The East Carolinian, May 19, 1993







ry
t aft" a
D
Lifestyle
New Moving Targets Release
Moving Targets' release
considered not worth
the 'Ride' or the money.
See story page 7.
The East Carolinian
l. 68 No. 32
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Wednesday, May 19,1993
14 Pages
ECU graduates 2,100 in 84th commencement
Always the lovers of a joyous occasion, these ECU graduates show how it feels to
finally be considered alumni.
Pho�o by Csdric Van Buren
By Karen Hassell
News Editor
Inone of the largest commence-
ments ever held at ECU, about 2,100
studentsgraduated on Saturday May
8. In a ceremony that lasted just un-
der two hours, this group of exuber-
ant Pirates had the title of student
stripped away and in its place, be-
stowed the honor of alumnus.
"We are no longer East Caro-
lina Universi ty students, we a re now
East Carolina University alumni
said Michael O'Hoppe, president of
the senior class. "We can no longer
start drinking at 3 p.m. on week-
days
With an informality fitting the
atmosphere inherent to ECU, gradu-
ates came bearing signs of "Thanx
Mom & Dad and mortarboards
graced with the words "Will Work
For Food Purple and Gold balloons
periodically floated upward toward
theheavensand champagnespewed
forth dousing cap and gown alike.
All this took place before the
ceremony was over.
Acombinationoftheconstruc-
tion currently taking place at Ficklen
Stadium and the large crowd forced
many guests to stand in the sidelines
and at times tempted them to wan-
der out onto the field.
Playing on a long-time joke at
ECU,OTfoppegave thanks, "Thanks
to our family and friends who have
helped us through the past four, five,
even six years of our lives
John Jackson Beard HI, co-an-
chor of the4p.m. edition of Chawiel4
News, which airs weekdays on
KNBC-TV, the NBC-owned station
in Burbank, California, delivered the
commencement address at ECU'S
84th spring commencement.
Beard, a native of NC, studied
broadcastingand speechatECU,and
graduated in 1975. He has been hon-
ored several times for excellence in
broadcasting, and has received
Emmy Awards for news and feature
reporting and several Golden Mike
Awards for anchoring and report-
ing. He has been voted best news
anchor in three annual Los Angeles
newspaper readers' polls and was
critics' choice as best news anchor
inthel990TVnews"dreamteam"
ratings.
Beard offered advice to stu-
dents who are currently studying
in thebroadcasting field, a piece
of advice, if I were you, I would go
to dental school
Beard's advice to the gradu-
ates consisted of three keys to a
meaningful life. The first is imagi-
nation, the second education and
the third, conscience. Heasked the
graduatestorememberwhatMark
Twain said, "If you tell the truth,
you don't have to remember any-
thing
The University Award, the
most prestigious honor bestowed
on an East Carolina University
undergraduate student, was pre-
sented to Gillian Kim Ashley of
Fayetteville,SandraRupesh Singh
ofEdentonand CraigStephenSpitz
of Greenville. The award, spon-
sored by the Alumni Association,
See GRADUATES page 2
Academic accreditation relies
on state funding to survive
By Warren Summer
Assistant News Editor
The North Carolina Gen-
eral Assembly is preparing to
review a new piece of legislation
that has many East Carolina ad-
ministratorswatching closely. A
$29 million bill, currently sub-
mitted to both houses of the leg-
islature, is expected to be passed
sometime this summer. These
funds are necessary to expand
the university's library facilities,
a crucial part of maintaining the
university's academic accredita-
tion.
Charles McLawhorn, a rep-
resentative of eastern North
Carolina in the House, said he
believes the chances for passing
the bill are extremely good and
that enactment of the bill is long
overdue.
"I feel like we'll get these
funds McLawhorn said. "If we
don't get them through the bill,
I feel like they will come from
the (state) bonds program
McLawhorn said that re-
cent improvements in university
image have helped legislators
pay more attention to ECU and
said that he hopes that this new-
found publicity will translate
into future legislative success.
"I think their eyes are open
more now than they have been
in the past. We are now first on
the list for new funding and I
think that they are beginning to
understand about the school
McLawhorn said he has no-
ticed a difference in the levels of
funding that ECU has received
in comparison to its contempo-
raries in other parts of the state.
"It's certainly looked (un-
fair) in the past he said.
"(North) Carolina and (North
Carolina) State are always well
represented on the assembly
with the alumni and all
Dr. Marlene Springer, vice-
chancellor for academic affairs,
denied that ECU is in serious
trouble of losing accreditation,
but said that gaining the sup-
port of the legislature is very
important for the continued suc-
cess of the university. She said
that when she arrived at the uni-
versity four and a half years ago,
the money was appropriated by
the General Assembly, but had
to be retracted due to budget
problems.
"It's always frustrating
when you encounter funding
problems, but you have to stay
optimistic Springer saidI'm
very optimistic about the bill's
chances. I've been told its the
number one priority and that
we've got the support of local
legislators, which is important
Moving
In
After a two
week
summer
break, ECU
students file
back to
school.
Graduate student
elected to chair
Democratic party
Professors teach via telephone lines
By Shannon Cooper
Staff Writer
ECU is represented by one
:f it's graduate students in the
ITiird District Democratic party.
David Elliott was elected by 350
jelegates from eastern North
Zarolina as the Chairman of the
Third District Democratic Party.
As the new chairman,
Elliott will be representing over
250,000 Democrats from east-
ern North Carolina.
He will be responsible for
organizing the Democratic
jarty in 19 eastern North Caro-
ina counties.
Elliott, active in politics
ince 1984, has campaigned for
Democratic Senatorial Candi-
date Harvey Gant, has held the
jresidential office of the Pitt
lounty Young Democrats and
jlso of East Carolina's College
Democrats.
"It's really remarkable that
ive have ties with someone who
an make a tremendous differ-
ence in the Democratic party
Thomas Blue, College Democrat
president, said.
Elliott'scampaigning pro-
cess included mailing letters to
the delegates expressing his in-
terest in being chairman and
campaigning throughout the 19
counties in eastern North Caro-
lina.
"I campaigned for it like
you would foranyothercounty
office Elliott said.
Elliott said thatduringhis
term his goals are to get more
people involved in the Demo-
cratic party and to gain more
Democratic power in the Con-
gressional State House and Sen-
ate.
"My main focus is on the
mid-term congressional elec-
tion Elliott said.
Blue has an optimistic out-
look on the future of the Col-
lege Democrats. "1 hope that
others involved in our party will
go on to accomplish as much as
David Elliott has he said.
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
ECU and Carolina Tele-
phone & Telegraph Co. are tak-
ing pa rt in a joint project that will
allow communities in eastern
North Carolina to share informa-
tion and resources.
The project, called the Net-
work for Interactive Learning in
Eastern Carolina (NILEC), will
permit the transmission of live
video and aud io communication
and the exchange of data over
telephone lines between Green-
ville and other communities.
"NILEC is at the leading
edge of a wave of advances in
communications technologies be-
ing used to build a national net-
work of electronic information
highways said David Balch, di-
rector of the ECU Center for
Health SciencesCommunication
and a coordinator of the project.
According to Balch, NILEC
is a working example of the pro-
posed statewidecommunications
network for North Carolina that
Gov. Hunt announced on May
10.
The testing for NILEC be-
gan in January and since then
professors from ECU have been
teaching nursing and teacher
education courses to students in
Jacksonville and Ahoskie. In-
structors at Pitt have taught ra-
diologic technology courses
through the network.
Medical doctors in Green-
ville have examined patients at
other sites using an electronic
stethoscope and other diagnostic
tools.
According to Balch, NILEC
will best serve smaller hospitals
that do not have access to spe-
cialists. NILEC can serve as a
pipeline to various physicians in
these facilities.
In addition to serving medi-
cal needs, NILEC will be benefi-
cial to people trying to gain
access to Joyner library. Even-
tually, individuals with com-
puters will be able to retrieve
media resources from Joyner
library through their comput-
ers.
"NILEC is a pipeline to
handle video and audio links
Balch said.
Currently, NILEC is be-
ing tested between Greenville,
Jacksonville and Ahoskie. Af-
ter the testing is completed in
June, there will be an evalua-
tion to determine if NILEC will
be a worthwhile expenditure
to the community.
Bosnia called "A Problem from Hell"
(AP)� Secretary of State War-
ren Christopher told Congress to-
day the ethnic war in Bosnia-
Herzegovina was "a problem from
hell but that the United States
would keep lookingforwaystobring
Serbs into accord with Croats and
Muslims.
Christopher said the goal
should be to put severe pressure on
the Serbs through a combination of
force and economic sanctions. "We
have not given up on what we think
is the soundest approach � lifting
the arms embargo against Bosnia
with whatever compensatory air
action that may be necessary he
said.
But, Christopher acknowl-
edged: "Our allies and friends are
not prepared to follow thiscourse
He said he would meet here on
Thursday with Russian Foreign
Minister Andrei V. Kozyrevand next
Monday with French Foreign Min-
ister Alain Juppe to try to shape a
common strategy.
However, Christophersaid he
would not attend a foreign minis-
ters' meeting Friday at the United
Nations, which Russia has proposed.
The reason, he told the House For-
eign Affairs Committee, is that it
would be a futile attempt to imple-
ment an international peace plan
rejected overwhelmingly by Btsnian
Serbs.
Christopher called theconflict
in the former Yugoslav republic "a
historicallydifficultandtragicprob-
lem He said there were atrocities
on all sides.
He called it "a problem from
hell
Christopher appeared before
the committee to testify on the
Clinton administration's budget.
The fiKus quickly shi fted to the war
and how to end it. An estimated
134,(XX) people have been killed or
See Bosnia page 3





MAY 19, 1993
od abuse used as
defense against death penalty
GRADUATION
Continued from page 1
hearing.
s like Mr. Knight has
taken them up on a dare and
shown them how bad a crime
can be Vince Rabil said Mon-
day. The jury in Forsyth County-
Superior Court found Rickey Eu-
gene Knight guilty of first-de-
n the stab-
mutilation oi Carlos
i n N. 1 i �
Knight stabbed
Stoner in the back of the neck, cut
open his chest and cut off his
penis, he did not just kill Stoner,
he robbed him of his dignity and
humanity, Rabil said.
"In your heart of hearts, I
think you know what is called for
inthiscase'hesaid. Dutdefense
attorney Ronald Short said he
hopes that jurorscan find in them
the mercy that Knight did not
have tor Stoner.
"You all can be better than
he was; you can show him
mercy he said. "Killing Rickey
will really not do anybody any
good
Defense attorney Clark
Fischer said Knight deserves
mercy because he suffered
through a childhood of abuse
from his father. Sentencing him
todeath would continue the cycle
of violence in his life, Fischer said.

A mandatory News Writer's meet-
ing will be held today at 2:30 p.m.
ispresented toseniorswhohavedem-
onstrated rare achievement in schol-
arship, leadership and service.
Honorary degrees were pre-
sented to A.R. Ammonsand George
H. Hitchings.
Ammons received the Honor-
ary Doctor of Letters and isanativeof
Whiteville, NC. He is probably the
mostfamouslivingNorth Carolina
poet Hehaspublished 14 volumesof
poetry, won theNationalBookAward
for poetry in 1973 and the Bollingen
Prize for 1973-74 � two of the three
most prestigious awards given to
poets in America.
Hitcrungs,anativeofHoquiam,
Washington, holds a BS. and a M.S.
in chemistry from the University of
Washington and a Ph.D. in biochem-
istry from Harvard University. His
many honors include the prestigious
Nobel PrizeinMedicineand Physiol-
ogy, the Gregor Mendel Medal for
contribution to the advancement of
medical science, the American Can-
cer Society Annual Award and the
North Carolina Governor's Award.
He received an Honorary Doctor of
Science from ECU on Saturday.
Save a tree.
Think ecologically.
Do your own little
part in saving the
planet.
Recycle The East
Carolinian instead
of throwing it away.
Formerly The Rum Runner Dive Shop
Serving the area since 1975.
Dive Center, I IK 2905 E. 5th Street, Greenville. NC Phone 758-1444
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-
MAY 19. 1993
��Pjj$es
I Powell invite sparks protest
ulty are protesting Harvard University's
to invite oint Chiefs of Staff General Colin
Pom ell to speak at the school s 357th commencement on June 10th.
The decision to invite Powell prompted 350 people to gather in
protest of Powell's open opposition to allowing gays to serve in the
military. Homosexual faculty members reacted by sending an open
letter to Harvard president Neil L. Rudenstine, criticizing the deci-
sion. Acting vice-president Jane Corlette defended the university's
choice of Powell. "The invitation did not in any way represent an
endorsement of the present policy on military service by gays and
lesbians Corlette said.
Sorority women get ad pulled
A write-in campaign by University of Washington sorority
members has removed a radio advertisement for the Washington
State Egg Commission from the air. The advertisement, part of a
promotion for the commission, depicted sorority members attend-
ing a rush party for a fictional "Alpha Omicron Kappa" sorority. A
voice-over in the ad said, "Fake is OK for sorority girls, but you want
fresh when it comes to eggs The Egg Commission apologized and
pulled the campaign after receiving a faxed petition of 1000 signa-
tures objecting to the promotion.
Look for liidden' job markets
New college graduates should look for "hidden" job markets
that provide opportunities in high-gTowth areas of their fields, a
career service director advises. Although companies may not be
hiring as many graduates as usual this spring, high job potential
exists in industries such as health care, packaging, automotive,
manufacturing, government and merchandising, said Dianna Kunce,
assistant director for career services at the University of Puget
Sound. "Graduates must do some research on who's hiring and
consider different areas Kunce said.
Compiled by Warren Sumner. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
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BOSNIA
Continued from page 1
left homeless over 13 months.
Diplomatic efforts have cen-
tered on a plan drafted by former
Secretary of State Cyrus R. Vance
and Lord Owen, a former British
foreign becretaiy, that would divide
Bosnia-Herzegovina into 10
emiautonomons ethnic provinces,
with control of Sarajevo, the capital,
shared by Muslims,Croatsand Serbs.
It would also stop the fighting
and give the Bosnian Serbs some,
butnot all,of the territory they gained
through a military campaign sup-
ported by the Serbian-dominated
government in Belgrade.
Christopher said he wasnever
convinced the Bosnian Serbs would
implement the accord even though
their leader, Radovan Karadzic,
signed it May 2. Casting doubt the
plan could ever work, Christopher
said "a new forum" may be neces-
sary. Wi thou t pronou ncing the plan
drafted by mediators Vance and
Owen dead, State Department offi-
cials said Monday there could be
other ways toachievea settlement in
the 13-month-old war.
The department, for instance,
endorsed the idea of posting moni-
torsatthe Serbian border with Bosnia
to see if Serbian President Slobodan
Milosevic keeps his pledge to stop
providing arms and other supplies
to Bosnian Serbs.
The East Carolinian 3
CBS announces Chung
to become co-anchor
(AP)�The network thathas
had only three news anchors in 45
years will have two at the same
time come June: Dan Rather and
Connie Chung.
The surprise announcement
fromCBS marks the first time since
Barbara Walters and Harry
Reasoner were unhappily paired
at ABC in the 1970s that one of the
Big Three has made a man and a
woman co-anchors of its evening
news.
CBS News officials por-
trayed the tandem approach at
the No. 2-rated "CBS Evening
News" as a way to prepare the
broadcast for the next centu ry and
to free up Rather to do more of
what he says he loves best, report-
ing.
See CHUNG page 4
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MAY 19. 1993
It did not
rt from the field the
Id .�id Mont;
The move marks the
end of a n era a t C BS, w here
the anchor desk has be-
longed to the single white
male. Rather's predeces-
sor, Walter Cronkite, had the job
tohimself for 19 years. For 14years
before that, it was Douglas
Edwards.
CBS has trailed ABC since
1989 and sometimes has fallen be-
hind NBC as well. In the mid80s,
couldn't be more
excited about work-
ing with him in this
new role.
Connie Chung
take.
Rather will keep his title as
managing editor of the "Evening
News" and remain anchor of CBS'
"48 Hours" news magazine. And
Chung will keep her own maga-
zine show, "Eye to Eye With
Continued from page 3
Connie Chung slated fora sum-
mer launch.
"We've known each other
for more than 22 years Chung
said, "and 1 couldn't be more ex-
cited about working with him in
this new role
�� Chung, 46, joined
CBS in 1971, left for NBC in
1983 and returned sixyears
later. She has been anchor
of the Sunday edition of
CBS' newscast as well as
her own magazine show.
CBS'move comes just
before a meeting next week
of CBS' affiliate stations. It
also comes at a time when
ABC's "World News Tonight" is
a solid No. 1, and freshman NBC
News President Andrew Lack has
named ABC's former "World
News" producerjeff Gralnick,as
executive producer of the "NBC
Nightly News" with Tom Brokaw.
r
Welcome Back
ECU Students and Faculty
Open 7 Days
11:00 a.m. - 1:00a.m

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TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
fi.i.inWTf "T
fOf RBI
et . part-
month. Avail-
lOthrough Augu
Deposit $200. Call Gary (919)
775-3694.

HdpW�rted
ara v
(till available within
inceorbusaccessto
campus. Call us and tell us your
needs. 732-1375 Homelocators
tee ($60)
S10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing
baxhureslSparefulltime.Setown
hours! RUSH stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 HillandaleRd.
1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
HdpVnted ' i
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT
PAY! Assembleproductsat home.
Call toll free l-80O4o7-5566 exL
5920
g r ntis war! gFssxss&m
FOR RENT: Summer quiet area
5 blocks from campus; ac, 1 3
utilities etc must be easy going
and serious. 752-2608 ask for
Dvlan.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Nov. Taking Leases fix
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom fe
1ifficiencv Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
LARGE BEDROOM with
kitchen privileges in a beautiful
house near ECU. Mature NON-
SMOKER female student. $230
including utilities. 752-2636
FEMALEneededtoshareapt.at
Stratford Arms through July
$145 plus 12 utilities 355-5986
or (919) 522-0529
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to
share2bedroomhousewwd,
cha. Great location, walking
distance to campus and
dowtown. Call (919) 822-7648
$22512 utilities
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn
extra cash stuffing envelopes at
home. Allmaterialsprovided.Send
SASE to National Distributors, PO
Box 9643, Springfield, MO 65801.
Immediate response.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
ManTositions.Greatbenefits.Call
1 -800-4364365 ext. P-3712
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-
800-4364365 ext. P-3712
JOIN fellow East Carolinia la-
dies in making $100s a day escort-
ing in the Greenville area. Must
have own transportation; own
phone and out going personality;
must be very self conscious and
well groomed. We offer flexible
hours to work around classes and
nights. For more information call
"pager" 757-5657. All information
held in strict confidence.
.NEW
I PLACE?
Don't Pay Full
Price for
FURNISHINGS!
We've Got-N-Used:
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors. Instructors,
Kitchen. Office, Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
� ed youth summer sports camp. Will train. Over 25
CAMP I'IXE WOOD activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Henderson ville.NC 28792.
�&9i�M,mvMJSispt
For Sale
gyy-WWWB
NEED A PLACE FOR NOW??
OR FALL?? We have one, two
and three bedroom
accomodations available. Many
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS, trucks, boats, 4 wheel-
ers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now.
Call 1-800436-4363 ext. C-5999.
PERSONAL CARE: Disabled
women looking for personal care
attendant. Flexible hours. Call355-
9161
DRIVER NEEDED: Mature, re-
sponsible, and reliable person
needed totransportfunloving4yr.
old child to ECU Pre-school some
mornings and summer activities.
Call 321-3809
ck?
Do you hunt aad
How fast caii you tyie?
What's the QWERT system?
Answer these questions and apply today for
typesetter positions at The Mast Cammmt,
Student Publications Building, Second floor.
Typesetters should be available immediately.
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Stereo Equipment
We're buying, too!
If you are selling you musl be 18
with a picture ID (NCDL. ECU)
TUDENT
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HOP
I EVANS STREET MALL
� Park behind Globe Hardware
If & use our new rear entrance
I 752-3866
K Mon 10-12 1-5
m
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3 Sat 10-12
Announcements
NFWMAN CLUB
Ascension Thursday Masses:
Wednesday, May 19: 5:30 p.m. (Vigil
Mass) and Thursday, May 20: 8 a.m
12:15 p.m 5:30 p.m. The Center is
located at 953 E. 10th Street (next to
the East end of campus). Telephone:
757-1991.
RFAI. CRISIS
We need your experience! Your
achievements in everyday situations
can be useful to others. Earn that feel-
ing of accomplishment. REAL Crisis
Center is recruiting volunteer crisis
counselors for our telephone hot-line
and walk-in center. We will be offer-
ing training classes in this enriching
field beginning June 2,1993. Call 758-
HELP or come by 312 East 10th Street.
NFvylANl CATHOLIC
STIIDFNT CENTER
Welcome summer students! The
Catholic Center will be open for 1st
and 2nd session summer school. We
are located at 953 E. 10th St second
house from the Fletcher Music Build-
ing. Masses: Sun. 11:30 a.m. & 8:30
p.m. and Wed. 5:30 p.m. All masses
are held at the Center. Please come
and visit
RFAI. CRISIS
Teens! Dial-a-Teen is interested
in your valuable time. We are looking
for special teens, between the ages of
15 and 18, who would like to volun-
teer their invaluable listening skills to
help others in crisis. We are offering
training classes for our teen hotline
beginning June 2,1993. Call 758-HELP
or come by 312 East 10th Street.
piTT COUNTY FCU ALUMNI
CHAPTER
The Ninth Annual Silent Auction
to benefit the Pitt County ECU Alumni
Chapter Scholarship Fund is coming
to Mendenhall Student Center on the
ECU campus Thursday, May 27. And
this year, the auction has gone coun-
try, with great deals on donated items
from area merchants. Heavy hors
d'oeuvres and beverages will be
served, and you must be 21 to attend.
Tickets for the event are limited. For
information on tickets and on items
up for auction, call Jill at 355-5689 or
Julie at 355-2361.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
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Announcements
Any orsanization may use the Announce-
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activities and events open to the pctolic two
timesfreeofcharse. LXjetorhelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
Deadlines
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Wednesday's edition.
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publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
For more
information call
757-6366.
Adventures Of Kemple Boy
By Kemple
W pirate
fW,AINTWe?) COm
CONVENTION CONFIDENTIAL
Tha's right, jerkies! A screaming good time was had by all this past
Saturday at the Parts Unknown Comic Book Convention in Greensboro.
Anyone hip enough to attend (ke HI' ol' me) got to run amuck in the midst
of thousands of comic books and real, living, comics professionals The
roll call included comics legends Al Williamson and George Evans (of EC
Comics fame), who had tons of wisdom and anecdotes to espouse to all!
Mark Schultz was also present, who flabbergasted everyone with his
latest pencils for his book, Xenozoic Tales, and who also had plenty o'
poop on the new Xenozoic animated series coming this fall! Beware, Mr.
Rob Liefield and cronies! Mark's got a big, fat rock for you to crawl under!
Also in attendance were George Pratt (Enemy Ace), Scott Hampton
Batman: Night Cries), Kent Williams Meltdown, baby), and Jeff Jones,
who were all their usual, jovial selves. And to top it all off, I got a cool
Captain Easy comic book! If you happened to miss the show, have no
worries; there's going to be another convention June 11th in Charlotte!
Stay tuned to your trusty ol' comics page for more information. Kapish?
Oh, incidentally, if you don't know who Al Williamson or Mark Schultz are,
their work appears above, respectively. Your welcome. Christopher Kemple





The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
Riding the Mobius
WednesdayOpinion
Bill needed for expansionI Tuition hikes offend out-of-state students
By Jason Trernblay
Senate and House propose to
give university funds for
library renovation
The North Carolina State Senate and House
proposed a bill concerning the appropriation of
$29 million toaid in library expansion. Along with
this, a recent accreditation review stated that
Joyner's renovation should be the number-one
priority for East Carolina.
Dedication to expansion and renovation to
the library needs to acquire the focus of a laser
beam. Why the rush? If renovations are not made
by the next accreditation review, the university
will not be accredited. Accreditation means a
better standing in the eyes of the educational
community nationwide.
Accreditation is a major component of "play-
ing in the big-leagues What it means to East
Carolina directly is another foot in the door as an
education-minded university, not just a sports
school, a party school or a great weather spot.
How many times have you gone into Joyner
Library and were unable to find the book that was
essential to your paper? It is a constant aggrava-
tion for students across campus. Granted, no li-
brary has every book in
print. However, the se-
lection at Joyner
certainly could be
widened. As East
Carolina ex-
pands, so should
its library's re-
sources. It only
makes sense.
Another
disturbing aspect of Joyner is the section of the
building known as "the stacks It's almost as if
one walks into some sort of catacomb, complete
with a dizzying, maze-like shelving plan. Count-
less people mill around, eager for some sort of
explanation or aid.
There also seems to be excessive shifting of
whole sections, to the point that a library patron
could walk in on a Friday and be unable to find a
related book in the same section on the following
Monday. This certainly does not lend itself to
easy research.
No, it's not just "the stacks" that deserve the
$29 million. Expansion of the library would mean
more areas of study with the influx of new infor-
mation � maybe more periodicals, computers
and possibly even an undaunting floor plan.
Let's be honest with ourselves. Patrons and
supporters of athletic departments would bend
over backwards to complete a stadium if they
were handed $29 million by the state. Lest we
forget, the first reason that we attend this school
is advancement of ourselves educationally. We
are here to learn.
The library is a time-honored tradition of
sorts. It allows people the opportunity to explore
the world and beyond. It is a familiar haven for
incredible ideas and beliefs from across the world.
It just so happens to be in our own backyard. Best
of all, it's free!
Support of this bill is inherent to how we, as
East Carolinians, are classified. Effects of the pas-
sage of the bill will reverberate not only in
Greenville, but across the nation. It can increase
enrollment, open up new classes and may even
create a few new minors.
Who knows, "the stacks" may not have to be
such an intimidating place to search for a book.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Joseph Horst, Managing hdnor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Karen Havsell, News Editor
Warren Sumncr, Asst News Editor
Dana Danielson, UJrstyle Editor
Julie Totten, AM Ufestyle Editor
Amy E. Wirtz, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sporu Editor
Misha Zonn, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy hUittor
Rhonda Owens, Copy Editor
Tony Dunn, Business Manager
Jody Jones, CirruLitum �
Blirt Aycock, hnout Manager
Franco Sacchi, Asst layout Manager
Tony Chadwkk, Creative Director
Cedric Van Ruren. I'hoin Editor
Chris Kt-mple, Staff Illustrator
Matt Mai Donald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday sui.i
Thursday. 1he masthead editorial in each edilion is the opinion of the
Editorial Board The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which tnay be edited for decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the ru'lit to edit or reject letters for
ptiblaation. I.etlets should he addressed to IV Editor, The lastarolowm.
PeMcatioBtBldgECU,GneaviiieN.C.l278SB-43S3 For more informa-
tion. call (919) 757-6166.
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
So you're tired of tuition
hikes. You don't want to pav a few
extra dollars each year to continue
your education. You're morally
outraged that they keep charging
you more and more each year.
Well, native North Carolinians, as
an out-of-state student, all I can
say is, "Sit down and stop whin-
ing
That's right. I said stop whin-
ing, because that's exactly what
many of you are doing. Quite
frankly, it makes me want to puke.
Let's take a look at ocr fig-
ures for tuition and wonder at the
grand confusion of it all, shall we?
Residents of North Carolina
pay, roughly, $718 per year for
full-time status. That's just dandy
by my way of thinking; the cost of
education in most places nowa-
days is way beyond exorbitant,
and people should be given every
opportunity to learn without put-
ting themselves intodebt for many-
years to come. 1 applaud the state
of North Carolina for taking edu-
cation so seriously.
Non-residents like me pay
$690 per year, minus numerous
fees and housing to be a part of
this bastion of higher learning
Now, as I've said before, I'm
not a math major, but even I can
understand the economics of the
issue. Consider for a moment, if
you will, that for the out-of-stater
price of one year, a resident of
North Carolina can fund hisorher
entire four-yeareducation. Twice.
Be objective here: does this
really seem fair to anyone? Every-
one attends the same university
and we're all capable of receiving
the same level of education in the
same facilities, so why the vast
gap in tuition rates?
It is, of course, standard col-
legiate practice to charge out of-
staters slightly higher rates than
residents, but 890 higher seems
a bit steep to me. One of the rea-
sons this Yankee boy (and proud
of it) chose to come down south
for school is that it was a little
cheaper than the typically high
tuition rates that run rampant
where I hail from.
So thinking that the grass
will be greener on the other sideof
the country, I decide to sign on
and grace ECU with my presence.
Now, it seems, with every new
budget crunch that pops up in the
NC school system, legions of stu-
dents raise up a hearty cry of "Raise
out of state tuition! Lower the al-
ready ridiculously low in-state
rates so we can keep complaining
about them anyway! Monetary
death to the Yankees! Elvis and
Billy Ray Cyrus live! Yaaarrgh
Or something to that effect.
You know what? It offends
me. Without out-of-staters, there
would be no cultural diversity, no
fusion of ideas, no inflammatory
Northern editorial columnists.
None of that gcxxi stuff that really
makes college worthwhile.
You know thatgasolineprice
principle "All the market will
bear?" Essentially, it says that the
oil producers will charge us as
much as they possibly can with-
out crossing the line and mak-
ing it so expensive that people
will stop buying.
That spectral lineexists in
all areas of commerce. It rears
its ugly head in the realm of
tuition rates, and to me at least,
ECU is growing dangerously
close to crossing that line. For
just a very few dollars more, I
can stay up North and go to
school, probably get a better
education and save myself an
eighthour-drivein the bargain.
As I've said, that line is very,
very thin.
So please, natives, don't
let me hear you whine about
how you don't wa n t to pay $750
instead of $718 or whatever. I
have no pity for you, especially
when I goand sign overa check
for $6,390 from my Northern
account.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza, and
watch some cartoons.
JOE'S FIRST TRIP TO'THE STACKS
QuoteoftheDay
Every man who knows how to read has it in his power to
magnify himself, to multiply the ways in which he exists,
to make his life full, significant and interesting.
Aldous I tuxley
Letters to the Editor
Beliefs should be expressed with love, not anger
To the Editor
There has been a lot of
hatred going on lately in re-
gards to people's moral be-
liefsabout homosexuality. In
the midst of all of the letter to
the Editor bickering, a letter
was printed by Tracy Stanley,
to whom I must extend my
gratitude. This is the one let-
ter that has emphasized love.
Being a Christian, I
know from personal experi-
ence that the mainstay of
Christianity should be love,
which had been sorely miss-
ing from this series of argu-
ments. When Jesus said, "So
in everything, do to others
what you would have them
do unto you in Matthew
7:12, he commanded those
who confess a belief in Him
to not lash out in anger. This
verse goes on to say, "for this
sums up the Law and the
Prophets referring to the
Old Testament. How we
Christians can so often over-
look the foundation of our
system of beliefs is beyond
me.
When Rhonda Peacock
said, in an earlier letter, "keep
your religion to yourselves
she commanded us to go
against the Bible and, hence,
God. Hebrews 13:15 says,
"Through Jesus, therefore, let
us continually offer to God a
sacrifice of praise � the fruit
of lips that confess his name
It is impossible for me to do
this without telling others
what I believe, but 1 can ex-
press my beliefs with love.
I have yet to meet a per-
fect person upon this earth,
so where does all of this righ-
teousness come from that so
many have been throwing
around? Isaiah 57:12 says, "I
will expose your righteous-
ness and your works, and
they will not benefit you
No one is trulv righteous.
I am sure that a good
number of people are think-
ing about their shortcomings,
but seeing how good theyare
in comparison w ith more ex-
treme immoralities, such as
homosexuality. I have yet to
find where the Bible rates sin.
As long I have been a Chris-
tian, 1 have1 lieved that lesus
died once for all people and
every sin, not twice for the
really bad stuff.
As Stanley so well put
it, we need to "love a little
more, people
Bryan Shaw
Sophomore
Music Theory
Letters to the Editor must be signed and accompanied with
a working daytime telephone number. If the author is a
student, he or she must also provide class rank and major.
Any letters not following this criteria will not be printed;
tetters may also be edited for sake of brevity, decency and
content.
All Letters to the Editor should be addressed as follows:
The East Carolinian, Attn Opinion Page Editor, Student
Pubs. liuitding, Second Floor, ECU, Greenville, NC 27858,
By T. Scott Batchelor
Bosnia situation
deemed different
from Gulf War
While President Clinton struggles to
form a viable coalition among several Euro-
pean nations with regard to taking united
action in Bosnia-Hercegovina, let us stop and
take a rational look at what role the United
States should play in that crisis, and why.
To begin with, let's address those who
make a sport out of comparing our involve-
ment in the Gulf War with the situation in
Bosnia-Hercegovina. When Saddam
Hussein'sarmy invaded its neighbor, Kuwait,
the United States had two reasons for inter-
vening militarily (listed here in decreasing
order of importance): with the capture of Ku-
wait, Iraq assumed control of a larger portion
of the world'soil supply, and U.S. intelligence
reports, which have been subsequently veri-
fied. These reports indicated that Saddam's
ultimate goal was to establish control of the
oil-rich Saudi Arabian peninsula. This would
have put him in a position to set world petro-
leum prices. Lest we forget, oil is the lifeblood
of industry.
Theother reason the United Statesha la
role in the Gulf War is because of a moral
imperative. When one country overruns and
violates thesovereignty of another, the Uni ted
States is committed, yet not compelled, to act
against that aggression.
The question concerning Bosnia is, do
either of these two criteria pertain? The an-
swer is no. The conflict now underway in me
former Yugoslavia is a civil one involving no
U.S. security or economic threat.
What about the moral compulsion that
the United States certainly must feel? Many
people have asked(very rhetorically) thisques-
tion. John Chancellor on NBC Nightly News
lat week said the United States hasan obliga-
tion to intervene militarily in Bosnia. Indeed,
Chancellor feels we should intervene wher-
ever there is the ugly splotch of civil strife. So
let's put that fanciful idea to the reality test.
If we use force to stop the fighting in
Bosnia's civil war, what about the myriad
other nations involved incivil strife? See if this
Associated Press report soundsfamiliar: "Re-
ligious, political and racial conflicts exploded
in civil war 10 years ago Deja vu? No, the
Sudan in Africa, where for the past decade the
violence there "has killed asmany as 1 million
people, displaced six million more and sent
hundredsof thousindsof Christians fleeingto
the desert This time it's the Christians who
are being pushed out and killed, and the
numbersare much higher than in Bosnia, but,
interestingly, I've heard no outcry calling for
the United States to bomb the Sudan.
How about Angola, another African
Country undergoing civil strife.There,accord-
ing to another Ar report, "outside the com-
pound (in Lubango) former sildiers went on
a twixiay killing rampage. Witnesses esti-
mate 300 to 500 unarmed supporters of the
UNITA rebel movement were slainCan the
United States just stand by and let the killing
continue? In Angola? In the Sudan? Or how
about Lint i ia, Sierre I �me, Zaire? Let's not
forget (if you even knew about them) the
almost 18,0IX) people killed since 1983 in Sri
Lanka's ethnic war.
In India, hundreds (perhaps thou-
sands) of people have been killed In recent
fighting between Muslims and I (Indus.
the list goes on and on.





The East Carolinian
MAY 19. 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
Faculty member compiles,
publishes Thoreau writings
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
When a new book by a fa-
mous w riter first appears, it's al-
ways a major news item.
If the author happens to be
Henry David Thoreau, who's
been dead more than 130 years,
it's major news indeed.
Publica tion of a new Thorea u
work, "Faith in a Seed" on April
20 (just in time for Earth Day)
was the result of years of pains-
taking work by its editor-com-
piler, Bradley P. Dean, a faculty
member in the East Carolina Uni-
versity Department of English.
The book reveals the late Con-
cord, Mass essayist-naturalist to
have been a noteworthy pioneer
scientist; to assemble Thoreau's
notes and fragments into cohe-
sive prose required that Dean
become a scientist as well.
The lavishly illustrated and
indexed book (Island Press
Shearwater Books) consists of a
lengthy essay, "The Dispersion
of Seeds" and three shorter
pieces: "Wild Fruits "Weeds
and Grasses" and "Forest Trees
as well as copious editorial notes
and a Thoreau chronology.
"Faith in a Seed" has drawn
widespread notice in literary
circles and elsewhere.
It is being adopted as a se-
lection by the Book of the Month
Club, the Natural History Book
Club and others, and will be ex-
cerpted in "Life "Audubon"
and "Science" magazines.
An interview with Dean vid-
eotaped at his farmhouse near
Ayden will be featured on the
May 23 broadcast of Charles
Kuralt'sCBS-TV program, "Sun-
day Morning
Dean is also scheduled to
travel to Washington this month
toaccept the Environmental Pro-
tection Agency'sprestigious first
Henry David Thoreau Award.
Among many of the public
appearances Dean will make are
two near his home base: a June
13 readingsigning party at
Michael's Bookstore and a yet
unscheduled book-signing ses-
sion at the ECU Student Store.
"Faith in a Seed" garnered
favorable reviews from critic
Herbert Mitgang in the "New
York Times" and poet W.S.
Merwin in the "Los Angeles
Times A "Boston Globe" review
praised Dean for his "honesty,
accuracy and that rarest of aca-
demic editorial traits, modesty
Henry David Thoreau (1817-
1862) was the first Anglo-Ameri-
can ecologist to be influenced by
Darwin's principles.
Heobserved and wrote about
nature in a time when many edu-
cated persons believed that some
plants could spring from the
ground spontaneously � with-
out benefit of seeds, roots or cut-
tings.
In the essays collected in
"Faith in a Seed Thoreau speaks
of human creatures with kind-
lier, more mellow tone than is
typical of his earlier writings.
He synthesizes natural his-
tory and philosophical insights
in a reflective, poetic fashion, an-
ticipating environmental con-
cerns that did not become popu-
lar issues until the early 1970's.
Sifting through three
trunkfuls of unpublished
Thoreau papers in the New
York Publ ic Li bra ry's Berg Col-
lection called for much patience
and detective skills on Bradley
Dean's part.
In order to arrange notes
and fragment in proper se-
quence, Dean studied
Thoreau'shandwritingand the
types of paper he used, even
scrutinizing traces of the red
sealing wax and pins the writer
had used to fasten his pages
together.
Computerized transcrip-
tions and enlarged photocopies
of the author's seemingly in-
dispensable penciled scrawls
proved indispensable to his
analyses.
Bradley Dean is secretary
of the Thoreau Society and ed-
its the society's "Bulletin He
describeshimselfas "a Thoreau
freak recalling that duringhis
Navyservicehecited Thoreau's
writings as part of a (unsuc-
cessful) defense in a court mar-
tial case over Dean's refusal to
get a haircut.
Currently, Dean is an ad-
junct assistant professor ir. the
English department at ECU.
From their home, the
couple operates a consulting
firm,TransPacificCommunica-
tions, via computer modem and
facsimile machine, working
with Japanesecorporate clients.
In the future, Dean plans to
compil e a t least two more books
from the still huge treasure
trove of unpublished Thoreau
material.
Bradley Dean
Political satire 'Dave' untimely, lame
Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Political satire proves time
and again to be a difficult task-
master. Finding the right tone to
convey humor and warmth can
be a tricky proposition. Although
some political satires have been
wonderfully concieved and pro-
duced, too often the expedition
proves frustrating.
Dave, a nw film by Ivan
Reitman (Ghostbusters I and II,
Meatballs and Twins), tackles the
political arena with a gentle, al-
most naive touch.
Dave tells the story of a man
named Dave Kovic (Kevin Klein)
at a photo opportunity. Dave is to
say nothing, move quickly and
then wave to the crowd as he en-
ters a limousine.
Because Dave looks identical
to the president and because he
does impressions as a part-time
job, he fills in perfectly. So per-
fectly, in fact, that when the presi-
dent suffers a severe stroke, Dave
is recruited to fill in permanently.
The premise sounds mildly
interesting but the concept is
misfactored into the story.
Thepresidentsuffersfrom the
stroke while having an illicit af-
fair. Hehad previously shovvn that
he is a man of unscrupulous char-
acter, caring little about the coun-
try. He rarely sees his wife
(Sigourney Weaver) because she
hates him. Their apparently happy
relationship isa facade for the press.
The film has a perfunctory
vi 11 ian in the Whi te House Chief of
Staff, Bob Alexandar (Frank
Langella). Bob is even more un-
scrupulous than Bill Mitchell. He
cares little about job bills and less
aboutthecountry. Hiscorrupt plans
to be president have no motiva-
tion. Itseems Bob wants to He mean
justtobemean(meaningjustsothe
filmmakers have a villain).
When Dave enters office he
tries to help the country, and suc-
ceeds. He also falls in lovo with
Mrs. Mitchell, the president's wife.
No surprises lurk in any corner of
this film and the cliched machina-
tions of the plot wear thin quickly.
I looked at my watch thinking the
film to be overlong only to realize
thatithad been on screen forslightly
over an hour.
Kevin Klein is always likeable
towatch. Hehasadisarmingscreen
presence thsat seems genuine. Yet,
this Tony-winning actor still loves
to perform Shakespeare and has a
habitof pickingbland fil ms. He has
yet to find a cinematic vehicle to
compare to thestellardebuthe made
in Sophie's Choke.
Sigourney Weaver is stuck in a
thankless role. She plays an ice
queen for most of the film and then
hastodoanabruptchangeand play
a lovelorn female. Weaver had
worked with Reitman before, in the
Ghostbusters films, which may ex-
plain her ill-advised choice in star-
ring in this film.
Several years ago Weaver
claimed to want to do more films
that meant something,asshedid in
one of her best films, Gorlths in the
Mist. She has yet to find anything
comparable to that film. Weaver
also said that she would not do
another Alien film after Aliens, so
perhaps she isnot to be trusted. She
has not been in a film for a few years
and Dave wasan ill-advised way to
get back into cinema.
One of thenicer touches of Dave
is the bevy of cameos. During one
stretch of film I fet like I was watch-
ing the opening minutes of The
Player. Arnold Schwarzenegger
appears as himself promoting kids
health. JeyLeno is shown on his talk
show doing monologues about the
president. Many politicians appear
as themselves giving commentary
about President Mitchell.
The funniest cameo, and the
funniest part of the film, isgiven by
Oliver Stone who appears on Larry
King Li ve tou ting a new conspi racy
theory about how the goverment
has switched presidents. Seeing the
usually serious Stone poking fun at
himself is refreshing.
Perhapsoneof the reasons Dave
plays sodryly is that it appeared at
a bad time. Dave joins The
Dintinguished Gentlemen and Bob
Roberts as mediocre humor about
the political system. In the midst of
the current president struggling to
maintainhisintegrityand popular-
ity,thathumorinDm;eseemsstilted.
Perhaps a key to political hu-
mor istoinventcountries to parody
like Freedonia (in the Marx brother's
Duck Soup) or Parador (in Paul
MazursVy's Moon Over Parador) or
to stick to the serious side of the
government and try to realistically
portray politicians, as in Frank
Capra's Mr. Smith Goes to Washing-
ton.
Usually when a studiodecides
to release a film with as much star
power as Dave three weeks before
the summer movie season begins,
they must feel uncertain about it. In
this one case, I have to agree with
the studio executives.
Dave is a dud.
Florida scuba divinj
considered splendi
summer gateway
Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
Whenltook scuba divingduring
tr�espring,ltroughtitwasprettyneat
I liked breathing under water and
seemga few fish during my first few
open water dives. I was finally certi-
fied through N AU1 and could diveon
my own, with a partner. But I didn't
feel quite secure
enough to go out
with just my part-
ner. That waswhen
we decided to
sign up for open
water II.
Ocean Wonders Dive Shop,
owned and operated byJimStephens,
was offering open water II classes at
special rates. For $200, we could take
atwodaytripand dive wrecks off the
coastofNorthCarolina. Ontheother
hand, wecouJd takea fourday camp-
ing anddivingtriptoGinnie Springs,
Florida for$210. Eitherwaywewouid
have an exciting trip and learn more
aboutscubadiving. Wechose Florida.
Located near High Springs,
Florida, Ginnie Springs runs into the
Santa FeRiver. Itmaintainsaconstant
72'F water temperatureand ishome
to many fish, turtles and plant life.
Weevenheardthatithousedasmall
breed of alligators that would not
attack people,butweneversav, any.
Fan ulies and organizations use the
Ginnie Springs campground on
weekends and for summer vaca-
tions. Italsoofferslotsofgood scuba
diving.
Six of us
loaded up and
headed outon
Thursday,
May 13. There
were five stu-
dents under the instruction
of Guy Martin, Ocean Wonders
employee and Industrial Technol-
ogy major at ECU.
Wereachedourdestination that
evening, set up camp and excitedly
awaited our first dive on Friday
morning.
Early the next morning we
headed to Peacock Springs in
Lurasville, Florida. We put on our
standard equipment for diving,
which consisted of a full wetsuit,
See SCUBA page 9
Moving Targets release: wait for the next one
Richard Cranium
Staff Writer
So you're saying what in
the world business does Rich-
. ard Cranium have reviewing a
CD?! Well, let me tell you one
thing. I know women and I
know music. All music. And
you know I love ya, so I only
want to help you with your
perusings for tunage.
And look. Take This Ride is
well, lacking intensity. In fact,
you might not want to take this
ride. "Right Way" and "Take
this Ride" are pretty cool songs,
and "Unwind" is really a killer
tune, a fun weekend-type song.
Butthosearethehighlights. For
the most part the music doesn't
sound polished, and that's too
bad. Back to the studio baby!
If Moving Targets puts out
another album, buy it. They
should have had time to work on
their sound and get some stuff
rolling. But the sound on Take
This Ride is just that, a sound.
They sound like, you know, stuff,
like every other song. The sound
is almost familiar, but not quite.
I'm not knocking Moving Tar-
gets, I just think they need more
rehearsal time.
The sound they have is not
their own and it's like sex with-
outanorgasm: there'sabuildup
and all, but it never goes any-
where. I don't know, maybe it
was recorded with hand-held
tape recorders. It's almost pre-
dictable. Like if it's cloudy and
you don't carry an umbrella, or if
you do, for that matter.
But all is not lost. While it's
true the guitar really goes no-
where, the drummer is intense
and he's getting it on and that's
beautiful. Unfortunately, it'snot
enough to carry the album. Lis-
ten to it or borrow it, but don't
buy it. Shucks, the cover isn't
even all that appealing, unless
you like boring pictures. Actu-
ally, the cover has these people
on the swings at a carnival or
something. Doesthispictureper-
tain to the name of the album or
the name of the group? Interest-
ing.
And hey, if you were to ever
really crack and wanted to kill
people, try the little sniper's roost
on the side of Mendenhall that
faces the library. You've got
bricks for cover and a steel door
behind you.
Think about it.
'Moving
Target's
sound is like
sex without
an orgasm:
there'sa
buildup and
all, but
never a
release
Photo courtesy
Taangt Mecous





MAY 19, 1993
on't run my life
T&cAtvtd (natrium
u think you
I'm like
Freddie Or w orse
r"es,l m back and it feels
ixx.i. Soanyway, isn'tGreenville
nice during the summer when all
tlie turds a re gone? Most of them.
But I don't want to talk about
(ireenville or turds, 1 want to talk
aboutbackstabbers, moochersand
big-mouths. Actually, I guess I do
wanttotalkaboutturds. Sonever
mind.
Did you ever know one of
those people who's not happy un-
less he or she is upset or bitching?
Can you dig that? They kill me.
I know this girl right now
who'sgot her ass on her shoulders
because I called her a mooch. Ev-
ery time she sees me now she can't
wait to bring up the fact that she
fed me this or she d rove me some-
where or she bailed me out of jail
orsomepiddlyli'lthang. But you
know what? The next time she
comes to my house, I'll still be
pouring her drinks from my own
private stock.
And that's not all. She never
wants to t,ilk about the weather or
movies or hxAs or schixl or how
Cheer is about to end. No, it's al-
ways some problem or just some-
thing that needs fixin' in her lifeand
it's just nag, nag, nag, bitch, bitch,
bitch Grrr So why do I put up
with it? Let me tell you. 1 love her.
I love everybody. I love life. Life is
about love, baby, so love one an-
other. It's a beautiful thing.
It's summer man! Life is good!
Let's play frisbee golf (actually, it's
disc golf; "Frisbee" is a registered
trademark of the Wham-O Corpo-
ration)
So put them shorts on and pack
up the Subaru, Homes, cause we
headin' to the beach to roll in the
sand and drink lukewarm Natural
Lights and listen to Jimmy Buffett
and get sand in our cracks'ca use i t's
summer,baby. But wait! We've got
summer school.
Let me tell you, the only
thing good about summer school is
that movie by the same name star-
ring Mark Harmon, who did an
excellent job of portraying Ted
Bundy on this other TV-Movie.
But seriously folks, sum-
mer schcxil is cooL Sure you've got
class every daggone day. Sure it's
going to be hot hot hot and humid-
ity will be uparound97and you'll
take your shower and get all fresh
and rosy and you'll step outside
and theheatand humidity willsettle
on your shoulders like a wet blanket
and you'll walk to class and have a
bigsweatstainonyourbuttbuthey!
It's summer man and you can chill
after class and lay out and toss the
frisbee and hoot and holler and be-
lieve me, that's what life is about.
Because that's love. Just remember,
drink seven glasses of water a day.
So look, enjoy life and study
hard. And please don't procrasti-
nate. Summer school is only beau-
tiful if you make it beautiful. Hove
ya, boss, and don't you forget it.
Heck, I'll even buy you a beer (you
buy the next round).
And when some clown comes
up to you with big ol' puddles un-
der his arms and sweat all on his
forehead and he says, "It ain't the
heat,it'sthehumidityrhumphim
good and say, "Don't run my life
Minnie Evans exhibit featured
Julie Totten
Staff Writer
The Wellington B. Gray Gal-
lery at East Carolina has been
awarded a $15,000 grant from the
National Endowment for the Arts.
The goal is to organize a major
exhibition and educational pro-
gram illustrating the lifeof the late
Minnie Evans.
Evans, a renowned African-
American folk artist, was bom in
Wilmington, N.C She began her
artistic career there in 1935 with
only a sixth grade education. Al-
though Evans had no formal artis-
tic training, her simple pencil and
crayon drawings soon evolved
into paintings of great complexity
and emotion.
Evans' work has appeared in
18 separate solo exhibitions and
32 group exhibitions internation-
ally. In 1975, the prestigious
Whitney Museum of American
Art, located in New York, show-
cased her art in a solo exhibition.
"The exhibit is one of the
most important exhibits ECU has
ever done said Charles Lovell,
ECU gallery director. 'This$15,000
grant enables us to make this a
community wide project
A committee was formed to
coordinate educational programs
toaccompany theart exhibit. Films,
videos, school tours and gospel con-
certs are planned to help celebrate
the artistic career of the late Evans.
The Dream Realm of Minnie
Evatis, featuring 53 drawings and
pa i ntings, wil 1 be held from May 14
to August6,1993. Individuals, busi-
nesses, local groups and churches
are invited to become a part of this
community effort Those interested
should contact Lovell at 757-6336.
WHAT'S UP?
Downtown Greenville this weekend
Attic
Thursday: Cheers Final Call
Friday: Seven Feathers
Saturday: Sex Love & Money
Corriaans
���
Thursday & Friday: Victor
Hudson
Saturday: Bottom Line
O'Rocks
Friday: Breed 13
Saturday: Unsound with
Pandora's Lunchbox
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th
Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O. Box ! 847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
?Remember to attach a "letter of
credit" from yourparents' power company
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utiliyservice put in
your name, a deposit will be�equired. Deposits
are as follows:with electricorwout electric
gts space heaingorgas space heating
Electric OnlyS100$75
Electric & Water$100$85
Electric, Water & Gas $110$85
Electric & Gas$100$75
You can save time by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where wc may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
Greenville
Utilities
AIDS patients find
solace in Bible
Today: Rocky
Mountain
Spotted Fever
Anwrd by Jennifer Phillips,
Student Health Canter
Question: What are the signs
and symptoms for Rocky Moun-
tain Sported Fever?
Answer: Rocky Mountain
Spotted Fever isadiseasepassed to
humans through the bite of an in-
fected tick. Typically, thedisease is
seasonal, occurring in the spring
and summer months.
Signs and symptoms of spot-
ted fever may occur from anywhere
from three days to two weeks a fter
a bite. Symptoms may include a
sudden fever reaching up to 103 -
104 degrees Farenheit, coughing,
headache, joint pain, restlessness,
insomnia, delirium and coma.
These symptoms may be ac-
companied by a rash that usually
appears on rheextremi ties�hands,
arms, feet, and eventually spreads
to other parts of the body. If some-
one you know displys these
syptoms, medical attention should
be sought immediately.
Not all ticks are infected with
the organism that causes Rocky
Mountain Spotted Fever, but any
tick should be removed from the
body � carefully, and as soon as
possible. It is best to remove ticks
with tweezers by slowly pulling
them straight back. Do not twist or
jerk becuase this may leave the
mouth parts under the skin which
may promote infection. Hands
should be washed and the bitearea
should be cleansed with alcohol or
methiolate.
The best way to prevent tick
bites is toavoid tick-infested areas.
(AP)�The Rev. Howard War-
ren, a Presbyterian minister with
AIDS, says people with the virus
are "Jesus' kind of lepers
Fred, an Ep'opalian in an af-
fluent Connecticut suburb, turned
to the biblical account of Job for
understanding when within a
month he went from havingcancer
to beingHIV-positivetohaving full-
blown AIDS.
And the Rev. Ray Highfield, a
Pentecostal minister who sold his
house and moved into an apart-
ment above a garage next to a resi-
dence for homeless people with
AIDS, sees himself following the
dictates of the Gospel account of
the Good Samaritan.
"Modem-day lepers" is a term
often used to describe people with
AIDSbecauseof thehateand preju-
dice with which much of society
has confronted the great disease of
our age. Even within religious
circles, some houses of worship
have turned their backs on people
with the virus, and a few clergy
have preached that AIDS is God's
judgment on homosexuals and
drug users.
But in a series of interviews,
people with the disease and those
who care for them often reported
finding comfort and hope in the
Bible, where they say unconditional
love is the model of care for the ill.
At the Church of the Interces-
sion in New York City's Harlem,
Canon Frederick Mitchell said the
clergy took the position that the
See BIBLE page 10
It's All Happening
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;�������
MAY 19, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
SCUBA
Continued from paqe 8
iti. aiBenfidd,ECU �: xiplacttc)
ings. Ihe w ate is h dear
� ilnxst evsryihmg going
not afraid.The dtvper we went, thev e watched onedivergointo the
cIoht we came to the caves of Pea-
cockSprings. We swam around and
explored the area before surfacing to
return toGinnie Springs.
Ginnie Springs and the sur-
rounding areas were trie location for
the remainder of our dives. On Fri-
day afternoon, wehitGinnieSprings
and the cavern immediately below
us. The water was fairly warm be-
cause it maintains a constant 72 de-
gree temperature. The first thing we
noticed was that the fish were pretty
friendly, especially if you brought
thematreat. The Springs were full of
brim, gar, bow fin fish, bass catfish
and fresh water flounder. If you
looked doseenough,youwould even
see turtleschasingeachorher around.
'Tmtornnow'diver Tim Clark
said. "I like to fish, but now I almost
hate taking them from their natural
environment
Then,off tothecavern. At55feet
deep, we found a grate that kept
divers from going into the caves. In
order to dive caves, a diver must be
classified as an advanced diver and
takea specialty course becauseitis so
easy for a diver to lose his way in an
underwa ter cave.
We looked for shells, rocks and
fossils insidethecavemand explored
the general area so we would be
ready for our night dive in the same
cavern. Later that evening, flash-
lights in hand, weentered thecavern
again. Although it was the same
cavern, it was different at night than
intheafternoon. Aftersurfacingand
cleaning our gear, six tired divers hit
the tents to rest up for the day ahead.
Saturcbymomingtookusabouthalf
a mile from our campsite to the cav-
erns and caves of Devil's Ear, Devil's
Eye and Little Devil. These caves
were not blocked off, and we had to
be careful not to be lured into the
caves where many people have lost
cave of Devil's Eye. He ignored the
Gnm Reaper sign warning about fa-
talities and disappeared intothecave.
He had plenty of air and a motor
attached to help him against die cur-
rent rushing out of the cave.
Although Guy Martin plans on
takinga cavediving course in thenear
future, the rest of us agreed to leave
cave diving to the experts. We felt the
strong current and learned why they
call it Devil's Eye.
Later in theaftemoon, weheaded
up the Santa Fe River for our drift dive.
The current carried us down to our
campsite, sometimes too strong for us
to keep from being swepta way. Other
times, we were abletohold on torocks
on the bottomof the river and look for
fossils and arrowheads ru mored to be
in the water. After over an hour in the
water, we all agreed it was time for a
break.
Instructor Guy Martin gave us a
choiceforoursixthandfinaldive. We
could dive any of the sites we had
already explored and bequalified for
our open water II certification. It was
unanimous. We dove in Ginnie
Springs that night.
After our final dive, we closed
camp, loaded up and headed home.
Ourcampingexperiencewasnot
limited to diving. We rented inner
tubesand floated down the river,stop-
ping to swing from a rope into the
river. Wealso rented canoestopaddle
up and down the river, enjoying the
solitudeof nature. Weevenhadsome
unexpected visitors on Friday morn-
ing. Some local squirrels raided our
food supplies, chewing their way into
three of the four tents! In spite of this,
alcrigwithsomeotherminorsetbacks,
the trip was well worth the money.
"it was great said Jennifer
Anderson,ECU graduate, "itwasmy
graduation and it was well worth it"
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We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
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Student Stores
Wright Building
Greenville, NC 27858
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��� - � .�-� M i
MAY 19, 1993
BIBLE
continued from page 8


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Corner Red Banks Road & Evans Street
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AIDS epidemic was a health
issue, not a moral issue.
"AIDS was the modern-day
leprosy, and if jesus could go and
hea l the lepers, we can certainly go
and do the same thing he said.
Butitisa lesson many churches
still have to learn, Warren said. He
recalled how some church mem-
bers passingby the AIDSquiltfilled
with Bible verses and crosses and
other religious symbols at the Pres-
byterian General Assembly in Bal-
timore in 1991 responded by say-
ing, "These people deserved what
they got
"The word is not out that HTV-
AIDS is OK in the church said
Warren, who waited two years be-
fore disclosing that he had the vi-
rus. "The place I found help was
the Bible
When he speaks in church, his
sermon topic � "God has HTV-
AIDS"�is based on the 25th chap-
ter of Matthew, where Jesus says
thatatthefinaljudgmentindividu-
als will have to account for their
actions with regard to the poor, the
sick and those in prison.
"Truly I tell you, justasyou did
it to one of the least of the members
of my family, you did it to me" is
the well-known passage in Mat-
thew 25:40.
The Book of lob helped give
meaning to Fred, who was a physi-
cian who had anticipated a long life
helping others when he found out
he had AIDS.
"Initially, I was very angry at
God. 1 did the Peace Corps and
helped old ladies across the street.
Why did this happen to mewhen
there are lots of people out there
who deserved this?" he asked.
But like the biblical Job, who
eventually sees a divine purpose in
life despite his trials, Fred (who
spoke on the condition that his real
name not be used) says the disease
hasbroughthim closer toGod. Even
wi!h AIDS, he said, "I have to judge
my life as a success
Highfield, a stocky Pentecostal
minister who wears a painter's cap
as he greetsa visitor to Benji'sHouse
for people with AIDS, compares
the religious individuals who ig-
nore AIDS victims to the ones in the
accountofthe Good Samaritan who
walked down the other side of the
road when passing by the injured
person.
The lesson he says he learned
from the Samaritan was to kneel
down beside people with AIDS and
accept them as they are.
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The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
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some games tttke you to the edge of fun
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Intramural Sport Schedule
Register as an indiv idual andor team. For details call
David Gaskinsat 757-6387.
1st Summer Session
May 25 � Softball Registration � 4:00pm
1 3-on-3 Basketball Registration � 4:30pm
Bowling Singles Registration � 4:00pm
� Tennis Singles Registration � 4:30pm
Volleyball Registration � 4:00pm
Fnsbee Golf Singles � 4:00pm
BIG SPLASH Golf Bonanza � 4:30pm
Roundball Rama � 4:00pm
May 25 �
May 26 �
May 26 �
June 2 �
June 8'
June 8 '
June 15
2nd Summer Session
June 29 � Softball Registration � 4:00pm
June 29 � Basketball H-O-R-S-E Registration � 4:30pm
July 5 � Fnsbee Golf Registration � 4:00pm
July 12 � Putt-Putt Golf Registration � 4:00pm
July 13 � 1-on-l Basketball Registration � 4:00pm
July 19 � Golf Classic Registration � 4:00pm
July 20 � BIG SPLASH Golf Bonanza � 4:00pm
All registrations will be held in Biology 163
Outdoor Recreation Schedule
Registration is required for 1st session trips & workshops
beginning May IV.
1st Summer Session
May 27 � Windsurfing Outing � 3:00pm
June 3 � Climbing Workshop � 3:(X)pm
June 6 � Beach Horseback Riding Trip
June 11-12 RaftingClimbing Trip
June 17 � Climbing Workshop � 3:00pm
Registration is required for 2nd session trips & workshops
beginning June 4
2nd Summer Session
June 30 � Climbing Workshop � 3:00pm
July 8 � Windsurfing Outing � 3:00pm
July 11 � Beach Horseback Riding Trip
July 14 � Climbing Workshop � 3:00pm
July 16-17 � HangglidingWindsurfingTnp
Recreational Outdoor Center Hours: (117 CG)
Monday l:30pm-5:30pm
Tuesday-Thursday � 3:00pm-5:30pm
Friday � ll:30am-l :30pm
Saturday & Sunday-Closed
Phone: 757-6911 or 757-6387 lor details
Fitness Class Information
Register for first session May 17-21
Register for second session .June 23-28
Special drop-in classes will be held June 21-24
Mon & Wed 3:00-4:(Xpm (Basic STEP) CG 1 OS
Mon & Wed 4:04-5:05pm (Power STEP) OG 108
Mon & Wed 5:10-6:00pm (Aquarobics I CG Pool
Mon & Wed 5:15-6:15pm (Low Impact) CG 10S
MonWedFn 6:3()am-7!20ani (Early Bird STEP) CG 108
Tu&Thur 3:0()-4:00pm (Hi-Lo STEP) CG 10S
Tu&Thur 4:05-5:()5pm(CardioFunkSTEP) CG 10S
Tu & Thur 4:3()-5:3opm (Tonint) CG 112
Tu&Thur 5:10-6:00pm(Aquarobics) CG Pool
Tu&Thur 5:15-6:15pm (Basic STEP) CG 10S
Register in 204 Chrisienburv Gvm M-Th from
8:OOam-5:OOpm. Sessions cosl 5730 for students and 515.00
for facully and staff. AH classes are available on a drop in
basis by purchasing a drop-in ticket in 204 Chnslcnhur
Gvmnasium in minimum increment.1- of 55.00 for studenls
and SI 0.00 for facultystaff.
These summer Vita Clubs are also offered:
KXCKL-Fit - Self-directed fitness class dub.
Commit-to-Fitness - Self-directed cross-training club.
Club Ped - Self-directed walking club.
For additional information call : 757-6387
Play with us this summer.
ECU Recreational Services, 204 Christenbury Gym, 757-6387.
"T"





The East Carolinian
Sports
Page 11
Watkins invited to try out for Team USA
Outfielder
Pat Watkins
(No. 22) will
be offering
his services to
Team USA
this summer.
Watkins was
in the CAA
leaders in
several
categories
this past
season and
will be
leading the
Pirates into
the CAA
tournament.
Payne inks big recruiting class
Photo courtesy Biff Ransom
TRENTON, N.J.(SID) � Pi-
rate right fielder Pat Watkins has
been invited to try out for the
1993 USA National Baseball
Team, which will participate in
the World University Games in
Buffalo, N.Y July 9-16. He joins
18 other players who also received
invitations from USA Baseball.
Watkins, a junior from Gar-
ner, N.C has been among the
national leaders in both batting
average and home runs for most
of the season.
Sponsored by The Topps
Company, Inc Team USA will
be coached by Gary Anderson,
head coach at the University of
Minnesota. He will be assisted
by Gary Pullins of Brigham
Young, Ray Tanner of North
Carolina State, LarazoCollazoof
the University of Miami, Dusty
Rhodesof the University of North
Florida and Scott Carnahan of
Linfield (Ore.) College.
"The selection process for
team USA actually started last
summer when ourcoaches talked
to the various summer coaches
across the country to help iden-
tify players Anderson said. "We
put together a master list and
came up with what we think isa
very representative group of
players
A total of 40 players will be
invited to the Team USA train-
ing camp, which opens at its
National Training Center in
Millington, Tenn on June 9. In
addition to the World Univer-
sity Games, Team USA will par-
ticipate in the Intercontinental
Cup Tournament in Italy and
the Pan American Classification
Tournament in Managua, Nica-
ragua � a qualifying tourna-
ment for the 1994 World Base-
ball Championships � during
the summer. In addition, the
team will play series against in-
ternational foes Australia, Ja-
pan, Cuba and Canada as part
of its tour.
"We tried to find kids that
want to come and play hard for
Team USA Anderson said.
"I t's a tough su mmer wi th travel
both in the USA and abroad,
and it takes a dedicated player.
We think we have found the
type of players who will be
proud to represent the USA
(SID) � Chuck Jones, a &6 for-
ward from Kinston, Chuckie
Robinson, a 6-8 forward from
Charleston, S.C, and Tim Basham, a
6-512 forward from Roanoke, Va.
have signed national lettersof intent
to play basketball for the ECU Pi-
rates.
Jones comes to ECU from Fork
Union Military Academy, where he
playedduringthel992-93.Joneshad
astellarcareerforCoachPaulJonesat
Kinston High School before enroll-
ing at Fork Union.
"Chuck has the benefit of play-
ingfortwoofuVtestaMchesaround
� Paul Jones and Fletcher Arritt
said EddiePayne,ECU'smen'sbas-
ketball coach. "He's an aggressive
player � the type we need. Chuck
also has very good athletic skills.
We're real pleased tohavehim in our
program
Robinson played the last twosea-
sons at Howard County College in
Big Spring, Texas
"I am very familiar with Chuckie
(Robinson)said Pavne,whocoached
at South Carolina for five seasons.
"One of his greatest assets is that he
plays consistently hard. He is quick
off his feet and has become more
physical. Chuckie is capable of help-
ing us right away
Last season, Basham averaged
102pointsand9.4reboundspergame
for the St John's Prospect Hall Vi-
kings (Md.), coached by Stu Vetter.
The Vikings finished 23-2 last season
and were ranked eighth nationallyby
USATODAYand ESPN's Scholastic
Sports America.
"Tim is an outstanding college
prospectr"VettersaidHehasagreat
Team USA sched.
attitude and workethic. Heshould be
able to make a significant contribu-
tion to the ECU basketball Program
Both Tim and I were impressed with
Coach (Eddie)Payne and thepositive
direction of the East Carolina pro-
gram
Basham wasa pre-season honor-
able all-america by Blue Ribbon Col-
lege Basketball Yearbook last season.
'Tim Basham has, what I call, a
cornpletegameTaynesaid'Hedoes
everything well and nothing poorly.
Tim will be a solid addition to our
program. He comes from winning
programs and has the winning men-
tality we want to develop in our pro-
gram"
Louis Moore, a &6 forward from
Rock Hill, S.C Jones, Robinson, and
Basham join early signee Skipp
Schaefbauer as the Pirates' recruiting
dass thus far in 1993. Schaefbauer
earned Mr. Basketball honors in Min-
nesota this past season,averaging21.4
points for Elk River High School.
Teague selected for NCAA's
Date Opponent Site
June 15-19 AustraliaJury 9-16 World University
Millington, Tenn.GamesEddie Payne,
Buffalo, N.Y.who coached
June 23 Mexicothe Pirates
Italy (various sites)July 19Japanthe
June 24 SpainFlmira.N.Y.NCAA
Italy (various sites)July 20Japantournament, Sl
June 25 AustraliaScranton, Perm.has signed a mtKL,I
Italy (various sites)July 22-24Japantalented pBjl
June26 KoreaMillington,Tenn.group of" "�
Italy (various sites)athletes
June27 CubaJuly 28Cubawho will $1
Italy (various sites) June 29 France Italy (various sites)July 29-31Witrhita,Kans. Cuba Millington, Term.contribute to ECU'S improvingjA

&�!&.
June 30 ItalyAug. 3-5 SanctiCuba 3piritus,Cubabasketball

Italy (various sites)program.
July 1 Nicaragua�
Italy (various sites)Aug. 7Canada
July 2 JapanAlexander Gty, Ala.
Italy (various sites)Aug9Canada
Juh3 SemifinalBirmingham, Ala.
Italy (various sites)
July 4 Finals
Italy (various sites)Aug. 12-26WorldU(j
Championship Qualifier
July 7 Carvda
Toronto,CanadaManagua, Nicaragua
Photo courtesy 1 JMt Dail Reed L��11.1
(SID)� East Carolina Golfer
Mike Teague has been selected to
play in the NCAA East Regional
Golf Championships June 2-5 at
the Birdwood Golf Course in
CharlottesvilIe,Va.
A senior co-captain, Teague
is the only Pirate in the history of
the program to be on
four Colonial Champi-
onship teams. He had
more top ten finishes
than any other Pirate
last season (four) and
has been named to the
All-CAA team four
consecutive years.
Teague's best finishes mis year
include a third at the Colonial
Championships, a ninth at the
ECU SheratonEmerald, and 17th
place finishes at the Furman In-
tercollegiate and Cavalier Clas-
sic.
Teaguehasalreadyplayed the
Birdwood course once this year,
shooting a 76-71-76223 at the
Cavalier Classic.
Teague is one of two indi-
vidua Is selected from District
3 (North) to compete in the
East Regionals, the other be-
ing UT-Chattanooga's Neil
Connolly. The eight
teams representing
District 3 (North) are
Georgia Tech, Wake
Forest, Virginia,
Clemson, North Caro-
lina, Duke, N.C State
and Augusta College.
22 teams and 10 in-
dividuals will play in
the East Regional along with the
eight District 3 (North) teams,
among them Connecticut and
Hartford from District 1; Penn
State, Army, Princeton and Temple
from District 2; Florida, LSU, Geor-
gia, Tennessee, Alabama, Auburn,
Horida State and South Carolina
from District 3 (South).
Blueprint for bowl coalition created championship
MYRTLE BEACHS.C(AP)�
The first blueprint for the college
football bowl coalition never intended
to create a national championship
game.
"Originally, the Atlantic Coast
Conference and the Big East � we
wanted to get our champion to play
thechampionofarctherccriference
said ACC commissioner Gene
Corrigan, one of the coal ition's chief
architects. "That was our first goal,
puregreed. We wanted toplay inone
of those three (big) bowls
Independent Notre Dame then
entered the picture and a title game
matchup became even less impor-
tant
"When wetalked toNotreDame
aboutjoininginwithus,theywereso
serious about not doing anything
thatwouldcreatea playoff'Corrigan
said Monday at the ACC spring
meetmgTheysaidLet'screateour
own playoff atmosphere by having
this thing
So, it's ironic that what the coali-
tion worked so hard to avoid hap-
AIMefensive team named
pened in its first season; the dream
matchup of No. 1 Miami vs. No. 2
Alabama for the national crown in the
Sugar Bowl.
It turns out the game wasn't all
good for the pact, which has been
extended for two more seasons,
Corrigan said.
"One of the problems is we
ended up with No. 1 vs. No. 2 and tha t
kind of relegatedalltheother bowls to
a position that just happens every
once in a while. While it was great for
the fans and the media to have No. 1
vs. No. 2 and everybody got fired up
about it, it certainly didn't help the
Orange Bowl or the Cotton Bowl or
the Rose Bowl or any of them. We
know that is not going to happen
every year he said.
Andonemajorglitchintheequa-
tion involved an ACC team
The Cotton Bowl passed over
then No. 4-ranked Florida State in
favor of lower ranked Notre Dame, a
nation drawing card for TV, to play
See BOWL page 12
NEW YORK (AP) � Michael
Jordan of the Chicago Bulls and
Hakeem Olajuwon of the Houston
Rockets were named Tuesday to the
NBA all-defensive team.
Joe Dumars and Dennis Rod-
man of Detroit and Scottie Pippen of
theBuusalsowereselected forthefirst
team by the 27 NBA coaches.
Jordan, on the team for the sixth
straight season, led theNBA in steals
for the third time in his career and
received 51 of a possible 52 points.
Coaches' first choices received two
points and their second picks one.
GoadresccwWixtvetefortjcfwn
players.
Olajuwon, on the team for the
fourth time, led in blocked shots for
the third time in four years.
Rodman, theleadingrebounder
the lasttwoyears, made the team for
the fifth straight season,and Pippen
for 6e second straightyear. Dumars
was picked for the fourth time.
The second team was Dan
Majerie of Phoenix, John Starks of
New York, David Robinson of San
Antonio, Larry Nance of Cleveland
and
r





MAY 19, 1993
is coach of the year bowl
from page 11
iviteeeand
tsng aw irds is not why I'm coach-
ing. This is .i residual award based
on the team winning, but 1 will fee!
very awkward accepting this if
Patrick Ewing does not win the
MVP
Riley also said Monday he was
disappointed that none of his play-
ers was on the NBA All-Defensive
team although the Knicks led the
league in fewest points allowed and
field-goal percentage allowed.
"I've never been with a group
that wanted to win more he said.
Riley, who also was Coach of
the Year for the Los Angeles Lakers
i i hampion-
lem by the time he won
ot win the
. istheyearlleftcoach-
ilej who spent a year
st before joining the
eforethe 1991-92season. In
ond season, Riley led the team
60-22 record, matching the
winningest mark in its 47-year his-
tory. The Knicks' 37-4 home record
at Madison Square Garden was the
best in the NBA and the best in team
history. "He pushed all the right
burtons to bring us together said
guard John Starks, one of only five
holdovers from Riley's5Twin team
of 1991-92Wehad seven new guys
and he's done a wonderful job ma k-
ing adjustments. They say the NBA
is a players' game, but his coaching
has a lot to do with us winning
"Basketball is justa game, but a
coach can make it more than a game
through motivation said Rolando
Blackman,a 12-yearNBAveteran in
his fi rst season wi th New York. "Pat
is .i master of motivation, whether
he is conjuring up real stories or
telling flat-out lies
Du ring theseason, Riley reached
the 600-victory plateau when the
Kn icksdefea ted Mia mi 91-87on Dec.
19. Hiscareer record with the Lakers
and the Knicks is 644-247, and he
also is the only NBA coach with 100
playoff victories.
Riley edged Houston's Rudy
Tomjanovich by onevotein theclos-
est balloting in the31-year history of
the award. Riley received 32 votes
and Tomjanovich 31 in voting by 98
NBA writers and broadcasters �
three from each league city and 17
representing the national media.
Also receiving votes were
Sea ttle's George Karl (10), Phoenix's
Paul Westphal (9), New Jersey's
Chuck Daly (7), San Antonio's John
Lucas (6), Boston's Chris Ford (2)
and Cleveland's Lenny Wilkens (1).
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,J
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No. 3 and undefeated Texas A&M,
sending the Seminoles to the Orange
Bowl to face Nebraska with nochance
of winning the national title.
"That wasa glitch that should not
have occurred and they ended up
payinga bigpriceforthat'said Florida
Stateathletic director Bob Coin.
Notre Dame defeated the Aggies
in a lopsided game.
Corrigan also said Stanford had
toplay its tier twocoali tion bowl game
inHcrMa,son3X)C)0rrulesfrornhorne.
Few fans attended.
"As with anything in the first
year, therecouldhave been things that
went better he said. "What we al-
ways find outis thatyou have to have
regional teams in your bowls
Overall, the ACC has benefited
from the coalition, Corrigan said.
"Whaf shappened becauseof the
coalitioniswe'regettingourtwo,three
and four teams set in bowls and it
makes it a whole lot orderly and a
whole lot less stressful
DOGWOOD HOLLOW
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PRE-LEASING FOR
JULY & AUGUST 1993
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 full bath units
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Apartment 1-H Monday - Friday 4:00 - 5:30
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�JT wa.Mi� i i i.�m
MAY 19. 1993
The East Carolinian
13
Olajuwon named defensive POY
nat
� fensivePIayerofthe
iday by a wide margin.
lajuwon, named earlier to the
NBA All-Defensive first team tor the
fourth time, averaged 26.1 points
"id 13.1 rebounds in the regular
sea �. He led me NBA with 342
blucked shots and was first in steals
bv centers with 150.
J
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar,with five
selections, is the only center in NBA
history to be selected to the All-De-
fensive first team more times in his
career than Ola ju won since the team
was established in 1968-69.
"1'mjustgoingtobe happy with
this Olajuwon said. "This is a big
title and 1 'm very honored to get it
The Rockets led the Western
Conference in defense and finished
n the MBA, allowing oppo-
ige of 99.8 points.
"Thekej toourseasonhasbeen
ourdi louston coach Rudy
Tomjanovkh said.
Other players get some of the
credit, too, but he is the anchor to
what we try to do
Olajuwon received 73 of a pos-
sible 98 votes from a nationwide
panel comprising three sports writ-
ers and broadcasters from each
league city and 17 representing the
national media.
Last year'swinner, Michael Jor-
dan of the Chicago Bulls, and David
Robinson of the San Antonio Spurs,
tied for second with nine votes each.
Detroit Tistons' Dennis Rod-
man, winner of the award in 19911
and 1991, had three votes and Dan
Majerle of the Thoenix Suns and
Patrick Ewing, John Starks and
Charles Oakley of the New York
Knicks received one vote apiece.
"With Hakeem, that's a great
starting point to build a good de-
fense, and defense is what wins
games Tomjanovich said. 'Teams
have to hit from the outside when
you have someone like Hakeem
down low
Olajuwon registered 1.83 steals
per game, ranking 13th in the NBA
overall and first among centers. He
also finished fourth in the NBA in
both scoring and rebounding, be-
coming the only player to rank
among the top five in scoring, re-
bounding and blocked shots.
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MAY 19, 1993
Lewis considering $12
million bout with Bowe
M- '�'��
�B
m m
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) � Lennox
Lewis' promoter says he wouldn't be
surprised to see the World Boxing
Council's heavyweight champion ac-
cept a $12 million offer tofightRiddick
Bowe, holder of the International Box-
ing Federation and World Boxing As-
sociation tides.
Dan Duva, of Main Events, said
Friday an offer by Bowe's manager,
Rock Newman, would be considered
by Lewis' people
"1 think there will be a very posi-
tive response from the Lewis camp�
if Newman makes the offer Duva
said.
Duva said he released Lewis, of
London, from his contract tofind out if
Newman is really seriousabout hand-
ing Lewis $12 million for the proposed
Nov. 5 bout in Las Vegas
"Wefreed Lewis tosee if it'sa real
offer said DuvaTfhe wants to make
the fight happen, he has to make the
offer directly to Lennox
"We're stepping out If you're go-
ing around telling everyone you're of-
fering $12 million for a fight, then lef s
seeitNewmandidnotretumsev'eral
telephone messages left at his Wash-
ington, DCoffice Friday. Hisbrother,
Spencer Promotions head John New-
man, was not in the office and unavail-
able to comment, a secretary said.
There is a big question mark sur-
rounding any Bowe-Lewis matchup
�thetentativetitierematchdatebeing
negotiatedbetweenBoweand Evander
Holyfield.
Those two camps are looking to
meet in Las Vegas during the first two
weeksof November. And aspartof the
deal toreleaseLewis,any Lewis-Bowe
fightcouldtakeplaoeonly after Bowe's
date with Horyfieki.
"That makes Rock's offer even
more interesting said Kathy Duva,
Lou's wife. "They want to schedule
two fights within a few weeks of each
other
HolyfieH,wrttfightsAlexStewart
on June 26, also has a contract with
Main Events.
LewisdefiendedhisWBCtitieMay
8 by winning a unanimous decision
over Tony Tucker. Bowe will defend
his tide against Jesse Ferguson on May
22 in Washington's RFK Stadium
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m





Title
The East Carolinian, May 19, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 19, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.943
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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