The East Carolinian, April 29, 1993






Sock Her!
Soccer Team
xpel Hill and
d at a state
ament.
See page 10 for story.
Food Briefs
Orango Tango is one of
many new flavors from
Haagen-Dazs.
See story page 7.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 32
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Career sendees aids in all job-finding steps
From resumes to interviews,
Bloxton House helps students
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
You've signed up for your
last semester of classes. You've
donea senior summary, filled out
the graduation form and finished
all the other red tape and paper-
work needed to graduate next se-
mester. You've even planned
ahead and booked your parents a
hotel room six months before com-
mencement. You think, "W'hatelse
is there?"
A job. Your future. The "real
world Don't worry, Career Ser-
vices is here to help.
Located in Bloxton House,
between Mendenhall Student
Center and Greene Residence
Hall, Career Services provides
seniors and graduate students
with services that include work-
shops in resumes and interview-
ing, employer and career litera-
ture and monthly job guides.
Dr. Jim Westmoreland, di-
rector of Career Services, urges
students, even if they are gradu-
ating this May, to come in and
avail themselves of the resources
at Career Services.
"The main thing to get in
students' minds is that they can
still get information
Westmoreland said. "It's never too
late to come in
Possibly the best known as-
pect of Career Services is their
regular resume and interview
workshops that are open to all
students. These workshops allow
students to come in and work on
resumes and credential packets
that will go out to prospective
employers.
"If a student graduating in
May has not done a resume, they
really need to come in said Lisa
Pittman, assistant director of Ca-
reer Services.
When a student first regis-
ters at Career Services (at no
charge), he or she will complete a
credential packet. This packet will
antain thestudent's resume, their
references and a student teaching
report, if the student is a teaching
major. By student request, these
packets will be sent out free of
charge the first five times, and for
a small fee, any additional times.
Employers may request these
packets at any time for no charge
to either them or the student.
According to Pittman, em-
ployers sometimes call for spe-
cific resumes that Career Services
will send to them. The employers
are looking for specific majors or
preferred geographical areas.
"However, someemployers
See CAREER page 4
Not only can Career Services help you find a job,
prospective employers find you.
Photo by Dail Reed
can help
they
Tuesday, April 29, 1993
14 Pages
Career search should
start with freshmen
(AP) � When is the best
time to start a job search?
"Startdrillingwhat it takes
togetajobinto their heads when
students start college, not dur-
ing their senior year advises
William Smith, career develop-
mentcenterdirectoratWartburg
College in Waverly, Iowa.
Smith says that all too of-
ten graduates don't realize how
d i fficu Hand competitive the job
market is. "There are jobs avail-
able.Careerdevelopmentoffices,
however,need to make their stu-
dents more marketable
At Wartburg, incoming
freshmen meet with counselors
to get job-finding advice.
Students might be urged
togetundergraduateexperience
in co-op or internship programs,
so that when they go into the job
market full time they have some
kind of work record.
"Internships and co-ops
are an important link between
the academic world and the real
world says John Wallace, dean
of cooperative education at
Antioch College in Yellow
Springs, Ohio. Antioch students
must complete 18 months of co-
op work, and at least three
months in a different cultural
environment, to graduate.
"Somebody with a Euro-
pean background might spend
three months working in Harlem
or South Central Los Angeles
says Wallace. Students typically
work in hospitals, homejess shel-
ters, newspapers and government
agencies.
Frank Kollar, career devel-
opment and placement director
at Mansfield University in Penn-
sylvania says that this work helps
students sort out their goals. "In-
ternships and co-ops are impor-
tant because students learn what
jobs they don't want as well as
what fields interest them
Co-op work is part of the
manydegreeprogramsofferedat
the Rochester Institute of Tech-
nology in New York. RIT says it
places2,600students annually and
attracts 1,400 employers around
thecountry.Studentsalso are find-
ing jobs abroad.
Manny Contomanolis, di-
rector of cooperative education
and placement, says he recently
placed the first RIT student in
japan. "The numbers of students
we have assisted over the years
astounds me he says, citing the
longevity of the program, now
over 80 years old.
"Women students usually
have a tougher time in the job
market and need extra help, says
Dr. Mary Cianni, who created a
See START page 4
Part-time jobs, internships at co-op
By Shannon Cooper
Staff Writer
ECU's Department of Coopera-
tive Education helps students find part-
time jobs and internships, along with
helping undecided students choose a
field of study.
Co-op opportunities are available
for all graduate and undergraduate
students in most academic areas with
a minimum 2.0 GPA.
Students from all over the United
States are recommended to apply for
co-op. Co-op opportunities are not lim-
ited by location.
"Two ii.formation seminars are
held every week Mary Cauley, Di-
rector of Cooperative Education, said.
"Studentscan attend these seminars to
find outabout the program and what's
available
Students are given applications
at these seminars to complete. After
doing so, students may make an ap-
pointment with a coordinator that
works with their particular major.
"For summer jobs, students re-
ally need to think about that early in
the semester Cauley said. "There are
some really good internships out there,
but the deadlines are very early in the
year
The deadline for the job applica-
tions depend on the employer. "It's
better for the students to come early
because there are more opportunities
the earlier people come, but there are
still some opportunities out there
Cauley said.
To make co-op services more con-
venient, students can now access co-
op's job database through the comput-
erized job Opportunities Bank System
See CO-OP page 4
Cooperative
Education is
available to help
students find
part-time jobs,
internships and
even a major.
Photo by
Dail Reed
Answer want ads carefully
PRINCETON JUNC-
TION, N.J. (AP) � The odds
of getting a job through want
ads are better than you might
think, says Phyllis Macklin, a
career specialist. Knowing
how to read and respond to
them will increase your
chances.
Macklin, partner in
Mtnsuk, Macklin, Stein & As-
sociates, a career counseling
and outplacement firm, agrees
with industry estimates that
only 10 to 15 percent of all
professional positions are
found through recruitment
advertising. But she points to
a 28 percent success rate
among her clients � owirie,
she says, to tips she gives
them:
� Learn who's behind
the blind listing undera post
office box number by calling
the post office, which is by
law required to reveal that
information.
� After finding out
who the advertiser is, tena-
ciously network into the
firm. Establish contact with
the hiring authority for the
job and aim for an appoint-
ment to which you'll bring
your resume � instead of
sending it beforehand.
�Read ads creatively.
If a company often adver-
tises for sales personnel, that
meansjjt probably needs
credit-collections people. If
a "V.PMarketing" spot is
advertised, there probably
See ANSWER page 4
Books offer assistance to job hunters
(AP) � An accessible source
of advice about career planningor
jobhunting isyourbookstore. Here
are some picks:
� In "The Street-Smart Ca-
reer Guide" (Crown Trade Paper-
back), author Laura Pedersen en-
courages potential careerists to
think like entrepreneurs, whether
they work for companies or for
themselves. "Knowing things has
become more important than mak-
ing things says Pedersen, who
becamea millionaire via WailStreet
and retired to start another career
before she was 23. By being an
innovator and not just a worker,
the career entrepreneur is more
resilient in a changing economy,
she says.
� For those who decide to
work for themselves, there is an
updated paperback version of
Judith H. McQuown's "Inc. Your-
self" (HarperBusiness). In a new
chapter, McQuown pays special
attention to the challenges faced
by entrepreneurial minorities and
women. She also covers how to
save on taxes and get medical, life
and disability insurance through
self-incorporation.
� The future is nearly here,
and author Shelly Field assays the
"lOOBest Careers for the Year 2000"
(Arco-Prentice Hall). Social and
economic changes will push cer-
tain careers to the forefront, she
writes, picking a selection of the
most promising � from medical
technoK gy positions tocompu ter-
based businesses run from home.
She gives an overview of each job,
its responsibilities, earnings and
advancement potential, education
required, and tips about where to
find openings. There's also an ap-
pendix listing add ressesof relevant
professional organizations.
�Immediate concerns of the
job hunter are addressed in "How
You Really Get Hired" (Arco-
Prentice Hall), by John L. LaFevre.
The author, a corporate recruiter,
walks the applicant through the
procedure, helps anticipate ob-
stacles and offers this advice: Al-
ways avoid personnel depart-
ments. He also gives tips about
how to keep your resume from
being immediately round-filed.
� What to expect and how
to deal with die job interview is
covered in David R. Eyler's "Job
Interviews That Mean Business"
(Random House). The author dis-
cusses the interviewer's psycho-
logical techniques in the inter-
change and how the applicant
should deal with them.
� Sick of big city business
and office politics? Long for the
good life in the boondocks? It's
possible to makea living out there,
argue authors Marilyn and Tom
Ross in "Country Bound" (Com-
munication Creativity). The
couple, who left urban Southern
California in the early 1980s to set
up shop in a small Colorado moun-
tain town, assess the possibilities
for you � entrepreneurship, fran-
chises, home-based computer busi-
nesses, telecommuting, rural job
opportunities,and more. They also
cover business opportunities for
retirees. "Many are turningadver-
sity into opportunity by moving
their fanlies where they can live
better on less and launch exciting
new careers says Tom Ross of
some urban refugees.





APRIL 29, 1993
- nince
Ifllli'Ill W.IS
1:20 p.m.
a i'ik- secured on the
April H
12:03 p.m.
A laj toj � omputer, valued u almost S3.000. w;i stolen from
unn room 216.
1:10 p.m.
A suspect attempted to steal a book from a student in Jovner
Library. The suspect took the book off a table on the first floor of the
east wins stacks.
4:15 p.m.
A 21-year-old man was caught in possession of a stolen bicycle
at the tennis court area south of Minges.
April 12
2-05 p.m.
The back glass on a 1989 CMC Van was broken out at the
southeast side of Jovner Library.
April 13
3:56 a.m.
An unknown person broke into the vending machine on the
southeast side of Fleming Hall.
April 16
1:13 p.m.
A 22-year-old woman was caught masturbating in room 115 of
the Theater Arts Building.
April 25
6 p.m.
A wallet was stolen from a student's bookbas in the Health
Sciences Library-
April 22
A 21-year-old man pushed and hit his ex-girlfnend and was
charged with assault. The event took place at Wnght Circle.
4:39 p.m.
-An unknown person entered a residence hall and stole atout
$300 worth of jewelry and $245 of other equipment.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Music, computer industries hold
unknown career openings
(Ar) � The law of supply
and demand rules the job market,
x you might consider one these
fields which need recruits:
� ComputerSystems. "Stu-
dents may be scared away by head-
lines about the slump in the com-
puter industry, but they should be
reading the want ads says Dr.
Alton Sanders, head of the sys-
tems analysis department at Mi-
ami University in Oxford, Ohio.
Enrollments are down � he
cites61 entering freshmen lastyear
contrasting with 300 a decade ago
� yet the U.S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics projects a 79 percent in-
crease in the need for systems ana-
lysts and computer scientists by
2005. The demand stems from
growing use of computersas prob-
lem solvers by business and in-
dustry.
In a university survey, Sand-
ers found that 62 of 65 responding
1992 majors had landed jobs
within six months of graduation.
Starting salaries averaged $30,031.
� Actuarial Science. Num-
berless numbers are out there in
thecomputerized workLand there
have to be people who can make
sense of them. People with good
analytical, statistical and math-
ematical skills will find opportu-
nities as actuaries in all types of
business fields,notably insurance,
accord ing to Carl Cowen, d i rector
oftheactuarialscienceprogramat
Purdue University in West
Lafayette, Ind.
"Actuaries must be able to
work with facts, figures and people
to solve a variety of problems he
says. "These types of skills are
also sought by employers looking
to fill positions in areas such as
quality control, market research
or census management
Actuaries' quantitative and
analytical skills make them prime
candidates for management, he
adds. Purdue's progam includes
courses such as interest theory but
also stresses backgrounding in
communication, English, business
and liberal arts.
� The Music Business.
There's more to music than per-
formance, says Frederick Miller,
dean of the School of Music at
DePaul University in Chicago. "It
extends into such areas as pub-
lishing, merchandising, arts man-
agement, record marketing, pro-
motion and sales
DePaul's new music-busi-
ness degree program steers busi-
ness-oriented musicians tocareers
that will let them enjoy the best
two worlds. "These students can
go a variety of ways a f ter grad ua-
tion. They have an opportunity to
stay close to music but work in a
business setting says Miller.
� Court Reporting. An old
profession with a new look, court
reporting is growing along with
the amount of litigation in the
country. Thesedays, court report-
ers can create instant transcripts
with computer-aided transcrip-
tion (CAT), which turns stenogra-
phy notes quickly into English.
"Opportunitiesareplentiful,
and technology is aiding our abil-
ity to deliver these extremely im-
portant services to the legal com-
munity and the judicial process
says Mary Hauptman, president
of Court Reporting Institute of
Hicksville,N.Y.
Certified and registered
court reportersalso are indemand
for rapid data entry and closed
captioning, she says.
Hotel industry majors receive tips
People about to embark on
a careers in the lodging ind ustry and
hoping to fast-track to the top might
note these tips from industry pros:
� Choose slots best suited to
your skills and personality. Front-
of-house positions are decidedly
people-oriented, while behind-the-
scenes jobs are good for people with
technical expertise.
�High-end hotelsoffer better
employee incentives, but they'realso
more demanding. At the top are
Nikko, Four Seasons, Ritz-Carlton
and Rosewood chains.
� Deluxe and mass market
super-chains (Best Western, Hilton
Hotels,Holidaylnn,Hyatt,Marriott
and ITT-Sheraton, among them)
have vast numbers of enormous
properties with more jobs to be filled,
so you may find greater opportunity
to fast-track your career with one of
these chains. Butbeprepared to relo-
cate frequently; some chains expect
employees to move every 18 or 24
months. You can refuse, but if you
turn down several offers, you may
not be asked again.
� If you're unwilling to relo-
cate, you may wantto position your-
self in a city where there are many
hotels, so you can jump from one to
another. You'll sacrificeseniority,but
look for a better title and higher pay
t ch time you change companies.
� Choosing a hotel location
can influence your career success
and personal happiness. If you're a
high-energy, type-A personality,you
may have difficult)' adjusting to
slow-paced 'island time' typical at
resort destinations like Hawaii or
the Caribbean. On the other hand, if
you don't handle pressure well, you
may boil over in the heated atmo-
sphere of a New York or Chicago
business hotel.
� If you want to work over-
seas, the hotel business can offer the
way.
Company
loyalties
falling
CHICAGO (AP)�A ca-
sualty of the corporate restruc-
turing wars may be company
loyalty, according tostudy pro-
jecting what the managerial
work force will look like in the
1990s.
Managers recognize that
restructuring, deregulation,
competition and costs can im-
peril thei robs with their present
employer, says the lead re-
searcher, Dr. ArmeReilly, assis-
tant professor of management
at Loyola University Chicago.
That means the manager's pri-
mary loyalty will be to his ca-
reer, not to the company.
When the economy im-
proves and experienced man-
agers are in greater demand,
turbulent companiesrnayfind
themselves with turnover prob-
lems. "With a slight improve-
ment in the economy, these ca-
reer-loyal young managers �
the work force of the future �
may prove to beverydifficult to
keep Reilly says.
That can lead to poor or-
ganizational performance.
"Companies may find them-
selves in a vicious circle of tur-
buience restructuring loss of
competent managers and poor
perforrriance,leadingtoanomer
round of turbulence and so
forth says Dr. Linda K. Stroh,
assistant professor at Loyola's
Institute of Human Resources
and Industrial Relations.
The study, "The Impact
of Corporate Turbulence was
done jointly by Loyola and
Northwestern University and
looked at the connections be-
tween organizational turbu-
lence and attitudes of almost
700 mid-level managers at 17
Fortune 500 companies.
DID YOU GET ONE?
We gave away 2,000 copies of the
TREASURE CHEST
VIDEO
YEARBOOK
at Barefoot on the Ma
WE HAVE MORE
to distribute between
8:30AM and 4PM
THURSDAY APRIL 29
in Mendenhall Student Center
PLUS
Pick up your copy of the
DROP
25
POUNDS
SELL YOUR BOOKS
We buy all books with current market value
AND MAYBE WIN A GREAT PRIZE
WRIGHT PLACE SODA SHOP
April 29 .
April 30
May 1 (Sat)
May 3 - 5
May 6
8:30 AM - 7:00 PM
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and the year-end issue of
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ON THE HILL & ON THE MALL
April 29 & 30 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
May 3 - 5
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Student Stores
Wright Building � 757-6731
Mon-Thurs 8am-8pm � Fri 2am-5pm � Sat 11 am-6pm
More than just books�your dollars support student scholars





1�
�III �
APRIL 29, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
leaith careers continue to be a promising option for many
leading the list is nursing,
driven by need to oil health care
costs and the continuing shortage of
nurses. The American Association
ofG Ueges ofN u rsi ngestimates that
sorting in 1995, nursing graduates
must increasebynofewer tlian 20,000
per year to meet needs.
"We just about doubled our
admissions two years ago says
Judith Ruland, head of the nursing
department at Hartwick College in
Qneonta,N.Y. 'There's been a rise in
admissions in recent years but no-
where near enough to meet the de-
mand. The numbers must increase
radically,and soon, in order to main-
tain the supply and demand bal-
ance
ialties include clinical
nmunity health, manage-
�nsulting.
Nurses in.ill fields are having
no problems getting jobs, and the
starting salaries for recent graduates
are better than those tor any other
major field, says Leo Charrette, di-
rector of career planning and place-
ment at Hartwick. Starting salanes
in most areas are around $30,(XK).
"Nursing majors draw the highest
salary in the first job out he says.
Some majors are placed even
before they get their diplomas, ac-
cord ing to Everlena Hoi mes, dean of
the School of Health Sciences at
Hunter College in New York City.
"They do field work and internships
as part of the curriculum. They're
out in the workplace and people
approach them about jobs
One of the fastest-growing
fields is nurse practitioner � the
lower cost alternative to doctors for
much routine treatment � says Sis-
ter Mary Jean Flaherty, nursing
school dean at the Catholic Univer-
sity of AmeriGi in Washington, D.C.
These professionals are edu-
cated topromotehealthandcan treat
problemsand prescribe medications
in many states, she says, and they
tend totreatpatientsinbroader,more
comprehensive ways than physi-
cians typically do.
"A physician dealing with a
cardiac patient will discussdiet and
exercise with a patient, but a nurse
practitioner mightalsoidenti fycom-
muniry resourcesand teach the fam-
ily how to support the patient on a
daily basis she says.
Nursing's salaries and inde-
pendent professionalismareartract-
ing more men to the field, says Dr.
Herbert Nishikawa, associate pro-
fessor of nursing at the University of
Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
in Oklahoma City. "Specialized
Freelance an option for all majors
CHICAGO (AP) �
Freelancing, long associated with
artists, writers and performers, is a
career option for people in all fields
these days.
Because of corporate
downsizing, freelanceopportunities
aregrowing for special istsin account-
ing, marketing, management and
other traditional business functions,
says Timothy Long, a career ad visor
at Columbia College Chicago.
Fax machines, cellular tele-
phones, personal computers and
desktop publishing have made it
easier for freelancers to compete for
and service clients.
"Part of thedraw of freelancing
is the element of freedom. You have
noboss,andyouworkinyourspace
says Long, who th inks collegesneed
tohelpstudentspreparefor this kind
of work. "Students notonlyhaveto
lookat thecreativesideof freelancing,
they have to consider the business
side as well
The successful freelancer, he
says,mustbeskilledatrunningwhat
is in fact a small business. For one
thing, the freelancer must have an
ability to market his talents through
direct mail, trade publication adver-
tisements or creative source books.
Noneofthisisparticularlyeasy
or leisurely. "Having a business of
your own can be an addictive and
all-consuming passion says Ed
Eusebio, a Columbia graduate stu-
dent who with Kim Bagwill edits
anddesignsaliterary magazine from
their home. "Kim and I have often
found ourselves working long after
we should have gone to bed. That's
parti rularlydifficultsincelalsowork
a day job
While one of the goals of
freelancer; ;s to have a real life be-
yond work, he says, deadline pres-
sure can wipe personal plans off the
schedule.
Bagwill likes the idea of being
able to takecareofthechildren while
working, but adds: "Some people
think that workingat home will free
them to do glamorous stuff with
their kids, like going to museums
and zoos and plays all the time, but
it doesn't. Working at home can free
you to be a part of your children's
ordinary lives, and that'senough for
me
Creative money management
helps, too.
When he and Jim Steinkamp
� both Columbia graduates �
opened their business eight years
ago, they started from scratch. "We
didn't have any capital to start the
business, so we kept our overhead
low and built the business gradu-
ally.
"We started tine business part-
time while both kept our full time
jobs. It took a few years before we
could both get into it full time
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nurses�nursepractitionersornurse
anesthetists for example�have the
opportunity toopen theirown busi-
ness, especially in a rural area, and
this is appealing to men he says.
"Most malenursing students,
whomakeupaboutl2percentofthe
total of nursing students nationally,
arenotyourtypical2l)-year-oldright
out of two years of junior college.
Many of them are military veterans,
haveexperienceasemergency medi-
cal technicians or have held other
jobs in the health care field
� Another fast-growing spe-
cialty that takes over many of a
doctor'sdu ties is physican assistant.
PAstypicallytakemedicalhis-
tories, conduct physical examina-
tions, order lab tests, perform minor
procedures, counsel and educate
patients on health matters.
"The education is based on a
medical model,bothdiagnosingand
treating. Instead of specializing in a
certain area, as physicians do when
they go through residency, PAs
traditonally focus on 'wellness' and
common illnesses in primary care
explains Julie Dickens, PA program
axrdinator at the Rochester Insti-
tute of Technology in upstate New
York.
Unlikedoctors,candidatesfor
this field can complete study wi than
undergraduate degree, she says.
Starting salaries range from
$35,000 to $45,000. Brian Owens, a
PA placement specialist with
Snelling Personnel Services in Dal-
las, says demand outruns supply.
Many dKtors want to expand their
practices, he says, but instead of
bringing in a partner add one or two
physician assistants.
� There are critical shortages
of qualified technologists working
in radiology and oncology, accord-
ing to the AmericanCollegeof Radi-
ology.
ACR cites U.S. Labor Depart-
ment statistics which project a 65
percent increase in demand for these
professionals by the end of the de-
cade. Typical starting salaries range
from $20,000 to $30,000.
Radiation therapists adminis-
ter radiation treatments to cancer
patients. Radiographers and
sonographers handle diagnostic X-
rays, sonograms, magnetic reso-
nanceimaging(MRI)and computed
tomogra phy (CAT) scans for a vari-
ety of patients, including expectant
mothers. Most critical need is in ra-
diation therapy technology, with a
17 percen t vacancy rate, and nuclear
medicine technology and
sonography,with lOpercentvacancy
rate.Radiographyandorherspecial-
ties also need recruits, according to
the organization.
� It stands to reason that
people who oversee exercise pro-
grams would be in demand.
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1499 16.99 17.99 2499 29-99 3299 49.99
Whisper Bio-Bag sale ends 43093
4pa 9pacK 12ea�k d pack
4.99
8.99
10.99
18.99
UNIVERSITY CENTER � 14th & CHARLES ST
TCTaAAffA Monday-Friday 11-9
�9 I "WW Saturday 10-9-Am exDisc
SALE ENDS MAY 1
Sunday 1-6�MCAisa
Coold you
fotKke 4V
5
d
00 k fceft
Turn Your Education Into Experience
Join the award-winning team in the Advertising Department of The East Carolinian as
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Win Awards For Your Resume
Develop Your Portfolio With Printed Pieces and Make Money
Working Knowledge of
Macintosh Computer Applications Necessary
r A tfT PageMaker, Quark XPress, Freehand & Illustrator
PaObJL . APP'y at Tie East Carolinian offices
Carolinian 2nd Floor of Student Pubs building.757-6366
�v-v-v.
140 Oakmont Drive Greenville, NC 756-9175
GREENVILLE
FUN PARK
ing
i.
GO-KART RIDES
MINIATURE GOLF
& GAME ROOM
I-IO Mon-Thur
1-11 Fri & Sat
2-8 Sun
PARTIES & GROUPS
757-1800
2 Miles South of
Burroughs Wellcome on 264
. - M�w'�wpj.nLMr p�bwwp vmm
� IIWIIP II.I.II
inrnMRinnni





APRIL 29, 1993
CO-OP
Continued from page 1
ac- ,i company in the institutions
men! program.
"I recommend that stu-
dents find out about co-op ,is
'gramisverj freshmen so th.it they'll know
graduating stu- how to plan their academic pro-
�' im and if not .it least by the
ginning oi their sophomore
fered a permanent position from year Cauley suggested.
ittmansaid.
fne Iso provides a
monthly ob Guide that includes
all jobs reported to Career Ser-
vices. Mailed or available around
the third week of each month, ob
Guide also provides information
and sign-up tunes tor upcoming
campus interviews.
Frospectiv eemploverscome
on campus between October and
April. As with call-in requests,
some employers have open sign-
ups, while others will be looking
for specific majors or qualifica-
tions. Some employers may also
require a previous resume before
they come to campus for inter-
views. Career Services will keep a
student on active file status for an
entire academic year. December
graduates who come in have the
additional benefit of starting in
September and going through un-
til the next May, one semester af-
ter they graduate.
Career Services also pro-
vides employer and career litera-
ture to students, along with bro-
� and i esume.
eer Services pro ides the
new SIGI PLUS a computer pro-
gram that helps students plan and
decide on a i areer. Students can
receive information on salaries,
benetits, advancement possibili-
ties and skills needed for hun-
dreds of jobs. Interested students
should makeanappointmentwith
Career Services to work with a
counselor tn the program by call-
ing 757-6050.
Career Services provides an
indispensable aid to the graduat-
ing student. Margie Swartout, as-
sistant tli rector of Career Services,
said that the office is here to aid
students in finding the career
suited to them.
"We work as a liaison be-
tween the student and the em-
ployer Swartout said. "We try to
make the connection between the
two
"We help students polish up
their skills and make them more
marketable said Tinman. "We
really try hard to get students
jobs
START
Continued from page 1
ANSWER
Continued from page 1
will be a national sales man-
ager opening, too.
- Reply K phone, even
if the ad says, "Absolutely no
phone calls will be accepted
Avoid mail replies w hen pos-
sible.
Even if asked, don't
specify salary requirements.
bay only that compensation
will depend on responsibili-
ties and growth opportunities.
� Never send a resume
to the personnel department,
even when the ad requests it.
Find out who is hiring, and
contact that person directly.
Answer ads Lite � a
week or 10 days after the ad
appears to avoid "resume
rush
� Answer old ads. The
firm may not have found the
right candidate, or it may need
to fill another similar position.
� Answer twite, send-
ing more information.
�- Always follow up by
telephone. Your persistence
may get you the interview.
Macklin says the best way
to find a job is by networking,
but other sources � ads, re-
cruiters, direct mailing �
should be explored creatively
and Stragegicallv.
"Don't be reactive, wait-
ing tor a position to appear
magically. Make it happen
she says.
mentorship program at
Susquehanna University'sSigmund
Weis School of Business in
Selinsgrove, Pa. I ach female busi-
ness freshman is assigned a success-
fulalumna as mentor. "Women have
a harder time than males students
finding ood jobs, but women cm
learn the ins and outs of corporate
lite long before they graduate by
taking part in our mentorship pro-
gram
lob leads and course recom-
mendations trom alumni are invalu-
able, as is networking entree, ob-
H'resToniMcLnvhorn,careerplan-
ning and placement director at
Roanoke College in Salem, Va.
Her college organized an
alumni-parent network along the
EastC oast tohelp find opportunities
for students.
"If you know somebody,
you're going togeta foot in the door
a lot easier than somebtxly trvin" it
cold turkey McLawhorn says.
StilLthe only person with ulti-
mate resp, insibility in the jt b search
is tile student.
I hecareercenterscanhelplvst
byteadtingmestudentshowtodoit
themselves.
"Devetopingactear,rnanage-
ableand realistic planon how to find
a job is( rften missing fit im a student's
approach to the job market savs
Dale Austin, career planning and
placement director at Hope College
in Holland, Mich.
His advice: Start early, when
you're a fresh man or sophomore.
"Any candidate looking for a
career opportunity can't wait until
graduation to worry about intern-
ships or resumes. Forget it. If you
wait until you're a senior to start
preparing to find a job, then you
missed the boat"
School's Almost Over
It's Time To
Headed
home g
for the
summer?
Store your "stuff" with us!
Free campus pick-up and delivery
?
?
?
Individual storage con tamers
Size: 40" x 48" x 60"
You pack it, you lock it, you keep the key
Local, climate controlled warehouse
Secure, licensed and insured
tudent torcige
network
When the dorms lock you out,
we lock you in!
Call Now
Container quantities are limited!
800-4U2-LOCK
800-482-5625
Open Monday through Friday
9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. EDT
Checks and major credit cards accepted
� i iwwij mmvmmmttr
Xl�feT
Sign up today for Overton's 1st Annual 3
on 3 Basketball Tournament to be held on
Saturday, May 1, 1993.
� 4 Players per team (one injury sub if needed). Open
to ages 15 and up.
� Teams will be placed according to height, skill level
and experience. Single Elimination Tournament.
� Entry s40.00 per team.
� Rain Date Sunday, May 2, 1993.
� For more details call Jake Jacobs at 355-5783 or
come by Overton's for complete rules and entry form.
Overton'sw,
HI Red Banks Road, Greenville hlLs
NC WUdlife Agent gD W
Your Complete Sporting Goods Store
Hours: Monday thru Friday, 8 to 7 pm � Saturday, S to 6 pm
FAST, FREE DELIVERY
VIDEO
PIZZA
Receive $1.00 OFF
Any Size Pizza or
Pokey Stix
by showing us your rented
video. Pick-up only.
Get A Small
Cheese Pizza
or Small Pokey Stix
for $1.88 with any purchase at
our already low coupon price.
Additional items 50t each.
Ill
YOU WEED A BREAK?
SNACK
ATTACK
large
2 item pizza
$6.74
TRIPLE
TROUBLE
3
small
1 item pizzas
$9.99
PIRATE
SPECIAL
X-Large 1 item
& 2 sodas BLOWOUT
$7.36
2 small
2 item pizzas
& 2 sodas
$8.18
EXAM
SPECIAL
Medium
2 item pizza
$5.18
BURNOUT
. 2 large
2 item pizzas,
STUDY
BREAK
large
1 item pizza
& small Pokey Stix
$7.17
PURPLE
PEOPLE EATER
3
large
1 item pizzas
$14.99
& 4 sodas
CARRY OUT SPECIAL $12.38
Large 1 item pizza
$4.99
Prices Do Not Include Sales Tax.Offers May Expire Without NoticR.S5.00 Minimum for Delivery
HOURS
SUN-THURS:
11:00AM-1:30 AM
FRI-SAT:
11:00AM-2:30 AM
321-GUM-B
315 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
Located next to Blockbuster Video
J
PERSONAL CHECKS
WA
V)c Checkharet





TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
�$
now 752628.
SINGLEROOMSFORRENTforsum-
mersessions. S250 per s.s includes rent,
utilines,and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
SUBLEASE: Room for rent. Fully fur-
nished house. Pay S200 a month plus
13 utilities. Available for summer.
Please contact 756-4735.
1 BEDROOM, FULLY FURNISHED,
May-July. Ringgold Towers-1st floor
Parking included in S375month and
utilities (cheap). Call ASAP 830-6278.
SUBLEASE APARTMENT located at
King's Arms Apartments. Rent S265 a
month. Available May 10 through July
31.1 will pav all of Mav's rent. Deposit
SI 70. Call Angela 757-2437.
2 ROOMS IN LARGE HOUSE on
Eastern St. Few blocks from campus.
Available May 1st. 144.00 utilities.
Call Todd or Mark at 830-1371.
TWO ROOMS available to rent for
summer andor through Dec. SlOO per
month, 14 utilities, MUST SEE. Call
355-9695. Available Immediately.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATES needed for summer
fall; 3 bdrm. house, 1 block from cam-
pus; low utilities, ac, washerdryer.
Call Stephanie at 752-2560.
BEST PLACE IN GREENVILLE TO
LIVE. Needed: ONE GOOD
ROOMATE. 3 bedroom house, cathe-
dral ceiling, fireplace, loft, outdoor pa-
tio, AC, wooded lot, close to campus.
ARTIST or MUSICIAN preferred. No
pets (we have the world's smartest cat
already) should be laid back, respon-
sible and courteous. $200 13 util.
THIS IS THE LIVING SPACE YOU'VE
BEEN DREAMING ABOUT. Call us
758-7993.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for Wildwood Villa Apartment start-
ing May 15 (SI 50 per month plus utili-
ties) please call 757-0321.
2ROOMMATES NEEDED to share4
bedroom house very near campus.
Please call Brittany 931-8628 or Cathy
931-8637. (For summer only!)
HOUSEMATE WANTEDQuiet loca-
tion near ECU. SI 62.50 per month plus
1 2 utilities. Available May 1 call 758-
3311.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for apartment 1 2 block from Art Bldg
3 blocks from downtown and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great for art stu-
dents. Call (919)867-6211.
ONE OR TWO ROOMMATES
WANTED to share townhouse in Wild-
wood Villas. SI 55.00 per month. Call
931-8906 or 830-1359.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
$150.00 month rent. 1 utilities. Avail-
able June 1st own bedroom 12 mile
from campus. Call 752-0874 ask for
Frankie. Leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED for a newly renovated Wild-
wood Villa apartment. Each person
pays S127a month plus 15 of utilities.
Needed soon, please call 931-9333.
ROOMMATE for apartment at
Stratford Arms, next to Allied Health
Bldg nonsmoker, free cable and wa-
ter, starting in June. Rent 185. plus 1 2
utilities, phone. Call 756-1603.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY. Must be responsible,
honest and nonsmoking. 12 rent, 1 2
� C,heat,cable,
. ksrrom campus.
: 12 or 757-3697.
NAGS HEAD Male Roommate
I for May - Aug. Call Dunne at
931-7002 Leave Message
TWO ROOMMATES NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY! to sublease 2 bdrm.
duplex on llthStreet for summer. S150
month plus 1 2 utilities per person.
Call Paige at 931-7921 and leave mes-
sage.
STYLING 4 BEDROOM HOUSE w
ac, screened-in porch, fenced-in back
yard, and close to campus. Up to 2
relaxed roommates needed for sum-
mer. SI 50 pr month 758-9418.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for 1st sum-
mer session only (Ma y-J une) SI 56 rent
13 utilities. Fema lenonsmoker. Must
like dogs. Need to know bv April 30.
Mary 752-6775.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Mav through August. Large apt own
room; must fill;RENT NEGOTIABLE!
Call Dawn at 756-5134.
ROOMMATENEEDED:Fornextfall
call 752-4922 - ASK FOR KEVIN. After
May 5th call (919)934-2175.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedrooml 12 bath. Apt. 1
milefrom campus. RentS195.00month
12 utilities. Mature, graduate stu-
dent preferred Call 757-1510.
AUTHENTIC BEER-BARREL
LEATHER FURNITURE: Matching
couch, reclyner, two side tables, coffee
table and bar with stools. $300.00 for
whole set. Call Cori at 752-2478.
KEYBOARD: Good for beginners.
With synthesizer, percusionand many
other special features. S100.00 or best
offer. Call Cori at 752-2478
CHEAP! FBIUS SEIZED: 89 Mercedes
- S 200,86 VW - $50,87 Mercedes - SI 00,
65 Mustang - S5. Choose form thou-
sands starting $50. FREE Information
24 hour hotline 801 -379-2929 copyright
NC 030610.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DE A. Available your area
now. Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
1984 KAWASAKI GPZ 750: Red, stage
3 carburetor kit, Kerker pipe, one hel-
met. $1000. Negotiable. 758-4920.
FOR SALE: A nice sofa and armchair
that are in very good condition. Ask-
ing $300 � Call 321-3440 and leave a
message.
COUCH AND CHAIR FOR SALE.
Good condition. Graduating! Mustsell
ASAP. I don't have room to take them
with me. $75.00 Cal 830-6665.
SOFA, LOVESEAT, DRESSER,
CHEST OF DRAWERS, RECLINER,
COFFEETABLE,2ENDTABLES.Sale
for cheap. Call 752-6491.
1988 YAMAHA FZ-600: redwhite,
FIR pipe, new back tire, helmet, S1750.
negotiable. 931-9041 leave message.
CDs USED $5; Futon, matching tables
wglass, dark green cover, $400; 355-
9502 leave message.
MEMBERSHIP to the club for women
only. Fitness and tanning center. For
more information contact Melissa at
355-4709.
LOFT FOR SALE, single bed loft,
stained and varnished. Shelves for ste-
reo andor books. Headboard shelf,
also. Excellent condition. $50752-8186.
AMP - '89 CRATE G40XL. 70 watts.
Celestian speakers Chorus, Reverb,
Distortion, etc. Absolute mint cond.
Still under warranty. Will sacrifice for
S275. Call Scott, 758-2119.
HUGEMOVINGAWAYSALESat-
urday May 1,7:00am - Noon. 2899 East
5th Street, University Apartments 12
by St. Peters Catholic Church Selling
bed, appliances, chest of drawers,
clothes, stereo, rugs, kitchen accesso-
ries, art supplies, and lots more. Early
birds get the best deals!
COFFEE AND END TABLE - $25,
cruiser bike lock - $100, Futon mat-
tress - $25. Call 752-9783.
MOUNTAIN BIKE - 20" Shasta Ar-
rowhead, white, 6 months old, I barely
rode it! Great condition must sell $150,
call Craig at 756-8854.
ELTON JOHN CONCERTTICKETS
May 7th, Dean Dome,ChapelHill. Call
830-6997. Leave a message.
groupGUARANTEEDatleast $400.00.
Mustcall BEFORE ENDOFTERM! 1-
800-932-0528, ext 99.
JOIN fellow East Carolinian ladies in
making 100's a day escorting in the
Greenville area Must have own trans-
portation; own phone and outgoing
personality; must be very self con-
scious and well groomed. We offer
flexible hours to work around classes
and nights. For more information call
757-3477 and ask for Amy. All infor-
mation held in strictest confidence.
WANT A SUMMER JOB? Be a
Domino's Driver! Flexible hours, good
pay. Must be 18 and have own trans-
portation. Call 746-4042.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Spa re fu 11 time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
200 -$500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information - 24 hour hotline. 801 -
379 - 2900. Copyright NC 030650.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church,510South Washington St on
Sunday mornings from 9am until
12:30pm. To work with toddlers
through 3 year olds. Applicants must
be punctual and dependable. Appli-
cants also should have cheerful,
friendly and caring attitudes in their
interaction with children and their
parents. For application information
contact the Church office 752-3101.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED
Great money, great club. Easy hrs
Thurs Fri Sat. 9pm - 2am. Cash SSS
Cash SSSCashSSSCall Paul (919) 736-
0716 Mothers Pla yhouse.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All materials provided. Send SASE to
National Distributors, PO Box 9643,
Springfield, MO65801. Immediate re-
sponse.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext. P-3712.
NEEDED 45 people to lose weight
now. New product recommended by
doctors. 100 natural, 100 guaran-
teed. Call 321-1046.
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT
- Make money teaching basic conver-
sational English abroad. Japan and
Taiwan. Make S2,000 - S4,000 per
month. Many provide room and board
other benefits! No previous training
or teaching certificate required. For
International Employment program,
call the International Employment
Group: (206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
BANQUETWAIT HELP FOR SUM-
MER JOBS. Apply Ramada Inn, 203
W. Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -Earn
S2,000month world travel (Hawaii,
Mexico,TheCaribbean,Etc.) Holiday,
Summer and Career employment
available. No experience necessary.
For employment program call 1-206-
634-0468 ext. C5362.
CURBSIDE WAITRESSES NEEDED
- Flexible hours. Apply in person at
West Ford End Drive-In.
WANTED: Students interested in be-
coming representatives for the Depa rt-
ment of Athletics as members of the
Pirate Crew. The Pirate crew is a vol-
unteer organization that assists ECU
athletics in fund raising activities and
the recruitment of student athletes.
Call 757-4570 for an application and
more information.
PART-TIMEHEI.PNEEDED morn-
ing hours only. Apply in person at
Carpet BargainCenterl009 Dickinson
Ave.
GUARANTEED $400: Two student
clubs needed for fall project. Your
fr
FILIBUSTER'S

a new full-service resturant and
bar in the downtown area, is
accepting applications for all
positions for summer & fall
employment opportunities.
Applicants may inquire at 114
East 14th St. across from the
Sports Pad between the hours of 2
. y& 4pm, Mon-Fri.
J)
EXCITING NEW
CONCEPT COMING TO
GREENVILLE AREA
Great Summer Job Opportunity.
Looking for delivery drivers
(Drivers average $8-1 2), cooks
and management personnel.
Apply In Person
Saturday, May 1 st
10-3
1414-A Charles Blvd.
(next to Dino's)
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with visaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
In Calit. (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave �206-A. Los Angles. CA 90025
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typingand photocopying services. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand wntten
pages. SDF Prof essiona 1 Com puter Ser-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's)Creenville, NC 752-3694.
MINISTORAGE-14K Brand newstor-
age units, verv close to university, cheap
rates, EVANS STREET CENTRE
MINI STORAGE 355-7443.
HANG GLIDE AT NAGS HEAD,
NORTH CAROLINA!Fora weekend
or a week of adventure and fun! Kitty
Hawk Kitep' beginner hangglidingles-
son S49 per person (show college ID).
1-800-334-4777. Sun Realty's modem
beach cottages S250 per weekend or
S350 per week (plus applicable taxes,
fees and security deposit). 1-800-334-
4745. Offer good through early May
1993.Call today foravailabilities.(Some
restrictions apply).
WRITERphilosophermusician and
poetic soul seeks friendship and corre-
spondence from like-minded lady. Pho-
tosand letters to MVPOBox8663,Green-
ville, NC 27835.
CONGRATULATIONS MARY
BETH! Thisisit,graduationdayiscorn-
ingupon you. First,Iwant to say THANK
YO U for a lwa ys being thereduring those
"console eg roommate times In the past
threeyearswehavebeenthroughl wierd
roommate, some heartbreaks (or is that
heart attack?), lots of parties, bunches of
beer, wild la tenights, MY MOM,and lots
of those "roomie talks I never thought
this "NECK" would have found a friend
likeyou,THANKSFOREVERYTHING!
I wish you the BEST OF LUCK in your
fu ture endeavors and always know that
I'm here for you just as you have been for
me. GOOD LUCK ROOMIE! love ya,
Shanna.
YO ED. Go Penguins! And "no I will
not take a picture of your butt, A & D.
BRIAN,CLIFF,MISSYUSA,JEREMY,
SEAN, T.J RODNEY, ALEC, GREG,
MARC G ADAM, PHIL, KEITH,
BOBBY W PAUL, TIM, JOE, BLAIR,
ALBIEJOHN BROB J JEFF, SCOTT,
HEATHER F PILAR, THE EAST
CAROLINIAN, REAL CRISIS CEN-
TER, AND EVERYONEELSE WHOSE
NAMEISLOSTINMYMINDRIGHT
NOW: You guys have given me a lot to
remember about ECU and you all have
taught me a lot. Some of you I haven't
known that long, but I will always re-
memberyou. Ireallyappreciatethoseof
you who have listened to my crazy life
and have been there for me when 1 really
needed a friend. I won't lie;Ican'twait to
be at UNC, but knowing that 1 have to
leave you guys to go there makes it a lot
harder. Please take care of yourselves
and remember me, o.k.?! You mean so
much to me and I'll cherish my memo-
ries from you all and good 'ole ECU
forever. All my love, Lisa Marie.
LATOYA HANKINS: Yo roomie! Just
wanted to let you know thatyou'vebeen
a really cool roommate this year and I
fovedallofour'M.itenightuntil-you-fall-
asleep" talks! I wish you the best of luck
in Gastonia and with Rickand your new
car! Becarefulandhavefunandkeepin
touch with me! Onedaylwilllearnhow
to step and 111 have to show you! Love
ya, Heathcliff! Your roomie, Lisa Marie.
SELL
tYOUR STUFF!
We're paving
(CASH for
X Furniture
X Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
I Microwaves
I Stereo Equipment
r U you arc selling you musi be 18
E whh a piciure ID (NCDL. ECU)
? or
BUY
l SOME STUFF!
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
r
EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
752-3866
Mon 10-12 1-5
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3 Sat 10-12
TO ALL THE PEOPLE AT THE TEC
who worked long hard hours and la-
bored with blood, sweatand tears here's
to you. We wish you luck with careers,
that is if anybody even has a lead and
where ever you all go may the booze
pour freely! See ya, wouldn't want to be
ya! From Cori, Beth, and Mo!
TO ALL NEWS STAFF WRITERS-
Thanks for all your hard work! Have a
greatsummer. Yourfavoriteeditor-Beth.
THANKS LISAforallyourgrearhelp!
Good luck! Monique
Y qU:US(r 'mm!
DELTA CHI FORMAL - Off to the
mountains we went; withouta lantern,
map or tent. Looking for fun or maybe
trouble, we found a pool that went
bubble,bubble. The beer we drank, the
shoo tersweshot, the girls we had were
really hot. Beard got drunk drunk
while Jim blew chunks. The time was
high, the tuxes fly and Sam learned not
tocry.Brian'scardidn'tmakeitfar,but
Varner did. Where is my deposit?
DELTA CHI CONGRATULATES
NEW BROTHERS: Ben Hocutt, Matt
Flippin, Jason Valentine,ClarkIbrahim,
John Turner, Jim Downey, Alan
Johnson, Brian Powers, Jason Savage
and Eric Waddell. You have made the
best even better. Welcome to the
Brothrhood of a Lifetime.
PIKES: Wish everybody good luck on
EXAMS
PI KAPPA ALPHA Congratulations
to the newly initiated brothers of Pi
Kappa Alpha;J.R.Bullock,NickFaber,
Damen Jones, B.J. Whitesell, Matt Aus-
tin, Matt Downs, Patrick Satowski.
PLKES
ALPHA PHI: We would like to con-
gratulate all graduating seniors, espe-
dally:ShellyBarron,LynnDzarnowski,
Ka thy Jablonski, Wendy Keck, Mandy
Morgan, Wende Peacock, Kelli Weeks
and Stephanie Yoder. Good luck, we
will miss you all!
ALL CAMPUS: Alpha Phi would like
to wish everyone a safe and fun sum-
mer. Good luck on finals!
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors. Instructors.
Kitchen, Office. Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
" H DtVfWAAii ei y�utn summer sports camp. Will train. Over 25
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artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendei sonvillc, NC 28792.
FIELD SCOUTS - Late to Mid-September.
Must be trustworthy, reliable, conscientious, in
good physical shape, love the outdoors and have
reliable transportation. Salary plus milage. Excel-
lent opportunity for college students and teachers
looking for summer work.
Send resume to: MCSI, PO Box 179, Grifton, NC 28530
FAX to 919-524-3215.
or
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Bartenders, Hostesses, D.Js,
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� Cheap Rate
� Month-to-Month lease
� Brand New Units
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Announcements
DESIGN ASSOCIATES
Design Associates is hosting a
visit from Internationally recognized de-
signer David Carson and ECU School of
Art Alumnus, Hayes Henderson. David
Carson - Art Director - Ray Gun and
Surfer magazines: Slide lecture - Thurs-
day April 29,1993,7pm in Speight Audi-
torium. Hayes Henderson - Illustrator
Designer: slide lecture - Friday, April 30,
1993,10am in Room 1303, Jenkins Bldg.
To Deborah:
Tfou are the jgtue, spackle, nails, thumbtacks, caulkmg, rubber cement, Elmer's,
bubble gum, Post-It-Notes, wax, push pins, Vekro, magnets on the refrigerator,
Banckud, Scotch, Duct, electrical and Masldng tape that holds this plac� together.
V We love you and wul miss you. V
To AMY who lives in
Tar River: Thank
you for returning
my keys unharmed -
you saved me more
stress than you
could possibly
imagine! Dana.





The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
yOpinion
By Gregory Dickens
alutc to departing staff I U.S. armed forces not solution to world woes
Heart-felt eulogy for
graduating board members
leaves tears in eyes
A moment se.
Dearly belt are gathered here today to honor
the memories of those individuals who will be passing
through that white light into the realm that has been
affectionately called, "the real world These individuals
have left their mark on this campus through this newspa-
per, and will hopeful! v continue this excellence in the next
world.
No matter their position, each individual has con-
tributed to the great team effort that puts out our honored
TEC twice a week. In one semester, the paper has won
awards while up against papers with 100,000 or more
circulation.
As our staff looks back on this record-breaking,
though at times stressful semester, we would like to honor
each individual that is either graduating or leaving our
hallowed halls for what will assuredly be a better life. No
particular order of importance is accrued one single indi-
vidual, rather their accomplishments all contribute to the
success of this paper.
If you would all please bow your heads:
� To Jim "King" Knisely, a crown of laurels that will
have Lifestyle condoms intertwined within it. His leader-
ship led this paper to three national awards and improve-
ments that will bring our paper into the 21st century and
beyond.
� To Cori Daniels, a dinner date with Garth Brooks.
Her winning personality and dedication to her job eased
everyone's stress on production night and decreased the
value of Maalox stock.
� To Monique Campbell, a gold-plated cue stick.
Working on Classifieds and Opinion layout, she would be
quiet and unassuming until the computers were too
slow. Luckily, they (and other co-workers) survived the
abuse.
� To Woody Barnes, a bronze statue of Jeremy Jor-
dan. His creativity and late nights pushed the advertising
department to new heights, and contributed possibly the
most one person could at this paper.
� To Michael Albuquerque, a list of the incoming
editorial board members so he can update his little black
book. His business managing skills weren't heard of that
much, but they will be when the state-of-the-art equip-
ment comes in.
� To John Bullard, a headstone for his bachelorhood.
Working virtually undetected, he helped keep the Li festy le
section running as smooth as possible, but also contrib-
uted stories on a consistent basis.
� To Beth Shimmel, Neosporin for those annoying
beaver bites. She won our award for Best Editor and her
witty reparteewithCorikeptthe office in laughter equally
mixed with strange looks.
� To Dail Reed, a maid to come in once a week to
clean his desk. Overseeing two other photographers, he
updated the photo department and made the editors' jobs
a little bit easier.
� To Rich Haselrig, a Zip-Loc bag to hold his brain
when he's not playing with it. Keeping a consistent staff
of comics, he brought continuity to a section plagued with
problems in the past. Remember, yellow and blue makes
green.
� To Andy Sutorius, a gift certificate to Annabelle's
for a month's worth of free buffalo wings and shrimp. He
remodeled the advertising department with a passion
that showed his true dedication.
All of the remaining staff members will miss these
individuals greatly. In one semester, we came together as
a cohesive unit to produce a paper we could be proud of.
Assuredly, all the new staff members will combine to
keep the high caliber of future papers.
Goodbye all, it was great while it lasted.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, Hewt Editor
Karen HassellAii; Newt Editor
Dana Danielson, jfestyle Editor
John Bullard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Assi. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Ctfj Editor
Gregory Dickens, Cap) Editor
Michael Albuquerque, feriwsi ffffnrniujrr
.Jody Jones, Cin ulanon ttmmtga
Cori Daniels, lmfm� Manager
Monique Campbell, Asu. Uiyout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Da 11 Heed, Photo Editor
Kichard Haselrig, Suifl Bhaaator
Matt MacDonald. Sjmem Manager
Deborah Daniel Secretary
The East Carohnian pnUnha 12.000 rapid every Tuesday ami
Thursday The masthead editonal in each ediiion a fee opinion of the
EdionaJ rWd The East Carolinian welcomes leaen, In M0
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should he addressed to The Btoat, The EatfGm ����
Publications Bldglrr Greenville. Nf: 27S38-4353 r ��.re inh.ru
tion, call -919) 757-6?66.
Printed on
w
100�. recycled
paper
It's been over a year since
Yugoslavia disintegrated into war-
ring ethnic factions.
We've all heard the statistic-
laced news reports (if Serbian domi-
nation and the vulnerability of the
Muslims, whodonot have the mili-
tary or financial advantage that the
Serbs enjoy via their government.
Because of this glaring disadvan-
tage, new of Muslim suffering of-
ten includes the terms "ethnic
cleansing" and "mass rape It is a
horrifying situation. So, who can
help the Muslims?
Not Europe. Since the fight-
ing began, Europe has tried itscol-
lecuvedamnedesttoignore Bosnia-
Herzegovina. Toaftempt toend an
ethnic dispute over land and law,
which the cause of the fightingboils
down to, would be antithetical to
the European way. How can this
collection of countries claim moral
superiority over Serbian aggres-
sion? England won't release Ire-
land from enforced religion. Ger-
many can't control the a scent of its
neo-Nazi subculture against an in-
flux of immigrants from the Baltics
and Slavicnations. Italy'sonly con-
stant has been the tendency of its
states to abandon their union. The
history of Europe is a textbook in
ethnic antagonism dating back to
the Peloponnesian War.
Can the United Nationshelp?
Obviously not. The U.N. peace-
keeping forces (with theircute little
blue helmets) haven't done any-
thingsubstantialtohalttheSerbian
drive toward the Mediterranean.
In fact, the optimistic arms em-
bargo established by the United
Nations has only served to keep
the Muslims unarmed and out-
gunned. This means the world
looks to the country that still sets
aside$2 billion for defense against
an unspecified threat: the Uncle
Sam of America.
This assumption escapes
logic. How can we rev up the mili-
tary machine and sing "Over
There" and expect to end the eth-
nic antagonism, resentment and
conflictmerelybyannouncingour
presence? Are we to assail their
mountains with abstract ideals of
crime and punishment over mur-
der and rape when we can't guar-
antee our own citizens justice
through our court system? Arewe
secure enough morally to deter-
mine the propriety of racial dis-
putes through warfare when street
gangs and riots threaten our inner
cities? Since there are no solid an-
swers to these questions, how con-
fident can our troops be while
they're dodging bullets when we
send them in?
Make no mistake, we will in-
tercede in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
President Clinton's options con-
cern just how much America will
intervene. Economic action will do
little to stem the violence and air
vrKSSC
iAlriaLk But jusf
one. more
KMIMMI
sn:
Derzbc
ymmM
strikes, Persian Gulf technolo-
gies aside, and can just as easily
endanger the Muslims
Yugoslavia isembroiled in
a battle on par with a jihad.
America would do well to act
only in a concentrated effort as
seen beforeagainstlraq. Itseems
that before we were accused of
beinga global constable, now we
are expected to assume the role
to the point that our reluctance
raisesdoubtsof ourethical stand-
ings.
I contend that the United
Nations must bear this mantle,
to "serve and protect" the citi-
zens of those countries affiliated
with the organization. Sound
daunting? If so, how can (and
why shou Id) one country fil I such
the obligation of a league with
over 100 represented countries?
I propose we take a stand
for ourselves. Get tough,
America. Just say no.
Riding the Mobius
v.
QuoteoftheDay
A man's work is his dilemma: his job is his bondage, but
it also gives him a fair share of his identity and keeps him
from being a bystander in somebody else's world.
Melvin Maddocks
Letters to the Editor
Bible cited as only book to deal with morality
To the Editor:
Before you arrive at a
specific destination, it's al-
ways wise to know in advance
where that destination leads.
Please allow me to address
Mr. Wilhelm's letter.
First, let's apply
Wilhelm's logic about what
the Bible says to road signs, or
to electricity. Whv should we
care what the Bible (or signs,
or electricity) because a few-
out of a billion people are go-
ing to just misinterpret it any-
way! Just because someone
will misuseelectricity and die,
is that a good reason for all of
us to be in the dark? Just be-
cause someone will misinter-
prethighwaysignsshouldwe
all just stop caring about
them?
Second, the question
"Does God exist?" is a great
one. How we answer that
question will have more con-
sequences in our lives than
any other. Let's determine
some consequences of deny-
ing God. If we take God out of
our lives, then what outside
source of accountability 'do we
have when no one else is link-
ing? How could we ever know
what right behavior was if the
basis was only the changing
decreesof fleeting man? If our
"inalienable rights" aren't
God-given, then they surely
will be taken by man or state,
won't they? Why do we have
a sense of fairness if evil
people who go unpunished
in thislife,gounpunished for-
ever? The questions seem un-
limited, but theinevitablecon-
clusion is that denying God
does ultimately lead to "nihil-
ism" or a sense of "Is there all
there is to life?"
Sartre was intellectually
honest enough to see through
agnosticism to its logical end
that "life isabsurd'N'eitzsche
didn't foresee the futility of
denying God and he spent his
last 11 yearsanguishinginan
insane asylum. Where will
Nietszche's worldview take
you? Just look at three of his
star disciples: Hitler,
Mussolini and Stalin, who m
denying God, slaved more
people than all of the wars of
all of human history put to-
gether. What does agnosti-
cism get you? Nothing, a "0"
with the rim knocked o(i. No
meaning, no hope, no joj, no
peace, no morality, no love,
no right, no wrong, no being
understood, no understand-
ing another, no answers, no-
where.
As for the men Wilhelm
mentioned for moral guidance
and meaning in life, not onv
of them came to terms with
morality or meaning in their
own lives. What kind of blind
guides would they be? In our
courtrooms, would pl.umg
your hand on a book ai the
"Critias" inspire anyone to tell
the tru th, the whole tru th and
nothing but the truth, so help
them Plato? Try reading
Thoreau's "Walden" to pris-
oners in jail to see if it breaks
the spiritual chains of drug
addiction and the cycle of
crime like the Bibledoesdaily!
Who is going to trust their
very real problems now to the
power of Immanuel Kant who
always saw limitations.
Only one name has ever
totally come to terms with
morality and life's meaning.
Even his enemies said he was
without sin. His name �
lesus! If Jesus never lied and
yet said he was .o, and
backed it up by breaking up
every funeral he attended;
then yes, Clod exists! 1 know
god lives because I gave up
trying to live as an agnostic
and asked Jesus into my heart
tone Lord of my life and God
did! Now every day I see God
working little miracles in my
lite (and sometimes bigones!).
I now have hope that I will
meet all my loved ones for-
ever in heaven.
If you really want to
prove to yourself that God
lives, just honestly take lesus
up on his challenge in lohn
7:17, then keep seeking until
Cod reveals himself to you �
God will!
E. A. Tumage
Night student
By Jason Tremblay
More computers
needed to meet
student demand
Isn'titneathow every yearstudentsare
battered by a barrage of last- minute papers?
Ata time when mostare busily crammingfor
exams (or at least should be), countless num-
bers are frantically trying to find an open
computer to get some important, and often
unnecessarily lengthy, paperdone in time for
the last day of class, while at the same time
trying to prepare for the scourge of exams.
Exams, however, are not my gripe for
this week, since we are powerless to change
thatparticularpolicyandmustsimplyendure
it.Theproblemthisweekisonethatmostofus
haveexperiencedand likelybeenutterlypissed
off by: the terribly inadequate computing fa-
cilities at good ol' ECU.
Yep, we're ta I kin'nasty lines and crabby
patrons when some class or another has a
paper due, large or small. The severity of the
problem is most easily noticed when you're
trying to get some work done in your dorm
(unless you were a smart one and brought
your own computer).
ItjustsohappensI'maproudresidentof
Aycock Hall, the finest in non-airconditioned
all-male living. If I remember correctly, my
hall has the capacity to house around 500
guys.Guesshow manycomputersthelotof us
have to share. Go on, guess. Nope, try two.
That's one plus one for 499 plus one.
Now, it's not difficult to see that if three
guys need to get something done on a com-
puter at the same time, we have a problem.
Heaven forbid that nine or lOguys in the same
class with the same assignment live in our
dorm. There might be bloodshed.
If you happen togodown to the rcxim in
your hall where the extensive computing fa-
cilities are housed and all two of them are
occupied, there's always the labs on main
campus. Here we have around 30 Macintosh
computers and a bunch of other lesser, more
complicated machines for those of the MS-
DOS persuasion. As far as I know, there are
threeor four such labs on campus, putting the
accessible Macintosh total around 150,giveor
take a few terminals.
Would someone please tell me how
roughly 17,IKX) students are supposed to be
adequately served on under 200 computers?
Unless there's some principle of New Math
that 1 ha veyet to learn, the numbers are some-
what discouraging, especially when the load
reaches the critical point, as it's doing.
What I propose issimple: stop throwing
money away on things that we can do with-
out, and start spending it on things that we
need. Do we realry need a new dining hall on
the Hill? I live up thereamong the Lost Ones,
and personally, I don't think so. Iheoneatthe
base of Jones Hall has been doing tine by me.
Do we really need tobeexpanding our sports
facilities, especially when many of our pro-
grams do not merit expansion?
College is about learning, kids. It's not
abouteatingthesameold hxxl in a brand new
money pit,andit'scertainlynotaboutplaving
ball .n some exorbitantly renovated thing, be
itgymnasiumorcoliseum.eitherofw'hichw'ill
soon tx eating up millions of educational
dollars. Computers become An increasingly
importantasptvtof education witheachpass-
mgday, and ECU needs to recognize that fact
and aid its students m the pursuit ot knowl-
edge, not mother Peach Bowl trophy.
Now stop reading, thinkabout it, go get
a pizza, and watch some carto mis





mtf! .�� �I'miiM.i
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
Senior students display mature works
breaks
his back
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
This summer holds a great deal
for the best det�CtiveinccaTOCS,Batman.
The Dark Knight will ha e to fight all
of his greatest enemic and a new,
powerful vigilante, tic'11 get a new
costume, tight one of independent
comics' most popular characters and
see a foe, as well as his sidekick, get
their own comics.
Batman's latest story line,
"Knightfall has put the caped cru-
sader in a bad situation. Bane, a new
vigilante who hates Batman and wants
to put an end to his existence, has
broken all the inmates out of Arkham
Asylum, the institution that special-
izes in superhuman criminals. Bane
knows Batman will feel obliged to
put them all behind bars again. These
criminalsindude the Joker, Two-Face,
Scarface, Killer Croc, the Scarecrow
and Zsasz. After Batman fights all of
these criminals, he must face Bane.
It was rumored that DC Comics
had planned to kill Batman, d ue to the
success of Superman's death, but the
rumors haw changed as of late. Now
-the grapevine yields that Bane will
break Batman's back or Batman will
See BATMAN page 10
Assistant I ifestyle Editor
I w hen vou need some
i ad on down to the Henry
raj hy Gallery at 802 Clark
St 1 hree art majors will be showing their
work from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and should
provide some creative energy for drained
SOuls.
End tided in the show are Dena Blount,
Andrew Linton and Paul Pisoni.Theshow
encompa-es metals, painting and sculp-
ture.
Blount brings a variety of pieces done
in metals that draw heavily from the Art
Nouveau and Art Deco Movements. Her
piecesexpressa maturity which also leaves
room for a little fun. The works include
pieces ranging from jewelry to silverware
and most of the pieces are figurative in the
functionality. For example, there are a pair
of metal martini glasses, titled "Tits and
Ass The interesting part about the glasses
are their stems that are rendered as nude
women.
See ART page 10
The Henry
Stindt Photo
Gallery now
has the work of
three art
students on
display: Dena
Blount (left),
Andrew Linton
(right) and
Paul Pisoni.
Photo courtesy
Andrew Linton
New word processor shames old model
(AP) � In The Beginning,
right after heiroglyphs and type-
writers, there was WordStar.
For many personal comput-
ing wizard s, it was the first word
processing program. And mas-
tering all of WordStar's arcane
control, alternate and dot com
mands was proof positive of wiz-
ardry � ordinary folk wouldn't
naturally think to open a file with
the command "D" or to close it
with "Control K D
But that wasin thedayswhen
computers were puny and wiz-
ards were powerful. When cen-
tral processing units grew pow-
erful enough to run small cities
and still produce documents,
other word processing programs
�most notably WordPer feet and
Microsoft Word � took most of
the limelight (and the sales).
Last year, WordStar 7.0 was
introduced.Ithadthepull-down
menus and other features of its
competitors, but it still doesn't
domina te the pages of the glossy
computer magazines. It is, none-
theless, a fine tool for writing,
and a version is now bundled
with a how-to book as "WordStar
Included (Bantam, $39.95) by
Tom Rugg and Werner Feibel.
That $39.95 price brings you
a version of the program that will
satisfy most ordinary needs and
at a fraction of even the $250
$300 discounted price of
WordPerfect and Microsoft
Word.
And itworks very well, thank
you. It has a spelling checker,
pull-down menus and supports
a Mouse. It also has drivers for
Laserjet and PostScript printers,
as well as plain vanilla dot ma-
trix printers.
The book is well written and
clearly explains what buttons to
push and what happens after
that. But the menu system is so
thorough that most will be able
to do routine tasks without a lot
of book-checking. A glossary is
included, and basic word pro-
cessing concepts are explained.
For aging wizards who still
remember the old commands,
Version 7.0 will accept them.
So what's disable in thisedi-
tion that should make you want
to pay an $89 upgrade fee for the
full working version? For most
ordinary uses, not much.
The thesaurus, for example,
is disabled. So is par,e preview
and integrating graphics with
text. You also can't send facsimi-
les directly from the word pro-
cessor. And it doesn't have the
typical printer-specific support
for "ne dozens upon dozens of
printers out there.
See PROCESSOR page 10
Quest Benefit
Photo courtesy Arista
L.A. Style gives "rave'
outrageously fun edge
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
It's dance. If s rave. It'sL.
A. Style. It's a beautiful thing.
Buthey, don't take my word for
it,askL.A.StyleL.A.Styleare
a fun tribe of ravers who's main
pastime is generating good
times and brain storming mu-
sic. We use today's super-tech-
nology to produce the Ravin
est sounds around. We're ob-
sessed and possessed by using
samples to create and obtain
the best results possible
Words of wisdom.
"James Brown is Dead a
track which isheating updance
floors across this nation we call
America, and yeah, the whole
wide world, is the first track on
the album and it's funner than
getting into a movie free. For
those who sometimes find
themselves feeling balkxinular,
there's "Balioony a nitrous-
oxide generated cut that moves
like a snake that crawled into a
fire-ant nest.
And for those who may be
unsurewhatraveis,there's'T'm
Raving which raves to the rave
and defines the rave. Rave on.
One of the coolest cuts is
"jesus on Channel Four Here
the rap is good old-fashioned
rap that hearkens back to the
days when rap was fun and not
concerned with drugs and sex
and gang violence. Fun, fun,
fun.
And my favorite: "Twilight
Zone It's so cool I got to save
a little for myself. It reminds me
of that "Twilight Zone" episode
when the fly ing sa ucer lands on
the little old lady's roof and the
little aliens plague her and no
one believes her so she destroys
thespaceshipwithanaxe! Now
that's what I call music!
See STYLE page 10
The Attic is featuring
Billyclubfest,01dSchooland AKC
tonight as a benefit for Johnny
Quest.
On Sunday, March 7, Johnny
Quest was involved in a single
vehicle accident on 1-95 in
Gaffney, S.C. The van carrying
the band members and two crew
members ran off the road and
flipped five times, bursting in
flames. The van and all of the
equipment were a total loss.
All the riders received minor
cuts, scrapes and bruises except
Trey Oates, who received a bro-
ken collar bone, and drummer
Steve Hill, who suffered multiple
compound fractures in the left
leg, and a torn ligament in his left
hand. Hill wassubsequently hos-
pitalized for two weeks.
During the two-week period,
Hill had three seperate surgical
operations in an attempt to cor-
FooJ&wuL
rect the damage to his leg. One
place in his lower leg had over 30
breaks in a small area.
Aside from being out cf work
for months, the band's insurance
company isdenyingcoverageand
a lengthy battle is expected.
Each of the accident victims
has incurred property loss, emer-
gency room treatment, hospital
bills, physical therapy and medi-
cal bills in excess of thousands of
dollars. Hill's medical bills alone
have already topped $50,000.
A fund has already been es-
tablished in the name of the band
and any donationsare greatly ap-
preciated. The address is:
Johnny Quest Accident
Fund
P.O. Box 33279
Raleigh, NC 27636
919-851-5083
Show your support for
benefit. Proceeds will
Photo courtesy Blus Dixte LTD
Johnny Quest by attendingtheAttic'sthree-band
go toward new equipment, medical bills, etc.
Culinary Oscars
WESTPORT, Conn. (AP)�Everyone has
a chance to make dreams come true for some
very deserving charities by entering the third
annual Newman's Own and Good House-
keeping Recipe Contest.
Actor Paul Newman has created his own
"Culinary Oscars which he will bestow on
seven creators of the best main-dish recipes
using Newman's Own products. Newman
will judge the recipes in a luncheon with the
finalists in New York City in October.
The grand-prize win
ner will receive
$50,000 for his or her favorite charity; the other
six finalists will receive $10,000 each for charity.
Supermarkets named by the finalists will share
$40,000 for charity.
Thecontest includesa category' just for chil-
dren. Deadline for entries is Aug. 15.
TheMay issueof Good Housekeepingmaga-
zine contains contest rules.
Tabasco Community Cookbook Awards
NEWYORK(AP)�Fund-raisingcookbooks
published by nonprofit organizations in 1992 or
1993 are eligible for the fourth annual Tabasco
Community Cookbook contest, sponsored by
Mcllhenny Co. Deadline is Oct. 1.
Entries willbejudged on layout,design, title,
theme, story line, recipe content and the
organization'sfund-raisingefforts. Three national
and six regional winners will each receive contri-
See FOOD page 8





APRIL 29. 1993
nnounce
hristy
� I Meet
i ably the
the album.
hem Back ,1
ici �J sortgabout
how cranky and materialistic
tabout their stuffwhen
they break up
Unfortunately, ,1 lot of
sameness exists on the album.
C hrisrydoesn't takechanceswirJh
her music; she stays safe in what
she knows.
Real musicians, inte.ui of
drum programs and synthesiz-
ers might help to give the music
morepresence. And please, 1 ord
song about how emotions and help me! Get some acoustic eui-
growing up ami bad things and tars! It's a waste to support such
silenceallworktogethertowreak a wonderful voice with electronk
hVlV- music.
Bui then she ruins it by has - But hey, let me tell you It
uig die girl marry the guy. Wilson Phillips can make it
for the m. st part, the songs Lauren Christy
are all mellow and slow. And better.
a lit.about father,
� -nght i the r when she's a luences her life
ind�and she never tells
�nybody aiid it's sort of a sad
yean make it even
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nd,faw� temporary help companies isn't
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I tit rim
P E R S 0 N N E L.
FOOD
Continued from page 7
butions to the charities that benefit
from the cookbooks' siles.
Foran entry form and-or a free
booklet, "CompilingCulinary His-
tory: ACreativeGuidetoCraftinga
Community Cookbook send a
self-addressed, stamped, business-
size envelope to: Tabasco Commu-
nity Cookbook Awards, Hunter
MacKenzie Co 41 Madison Ave
New York, N.Y. 10010-2202.
envelope to: State of Dessert Con-
test, The Alden Group, 52
Vanderbilt Ave, 12th floor, New
York, N.Y. 10017.
State of Dessert Contest
NEW YORK (AP)�Martini &
Rossi, producers of Asti Spumante
imported sparkling wine, is spon-
soring a "State of Dessert" recipe
contest.
Entrants must submit an origi-
nal dessert recipe that uses a fcd
that is representative of their state.
The grand prize includes a trip to
New York City in October, where
die winning dessert will be pre-
pared by a professional chef. Dead-
line for entries is j ulv 3( I.
Lauren Christy
Photo courtesy Mercury
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you waif
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111 E. 3rd Street Hours.
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G.nme Springs Fia. 13-15 Mav





APRIL 29, 1992
The East Carolinian
9
)lonial Williamsburg
resulttrur
� e the
iipware
ik-likecha racier.
between them
uiitterentuseofthesame
� y'reboth
liquid clay.
. isksns, plain
iriet) crfboJd
les using natn-
i metimes abstract
ith methods of decoration
were used in England and in this
country for Kiwis, pitchers, mugs
and dishes, from the 17th to the
19th centuries.
The exhibitions are "Mocha
Mania" in the DeWitt Wallace
Decorative ArtsGallery,and "The
Best Is Not Too Good For You:
English Slip-Decorated Earthen-
ware" at the Abby Aldrich
Rockefeller Folk Art Center.
Both open May 18 and are
scheduled to be on show through
March 18,1994.
vltuo 4 7Aoe . .
at The Attic
Thursday: Johnny Quest Benefit
Friday: Sidewinder
Saturday: Cry of Love at Q'Rock's
Friday: Toxic Popsicle
Saturday: Fountain of Youth
at Corrigans on Saturday: Bruce Frye
Goodbye Goodbye Goodbye Goodbye Goodbye Goodbye Goodbye
to our friends, who will soon leave us to chase their dreams.
Michael Albuquerque Karen Bilyj RichHaselrig DailReed
Lisa Angeldorf Monique Campbell Jim Knisely Andy Sutorius
Woody Barnes Cori Daniels Aimee Lewis Beth Shimmel
We will miss you, and all the good and bad times we spent publishing the best damn
college newspaper at ECU. Good luck, stay in touch and never forget. We won't.
Who's behind barefoot on the mall?
'�'
m
WB
Special thanks to the members of the ECU
Student Union, for all their hard work in
presenting barefoot on the mall thursday
the bands, booths, food and fun were a fj
blast, in spite of the chilly weather and
FLYING COCONUT CREAM PIES. We HAD A GREAT H
time. Once again, thanks for all
8
�!�
'�
�:��: .
YOUR HARD WORK.
The Staff of The East Carolinian.
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time � and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th
Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847. att: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of
credit" from your parents' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
are as follows
with electric or
gas space heating
wout electric
or gas space heating
Electric Only SI00 $75
Electric & Water $100 $85
Electric, Water & Gas $110 $85
Electric & Gas $100 $75
You can save time by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
Greenville
Utilities
Harris teeter
mm m prices
BEEF
GROUND FRESH
SEVERAL TIMES
DAILY
FRESH
MUSHROOMS
DIET COKE OR
COCA-COLA
2 LITER
HARRIS TEETER LOW PRICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
79
WORK AT
THE BEACH!
t V- r OUR MYRTLE BEACH
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THE SUMMER.
IF INTERESTED, APPLY AT THE
MYRTLE BEACH AND HILTON
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APPLICATION TO: Q v
-fy ���
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LITCHFIELD, S.C. 29585
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Prices Effective Through May 4, 1993
Prices In This Ad Effective Wednesday, April 28 Through Tuesday, May 4, 1993 In Greenville Store
Only We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None bold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept FederafFood Stamps.





APRIL 29, 1993
ATMAN
nued from page
STYLE
Continued from page 7
Another project, one that's
taken four years to see publication,
sHhe Bat twin VersiisGrerutei special.
MattWagner,thecreatorofGrendel,
blazed new trails in independent
story publishing in the late '80s. He
began the project when the publish-
ers of Grendel, Comico Publishing
Company, was in financial stabil-
ity. Before he could finish, Comico
fell upon hard times and the project
was delayed. Finally, Hunter Rose
(Grendel) and Bruce Wayne
(Batman) will match wits. Grendel,
as Wagner describes him, is not so
much a person as it is a spirit that
survives through thecenturies.The
first Grendel was indeed the
Grendel that opposed Beowulf in
the ancient tale. Wagner made a
few changes and created a new
comic. Battnan Versus Grendel will
be released in in June.
Other Batman-related releases
include an on-going Catwoman se-
ries born from "Knightfall
Catwoman has joined forces with
Bane, the man thatcrushed the Dark
Knight.Their relationship has made
her a target cf Bane's enemies and
it's only a matter of time before
she's forced to decide whether to
stay with him or not. Robin,
Ba tman's sidekick who has already
had success with three limited se-
ries, will also be getting his own
title.
. the music is unpre-
you never know when
it's going to changeorsomething.
it's not music to listen to when
grilling hambu rgersand hot dogs.
It may be driving music, depend-
ing on where you're driving.
But it's definitely dance music
1 think this music should accom-
pany MacGyver or something.
That would be fun and festive
It jams! It raves! It's fun! Pull
my finger.
ART
Continued from page 7
PROCESSOR
Continued from page 7
Yeah? So? If you're writing a
letter, a novel, a term paper, a
simple newsletter, a note, this ver-
sion o f WordStar will do just fine.
And you'll be anywhere from
$100 to $300 richer'than if you'd
purchased something fancier.
For CompuBug's book,
"ABCs of Computing, a Plain-
English Guide send $10 to
CompuBug, P.O. Box 626, Sum-
mit, NJ. 07901. ($7for active-duty
members of the U.S. armed
forces). For an on-disk hypertext
version, send $10 ($7 for active-
duty military) to DPA, 1160
Huffman Rd Birmingham, Ala.
35215. Specify disk size and moni-
tor. Qu estions and comments a re
welcome at either address.
Can you write? Stuck here this
sumrner? Need some extra cash? If so,
apply to be a Lifestyle reporter during summer
school. You will report on books, music,
concerts, plays, people, movies, parties, etc.
Pick up an application at TEC, second floor
student pubs building.
"The glasses are completely
functional and force you to hold
them by the figures' tits' and ass
Blountsaid.Blountincorporatesthe
stems tactfully and tastefully to pro-
duce martini glasses that go well
beyond their functionality.
Many of her pieces of jewelry
have a quality to them that tran-
scend your typical ideas of jewelry.
For instance, Blount makes stands
for her pins for when they are not
being worn. All of her works in the
show are brightand give the viewer
a sense of where metals work is
going.
The show's two dimensional
artwork is from Andrew Linton.
Early in Linton's education, he was
influenced by Hans Hoffrnan'scolor
theories. Linton underpaints colors
inacrylicand then glazesover them
with transparent colors in oil. His
newer works incorporate Hoffman
color theories along with newer
themes.
"L.A. Today, The World To-
morrow" is probably his most am-
bitious work. It is of a businessman
wearing a gas mask. The colors and
movement of the piece giveita very
anxious, stifling feel. "I lived in Los
Angeles for a year and heard smog
wamings,could hardly breathe and
had togetoutofthere'Lintonsaid.
Thepaintinggoes well beyond
a commentary on smog. It gives a
taste of where we are as a society
now, not later. The piece shows the
scope of Linton's vision and his
potential to speak for the masses.
Unlike some of his other pieces, it
encompasses a problem, not just
the emotion. His work seems to say
to the viewer that we live a life that
is necessitating a new, better way.
If his art continues to reflect
such urgent issues, Linton's work
will be one of the few that gives an
answer as to the question of the
usefulness of art today.
The sculptures of Paul Pisoni
completes the show with some very
excellent pieces. Pisoni works with
a variety of materials. One of his
sculptures, that stood about five
feet, reminded me of the work of
Calder. Pisoni's sculpture, however,
was a floor piece that was much
more fluid and figurative than those
of Calder's mobiles.
"The sculpture is one in a series
that has led me into incorporating
floor pieces and hung pieces in the
same work. The suspension of
pieces gives a sense of lightness
Pisoni said.
Hismostmatureworkreflected
his statements. It was a sculpture
that used both floor and hungpieces.
It, like Linton's painting, speaks to
us now. Found objects are sus-
pended over a figurative floor piece
that seems to be in a defeated pos-
ture. The hung objects include a TV
and fiberglass pieces which are dis-
jointed and broken. The feeling of
anxiousness and a desire for ques-
tioning are felt within the piece.
The reception this weekend
should give all a feeling of the talent
that is being produced at ECU. The
time spent will be well worth it to
see and reflect upon where we are
and where weare going (and should
go)-
The works of Blount, Linton
and Pisoni are very mature and
show the aesthetic qualities and the
more dark issues of our time.
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For Your Resume
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The East Carolinian
Is currently accepting
applications In the
award -winning
Advertising Department for an
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
�Work with leaders in the
business community
�Create advertising campaigns
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�Own personal transportation
Apply at The East Carolinian
2nd floor Student Pubs
757-6366
CAROLINA HEART PRESENTS ANOTHER
"Ask the Doctor Seminar"
� How concerned should I be about chest pain?
�Ifl don't have any family history of heart disease, what is my
risk?
� How does blood pressure affect heart disease?
� How long does it take for a low-fat diet to reduce cholesterol
levels?
Eric B. Carlson, M.D.
Presents
"Early Warning Signs of Heart Disease"
A Short Lecture Followed by a Question and Answer Session
Free to the Public � Refreshments Provided
Monday, May 3rd, 7 to 8 PM, at the Gaskins-Leslie Center, Conference Room "A" (Turn
onto Stantonsburg Road off of Memorial Drive, then right at the 2nd light. Enter the 4th
driveway). Call 757-1000 for more information.
FAMOUS FROZEN YOGURT
SPRING SPECIAL
��? OF THE WEEK V
f May I-May 9 f
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UNIVERSITY
Frame Shop
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Hours: Monday-Friday 9-6, Saturday 1 0-5
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752-4620





iv ao pounds overwei&ht
WITH NO WILL-POWER TO DIET �
X Look TERRiSLE IN A SWIM"
SUT� XR.VIN.6 NEVER PANjS
ATTENTION To ME, ANt He
WON' T CoMy- Wv OBto
IS A TEW
NO MONE
Wy FRENl
HAVE
IotHe
IAKb TH
TuiT LIKE To SA TV4T
THE KTTVTUDCS E OPiNoNS
OPfiEEb By CATHNAKE
NOT THOE OF MOiT NORMALJ
WOMEN. THANK you.
Pagliaccis Family Slaughter Circus
by Psycho
Guardian
by Grubbs and Potts
We ftWH Cocas'?"
Summer's Comin'
?.nd Pirate Comics could use some
help cranking out the page for both
summer semesters. If you're gong
to be in Greenvile this summer,
either enrolled in summer school
or already registered for next fall
semester, leave Chris Ker iple
message at 757-6366.
Those who have submitted
something before, we probably
still have your stuff,
so let's talk.
i Fred's Corner
By Sean Parnell
HeV yitvM TvtoyE &e V.EE-P
CcAeAHKTON o"r 3oWVSAC�M
ITS VKsBt.B-V YAETOcT TUKV
in
Sr-
Special Comic Page by David Jones
HeYKP5$oWuucur
suMMe?, He&'s oajc of
CARP?
WANG TV
By Manning & Ferguson



i:





The East Carolinian
Sports
Page 12
Women's soccer team finishes second in state
p Hudson
Staff Writer
The E:t Carolina Women's Soccer
TeamtraveBedtoChapelHiUthispastweek-
ertd to take place in the state tournament for
theNorthCawlinaVVomen'sSoccer League.
This was ECU's first invitation to attend the
tournament, and they placed second in the
Eastern Division.
On Saturday, the Pirates geared up to
face a tough club from Charlotte. The game
was extremely exciting, and very physical.
The East Carolina defense, spearheaded by
Junior sweeper Joelle Pierce and her twin
sister Jaime in the goal refused to allow
Charlotte to score, as they ha ve done to 4 out
pponents that ECU played this
a gng into halftime, the game was
locked in a scoreless tie.
lnthesecondnalf,ECL'cameoutstrong,
led by midfielder Kerri Griffiths. She consis-
tently controlled the center of the field, and
distributed the ball brilliantly to forwards
Amy Warren and Alison Russell.
With30secondsleft in regulation, War-
ren chased down a pass from Griffiths. The
Charlotte sweeper chased the ball down,
but Warren applied so much pressure that
the defender kicked the ball past her own
goalieandintothenetforathrillingvictory,
1-0.
"We really deserved to win this game
Doug Silver said. "I know that nobody was
more happv than Danielle to see tli.it last
second goal go in. This game goes to show
that if a team keeps plugging away, and
refuses to get discouraged, they will win. It
isarealcredittoourplayersthewayweheld
up under the pressure and held on to win
On Sunday, ECU had a chance toavenge
their only loss of the year as they played the
Raleigh Club in the state finals. Raleigh beat
ECU 4-2 the previous weekend in Green-
ville, but the Pirates remained the only team
to score on Raleigh all year. The higher skill
level of the Raleigh team was apparent.
Twenty-fiveminutesintothefirsthalf, goal-
keeper Pierce made a diving save of a shot,
but the rebound was sent into the net and
ECU trailed 1-0. The Pirates were able to
build a few attacks offensively, but at half-
time they still trailed.
In toe second half, ECU was hoping
that their stamina would allow them the
chance to tie or goahead. However, Raleigh
continued to dominate most of the play.
Russell, playing in her last game for ECU,
wasfaced with theunen viable taskof trying
to mark Raleigh's star forward, who played
varsity soccer for N.C State. She held her in
check for the majority of thegame, but in the
80th minute of play, toe forward escaped
and putRaleighup2-0.EastCarolina made
a valiant effort to come back and score, but
the previous day's game had taken its toll.
"I couldn't be prouder of this team
Head Coach Chip Hudson said. "The fact
thatRaleighdidnothavetoplayasemi-final
game yesterday due to forfeit made a real
difference. Wewerebeginningtowearthem
down, but we had played 90 minutes of
intense ball yesterday while they were rest-
ing. Our girls worked so hard all year long,
and they deserve all of the credit for the
tremendous turnaround that this program
has made
The ECU Women's Soccer Team iscur-
rently under the Club Sports Department
and the Athletic Department has talked
about the possibility of making Women's
Soccer a varsity sport in the near future. The
women'ssoccer team wouldlike to thank all
of the parents and fans that supported them
this season.
Duke, Wake Forest
pull off home wins
Men of steal
DURHAM (AP)
Duke 6, N.C. Wesleyan 1
Duke completed its home
schedule with a record perfor-
mance by Scott Pinoni and a triple
play in the fourth inning Tues-
day in beating North Carolina
Wesleyan 6-1.
Pinoni collected three hits,
including two doubles to increase
his 1993 total to 19 to set a school
mark.
In the fourth inning, N.C.
Wesleyan's Tom D'Aquila
doubled and moved to third
when Chris Bryant singled. Des-
ignated hitter Scott Morgan
grounded to Duke's Sean
McNally at third, and he threw
to second and forced Bryant. Sec-
ond baseman Jeff Piscorik's
throw to first got Morgan for the
second out and Pinoni threw to
the plate to get D'Aquila.
David Darwin (6-3) scattered
eight hits over seven innings and
struck out four to win the battle
of freshman starters over Mike
Gleza (1-1).
Duke's 36-13-1 record is
within two victories of tying the
school mark set last season. The
Bishops (23-5) lost for the first
time in six games.
Wake Forest 4, N.OAsheville 0
Freshman Brian Coffey
pitched Wake Forest's first com-
plete-game shutout in more than
two years Tuesday in a 5-0 vic-
tory over North Carolina-
Asheville.
Mike Buddie pitched Wake
Forest'slast complete-game shut-
out, a 17-0 decision against Mary-
land on April 13,1990.
Coffey (3-0) was in a jam in
the first inning when Matt Swaim
walked and Keith DiYesosingled
with one out. Wake Forest catcher
Chris Smith attempted to pick
off DiYeso at first, but his throw
went into right field and moved
the runners to second and third.
To escape the jam, Coffey
struck out clean-up batter Trevor
Moore and got Todd Bess on a
ground ball.
UNCA's Chris Walker (1-4)
wriggled out of a bases-loaded
situation with two out in the sec-
ond, then escaped the fourth in-
ning without incident after walk-
ing two batters with two out.
In the fifth, Brad Pryce drove
in a run with a single to give
Wake Forest a 1-0 lead. Walker
gave up a single to Jeff Drabik in
the sixth, hit David Hedgecoe
with a pitch and walked Bret
Wagner to load the bases. Walker
gave up a walk to Pryce to force
in a run.
Reliever Tom Kipphut
walked Chris Smith and Steve
DeFranco to force in two more
Demon Deacons runs.
Wake Forest climbed to 28-
15, while UNCA lost its fifth
straight game and dropped to
17-21.
Mourning waking up
NBA from Shaq's spell
f�hXo by Bltf R�n�on
Pirate outfielder Jamie Borel (No. 7) is fourth in the CAA in stolen bases. Teammate
Pat Watkins is third.
Lacrosse team to
travel to Maryland
for Eastern finals
ByjVarren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The East Carolina lacrosse team, after de-
feating most of the teams in North Carolina, is
preparingtomakeatriptoMarylandtocompete
in toe Eastern Division championship tourna-
ment. The team undefeated in the regular sea-
son, is favored to claim the eastern division
crown, to the first round, they are slated to meet
Old Dominion, a team they have already de-
feated this year.
The ECU squad, after successful matches
agaiitElc�College,NorthCarolinaState,UNC-
Wilmington and UNC-Greensboro, as well as a
forfeit victory over Duke, proved itself to be the
dominant lacrosse team in the state. Coupled
with their in-state dominance, were wins over
Virginian teams like ODU and VCU, the Pirate
unit made a strong case about its dominance in
the region. According to Ward Taylor, an offen-
sive attacker en the team the aggressive style of
the Pirates' offense and toe dedication of the
team are the two major factors in the team's
success.
'Tacrcsseisantoteresttogsportwifhalotof
action Taylor said. "Our styleof play isreal fast
and real up-front We have a real aggressive
scoring team
Taylor oounts teammates Drew Borque,
Kirk Katzburg, and Lake Slacum as leading
scorers on the intercollegiate team and says that
they have provided an attack that opponents
havebeenunabletooompensatefor.Taylorsaid
the team's dedication to the sport is exemplary,
as toe team practices for two hours a day, un-
usual for mostclubsports-Taylorsaidhefelttoat
thisdedicatkn translated intoteamdepto, which
enabled toe team to outlast many of their oppo-
nents. "We just seemed to be able to wear other
See LACROSSE page 14
DWI
NEW YORK (AP)-Alonzo
Mourning on Tuesday was
named April rookie of the month
� the second straight month he
took that honor.
Rudy Tomjanovich of Hous-
ton was selected coach of the
month.
Mourning averaged 26.3
points, 10.8 rebounds and 2.17
blocked shots for the Charlotte
Hornets, leading them to a 9-3
record and their first NBA play-
off berth.
' Mourning had his biggest
I game on April 16 with 36 points
and a career-high 22 rebounds. It
was the second 30-point, 20-re-
bound outing in Hornets history.
Tomjanovich coached Hous-
ton to an 11-0 start in April be-
fore finishing with two losses.
The Rockets won the Mid-
west Division for the first time
since 1986 and Tomjanovich be-
came only the seventh coach to
win a division title in his first full
season.
Mourning is finally coming out
of Shaq's shadow and receiving
the long over-due recognition he
deserves.
GREENSBORO (AP) � In-
creased police patrols and an ear-
lier cutoff time for beer salescurbed
drunken driving at the Greater
Greensboro Open this year, offi-
cials said Monday.
Only 11 people were charged
with driving while impaired, state
Highway Patrol Sgt. R.P. Simon
said. Usually,hesaid,twice as many
In 1990,64 people werecharged
with DWI during the tournament.
About 60 troopers � twice as
many aslastyear�patrolled roads
around Forest Oaks Country Club
and the highways and streets lead-
ing into the club.
The Greensboro Jaycees made
several changes this year to pre-
vent drunken driving and under-
saia.usuaiiy,nesuu,iwii.caj.Kr Xm .w
peoplearechargedwithDWldur- agedrinkingattheGGO.Beersales
Sthe tournament. were cut off at430pm Ino
'The number this year was a years, beer has been sold until the
significant decrease he said. end of each day's round.
Alcohol Law Enforcement of-
ficers made nine arrests for under-
age drinking.
ALE Supervisor Rick Amick
said the earlier cut off time for beer
sales brought fewer problems.
The most disruptive drunken
fans at the tournament were at the
corporate tents, Amick said, where
alcohol was served until the tour-
nament ended each day.
GGO Chairman Kelly Marks
said cutting off beer sales at 430
p.m. meant less revenue for the Jay-
cees, but helped reduce problems.
He expects the Jaycees will again
cutoff beer salesearly at nextyear's
tournament.
Mothers Against Drunk Driv-
ingpresidentMikeJacksonsaidhe
is pleased with the changes the Jay-
cees made this year.
"I think if s a step in the right
direction and I congratulate them
he said. "1 think they have proven
that they can sell alcohol and have
a great tournament and get every-
one home safely to toe process
I game on April 16 with 36 points deserves 1 . . � � " iiM,
Rogers foregoes senior season to enter NBA draft, cites financial reasons
WTNSTON-SALEM (AP) � Before
Rodney Rogersdecided to leave Wake For-
est for the NBA, he talked to superstars
Michael Jordan and Larry Johnson.
Jordan, the Chicago Bullssuperstar,de-
cided to pass up his senior year at North
Carolina. Johnson, an All Star in just his
second year with the Charlotte Hornets,
stayed at Nevada-Las Vegas for his senior
year.
"Michael told me it was difficult for
him Rogers said after announcing Mon-
day that he was choosing the same route.
"He didn't think he was ready, but coach
(Dean) Smith told him it was best for him to
go early.
"For Larry, the timing wasn't right
said Rogers, a 6-foot-7, 235-pound junior
forward who was the Atlantic Coast
Conference's Player of the Year. "He thinks
it was the best decision for him
AfteF weeks of speculation, Rogers
made it official Monday: He will enter the
NBA college draft, passing up his senior
year at the ACC school.
"I thought it was time to go on to toe
next level said Rogers,anativeof Durham
whoislocktobealotterypickinthejune30
NBA draft.
Rogers averaged more than 21 points
this year for toe Demon Deacons, picking
up numerous awards aldng the way. Be-
sides ACC Player of the Year, he was a
second-team All-American.
In three seasonsatWakeForest, Rogers
scored 1,720 points, an average of more
than 19 a game.
Despite all the money, he said it was a
difficult decision to turn pro. He talked
several timesat length with hiscoach, Dave
Odom, before making up his mind about
twoor three weeks ago.
"Durham Bull" projected
lottery pick
'To my teammates at Wake Forest and
my family and friends, it gives me a lot of
sadnesstotell you I'm leaving Rogers told
a packed news conference. "But I'm doing
what I think is best for me and my family"
The prospect of a rookie salary cap in
the NBA had no effect on his decision to
enter toe draft this year, Rogers said
While he listened to all toe advice, he
ultimately made the final call.
"Thiswasn'tup to my family or friends
to decide he said. "It was up to Rodney
Rogers
R( gers was joined by his rrx ther, Estefla,
and other family members at the news con-
ference.
His mother said she supp � te his deci-
sion, but wants him to remember that she
wants him to get his college degree.
"So far he's done what he promised
she said. "If he doesn't get it, it will be
something he'll have to live with
Rogers led toe Demon Deacons to a top
10 ran king and the round of 16 in the NCAA
tournament. He was first-team All-ACC in
1992 and 1993.
Rogers shot 55 percent from the floor
last season in lead ing toe Demon Deacons to
a 21-8 record, their best since 1984.
Teammate Randolph Childress said
Rogers made the right decision.
"He's already proven himself to toe
best basketball conference in the country
said Childress, whoattended thenewscon-
ferencealongwiih several other Wake play-
ers.
"I told him he should do it he said,
acknowledging that Rogers' departure
leavi-sahugevoidinWake'sstartinglineup.
"1 don't think anyone in toe country could
fill his spot
The Sporting News has said Rogers
could beamong toe top five players taken in
the draft Other observers have said the
burly forward's prospects were hurt by a
poor showing in the NCAA Southeast Re-
gional in Charlotte last month.
Rogers was upstaged in that game in a
matchup against Kentucky's Jamal
Mashbum, scoring just 14 points.
Odom said the ACC loses one of its all-
time greats.
"He is certainly one of the best basket-
ball players to ever play in this league he
said. "And he did it with grace, style and
class
Rogers has toe size and talent to be an
All Star in the NBA in four seasons or less,
See T-TOP page 14





APRIL 29. 1993
The East Carolinian
13
hoenix
hampionship likely
lorkKruci tstern
la20-
mewinningstreakatrM me. rhey
are coming in having Inst thrive of
fiiur gamfs. They haven't gotten
past tlie first round of the pla ofls
siruv 1976, inning just three of 17
gamesinflwtspanoffivepostseasan
appearances. And, they ent and
got the Knicks mad by beating them
in their latest meeting.
"WestUlhaveabad tasteinour
mou thsfrom them beatingusa few
weeks ago Knkks guard lohn
Starks said, referring to the Pacers'
108-94 victory at Market Square
Arena on April 16,t!ieironly win in
four games with New York this
season.
So, in addition to ali the above-
mentioned probiemsfacingthePac-
erssquareinfhefacewhenthebest-
of-5 series opens in New York Fri-
day night, there its also a touch of
revenge from a team which Sn-
iped 60-20, a record topped only
by the Phoenix Suns who won two
more games, and which allowed a
league-low 95.4 points per game.
"We won thedi vision, got the
homecourt advantage in the con-
fererK�andwci6Gganie"Kraek5
centerPatrkJkEwasaicL "Thfriigs
look very bright"
The playoffs get underway
TruHsdayrughtwifhlStewJerseyat
Cleveland, GharIctBostori, fhe
Los Angeles Clippers at Houston
and San Antonio atPorttend, In
vrs-Knicks, Fri-
i i include Atlanta
tahatSeatrJeandthe
u igdes Lakers atPhoenix.
lit ianacoach BobHill used to
be the head man with fhe Knkks,
(hi t ix � was let goa ftergoing20-46as
an in -season replacementfor Hubie
Brown in 1986-87.
"TVuit was a long time ago
Hill said. "Itisn'tevenapartof my
thinking as I prepare for the play-
offs
He'shopingthePacersarebei-
ter than the way they ended the
season in finishing41-41.
"When you go to the playoffs,
the environment changes right
away, and hopefully the attitude
changes Hill said.
He said his team matches up
well with the Knicks and the
season's results are deceiving.
"They got us once really good
in New York Hill said. "Other
thanthat,thegairhavebeenclose.
It's not hike they dominafed.The
fact that vvewon herethelasttimeis
certainly going to be good for our
confidence. You always have totry
yourbesttntryand gooutandwin
one of those first two on the road
Utah also has to come up with
one of those road victoriesand trie
Jazz's effort may be herped by the
returnof7cot-4certerA4arkEatcn.
The mainstay of Utah's Inte-
rior defense for a decade, Eaton
underwent knee surgery in late
October. He had just begun to re-
rumtoformwhenasprainedlow'er
backput hirnbackon theinjuredtist
April 15.
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You're Fired!
Rothstein loses
job with Detroit
Pistons
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP)
� Ron Rothstein was doomed to
failure almost from the moment he
took over as coach of the Detroit
Pistons.
That failure was made official
Monday when Rothstein was fired.
The axe fell one day after the Pistons
finished the season 40-42 and outof
the NBA playoffs for the first time in
a decade.
Don Chaney, an assistant who
once coached the Houston Rockets,
isconsidered one of the leading can-
didates to succeed Rothstein, but
club officials refused to comment.
"It wouldn't be fair to say that
before we talk to all our assistants
said Billy McKinney, the Pistons'
d irector of player personnel. "Maybe
toward the end of mis week, or early
next week, we'll have an announce-
ment on a replacement
The la st ti me the Pistons missed
the playoffs was 1983, Isiah Thomas'
second year in the NBA. Scotty
Robertson was the coach then. They
fired him, too.
A man named Chuck Daly was
hi red to replace Robertson. He went
on to become an icon in Detroit,
leading the Pistons to the NBA Fi-
nals three times and winning con-
secutivechampionshipsin 1989 and
1990.
The feeling was that whoever
followed Daly was likely to fail. "Itis
natu rally d ifficult when you come in
behind a man likeChuck, and espe-
cially in an organization that's had
so much success McKinney said.
"We're not a championship team
anymore. And theplayersaren't the
same now as they were then
McKinney and Pistons presi-
dent Tom Wilson met withRorhstein
at The Palace early Monday. They
announced his firing at a 230 p.m.
news conference which Rothstein
didn't attend.
"This team was beset with in-
herent problems from the day I took
over Rothstein said in a statement.
"I don't think I have to recount the
other problems that unfolded as the
year progressed have given this
tU
rikih
sU
?
1 oi t Jiis paper is
dedicated to tne stair oi
The East CarolmJan
ior yet another
successrui year.
Bye!
to.
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job my all from day one. I tried to
find a balance between the needs
and wants of the players and what I
feltwasmyresponsibilityasthehead
coach. Above all, I have tried to con-
duct myself in a professional man-
ner
Rothstein's biggest problem, of
course, was Dennis Rodman. The
moody forward missed all of train-
ing camp and 20 games during the
season, for one reason or another.
The Pistons were 4-16 when
Rodman d idn't play. They even lost
to Dallas. In the end, they missed
qualifying for the playoffs by one
game.Rothsteinmadehis reputation
as an assistant to Daly. As a result,
the expansion Miami Heat made
him their first coach in 1988. But the
complaints in Miami were the same
as the complaints in Detroit. The
players didn't like his hard-driving,
short-tempered style.
He returned to Detroit as a Pis-
tonsbroadcasterlastseason.Butthat
didn'tsetwell,either.Rodman,who
looked on Daly like a father, felt
Rothstein was looking over Daly's
shoulder, trying to push him out.
Daly did quit at the end of the
season, and later took the New Jer-
sey Nets job.
Rothstein was signed to a four-
year contract worth a reported $2.1
million by Jack McCloskey. But a
week later, McCloskey also quit to
become general manager of the Min-
nesota Timberwolves.
That left Rothstein on his own,
with players who didn't like him
and a general manager who didn't
sign him The lack of support from
the front office becamea factor as the
season unfolded.
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APRIL 29, 1993
incluvi
Thi Id Wall.
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id wiser, felling good behind wheel
T-TOP
ld me how
what it meant to him, and l could
� he looked, so l got
ire,ldidn'tfeelgood.lfeh
the time and I was getting
ed of not being mentally clear.
Now I've got about 40 percent bet-
ter fitness. I've got a clear head all
the time. Mont get tired inthecar
But Wallace also noted that the
fast start is because ofwhathe called
"a total team effort I've got the
ood he felt and feeling in my blood now like I did in
He began
weight and
sical health.
'88 and '89. I've got a car that's
second to none, a crew that's sec-
ond to none, a chassis that's second
to none and a great engine pro-
gram. We're going to be tough all
year
Another difference, Wallace
says, is that he is older and wiser as
a race driver.
"Now that I've gotten older, I
think a little more he said. "Now
1 think about it before I go driving
into a hole out there
Continued from page 12
his college coach said.
"He is ready to play in that
league Odom said. "I think he'll be
a great pro, but like all young pro
players it will take some time. There
were a lot of things he could have
worked on to be even better if he had
come back next year Rogers ac-
knowledged that a big factor in his
final decision was financial.
"1 want to do something for my
family after they've done so much
for me all my life he said.
LACROSSE
Continued from page 12
teams out Taylor said. "That depth
and conditioning from practice really
helped us out"
Taylor said he feels that athletes
who participate in non-varsity pro-
grams sometimes do not receive the
credittheyaredue,butfeelstheover-
all attitude of the lacrosse team is
attractive to some of its members.
"Wemay not getas much cover-
age or as much money, but we still
work hard. We don't train to be 'die-
hard its just a real laid back sport"
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 29, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 29, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.942
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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