The East Carolinian, June 9, 1993







Lifestyle
Where Music's Going
Reviewer praises the
sounds of The Mighty
Mighty Bosstones,
Catherine Wheel, and
Mind Bomb. Story page 4
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 36
Circulation 5,(XX)
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, June 9,1993
10 Pages
Senate's tuition increase expected to pass
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
North Carolina college stu-
dents and their parents have been
closely watching one of the debates
now taking place in the state legisla-
ture to find out if they will have to
spend more on education.
The subject of the debate is
tuition increase and the concern is
money and education. Nancy
Herndon, of Rep. Charles
McLawhom'soffice in Raleigh, said
that there are two bills ma king their
way through the legislativedebates.
Each house passed its own
version of the tuition increase bill
late in May. The Senate passed a bill
that included a five percent increase
for all students enrolled in state-
owned universities. The Senate'sbill
also incl uded a $200 tui tion increase
for those students who go to the
state's research institutions, North
Carolina State University and the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
TheHouseofRepresentatives
passed a bill that included a five
percent increase in tuition for out-
of-state studentsand a three percent
increase for in-state students.
The Bill Status Department in
Raleigh reports that the bill isnow in
the Senate Appropriations Commit-
Let's
play!
Students take
time out of
their busy
schedules to
enjoy this
beautiful
day.
File Photo
Media Board provides avenue
to prevent further conflicts
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
(Editor's Note: This is the sec-
ond part in a two-part series.)
Good news! Contrary to
popular belief, you don't have
to sign your life away if you
work for a branch of the ECU
media.
ECU's radio station,
WZMB, received the official
"Declaration of Interests" form
Monday, said Greg Brown, stu-
dent media advisor.
The form is in response to
the conflict of interest dilemma
discovered at WZMB recently.
Former WZMB general
manager Tim Johnson wrote a
personal check in March to The
East Carolinian to pay for an ad-
vertisement promoting one of
two bands Johnson managed
outside of his WZMB employ-
ment. The ECU Media Board
ruled this a clear conflict of in-
terest.
The discovery of the per-
sonal check exposed other out-
side employment cases that
posed conflicts of interest.
The solution resulted in the
formal resignations of two em-
ployees.
WZMB employees will re-
ceive a "Declaration of Inter-
ests" form next week at their
staff meeting, Brown said.
Additional copies will be
distributed to the various stu-
dent media branches, probably
by the end of this week, Brown
also said.
The form reads, "I, the un-
dersigned, do hereby decla re my
current employment status
with, or other affiliation with,
any organizations outside the
East Carolina University stu-
dent rnedia.
Furthermore, I agree to in-
form the University Media
Board upon taking future em-
ployment or accepting member-
ship in any organization out-
side the ECU student media
The Media Board will re-
view each sheet for potential
conflicts and necessary action
will be taken.
The Board will follow the
guidelines as printed in the Uni-
versity Media Board Code of
Ethical Conduct which states,
"Staff members must not use
their association with the stu-
dent media for personal gain.
This specifically prohibits us-
ing the medium's name, or us-
ing a job position, to gain ad-
vantage in a private situation.
"Staff members should
See CONFLICT page 2
Visiting students take advantage of classes
Location and broader choices lure students to ECU
By Scott Vanhorne
Staff Writer
Summer school at ECU is
not just a time to catch up on
some classes. Students from
around the state take classes
in order to fulfill requirements
for their own universities or
just break the monotony of
summer.
Lori Liverman, a senior
from Chowan College, said
that she is going to ECU this
summer out of necessity.
Liverman has to complete lev-
els three and four in Spanish
in order to graduate next
spring. Chowan does not offer
Spanish during the summer,
so Liverman commutes from
her home town of Aulander,
an hour drive, to Greenville
for an 8 o'clock class every-
day.
"I like the school a lot,
but it's really hard to find a
place to park said Liverman.
Some visiting students
come to ECU because it is con-
venient. Lisa McNamee, a
Greenville resident and a
sophomore from Appalachian,
is taking a literature course in
order to fulfill a general col-
lege requirement. Since she
had to stay at home this sum-
mer, McNamee decided to use
her time to get ahead in school.
"I like Appalachian more
because the students there
seem to be more sociable said
McNamee.
Mary Beth Gray, a
sophomore at UNC Chapel
Hill, is also a resident of Green-
ville and is taking a philoso-
phy course this session. "If I
can get one of my perspective
classesoutof the way thissum-
mer, I'll be able to concentrate
on my major more next year
said Gray.
Gray also has a job work-
ing at the School of Medicine.
To get the job, she had to en-
roll in at least one summer ses-
sion.
Visiting students must
present statements from their
deans verifying that the
class(es) they want to take will
transfer, and that they are in
good standing with their
school. Visitors must also
present the Student Health
Center with an up-to-date
health certificate.
Since most schools do not
transfer grades, visiting stu-
dents take courses on a pass or
fail basis. They must make a C
or above in order to transfer
the credits. If the student
makes a D, the credits do not
transfer. However, any grade
made by a visiting student will
not affect their GPA.
tee.
"Itissuspected thattheSenate
version of the bill will pass
Herndon said. "However, they are
going to set up a joint conference
committee in the next week or two
with members of both the House
and the Senate
The last time the state ap-
proved a budget increase the final
resultswere not known until July or
August
During the past year the Col-
lege Democrats at ECU have been
working to build student opposi-
tionagainst the large tui tion increase
that was expected. State legislators
initiallyproposedanincreaseashigh
as 20 percent in tuition costs
"Overall the majorir if stu-
dents were apathetic said Bill
Gheen, vice-president of the Col-
lege Democrats. "But we did get
involved. It would be toobold to say
we kept the tuition increase low,
however they (legislators) knew
we were here. We made that cer-
tain
Gheen said he hoped that
students are able to see the impor-
tance of involvement in politics
by realizing the part his organiza-
tion may have played in keeping
the bill from reaching the high
numbers that were originally sug-
gested.
Fresh face graces WTTN
By Molly Perkins
Staff Writer
Since January 31, there has
been a new face on WITN's 6 and
11 o'clock news. A young woman
withabigsmiledeliversthenews,
jokes, laughs and chats it up with
Ben, Brad and Gary. Who is she?
Where is she from?
Her name is Crystal
Thornton and she grew up in To-
peka, Kansas, which explains the
fact that she has no southern ac-
cent. She attended the University
of Alaska at Anchorage, but
graduated from Eastern Michigan
University with a degree in Tele-
communication and Film. In 1990,
she interned at MGM studios at
Disney World in studio film pro-
duction.
How did a Mid westerner
who has lived in Alaska, Michi-
gan and Florida end up in eastern
North Carolina? Thornton's hus-
band isa pilotin the Marine Corps,
which brought them to Jackson-
ville, where Crystal Thornton got
a job as news director of Cool 98.7
radio station. Her job as
anchorwoman a t WITN is her first
job in television. She simply ap-
plied and got the job.
"It was all timing she said.
"I never said, T want to do this or
I want todo thatI just kind of fell
into it
Thornton's talents are very
diverse. She likes her job in televi-
sion but her first love is the the-
ater and acting. She did a lot of
acting in college plays and at
If you can
laugh at
yourself, then
the people
watching will
laugh with you
and not at you.
99
Crystal Thornton
Disney she played a cowgirl who
highjacks a tour guide. All of her
acting has been live, though she
would one day like to get into film
acting. In addition to acting,
Thornton also enjoys singing gos-
pel music.
Thornton said the hardest
thing abou t anchoring the nightly
news is reading another person's
script.
"I like to write my own
script she said. "But of course
time won't allow me to write all of
it
She explained that while
reading another person's script,
allof the sudden,a long or foreign
name or place will come upon the
TelePrompTer tha t she has no idea
how to pronounce, which can be
embarrassing.
"Each night on the air is full
of surprises Thornton said.
Her most embarrassing mo-
ment occurred during an emer-
gency broadcast when she was
forced to ad-lib the broadcast
because instead of usingher foot
pedal to make the
TelePrompTer go forwards, she
made it go backwards.
Thornton does not let mis-
takes worry her though. "Hey
she said, "if you can laugh at
yourself, then thepeoplewatch-
ing will laugh with you and not
at you
The person that Thornton
says she most admires in televi-
sion is Beverly Smith from BETs
talk show "Our Voices be-
cause she is so well-rounded,
intelligent and involved in her
community. Thornton said she
thinks of Smith as "the inter-
viewer and that the highlight
of her career was when she got
to "interview the interviewer"
as part of her job at Cool 98.7.
Thornton's philosophy on
life is simple. "1 am not one to
See THORNTON page 3
wm �� �M
lingering in the sunshine Students in front of the Flanagan Building soak up the sunshine. Flit Pholo
PCMH and Med School update phone facilities
By Laura Al lard
Staff Writer
The prefix of all phone
numbers at Pitt Memorial Hos-
pital and East Carolina Univer-
sity Medical School will change
from 551 to 816 on June 11, at 7
p.m.
"Because of continuing
growth at Pitt Memorial Hospi-
tal and ECU Medical School,our
existing telephone prefix-551 -
isfillingup said Tim Gilmore,
Carolina Telephone's district
commercial manager. "We are
adding a new group of numbers
with a new prefix
Carolina Telephone cur-
rently uses the 551 prefix for resi-
dential lines as well as the hos-
pital and medical school. The
816 prefix will be used only for
the more than 4000 lines used by
the hospital and medical school
and the 551 prefix will remain in
service for all other customers.
Because the numbers in-
volved are so widely circulated
and are often needed in emer-
gency situations, they will not
be re-issued until October 1994.
Paul Surles, corporate
communications assistant, said
that normally numbers are
held just until the phone com-
pany releases the next phone
book. In this case, the numbers
will be held for an extra year.
Until October 1994, calls to 551
numbers will be answered by
an operator.
These numbers will not
be released to new customers
until after 1994.
����a�wfl��i





Lifestyle
Where Music's Going
Reviewer praises the
sounds of The Mighty
Mighty Bosstones,
Catherine Wheel, and
Mind Bomb. Story page 4
Today
Tomorlo
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 36
Circulation 5,(KK)
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, June 9,1993
10 Pages
Senate's tuition increase expected to pass
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
North Carolina college stu-
dents and their parents have been
closely watching one of the debates
now taking place in the state legisla-
ture to find out if they will have to
spend more on education.
The subject of the debate is
tuition increase and the concern is
money and education. Nancy
Herndon, of Rep. Charles
McLawhorn's office in Raleigh, said
that there are two bills making their
way through the legislauvedebates.
Each house passed its own
version of the tuition increase bill
late in May. The Senate passed a bill
that included a five percent increase
for all students enrolled in state-
owned universities. The Senate'sbill
also included a $200 tuition increase
for those students who go to the
state's research institutions, North
Carolina State University and the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
The House of Representatives
passed a bill that included a five
percent increase in tuition for out-
of-statestudentsand a three percent
increase for in-state students.
The Bill Status Department in
Raleigh reports that the bill is now in
the Senate Appropriations Commit-
Let's
play!
Students take
time out of
their busy
schedules to
enjoy this
beautiful
day.
Rta Photo
Media Board provides avenue
to prevent further conflicts
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
(Editor's Note: This is the sec-
ond part in a two-part series.)
Good news! Contrary to
popular belief, you don't have
to sign your life away if you
work for a branch of the ECU
media.
ECU's radio station,
WZMB, received the official
"Declaration of Interests" form
Monday, said Greg Brown, stu-
dent media advisor.
The form is in response to
me conflict of interest dilemma
discovered at WZMB recently.
Former WZMB general
manager Tim Johnson wrote a
personal check in March to The
East Carolinian to pay for an ad-
vertisement promoting one of
two bands Johnson managed
outside of his WZMB employ-
ment. The ECU Media Board
ruled this a clear conflict of in-
terest.
The discovery of the per-
sonal check exposed other out-
side employment cases that
posed conflicts of interest.
The solution resulted in the
formal resignations of two em-
ployees.
WZMB employees will re-
ceive a "Declaration of Inter-
ests" form next week at their
staff meeting, Brown said.
Additional copies will be
distributed to the various stu-
dent media branches, probably
by the end of this week, Brown
also said.
The form reads, "I, the un-
dersigned, do hereby declare my
current employment status
with, or other affiliation with,
any organizations outside the
East Carolina University stu-
dent media.
Furthermore, I agree to in-
form the University Media
Board upon taking future em-
ployment or accepting member-
ship in any organization out-
side the ECU student media
The Media Board will re-
view each sheet for potential
conflicts and necessary action
will be taken.
The Board will follow the
guidelinesasprinted in the Uni-
versity Media Board Code of
Ethical Conduct which states,
"Staff members must not use
their association with the stu-
dent media for personal gain.
This specifically prohibits us-
ing the medium's name, or us-
ing a job position, to gain ad-
vantage in a private situation.
"Staff members should
See CONFLICT page 2
Visiting students take advantage of classes
Location and broader choices lure students to ECU
By Scott Vanhome
Staff Writer
Summer school at ECU is
not just a time to catch up on
some classes. Students from
around the state take classes
in order to fulfill requirements
for their own universities or
just break the monotony of
summer.
Lori Liverman, a senior
from Chowan College, said
that she is going to ECU this
summer out of necessity.
Liverman has to complete lev-
els three and four in Spanish
in order to graduate next
spring. Chowan does not offer
Spanish during the summer,
so Liverman commutes from
her home town of Aulander,
an hour drive, to Greenville
for an 8 o'clock class every-
day.
"I like the school a lot,
but it's really hard to find a
place to park said Liverman.
Some visiting students
come to ECU because it is con-
venient. Lisa McNamee, a
Greenville resident and a
sophomore from Appalachian,
is taking a literature course in
order to fulfill a general col-
lege requirement. Since she
had to stay at home this sum-
mer , McNamee decided to use
her time to get ahead in school.
"I like Appalachian more
because the students there
seem to be more sociable said
McNamee.
Mary Beth Gray, a
sophomore at UNC Chapel
Hill, isalsoa resident of Green-
ville and is taking a philoso-
phy course this session. "If I
can get one of my perspective
classes out of the way this sum-
mer, I'll be able to oncentrate
on my major more next year
said Gray.
Gray also has a job work-
ing at the School of Medicine.
To get the job, she had to en-
roll in at least one summer ses-
sion.
Visiting students must
present statements from their
deans verifying that the
class(es) they want to take will
transfer, and that they are in
good standing with their
school. Visitors must also
present the Student Health
Center with an up-to-date
health certificate.
Since most schools do not
transfer grades, visiting stu-
dents take courses on a pass or
fail basis. They must make a C
or above in order to transfer
the credits. If the student
makes a D, the credits do not
transfer. However, any grade
made by a visiting student will
not affect their GPA.
tee.
"Itissuspected thattheSenate
version of the bill will pass
Herndon said. "However, they are
going to set up a joint conference
committee in the next week or two
with members of both the House
and the Senate
The last time the state ap-
proved a budget increase the final
results were not known until July or
August
During the past year the Col-
lege Democrats at ECU have been
working to build student opposi-
tion against the large tui tion increase
that was expected. State legislators
initially proposed an increaseashigh
as 20 percent in tuition costs.
"Overall the majority of stu-
dents were apathetic said Bill
Gheen, vice-president of the Col-
lege Democrats. "But we did get
in volved. It would be too bold to say
we kept the tuition increase low,
however they (legislators) knew
we were here. We made that cer-
tain
Gheen said he hoped that
students areable to see the impor-
tance of involvement in politics
by realizing the part his organiza-
tion may have played in keeping
the bill from reaching the high
numbers that were originally sug-
gested.
Fresh face graces WITN
By Molly Perkins
Staff Writer
Since January 31, there has
been a new face on WITN's 6 and
11 o'clock news. A young woman
withabigsmiledelivers the news,
jokes, laughs and chats it up with
Ben, Brad and Gary. Who is she?
Where is she from?
Her name is Crystal
Thornton and she grew up in To-
peka, Kansas, which explains the
fact that she has no southern ac-
cent. She attended the University
of Alaska at Anchorage, but
graduated from Eastern Michigan
University with a degree in Tele-
communication and Film. In 1990,
she interned at MGM studios at
Disney World in studio film pro-
duction.
How did a Midwestemer
who has lived in Alaska, Michi-
gan and Florida end up in eastern
North Carolina? Thornton's hus-
band isa pilotin theMarineCorps,
which brought them to Jackson-
ville, where Crystal Thornton got
a jobasnewsdirectorof Cool 98.7
radio station. Her job as
anchorwomanat WITN isher first
job in television. She simply ap-
plied and got the job.
"It wasall timing she said.
"I never said, T want to do this or
I want todo thatI just kind of fell
into it
Thornton's talents are very
diverse. She likes her job in televi-
sion but her first love is the the-
ater and acting. She did a lot of
acting in college plays and at
If you can
laugh at
yourself, then
the people
watching will
laugh with you
and not at you. 99
Crystal Thornton
Disney she played a cowgirl who
highjacks a tour guide. All of her
acting has been live, though she
would one day like to get in to film
acting. In addition to acting,
Thornton also enjoys singing gos-
pel music.
Thornton said the hardest
thing abou t anchoring the nightly
news is reading another person's
script.
"I like to write my own
script she said. "But of course
timewon'tallowmetowriteallof
it
She explained that while
reading another person's script,
all of the sudden,a long or foreign
name or place will come up on the
TelePrompTer that shehasno idea
how to pronounce, which can be
embarrassing.
"Each night on the air is full
of surprises Thornton said.
Her most embarrassing mo-
ment occurred during an emer-
gency broadcast when she was
forced to ad-lib the broadcast
because instead of usingherfoot
pedal to make the
TelePrompTer go forwards, she
made it go backwards.
Thornton does not let mis-
takes worry her though. "Hey
she said, "if you can laugh at
yourself, then the people watch-
ing will laugh with you and not
at you
The person that Thornton
says she most admires in televi-
sion is Beverly Smith from BETs
talk show "Our Voices be-
cause she is so well-rounded,
intelligent and involved in her
community. Thornton said she
thinks of Smith as "the inter-
viewer and that the highlight
of her career was when she got
to "interview the interviewer"
as part of her job at Cool 98.7.
Thornton's philosophy on
life is simple. "I am not one to
See THORNTON page 3
lingering in the sunshine Students in front of the Flanagan Building soak up the sunshine. Fil� Photo1 1 1
A
lD �l
-AyJfVl
:��� J 'Yf- " '
1 ' �JS -
I �� �l ,
w iijy t
: "� 1 i v v 1
Hvu-i - h.mUv.v "��jMBW�"Pwwwr
PCMH and Med School update phone facilities
By Laura Allard
Staff Writer
The prefix of all phone
numbers at Pitt Memorial Hos-
pital and East Carolina Univer-
sity Medical School will change
from 551 to 816 on June 11, at 7
p.m.
"Because of continuing
growth at Pitt Memorial Hospi-
tal and ECU Medical School, our
existing telephone prefix-551 -
is filling up said Tim Gilmore,
Carolina Telephone's district
commercial manager. "We are
adding a new group of numbers
with a new prefix
Carolina Telephone cur-
rently uses the 551 prefix for resi-
dential lines as well as the hos-
pital and medical school. The
816 prefix will be used only for
the more than 4000 lines used by
the hospital and medical school
and the 551 prefix will remain in
service for all other customers.
Because the numbers in-
volved are so widely circulated
and are often needed in emer-
gency situations, they will not
be re-issued until October 1994.
Paul Surles, corporate
communications assistant, said
that normally numbers are
held just until the phone com-
pany releases the next phone
book. In this case, the numbers
will be held for an extra year.
Until October 1994,callsto551
numbers will be answered by
an operator.
These numbers will not
be released to new customers
until after 1994.
mmmmmm i n mim �iiik .i"





JUNE 9, 1993
CONFLICT
Continued from page 1
College students stay close to home
A recent study has determined that most OoHege students
attend school a small distance from their home. Conducted by
Ryder Consumer Truck Rental, the market research study sur-
veyed 1000 students at 15 different universities nationwide and
determined that 31 percent of the students surveyed lived within
100 miles of their home and 21.6 percent within 250 miles. The
survey also determined that 64 percent of the students attended
schools in their home state. The study reflected both graduate and
undergraduates.
Gay student housing decision de-
layed by Ohio State trustees
The Ohio State University board of trustees has delayed a
decision to allow gay and lesbian couples to move into family
housing at the University's "Buckeye Village The apartments,
reserved for married student couples, will possibly allow homo-
sexual couples to live on their premises tc be consistent with non-
discriminatorv policies for student housing. The new policy, origi-
nally planned to take effect on July 1, but public reaction prompted
the board to review the policy. University president Gordon Gee
said that public reaction, in some instances, was unjustified. "There
havebeenauesrionsabouttheuseoftaxdollars,even though there
are no tax or tuition monies involvedthere are some people who
just disagree with the decision, period To be qualified as a
domestic partnership, the gay and lesbian partners must prove
that they have been in a relationship for six months, have com-
bined incomes, and be responsible for the common welfare of their
partners.
Sexual harassment guide published
Campus faculty and administrators now have a guide defin-
ing what constitutes sexual harassment and its resulting punish-
ments. "The EducatorsGuide to Controlling Sexual Harassment
by Bemice Shandler and Michele Paludi, was published by Th-
ompson Publishing and aids colleges in evaluating their current
sexual harassment policies as well as covering the issues involved
with faculty sexual relations with students. The cost for the guide
and monthly bulletins is $287 and also contains information on
how to investigate harassment complaints.
Compiled by Warren Sumner. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
avoid involvement in public af-
fairs and other outside activi-
ties that could create a conflict
of interest or the appearance of
one.
"Staff members who are
also members of outside orga-
nizations should not be involved
in the news coverage of the or-
ganizations and should not use
their positions in the student
media to seek publicity or oth-
erwise promote an
organization's interests
A second issue brought to
the Board's attention concerned
a compact disc produced by
three VVZMB employees.
Tim Johnson, former gen-
eral manager, Kevin Brelsford,
former program director, and
Paul Meador, music director ap-
proached the board prior to the
CD's production to request per-
mission for WZMB to sponsor
the disc's production, Johnson
said.
After consulting with Uni-
versity attorneys, this request
was denied. Johnson said the
attorneys cited possible legal
action if the school sponsored
such a production.
Johnson, Brelsford and
Meador pursued the production
on their own. The result was a
compilation of music by local
bands, entitled Escape From the
Emerald City. The problem arose
when the Media Board discov-
ered WZMB's telephone num-
ber prinied on the CD's jacket.
The printed telephone
number associates ECU to the
CD, said Dr. Alfred Matthews,
vice chancellor of Student Life.
"The University is not
likely to pursue any legal action
against the students Matthews
said, "as those involved are no
longer working at WZMB
Brelsford and Meador said
they had no prior knowledge
that WZMB's phone number
would be printed, and attrib-
uted the inside writing to an
ECU student who has since
graduated.
"1 can see (the Media
Board's) point of view on this
Johnson said. "But itall depends
on how a person interprets the
phone number being there
Johnson said the number
was to provide the public with
access to the producers of the
CD, all of whom could be
reached at the WZMB office.
This was deemed a conflict of
interest by the Media Board, and
prompted the Media Board to
draft the ECU Media Board Dec-
laration of Interests. All students
interested in media employment
at ECU will be requested to fill
out such a form.
News writers meeting
today at 2:30. Assignments
for next week will be
given out. See ya.
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JUNE 9, 1993
vgraders charged in scheme to hurt teacher
arold stu-
Eli mt'iv
,lumbu.l "i were
ted Friday on disorderly con-
duct charges and released to their
parents' custody. The four beys
ami three girls were not identified
because of their age.
ispired to
eir teacher) be-
tnted to make them
. t i tiveMaj. John Wood
iciate uvenile Court
June Jones said the children
could face charge of conspiracy
to commit murder. A prosecutor
was to review the policecomplaints
today to decide how to proceed,
Jones said.
The unidentified teacher,
who has taught at Georgetown for
more than 21) vears, learned about
the scheme about a week ago as
rumors spread among the school's
697 students, said principal Carol
Hutcheson.
One girl is accused of bring-
ingcherrucalsfromnerhornechem-
istry set to slip into the teacher's
tea. A boy is charged with bringing
a handgun to school in his txxk
bag and a knife described as "big
and long No weapons were con-
fiscated.
The complaints also accuse
the students of trying to trip the
teacher in a stairwell.
A student who wasn't in-
volved told a counselor, who told
Hutcheson, who called police.
"It was serious enough that 1
felt we had to get the police in-
volved Hutcheson said. "I'm not
sure, in all honest) (the students)
would say'killbut there certainly
was concern they wanted to harm
her
The teacher was never con-
fronted with a weapon,and did not
get sick from the supposedlytainted
tea, Hutcheson said.The chemicals
were being tested, she said.
THORNTON
The East Carolinian 3
Continued from page 1
put mv views on someone else
she said. "I want to hear other
people's v lews. I believe that we
.ill have to agree to disagree, and
that we can all learn something
from each other
As for advice to ECU stu-
dents, Thornton said, "Beiieve in
yourself. Be persistent, patient
and have confidence that you can
achieve anything As for herself,
Thornton said that she likes living
and working in Eastern North
Carolina and plans to stay and
take the direction her career in
television is going, at least for
now.
"My degree has blos-
somed she said. "1 feel 1 am
developing and growing. I'm
just trying to learn as much as I
can
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Gunmen fire on United Nations military headquarters
(AF) � Gunmen fired on
the U.N. military headquarters
early today and peacekeepers
fought back with a machine-gun
barrage, keeping the city on
edge after a night of clashes.
The fighting, which began
Monday night, was the first
since Saturday, when 23 Paki-
stani soldiers were killed when
they were ambushed by Somali
street fighters in the capital.
Two Somalis died late
Monday in a gunbattle outside
Pakistani military headquar-
ters.
Before dawn today, snip-
ers using machine guns and
rifles began shooting at U.N.
military headquarters in the old
U.S. Embassy compound, said
U.S. Army Maj. David
Stockwell.
U.N. helicopters swooped
low over the city with search-
lights while U.N. troops fired
machine guns in the direction of
the snipers.
There were no reports of
casualties from the half-hour
firefight around U.N. headquar-
ters. Stockwell said the gunmen
apparently were firing from two
locations.
The helicopters continued
to patrol after sunrise today but
there were virtually no military
vehicles on the crowded streets.
Stockwell said sending
U.N. soldiers on foot or in ar-
mored personnel carriers
through the tense city could ag-
gravate the situation.
Barricadesand burned-out
cars littered the streets and for-
eign relief workers were no-
where to be seen, most having
been evacuated after Saturday's
firefight.
The bodies of the Paki-
stanis killed Saturday were to
be flown home today.
U.N. Secretary-General
Boutros Boutros-Ghali sug-
gested Monday that the Secu-
rity Council could set up a spe-
cial court to try Somalis blamed
for Saturday's ambush.
"The Security Council set
up a tribunal for war crimes in
Yugoslavia he said in Paris in
an interview with France 2 tele-
vision.
"We can easily create an
ad-hoc tribunal in Somalia to
condemn those who violated ac-
cords which they signed and
attacked soldiers of peace
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Remember the first time you.
climbed a set of stairs?
climbed that big tree in the backyard?
climbed the monkey bars at school?
Climb the Hard ROC Tower this summer.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
It's as easy as you remember.
Climbing Workshops
Sponsored by the Adventure Program staff, these 2 hour workshops are designed
for beginning climbers. The cost is $5 for students and $8 for facultystaff.
Workshops are offered daily at 4:00pm during both summer sessions. You MUST
enroll in a workshop to gain eligibility for a Pass Purchase.
Workshop registration is held In 204 Christenbury Gymnasium on Monday from 7:30am 1:30pm;
Tuesday & Thursday from 7:30arrv3:30pm; Friday from 7:30aml 1:00am. Register at the Recreational
Outdoor Center in 117 Christenbury Gym on Monday from 1:30pmS:30pm Tuesday & Thursday from
3:30pm5:30pm; Friday from 11 rOOarrvl:30pm.
Drop-In Supervised Climbing
Purchase a climbing day or semester pass for
"bouldering" in an informal setting. After successful
completion of a Climbing I Workshop, climbers are
eligible to purchase these passes at th? following
prices:
Day Pass:
Session Pass:
Student: $1.00
FacultyStaffGuest:
$2.00
Student: $10.00 per session
FacultyStaffGuest: $15.00 per session
The Hard ROC
Tower is open
for Drop-In
Climbin
Wedn
4:00pnv7:00pm
and is located
behind the Belk
Allied Health
Building.
ForaddMona) information regarrJng Hard ROC Tower I
Uw��yamaidigtao�fcredbyBCU
the Recreational Outdoor Center or any of
" Services, cal 757-6387.
Attention Student
Organizations
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
�Increase enrollment in your organization
�Increase awareness of programs offered by your organization
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU has to
offer them
DATES
June 14,17,21,28
July 1,8
TIME
11-1
LOCATION
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
(Exception July 18-Social Room)
CALL the SGA Office to Reserve Your Booth
757-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 4
'Where Music's Going three bands with direction
By Mark Brett
Photo courtesy ot Mercury Records
Hie Mighty Mighty Bosstones
Staff Writer
SummertimeintheEmeraldGty:
a hot, sticky, sweaty mess of a time.
Qasses blink by, beneath our aware-
ness as we slowly sink into the fleshy
mellow morass that is Greenville in
thesummer. A good time to get lightly
drunk and have sex with an a ttractive
stranger on a moonlit fouton. Or, if
you' re out of condoms, a good time to
1 isten to some music while you wring
that humid Greenville air out of your
shirt
Which brings us to our real topic
of conversation today, a keen little
sample EP from Mercury Records
called "WhereMusic'sGoingOf the
five songs featured here,threeare nice
little numbers showcasing a rich iinix
of alternative rock styles. Good sum-
mer listening; chill out, love your fel-
low man, thatsort of thing. Well getto
those.
But first, we need to take out the
trash. We've got a couple of Seattle
Sound posers in the mix here, and I'd
like to dispense with their Forty-Dol-
lar-Grungewear-Flannel-Flashing
butts immediately. The groups are
Greta and Animal Bag. They suck.
Greta isagutlessSoundgardenrip-off
outfit with absolutely no redeeming
qualities.
Animal Baghasatleasttried some-
thing different the grunge in their
"Everybody" does have a nice funky
edge. Unfortunately, they've fallen
back on too many '70s rock guitar
conventions and a vocal delivery that
recalls Rick James' "Superfreak If
you're not laughing by the end of this
one,stoplisteningandgoleam"where
music used tobe" soyou can play with
the grown-ups.
Okay, the angry part of the re-
view is over; so now we can get on
with thaf'loveyour fellow man"stuff.
Let's start with the Mighty Mighty
Bosstones' "Someday I Suppose
What can I say? Music would be well-
served togohere. The Bosstones mixa
growly punk rock kick into Ska's
Polka Reggae Big Band stew for an
explosive, though tful effect. This is the
kind of music that makes you scream
and holler and jump around. It's bub-
bly cuddly fun with a rusty knife in
the middle!
On the other end of the spec-
trum, Catherine Wheel offers the
dream-like "Black Metallic" This is
crie with the air ofDeath-Rockabout
it, which means that all those wil-
lcvy,seriouskidsintheblackdothes
will really dig it when they're doing
Ecstasy and tryingtofitintotheRave
scene this summer.
Finally, we see mat music isalso
goingtoMind Bomb and their offer-
ing, "Do You Need Some?" Thisone
twists off into some breathy funky
grinding variations on that old de-
mon Seattle Sound. Mind Bomb
avoids the problems of other SS.
bands, by achieving keyboards at
appropriate moments. In other
words, they're interesting.
So Ismusicgoingtotheplaces
exposed here? Hell, who knows?
Certainly not the dip-on ponytail
record execsthatputthisEPtogether.
And certainly not me. Call the Psy-
chicPals Hotline if you wanna know
the future. 111 be hip degp in that
sopping wet Greenville summer.
Don't Run My Life
by Richard Cranium
I had the bowel-wrenching
pleasure of discourse with some
politically and socially correct
hutrons the other day. One said to
me, "Dick, what's with this 'Don't
Run My Life' stuff? Don't you
think you might offend someone?
You sure seem to pick on a lot of
people. Golly, thatadviceyou give
blah blah blah naggety nag nag
Andonitgoes. Ofcourse,Ijustput
my footin their ass and said, "Don't
run my life
I don't get it. Why do some
people always want to get in my
face, acting and thinking like they
know more than I do? Espedally
these "correct" people. Sheesh. I
mean, you and I both know the
Cranium knows almost every-
thing. I am a certified superior
intellect.
So let's try this. Here is the
offidal Don't Run My Life IQ Test.
It's short, so take it. Write your
answers down; if you keep them in
your head, you're cheating.
1) Whatisahutron?
2) Three Chinamen find an
egg in a gutter. The egg is brown
wirhlittlespecklesonit. Whokeeps
it, the oldest, or the youngest?
3) Rudy has three kittens: two
black, one gray. Rudy's sister,
Maya, wants a pet. Is it farther to
the moon or by bus?
4) If three adults and six kids
were going to play a game of touch
football, how should the teams be
divided?
5) Sharon has a pack of juju
beans. If the standard deviation is
plus or minus one above or below
the mean, 1 mean median, or what-
ever, how many jujus must Sharon
eat?
6) Would you rather bea tiger,
a lion or a pair of Wrangler jeans?
7) My Rice Krispiesare talking
to me, what are they saying?
8) In 1865, General Robert E.
Lee su rrendered his bra ve and cou-
rageous army to the treacherous,
heinous Yankees. Reconstruction
began soon afterand lasted til 1890.
How many years did it take the
Republicans to cast the once-glori-
ous South into a cesspool of eco-
nomic ruin, a disastrous boil still
festering in the country more than
a century later? Thank you
Abraham Lincoln, W. T. Sherman,
Ulysses Grant, and Andrew
Johnson! You couldn't just let us
seceed peacefully could you!? Oh
no! You killed Kennedy!
And there you have it. Now.
Each time your answer corre-
sponds with mine, give yourself
five points. If you didn't answer a
question, give yourself zero. And
if you answered wrong, minus five!
1) Hutron is the term for po-
ll ticallyand socially correct people.
Since we can no longer say "man
humans become hutrons. What a
glorious and sexless society these
nugget-heads want to build for us.
Double your score if you hate
hutrons.
2) Why would a person of Far-
Eastern descent want an egg out of
the gutter? This isa racial slur! The
question should be thrown out!
Also, if there were three of them,
why did the question involve only
two? Theanswerisobvious. Since
thediscriminating factor deals with
age, the implication is that the third
Chinaman is ageless. Therefore,
he is Fu Manchu. The presence of
a fictional character renders the
question null and void. So you
should not have answered the
question twice.
3) An interesting and dubious
question, but a simple one. As
siblings, Rudy and Maya should
be able to harmoniously share and
eat the kittens as they will, espe-
dally during the lunar phase of
mass transit Bonus pointsifyou've
ever peed your name in the snow.
4) It depends how many girls
there are. Everybody knows girls
See CRANIUM page!
'Jurassic Park' anxiously
awaited by audiences
Staff Reports
Also marks debut of Digital
Theater sound System
The East Carolinian
It's the most highly antici-
pated film of the decade and it is
sure to shockand thrill audiences
everywhere. Based on the best-
selling novel by MichealCrichton,
Jurassic Park asks the question:
What if man and dinosaur shared
the earth rgain? The answer is
easy man would become ex-
tinct.
Jurassic Park stars Sam Neill
as Dr. Alan Grant, a renowned pa-
leontologist who is asked to in-
spect the spectacular Jurassic Park;
Laura Dern as hiscolleage, Dr. Ellie
Sartler; Jeff Goldblumasa brilliant
but eccentric and cynical mathema-
tician whose Chaos Theory ex-
plains the danger of the island's
project;SirRichard Attenbourough
as John Hammond, the park's am-
bitious developer; and an award-
winning design team who have
created the most realdinosaursever
seen on screen.
The release of Jurassic Park
also marks the debut of a new
digital theater sound system
called DTS(DigitaI TheaterSys-
tem). DTS differs from other
digital systems in that its digital
soundtrack is on a separate CD-
ROM disk while a digital time
code is printed on the film itself
controlling the CD opperation.
The new DTS not only dramati-
cally increases the quality of
sound but is compatible with
existing theater sound systems.
Today. Testicular Cancer
Answered by Jennifer Phillips
Student Health Center

and
The Moody 'BCues
Order your tickets from Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall, 757-4788
Join ECU Student Union for a special trip
to Hardee's Walnut Creek to hear in
concert the Moody Blues and the NC
Symphony. Total trip cost: $20. Departs from
Mendenhall at 5 p.m Friday, June 18
Question:
What are my risks as a college
student of developing testicular
cancer and can 1 prevent it?
Answer:
Testicular cancer is most com-
mon among men aged 15-34. Men
who have undescended or partially
descended testiclesareparticulary
at risk.
Usually, the first sign of tes-
ticular cancer is a slight enlarge-
ment of one of .the testes and the
formation of a massorlump. (Note:
Most men are not perfetfly sym-
metrical. It is common for one of
the testicles to be slightly larger.)
There is often a dull ache in the
lower abdomen and groin, accom-
panied by a sensation of heavi-
ness. However, there may be no
pain at all.
The National Cancer Soci-
ety recommends that
men perform regular
monthly self-exami-
nations of the tes- .
tides. The best time
to perform the exam (
is after a warm
shower. Place the
thumbsof both hands
on top the testicle and �&
fingers on the underside. Gen-
tly roll the testicles between the
thumb and fingers. A healthy tes-
ticle should be fairly smooth and
firm in consistency. If hard lumps
a
or nodules are detected, see a
health professional immediately.
Thereare individual variations in
the consistency of testicular tis-
sue, so it is important to
become familiar with
f your own anatomy in
order to note
"T changes.
Over the years,
treatment has be-
0 come extremely suc-
!�, cessful with early de-
"Vl tection of a problem. Stud-
ies indicate that men often de-
lay seeking treatment for fear of
sexual performance problems.
Sexual complications rarely oc-
cur as a result of testicular cancer.
'Menace II800161 assured to awake America
Follows same lines as 'Boyz 'N the Hood'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
In the summer of 1991, a film
by a young black director named
John Singleton exploded onto mul-
tiplex screens to presenta poignant,
poetic picture of life in South Cen-
tral Los Angeles. The film was Boys
'N the Hood.
In the summer of 1993, another
filmhasarrived to remind America
that it must never know what exists
in LA. � that film is Menace II
Society.
Though comparisons between
the films may be unwelcome, the
similarities are too great to ignore.
Both films try to realistically por-
tray life in the black inner city. Both
films focus on one main character
(Cuba Goodmg Jr. in Boyz, Tyrin
Turner in Menace). Both directors
are young novices in the world of
cinema (John Singleton was 24 at
tiie time, the Hughes brothers are
21).
Allen and Albert Hughes are
twins who worked together both
on the screenplay and on the direc-
torial chores of Menace II Society.
Together they have brought a
shared vision to the screen in bleak,
brutal,and ultimately artistic terms.
Mertace II Society begins the
same way Boyz 'N the Hood did,
with harsh language heard over a
black screen. Like Boyz, much of the
first part of Menace occurs in the
past
The narrator, Caine (Tyrin
Turner), tells of his criminal father
and drug addicted mother. He tells
how "Pop was killed inadrugdeal"
and "Mom died of an overdose
Caine vas reared by his grand-
parents who tried toassist Caine by
teaching him the ways of religion.
Buthisgrandfather'swords "went
in one ear and out the other
As the story shifts to thepresent,
Caineisseenpreparingtograduate
from high school. Hisgrandparents
are proud of him but Caine's ex-
pressions make it dear that the
achievement means little to him.
Unlike the protagonist in Boyz
'N the Hood, Caine neither despises
nor fears the streets on which he
was raised, although by the end of
the film he is ready to try to begin a
new life in Atlanta (the same dty
the hero of Boyz went to).
Caine deals drugs, commits
robbery and before the final reel,
becomes a murderer. Yet this
troubled youth appears sympa-
thetic to the viewer.
The violence in Menace II Soci-
ety occurs as clips that fade in, then
fade to black. In between the black-
ness intense scenes are played out
�many end ingwith spilled blood.
The episodic nature of the fil m
plays more like a documentary than
a character study. This is the point
where Boyz and Menace begin to
diverge. While Boyz was gripping
for its intense characters, Menace is
gripping because of its intense
scenes. Meriace, for this reason, does
not hold togetherasafilmaswellas
Boyz although it does coalesce as a
sodal statement.
Singleton may express more
poetry in his story but the Hughes
brothers still exhibit an amazing
artistic control. In one scene a five-
yearold, lying in his bed, asks his
mother if Caine will live. The
Hughes slxxit the discussion from
the foot of the bed so that the audi-
ence looks through the spindles of
the bed frame. The shot creates the
effect of a crib, heightening the in-
nocence of the boy's question.
In another especially effective
sequence, Cainewatches Jf'sfl Won-
derful Life with his grandparents.
As the tearful ending unfolds on the
screen, Caine'sfacemakesclear that
this scene iscompletely alien to him.
Capra's vision of an ideal family
cannot speak toCaine, the real world
outside the 1 i ving room looms much
too immediately dangerous.
Another magnificent asset ex-
hibited in Menace II Society is the
film's lack of pretentiousness. Never
does the film find fault. Every
character's actionsare understand-
able in light of the circumstances.
Even when Caine hangs up on
a girl who claims that he sired her
unborn baby, the audience under-
stands him. His actions cannot be
judged too harshly, if at all. He
simply responds toa situation the
way he knows how. Little time is
spent thinking about the past be-
cause the present affords no time
for it.
Menace II Society gels as an
artistic whole. The film disturbs
conventional sensibilities by bring-
ing the audience to the front line in
an ongoing battle in the inner cit-
ies. Though difficult at times to
watch, Menace II Society is one of
the most important films released
so far this year.
Though no answers are given
or sought in the film, the problem
is made painfully dear. Though
sand and sun may fill most of the
summer, every American needs
to spend some time thinking about
this extremely powerful film.
MnmnHnm





TheEastCaroRnian
mm
For Rent
liable
. vailable within
walkingdistanceorbi
pus. Ca 11 usand tell us vour needs 752-
1375 Homelocators fee ($60)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
apartment 1 2 block from Art Bldg ?
blocks from downtown, and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great for art stu-
dents. Call 757-1947.
104 MANHATTAN - Three blocks
from Sigma Tau Gamma house be-
tween Chestnut and Dickinson Ave.
Two bedroom house (maybe three),
living room, dining room, renovated
kitchen and bathroom, window unit
A.C. No pets. S330 per month. First
and last month plus S200 cleaning de-
posit. Available now wlease. Refer-
ences required 355-5150
108 PARIS. Two blocks from Sigma
TauGamma House between Dickinson
Classifieds
�j
For Rent
eal
earning
deposit w, lease required Available
now. Fenced in backyard for garden
and kids References required. 355-
5150.
ATTENTION STUDENTS. Three
bedroom house in University Area for
$450mo. Call 757-311
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
from July 1st to Dec 31,1993. $150.00
rent, 12 utilities 6 blocks from cam-
pus. Call 757-1372 after 9:00 p.m.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases lor
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
1 Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
U Roommate Wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Older college student preferred. SI 60a
Announcements
I Roommate Wanted
month and half all other expenses. Call
355-8063
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share two bedroom apartment close to
campus. Available July 1. Low utilities.
Water and cable included in rent. Non-
smoker preferred. Call Jeri at 758-8836.
For Sale
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DE A. Available your area
now. Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
FOR SALE: 2,3-way, 150-watt Fisher
Speakers, verv nice condition. $180 .
Call 752-6223
ALPINE 5905CD.player,pullouttype
for$l 80 and Alpine equalizer for $140,
callafter6:00Pm. 752 2596
TWIN MATTRESS and Boxspring,
S30; Loveseat, S30; Entertainment cen-
ter, 515; End table, S10. Call 757-0412.
REFRIG ER ATOR for sa le. S50.0u. Call
758-5017 or leave a message.
For Sale
1984 AUDI 5000S. Smoke gray; Body
and interior excellent condition; runs
good.Call758-4821 after 7:00PM; S2000
or best offer
MOVING- must sell. 5 pc. cherrv and
oak bedroom set $�0.00. Call 919-946-
9653.
1992 18" GT Avalanche Mtn Bike -
S600.199018"GTAvalancheMtnBike
- S450. 6'10" Action surfboard - S200
1987 CR 250 dirtbike - best. 9'6" surf-
board package - best. Call William at
830-1479
Sfl Help Wanted
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many posi-
tions. Great Benefits. Gill 1-800436-4365
ext.P-3712.
JOIN FELLOW EAST CAROL1N ALA-
DIES making HXTsa day escortingin the
Greenville area. Must have own trans-
portation, own phone and outgoing per-
sonality; m ust be very self conscious and
well groomed. We offer flexible hours to
workaroundclassesandnights. Formore
information call pager 757-5657. All
information held in strictest confidence.
Page 5
iEsaassH i - mnm.umm
EASY WORK! Excellent pay! Assemble
productsathome. Call toll free 1-800467-
5566 ext. 5920.
MOTHERS HAS CHANGED OWN
ERSHIP and is looking for enthusiastic
entertainers! EasySSandexcellenthours
Gill Alex at 734-3777after 12 noon M-F.
SUMMER CONSTRUCTION WORK-
ERS Applyin person from6:30to7:30at
Farrior & Sons, Inc Hwy 264 Alternate
West, Farm vi lie, North Carolina.
RESPONSIBLE live-instudentneeded;4
hrs daily of caring and driving for older
gentleman. Room , board and $200
monthly. 355-1399 before 9 P.M.
ssssssssssssssss
APPLY NOW
$9.25 to Start
Vector has summer
openings in Raleigh
area. Ideal for college
students. For details
call 782-8006.
SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
HANG GLIDE AT NAGS HEAD,
NORTH CAROLINA! For a Week-
end or a week of ad venture and fun!
Kitty Hawk Kites' beginner hang
gliding lesson $49 per person (show
college ID). 1-800-334-4777. Sun
Realty's modern beach cottages $250
per weekend or 350 per week (plus
applicable taxes, fees and security
deposit). 1-800-3344745. Offergood
through early May 1993. Call today
foravailabilities. (Somerestrictions
apply).
CHILD CAR SERVICES! Elem. Ed.
major available A.M. hours - eve-
nings and weekends negotiable.
Love children. Have experience and
references! Kris - 752-3501. Leave
message!
no
Personals
MISSING CAT since 5-5-93. Avery
StRiverarea. Neutered male. Grey
tabby wblack stripes. Short hair.
Reward for return or info leading to
return. Have photos, video, vet.bills
for positive id. 355-9423 days. 752-
6975 weekend. Answers to Charlie.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Climb High this summer! The
Hard Roc tower will be open for
climbing workshops and drop-in
supervised climbing both 1st and
2nd summer sessions. Drop-in
passes may be purchased Mon-Fri
and Sundaysfor$l.tX)perday. Pur-
chase a semester pass for $25.00.
Climbing workshops introd uce us-
ers to the sport of rock climbing and
reapphangiixludingbelaysystems,
bouldering, movement techniques
and equipment Workshops a re of-
fered for $5.00 for a two hour ses-
sion. Call Recreational Services at
757-6911 for more details.
GOLDEN KEY NATION AI
HONOR SOCIETY
Golden Key Members - meet-
ings will continue throughout the
summer, 3rd Wed. of each month,
3:00 pm, in GC 3006. Be a part of our
many activities. Don't miss
September's pizza party
PARENTS WITHOUT
PARTNERS
The Greenville Chapter of Par-
en ts Without Partners will hold their
monthly meeting on Thursday, J une
17 at 6:30 pm. Orientation will begin
at 730 pm. The meeting will take
placeattlx?Firet Presbyterian Church
located on the comer of 14th and
Elm Streets.
NEWMAN CATHOIIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center invites the summer students
&gueststoworshipwiththem.Sun-
day masses: 1130 A.M. & 830 P.M.
(followed by refreshments) at the
Newman Center, 953 E. 10th Street,
right next to the East end of the
campus. Join usalsoon Wednesday
evenings for Mass at 530 P.M. fol-
lowed by fellowship. For further in-
formation, call Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-
1991.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
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merrtsSexSkriofTheEiEtCarrjfaantoSst
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canceJedbefore 1 Oajnthedaypriorto
publication; however, norefundswill
begiven.
Formore
information call
757-6366.
Yer dam tootin As promised, we at Pirate Comics have got all the poop
on the gargantuan Heroes Convention in Charlotte starting this Friday
the 1 lth through the 13th! The Con (heh! I'm usiri comics lingo - dig me!)
will be at the Holiday Inn Center City, 230 North College St. in of course,
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the guest list Bo Hampton, Dick Giordano, Dave Sim, Richard Case,
Mark Bagely, Adam Hughes, and George Perez, are just some of the
dozens of guests slated to attend! Admission is $10 a day or get a 3 day
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hotel number is (704) 335-5400. There. You don't have an excuse, you
know about it now, so get off yer can and get there!
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L rTTLE, TAIL Oki A "





t'ln�lt 11 ��
June 9,
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
Ridins the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
WedncsdayOpinion
wzmb violates ethics policy I Car alarms erupt into noisy frenzies of panic
Three station employees
receive a tough lesson about
conflicts of interest
It's all about what you love the most. When
you were a kid, you had to choose which favorite
toy would go with vou to the restaurant. When
you grow up, it's no different. Except, in the world
of business, not choosing could cost you your job.
Recently, three employees of WZMB were
given a lucky break considering the seriousness of
their actions. A check written by the former gen-
eral manager paid for an advertisement promot-
ing one of the two bands he was managing ou tside
of WZMB employment.
In addition to this, the program director and
music director were found to have been manag-
ing, promoting and booking club dates for two
bands with the former general manager.
When everything went public, the three men
were given options: they could cease managing
the bands, cease employment at WZMB or ad-
dress the Media Board and request permission to
continue both activities. What they decided really
isn't important (two resigned, while the remain-
ing WZMB employee remained). The really amaz-
ing thing is that the Media Board gave them the
options. Your ass would be long gone in the real
world, kids.
The ECU Media Board was more than gener-
ous with their terms. According to the ethics policy
adopted by the University, "Staff members are
prohibited from using their positions in the stu-
dent media and the influence of the student media
to benefit any outside employment enterprise.
Any outside employment that creates, or gives the
appearance of creating, a conflict of interest is
prohibited
No fancy legal jargon; just straight-forward
talk. Don't involve yourself with another business
venture if it will interfere or influence the place
you already call home.
The conflict of interest is not that the former
employees have given special treatment to the
bands, it's that the possibility of giving them spe-
cial treatment is a factor. The line is a very fine one
to distinguish.
To avoid conflicts from happening in the fu-
ture, The Media Board has plans to distribute a
form to every branch of the university media. It
will ask each student to list any and all outside
employment, whereupon the Board will deter-
mine any potential conflicts of interest.
This really is not the worst thing that could ever
happen to those who work in student media. In fact,
it allows for a more focused group, capable of serving
the East Carolina community more efficiently.
Journalists and media-involved folk have had
just about enough of all the talk about dishonesty
in the press. It's disheartening to think that when
asked, most of the public would slander a fine
institution such as student media, simply because
we are part of a larger, more corrupt, national
media.
The Media Board has brought an issue public
that was screaming to be dealt with. It allows all of
us the opportunity to check our own tracks. How
many times have you tried to do two things at
once, only to find that one action is detrimental to
the other? There is a valuable, necessary lesson to
be learned here.
Don't try to sneak that other toy into the
restaurant. You'll more than likely receive a wallop
for your efforts.
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielsou, Lifestyle Editor
Julie Totten, Asst. lifestyle Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor
Misha Zonn, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Rhonda Owens, Copy Editor
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycock, Layout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst. Layout Manager
Tony Chad wick, Creative Director
Cedrk Van Burcn, Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more informa
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
"You are standing too close
to the vehicle. Please step away.
An alarm will sound in ten sec-
onds. Whoop! Whoop! "
Have you ever been walk-
ing through a parking lot, just
minding your own business,
when suddenly, some uppity,
snooty car starts talking to you?
Well, admonishingyou is a better
phrase, I suppose.
It has happened to me on
numerous occasions. Itseemsthat
more and more people are in-
stalling car alarms with each pass-
ing day, many of them with "prox-
imity alarms
The fdet that no one trusts
anyone around their car nowa-
days doesn't really surprise me.
What does surprise me is that
some of the cars sporting expen-
sive alarm systems aren't worth
stealing. Call me stupid, but I fail
to understand the logic behind
putting a $300 alarm system in a
car worth $250. Are these people
afraid that someone's going to
steal their pine tree air freshen-
ers
Some people treat their
alarms as expensive toys. One
night as I was returning from
downtown, this guy sitting at his
window with obviously nothing
better to do activates his car a larm
as I'm walking by it, probably in
some childish attempt to scare
me. Now being a true '90s kinda
gu y, I 'm used to tha t sort of th i ng,
it didn't scare me a bit and I pleas-
antly flipped the guy off and went
about my business.
This brings me to my larg-
est point: no one cares when an
alarm goes off. Asa society, we've
grown accustomed to hearing au-
tomotivedistresssignalsemanat-
ing from parking lots everywhere,
and most of us tune them out.
Even if we do hear them, all they
do is cause irritation and the de-
sire to strangle the inconsiderate
owner who for some reason re-
fuses to turn it off. Just how many
of us would risk our necks to save
someone else's car in the event of
a break in that the owner was
unable to respond to?
Many owners cling to the
belief that their alarms will al-
waysalertthemintheeventofan
emergency .This is simply not the
case. On several occasions, I have
been awakened and kept awake
by ala rms that continued to sound
until the batteries of the cars
(much to my wicked delight) have
expired. Obviously, the alarms
weren't enough to awake these
unfortunate owners, and they
seem just a tad self-defeating.
Having a formerly noisy car that
won't start in the morning seems
a dubious comfort.
Besides that, there are cer-
tain "wicked elements" (myself
among them) who delight in
standing too close to these ve-
hicles or kicking them in the tire
for the exact purpose of sending
the car, and subsequently the
owner of the car, into a noisy
frenzy of panic. It's a harmless
pastime, and an infinitely amus-
ing one, plus it doesn't cost any-
thing. I would certainly recom-
mend it to anyone, as long as
you're fast enough to flee from
irate car owners.
My main point is this:
don't bother getting a car alarm
unless you've got a Corvette or
something comparable. You
could probably replace what-
ever was taken or damaged for
the cost of an alarm plus instal-
lation costs, so why bother?
You'd only be able to look for-
ward to dead batteries, innu-
merable false alarms (particu-
larly during thunderstorms),
and assholes like me who enjoy
setting them off for no reason,
other than it canbe really funny,
depending on the outcome of
the situation. So save your
money, kids, especially if you
drive a Gremlin or the like. Buy
a cool set of rims, or better yet,
save your pennies and buy a
better car (especially if you
drive a Gremlin.)
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza, and
watch some cartoons.
FUN SEEKING ON THE
BIZ2AR0 WORLD
QuoteoftheDay
When you prevent me from doing anything I want to do,
that is persecution; but when I prevent you from doing
anything you want to do, that is law, order and morals.
George Bernard Shaw
2
IN)
Letters to the Editor
Tailgater taps into frustrations concerning keg ban
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Joseph Horst, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
To the Editor:
I am writing this letter
about the asinine idea to ban
kegs from tailgating. If you
think it will limit the drinking
tha t goes on at tailgating, think
again. The only thing that it
will cause are problems. If you
consider how much beer is con-
sumed at tailgating, then imag-
ine the number of empty cans
and bottles that will be left on
the ground; you see that ban-
ning kegs only causes trash
problems. The only person I
can see benefiting from this
policy is the recycler who picks
up all the cans. The University
of South Carolina has a no-keg
policy. When I wasdown there
for the game last year, I could
not believe how trashy their
tailgating field looked (even
before I stepped on a broken
beer bottle).
If the members of the
Safety Task Force think that
drinking out of a can will re-
duce the risks of fighting, they
had better try again. People
will still drink as much beer
and they will still get in as
many fights. Instead of hitting
a person with their fists, now
they will be hitting mem over
the head with glass bottles. I
don't know about you, but I
would rather be hit by a fist
instead of a bottle.
To prove my point about
drinking outof a keg; if you go
to a bar downtown on any
giver weekend, people are
drinking outof cans and bottles
and I would estimate that
there are at least three to five
fights a night in all the bars
combined. So that pretty much
shoots the keg theory.
All I know is that I am a
senior at ECU and some of the
best times I can remember here
at East Carolina have been my
afternoons on the tailgating
field. Outlawing the use of
kegs is only going to cost the
students more money (money
they are willing to spend) and
cause many trash problems
for everyone else. I think
tilings have gone well in the
past and in my opinion, "If it
ain't broke, don't fix it
Steven P. Vollinger
Senior
Communications
Letters to the Editor must be signed and accompanied
with a working daytime phone number. Students must
also provide class rank and major. Any letters not
following this criteria will not be printed; letters may
also be edited for sake of brevity, decency and content.
AH Letters to the Editor should be addressed to: The
East Carolinian, Attn Opinion Editor, Student Pubs.
Building, Second Floor, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858.

By T. Scott Batchelor
Shark swimming
emerges as new
neurotic pastime
I watched "I Witness Video" Sunday
night. What I saw, coupled with the Barney
phenomenon sweeping the nation, made me
realize that America is on the verge of a na-
tional nervous breakdown.
The latest craze of the adrenaline-defi-
cientamongusistofind sharksand swim with
them. That's right, people willingly don
SCUBA gear and jump into an ocean teeming
with hungry sharks. How do I know they're
hungry? Sharks, as anyone who saw "jaws"
knows, are always hungry. Eating is one of
only three things sharks do, according to Matt
Hooper(Richard Ereyfuss)of the Woods Hole
Oceanographic Institute. The other twothings
are swim and "make little sharks
What kills me about this new and dan-
gerous pursuit is the amazing dichotomy it
presents. On one hand you've got a group of
everyday swimmers, like myself, who go to
the beach to enjoy a nice shark-free frolic in the
ocean. This group has seen "Jaws and some
of us have even memorized Robert Shaw's
"Indianapolis" monologue from the film and
are wont to begin reciting it when we've had
too many rum and Cokes. We swim facing
seaward, always on the lookout for a dark,
ominous dorsal fin to slice through the emer-
ald waves toward us.
The other group,those who thinka meal
of potentially deadly blowfish is a real kick in
the pants, pay money to be dropped into what
is essentially a shark-broth. What's scary is,
these folks are oftentimes doctors, engineers
and lawyers. We know why the lawyers can
swim with sharks without fear of being at-
tacked: professional courtesy. (Forgive me.)
Gettingback to "I Witness Videooneof
these thrill seekers took his video camera un-
derwater with him. The tape shows him and
his fellow loonies swimming about with sev-
eral circling sharks, most of them makos. Sud-
denly oneof these makosglidesup to thediver
with the camera, bumps him once and pro-
ceeds to bite down on his arm, violently shak-
ing backand forth. It'squite unnerving to hear
this hapless man screaming into his face mask,
totally at the mercy of the shark.
Another diver comes to the rescue and
prods the shark into turning loose. The dam-
age has been done. A Coast Guard helicopter
is summoned to airlift the badly wounded
diver to a hospital. Fortunately the diver es-
caped with his life and his arm.
How much did it cost the U.S. Coast
Guard, not to mention the U.S. taxpayers, to
airlift this badly mangled and bleeding "thrill
seeker " to the hospita 1? Nodoubt costs ran into
the thousands of dollars. All because this man
made a conscious decision to put himself de-
liberately in harm's way. Incidentally, experts
arequick to pointoutthatsharksare the nicest,
most benevolent creatures in the ocean, and
never intend to hurt humans. These "experts"
also think Elvis was killed to coverup informa-
tion concerning JFK's assassination. (Watch
for the Oliver Stone film conting soon.)
Asa less costly alternative to swimming
with sharks, why don't these people just take
a ride on Amtrak? It's equally as dangerous
and won't set the taxpayers back as much. Or
perhaps they could become Bill Clinton nomi-
11(1 "S.
Nope, come to thinkof it, that's probably
,i little too nsky. I d take the sharks any day.
"W





JUNE 9. 1993
in Wilmin
showing
gton
CRANIUM
Continued from page 4
raui
r in
Exit , French drama di-
rected by Ciara Liberman, will be
Ad Hoe's final offer erf their first
sea son asaprofessional company.
Sartre's plavs dominated the
stage from the postwar period in
France until at least 1951, and co-
incided with the emergence of
what came to be known as "the
theater of the absurd
His plays rank as classics and
are part of the literary history of
our time. The importance of his
work in the theaterand its leading
part in the history of contempo-
rary drama are now fully recog-
nized.
Sartre wrote "No Exit" in
1943and early 1944 because three
friends wanted to perform in a
play of his, each of them with equal
roles. That meant that he had to
have them all on the stage at the
same time and they had to remain
there; if one of them exited, he
would think the others had a bet-
ter role. To keep these people to-
gether to the end, as if for eternity,
�. cured to him to put them in
and make each the other's
Mrturer.
"No Exit' deals with three
people in a "hell" of their own
making. The play explores rela-
tionships: how other people are
responsible for the wav we see
ourselves. Into whatever we say
or feel about ourselves, someone
else's judgement alwaysenters the
picture, which means that if any
relation is bad, we are situating
ourselves in a total dependence
on someone else, and are indeed
in hell.
In Sartre's own words " to
be enwrapped in a perpetual care
for judgements and actionswh.ch
we do not want to change is a
living death since we are alive,
I wanted to show by means of the
absurd the importanceof freedom
to us no matter what circle of
hell we a re living in, I think we are
free to break out of it
"No Exit" will feature Marc
Garber, Michele Seidman, Theresa
Campana and Bob Sayer.
The play will be held at
Thalian Hall June 9-13, and June
18-20. Ticketsare$7and are avail-
able at the Thalian Hall Center
Box Office, (919) 763-3398 (toll-
free in NC 1-800-523-2820).
can't play fixitball.
5) Sharon needs to cut back,
she's getting fat to death.
6) The tiger is the mightiest
animal in the universe. TheBengals
are the mightiest football team in
the universe. Lions are stupid and
lazy, but Barry Sanders may be the
best running back in the game, after
Harold Green.
Jeans are inanimate, you buf-
foon.
7) "Eat me Bonus points if
you ever spelled dirty words with
your Alpha-Bets or Alpha-Bits.
8) You're either fer me, or
again' me.
Add up your score. If you
scored more than 33, you're smart,
maybe smarter than I am! Con-
gratulations! More than 20, swell.
You're OK. Expect to go far in the
food service industry. More than
zero, OK. The Cranium loves you
in a special way, you idiot. If your
score is zero exactly, you're either
specia, or you're going to be a star
on "America's Most Wanted
Less than zero means you need
to use small words and flash cards.
Look now. I love ya. Even if
you're not an intellectual giant.
And remember, if some hutronever
acts like it knows more than you
do, stick a key in its eye and say,
"Don't run my life
Slide shows available through Museum
Wto'9 There?
Attic Corrigan's
Thurs. Headstone Circus Thur. Wild Kingdom
Fri. Hooty and the Blowfish
Sat. Tumbling Dice Sat. Jerry Thomas
Hard Times
Thur. Dance Lessons
Fri. Simoline
Sat Simoline
The summer's major exhibition
at the North Carolina Museum of
Art in Raleigh gives North Carolin-
ians a rare chance to see paintings
from Eastern Europe.
"The Naked Soul: Polish paint-
ings from the National Museum,
Poznan" showcases 46 paintings,
many never seen in the United States,
by Pol ish artists working at the tu m
of the century. The exhibition, on
view through August 1 at the Mu-
seum, provides a rare glimpse into
the nationalistic spirit that charac-
terized Poland a century ago.
For North Carol inians who can-
not travel to Raleigh to view the
paintings and hear their stories, the
Museum has produced a slide pro-
gram about the exhibition that is
presented throughout the state to
schools, civic groups and cultural
groups by the Museum's outreach
volunteers. The program is also a
good introduction to the exhibition
for those who are preparing for a
museum visit To schedule a free
program with an outreach volun-
teer,callNancyBrantley,assistantto
the director for public programs,
weekdays at (919) 833-1935, ext.
141.
The Museum has many other
slide programs on art topics avail-
able for loan free of charge that are
excellent
preparation
for a museum
visit. They can
be used in the
classroom as
an indepen-
dentunit,oras
a program for
a civic or a I-
tural organi-
zation. All
slide pro-
grams include
objects in the Museum's perma-
nent collection; however, not all
objects in a given program are con-
tinuously on view. The programs
can be presented by an outreach
volunteer, or they are available on
a free, loan basis from the Mu-
seum. The borrower simply pays
return mailing costs. To order a
The exhibition
provides a rare
glimpse into the
nationalistic spirit
fhat characterized
Poland a century
ago.
program, call the Museum's Edu-
cation department weekdays at
(919)833-1935.
Slide programs that are cur-
rently available:
"The Maya BeforeColumbus
Ancient
America's Most
Brilliant Civili-
zation � Maya
Maya created
one of the most
spectacularcivi-
lizations of the
ancient world
This program
includes refer-
ence to the Maya
. Indianswhostill
reside in Mexico
and Central America today and re-
cent slides of ancient Maya cities.
Maya art in the Museum's collec-
tion is featured as well. (30 slides
with script)
"Jewish Ceremonial Art" You
will enjoy the museum's collec-
tion of Jewish ceremonial art in-
ducting many beautiful objects for
use in the synagogue and home.
The symbolism and function of
these objects, made of silver and
other precious materials, are dis-
cussed in relation to the traditional
ceremonies and rituals of the Jew-
ish faith. (30 slides with script)
"Fifty-five Centuries of Art
Discover art from ancient Egypt
to Renaissance to contemporary
North Carolina. All works of art
are in the Museum's permanent
collection. This program also fea-
tures a behind-the-scenes tour of
the Museum's building, activities
See EXHIBITION page 8
DOGWOOD HOLLOW
APARTMENTS
1108E. 10th Street
PRE-LEASING FOR
JULY & AUGUST 1993
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 full bath units
with all major appliances.
Located within walking distance to campus.
CALL 752-8900 or stop by the office Apartment 1-H
Monday-Friday 8:30-5:30
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Adult
Entertainment
Jf Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE
'Contestants need to call & register m advance. Must arrive by S.O0.
THURSDAYS -SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
Dancers wanted
S�vw Bull Bartender
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Dickinson Av�.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
ValidN.C. I.D. Required
1
I
I
I
I
I
TRYOUTS
for the 1993
0tOrAAr
ry&�
WHEN: Saturday, June 12,1993
WHERE: Christenbury Gymnasium Roomll2
TIME:10am-4pm
The Golden Girls are the dance line affiliated with the March-
ing Pirates. This group performs each year with the Marching
Pirates at all home and select away football games,
parades, pep-rallies and band exhibitions.
Please wear suitable dance clothes and sneakers for tryouts. Be
prepared to learn two dances and a short marching fundamen-
tals routine. If you have any questions or require additional
information, please contact Kelly at (979)756-4569,
or the band office at (979)757-6982.
We hope to see you on Saturday, June 12.
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Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th
Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
?Remember to alL.n a "letter of
credit" from your parents' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
are as follows:
with electric or gas space heatingwout electric or gas space heating
Electric Only $100$75
Electric & Water $100 Electric, Water & Gas $110 Electric & Gas $100$85 $85 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
Greenville
Utilities





JUNE 9, 1993
The East Carolinian
8
EXHIBITION
Continued from page 7
linting and s ul
turt- trui li mial era through
today are featured in this program.
Political, religious and economic
factors that made American art dif-
ferent from art created in Europe
and England are examined. All
works are from the Museum's ex-
tensive collection of American art.
(80 slides with script; audiocassette
available upon specific request)
"Changing Styles: The Evolu-
tion of American Art Viewers ex-
plore the chronological develop-
ment of American painting and
sculpture. Using works from the
North Carolina Museum of Art, this
program traces the growing com-
plexity of this country's artistic vi-
sion. From the direct, naive Colo-
nial portrait to the international ab-
stractions of our age, American Art
is shown to reflect both national
concerns and international ideas. (80
slides with script; audio cassette
available upon request)
"The Renaissance You will
experience heaven on Earth when
exploring the Renaissance mind-set
and the way in which European
artists turned theireyes to reality of
life on earth. This program studies
not only the development of artistic
forms, but also explores the way
external factors shaped the Renais-
sance world view. (80 slides with
script,audiocassette available upon
request)
Cressi-Sub � JD1 � TUSA
i (llories and Present Fas-
� . Arts el Antiquity
ers survi j I gyptian, .reek,
nan and Roman artifacts and
ivilizations that pro-
duced these masterpiecesthatareas
alive today as they were countless
centuries ago. Ancient art is prob-
lematical, mysterious, beautiful and
fascinating � and influences what
we expect of art and the world to-
day. (80 slides with script; audio
cassette available upon request)
"Myths Revealed- The Imag-
ery of Greek Mythology You will
study ways in which individual art-
ists depicted the gods, goddesses,
and ritualsofancientGreek mythol-
ogy. Using works from the
Mu seu m's collections, this progra m
shows the continual fascinationart-
ists have had with the subjects of
mythology. (33 slides with script;
audio available upon request)
'The Artwe Love to Hate: Com-
ing to Grips with the Modern Vi-
sion Explore ways of looking at
and understanding the modern
styles of abstraction, non-represen-
tation and expressionism. By exam-
ining works in the Museum's Ameri-
can and European modern collec-
tions, this program illustrates the
new frame of mind the viewerneeds
to grapple with an art that shows
invisible realities rather than tan-
gible objects. (80 slides with script;
audio cassette available upon re-
quest)
"Magic in the Laboratory�The
Conservation of Paintings This
program offers a fascinating dem-
onstration of the methods of clean-
ing paintingsand restoring them to
their proper condition, beginning
with examples from the Museum's
French collection and continuing
with treatment in the Museum's
laboratory of several important
American paintingsfromRandolph-
Macon Woman's College in prepa-
ration for an exhibition. (80 slides
with script; audiocassette available
upon request)
"African Art Viewers see a
sampling of African art objects. The
Museum's collection shows the di-
versity of this art as well as its
integral role in the daily lifeof tradi-
tional African culture. (80 slide with
script)
"The Christmas Story View-
ers see works in the Museum's col-
lection that provide new insights
into the familiar and beloved story
of the events surrounding the birth
of Christ. Paintings and sculpture
from the Middle Ages through the
baroque period portray the Christ-
mas Story as it was interpreted in
earlier times. (25 slides with script)
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Movies on the Lawn
The outdoor movie festival returns for the fourth season and for the
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Audrey Hepburn
June 11-12 Charade Fri. 7 p.m.
Fri. and Sat. 9 p.m.
June 18-19 Roman Holiday Fri. 7 p.m.
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June 25-26 Sabrina Fri. 7 p.m.
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Join the East Carolina University Student Union
for a special trip to Hardee's Walnut Creek
to hear in concert
and
lite Moody Bues
Friday, June 18, 1993
Departs from Mendenhall Student Center at 5:00 p.m.
Package includes:
�Round-trip transportation via ECU Transit bus
pack your dinner or purchase it when the bus stops just outside Zebu Ion
enjoy all of the concert activities and leave the transportation to us
and
�One Grass Pass ticket to the concert
Total trip cost - only $20
Limited seating - only sixty seats are available
Order your magic bus Moody Blues concert trip today from
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�'
�r i Tl � i II"
iliiiiiJILiiilIll .11 i.
The East Carolinian
Sports
Page 9
Crandell ready to man helm
Pirates start season with promising young gun
By Misha Zonn
Marcus Crandell
Photo by Cedric Van Buran
Assistant Sports Editor
When the Pirate football team
marches into Ficklen Stadium in
September to face the Syracuse
Orangemen, there will be many
questions facing the team about
the game and the season.
Will there be an early defen-
sive breakdown like there was in
last year's opening game against
Syracuse?
Will some of the inexperienced
players at the wide receiver spot
beable to handle theoffensive load,
created by ECU's possession route
oriented offense?
Despite the many questions
floa ting around before ga me ti me,
the spotlight will inevitably be fo-
cused on one player.
That one player will be Marcus
Crandell.
Crandell was officdally handed
the reins of the ECU offense after
last year's quarterback, Michael
Anderson, left school for undis-
closed academic reasons. Crandell,
a redshirt freshman, spent last sea-
son leading the scout team in simu-
lated game situations in order to
better prepare the ECU defense
for the next week's opponent. This
year, it will be the real thing.
To most, it might seem as if
ECU's high tech offense would be
a burden to a young quarterback.
However, Crandell said that the
big time passing attack was one of
the things that first attracted him
to ECU when he was being re-
cruited at Robersonville High
School.
"One of the things that I really
liked about the ECU program was
theoffense'Crandell said. "Other
schools weren't recruiting me as a
quarterback. ECU gave me an op-
portunity to play QB in an offense
with a lot of passing. In high school,
the offense was a lot different be-
cause I didn't get to pass as much
aslwilihere. Theoffenseispretty
complicated, but I'm getting used
to it
Crandell will probably be
passing a lot when he makes his
debut in front of the home crowd
at Ficklen, as well as the national
ESPN audience.
Crandell says that he is not
trying to concentrate on all the
added pressures. He is only focus-
ing on goingout and doing his job.
"I feel thatiflgooutthere and
take itonegameata time, I can put
somedoubtstorest'Crandellsaid.
"I look at the idea of coming in
immediately as an opportunity
more than anything. I just need to
go out there and prove myself
Crandell'sstyleofplayshould
prove to be exciting for Pirate faith-
ful. Some might find his style of
play and physical abilities to be
similar to that of former ECU quar-
terback Jeff Blake. Crandell said
that he could see where some
people might make comparisons,
but that in the long run there were
many differences.
"I'm the type of quarterback
who is more comfortable scram-
bling he said. "I (would) rather
do that than stand in the pocket.
On the field, I don't talk very much.
I just try and lead by example, and
get the job done
As Crandell attempts to get
the job done on the field, there will
be many veteran ECU players at
his side, helping him along the
way. One of those players, se-
nior tight end Carlester
Crumpler, said one of the main
things young players like
Crandell need isencouragement
Crumpler understands
Crandell's style of play is totally
different from that of Anderson,
the former ECU QB.
"You just have to go with
you're God-given abilities
Crumpler said. "Michael was the
type of player who could stand
in the pocket and see everything.
Marcus, because of hisheight, is
going to be a better player when
he's moving around and scram-
bling out of the pocket
For now, Crandell is more
concerned with the immediate
future than he is with thinking
about where he will beat theend
of the season.
Two-a-day practices will be-
gin in August, where Crandell
will have to prove himself in
front of his teammates and
coaches, before he will get the
golden opportunity to prove
himself under the lights of
Ficklen Stadium.
Watkinsdrafted by Cincinnati
Reds in second round as junior
GREENVILLE,N.C(SID)�
East Carolina outfielder Pat
Watkins has been taken as the
firstpkk of theCincinna ti Reds in
Thursday'smajor league Baseball
draft announced Reds' officials.
The 32nd pick overall,
Watkinswasa supplemental first-
round pick for the Reds. The team
received the pick for the loss of
Type A free agent Greg Swindell
who signed in the offseason wi th
the Houston Astros.
A native of Garner, N.C,
Watkins led the Pirates in batting
(.445), hit 19 home runs, drove in
57 runs and had 29 stolen bases,
With 29extra base hits, Watkins
Ted the team with a 764 slugging
percentage.
Watkins' list of accolades for
the 1993 season continues to grow
and to date, he has been named as
the 1993 Colonial Athletic Asso-
ciation Player of the Year, ECAC
Co-Player of the Year, BASEBALL
AMERICA first team All-America,
MIZUNO second-team Ail-
America arid All-NCAA Atlantic
Regional. In addition, Watkins is
one of the 38 players invited to
the Team USA tryout in June
Watkins' pick in the draft is
the highest ever for an ECU base-
ball player.
In 1973, Tommy Toms was
picked by the Philadelphia
Phillies in the fifth round. During
ECU'S history, several players
have been chosen by the Reds
including John Gast (1991) and
Kevin Riggs (1990).
Petrovic dies in auto accident
FRANKFURT, Germany (AP)
� Drazen Petrovic, a raw Euro-
pean talent who developed into
one of the NBA's top shooting
guards in two-plus seasons with
the New Jersey Nets, died in an
automobile accident. He was 28.
Policesaid Petrovic was killed
about 5:20 p .m. Monday, 15 miles
north of Ingolstadt on the high-
way going to Munich.
He was traveling in a
Volkswagen Golf with two
women and was sitting in the front
passenger seat.
In heavy rain, the Golf
slammed into a trailer truck that
had skidded on the slippery road.
The 23-year-old driver of the Golf
apparently had to brake suddenly
MLB Draft crop thick with North Carolinians
and lost control, hitting the rail
separating lanes headed in the
opposite direction and then hit-
ting the truck.
The driver and 53-year-old
female passenger sustained seri-
ous injuries.
In downtown Zagreb in
Petrovic's native Croatia, friends
met in his coffee bar, Amadeus,
early in the morning after It fil-
ing of his death.
"What can I tell you we all
lost today, this is an incredible
loss said Stojko Vrankovic, a
former Boston Celtics player who
now plays in Greece.
"This is the worst shock in
my life said Neven Spahija,
coach of Cibona Zagreb, Petrovic's
former team. "We are all here
now, watching each other, not
believing, weeping.
"Drazen's mother, Biserka,
was especially close to Drazen
and she was the hardest hit by
news. Drazen's brother, Aco,
took the parents somewhere out
of town to be in peace
Aco, whose full name is
Aleksandar, is also a coach with
Cibona and played alongside his
younger brother in the 1980s.
The Croatian national team
is in Zagreb for the next 10 days,
preparing for the Mediterranean
Games. The team returned Mon-
day from Poland via Frankfurt,
while Drazen went to Munich,
apparently to visit his girlfriend.
(AP)�Trot Nixon hasa choice
to make.
Will he accept the average
$639,000 contract offered to last
year's top 10 picks in the baseball
draft, or will he put off pro base-
ball to play football and baseballat
North Carolina State University,
where he verbally committed in
December?
Either way, Nixon will be do-
ing what he does � and loves �
best. Playing baseball.
"From day 1, it's going to be a
challenge Nixon said Thursday
after being selected as the num-
ber-one pick of the Boston Red
Sox. "I want to get dirty. I want to
get sweaty. I want to get nasty.
There are a lot of guys, and I'm one
of them, who would play for the
heck of it.
"The Red Sox are giving me a
chance, and I'm going todoevery-
thing possible to make it happen. I
justwanttoberememberedasone
of bestball players who ever lived.
Heroes are to be remembered. But
legends never die. I'm going to do
whatever it takes to become a leg-
end
Nixon was the seventh overall
pick in Thursday's annual ama-
teur baseball draft.
A record 18 pitchers were se-
lected in the first round, including
seven of the first 10 picks. Sixteen
of the 28 were college players.
The Red Sox ended a string of
five consecutive college pitchers
by taking Nixon, an outfielder for
New Hanover High School. Nixon
is hitting .530 with 10 homers and
49RBIsin66at-bats. Healsopitches
andisl0-0witha0.48ERAand 104
strikeouts and 29 walks in 58 2-3
innings.
Meanwhile, the Cincinnati
Reds used their first available pick
in the free agent draft to take Pat
Watkins, an outfielder from East
Carolina University.
Watkins, 20, was the 32nd
player taken. The Reds did not
have a first-round pick because of
the free agent signing of pitcher
John Smiley.
Watkins batted .445 with 19
homers and 57 RBIs this season as
a junior at East Carolina. He also
stole 29 bases in 60 games.
The Seattle Mariners used their
top choice in baseball's amateur
draft to pick Alex Rodriguez.
"We just decided to roll the
dice and gowitha positionplayer
Roger Jongewaard, the Mariners'
vice president of scouting and
player development, said Thurs-
day after making the pick. "There's
a certain risk factor in takinga high
school kid that we're well aware
of
The last time Seattle selected
first was 1987 when they took Ken
Griffey Jr nowa three-time all-
star.
"Junior is special and he
See NC DRAFT page 10
Softball team honored
Pirates receive more accolades
three pitchers selected, Parsons,
from Severn, Md had 32 wins
on the mound this season, the
nation's second-highest total.
Senior Cheryl Hobson, a first
team All-Star selection last sea-
son, was also named to the sec-
ond team. ECU's starting first
baseman, Hobson, from
Mechanicsville, Va led the team
with 44 RBIs and batted .364.
The Lady Pirates capped off
their 14th winning season in the
last 15 years with a berth to the
ECAC Softball championships in
May. ECU went 1-2 in the tour-
nament and ended another suc-
cessful season witha 34-22 record.
GREENVILLE,N.C. (SID)�
EastCarolina'ssoftballteamcon-
tinues to garnish honors from
another outstanding season as
three team members have been
named to the Eastern College
Athletic Conference (ECAC) All
Star team.
Junior outfielder Michelle
Ward of Virginia Beach, Va. was
named to the All Star first team.
Ward led ECU in batting (.450)
in 1993 and set a new NCAA
record for stolen bases with 73.
Senior Jenny Parsons, ECU's
all-time winningest pitcher with
102 career wins, was named to
the All Star second team. One of
Canadiens succeed in overtime for
tenth time in NHL playoffs games
INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP) �
Overtime is the right time for the
Montreal Canadiens.
"Wehave 10 wins in overtime
and every goal we have scored has
been on second and third effort,
and tonightwasnodifferent'said
Montreal captain Guy Carbonneau
after the Canadiens beat Los An-
geles 3-2 Monday nightand moved
within one game of their 24th
Stanley Cup.
If they go to overtime on
Wednesday night in Game 5 of the
finals in Montreal, no one would
be surprised.
The Canadiens have made
overtimegames their way of life in
the playoffs, winning a record 10
straight this season after losing one
to Quebec in the first round. Their
victory on Monday nightwas their
third straight in overtime over the
Kings, giving them a 3-1 lead in
the best-of-7 series.
For the second straight game,
itwasfohn LeClairwhoscored the
winner.
"Because of our record and
becauseofthewayourteamplays,
(overtime) is something that we
approach with a lot of confidence
and a lot of optimism said
Montreal forward Brian Bellows.
"We use all 20 players, so
everyone's pretty rested. When
you have the best goalie in the
league, it really makes a differ-
ence
As usual, Patrick Roy made
the difference in overtime. He
blocked 10 shots in the extra pe-
riod and extended his overtime
shutout streak in the playoffs to 96
minutes and 39 seconds. He has
stopped 58 shots in that span.
"There is no better goalie in
hockey than Patrick Roy right
now Montreal coach Jacques
Demers said.
"Hewasthedifference in over-
time Kings coach Barry Melrose
said of Roy. "I thought we had
(some) glorious chances
Actually, both teams did in a
wide-open fast-paced overtime
period that practically had more
action than the rest of the game
combined. The Kings outshot the
Canadiens 10-7 in the overtime
period.
"We worked hard said Kings
captain Wayne Gretzky. "We're
not getting beat because of lack of
intensity or lack of effort. We're
just getting beat right now, it's as
simple as that
Game4 was similar to Game3
at the L.A. Forum, when the
Canadiens rushed to a 3-0 lead,
only to see the Kings tie it.
This time, it was2-0 Canadiens
as Kirk Muller scored from the left
circle off a faceoff at 10:57 of the
firstand Vincent Damphousse con-
nected on a shot from the lower
right circle at 5:24 of the second
with the Canadiens on a power
play.
See STANLEY page 10
HansirY out
Pho�o by Csdrlc Van Bur en
ECU basketball standout Lester Lyons (front, right) and former ECU football player Ernie Lewis (back,
left) play some four-square with the fellas.





JUNE 9, 1993
ued from page 9
i f 1 could
uld get the
dor) out of
and goaltender kellv
NC DRAFT
ust like on Satur-
"Ihad pas on my mind all the
time he said, thinking he was
going to get the puck to teammate
Stephan Lebeau. "Their defense
had been dropping back most of
up behind the net
verybody out of the nets
eClair, a 6-foot-2,205-pound
forward from St. Albans, Vt. "1
tried to jam it in mvself and got a
little help
The puck bounced off
Hrudey's stick and off Sydor's leg
into the net, pushing the Kings to
the edge.
Sports Fillers
Georges Carpentier of
France, a one-time light-
heaxyweight champion, was
known as the "Orchid Man
A long-time Michigan
football coach, Fielding Yost,
was nicknnmed "Hurry Up
Yost
While playing for the Univer-
sity of Pittsburgh, football
coach Mike Ditka rushed the
ball twice for minus 16 vards.
Former heavyweight
champion Jersey joe
Walcott's real name was
Arnold Raymond Cream.
The famous college football
coach, Gil Dobie, was known
as "Gloomy Gil
Racetrack trainer E.I. Kelly,
St drove a tank in heavy
fighting in Europe in World
War II
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10. We Check the air filteri
11. We Check the wiper Wades1
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13 We vacuum the interior'
14. We even wash your windows'
We'll Have You Ready in Minutes
With No Appointment.
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126 SE Greenville Blvd.756-2579M-F 8-6 Sat 8-5
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Limit one coupon per person per visit. Good only in GreenviPe or JactosonviHe.
Expires 70&U3
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Continued from page 9
knows it said Rodriguez, a 17-
ear-old shortstop from
fc'stminsterChristian High School
in Miami. "I'm not setting a time-
table on my game. 1 just play hard
every game. I'll let managers tell
me when I'm ready to go up
Rodriguez hit .5(15 with nine
home runs, 36 RBIs and 35 stolen
bases in 93 at-bats this season. He
hit. 419 inhis three-year high school
careerwith 17homers,70RBIsand
90 steals.
Darren Dreifort, a right-
handed pitcher for Wichita State,
was taken second by Los Angeles.
He is 10-1 with a 2.23 ERA and has
110 strikeouts and 30 walks in 93
innings going into the College
World Series.
Other notable picks included
Kirk Presley, Elvis' third cousin,
who was taken by the New York
Mets with the eighth pick.
Nixon has three options: Sign
with the Red Sox; play football at
N.C. State while playing profes-
sional baseball or play both college
sports for N.C. State and re-enter
the major league draft in two years.
Last winter, when he commit-
ted with the Wolfpack, Nixon left
open theopti on of playing pro base-
ball. His senior season, which in-
cluded a six-game home-run
streak, helped make him a first-
round pick.
History suggests Nixon will
sign with the Red Sox. Only ahand-
ful of top 10 picks have turned
down the money and gone on to
college.
"Trot's torn said his father,
Dr. William Nixon.
"Our wholelife, his whole life,
has been built around sports Dr.
Nixon said. "Sports has kind of
occupied it. 1 guess he knows we
put a lot of time in this game. 1
think he knows the time and effort
we put in to reach this goal. But, I
don't think that goal has been in
the back of our mind until the last
two years
Trot, however, has been living
the dream much longer.
"It's real important Trot said
on making it to the big leagues.
After so much that mom
and dad have done for me, I want
to make it so I can give it all back to
them. Buy them season tickets. That
first game, I want to walk up to my
dad, give him the tickets and say
'Here you go, dad. This is the be-
ginning of the payback
I" JJaa is Hair Beairfy?aIon
WEEKLY SPECIALS
Two For The Price Of One On Tuesdays.
Students gel 20off regular prices.
Call for an appointment. 321-6960
Greenville Buyers Market
Open Mon-Sat 9am -9pm
OF THE
WEEK 8
eastcoaa
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
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Services & Counseling
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The Lee Building
Greenville NC
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Hours:
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& video
We now rent iaser DISCS
1109 CHARLES STREET
758.4251
OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT EVERY NIGHT
a a a rm a i d ji ii
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
752-73031 209 E. 5th St Live Music"
ATTIC
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
MARCHING PIRATES
COLORGUARD AUDITIONS
Students interested in colorguard are welcome
to come audition on
June 12,1993,10am-4pm
in front of Fletcher Music Building.
Alternate Audition Date:
August 15-lst Day of Band Camp
For futher information, please contact
the Marching Band Office at (979)757-6982,
Guard Captain Dana Finney at (979)537-1740, or
Flag Captain Jennifer Glover at 919) 623-5030
1987 1988 � 1989 � 1990 1991 �1992
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
Wednesday 9th
The :� �
CoMedi2JPWB
IM Highballs-$1.50 Tallboys
t
Thursday 10th
Headstone Circus
College Night
991 Highballs-99l 32oz Draft 990 Memberships
Friday 11th
feotie & The Blowfish
$2.00 32oz DRAFT
Saturday 12th
t
A Ttikte fo T(uMiuiq Slmm
$2.00 32oz DRAFT
Lese majesty n
An attack on any custom, institution, belief, etc. held
sacred or revered.
Greenville Aquarium's
x e
JUNE COUPONS
SAVE
25
ON ANY
WHISPERPOWER
FILTER
EXP. 63093
BUY 2 GET 1
FREE
PLANTASTIC
PLANTS
EXP. 63093
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20OFF
ANY NON-SALE
ITEMS-NO
TANKS
EXP. 63093
CHECK OUT OUR WEEKLY FISH SPECIALS
UNIVERSITY CENTER
14TH& CHARLES ST.
757-0056
M-F 11-9 SAT 10-9 SUN 1-6
VISA'I AMERICAN � 1 � 1
� .m ' - �-
MasteiCard.lFT
. � r .
Parking & Traffic Services 757-6294
DON'T STAND IN
LONG LINES TO
REGISTER YOUR CAR.
Ask about Early Vehicle Registration for
1993-94. Have your parking permit
mailed to you.





Title
The East Carolinian, June 9, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 09, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.946
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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