry in their lyrics. They
keep their old reelings of darkness
on some songs like "Big Blue
House" and wax poetically sur-
real on "New Life There iseven a
little tingeof punk flavor on tracks
Hey Zeus
like"CountryatWar"and "Arms
for Hostages which deliver
some stinging political and so-
cial satire. Their lyrics have ex-
panded beyond L.A they have
challenged themselves by explor-
ing the world at large. "Our goal
with this record was to do what
Los Angeles first did, and that is
to surprise people with some-
thing they weren't expecting
says Exene.
This isan album for the'90s.
fj They approach
j the all consum-
ingmaterialism
of America on
"Everybody"
and the post-
Bush recession
blueson "Clean
Like Tomor-
row There are
even a few love
songs thrown in
for good mea-
sure.
"Hey
Zeus is strong, new, and defi-
nitely worth buying. Maybe all
these grunge bands have ex-
panded America's musical tastes
to include X in their success,
which is not altogether a bad
thing for a band with real talent
Exene commented But if it
weren't for this new crop of
bands, I don't think I'd be as
enthusiastic about doing this. I
like the fact that it's not weird to
have your hair dyed red, to be a
political activist or to listen to a
band like Nirvana. For me it's
like getting out of jail
Can I get an amen?
Tidbits
REFLECTIONS � art exhibit by Jane L. Baldridge will
be presented at Mendenhall Student Center through-
out the month of July.
Today: Dietaty Fat
Answered by Jennifer Phillips, Student Health Services
a
Question:
Lately, everyone has been
making such a big deal about fat
grams. How many fat grams
should a person consume per
day?
Answer:
Nutrition experts recom-
mend that the fat in
our diet should
amount to no
more than 30
percent of the
caloriesweeat �
daily.
In order
to determine
how much fat
should be in
your diet, you
should estimate what
your daily caloric intake is
(or should be).
Women typically consume
2000 calories per day, while men
consume 2700 calories. (The ex-
act amount of calo: es needed
varies according toage, activity
level and other factors).
Once you've determined
your daily caloric intake, you
can figure out the maximum
number of daily calories that
should come from fat by multi-
plying the total number
of daily calories by
I .30.
For example,
2000 (total calo
ries) x .30600
calories (fat
calories). Since
" one gram of fat
contains 9 calo-
ries, the number
of fat calories
must be divided by
9. Using the previous
example 600 calories di-
vided bv 9 equals 66.6 grains of
fat.
Therefore, the maximum fat
intake for a 2000 calorie diet is
nearly 67 grams.





� �- .fr
July 14, 1993
ACTION
Continued from page 3
VVafchin forthe cmeosalonemake
rth watching.
Thestorifcdtisrun,too.VVatch-
ing Danny and Jack relate and trade
wisecracks back and forth is im-
mensely enjoyable.Schwarzenegger
has already proven he has a fine
comedic presenceand thisfilmshouki
only enhance his marketability as a
comedian. Seeing a Hollywood ego
defiatehimselfbyparodyinghisown
films is refreshing.
MIKEY
The audience for which Lje with
Mikey'rs intended includesall ages. In
a season where violence and adult
humor seem to dominate the screen,
aramUyfilmofthishighcaliberneeds
to be embraced with both arms.
Toooffilrnslikethisperfbrrn
poorly at the box office then find a
new life on video. While video pro-
vides an inexpensive, convenient
medium for watching film, so many
sacrifices must be made that video
ten is- not really an
actkmfilrrvburitdoes provideenough
action to keep it moving along. The
comedy is what really propels the
filmand servesas the main reason for
its recommendation
Try nottobe swayed by thenega-
tive press circulating against last Ac-
tion Hero. Even if you do not have a
great time, there is so much packed
into two hours that you are bound to
find something to enjoy. So do not let
this film become extinct Go see Lost
Action Hero.
Continued from page 3
should serve only as a last resort No
experience can compare to sitting
motionlessinadarkened theater. The
phone cannot disturb you and no
household chores will divert your
mind. You alsolose the satisfaction of
the mutually shared experience of
watching with others. Plus theatrical
releases must be cropped (i.e the
sides are chopped off) before video
release so the viewer is deprived of
one-third of the picture.
Greenyffle s Source
for Books, Magazines & Newspapers
Hardback and Paperback Books
3500 Magazine Titles
Bargain Book Collection from2.98 up
Local and Out of State Newspapers (V
Large Selection of Trading Cards
Greeting Cards
1993-94 Calendars
Gift Certificates Available
Central Book
&News
Mrn-Sat 9:30am-9:30pm
Greenville Square Shopping Center next to Kmart
757-7177
We recycle paper products
It's All Happening
Greenville
207 SW Greenville Blvd � 355-5000
m
Kingston
Place
SEATTLE
Continued from page 3
film understands that its romance
will be a Hollywood romance (after
all it is a movie), it alfows the viewer
to experience the film differently.
Rather than getting choked with
emotion, theaudiencecan pleasantly
experience the wonder of idealized
love Watching Sleepless in Seattle wil 1
put a smile on almost every face that
seeit
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT RENTALS
FOR FALL SEMESTER
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
ALL GLASSES DISHES SILVERWARE
DISHWASHER POTS & PANS
MAIL SERVICE
�CLUBHOUSE-LAUNDROMAT
SWIMMING POOL
�FREE CABLE & LOTS MORE
AT A PRICE THAT WILL
COMPETE,WITH THE DORMS!
Nora Ephron has been quoted
as saying "It's a movie about love in
the movies, and how that screws up
our expectations about love in our
own lives So it is. Every aspect of
Sleepless in Seattle works well. The
soundtrack meshes perfectly with
the stri king cinema tography, which
perfectly captures the heart of this
witty, endearing film.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The position of Lifestyle Editor will be
available starting in the Fall semester.
Interested persons should apply at The East
Carolinian before summer classes end.
I FRIDAY
i NIGHT I
I
DOLLAR
NIGHT
i
I
n
Ladies In FREE until 9:00 PM f
RfiMfiDfiINN
Hours: Mon-Ttnips 8 7 Fri 8-5 Sat 8 1
Auto Care Center
A better choice for
all your car care needs.
758-2306 JI-UlMosdvDr.
(Behind Parker's BB(J, Greenville Blvd)
Weekly Puzzle-Bring
ISolutions to Mad Hatter and
Recieve2 off any Service
NEW PUZZLE
A man leaves home, travels a certain distance and
makes a left turn Then lie travels the same distance and makes another left
turn. Again, he travels the same distance and makes yet another left turn and
heads for home. When he gets home, there are two men with masks on.
Who are they?
Solution to Puzzle from 6-18
lUbe first divided the eight kxM3 into three
groups. Croups A and B each had three loaves,
while group C had two loaves. Fist, she put group A on one end of the scale and Croup B on the
other end. t the scale was even, she took group C and put one loaf on each end. The end that went
down had the heavier loaf. However, i one side of the scale was lower than the other during the first
weigh-in, Katie woukl put one loaf from the heavier group on each end of the scale and leave the
thrd loaf on the sideJf the scale was even, she took group C and put one loaf on each end. The end
that went down had the heavier loaf.However, I one side of the scale was lower than the other
during the first weigh-in, Katie woukt put one loaf from the heavier group on each end of the scale
and leave the thkd loaf on the side. If the scale was even, the heavier loaf was the one she put otthe
side. If one side of the scale was tower, that side contained the heavier bat.
"OU. RLTER&CHANGE LUBE� T Tl"eTvARANTYMUFFLER
$16.50
Up to St, ot Pamzol MM or OmM 20WS0, Otur
Brandt � Waightt yitfiOy Mghar. MM can and loht I
�ucka. �
Q�m valid with coupon jjgjgjjW
MoM can and Ight tucta.
Oflw valid with coupon thru WIM
Great Expectations
Carolina East Mall 756-8694
10 Off
w fclkJ Student ID
Perms:
Reg : $39.95
Special: $34.95
Longer Hair Slightly More
Shampoo, Cut & Blow Dry
Reg: $14.00
Special: $10.95
We Cater To Students!
ECU'S NATURAL FOODS
SOURCE
NaturalOrganic Groceries - Produce
Vitamins - Supplements
Bulk Foods, Herbs and Spices
HealthBeauty Products - Cosmetics
Books and Magazines
Close to Cam' us in Downtown G'ville
405 EVANS ST.
758-0850
Hours 10-6, M-Sat.
DOGWOOD HOLLOW
APARTMENTS
1108 E. 10th Street, 2 Blocks from ECU campus. Brand new-
completion date: July 93.
2 Bedroom, 2 full bath units,Central Heat & Air.
We Furnish Cable TV, Water, Dishwasher, Disposal,
Washer & Dryer.
Office On Site.
Open 8:30-5:30 M-F
10:304:00 Sat & Sun
752-8900
at
outique,
BM &
MC
July 15, 1993 7pm to 8am
(6:30pm to 7:00pm Hors foeuvers Served)
Must call for your reserved seating.
Our selections will include:
After 5" Cocktail Formals
Jewelry, Gloves, Hose, Shoes,
Lingerie
MOB � Better Dresses
Pageant Prom
Utde Girls
And iatcst In Bridal Gowns
Tuxedos and Gifts
3,LL, �l 5LJ �,js
355-7186 or 355-9136 fax: (919)355-7112
ATTENTION
CITY OF
GREENVILLE
CITIZENS
RESIDENTIAL
RECYCLING
WILL BEGIN AUGUST 1993
FOR CITIZENS CURRENTLY
Your new service will include one a week backyard collection of garbage on an
assigned day of the week. You wi also receive once a week backyard
coiection of recyclables on a day of the week different from your garbage
service. The City will furnish you a recycling label to attach to your chosen
container. Curbside trash service wi continue to be provided once a week on
an assigned day. With these changes in service, you wi be billed $4 per
month as part of you utility bi.
FOR CmZENS CURRENTLY
RECEIVING FRONTYARD SERVICE
IROLL OUT CARTS!
Your new service will include once a week curbsicte garbage pickup on an
assigned day of the week For garbage service at curbside, you wi need to
use a rollout cart that meets city specifications. Also, you wil need to bring the
cart to curbside on the sssigned day of service and return the cart to your
residence at the end of that day. You wfll also receive once a week curbside
recyclable collection on an assigned day of the week different from your
garbage service. Each resident will need to provide their own container for
recyclables, preferably a standard garbage can from 20 to 32 galons in
capacity. The City wi furnish you a recycling label to attach to your chosen
container. AJI containers must be covered. Again, the resident wi need to
bring the recycling container to curbside on the assigned day of service and
return it to the residence at the end of that day. Curbside trash service wi
continue to be Yovided once a week on a different day. With this change in
service, you wi be billed3 per month as part of your utility bi.
FOR CITIZENS RESIDING IN APARTMENT
COMPLEXES AND CONDOS WITH
DUMPSTER SERVICE
Your new service will consist of once a week garbage collection at existing
dumpsters. You wi also receive once a week recyclable collection from
existing dumpsters clearly identified as recycling containers. We are currently
working with complex managers to identify the preferred locations for recycling
dumpsters. Fees for this service wi be3 per month for each resident to be
applied to your utility bi.





TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
For Rent
For Rent
For Rent
V' f H1
requirtvl Dutm Realty, Inc
36-26 b
REEDY BRANCH APARTMENTS.
New 2 bedrooms on East llith Street
Ready for fall semester Now taking
applications. S385.00 pm. Lease and
deposit required. Duffus Realty, Inc
756-2675.
IjlL'HtliilHuiiJT
7 H( "l "s Most ('onvenient ()1T
Campus Location. Now I rising
Unit 6()1. Starting on
871593 lo 731AM.
S2)8MonthsUKlent
Limit 2 Students.
2 Bedrooms. New Carpet & lieshly
Iuiited
Water & Sewer Included
. (919)323-4)415484-3(139 v
ntl2blockfromArtBldg
� s from downtown, and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great tor Art stu-
i Call 757-1947
GIRL TO SHARE apt. for July
Strattord Arms. 5125.00. Call 355-5986
or 522-0529 in Kinston.
RESPONSIBLE NONSMOKER fe-
male needed ASAP to share 3-BR du-
plex 3 blks from campus. $130 per
month and 13 utilities Deposit re-
quired Call 758-7879 for more infor-
mation.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED at
Eastbrook Apts. Two bedroom. $185,
plus 12 utilities. Lease begins in Au-
gust. Please contact ANDY at (804)
463-1454, ANYTIME'
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED-
nonsmoker, 3BR townhouse - Sheraton
Village, $250month 13 utilities,
ready for August 15. Call 756-8459.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom. 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FULLY FURNISHED 2 bedroom, 2
12 bath townhouse. Need 2 females
$195.00 per month per person plus 1
4 utilities. Pool, bus, laundry, 2 miles
from campus. Contact: Rachel at
Kingston Place 758-5393.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
r o.w n not si:
Need Four Students
fur townhouse. Completely furnished all
utilities included except telephone and cable.
Call Mike Simon at 703 560 8779
KINGSTON PI ACE
23 Help Wanted
POSTAL JOBS available! Many po-
sitions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext.P-3712.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products at home. Call toll
free 1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT � Make money teaching ba-
sic conversational English abroad.
Japan and Taiwan. Make up to
$2,000-4,000 per month. Many pro-
vide room & board other benefits!
No previous training or teaching cer-
tificate required. For International
Employment program, call the In-
ternational Employment Group:
(206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
CALENDAR GIRL! Interviewsnow
being taken for women 18-25 who
El Help Wanted
would like to be considered for the
all new 1994 GIRLS of GREEN VILLE
Calendar Call STAR SHOTS 355-
2772.
RECREATION EXERCISE PART-
NERS- Recreational Services needs
students to serve as Adapted Recre-
ational Assistants for students, fac-
ulty and staff with disabilities. The
Partners in Well-Being program pro-
vides one-on-one programs for dis-
abled individuals. Contact David
Gaskins at 757-6387 or complete an
application form in 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium.
For Sale
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4-wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA
Available in your area now Call 1-
800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: 1984 Honda Civic. 4-dr,
5-spd, AM-FM stereo. Serviced ev-
ery 3,000 miles, new clutch put in
recently. Asking $2250, price nego-
tiable. Great gas mileage, good for
around town. Call 752-5899; ask for
Joe or leave message.
For Sale Ej Services Offered
GOODCOLLEGEFURNITURE�
Cheap 2 couches, bed and frame,
chests, lamps, TV stand, etc Must
sell 1MEDM 758-5312.
FOR SALE: Couch, chair, end table,
lamp, queen size bed and ten speed
bike. All just $75.00. Call 830-1118.
EARLY AMERICAN oak finish
bedroom suite includes fullqueen
headboard, 5 drawer chest and 2
drawer nightstand. Practically new,
$225.00. 321-1708. Leave message.
El Services Offered
CHILD CARE SERVICES! Elem Ed.
major available A.M. hours - evenings
and weekends negotiable. Love chil-
dren. Have experience and references!
Kris - 752-3501, leave message.
USED FURNITURE
Student
HOP
Formerly Estate Shop
oin & Ring Man
NOW HIRING
Expanding company in Greenville
has positions available for part
time salespeople. 6-10 M-F.
C all 355-7S33 After 11:00
SELLING:
FURNITURE,
Men's Clothing,
Dorm Refrigerators,
Microwaves,
Stereo Equipment,
Miscellaneous Items
We're Also Buying
Used Men's
Clothing!
Top dollar for
Tommy Hilrfiger.
If you are selling you must be
18 with a picture ID.
752-3866
MON -FBI 10-12.1-3
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
Announcements
DISABILITY SUPPORT SERVICES
Employment opportunities are
available to students who are inter-
ested in becoming PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS to students in wheel-
chairs, READERS AND TUTORS. Past
experience is desired, but not required.
If interested, contact either of the fol-
lowing: Office Coordinator, 124 Cot-
ton Hall, telephone: (919) 757-6180;
Office for Disability Support Services,
Brewster A-116 or A-114, telephone:
(919) 757-6799.
P1CASO
PICASO, the Pitt County AIDS
Service Agency, is announcing its sum-
mer hours. As of Thursday, July 1,
1993, the office will be staffed the fol-
lowing hours: Monday through Friday
from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. and Tuesday and
Th ursday evenings from6p.m. -8p.m.
If you need to visit the office during
evening hours, please call ahead.
PARENTS WITHOUT PARTNERS
The Greenville Chapter of Par-
ents Without Partners will hold their
monthly meeting on Thursday, July 15,
at 6:30 pm. Orientation will begin at
7:00 pm. The meeting will take place at
First Presbyterian Church located on
the corner of Fourteenth and Elm
Streets.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT
CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center invites the summer students &
guests to worship with them. Sunday
masses: 1130 AM & 830 P.M. (fol-
lowed by refreshments) at the Newman
Center, 953 E 10th Street, right next to
theEastendof thecampus. Joinusalso
on Wednesday evenings for Mass at
5:30 P.M. followed by fellowship. For
further information, call Fr Paul Vaeth,
757-1991.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Big Splash Golf Tournament
Recreational Services, in cooperation
with Greenville's Big Splash Golf Cen-
ter, will host the Big Splash Golf Bo-
nanza. Register July 20th at 4:00 pm in
BIO 103. Call Rec Services at 757-6387
for more details Win a t-shirt!
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times free of charge Duetothe limited amount
of space, The East Carbiir�an cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements
Deadlines
Monday 4 p.m. for
Wednesday's edition.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day priorto
publication, however, no refunds Will
be given.
For more
information call
757-6366.
. . . :





July 14,
� The East Carolinian �
Opinion
Page 6
WednesdayOpinion
Cultural center to open
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
Swimsuit wearers beware of mirrored sunglasses
Multicultural center will offer
insight into numerous
backgrounds and nationalities
Two decades ago, most people had probably
never heard of multiculturalism, or cared to know
about it for that matter. But Americans often pride
themselves in being an ever-changing society, if
only to be recognized as number one. No, cynicism
is not my intent. A cultural center is not only a
nicety of an expanding university, but a necessity
of a culture in strife.
The Ledonia Wright Afro-American Center
moves to the Bloxton House across from the
Mendenhall Student Center. Most of you have
probably never heard of it, tucked away near Joyner
Library. Its much-needed move will hopefully
change all that.
1 challenge anyone out there to provide a
reason against a multicultural center. Maybe there
are a handful of narrow-minded individuals who
have eqlly narrow-minded hearts and brains
and are opposed to the center, but most are in
favor of one.
On a very simplistic level, it is capable of
expanding our little community of Greenville's
outlook on our common culture. That common cul-
ture is the one called "humanism Humanism
incorporates everyone's individualism and still
defines who we are. Sound like a magic trick?
Well, it may resemble one.
We are all different, thank goodness. Our
"differentness" is defined by how our parents
raised us, the neighborhood we lived in and nu-
merous other factors. It only makes sense that we
enter the world armed with ideas and beliefs in
opposition to others.
That doesn't necessarily mean that we can't
co-exist. People are lulled into believing that dif-
ferent is bad. On the contrary! Different can teach
us so much about others and ourselves. Most im-
portantly, it can expand our visions and dreams.
There is one aspect of the center that you may
be wondering about. Will it include all minority
cultures, even though it will be called the African-
American Center? The answer is yes. It will house
minority educational materials and a small library
specific to minority cultures. But it will not exclude
anyone.
The misconception is people think that since
it is called by a certain culture's name, it will only
cater to those individuals who are a part of it.
While it does serve the purpose of informing stu-
dents of that particular culture, it also provides the
opportunity for others to learn.
That's the whole point. It is there to teach, to
inform and to expand individuals' horizons. Its
purpose is not to hurt anyones feelings or egos. The
center will adopt an open arms philosophy and will
see to the needs and wants of all minority cultures.
Also, with the move, many faculty members will
receive the recognition they deserve. Now who can
oppose that?
Others aspects of the center will include art
exhibitions and paintings relevant to minority heri-
tages and as a social hang out for interested stu-
dents. If taken advantage of, it can turn out to be a
very cool place.
So get yourself over to the new African-
American Center when it finishes unpacking and
learn about someone or someplace different than
you. Open-mindedness is an important aspect of
education. Different can be a very good thing.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Joseph Horst, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tin k ham, Account Executive
Kelly Kellis, Account Executive
Karen Hassel News Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sews Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Julie Tottcn, Asst. Ltjestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Mbha Zonn, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amy Yongue, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley, Copy Editor
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chad wick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Well, kids, it's July again,
and we all know what that
means; well, maybe we don't.
Allow me to clarify.
July means seeing rela-
tivesyou haven't seen in months
or even years parading around
in abominable fashions (typi-
cally including Hawaiian shirts
and black kneehigh socks with
plaid shorts) over a barely di-
gestible charcoal burger.
July means insane pyroma-
niacs and amateur demolition
expert wanna-bes driving across
state lines to purchase fireworks
with which they will likely lose
fingers or hearing.
July means idiots who
come up to you and say, "hot
enough for you?" Or "it's not
the heat; it's the humidity
Most important, gentle
readers, July meansbikinis,and
with bikinis, ogling the bodies
that are in them.
Now ladies, before you get
pissed off as we progress in our
discussion, I'd like you all to
consider the male point of view
in this matter, and then take a
look at yourselves, honestly if
you are able. This point isn't as
one-sided as it may appear at
first glance, whether you are
able to admit it or not.
Now guys, work with me
here. Haven't we all just sat
around watching women? It's a
great pastime, and best of all,
it's free! I openly admit that I
thoroughly enjoy watching
tanned, toned and well-oiled
women parading their wares at
the beach.
As a "sensitive 90's man
who is comfortably secure in his
sexuality I'm not the least bit
ashamed.
Now, no one can tell me
that swimsuits today aren't de-
signed with people like me in
mind. The entire industry is
based on it.
Women buy padded suits
to appear more appealing to
those who would look, to land a
date, or a mate, not to put too
fine a tip on it.
What really pisses me off
(here's where 1 finally make my
point) is the fact that many
women are offended by recre-
ational viewers like myself.
Explain to me, if you will,
the logic behind covering only
10 percent of your total body
area, and then throwing a fit
when you accomplish your goal
of being noticed.
My theory is a simple one:
if you don't want people scoping
you out at the beach, you're
mentally and sexually dead, and
you might as well wear a petti-
coat and bring along a Reader's
Digest condensed novel.
The beach, and well, the
world in general, is a very flirty
place and those skimpy suits do
wonders for the whole process.
Do you know what? I think it's a
fine, fine thing.
Maybe if we all went
around totally naked all the
time, there might not be so many
lonely people in the world.
What's that? "Pig you
say? Well, "Oink! Oink says I.
It's the truth.
Ladies, please don't feel
above all this, because some of
us aren't the unobservant
louts walking-balls-of-sperm
some of you take us for; I, for
one, notice things.
I see women casually try
to look disinterested in a huge
chest and a tight butt in a pair
of Speedos.Give it up � we can
still tell. You're just as bad as
us, except we're more overt
about it.
So guys, do yourselves a
favor and avoid a hassle; buy
some mirrored sunglasses.
They help.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza, and
watch some cartoons
Next week in Riding the Mo-
bius: violence in movies and how to
improve race relations; Jason offer'
solutions and thisusual bit of phi-
losophy that he's so well-known for.
Watch for it.
WHLIT'S D4T? WE DONT
NEED NO vVMUt-TlPL!��)
CULT'RAL 5UILPINJ
,W�60TS KNUFF
CULTURE KftUND
QuoteoftheDa.
Culture is the sum of all the forms of art, of love and
of thought, which, in the course of centuries, have
enabled man to he less enslaved.
Andre Malraux
Printed on
a&L
100 recycled
paper
�EMPI,Ft3
Letters to the Editor must be signed and accompa-
nied with a daytime phone number. Students must pro-
vide class rank and major. All letters should be ad-
dressed to: The East Carolinian, Attn Opinion Editor,
Student Pubs. Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
By T. Scott Batchelor
Independence
Day proves
different for all
Ah, the Fourth of JulylThatspecial time
once a year when we gather with family and
friends to celebrate the invention of gunpow-
der. It's also called Independence Day, to
honor the freedom of those who j ust turned 21
and can purchase beer legally for the first
time.
We also celebrate the adoption of the
Declaration of Independence and the begin-
ning of the long, bloody struggle for Ameri-
can independence from Britain. Whocan for-
get those stirring words penned by Thomas
Jefferson in the sweltering July heat over 200
years ago: "What I want to know is, why do
we have to do this in the middle of the sum-
mer? My arm keeps sticking to the paper; I'm
sweating like a Tory; and I guess I'm going to
have to bribe the bar maid to bring me another
pint of ale
Tom made it through that summer and
emerged with America's birth certificate, so
to speak. What a happy turn of events for
present-day Americans. Wecelebratethathis-
toric period wi th carnivals, picnics, fireworks
(that is, in non-fascist states where they're still
legal), softball games and parades.
Incidentally, parades remind me of
Shriners, and Shriners remind me of that
annual fish fry they hold to benefit burn cen-
ters. Question: Am I the only one who thinks
holding a fish FRY to benefit BURN centers is
just a little sick?
Independence Day festivitiesareabout
friends. Folks who can share in your highest
achievements, who stand by you when the
chips are down; who don't tell the police
when you drop a bottle rocket down a pipe
and fire it at them; who don't mind the
temporary numbness in the fingers caused
when a firecracker's fuse is a little quicker
than expected. These are the people you want
to surround yourself with when celebrating
American independence.
(Disclaimer for NC law enforcement
authorities: The preceding references to class
"C" fireworks is in no way an admission of
guilt in the purchasing, possession or use of
such fireworks, and the similarities between
the scenes described above and what I actu-
ally did on the Fourth of July is completely
coincidental, as far as you're concerned.)
I think many Americans, especially the
youngsters, tend to lose sight of what this
holiday means. I asked one young person�
he was about 15 or 16� what the July Fourth
celebration is all about.
"Well he began, "it's when the found-
ingfatherssigned the Declaration of Indepen-
dence and proclaimed themselves free from
England
"That's impressive I said. "You'vere-
affirmed my faith in
"And then these found ing fathers,all of
them white male Europeans, of course, car-
ried on with the subjugation of women, the
systematic rape of the environment, oppres-
sion of the Africans brought here as slaves,
aggressive colonization, destruction of
"Hold it, hold it, kid I said. "Where in
the world are you from anyway?"
"Chapel Hill he replied.
So I fired a couple bottle rockets at him
and he ran away.
Now I ask you, name me another coun-
try where two people can engage in the free
exchange of ideas like that?





The East Carolinian
JuJ 1993
Opinion
Page 6
WednesdayOpinion
Cultural center to open
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
Multicultural center will offer
insight into numerous
backgrounds and nationalities
Two decades ago, most people had probably
never heard of multiculturalism, or cared to know
about it for that matter. But Americans often pride
themselves in being an ever-changing society, if
only to be recognized as number one. No, cynicism
is not my intent. A cultural center is not only a
nicety of an expanding university, but a necessity
of a culture in strife.
The Ledonia Wright Afro-American Center
moves to the Bloxton House across from the
Mendenhall Student Center. Most of you have
probably never heard of it, tucked away near Joyner
Library. Its much-needed move will hopefully
change all that.
I challenge anyone out there to provide a
reason against a multiculturalcenter. Maybe there
are a handful of narrow-minded individuals who
have equally narrow-minded hearts and brains
and are opposed to the center, but most are in
favor of one.
On a very simplistic level, it is capable of
expanding our little community of Greenville's
outlook on our common culture. That common cul-
ture is the one called "humanism Humanism
incorporates everyone's individualism and still
defines who we are. Sound like a magic trick?
Well, it may resemble one.
We are all different, thank goodness. Our
"differentness" is defined by how our parents
raised us, the neighborhood we lived in and nu-
merous other factors. It only makes sense that we
enter the world armed with ideas and beliefs in
opposition to others.
That doesn't necessarily mean that we can't
co-exist. People are lulled into believing that dif-
ferent is bad. On the contrary! Different can teach
us so much about others and ourselves. Most im-
portantly, it can expand our visions and dreams.
There is one aspect of the center that you may
be wondering about. Will it include all minority
cultures, even though it will be called the African-
American Center? The answer is yes. It will house
minority educational materials and a small library
specific to minority cultures. But it will not exclude
anyone.
The misconception is people think that since
it is called by a certain culture's name, it will only
cater to those individuals who are a part of it.
While it does serve the purpose of informing stu-
dents of that particular culture, it also provides the
opportunity for others to learn.
That's the whole point. It is there to teach, to
inform and to expand individuals' horizons. Its
purpose is not to hurt anyones feelings or egos. The
center will adopt an open arms philosophy and will
see to the needs and wants of all minority cultures.
Also, with the move, many faculty members will
receive the recognition they deserve. Now who can
oppose that?
Others aspects of the center will include art
exhibitions and paintings relevant to minority heri-
tages and as a social hang out for interested stu-
dents. If taken advantage of, it can turn out to be a
very cool place.
So get yourself over to the new African-
American Center when it finishes unpacking and
learn about someone or someplace different than
you. Open-mindedness is an important aspect of
education. Different can be a very good thing.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Joseph Horst, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Wes Tinkham, Account Executive
Kelly Keilis, Account Executive
Karen Hassell, Sews Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Julie Totten, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Mlsha Zonn, Asst. Sports Editor
Amy E. Wlrtz, Opinion Page Editor
Amy Yongue, Copy Editor
Jessica Stanley. Copy Editor
Tonya Heath, Account Executive
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Burt Ay cock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chadwick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. 77k East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The Fust Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
aSL
100 recycled
paper
Swimsuit wearers beware of mirrored sunglasses
Well, kids, it's July again,
and we all know what that
means; well, maybe we don't.
Allow me to clarify.
July means seeing rela-
tives you haven't seen in months
or even years parading around
in abominable fashions (typi-
cally including Hawaiian shirts
and black kneehigh socks with
plaid shorts) over a barely di-
gestible charcoal burger.
July means insane pyroma-
niacs and amateur demolition
expert wanna-bes driving across
state lines to purchase fireworks
with which they will likely lose
fingers or hearing.
July means idiots who
come up to you and say, "hot
enough for you?" Or "it's not
the heat; it's the humidity
Most important, gentle
readers, July means bikinis, and
with bikinis, ogling the bodies
that are in them.
Now ladies, before you get
pissed off as we progress in our
discussion, I'd like you all to
consider the male point of view
in this matter, and then take a
look at yourselves, honestly if
you are able. This point isn't as
one-sided as it may appear at
first glance, whether you are
able to admit it or not.
Now guys, work with me
here. Haven't we all just sat
around watching women? It's a
great pastime, and best of all,
it's free! I openly admit that I
thoroughly enjoy watching
tanned, toned and well-oiled
women parading their wares at
the beach.
As a "sensitive 90's man
who is comfortably secure in his
sexuality I'm not the least bit
ashamed.
Now, no one can tell me
that swimsuits today aren't de-
signed with people like me in
mind. The entire industry is
based on it.
Women buy padded suits
to appear more appealing to
those who would look, to land a
date, or a mate, not to put too
fine a tip on it.
What really pisses me off
(here's where I finally make my
point) is the fact that many
women are offended by recre-
ational viewers like myself.
Explain to me, if you will,
the logic behind covering only
10 percent of your total body
area, and then throwing a fit
when you accomplish your goal
of being noticed.
My theory is a simple one:
if you don't want people scoping
you out at the beach, you're
mentally and sexually dead, and
you might as well wear a petti-
coat and bring along a Reader's
Digest condensed novel.
The beach, and well, the
world in general, is a very flirty
place and those skimpy suits do
wonders for the whole process.
Do you know what? I think it's a
fine, fine thing.
Maybe if we all went
around totally naked all the
time, there might not be so many
lonely people in the world.
What's that? "Pig you
say?WellOink!OinksaysI.
It's the truth.
Ladies, please don't feel
above all this, because some of
us aren't the unobservant
louts walking-balls-of-sperm
some of you take us for; I, for
one, notice things.
I see women casually try
to look disinterested in a huge
chest and a tight butt in a pair
ofSpeedos.Giveitup � we can
still tell. You're just as bad as
us, except we're more overt
about it.
So guys, do yourselves a
favor and avoid a hassle; buy
some mirrored sunglasses.
They help.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza, and
watch some cartoons
Next week in Riding the Mo-
bius: violence in movies and how to
improve race relations; ason offer'
solutions and thisusual bit of phi-
losophy that he's so well-known for.
Watch for it.
WHUT'S datT we dont,
NEED NO vVMUIriPU�D
CULT'&ArL &UILPINJ
4ECoTS KNUFF
�ULTUgeftUND
HE�Bt Ciry goy!

QuotcoftheDav:
Culture is the sum of all the forms of art, of love and
of thought, which, in the course of centuries, have
enabled man to be less enslaved.
Andre Malraux
Letters to the Editor must be signed and accompa-
nied with a daytime phone number. Students must pro-
vide class rank and major. All letters should be ad-
dressed to: The East Carolinian, Attn Opinion Editor,
Student Pubs. Building, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.
By T. Scott Batchelor
Independence
Day proves
different for all
Ah, the Fourth of July! That special time
once a year when we gather with family and
friends to celebrate the invention of gunpow-
der. It's also called Independence Day, to
honor the freedom of those who just turned 21
and can purchase beer legally for the first
time.
We also celebrate the adoption of the
Declaration of Independence and the begin-
ning of the long, bloody struggle for Ameri-
can independence from Britain. Who can for-
get those stirring words penned by Thomas
Jefferson in the sweltering July heat over 200
years ago: "What I want to know is, why do
we have to do this in the middle of the sum-
mer? My arm keeps sticking to the paper; I'm
sweating like a Tory; and I guess I'm going to
ha ve to bribe the bar maid to bring me another
pint of ale
Tom made it through that summer and
emerged with America's birth certificate, so
to speak. What a happy rum of events for
present-day Americans. Wecelebrate that his-
toricperiod with carnivals, picnics, fireworks
(that is, in non-fascist states where they're still
legal), softball games and parades.
Incidentally, parades remind me of
Shriners, and Shriners remind me of that
annual fish fry they hold to benefit bum cen-
ters. Question: Am I the only one who thinks
holding a fish FRY to benefit BURN centers is
just a little sick?
Independence Day festivities are about
friends. Folks who can share in your highest
achievements, who stand by you when the
chips are down; who don't tell the police
when you drop a bottle rocket down a pipe
and fire it at them; who don't mind the
temporary numbness in the fingers caused
when a firecracker's fuse is a little quicker
than expected. These are the people you want
to surround yourself with when celebrating
American independence.
(Disclaimer for NC law enforcement
authorities: The preceding references to class
"C" fireworks is in no way-an admission of
guilt in the purchasing, possession or use of
such fireworks, and the similarities between
the scenes described above and what I actu-
ally did on the Fourth of July is completely
coincidental, as far as you're concerned.)
I think many Americans, especially the
youngsters, tend to lose sight of what this
holiday means. I asked one young person�
he was about 15 or 16� what the July Fourth
celebration is all about.
"Well he began, "it's when the found-
ingfatherssigned the Declaration of Indepen-
dence and proclaimed themselves free from
England
"That's impressive I said. "You've re-
affirmed my faith in
"And then these founding fa thers,allof
them white male Europeans, of course, car-
ried on with the subjugation of women, the
systematic rape of the environment, oppres-
sion of the Africans brought here as slaves,
aggressive colonization, destruction of
"Hold it, hold it, kid I said. "Where in
the world are you from anyway?"
"Chapel Hill he replied.
So I Fired a couple bottle rockets at him
and he ran away.
Now I ask you, name me another coun-
try where two people can engage in the free
exchange of ideas like that?





rTTir.i .����.sj.� �� .�-
77 e East Carolinian
Sports
Page 7
Hart remains soul of Pirates
ByWamsnSumner
Staff Writer
Ever wondered what Captain
Ahabfeltlikeclingingtothebackof
Moby Dick"
Ask Dave Hart. He probably
ha a good idea.
Hart, the Director of Athletics
at EastCarolina University, isquite
familiar with riding"the great white
whale" of Pirate athletics. He must
try to steer this program through
thebtormyseasof conference affili-
ation, national television contracts,
stadium renovation, athletic
fund raising and public relations
no small feat considering the high
aspirations held by the athletic de-
partment and its boosters.
While gainingnational promi-
nence for ECU athletics must al-
ways remaina team effort,itis Hart
that the administration and Pirate
club supporters charge to get re-
sults. Hart said that keeping all these
"constituencies" happy isa require-
ment for his position.
"I think the job as athletic di-
rector is a very high profile one
witha lot of builtin 'constituencies'
if vou will Hart said. "You have to
be sensitive to the studen t body, the
athletic staff, the media, the alumni,
the athletes the list goes on and
on.
Harthas worked intheathietic
department since 13 and was
named to his current position in
1987. During his tenure, Hart has
maderevolutionary improvements
to the depart-
ment. He has
been instru-
mental in the
implementa-
tion of a Student
Development
program for all
studentathletes
at ECU, has fa-
cilitated im-
provements to
Ficklen Sta-
dium and
Minges Coli-
seum through
fundraising
ventures, and
has worked tirelessly to promote
the ECU athletic programs to major
conferences, most notably the Big
East.
"We have spent a lot of time
and energy with the Big East Hart
said. "We have done a great many
things to represent ourselves in a
very professional manner to that
affiliation and I would say that we
have earned their respect
Hart said that he feels his de-
partment has been very successful
Dave Hart
despite the adversity the school
facesasa football independent with
a budget dwarfed by other pro-
grams. Hart said that while he is
extremely proud of the work his
department has
done, things
much change in
order for the pro-
gram to continue
its success in the
future.
"We can't
continue to com-
pete with the cur-
rent level of fund-
ing we have now.
Our athletic bud-
get is about 2 per-
centofwhatother
budgets are. We
have been very
fortunate that we
have been so successful with the
amount we have spent. We can't
continue to pull rabbits out of the
hat
Hart is optimistic about the
changes already being imple-
mented at the university, but par-
ticularly those called for in the
Shared Visions campaign. This
massive fundraising venture will
provide capital for expansions to
Ficklen Stadium and Minges Coli-
seum, as well as construction of a
top-notch student recreation cen-
ter. These changes will prove very
attractive to incoming recruits as
well as athletic conferences. Hart
said that this campaign is vital to
the athletic program as well as the
rest of the university.
"Shared Visions will be the
most important thing to happen to
this university since the medical
school Hart said.
Hart said that the Pirate club,
the major source of alumni contri-
bution to the university, must
double its membership over the
next two years, a difficult proposi-
tion, but one Hart has faith in. Hart
believes thatdespite the pessimism
of outside forces, the alumni will
come through.
"ECU alumni have a quali ty of
being battlers. We have been cast in
the role of the underdog. You al-
ways have people who say things
can'tbedone. Those peopleneed to
get out of the way and make room
for the people whoaredoing them
Hart said that like any other
job, his has its frustrations, particu-
larly the slow pace at which things
take place because of funding, but
the rewards he has seen far out-
weigh the disappointments.
"The (1992) Peach Bowl vk-
See HART page 8
Earnhardt takes lead
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP)
� Dale Earnhardt's victory in
Saturday's Pepsi 400 at Daytona
International Speedway has put
the five-time national champion
251 pointsahead of hisnearest com-
petitor in the NASCAR Winston
Cup standings.
"There is so much that can
happen from week to week that
251 points may be the margin we
need to make up for any bad luck
we mighthave later on. We're only
halfway through the season right
now said Earnhardt, whose vic-
tory Saturday was hisfourth of the
year.
The margin is wide enough
that Earnhardt could finish last in
Sunday's Slick 50 300 at Loudon,
N.H and still be assured of no less
than a 103-point lead in the stand-
ings.
In fact, 251 points is the differ-
ence between second-place Dale
Jarrett and llth-place Geoff Bodine
after the first 15 races of the 30-
event season.
Second-place Jarrett has 2,091
points, while Rusty Wallace is third
with l,997.MorganShepherd holds
fourth with 1,991 points and Ken
Schrader is fifth with 1,977.
Rounding out the top 10 are:
Kyle Petty, 1946; Davey Allison,
1934; Jeff Gordon, 1905; Ernie Irvan,
1889, and Mark Martin, 1873.
Earnhardt easily leads the cir-
cuit in earnings with $1,080315.
Second-place Ernie Irvan has won
$671,075.
Pole qualifying is scheduled
Friday at New Hampshire Interna-
tional Raceway.
Sunday's race will be the first
for the NASCAR Winston Cup
teams at the speedway, which is 60
miles north of Boston.
Runnin'
Rebs
These students
get a little
exercise
hoopin'it up in
Christ enbury
Gym.
Photo by
C�oYlc Van Buran
Young may miss opening of training
camp cause of contract negotiations
Aikman throws again after surgery
(AP)�Steve Youngmaymiss
theopeningof trainingcamp. Troy
Aikman may not miss as much
camp as everyone thought he
v.ould.
Young'scontract with theSan
Francisco 49ers expired after last
season, and under league rules he
cannot participate in camp until a
new one is in place. The 49ers'
camp opens Wednesday.
"We have every intention of
him being in training camp, but it
takes two to do a contract said
Leigh Steinberg, Young's agent.
"We also have every intention of
having him compensated fairly
Aikman, the Super Bowl
MVP, threw a football for the first
time since undergoing back sur-
gery June 19. He downplayed the
short tossesasan insignificant step
in his rehabilitation.
'7ust standing there throw-
ing, I didn' t expect to feel any pain
or any discomfort Aikman said
after making several dozen throws,
'at really doesn't test the back all
thatmuch,at least in my opinion
The Cowboys are hoping to
have Aikman in practice the sec-
ond weekof Augustafter the team
returns from an exhibition game
in London against the Detroit Li-
ons.
In other NFL training camp
news:
� Quarterback Billy Joe Hobert
left his baseball bat in Sarasota,
Fla and reported to camp with
the Los Angeles Raiders. Hobert,
whowasplayingrrtinorleaguebase-
ball in the Chicago White Sox sys-
tem for the past three weeks, be-
came the first of the Raiders' six
draft picks to come to terms and
joined the team late in the second of
two workouts Monday.
� The Seattle Seahawks' top
draft pick, quarterback Rick Mirer,
and six other 1993 draft choices are
still not signed. Rookies and some
veterans report to camp Wednes-
day in Kirkland, Wash for physi-
cals. Mirer, of Notre Dame, was the
second player chosen in this year's
draft.
� NewOrleansSaintscoachJim
Mora said it could take the entire
preseason to decide on his No. 1
quarterback. Bobby Hebert left the
Saints during the offseason and
signed with Atlanta, leaving the
competition between Wade Wilson,
SteveWalsh and MikeBuck. "I don't
think it makes any difference what-
soever Mora said. "Our team is
comfortable with all three guys
� The Green Bay Packers will
have all their draft choices in camp
Wednesday when freeagents, rook-
ies and selected veteransreport.The
Packers spen t $30 million to bring in
defensive star Reggie White and six
other free agents in an attempt to
improve on a 9-7 finish last season.
� Wide receiver Andre Rison is
participating in Atlanta Falcons
workoutsdespiteacontractdispute.
Rison, who owns NFL records for
most catches in the first three years
(215)andfouryears(308)ofacareer,
feelshe'sworthasmuch money as
the Falcons paid some free agents
they signed during the offseason.
Also in Falcons camp was run-
ning teckEricDickerson, acquired
last week in a trade with the Los
Angeles Raiders.
Young, whohasnever missed
a day of training camp, made $25
million last season when he led
theNFLinpassingand wasnamed
the most valuable player. He
guided San Francisco to a league-
best 14-2 regular-season markand
a berth in the NFC championship,
where the 49ers lost, 30-20, to the
Cowboys.
"He was the MVP of the
league, which distinguishes him
from other people so that we're
probably lookingatacontract that
would bea little bit trend setting
Steinberg said from his Newport
Beach, Calif, office.
Carmen Policy, president of
the 49ers, did not return a phone
call seeking comment on the sta-
tus of the negotiations with Young.
Steinberg said he talked by phone
with Policy on Sunday and
planned to meet with him today
or Wednesday.
In Irving, Texas, Cowboys
coach Jimmy Johnsonwaspleased
with Aikman's workout
"He's much farther along than
what anybody ever anticipated. I
really feel optimistic and some-
whatrealisticthathe'll be there for
the opening ballgame Johnson
said.
Seles slowly
recovering
after stabbing
VAIL, Colo. (AP) � Monica
Seles is making a slow, steady
recovery from a stab wound in
the back, but isn't sure when she
will return to tennis or if she will
be able to defend her U.S. Open
title next month.
"She's continuing her reha-
bilitation, and there's no real ef-
fective way to anticipate when
she'll be ready to play again
Stephanie Tolleson, Seles' agent,
said. "She wants to be out on the
court, so that's obviously frus-
trating.
"But she's hanging in there
and working very hard, trying to
get healed so she can get back to
playing
Seles was ranked No. 1 in the
world when she was stabbed
April 30 during a tournament at
Hamburg, Germany. Later, the
knife-wielding German said he
was a Steffi Graf fan who wanted"
to knock Seles out of the No. 1
spot. Since then, Graf has taken
over the No. 1 ranking.
Seles has been undergoing
rehabilitation at the Steadman
Hawkins Clinic here.
In a statement Friday, her
doctors said: "Her shoulder con-
tinues to improve regarding mo-
tion and strength, and her im-
provement is monitored on a
daily basis
They said there is no time-
table in her rehab program, add-
ing that her shoulder "will let
her know when she will be able
to return to competition
Allison dies
after crash
CHARLOTTE (AP) �
Davey Allison died this morn-
ing of injuries he suffered
when a helicopter he was pi-
loting crashed in the infield at
Talladega Superspeedway.
The 32-year-old Allison
died at approximately 7:30
a.m CDT, according to a
woman who answered the
phone at Robert Yates Racing
in Charlotte.
Allison was born on Feb.
25, 1961. After watching his
father and uncle race on the
Winston Cup circuit, the
younger Allison made his de-
but in 1985, finishing tenth in
the Talladega 500.
Two years later, Allison's
performance was good
enough to earn him rookie of
the year honors. He started
that year by earning the out-
side pole for the 1987
Daytona 500, the youngest
driver ever to gain that dis-
tinction, and he closed the
year among the top 25 driv-
ers in the point standings.
In his 14th start on the
Winston Cup circuit, Allison
won the Winston 500. That
made him the youngest
driver to take a checkered
flag since Ron Bouchard cap-
tured the 1981 Talladega 500.
Of his 22 starts in 1987,
Allison got two victories,
nine top five finishes and ten
finishes in the top 10.
Allison captured five rac-
ing victories in 1991 and 1992.
His only victory this year
came at Richmond, and he
took third in last weekend's
Slick 50 300 in New Hamp-
shire.
Triangle loses hope
Minor leagues best bet for Raleigh,
Durham and Chapel Hill area
RALEIGH(AP)�TheTriangJe
area might as well be content with
the Durham Bulls, theRaleigh Flyers
and the IceCaps, because even the
strongest promoters of big-league
sportsdon'texpecttoseea teamhere.
"We'regoirigtobedinerentfrom
Charlotte in that regard said Jim
Goodmon, owner of the Durham
Bulls baseball team and Raleigh Fly-
ers soccer club. "It just wasn't in the
cards for us. We're going to be a
college-oriented area, which is good,
and have our minor-league proper-
ties.
"We're going toCharlotte to see
the NBA and maybe the NFL, and
that's the way it is. The major-league
pro teams are out of reach for us
Miles Wolff, former owner of
the Durham Bulls and owner of the
RaleighlceOpsprokshockeyteam,
concurs.
"What we have is what we're
going to have in the area. We are at a
top tier in college sports and at the
middle tier in professional sports.
There's nothing wrong with that
Wolff told The News & Observer of
Raleigh
There's a slight chance, Wolff
said, the NHL might look at the area
in the distant future if the league
expands and if a facility were avail-
able
"This is such a good sports mar-
ket That'sthe reason wetooka chance
on hockey he said. "If a sport is
promoted and marketed right,itwill
do all right"
Steve Bryantowner of theCaro-
lina Mudcats baseball team, said the
area's chances are poor for a major-
league baseball team unless a third
major league is created.
"We're pretty limited to what
wehavenow'hesaid. "We'repretty
much known for college sports and
minor-league baseball. I don't see
that changing
The difference is more than
just size. Charlotte, the Triangle
area and Winston-Salem have
about the same populations.
"But Charlotte is less frag-
mented and because if s one com-
munity, there's cohesiveness
there Goodmon said. "They're
all working together. Charlotte isa
can-do town. And Charlotte
doesn't have the college influence
mis area has. It could concentrate
more on a goal of professional
sports
Besicteitsfccus,Charlottehas
another advantage over Raleigh.
The Queen Gty is the corporate
headquarters for First Union,
NationsBankand DukePowerCo.
among other heavy hitters of fi-
nance. "They get behind projects
are! rriaketriem work Cxximon
said.
Raleigh attempted to bid for
an NFL expansion team just as
(ZhariottedkiButitwentoutlikea
candle in the wind.
"The total market statistics
hereare very similar toCharlotte's,
and we had access toa stadium (at
N.C State), so we said, lef s go for
it said Goodmon, who was in-
vorvedintheproject "Butwedidn't
havetiiecapitalandcorporatesup-
port to make it happen
Goodmon, president and
CEOofCapitol BroadcastingCorn-
pany Inc has worked to get the
Wghestlevdofprofessiorialsports
possible in the Triangle. He pro-
posed building Triangle Central
ParknearRategrHrDurhamairport
"Spcrtscannlybringacom-
munity together. That's why I
See TRI ANGLEpage 8
High
flying
Despite the
heat, some
people have
to play a
little volley
ball.
File Photo
wmmmmmmmf





July 14, 1993
jge7
-
Eddie (Payne, basketball coach) that
we would move this program for-
ward it it killed me. 1 think our
basketball team reached a peakand
gained our program respect
Hart said he is sure that the
future for ECU athletics will be an
' i suc-
lous challenge.
with
rogram)to
sful hut want to do it the
right i
"We've done a lot of g'xxi
things here, we have a lot of go
people who are committed collec-
tively to bringing about success.
We're achieving a lot of things that
people have said we couldn't do
TRIANGLE
Continued from page 7
d to build Triangle Central
be .ins thought it could bring
wind Durham together with a
facility that everybody could use,for
football, baseball, basketball, soccer,
hockey. tennis, with everybodypaj �
ing for it Goodman said.
The project didn't catch on, and
1 nangle Central Park is now on a
back burner, Goodmon said. Now
Gxidmon is building an $11 million
stadium for the Bulls in downtown
Durham scheduled to open in April.
With twominor-leaguebaseball
teams, the IceCaps, the Flyers and
World TeamTennis, the Triangle af-
fords sports fans a varied sports cal-
endar. And thearea remainsatop the
collegiate market with Duke, N.C.
State and NorthCarolina on the scene.
"We're not going to be the ma-
jor-league sports area in the state. So
we need to do the best in other areas
� great college sports and minor-
league teams�and make them bet-
ter Goodmon said.
"The Bulls, Mudcats, Flyers, the
Edge, the IceCaps are going to be
successful, and they give the area a
diversity of pro sports
And that's the way it is going to
be into the next century.
"Well have our minor-league
sports and take the train to Charlotte
to see the Hornets and an NFL team
if they get it Goodmon said.
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PIRATE FOOTBALL TABLOID 1993
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Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time � and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office. 200 W. 5th
Street
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O. Box !847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847. alt: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of
credit" from your parents' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
are as follows: , , . . . . �
with electric or wout electric
gas space healing or gas space heating
Electric OnlyS100S75
Electric & WaterS100S85
Electric. Water &. GasSI 10S85
Electric 8t GasS100S75
You can save time by mailing the deposit
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 14, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 14, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.951
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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