The East Carolinian, June 2, 1993






Lifestyle
New Garden of Eden
Wildlife organization in
Grimesland concentrates
on placing animals back
into their natural habitat.
See story page 3.
Today
- y �� �
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 35
Circulation 5,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, June 2,1993
8 Pages
Media Board charges conflict of interest
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
(Editor's Note: The following
is the first in a tun-part series that
will be completed in next week's
paper.)
The words "conflict of inter-
est" have forced three employees of
ECU'sradiostation,WZMB,tomake
an important decision�one which
other members of student media
may eventually have to make them-
selves.
Thursday, May 27, the ECU
Media Board met toaddressseveral
issues Last on their agenda was an
issue labeled "WZMB conflict of in-
terest" Thus, a can of worms, so to
speak, was opened.
Beth Arthur, general manager
of WZMB, said a check was discov-
ered, about two or three weeks ago,
that former general manager Tim
Johnsonhad written to TheEastCnro-
linian in March. The check paid for
an advertisement promoting one of
the two bands Johnson was manag-
ing outside of his WZMB employ-
ment
From misinformation, Arthur
discovered that Kevin Brelsford,
program director for WZMB, and
Taul Meador, music director for
WZMB, were managing, promot-
ing and booking club dates for two
bandswith Johnson, underthename
subZero management and promo-
tions (sic).
According to the University
Media Board Code of Ethical Con-
duct, adopted by the University
Media Board April 15,1991, such
outside involvement poses a con-
flict of interest
The ethics policy states, "Staff
members are prohibited from using
their positions in the student media
and the influence of the student
media to benefit any outside em-
ployment enterprise. Any outside
employment that creates, or gives
the appearanceof creating, a conflict
of interest is prohibited
Arthur, upon learning of the
additional activities,gave the WZMB
employees threeoptions: they could
cease managing the bands, cease
employment at WZMB or address
the Media Board and request per-
mission to continue both activities.
Brelsford and Meador chose
toaddress theboard.Johnson, work-
ingasadisc jockey for WZMB,chose
to await the board's decision.
"(The Code of Ethical Con-
duct) gives an example which is
pretty clear-cut Arthur said. "Any-
body with a little bit of common
sense can figure out what that is
Rudolph Alexander,assistant
vice chancellor of Student Life and
director of University Unions, ex-
plained: "The conflict of interest
doesn't mean that you have given
preferential treatrnenttotherecords
these bands own, but it's still a con-
flict of interest because there is the
potential thatyou could do this in the
eyes of the public out there, the pub-
licbeing the students, the university
community it is not etr-cal
Susan Stewart, Media Board
chairperson, agreed with Alexander
and issued the board's decision: "I
think it's a serious conflict of inter-
est, to me it's very blatant,
(Arthur) needs to tell (anyone pre-
sentingaconflictofintErest)tomake
their decision, either quit subZero
management and promotions or
quit WZMB
Stewart expressed regret to
see the employees leave, but
added it's just wrong
As of Monday, May 31,
Brelsford had formally resigned
from his WZMB position, as had
Johnson. Meador chose to remain
at WZMB as music director.
'It's in my best interest
Brelsford said, "We're under a le-
gal ly binding contract with
subZero
"I'm staying here (at
WZMB) Meador saidT've put
See WZMB page 2
Remodeling
of the
Student
Store is well
on its way to
providing a
more up to
date facility
for students.
Automatic teller machine
built on central campus
Photo by
Cadric
Van Buran
Student Store receives facelift
By Scott Vanhorne
Staff Writer
The Student Store is going
through renovations this sum-
mer. Anyone walking into the
store can tell by the smell of paint
and freshly cut wood that mas-
sive changes are taking place.
The manager of the Stu-
dent Store, Michael Coston, said
that unlike most retail stores, his
facility has not been renovated
in 20 years.
He also said that the cur-
rent renovations will bring the
store to modern standards, mak-
ing the store a more pleasing
place to shop.
The remodeling will cost
$354,000 and revenues from the
storea re pay ing for theconstruc-
tion. However, Mr. Coston be-
lieves that the new store will
hold down costs of running the
business by unlizingspace more
effectively. By decreasing the Stu-
dent Store's costs, Mr. Coston
hopes the store can pass the sav-
ingsontostudents with lower book
prices. Many of the employees are
pleased with the changes.
"The new store will have reg-
isters in different locations said
employee AllieWashingtonThat
will make us more efficient be-
cause allof the students won't have
to go to one place to check out
The plansalso include a way
of making the Student Store easier
torecognizeSome times students
come in here and don't even know
where they are said Washing-
ton. The renovations include a
large emblem of the Pirate on the
lobby floor mat will help future
students know they are in the Stu-
dent Store.
Although most of the staff
agree the changes will make the
store look better, some think that
the plan may cause more theft.
One employee, who asked to re-
main anonymous, described the
layout as "a thieves' paradise
Many students like the fact
thatthe storeisbeingremodeled.
"I think it's awesome said Paul
Richardson, a senior communi-
cations major. "The renovated
store wil 1 be more organized, big-
ger and better suited to meet the
need s of ECU's growing popula-
tion
The Student Store is plan-
ning toexpand its general books,
art supplies, and computer ac-
cessories areas. There are also
plans to start renting videos to
students.
The project, which started
in late March, should be com-
pleted by June 23. However, if
you would like a sneak peek of
whatthenewstorewill looklike,
mere is a picture standing inside
the store that gives a good idea of
what to expect.
By Shannon Cooper
Staff Writer
The mysterious little build-
ing that suddenly appeared in
front of the Student Stores last
month is actually there for the
benefit of students.
TheState Employ ee'sCredit
Union automatic teller will be
placed in the new structure cur-
rently under construction. It is lo-
cated in front of the Student Store
between Rawl and Austin.
The new automatic teller
will be beneficial for anyone on
campus.
"It will be convenient for
faculty and students said
Michael Coston, director of retail
services.
"The Credit Union's inter-
est in locating one of their auto-
matic tellers on campus was initi-
ated by a demand from ECU fac-
ulty and students.
"A lot of our members are
faculty and students and they
want access to their money
through our automatic tellers
said RussTaylor,branch manager
of the State Employee's Credit
Union.
The new teller will be lo-
cated between Rawl and Austin.
This location was chosen for con-
venience and security reasons.
The building for the future
site of the automatic teller is
provided by the Credit Union,
which is a member of the Plus
Network.
"The building is very ex-
pensive Coston said. "You
don't just put up four walls
"The Credit Union's cost
was in the neighborhood of
$30,000 Taylor said.
The actual date of comple-
tion for the new teller is not
known. "We're not certain, but
we hope to have it open as soon
4�4QSsibleCDSton said.
? "Power should be in this
week Taylor said. "Hopefully
it will be open by the end of
June
University bans kegs at tailgating
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Haveyoueverwonderedwhat
it would be like tailgating without
kegs?Well,youareabouttofindout
Uruversityofficialshaveunani-
irmsly derided toabottshkegs from
all university owned fields.
"We believe the abolishment
of kegs will be a step in a positive
direction said Dave Hart, athletic
director.
Kegs will nolongerbeallowed
at Harrington Field, the Frisbee-Golf
Field, the field across from Allied
Health and the adjacent rugby field.
Although canned and bottled
beer will still be allowed, the Safety
Task Force believes that by getting
rid of kegs, fighting and disruption
can be reduced.
"Wehad fightslastyearwhich
is very unfortunate said Lt Keith
Knox, crime prevention officer. "It
looks bad to have the ambulance
come out several times.
"A lot of people who come (to
tailgate) never make it to the game
Knox said.
Knoxadded thatproblemscre-
ate news which gives a bad impres-
sion of the university.
"We want to maximize the ex-
perience and minimize the prob-
lems Hart said.
Members of the Safety Task
Force, which include Dean Ronald
Speier, Vice Chancellor Alfred
Matthews, Athletic Director Dave
Hart, Associate Director of Athletics
for Administration Henry VanSant,
Lt Keith Knox, as well as several
other campus officials, assured stu-
dent leaders that this will not be the
first step towardsendingalldrinking
during tailgating.
"My main concern is that we
keep the tailgating KeithDyer,SGA
Pr 3identsaid.
According to VanSant, the
decision to abolish kegs from tail-
gatingwasa university regulation,
not an athletic decision.
"I don't see where there
would beadifferencebetweenbeer
in cans and kegs David Bryan, an
ECU student said. "1 can get drunk
either way. Now it will just cost
more
"This is going to take away
from traditional tailgating where
kegs have been the drawing point
for student socialization said
Bryant Becton, an ECU junior.
According to Barry
Morrison, an ECU senior, the abo-
lition of kegscould hurt localsmall
businessesandcreateagreater trash
problem.
Hart said that the university
hopes to promote responsible
drinking in establishing this new
regulation.
29 percent tuition increase expected in fall
By Gina Jones
Staff Writer
On Thursday, May 28, the N.C.
House of Representatives and the Sen-
ate passed a bill that approved the rais-
ing of state funds for abortion, higher
pay for state workers and a tuition in-
crease for the University of North Caro-
lina school system.
The change has been coming about
since Gov. Jim Hunt put the $9.1 billion
budget in operation.
When the bill was first proposed,
the expected increase was 20 percent
per year for five years.
After a lengthy deliberation, the
House of Representatives and the Sen-
ate passed the bill that included a 29
percent increase for in-state students
and an eight percent increase for out-
of-state students.
"I hope the increase will be as
small as possible. The country is still
in a recessionary period UNC
president Dr. CD. Spangler said.
The House of Representative
budget increase will be five percent
higher for out-of-state students and
three percent higher for in-state stu-
dents.
The Senate budget increase will
be a $200 tuition increase for UNC
Chapel Hill and N.C. State students.
Although the increase is within
current standard of living costs,
many people were filled with con-
cern.
Dr. Spangler also felt if the tu-
ition had been increased substan-
tially, it could have had an adverse
affect on students and parents as
well.
ECU students, particularly the
Student Government Association,
were prepared for the bill.
In spring semester, a bill was
to be passed simply stating opposi-
tion to the proposal, but it was
tabled.
"It (the increase) probably will
not be as much as everyone thinks it
will be said Keith Dyer, president
ofSGA.
Dyer also stated that the SGA
was against it, but there was noth-
ing they could do about it.
The tuition increase will begin
in the fall, and although many stu-
dents are upset, others are relieved
because the increase was not unrea-
sonably high.
"It's important to keep an eye
on student fees and focus on where
the money is spent on campus.
I hope it goes to essential stu-
dent needs said Bill Gheen, chair-
man of Committe on Student Tu-
ition (C.O.S.T.) and president of
N.C. Federation of College Demo-
crats (N.C.F.C.D), an umbrella or-
ganization for College Democrats.
Anyone
for
jumping
rope?
Clayton Driver
double dutches
at last Thursday's
cookout on the
Mall.
Photo by
Cedric Van Buron
� -
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�WJMMWW





JUNE 2, 1993
S)ENE
May 02
i watch valued at S350 from Suite313Scott
WZMB
Continued from page 1
May 03
ECU police called to Clement Hall to investigate a case of a person
missing for more than four days
May 04
3:34a.m.
A female was assaulted on the dirt lot north of Jones hall when her
boyfriend allegedly pushed, slapped and choked her dunng an apparent
dispute.
7:30 a.m.
An unknown person stole a gas grill from the courtyard area south of
Belk Hall. The grill was valued at $160.
May 05
9:30 a.m.
An unknown person broke into a car parked between Fletcher and
Garrett dormitory and stole a radio valued at S320 from the trunk.
A subject was apprehended just north of Jenkins for possessing a
butterfly knife in his pocket. The juvenile was released into the care of an
adult.
May 06
3:00 p.m.
An unknown person stole S334 of clothes from a washroom on the
second floor of Garrett Hall.
May 16
6:08 p.m.
An unknown person stole 5350 of bushes from around the trees at
Mendenhall
Compiled by Warren Sumner.
Taken from ECU Safety Records.
so much effort into WZMB, why
throw it away?"
Johnson said he is "tired of
fighting the Media Board and has
resigned completely from WZMB.
"Tim Johnson should have
known (about the ethics policy)
Arthur saidI'm the clean-up com-
mittee. He was very much aware of
the situation, he chose not to take
action
"1 was aware of the ethics
policy Johnson said. "But the ex-
ample that was given to me was not
as clear as it should have been
"J think the term 'conflict of
interest'isdifficulttointerpnet'said
Dr. Alfred Matthews, vice chancel-
kr of Student Life.
"There's a conflict only when
your jobs a re related to the competi-
tion, or giving anyone an advantage,
simply reappearance ofaconflict
poses a problem that needs to be
addressed
Brelsford, Meador and
Johnson, in separate interviews, ex-
pressed concern for future students
who decide to become involved in
student media.
The Media Board has plans to
distribute a form to every branch of
the university media that will ask
each student to list any and all out-
side employment The Board will
then determine any potential con-
flicts of interest.
Brelsford, however, d isagrees
with the Board's intense scrutiny.
"Students want to be able to
pursue experience Brelsford said, ize they're hurting the students. 'Thisisaleamingexpenence
"No one can just graduate with a Eventually, this will forcea lot being turned into something
degree and get a job. Maybe down of people to make a difficult deci- screwed up, Meador said. It s
theline(theMediaBoard)willreal- sion ludiaous to tie people down.
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The East Carolinian
Jtn
Lifestyl
� � Page 3
New organization focuses on reproduction
3yMariorieMcKinstrv Am���taiui.i. -J ��
By Marjone McKinstry
Staff Writer
Many environ mental organiza-
tkmsconcentratesoleJy on preserva-
tion, but the New Garden of Eden
focuses instead on the breed ing and
then the rein Production of endan-
gered plants and animals into their
native habitats. Based in Greenville,
the grou p hopes to spread out across
the United States, and eventually
become international.
Asofnow,NewGardenofEden
owns one two-acre refuge near
Grimesland. Although future plans
spotlight the breed ing of all types of
endangered animals, both wild and
domestic, the refuge currently con-
centra teson birds. Thedomesticand
wild bird population includes blue
and whi te peacocks, bl ue ear pheas-
ants, quail and grouse. The refuge
also has a small population of Ger-
man Giant Angora rabbits.
According to Hollis Lilley,
founding member of the New Gar-
den of Eden, thebreedingof animals
will help in at least two ways: endan-
gered animals will be first bread in a
healthy environment and will then
be released as healthy adults with a
higher likelihood of survival in the
wild.Seoondly,thebreed ing of mon-
etarily desirable animals, such as
exotic tropical birds, may decrease
the demand for black market sales
and the inhumane treatmentof such
animals. According to Lilley, these
birds are "bound, and then stacked
like bottles in packing crates" before
being shipped. In one instance, in-
spectors smashed open a suspicious
crate and found about 120 poached
parrots bound and stacked inside;
all but one were dead, and that par-
rot died later in the same day.
Immediate action aside, thenew
Garden of Eden alsohopes to stimu-
late the environmental interest of
Check
it Out!
For the
upcoming
sultry
summer
days,
Mike's Deli
also offers a
wide
variety of
fresh fruit,
beer, and
wine
Tool makes the
world a better place
Undertow should keep you
amused, nutty or not
By Richard Cranium
Staff Writer
Here we have one of those
albums labeled with a "Parental
Advisiry" label, courtesy of Tip-
per Gore, I guess. But really, I
don't thinK most kids would lis-
ten to Tool's Undertow, so if my
parents are the parents being
warned, then never mind the
warning, cause I'm a big boy now.
But what about Tool? Well let's
talk.
First off, buy this one just to
look at the crazy mystifying pyro-
gyrating pictures on the fold-out
jacket. Nutty.
"Disgustipated the 15:47 fi-
nal cut is something else, man.
There's the song part for a little
while, then there's the lovely
sound of crickets in thegreatout-
doors for a little while, like eight
minutes,and then there's a haunt-
ing little second person narrative
that is bizarre. And hey! What
happens is, you put the CD on,
OK, and "Disgusitpated" is the
tenth track, but the counter counts
up to 69 before the thing ever
starts. It's so crazy it's festive.
Bu t enough wi th the tomfool -
ery. What about the music? Tool
is another one of those band s who
defy categorization. They are
somewhat unique. What can
we do with them? I don't know.
I can't give you any lyrics be-
cause I don't understand most of
them. But 1 can tell you this, the
bass player is an animal! He'sall
on mat thang! Remember how
the bassist for the Violent Femmes
was? It's like that, only different.
I would say the jammin' bass is a
beautiful thing.
There's some dirty words,
now. What can you do. There's
always these nutty little soiunds
before the songs, too. I think you
could drive to this music. There's
a lot of heavy riffs and some
jammin'guitar goin' on. Check it
out. Major drawback? Good God
the songs are long! The ten tracks
add up to more than 67 minutes!
Hoo-wee! Only two of them are
less than five minutes. Y'know,
sometimes the vocals are a little
Mickey Dolenzesque. Oh well.
"flood" is a number on this
album that straight out jams. Try
it, it's more fun than a box of
Crunch 'n' Munch. And then
there's "sober a crazy little cool
tune that sort of reminds of some
of that wacky Pink Floyd 70s
stuff. How about "bottom a little
mover that talksabout peopleand
relationships and truth and con-
flicts and pain, baby, pain. I
uderstood the lyrics here.
So what's the beef? Do you
buy it or not? Well, if you can
afford it and you've already
bought this month's Playboy, and
you already have a cool hammer,
I think you should. Check it out.
And remember, tools help make
the world a better place.
So maybe Tool wants to be
useful. I don't know, I just thought
of that. Hoy!
children. Educational materiel aimed
towardsyoungadultsisintheworks.
Lilley is interested in reaching se-
niorcitizensaswell,remindingthem
that they need "to protect their envi-
ronment for their children, grand-
children and great-grandchildren
The New Garden of Eden wants
to be able to open their refuge to the
public so people may come by and
see what their donations and help
have accomplished. The group is
hoping to be supported by the uni-
versity, and in return for this sup-
port, the New Garden of Eden wou Id
like to establish a field-work study
benefiting the zoology and biology
programs on campus. Lilley men-
tions that the refuge "may be the
only place people can see these ani-
mals up close
Politically, the New Garden of
Eden would like to encourage the
government to support the protec-
tion of animals and their habitats,
but also to support the breeding of
these endangered animals as well.
Membershope for legisla tion remov-
ing the red tape from the process of
reintroducing animals to the wild.
They do not, however, believe ani-
mals should be dropped off into the
woods haphazardly. Instead, they
believe that people experienced in
working with animals should be
given more leeway by the govern-
ment
This professional commitment
is highlighted by the group's policy
regarding bloodlines. The NewGar-
den of Eden is against the mixing of
pedigrees; they opt for clean blood
lines instead of hybridizing, espe-
cially in domestic animals. Hybrid-
ized chickens, for example, all tend
to be big fat white chickens with
neithergenetkdiversitynortheabil-
itytobreed on their own.The market
for these birds is detrimental to the
common farm chicken. Pretty soon,
the d ifferent breeds of this domestic
bird maydisappear from barnyards,
only to be seen in old
FbgHomLeghorn cartoons. Accord-
ing to Lilley, even though these are
domesticated animals, they still have
a right to exist.
Although primarily concerned
with breeding, the New Garden of
Eden hopes thatthepublic'sinvolve-
mentwith theorganization will lead
to the public's environmental en-
lightenment
One of the group's goals is to
make the people more a ware of and
responsible for their treatmentof the
environment Onesimplearea where
normally conscientious people may
be harming the environment is by
carelessly spraying Round-Upa
weed killer) around water supplies.
What many home owners do not
realize is thatsprayingonditch banks
introd uces the chemicals to a water
supply systemconnected tostreams,
lakes and eventually the ocean.
Peoplealsodonot realize the power
of this poison; according to Lilley,
Round-Up can even "kill a 200
year old black gum tree; the stuff is
like acid
However, all these goals are
dependant on public support as a
non-profit organization, the New
Garden of Eden receives funding
only from donations, grants and
memberships. The group wel-
comes public involvement in any
form.
Memberships may be ob-
tained for $30 a year (or $25 if the
price seems toohigh for some bud-
gets),anddonationsoftime,build-
ing materials and environmental
information are generously ac-
cepted. For further information,call
HollisLilleyat355-0981,orwriteto
the New Garden of Eden, Inc. co
Hollis Lilley, 100 Duran St. Green-
ville, N.C. 27858.
Greenville blessed
with 'true deli
By Julie Totten
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Mike's Deli brings exciting,
affordable, and delicious new
food to Greenville.
Before indulging in one of
Mike's 15 dessert choices, you are
faced with many other tantaliz-
ing decisions.
Unlike any other eating es-
tablishment in Greenville, Mike's
Deli assures customers they will
getexactlywhatisorderedwitha
menu you checkoff yourself. The
choices are broken down into
seven categories: meats, breads,
cheeses, garnishes, desserts, spe-
ciality sandwiches and drinks.
This method of ordering proves
to be quicker and much more ac-
curate than the old fashioned-tell
and-confuse.
The meats the deli uses are
also new to Greenville. Boars
Head Meat, from New York City,
is piled on each sandwich, which
is a hearty alternative to usualyl
skimpy sandwiches.
For vegetarians, Mike's sim-
ply layers your choice of provo-
lone, Swiss or American cheese
instead of meat.
Mike Hatoum, owner and
manager from Toronto, Canada,
said, "I heard about Greenville
from a friend of mine. I realized
the town's need for a true deli
A "true deli" is exactly what
Greenville has been blessed with.
Mike's also is a mini convenient
store where you can pick up any-
thing from batteries to magazines.
For the upcoming sultry sum-
mer days, Mike's also offers a
wide variety of fresh fruit, beer
and wine.
The Deli is conveniently lo-
cated on 10th Street, near the post
office (Freshway's previous loca-
tion).
Mike's should be highly re-
garded for its food and also the
owners success at wrapping con-
venience and quality in one loca-
tion.
Today:
Yeast Infections
Answered by Jennifer Philips
Student Health Center
Question: How do I know if
I have a yeast infection? What
causes this type of infection?
Answer: A yeast infection,
also known as candidiasis, is
caused by a fungus (Candida).
This fungus may be found on
most any part of a woman's
body; on skin, under nails, be-
tween fingers and toes and is
normally present in the
vagina. However,
when these fungi
begin to multiply
rapidly, the over-
growth crea tes a d i s-
charge that looks
something like cottage
cheese (thick and white),
accompanied by odor, burning,
itching in and around the va-
gina, otherwise considered a
yeast infection. The symptoms
of yeast infections are similar to
other forms of vaginitis and
some sexually transmitted dis-
eases. It is generally recom-
mended that women undergo
an initial diagnosis of the prob-
lem to confirm the over abun-
dance cf Candida before ad-
ministering self-treatment.
For one in 10 women, the
problem of yeast infections be-
comes chronic, occurring five
or more times a year. There are
. several con tr i bu ting fac-
' tors that may facili-
' tate the growth of
�m T yeast including: a
�1 diet high is sugary
foods, diabetes,
stress, antibiotic treat-
Kr ments, the use of oral
contraceptives, preg-
nancy, tight pants, wet bathing
suits, nylon undergarments,
poor hygiene practices and spe-
cific points of the menstrual
See YEAST page 4
'Sliver' considered
Peeping Tom cinema
Tool
Photo courtesy Zoo Entertainment
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The reason discriminating
film fans have generally disre-
garded pornographic films is be-
cause of their paper thin plots.
The films deliberately downplay
their story line in lieu of the most
explicit sexuality. This explicit-
ness arises because most viewers
of these films have no desire to
see a complicated plot.
Imaginea film thatpossesses
the same banal story as a hard-
core pom film without any titil-
lating sex. Now wrap the film in
a glossy Hollywood package,hire
a beautiful, sexy actress, attach a
catchy tag line like "you like to
watch, don't you" and then hype
the film extensively and the re-
sult would be Sliver.
Sliver stars Sharon Stone, Wil-
liam Baldwin and Tom Berenger.
The film tells the story of a high-
rise in New York that is owned
by a voyeur who has cameras
installed behind the mirrors in
every room. This voyeur sits be-
hind a wall of screens and
watches the apartments simul-
taneously. The apartment com-
plex also has been the site of
several bizarre accidents, which
the audience learns from the be-
ginning are murders, leading the
press to dub it the "horror high-
rise
In the midst of all this voy-
eurismand death,a relationship
develops between two tenants
Carly Norris (Stone) and Zeke
Hawkins (Baldwin). After sev-
eral intense sexual encounters,
Carly begins to wonder if Zeke
could be the murderer.
Carly also wonders about
another man she knows named
Jack Lansford (Tom Berenger),
a pulp novelist whose brusque
demeanor frightensCarly. Carly
does not know whether to trust
him with her misgivings about
Zeke or to fear him.
Sliver was written by Joe
See SLIVER page 4
L.A. Style offers ravers something to dance to
By Richard Cranium
Staff Writer
It's dance. It's rave. It's L. A.
Style. It's a beautiful thing. But hey,
don't take my word for it, ask L A.
Style: "L. A. Style are a fun tribe of
ravers who'smain pastime is gener-
atinggood times and brain storming
music. We use today's super-tech-
nology to produce the Ravinest
soundsaround. We'reobsessed and
possessed by using samples to cre-
ate and obtain the best results pos-
sible Words of wisdom.
"James Brown is Dead a track
which is heating up dance floors
across this nation we call America,
and yea, the whole wide world, is
the first track on the album and it's
funner than getting into a movie
free.
For those who sometimes find
themselves feeling balloonular,
there's "Balloony a nitrous-oxide
generated cutthatmoveslikeasnake
that crawled into a fire-ant nest.
For those who may be unsure
what Rave is, there's "I'm Raving
which raves to the rave and defines
the rave. Rave on.
One of the coolest cuts is "Jesus
on Channel Four Here the rap is
good old-fashioned rap that hear-
kens back to the days when rap was
fun and not concerned with drugs
and sex and gang violence. Fun, fun,
fun.
And my favorite: "Twilight
Zone Ifssocooilgottosavealittle
for myself. It reminds me of that
'Twilight Zone" episode when the
flying saucer lands on the little old
lady'sroofandthelittleaJiensplague
her and no one believes her so she
destroys the space ship with an
axe! Now thafs what I call music!
Anyway, the music is unpre-
dictable, you never know when
if s going to change or something.
It's not music to listen to when
grillingharnburgersandhotdogs.
It may be driving musicdepend-
ing on where you're driving. But
if s definitely dance music I think
this music should accompany
MacGyver or something. That
would be fun and festive.
It jams! It raves! It's fun! Pull
my finger.
1 I IW.JUlllUMl,WWMHH�,J�BIPM





JUNE 2, 1993
!
Continued from page 3
m a novel (by Ira Le m),
�rhasonly received $1 million
his work. Money is not the
issue, but theexcessive sums, paid
for these cliched, derivative
scripts epitomizes th infantile
mentality running rampant in the
Hollywood studio system.
joe Esterhas is a hack who
now commands seven digit sala-
ries. One respectable script was
The jagged Edge. Instead of im-
proving his craft by learning to
tone down the plot twists in lieu
of sturdier character develop-
ment, he went to the other ex-
treme. He now takes the worst
elements of The jagged Edge script
and churns out misguided, sexu-
ally explicit trash.
To put it in the form of stan-
dardize test statement: Joe
Esterhas is to movies what
Danielle Steele is to novels.
If Sliver had explored the
world of voyeurism and its im-
plications, it may have been in-
teresting. Instead, it concentrates
on a mystery-shrouded murder
case that makes no sense.
The original ending was
changed after a preview audi-
ence vetoed it. From what can be
gathered from press reports the
origina! ending had a different
mu rderer. Nowhere in the course
of the story is there any evidence
r t
mi thatanyom � have
committed the murders. SirKe
es are attached to the
� rand the killings are never
explained, getting involved
in this part of the story proves
futile.
Thus remains the romance be-
tween Carly and Zeke which is as
satisfying as a warm glass of wa-
ter on a hot summer day. Lots of
perspiration may be on the side
of the glass but the drink is still
not pleasant.
As one member of a preview
audience succinctly put it: the sex
scenes were "juvenile, like some
high schoolerwritingon the walls
in a locker room
While on the subject of pre-
view audiences, I should men-
tion that the idea itself seems
juvenile. What kind of art can
ever evolve that tries to please
the masses? Studio executives
should learn the lesson that Aesop
taught centuries ago in his fable
about a farmer, his son and their
donkey: "In trying to please ev-
eryone, you please no one
If the filmmakers were aim-
ing at soft-core porn they needed
to look at Brian DePalma's Body
Double, which also involved voy-
eurism. (It is not a good film, but
at least it accomplished its aims.)
If the filmmakers were aim-
ing at a voyeuristic statement in-
volving murder, they needed to
look at Micheal Towell's Peeping
Tom (which is a great film). In-
stead, they watched too many
mini-seriesand thought that some
nudity would improve the type
of story so often seen on the small
screen.
In answer to the question
posed by the film: Yes, I like to
watch � but not derivative films
like Sliver.
YEAST
" cont'd from page 3
cycle � most commonly mid-
cycle or a few days before the
onset on menstruation.
Health care providers usu-
ally recommend treatment with
antifungal medications that are
sold over the counter. Be sure to
follow all instructions for the
product's correct use. Often
treatment involves a repeat
course of therapy.
Men may harbor the fungus
on the penis but have no appar-
ent symptoms. In some cases, it
is beneficial for men to undergo
treatment for yeast to avoid
reinfecting a sexual partner.
While Candida may be
transmitted during sex, it isgen-
erally not considered a sexually
transmitted disease.
If you have other questions
about a yeast infection (Can-
dida), contact Jennifer Phillips,
ECU Student Health Service,
Greenvillle, NC, 27858.
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Adult
Entertainment
f Center
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11 pm-1am
CASH PRIZE
'Contestants nerd to call & register m advance. Must arrive by 8fi0.
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
Dancers wanted
TuUeAU
Silver Bullet Bartender
ALFRE
NEW YORK STYLE
r
i
i
i
it
i
i
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We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 AIL
Dieklnaon Aye.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
f �
Combo
Lg Pizza w
topping
Pitcher of beer
$7.49
ALFREDO'S
Expires 53193
Pizza-Beer "j Pick-up
Special
1 large one j
topping
$4.99 !
218E.5thSt.
752-0022
ALFREDO'S
Expires 531TO
FEATURING
Greenville Aquarium's
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25
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PLANTASTIC
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&?.
CHECK OUT OUR WEEKLY FISH SPECIALS
MIT
ERK
(PRE
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UNIVERSITY CENTER
14TH & CHARLES ST.
757-0056
M-F 11-9 SAT 10-9 SUN 1-6
J AMERICAN
5 tXPRF" �
MasterCard.lI QlCV
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can elinunate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from roonr&l 1 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office. 200 W. 5th
Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
?Remember to attach a "letter of
credit" from your parents' power company
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
are as follows: wilh eleclric orwout electric
gas space heatingor gas space heating
Electric Only SI00S75
Electric & Water SI00S85
Electric, Water & Gas SI 10S85
Electric & Gas SI00S75
Greenville
You can save time by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where wc may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
Utilities
AT THE
TUESDAY
peve
0t DRAFT ALL NIGHTI
WEDNESDAY
CLASSICS NIGHT
with the best in classic Rock & Dance Music
$3.00 Members $4.00 Guests
0C DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � 50 Jello Shots � 75 Kamicazes
THURSDAY
DANCE RANCH!
All your favorite Country, Southern Rock & Dance Tunes.
$1.00 Members $3.00 Guests
$1.00 Domestics & $2.75 Pitchers
FRIDAY
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for All 8 til 9:00
for Members & Greek ID's
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � $2.75 Pitchers
75 Kamikazes � 75 100 M.P.H.
SATURDAY
Zaturday!
$1.00 Members $3.00 Guests $150 Zima'si $3.00 Pitchers
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Not vilid with iny other promotional offer '
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Buyers Market, Greenville
35!





TheEastCarolinian
JlllM
Classifieds
Page 5

forfent
tit
Roommate
mm� &FW1kikt1!L
terred but will
tiate.CaU752-
NEED A PLACE FOR NOW?? OR
FALL?? We have one, two and three
bedroom accommodations available.
Many choices still available within
walkingdistenceorbusaccess tocam-
pus. Call usand tell usyour needs. 752-
1375 Homekxators fee (560)
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
sharecondoinWilloughbypiirk. Own
room and bath. Washer, dryer, pool
and tennis courts. Call 756-2990.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
apartment 1 2 block from Art Bldg 3
blocks from downtown, and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great for art stu-
dents. Call 757-1947
LAIDBACK BUT CONSIDERATE
roommate needed to share house across
from campus. Do not call if you can't
clean up after yourself. Female pre-
1 WO BEDROOM APARTMENT few
rent. One block from campus, only two
blocks from downtown' Less than 1
year old. S425 per month. 1 year lease.
Can move in anytime after June 11th!
Call Greg or James at 752-0421. Leave
message.
ONE BEDROOM HOUSE for rent -
S150month, close to Art Building -
need to sublet for June and Julv only.
All utilities hooked up. Call 830-0552.
I AM LOOKING for a female room-
mate for the Fall of 1993. Preferably a
graduate or medical student. If inter-
ested please contact Liz at 757-2571
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share two bedroom apartment close to
campus Available July 1. Low utili-
ties. Water and cable included in rent.
Non-smoker preferred. CaII Jeri a 1758-
88336 for more information.
Ol
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DE A. Available your area
now. Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
SLEEPERSOFA-Excellentcondition,
very clean and cozy. $150.00. Call 757-
0692.
, il1.1 nil
j
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom. 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many posi-
tions. Great Benefits. Call 1-800-436-
4365 ext. P-3712.
JOIN FELLOW EAST CAROLINA
LADIES making 100's a day escorting
intheGreenvillearea. Musthaveown
transportation, own phone and outgo-
ing personality; must be very self con-
scious and well groomed. We offer
flexible hours to work around classes
and nights. For more information call
pager757-5657. All information held
in strictest confidence.
EASY WORK! Excellent pay! As-
semble products at home. Call toll free
1-8CXM67-5566 ext. 5920.
RECREATION EXERCISE PART-
NERS - Recreational Services needs
students to serve as Adapted recre-
ation assistants for students, faculty
and staff with disabilities. The Part-
ners in Weil-Being program provides
one-on-one programs for disabled in-
dividuals. Contact David Gaskins at
757-6387 or complete an application
form in 204 Christenbury Gymnasium
MOTHERS HAS CHANGED OWN-
ERSHIP and is looking for enthusiastic
entertainers! Easy $$ and excellent
hours. Call Alex at 734-3777 after 12
noon, M-F.
ssssssssssssssss
APPLY NOW
$9.25 to Start
Vector has summer
openings in Raleigh
area. Ideal for college
students. For details
call 782-8006.
SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS
NEED A SITTER? Experienced 20 year-
old willcare for any age childduringday
andeveninghours. Contact Amyat758-
8873. Ifyoudon'treachmeinitially,keep
trying!
HANG GLIDE AT NAGS HEAD,
NORTH CAROLINA! For a weekend
or a week of adventure and fun! Kitty
Hawk Kites' beginner hang gliding les-
son $49 per person (show college ID). 1-
800-3344777. Sun Realty's modern
beach cottages S250perweekend or 350
per week (plus applicable taxes, fees
and security deposit). 1-800-3344745.
Offer good through early May 1993.
Call today for availabilities. (Some
restrictionsapply).
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
�English Literature Major
�Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Composed Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
TALL, ATTRACTIVE SWM in
mid 30s, athletic, enjoy running
and cycling, looking to meet at-
tractive SWF, same age or younger,
with similar interests. Enjoy ro-
mantic dinners, movies, concerts,
beach. Easy going, a real nice guy.
Send replies to SWM, P.O. Box
4004, Greenville, 27836. Photo pre-
ferred, please.
Announcements
RFCRF.ATIONAL SERVICES
Summer Adventures - The Rec-
reationalOutdoorCenterwillbeoffer-
ing the following adventure programs.
Registration begins now for:
- Climbing workshop held June
3 at 3:00 PM.
- Beach horseback riding trip held
June 6 to Cedar Island.
- Raftingclimbing trip held June
11-12.
For details call Recreational Services
at 757-6911.
RFCRFATIONALSERVICES
Climb High this summer! The
Hard Rock tower will be open forclimb-
ing workshops and d rop-in su pervised
climbingbothl stand 2nd summer ses-
sions. Drop-in passes maybe purchased
Mon-Fri and Sundays for 51.00 perday.
Purchase a semester pass for S25.00.
Climbing workshops introduce users
to the sport of rock climbing and repel-
ling including belay systems,
bouldering, movement techniquesand
equipment. Workshops a re offered for
S5.00 for a two hour session. Call Rec-
reational Services at 757-6911 for more
details.
RFCR B ATION1 Al SERVICES
Summer Recreation - Recreation
services will be offering the following
summer programs for ECU students,
faculty and staff. Registration meet-
ings are as follows:
Volleyball Registration - June 2,
4.00 PM, BIO 103.
Frisbee Golf Singles -June 8, 4:00
I'M, BIO 103.
BigSplashGolf-June8, 4:30PM,
BIO 103.
Roundball Rama - June 15, 4:00
PM, BIO 103.
For details call Recreational Services at
757-6387.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Classifieds
25 words a less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
iach additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East CaHinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
timesfreeof charge. Duetothelimited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements
Deadlines
Monday 4 p.m. for
Wednesday's edition.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled beforelOa.m. the day priorto
publication however, no refunds will
be given.
For more
Information call
757-6366.
Pirate Comics
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the art of sequential storytelling and have fairly strong drawing skills, give
Chris Kemple a call at 757-6366. If you stink, don't bother.
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The East Carolinian
Opinion
WednesdayOpinion
Riding the Mobius
Page 6
By Jason Tremblay
Parking woes ignored I Toothy Barney faces immediate extinction
' "I love you, you love me working in real life. Around everv Sesame Strpnt whpn I'm ru,ii� k4i j
Dangling the proverbial worm
fails to deter angry, frustrated
students
"Beautification" is a ten-cent word. It calls
to mind elderly Victorian ladies tending to their
gardens or Civil War widows tidying up the
cemetery plots of loved ones slain. Never mind
that, beautification is the current project on
East Carolina's list.
The project calls for the removal of the
green maintenancebuilding near General Class-
room and the transfer of all materials and ve-
hicles housed in and around the structure to the
buildings behind Eppes Middle School.
Soon beautification will be coming to our
neighborhood with bells on and trumpets a-
blast. Unfortunately, appeasement is like fire;
it's not a good idea to play with it. You could
very easily get burned. (Did they really think
they could fool us?)
You may or may not be aware of the park-
ing problem plaguing this campus. Without
going on and on about it�it's a problem. There
are, very simply, not enough spaces to accom-
modate students with cars. The result is clogged
streets around the university area, something
the residents are not too pleased about. Who
can blame them?
The university announced during the
spring semester that even though the action
would compound the lack of parking spaces, a
recreation
center would
be con-
st r u c t ed .
"That sounds
great you
say. Nope.
Think again.
This recre-
ation center
will take
away 300 cov-
eted, hungered-after spaces. Instead of park-
ing, students will have a place to recreate.
This decision was met with frustrated cries,
well-directed cursing and a surrender or two.
Student-peons broken by the whip of numer-
ous administrations chalked it up to another
win for the bureaucracy.
It's not over. Last week it was reported in
The East Carolinian that the university is plan-
ning on prettifying those areas deemed "eye-
sores Good! We're all for it! Except don't
expect us to leap for joy and turn cartwheels.
Because in the very next breath, we are made
aware of the fact that beautifying would give
us approximately 30 more parking spaces and
some foliage. That's small fries in exchange for
the removal of a building.
Let's clarify: Nature is a wild and wonder-
ful thing. I can't think of anyone who hates
Nature. The removal of the sinfully-ugly, green
building across from General Classroom will
definitely make that area of campus softer on
the eyes.
However, the complaint is that the univer-
sity seems to think they can dangle "beautifica-
tion projects" and "recreation centers" in front
of our eyes so that we forget about parking
woes.
Sorry guys, it just isn't going to happen
this time. We're all a little too sharp for that.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Joseph Horst, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Karen Hassell, News Editor
Wan en Sumner, Asst. News Editor
Dana DanieLson, lifestyle Editor
Julie Totten, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Robert S. Tttdd, Sports Editor
Mis ha Zonn, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Rhonda Owens, Copy Editor
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Burt Aycnck, layout Manager
Franco San hi, Asst. layout Manager
Tony (had wick, Creative Director
Cedric Van Buren. Photo Editor
Chris Kemple, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editiirial Board. The Etui Carolinian welcomes Idlers, hmiled lo 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East (arolinum reserves the right to edit or leje0 V tiers lor
publication. Letters should be addressed to Ilie Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg ECl Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call (91V) 757-6366.
Printed on
11X1 recycled
paper
"I love you, you love me
KABOOM!
Barney must die.
Doubtless you've seen his
toothy simpleton-esquegrin some-
where: Time-Life video commer-
cials, lunchboxes, toy store shelves,
etc. He's big. He's purple. He's so
fraggin'sickeningly sweet thathe'll
give you cavities if you watch his
show and don't floss afterwards.
He's Barney.
Barney, the latest in a long
line of childhood pop icons, has
got to be the most annoying and
disgusting one thus far. Trying to
follow in the footsteps of such pub-
lic TV giants as Big Bird and the
Cookie Monster, Barney seems to
have stolen the hearts of easily
d uped youngstersacross the coun-
try, at least for the time being.
The theory behind the Barney
phenomena is a fairly simple one:
design somethingcuteand lovable,
and the kids will eat it up, both on
the screenand on the shelves. Tragi-
cally, this theory does seem to be
working in real life. Around every
corner, there seems to be some in-
dication that Barney Was There.
Themain problem I have with
Barney is that his show seems de-
signed for and played by idiots.
The children look to be either de-
praved junior high school kids or
post-kindergarten lobotomy
throwbacks. They all prance about
the stage singing simplistic songs
about whatever trendy topic
Barney's producers have chosen
for that particular episode.
I can remember a time when
I sat in front of the television every
morning, at 7 a.m. watching PBS,
learning about the world around
me from "Sesame Street not to
mention laughing as I did it. Big
Bird, Cookie Monster, Bert and
Ernie, and a host of other Hen son
masterpieces have infinitely more
character and moreintelligenceand
appeal than the relatively expres-
sionless purpledinosaur known as
Barney.
In fact, I sometimes still watch
Sesame Street when I'm really
bored , and I still find it entertain-
ing, imaginative and even infor-
mative at times. Believe it or not,
my college-educated self learned
something new the last time I
watched "Sesame Street
Barney, on the other hand,
doesn't even qualify to buy com-
mercial time during "Sesame
Street I grew weary of the shriek
in Bamey'sshowafter the first three
minutes, not to mention the fact
that he's so damn "cute" that he
makes me want to puke. 1 won't
even comment on his reptilian co-
hort Baby Bop, or whatever her
name is. (I shudder to think of the
unholy product that would be the
result of a carnal union 'twixt
Barney and the Babe)
If you pay close attention to
the Muppets used in Henson'spro-
duction, you will notice that the
characters all display a profound
capability for expression. Barney,
at least from what I'veseen, has the
awesome capabilities of lycra-neck
bending and oversized jaw
flappin Pretty impressive stuff,
huh?
Despite all of these inad-
equacies, the kids still seem to
love himanyway (which doesn't
say too much for the taste of the
"New Generation Pepsi drink-
ers or no). But hey, I guess if it
makes 'em happy, more dippy
dinos to 'em. Make some poor
(in every sense of the word) pup-
peteer wealthy. Eventually the
kids will come around; then
Barney will join the New Kidson
the Block, Garbage Pail Kidsand
Velcro sneakers (that pile of junk
that was once the hottest fad, but
fell from public grace and was
lost to the world).
As for me, I think I'll stick
with the classics and chili with
Big Bird and Company, just wait-
ing for that glorious day when
Barney spontaneously combusts.
Now stop reading, think
aboutit, go geta pizza,and watch
some cartoons
QuotesoftheDay
TV� chewing gum for the eyes.
Frank Lloyd Wright
I find television very educating. Every time
somebody turns on the set I go Into the other
room and read a book.
GrouchoMarx
A blSPAtCH rROM
MAGAZINE
liie Usual Suspects
Think profoundly, act locally.
So. ialitc novelist Norman Mailer has
apparently launched himself into
yei anothet vocation: ecowarrior.
Not lone, ago he was taking out Ills
trash in from t Ins Brooklyn
hrnwnstone when he noticed
a neighbor abstntmindedly putting
,i bag o( ordinary garbage into
a recycling can "What arc yon
doing?" snapped the man who
writes deforesting, thousand-page
unread books. The young woman,
in whom Mailer had nevei he
fore spoken, looker! up, startled,
and Mailer berated her, "It's a
recycling day he tried, "flans,
bottles, papers! Anyone can see
that And so. little by little, the
planer is saved
Busy bachelor dad Jack Nicholson is
perhaps finally feeling Ins age. He
was in Pans not long ago, promoting
Hof.i, and his labors int hided being
interviewed by a comely young jmtr-
native, lie answered iiestions for a
while bur then decided to remind
the interviewer that hi hadn't always
been Ins current, slow-moving, Bran-
do-size self. Yon tunic, he said, in the
i.l.l l,n. .ific ( minutti � thh, I
ui.ttltll,ttt tritdtofmkytm II Nichol-
son had hoped his line would be pro
voiative V7. AI Nicholson, uh.tt In
yon mean, "zee oJ he was dis-
appointed. The reporter simply con-
firmed his intuition that he probably
seemed fairly de rcpit to her She re
plied. Oh, 7,7,i funny- 20 years ago yon
tried to fuck my mother, f)
TO THf
-And, j)G
-U.L

Alt,
dUO Ml
DM Ml'
' i r- , ii )�
By T. Scott Batchelor
Cable options
slim considering
high rates
Flipping through mycableTVchannels
the other day, I decided to lock out a few
offerings which I rarely watch.
My VCR has a lock out feature so when
I channel surf, I don't have to stop on the
channels I don't like.
Over the past two years I have already
eliminated some of thecabledeadwood from
my TV. I don't receive any of the premium
channels like HBO and Showtime, so I have
those locked out. Ditto the twopublicaffairs
electronic bulletin board channels.
When I finished performing this latest
operation, I took a survey of the channels I
had left to watch. The results were disheart-
ening.
I had: Fox,TBS,PBS(for"Are You Being
Served"), TNN (for that sexy country dance
show), both CNN and Headline News, local
NBC, CBS, and ABC affiliates.
My TV also offered QVC, ESPN, TNT,
C-Span, FAM, the Weather Channel, LIFE,
USA (for Rhonda), MTV (which I'm on the
verge of dispatching), NIK, A&E,WRAL (the
CBSaffiliateoutof Raleigh), WGNand lastly,
E! the Entertainment Channel.
That comes up to a grand total of 23
channels. Remember, I can pick up at least six
of these stations�Fox, PBS, ABC, NBC and
both the local and Raleigh CBS stations�
without subscribing to a cable TV service.
That leaves only 17 true cable channels that I
watch.
I must be honest here, though. Of those
remaining 17 offering, I rarely watch TNN
(strictly country stuff); MTV (strictly strange
stuff); QVC (not really a television networkat
all); ESPN (I'm not a sports junkie); C-Span
(turns into sports networkaround sixo'clock);
FAM (just the "Waltons" channel); the
Weather Channel (I don't do barbiturates);
LIFE (I'm not a feminist); NIK (I'm not a
communist�and if you don't get that refer-
ence, you probably voted for Clinton); or E!
The Entertainment Channel.
This paired-down list leaves me with a
totaloflOcablechannelsthatare worth watch-
ing. Ten.
Now, let'stalkeeonomics. Mylast cable
bill was for almost $21. Thatcomesouttoover
$2 per channel. Which leads me to thisques-
tion: Are we getting our money's worth from
cable TV? Of course, the answer is no.
What I propose to the friendly and well-
intentioned local cable TV folks is this: either
drop the rates toabout $10 a month, or throw
in the Discover Channel, along with IIBO,
Cinemax or Showtime.
Unfortunately, I doubt they'll go along
with my suggestion, which is ironic because
they recently installed brand-new state-of-
the-art transmission and cableeojuipment "in
order to serve you better This is like Wal-
Mart buildinganew store and sellingonly 10
items.
The cable company's efforts seem sort
ofwastedonjust 10 channels. The problem is,
there'sonlyonecablecarrienntown,soeven
if they gave us only one channel that played
"A-Team"rerurus24hoursaday,wewouldn't
have much recourse in the matter.
So when you think about it, competi-
tion in the market place i a good thing.
Yeah, 1 guess that's what I'm really
trying to say.





The East Carolinian
June 2, 1
Sports
Page 7
Disc-golf popularity rising
By Matthew Wright
Staff Writer
"Having fun and getting ex-
posed to the game Jimmy Smith
said. "That's what these touma-
mentsare really all about Smith is
one of the organizers of the weekly
Disc-Golf doubles tournaments that
are held next to Harrington Field
on campus.
Disc-Golf isa sport that isgain-
ing popu-
44
File Photo
Frisbees at ECU can be used in a number of ways. For those not
athletic enough for Ultimax (above), try the disc-golf course.
larity both
on campus
and in the
community
of Green-
ville itself.
While these
doubles
tourna-
ments may
be about
fun, these
athletes take their sport seriously.
"Some people come out here
with seven or eight discs Smith
said.
There are many types of discs.
They differ in the distance they fly,
in accuracy, and in the way one
throws them. Forexample, the ones
with a larger dome fly fai ther than
ones that are more shallow.
All kinds of people play this
sport.
"We have players coming out
that range from 10 to 75 years of
age Smith said. "Frisbee golf is a
sport that anyone can play With
theagesoftheseplayers,theappeal
of this sport is obviously not lim-
ited to people on campus. The ma-
jority of playerscome from thecom-
munity, according to Smith.
Event organizers say the popu-
larity of this sport is growing rap-
idly.
"On a good day we'll have as
many as 100 people come through
and play the course Smith said.
There are
similarities
between disc-
golf and the
original golf.
You have to
tee of fin disc-
golf. When
the disc is re-
leased, your
feet must be
within the tee
box. The disc
NGAS awards
s
12 education scholarships will be
Siven during state games
We have players
coming out that
range from 10 to
75 years of age. "
Jimmy Smith
is considered in play unlessit lands
in pre-designated out-of-bounds
areas, such as a road or someone's
backyard.
Disc-golfalsohashazardssimi-
lartogolf. The most obvious would
be the trees. Over half of the holes
on the course are in a wooded area.
"Patience and accuracy are really
needed when you're in the trees
says Smith.
For those whu are accurate
enough to throw an "ace" (hole-in-
SeeDISC page 8
DURHAHNORTH CARO-
LINA � The North Carolina
Amateur Sports Endowment
Fund will provide 12 education
scholarships through the State
Games of North Carolina pro-
gram, it was announced today
by Ms. Winkle La Force, presi-
dent of North Carolina Amateur
Sports (NCAS).
The 12 scholarshi psof $1,000
each will be offered to partki
pating State Games of North-
Carolina athletes who havedem-
onstrated an exceptional com-
mitment to education through
their own;achievements in
school as well as through their
athletic endeavors.
"These scholarship awards
recognize young people whose
efforts, spirit and dedication, in
addition totheirathteticandaca-
demicachievements, uphold the
high standards of personal and
physical adievernentasspciated
with the Olympics said La
ForceWe'reextremely pleased
tobe able togive our Norm Caro-
lina athletes this opportunity to
pursue their educational
dreams
The scholarship is open to
juniors at North Carolina sec
ondary schools who participate
in the 1993 NCAS State Games
of North Carolina. Twelve
scholarships will be awarded;
two males and two females
from each of the three regional
competi tion areas that make up
the State Games of North Caro-
una will be selected based on
thefr record of academic
achievement arid overall aca-
demic improvement; their par-
ticipation in State Games; and
their leadership skills and com-
munity involvement The re-
gional competitionareas aredi-
vided into western, central and
eastern North Carolina. Six
scholarships will "beawarded
during two grant cycles (July
15 and January 15).
For further information and
application forms, contact
North Carolina Amateur
Sports, Attn; Scholarships, PO
Box 12727, Research Triangle
Park, N.C 27709 or call at i
800-222-8763 across North
Carolina or 919-361 -1133 in the
Triangle.
1993 ECAC Div. I all-star team
Watkins shares POY award
FIRST TEAM
Pitchers
Steve Reich
JonRatliff
Kevin Loewe
Catcher
MikeHiggins
First Base
Marcus Lee
Second Base
Michael Martin Boston College
Third Base
Army
LeMoyne
Baltimore County
Rutgers
Navy
SR Washington,CT
JR Clay,NY
SO Perry Hall, MD
SR Nutley,NJ
JR San Diego, CA
JR Swansea, MA
CENTERVTLLE,Mass.�Two
of the leading hitters in the nation
have been named 1993 Eastern
College Athletic conference Divi-
sion I Baseball Co-Players of the
Year.
Junior outfielder Pat Watkins
of EastCarolina University and jun-
ior shortstop Dave Smith of Le
Moyne College have been named
co-red pientsof the ECAC Division
1 Baseball of the Year by the 80
Division I coaches and sports infor-
mation directors.
Watkins, named totheMizuno
second all-america, has led the Pi-
rates to a 40-17 record, the Colonial
A.A. Tournament Championship
and aberth in theNC AARegionals.
The CAA Player of the Year was
batting .445 with 19 home runs and
56 RBI, wlule also stealing 19 bases
and scoring 62 runs.
The Garner, N.C, native has
alsocompiled a .780 sluggingaver-
age and a .498 on-base pet. He led
all ECAC hitters in home runs and
was among the leaders in batting
average and RBI.
The hard-hitting Smith led Le
Moyne to a 34-6 record, the MAAC
North Title and the top seed in the
ECAC Division I Baseball Tourna-
ment at Waterbury, Conn. The
Dolphinsdroppedaheart-break-
ing 15-14 finale to ECAC Cham-
pion Fordham University Sun-
day in a game televised on
SportsChannel New England,
New York and Chicago.
Smith, a Cheektowage, N. Y,
native batted .441 and broke
school records with 14homeruns
and 64 runs scored. He knocked
in 66 runs, second on the team. He
was among the nation's leaders
in hitting, HR per game and RBI
per game. Smith was selected to
the GTE Academic All-America
Team, compiling a 3.58 GPA in
physics.
JackStanczak VillanovaJRPhiladelphia, PA
Shortstop
Dave Smith LeMoyneJRCheektowga,NY
Outfield
DenrtisDvvyer UConnJRHarrisville, RI
Pat Watkins East CarolinaJRGarner, NC
Jay Logwood Towson StateSRRandalstown, MD
Designated Hitter
Kevin Armstrong VillanovaSRHarvard, MA
Jordan silences casino critics
Indianapolis 500 lives up to billing
rNDIANAPOLIS(AP)�Too
slow. Too much traffic. Too little
fun.
If this were any other Sunday
drive, it would have been rated a
disaster. Instead, those elements
came together to produce theclos-
est, most competitive and most
memorable Indianapolis 500 in a
long, long time.
"We finished � forget where
we finished said Dominic Dob-
son who, for the record, finished
23rd. "This was one of the most
amazing races I haveever been in.
"When has there been this
many cars finish? I would never
in my wildest dreams have
thought 24 cars would finish the
Indy 500. If they were going into
this race to have a slower, safer
and more competitive Indy 500
he added, "then they hit on all
three
That opinion was hardly
unanimous.
"Tobe honest, racing hasbeen
more fun here Dutchman Arie
Luyendyk said. He finished sec-
ond . Canadian Paul Tracy likened
his day to being stuck on the "in-
terstate behind traffic in both lanes
going 35 mph He finished 30th.
But nearly everyone who fin-
ished ahead, between or behind
those two had better things to say
about a race and a reconfigured
track that kept the drivers closer
together in the corners and far-
ther apart on the way to the pits.
Those changes were respon-
sible for a fast lap Sunday of only
214.870 mph � nearly 15 mph
slower than last year's fast lap.
But they may also have been the
reason for all the suspense Sun-
day.
There were 12 different lead-
ers, 24 lead changes, an incredible
10 drivers on the lead lap at the
end, and an even more incredible
twodozencarsstill running when
the checkered flags were waved.
Unpredictability, in fact, was the
order of the day:
Emerson Fittipaldi gulped or-
ange juice in Victory Laneinstead
of the traditional first swigof milk
from a bottle, sending shock
waves through the state's dairy
industry.
Four-time winner Rick Mears
came onto the track behind the
wheel of a golf cart instead of a
race car. Four-time winner A.J.
Foyt exploded in rage only twice
during the race instead of the cus-
tomary two dozen times. Even
the rowdies in the infield behaved.
All day long.
That is not to say there weren't
problems.
"It was very tough to follow
the car ahead of you Fittipaldi
said. "The turbulence was high;
there was only one groove, one
line, and it was very difficult to
maneuver in traffic.
"But you know, I think the
track was safer. I think we had a
much safer race than last year. I
think he added, "the track
achieved what they wanted to
achieve with safety
Until Sunday'sconclusion, no
one could be certain the changes
wou Id prod uce any of the desired
results � let alone all of them.
The owner and crews who were
going to be the guinea pigs for
thisexperimentworried aboutthe
new guidelines and penalties to
improve traffic flow in the pits. In
one breath, a driver would say
that he was prepared to show re-
straint in the narrower comers; in
the next, he'd say he couldn't be
certain about the next guy.
"There were various predic-
tions on what would happen in
the race. Some people predicted
there would be a mammoth junk
pileinthefirstturn,butthatdidn't
happen said owner John
Menard, whose best finisher from
a three-car entry was Eddie
CheeveratNo. 16.
CHICAGO (AP) � Here is his
answer to those who either wrote or
read about him gambling at a casino
the night before Game 2 and won-
dered whether Michael Jordan would
be the player who finally stopped
Michael Jordan:
Fifty-four points. For the record,
Jordan didn't talk to reporters Mon-
day, but then, he can afford not to.
Even if he keeps his own counsel for
whatcouldbelOmoregames�three
against the Knicks, seven in the NBA
finals � whatever the league fines
him won't amount to much more
than walking-around money. To be
sure, the charity mat eets it will be
grateful. His teammate already are.
"It gives us an opportunity to
speak out a little bit Scottie Pippen
said.
"It gives me an opportunity
HoraceGrantchimed intogetafew
endorsements
Wecanassumethatwasnotwhat
Jordan had in mind. Itseems the idea
wasn't just to score. He can do that
almost any time. No, it seems the idea
this time wastosettleascore. With the
NlewYorkKnicksingeneralndJohn
Starks,GregAnthonyandDocRivers
in particular. With those people who
suggested they knew betterhowtogo
about the business of being 'Michael
Jordan than he did.
"Different people read different
things into different games that he
plays James Jordan said. "Me, I see
the same thing every game
Jordan's fa ther was speaking in a
hallway ofChicagoStadiu mon Mon-
daynightafewmomentsafterhisson
ledChkagotoa 105-95 win thatevened
the Eastern Conference series at 2-2.
"Hewasinadifferentspacefrom
everybodyelse'BullscoachPhil Jack-
son said. "We told him that 10assists
wouldmeanasmuchas40points.But
we didn't say anything about 50
Jordan had 45 of those points by
thethirdquarter.Still,uptothatpoint,
Starks, his principal nemesis, had
fought Jordan to as dose to a draw as
anyone could have. He had 22 points
of his own and kept New York from
being run over by the steaming,
steam-rolling Jordan.
"1 was playing good defense
Starks said. "He really didn't have a
lot of urx-ontested shots. I've seen
him do this before. I'm not frus-
trated. I'm looking at the score, not
his points
Good thing, that Because just
five minutes into the final quarter,
New York trailed only 91-84 and
Jordan washeaded tohebenchafter
picking up his fourth and fifth fouls
40 seconds apart And as much as
Jordan'spresencehad madetheBulls,
hisabsence threatened toundothem
� largely because running mates
Pippen and Grant had only two
points between them since halftime.
"That was the key three min-
utes Jackson said, "when Michael
had togotothe bench. Wemadeour
stand and were able to hold off any
See BULLS page 8
Air Ball!
Hoops are
hard to
find since
the
removal of
the rims
on Collese
Hill and
behind
Umstead
Residence
Hall.
�HMI ��





JUNE 2, 1993
Continued from page 7
DISC
i 1 hen he J rie
Continued from page 7
Asked about the conversation to it than that
l,RivensaidherepliedNo "Itwas&ivial'Riveresaid.
iway with one "and warned Notthfetime-NlottoMJchaelJor-
tattadiinganyrnoresignificance dan,anyway.
FRESH-NOW IN
CALIFORNIA STONE
FRUIT & GRAPES
1534 E. 14th St.
757-3311
2 LBS.
for$1
VIDALIA
ONIONS
HOURS
Mon-Sat 8am 6:30pm
Sun 12-5
Complete Floral Service
Kjs, Parties ruiie?Hls Hfisfirlal
All Sporial Ocnsuins
Open 7 Days � We�k
Mr, "�ll 10-9
��urul.iy I 10 f. JO
Univcrcsity Flowers
OF GREENVILLE
"Offering Quality. Selections, Value"
Greg Harrison
?R Carolina Easl Mall
Greenville NC ?7H;u
D'i very Service Available
Cftarcje by Pin m a Hi v ur Chary Card
(919)756-9897
Roses19.95
-
. - d which builds up
:t'ka"holein-one
FTiat person wins however much
money has accumulated.
The pool doesn't usually get
mt high because, according to
Smith, someone usually hits one
ace a week.
Appropriately, the first tour-
nament of the summer, this past
Monday, had an ace on the 17th
hole. Monday'sbad weather didn't
deter the It! hard-core disc golfers
who decided to take on the ele-
ments, as well as each other.
The rain hurt our turnout tre-
ousl) 'SmithsaidWegen-
erally average about 20 players
The team of Doug Poczoetek
and Kevin Clifton wasable toover-
come the rain and the other four
teams to capture the win in the first
tournament It wasClifton who sank
the ace to capture the ace pool for
this week.
Tou mamen ts are played every
Monday afternoon at 6 p.m. Regis-
tration begins at 530 p.m. between
Harrington Field and the Softball
field. Registration is twodollarswith
an additional dollar required for
the aces pool.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
DOGWOOD HOLLOW
APARTMENTS
11 OS E. 10th Street
PRE-LEASING FOR
JULY & AUGUST 1993
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 full bath units
with all major appliances.
Located within walking distance to campus.
CALL 752-8900 or stop by the office
Apartment 1-H Monday - Friday 4:00 - 5:30
AWARDED 1
VANILLA
in USA by Nicyra
Buy 1 Get 1 Fuse
Mini-Sundae
hank's Homemade ice cream
1316 e. 10th st greenville, nc
758-0000
i EXPIRES 060893
Limit 1 per customer. Not viilkl with any other promotion.
BLUE PLANET LifeFoods)
1
405 EVANS ST.
758-0850 Hrs: 10-6 M-F; 10-5 Sat
!Hair is flair BimriylSiloii
WEEKLY SPECIALS
Two For The Price Of One On Tuesdays.
Students get 2)off regular prices.
Call for an appointment. 321-6960
Greenville Buxers Market
Open Man-Sat 9am-Vpm
lue Planet Cafe
OOPS!
In ,i May 26 article, the hours of operation for the Croatan should have been reported as follows:
Mon-Thur. 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. and Fri. 7:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m. College Hill and Mendenhall Dining
rKill- will operate on a separate schedule during Orientation.
TEC apologizes for any inconvenience.
Summer
Frame Sale
50 Off Any Frame in Stock
(with purchase of lenses)
Lenses must include scratch
resistant coating and
UV filter.
Great Time For R x Sunglasses
Attention Student
Organizations
Get a Booth for
FRESHMAN
ORIENTATION
8reenville
pticiansjnc.
PRESCRIPTION EYEGLASSES
SUNGLASSES-MAGNIFIERS
N ISIGN AIDS
ilhtlniina Nelson
OPTICIAN
(919)752-4018
�Increase enrollment in your organization
�Increase awareness of programs offered by your organization
�Let students know what rewarding activities ECU has to
offer them
DATES
June 14,17,21,28
July 1,8
TIME
11-1
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 2, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 02, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.945
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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