The East Carolinian, April 27, 1993






Opinion
Action!
nethc )ation.
o lay

I

; f67�)
Partly c!oudy
72 )
( Partly cloudy
Tomorrow
e East Carolinian
nlation 12,(HH)
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, April 27. 1993
14 Pages
Second survey documents continuing air problem
� �
�mber sur-
tXl
I hat l
.Hi CO
I2(X
Kl ppm.
;se recommenda-
mfort le els ac-
ting to Herbert Oxendine, director
ironmental Health and Safety.
Though the February survey re-
sults have not come in yet, Oxendine
said that an increase in C02 levels
occur, but was a minor one.
"Theresultsw ere somt what higher
than last time Oxendine said. "The
surveyors wanted a more representa-
ti e sample of the building, so they con-
ducted the survey .it a time when more
pie were in the building. With more
� ,i higher level i C02 is to he
i v pe ted
Along with higher C02 levels, sur-
veyors found lower levels of volatile
organic compounds, cm �K s, than the
February survey. The survej studied
rmine whether they might
cause odor complaints that were preva-
lent at the time of the surv ev 1 he survev
in November showed that the levels ob
tained (714-940 micrograrns per cubic
meter) exceeded the optimum comfort
range ol less than 220 micrograrns per
cubic meter.
cendine stated that the second
la decline in the levels of
e le els were below any report-
able quantities Oxendine said. "This
ma uired fx ause of the n
dean air policy, which hasalso prod
a decline in the number of com
One of the major reasons that the
(General Classroom Building is facing
"bad air" problem
specifications. Ac cordingtol
physical plant engineer, the buii '
built according to standards put
after the 1970s energy cri-
"The CC Building was built un-
der codes that were written for maxi-
mum energy conserval
"It's the best building on campus
follows the codes ol thost timi
In a memo I
sical Plant, assistant directoi foi
See AiR page 4
New video yearbook
meets mixed reviews
like
the
the Media Board tffke and pic k up
a copy Brown aid 'But they must
ith the
way TreasureChest" turned out.
idering the fact that thi was
the first time we had done it, the
equipmentwasbrand new and the
staff was � Brown
Brown
lat
. still cor
were. Ii air
Bi v n saistu-
See YEARBOOKpage3
Pholo by Dsii Head
Over 2,000 copies of the "Treasure Chest the nev !I video yearbook were distributed at Barefoot on The
Mall last week.
Roll one
Dancers promote talent
through continued excellence
Staff VV riter
lour EC U dancers have performed
above and beyond the call ol duty, fulfilling
any expectations that anyone may have n.uf
when the department awarded them schol-
arships this past year.
JenniierMcGord, Stacy Mercier, Bonnie
White and Kristy Waters all received scholai
ships based on their past performances in the
dance department. All four hue been fea-
tured in the acclaimed Eastarolina Dance
Theatre, entertaining audiences with then
spirited performances.
McCord is a 21 year-old senior who
hasbeenaprincipJedancerand 12-year m
her of the Dance Theater ol Fayetteville, her
home town. She has appeared in 1 asfan
lina Dance Theater for tht
dancing primarily in ballet pieces Mc ord
also danced in "Am. .nl and the
tors" a - horeographed piei i
ed at the American
iin1ar
I amuiti -talenteddancer,said
that hei biggest Step personally was per-
forming in guest arc 11 arley's'Tton
Phenomenon" in th
cert.
"Thisdanceconcertwasabigstepfor
me Ma ord said. 1 felt I grew by being
giventhe i show my talent outside
of ballet"
� presents .in unassum-
losetsthequal 'tarn
i she performs in. Originalh from
Maine, Mercier is preside East
olina Dance AssociatiCH X) and
has trained in Pi andNewYork.
See DANCE page 2
Ly Dail Reed
Human bowling ,h one thing many students participated in during the 1995
Barefoot on the Mall spring i elebration
Alumni honored during
PurpleGold Weekend
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
Two alumni and a retired faculty
member were honored bv I he ECU
Alumni Association with the 1943 Dis-
tinguished Service ward during
Alumni Weekend, April 16 17.
lack S. Everton ol Virginia h
Va Marguerite Perry ol Greem Die and
leySlaughter aiootVirginia K
were honored fa tl i ir continued
vice to the urn-
Alumni Wei I '
Each of the honorees, selected
by the alumni association board of
d on nominations sub-
mitted by alumni, received a
memorative pew t�
The Distinj���
Award, one of the high
Alumni Associationbesl given
to those who symbolize and epito-
the spirit of service to their alma
mater said Donald V Leggett, asso-
llor for al
ALUMNI
ECU chosen
to transmit
TV station
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
"Lights, camera action" w
be a i ommon phra an und
pus later this year when an r
teIeisionchannelbi-ginsbi
ingfrom Joyner ' .it
Th-
three access channe
thmugh the new 15-year frai
agreement between thecityol
vilk
The campus-based channel v ill be
an educational channel, wl
CommunityCollegewillcoordinate
a public access channel, and Green-
ville City Hall will broadcast me
ings and public hearings on a g
ernment access channel
The Pitt County S -
ministration as aske I
site of the proposed stations After
s� iliciting bids from FCC an.
TCttCountvSurrinttTidentHoward
Sosne award
ontheba hfactorsasl
cal stafi available, access b
11.
. us.
Both
shongarnmitmenttothesucces
the Education
to working with and supporting
Counrv Schools and other edu
tional institutioi
Sosne said.
hi distribute -r the
demict i immui ii at u iSupp al
ices area injoynei
A
sitecould support up I
weekol,
cu n
staff.
The proposal . -
the School . Education ha
portfacilit) whichcouldbi
and telecom ;
BrodyBuildii

vated but unequipped i' stu
114 oynei
Supp managei
Weathersbeesaid besides trad
With
channel could bi
pipel
such programi
horn





APRIL 27, 1993
DANCE
Job outlook remains tight
The job market remains tight for graduating college stu-
dents this year, with fewer employers visiting campuses and
bringing only limited opportunities, according to the College
Placement council's March 1993 Salary Survey. For students
who received job offers, starting sa laries showed little movement
since the September 1992 survey, the council said.
Political science and government majors saw their initial
salary offers drop 1.6 percent, while humanities majors experi-
enced a 9.3 percent drop. Management information systems
graduates received an average offer of $29,267, up 2.6 percent
from September 1992 figures.
Graduate school tuition rises
Tuition increases for public and private graduate schools
ranged from 3 percent to 9 percent this year, according to
Peterson's Annual Survey of Graduate Institutions. Enrollment
in graduate programs also is on the rise, the survey found.
The average cost, which includes tuition and fees, rose the
most at public institutions.
State residents paid an average of $2,445 for the academic
year, an 82 percent increase over last year, and out-of-state
residents paid an average of $5,715, or 9.1 percent more from last
year.
Graduate student at private institutions paid $6,996, a 3.1
percent increase. "Considering the effects of our nation's linger-
ing recession on both public and private sources of educational
funding, these increases might be considered quite reasonable
said Peter Hegener, president of Peterson's Guides.
University, employee settle case
A secretary at the University of Alabama who accused
formerbasketball coach Wimp Sandersonofpunchingher settled
for $275,000 just before the case was to go to trial in mid-April,
officials said.
Nancy Watts had been Sanderson's administrative assis-
tant, school officials said. She claimed he hit her during an
argument.
The settlement resolved Watts' sexual discrimination claim
against Sanderson, the university and Athletic Director Hootie
Ingram. Assault and battery charges from the March 17, 1992
incident also were dropped.
Sanderson resigned under protest in May 1992. Watts
remained at the university and will retire in two years.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Among her cred its are four years of
Dance Theatre, NYC-Dance Space
Workshop performance and sum-
mer classesatMuhlenberg College.
Mercier plans to work and
study dance in Salt Lake City, Utah
during .he next summer. She then
plans ti move to Holland and then
come back to the United States to
dance professionally in New York.
Bonnie White has graced the
ECU stage with breath-taking bal-
let performances on a consistent
basis. Transferring to ECU in 1990,
Whiteattended community college
in Washington and became 1st
Dancer of Balletacoma in the two
years spent there.
White has performed in nu-
merous student composition
projects and equally numerous
Dance Theatres, most recently as
soloistlead in the 1993
"Variationen White has also
worked on full scholarships with
Ballet Hawaii and Meribeth Kisner
in Chicago. White's future plans
include auditioning in Houston,
Chicago and Seattle for dancing
position in major dance companies.
Lastly, Kristy Waters has in-
toxicated audiences withher vibrant
Continued from page 1
and exciting dancing that explodes
off the stage. Waters' accomplish-
ments include scholarships at the
Marie Wallace dance school, the
Conservatory of American Dance
Chi-Town jazz Dance Company
and various workshops and train-
ing under dance professionals.
Choreographing various
marching bands and musicals in
the Greenville and surrounding ar-
eas, Waters also has taught jazz
tap at a dance theater in New Bern.
Her future plans include working
in a professional jazz company and
possibly choreographing commer-
cial materials, including movies,
videos, etc.
Waters summed up the dedi-
cation and perseverance that all
dancers must have and these four
have shown while at ECU.
"You start with a dream
Waters said. "Everyone has one.
You set some goals and work hard
committing yourself totally men-
tally and physically. There will al-
ways be setbacks, but you survive,
pick yourself up and keep reaching
for that star. You never let go of
your goals and eventually your
dream will come true
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any questions? call
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1109 Charles Blvd.
OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT ALL WEEK �
School of Business
Graduate
Recognition
Ceremony
Honoring Spring and Summer '93
Graduates and Undergraduates
Friday, May 7
5:00 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Reception following program
First Floor
General Classroom Building
Celebrating:
�t Outstanding seniors from
each department
�� Commerce Club Scholarship
? Masters Hooding Ceremony
�� Teaching Excellence Award
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in recognition and appreciation
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and their families
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APRIL 27, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
U

Palace
a u rant
"III5IME
ALLYOU-CAN-EAT
LUNCH & DINNER BUFFET
7 DAYS A WEEK
Family
Dinner
Specials
Exotic
Mixed
Beverages
Lunch
Specials
Mon-Sat
All ABC
Permits
LUNCH
Mon-Fri llam-2:30pm
DIMMER
Mon-Thur 5-9:30pm Friday 5-10:30pm
Open All Day Saturday & Sunday
Saturday llam-10:30pm
Sunday llam-9:30pm
Take Out Orders Available
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Blvd. across from The Plaza
756-1169
YEARBOOK
Continued from page 1
GREENVILLE � TOYOTA
COLLEGE GRAD PROGRAM
? SPECIAL FINANCE RATE
? NO DOWN PAYMENT
? NO PAYMENT FOR 90 DAYS
? 6 MONTHS PRIOR TO GRADUATION
321-3000
dents can receive their copies at no
charge.
"We really feel proud of this
production said Dr. Xue-Mei
Zhanj instructor of the video pnv
duction class. "But we're still col-
lecting ideas from people
"We'll have a much more ex-
perienced staff next year,and in the
future I see the video yearbook be-
coming the first step for a TV chan-
nel or TV show Brown said.
Brown said thatUNC-Chapel
Hill has two cable stations. "1 think
that's something we could do
Brown said. "It would take a lot of
planning, butitcould be done it is
a possibility
The actual production of
"Treasure Chest" took place in a
class consisting of 12-15 students
meeting certain criteria, Zhang said.
Oily communication majors
can register for this class, and they
must receive special permission
from Zhang.
Previous audio and or video
experience isnecessary,and thestu-
dents must be "extremely moti-
vated Zhang said.
"The students learn to edit
and shoot basically they all learned
how to do every part of the video
Brown said. "For the first edition,
this was an excellent product
During the fall of 1992, the
class had to submit a five-minute
demo tape to the Media Board. That
tape metwith approval, Zhang said,
so production began.
During the fall the class spent
the ma jority of the time filmingcam-
pus life in general, but once spring
semester began the various campus
organizations were covered, Zhang
said.
"This is not a conventional
class Zhang said. "This isall hands-
on experience
Zhang said the deadline for
completed video was April 1, which
was met by the students after a
great deal of hard work. "We only
have a few students returning next
semester Zhang said. "Some will
vl
FEATURI
THE
UJ43�7iY4
Rove
CLASSICS NIGHT
$3.00 Members $4.00 Guests
K DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � 504 Jello Shots � 754 Kamikazes
SWEET 16 NIGHT
$1.00 Domestics � $2.75 Pitchers � $3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas
50c Jello Shots � 75C Kamikazes � 75C 100 M.P.H.
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for All 7 til 9:00
$3.00Teas & Bahama Mamas � $2.75 Pitchers � 500 Jello Shots
750 Kamakazes � 750 100 M.P.H.
"JeEkend
DRNcE PaRTY
leave in December, and we only
keep the very, very good ones
Steve Lewis will replace
graduating senior Sam Matheny as
executive producer.
Student response to the video
was mixed, and several students
offered ideas for future videos.
"I thought it was pretty good
overall said senior Lisa Hicks. "It
showed a wide range of campus
ictivities
"The ideas were OK, but a lot
of the video rolled by far too
quickly Bruce Erickson, an ECU
senior, said.
"ItwasOKfora first edition
Erickson slid. "But hopefully it will
get better and better
Erickson said future produc-
tions should include more local
music.
ALUMNI
Continued from page 1
"These three people have
rendered continued, outstand-
ing service to this university.
They are people who go the ex-
tra mile � rime and time again
� to enhance the growth and
progressof theuruversity,and it
is a greater institution because
of mem Leggett said.
Everton retired in 1985
from the United States General
AccountingOiT.cein its Norfolk
Regional Office and the Far East
Branch in Tokyo, japan, and was
honored with a Meritorious Ser-
vice Award by theorganization.
He is the current vice presi-
dent of the ECU Alumni Asso-
ciation, and is an active member
of the Tidewater ECU Alumni
Chapter, the Pirate Ciub and the
Hampton Roads Rotary Club.
Everton received both his
BS and MA degrees from ECU
in 1950 and 1958.
Perry taught French and
Spanish at ECU for nearly half a
century, eight years of which
she spent as chairman of the
Department of Foreign Lan-
guages and Literature.
She has been treasurer of
the Retired Faculty Association
since its formation in 1987, and
is a member of the Chancellor's
Society and the Planned Giving
Council.
Slaughter grad uated from
East Carolina in 1952, and
taught in high schools in
Harriett Ccwmty, Asheboroand
Norfolk where her husband, ihe
late Marvin Slaughter, ran a
floor covering business.
She is active in the Tide-
water Chapter of the Alumni
Association, the Chancellor's
Society, the ECU Foundation
and the Children's Hospital of
the King's Daughter Circle.
ON SALE
Whisper
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JB C i
14.99 16.99 17.99 Z4.99 Z9.99 32.99 4999
Whisper Bio-Bag sale ends 43093
4 pack
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8 oack
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11 pack
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1A pack
18.99
UNIVERSITY CENTER � 14th & CHARLES ST
m Mmmm Monday-Friday 11-9
7S7"OOSv Saturday 10-9
Sunday 1-6
AmexDisc
MCAisa
STUDENT UNION B;
HAPPENINGS "
MOVIES I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
LAST
OF THE
MOHICANS
WED, APRIL 28 & SUN, MAY 2
THE BEST REVIEWED
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I For More info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004





i m !��! � -� -
APRIL 27. 1993
m page 1
TV
Continued from page 1
stem.
-�nt
mmunica-
tver has
luntofworkhis
e to do in the
ssroom building.
i sed the length of
when ent�tments so mv students
more impI spend as much time in the
Floyd saidHowever weallagreebuilding Power said. "It's a ma-
thatsomeimprovementscan nowjor problem that needs to be
be made by certain adjustmentssolved
"Ultimately, we'd like to con-
nect several sites with a switching
device so thata meeting or class held
at Titt Community could be broad-
cast live from Joyner said jack
Postma, chairman of the Greenville
Cable Television Commission.
Chancellor Richard Eakin and
Greenville City Council woman Inez
Fridley have been enthusiastic sup-
porters of the proposed public ser-
vice channels, and the school sys-
tems' involvement in the channels
"Every institution involved will
havea role to play, and all will benefit
greatly Fridley said.
BLUE PI ANET CAFE IS OPEN!
Serving Vegetarian Caryy-out Meals; Sandwiches, :
1 Salads and Assorted Goodies: 11:30 - 2:00, Mon - Fri
Hot and ThirsW?
Tree of Life Unfiltered East Coast
APPLE JUICE
$4.25Gallon
ft 0
BL-UE PLANET LjfeFoods)
Organic Groceries & Produce VitaminsSupplements
Bulk Foods - Herbs Health & Beauty Aids
405 EVANS STREET MALL
758-0850
Hours 10-6.M-Sat
WANTED
Students interested in becoming
representatives for the
Department of Athletics
as members of The
Pirate Crew. The
Pirate Crew is a
volunteer
organization that
assists ECU
Athletics in fund
raising activities and the
recruitment of student-
athletes.
For an application and more information call
757-4570
,rr�rwrmwf'm?i
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CUFF'S
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
Washington Hightuay (NC 33 6xt-2 miles past 10th St Putt-Putt) i
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Steamed Oysters & Shrimp
Beer, UJinc & Brown Bogging OK.
7523172
SUPERMAN
IS BACK.
BUT IS ANY
OF THEM
THE REAL
MAN OF STEEL?

"REIGN OF
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SUPERMEN"
BEGINNING IN
ADVENTURES OF
SUPERMAN 501
ACTION COMICS 687'
SUPERMAN 78
SUPERMAN: THE MAN
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ALL ON SALE THE SAME DAT
HE LAST WEEK OF APRIL, 1993'
THE COMIC BOOK STORE
919Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, NC 27834
'OPEN 7 DAYS (919) 758-6909 Mon-Sat 9:30-6
A WEEK Sun 2:00-6
Captain D's new lightly breaded fish is lighter
and crispier than ever before. Dinner
includes coleslaw, golden fries and hushpuppies.
This offer won't last long so get yours today!
SEAFOOD
626 South Memorial Drive
758-6761
SUPER SENIOR WEDNESDAY
ANY DINNER $029
Plus Free Drink O
(E�dud� Ptanm �nd Packs) (AGE 60 & OVERI
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ON THURSDAY
Kid 12 & younger Limit 2
with each -dull dinner at reg
price. Dining room only.
BRING ALL
GRADUATION
PICTURES IN FOR
FREE SECOND SET OF PRINTS
TO ALL ECU STUDENTS
355-5050 �THE PLAZA
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757-6366
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CAROUNIAN
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88
Receive $1.00 OFF
Any Size Pizza or
Pokey Stix
by showing us your rented
video. Pick-up only.
Get A Small
Cheese Pizza
or Small Pokey Stix
for $1.88 with any purchase at
our already low coupon price.
Additional items 50c each.
Sign up today for Overton's 1st Annual 3
on 3 Basketball Tournament to be held on
Saturday, May 1, 1993.
� 4 Players per team (one injury sub if needed). Open
to ages Iff and up.
� Teams will be placed according to height, skill level,
and experience. Single Elimination Tournament.
� Entry 40.00 per team.
� Rain Date Sunday, May 2, 1993.
� For more details call Jake Jacobs at 355-5783 or
come by Overton's for complete rules and entry form.
Your Complete Sporting Goods Store
Hours: Monday thru Friday, 8 to 7 pm � Saturday, 8 to 6 pm
It
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large
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3
small
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$5.18
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2 small
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S. 2 sodas
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large
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NC Wildlife Agent
Prices Do Not Include Sales Tax-OHers May Expire Without Notice-$5.00 Minimum for Delivery
11
11
HOURS
SUN-THURS:
00 AM-1:30 AM
FRI-SAT:
:00AM-2:30 AM
321-GUM-B
315 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
Located next to Blockbuster Video
PERSONAL CHECKS

Mltf Check Cli.irpc





Apri!
�93
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
11
forRant
nispj
"XT'j1
ONI BEDROOM APARTMENT 1
BLOCK i R. M i VMPUS. Laundry
i.hgenoughf.r
2. Stirting beginning or mid-May! Call
now 7: 6-2( 28
SINGLEROOMSFORRENTfor sum-
mer session . SZ3t per s.s. includes rent,
utilities,and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
APARTMENT FOR RENT, available
after exams, 2 BR, 1 bath, Regency
House, spacious, furnished, S4O0 per
month, call 758-7422 for info.
SUBLEASE: Room for rent. Fully fur-
nished house. Pay S200 a month plus
13 utilities. Available for summer.
Please contact 756-4735.
SUMMER ONLY - Mid-May - Au-
gust. 3 bedroom 1 bathroom. Front
porchswing. 1102 Cotanche (across
from Travel Express and East Coast
Music) S450 per month. Call Charlie at
830-5582 leave message.
1 BEDROOM, FULLY FURNISHED,
May-July. Ringgold Towers-1st floor
Parking included in S375month and
utilities (cheap). Call ASAP 830-6278.
SUBLEASE APARTMFNT located at
King's Arms Apartments. Rent 5265 a
month. Available May lOthrough July
31.1 will pay all of May's rent. Deposit
SI 70. Call Angela 757-2437.
2 ROOMS IN LARGE HOUSE on
Eastern St Few blocks from campus.
Available May 1st. 14400 utilities.
Call Todd or Mark at 830-1371.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ONE OR TWO ROOMMATES
IrV A rFDtosharetownhouseinYVild-
wood Villas. S155.00 per month. Call
931-8906 or 830-1359.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
SI 50.00 month rent. 1 2 utilities. Avail-
able June 1st own bedroom 12 mile
from campus. Call 752-0874 ask for
Frankie. Leave message.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
NEEDED for a newly renovated Wild-
wood Villa apartment. Each person
pays SI 27 a month plus 1 5 of utilities.
Needed soon, please call 931-9333.
ROOMMATE for apartment at
Stratford Arms, next to Allied Health
Bldg nonsmoker, free cable and wa-
ter, starting in June. Rent 185. plus 1 2
utilities, phone. Call 756-1603.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED IM-
MEDIATELY. Must be responsible,
honest and nonsmoking. 1 2 rent, 12
utilities. Rent includes AC,heat,cable,
watersewage. 2 blocks from campus.
Call Robert at 931-7112 or 757-3697.
ROOMMATES needed for summer
fall; 3 bdrm. house, 1 block from cam-
pus; low utilities, ac, washerdryer.
Call Stephanie at 752-2560.
BEST PLACE IN GREENVILLE TO
LIVE. Needed: ONE GOOD
ROOMATE. 3 bedroom house, cathe-
dral ceiling, fireplace, loft, outdoor pa-
tio, AC, wooded lot, close to campus.
ARTIST or MUSICIAN preferred. No
pets (we have the world's smartest cat
already) should be laid back, respon-
sible and courteous. S200 13 util.
THISISTHELTVINCSPACEYOU'VE
BEEN DREAMING ABOUT. Call us
758-7993.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for Wildwood Villa Apartment start-
ing May 15 (S150 per month plus utili-
ties) please call 757-0321.
URGENT! FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share 2 bedroom apart-
ment in Tar River. SI 55 a month plusl
3utilities.CanKellyorLinda931-7821.
2ROOMMATES NEEDED to share4
bedroom house very near campus.
Please call Brittany 931-8628 or Cathy
931-8637. (For summer only!)
FEMALE non-smoker, responsible,
socia 1 d rinker. To share 3 bed room brick
house 3 miles from campus. S147.00
per month plus 1 3 utilities. Available
fall semester. Call 756-0899 after 5pm.
HOUSEMATEWANTEDQuiet loca-
tion near ECU. SI 62.50 per month plus
12 utilities. Available May 1 call 758-
3311.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for apartmentl 2block from Art Bldg
3 blocks from downtown and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great for art stu-
dents. Call (919)867-6211.
(
CHEAP! FBIUSSFJZED: 89 Mercedes
-S200,86VW-S50,87Mercedes-S100,
65 Mustang - 55. Choose form thou-
sands starting S50. FREE Information
24 hour hotline 801 -379-2929 copyright
NC 030610.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
bv FBI, IRS, DE A. Available your area
now. Call 1-800436-1363 ext. C-5999.
1984KAWASAKIGPZ750Red,stage
3 carburetor kit, Kerker pipe, one hel-
met. SI 000. Negotiable. 7584920.
CLUB FOR WOMEN ONLY MEM-
BERSHIP. Save S59 initiation fee.
ONLY S29 per month. UNLIMITED
TAN S10 additional. FULL FACILITY
GYM! 321-6831.
SOFA BED AND 2 CHAIRS - $100.
Ent. Ctr. 525. Computer desk whutch
-S50. Dining tablew4chairs-S50. Call
752-9347 and lv.msg.
CRUISER BIKE - S50. Stealth radar
detector - S50. Soloflex wleg ext and
butterfly att. - 5500. Tandy PC wcolor
monitor and DWP-S300. Call 752-9347
and lv. msg.
1979 BMW320i,runsgood,only 88,500
miles, AMFM cassette, 4 Pioneer
speakers, needs some work, only
51500.00. Call 355-7412.
FOR SALE: A nice sofa and armchair
that are in very good condition. Ask-
ing S300 � Call 321-3440 and ecve a
message.
QUEENSIZE WATERBED, heater,
cushioned siderails, headboard,
pumps, hook-ups. Great condition.
5145 neg. Call 758-9341 today.
COUCH AND CHAIR FOR SALE.
Good condition. Graduating! Must sell
ASAP. I don't have room to take them
with me. S75.00 Cal 830-6665.
SOFA, LOVESEAT, DRESSER,
CHEST OF DRAWERS, RECLINER,
COFFEETABLE,2ENDTABLES.Sale
for cheap. Call 752-6491.
1988 YAMAHA FZ-600: redwhite,
Fl R pipe, new back tire, helmet, SI 750.
negotiable. 931-9041 leave message.
CDs USED S5;Futon, matching tables
w glass, dark green cover, 5400; 355-
9502 leave message.
200 - $500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
ucts at home. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information-24 hour hotline. 801 -379
- 2900. Copyright NC 030650.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church. 510 South Washington St on
Sunday mornings from 9am until
12:30pm. To work with toddlers
through 3 year olds. Applicants must
be punctual and dependable. Appli-
cantsalsoshouldhavecheerful, friendly
and ca ring attitudes in their interaction
with children and their parents. For
application information contact the
Church office 752-3101.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED
Great money, great club. Easy hrs
Thurs Fri Sat. 9pm - 2am. Cash $$$
Cash SSS Cash SSS Call Paul (919) 736-
0716 Mothers Playhouse.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cashstuffingenvelopesathome. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Na-
tional Distributors, PO Box 9643,
Springfield, MO 65801. Immediate re-
sponse.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
4364365 ext. P-3712.
ALASKASUMMER EMPLOYMENT
- fisheries Earn $600week in canner-
ies or $4,000 month on fishing boats.
Free Transportation! Room and Board!
Over 8,000 ooenings. No experience
necessary. iaie or Female For em-
ployment program call 1 -206-545-4155
ext. A5362.
NEEDED45 people to loseweightnow.
New product recommended by doc-
tors. 100 natural, 100 guaranteed.
Call 321-1046.
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT
- Make money teaching basic conver-
sational English abroad. Japan and
Taiwan. Make $2,000 - $4,000 pa-
month. Many provide room and board
other benefits! No previous training
or teaching certificate required. For In-
te ma rionalEmploym ent program, call
the International Employment Group:
(206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
BANQUETWAIT HELP FOR SUM-
MER JOBS. Apply Ramada Inn, 203
W. Greenville Blvd Greenville, NC.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -Earn
$2,000month world travel (Hawaii,
Mexico, The Caribbean, Etc.) Holiday,
Summer and Career employmentavail-
able. No experience necessary. For
employment program call 1-206-634-
0468 ext. C5362.
CURBSIDE WAITRESSES NEEDED
- Flexible hours. Apply in person at
West Ford End Drive-In.
WANTED: Students interested in be-
comingrepresentativesforthe Depart-
ment of Athletics as members of the
PirateCrew. The Pirate crew isa volun-
teer organization that assists ECU ath-
letics in fund raising activities and the
recruitment of student athletes. Call
757-4570 for an application and more
information.
PART -TIME HELP NEEDED morn-
ing hours only. Apply in person at
Carpet BargainCenterl009 Dickinson
Ave.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Setown hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
Summer Positions
Vector Marketing has openings for its
summer work program. $9.25 starting
rate. No door to door or telemarketing
involved. Build resume and communica-
tions skill. All majors may apply.
Scholarships awarded to top students.
Raleigh: 248-9630
Durham: 549-6934
Greensboro: 333-1519
Charlotte. (704) 527-0073
Hickory: (704) 323-4665
Fayetteville: 630-4000
Knoxville: (615)691-3214
Greenville, SC: (803) 235-0009
EXCITING NEW
CONCEPT COMING TO
GREENVILLE AREA
Great Summer Job Opportunity.
Looking for delivery drivers
(Drivers average $8-1 2), cooks
and management personnel.
Apply In Person
Saturday, May 1 st
10-3
1414-A Charles Blvd.
(next to Dino's)
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typingand photocopyingservices. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pa ges.SDFProfessionalComputer Ser-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer? Only $169 Jet there anytime for
only $169 with AIRHJTCH! (Reported
in Let's Go! & N Times.) AIRHITCH
�212-864-2000.
MINI STORAGE-148 Brand newstor-
ageunits, very close touniversity, cheap
rates, EVANS STREET CENTRE
MTNI STORAGE 355-7443.
HANG GLIDE AT NAGS HEAD,
NORTH CAROLINA! Fora weekend
or a week of adventure and fun! Kitty
HawkKites'beginnerhanggli dingles-
son $49 per person (show college ID).
1-800-334-4777. Sun Realty's modern
beach cottages $250 per weekend or
$350 per week (plus applicable taxes,
fees and security deposit). 1-800-334-
4745. Offer good through early May
1993.Call today foravailabilities. (Some
restrictions apply).
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
'Editing & Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resumes
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NjQWi USED CD'S
JSELL
iYOUR
STUFF!
We're paying
I CASH for
Furniture
? Men's Clothing
- Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Stereo Equipment
If you axe selling you must be 18
with a picture ID (NCDL. ECU)
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
t EVANS STREET MALL
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
752-3866
Mon 10-12 1-5
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3 Sat 10-12
RESEARCH INFORMATION!
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with vteaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in Calif. 213 �77-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Resoarch Information
11322 Idaho Ave. H206-A, Los Angles. CA 90025
KEYS LOST! If you found a set of keys
(5-7 keys on a plain key ring) in Biology
Dept. of Howell Complex, or possibly
in the large commuter parking lot on
April 19,1993, please call 752-9939.
FOUND keys at Howell ScienceCom-
plex.GradNite92KeychainandMace.
See secretary in BN108.
LOST - A very important book bag that
is needed to graduate! Please return if
found! Contact The East Carolinian at
757-6366 and leavea messageorask for
Dana.
USA: Saturday night was really fun!
I'm still recovering from my drunken
state! Like flies to honey, those guys
sure were funny, next time we'll drink
before we go, and then we'll dance all
night at the Elbo! Love ya, Lisa Marie.
ANNETTE: Nowyou'rereallyold! At
22, In only 18 years you'll be 40. Oh my
God! You're life is almost over. Don't
you just love my sense of humor? Re-
ally, I hope you have the bestest birth-
day everand good luck on yourexams.
See ya . Karen
BUBBA You are wonderful, and I
never could have made it this semester
without you. Thanks for all the higs,
kisses, and support. I know we are
goingto makeit.Wehaveto-youstill
owe me an Explorer! You are very spe-
cial and I'll miss you this summer! I
love you bunches! Hon.
CORI & MO - Well, here it is, the
personal you've been waiting for all
semester! You know you both annoy
me, but you love me anyway. Cori -
Best of luck with roomates A,J, and W,
leant waitto visit. And Mo-I'll see you
in Raleigh! Thanks for all the Thurs-
days! I'll only say it once - I'm gonna
miss you both! Love ya-Buffy.
THE SISTERS OF ALPHA D ELTA PI
would like to wish everyone good luck
on exams and have a great summer!
See you in the fall!
PHI SIGMA PI National Honor Fra-
ternity wants to wish all our senior
brothers congratulations and best
wishes for bright and successful fu-
tures. Paula Anderson Borsman, John
Congleton, Joi Edmundson, Charlotte
Grady, Mary Henderson, Kandyce
Hemdon, Charl Humphreys, Trish
Lang, Christie Lawrence, Terry Light,
Karen McLamb, Cherie Matthews,
Michael Means, Brenda Smith, Kim
Smothers, Scott Tippins, Melani Wells,
JameyTisdaie,Tracey Wilson and Lisa
Willis.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors, Instructors.
Kitchen, Office, Grounds for western NCs finest Co-
rf ten t irjsirt edyouth summer sports camp. Will train. Over 25
L.AIVIr 1 IaKWIHIU activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792.
FIELD SCOUTS - Late to Mid-September.
Must be trustworthy, reliable, conscientious, in
good physical shape, love the outdoors and have
reliable transportation. Salary plus milage. Excel-
lent opportunity for college students and teachers
looking for summer work.
Send resume to: MCSI, PO Box 179, Grifton, NC 28530
or FAX to 919-524-3215.
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Exceptional Value
Available Immediately. One and two
bedroom apartments close to campus.
Water and sewer is FREE.
Laundry facility and ECU bus service.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
Permanent Part-Time Sales. Must have previous
retail sporting goods experience. Reliable transportation.
Able to work morningsnights and some weekends. Apply
in-person ONLY. ATHLETIC WORLD at The Plaza Mall and
Carolina East Mall. No phone calls please. E.O.E.
EVANS STREET CENTRE
& MINI STORAGE
� Cheap Rate
� Month-to-Month lease
� Brand New Units
�Share with Roommate
(3SS-74430 1528 S. Evans St.
Announcements
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FEI.l.OW-
SHIP.
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects? Need a refuge
form time to time? Campus Christian
Fellowship may be what you are look-
ing for.Our weekly meetings are at
7pm Wednesdays at our Campus
House located at 200 E. 8th St di-
rectly across Cotanche St. from Men-
denhall Student Center. Everyone is
welcome. For more information, call
Tim Turner, Cam pus Minister, a 1752-
7199.
ATTENTION PHYSICAL EDUCA-
TION MAJORS
The Physical Education
Motor and Physical Fitness Compe-
tency Test is scheduled as follows:
Minges Coliseum, 10:00 am,
Wednesday, April 28,1993. A pass-
ing score on this test is required of
all students prior to declaring physi-
cal education as a major. 1) Main-
tain an average T-score of 45 on the
six-item test battery. 2)
Having a T-score of 45 on the
aerobics run. Any student with a
medical condition that would
contraindicate participation in the
testing should contact Mike
McCammon or Dr. Gay Israel at 757-
4688.
To be exempted from any portion
of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance
Laboratory (Room 371, Sports Medi-
cine Building). Your physician's ex-
cuse must specifically state from
which items you are exempt.
DESIGN ASSOCIATES
Design Associates student
group is hosting a visit from Interna-
tionally recognized designer David
Carson and ECU School of Art Alum-
nus, Hayes Henderson.
You are invited to attend: David
Carson - Art Director - Ray Gun and
Surfer magazines: Slide lecture -
Thursday April 29, 1993, 7pm in
Speight Auditorium. Hayes
Henderson - IllustratorDesigner:
slide lecture - Friday, April 30,1993,
10am in Room 1303, Jenkins Bldg.
BUY IT, SELL IT, OR SAY IT
in The East Carolinian Classifieds
CALL 757-6366
�-�J���VI"�r.M�





The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
"uesdayOpinion
Educational channel beneficial
By T. Scott Batchelor
Final exams to be replaced by EASE questions
University's television channel
will provide additional
community service
Once again, East Carolina has proven that its
goal is not only to better itself, but to better the
Greenville community as well.
East Carolina has recently been selected to house
a new education channel that will assist students
with homework, broadcast live college classes and
screen documentaries and classic films to enrich the
school's curriculum. The channel will provide com-
munity members with a service that, until now, had
been unavailable to some.
East Carolina will join Pitt Community College
and City Hall in a three-channel broadcast that will
offer public and governmental access programs, as
well as the educational programs. All three have
striven to raise the level of education offered at all
schools in Pitt County.
With new technological improvements in the
near future, East Carolina has put itself in a position
tobe a ground-breaker in education. By showing this
strong commitment to the community, the univer-
sity provides greater access to the various services
available to the general public.
Education does not stop when a person walks
out of a classroom. It is something that continues
long after one has graduated from any college. By
providing this service, East Carolina has made the
means for a higher education that much easier, and
should definitely be congratulated for it.
Air problem in GC continues
Solution must be reached to
solve serious problem to
student, faculty health
It looks like students can continue to use "bad
air" as an excuse for not going to class in the General
Classroom building.
A recent survey reported that the level of carbon
dioxide in the building has increased since the first
survey in November of 1992. Officials have cited the
increase as happening because of more people being
in the building when the second survey was con-
ducted. However, this still does not solve the prob-
lem of the original levels, which were higher than
federal recommendations.
Officials have also cited that the General Classroom
building was built obeying codes that focused on energy
conservation rather than comfort. They say that this
explains why people have complained of odors, head-
aches and upset stomachs.
Comfort is now an important part of any workplace.
ECU should recognize the change in society's priorities
and adjust their standards to meet those changes.
Though complaints have declined since the first
survey, a problem still exists. No quick fix will be
found for this dilemma; the administration must look
for a long-term solution to provide safe education. As
everyone already knows, this is a serious problem
that will not go away if it is ignored.
Future surveys must be conducted; but first, a
plan of action must be implemented. Find a way to
correct the problem and embark on that action as
soon as possible. Students must understand, though,
that this will take money that will come out of their
pockets in the long run.
That's a small price to pay for your health and
safety. You can't set a dollar value on a person's life.
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Assi. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Bullard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Stress, stress, stress. (Read
as "exams, exams, exams)
Exams. Who needs 'em
anyhow? Do they really prove
anything, except that it's pos-
sible for a human to remain
awake and coherent for 72 hours
straight? In my opinion �which
I readily admit is a completely
biased one � final exams are
not worth the mental and physi-
cal anxiety they produce.
However, perhaps I'm be-
ing too hasty in my condemna-
tion of this antiquated and bar-
baric system. Perhaps my loath-
ing of the final exam regimen
comes from my propensity for
procrastination. 1 acknowledge
that putting off reading Dante's
Inferno till the day before exams
causes some stress. Yet even my
most conscientious friends suf-
fer the same symptoms.
A friend of mine came up
to me yesterday, sticking out his
tongue, and said, "Thee thith
"What'd you say?"
"Thee the ultherths on my
thongue?" he asked, pointing to
a patch of white bumps on his
tongue.
"Talk normally for good-
ness sake I said to him.
He withdrew his tongue.
"Did you see those ulcers? That's
from pre-exam stress
"How are your grades
looking?" I asked.
"Oh, I've got A's in all my
classes
"Are you behind on read-
ings or something?"
"Nope. I'm all caught up
he replied.
"You're disgusting I said.
"I hope your tongue falls out
You see? Even the most
well-prepared among us get
stressed out during final exams.
The technical name for these
people is "wimp
I propose a new system for
measuring a student's intellec-
tual growth. I call this new sys-
tem the Experimental Anti-
Stress Examination, or EASE for
short.
This new examination con-
sists of the following seven ques-
tions (to be answered honestly):
� Did you enjoy this
course? If so, why? If not, why
not?
� On a scale of one to four,
with one being a failing grade
and four being an A, which score
do you think you would get if
you had studied hard and kept
up with your assignments?
� What is your professor's
name? (Just one.)
� Did you at any time sleep
with your professor? (Univer-
sity of Virginia students only.)
� What is the air speed ve-
locity of an unladen swallow?
� Do you mean a European
or an African swallow?
� If Superman can stop
bullets with his bare hand, why
does he duck when the bad
guy throws a pistol at him?
Explain.
I know to many of you
this list of questions may seem
a bit silly, but so would your
questions if you were a chronic
procrastinator writing against
a deadline.
Anyway, with the EASE
examination completed, the
student's answers are then tal-
lied (using a byzantine and
wholly ambiguous formula)
and a grade is assigned, usu-
ally an "A
Maybe this doesn't sound
like much of a way to assess a
student's progress in gaining
knowledge, but wouldn't the
beautiful spring days seem
much nicer without all the
stress of traditional finals?
1 H&iRP THAT Vou'O
GOT A CLASS IN TU&
GENERAL. CLAGSKOOtYi
BUILPINC. HOWPO
YOU UK� TU�: ty�LL.
PLPtC� Xf V
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail ReeJ, Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Ca rolinum,
Publications BldgECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
Jrr
w
100 recycled
paper
.tmcv tsieep" to po
SoMerrufNe a&got
rue. ventilation'7
&(t othsk thaw
tut
QuoteofthcDay
I'm glad I don't have to explain to a man from Mars
why each day I set fire to dozens of little pieces of
paper, and then put them in my mouth.
Mignon McLaughlin
Letters to the Editor
Everyone wants world to conform to beliefs
To the Editor:
I would like to respond
to Ms. Peacock's letter to the
editor. What are your mor-
als? What are your beliefs?
Well, we all know now that
one of your beliefs is that
homosexuality is okay with
you. Perhaps you are also
pro-choice, or maybe you
believe in euthanasia.
Whatever your morals
are, I'm sure that you sup-
port them in many different
ways, such as voting for
people who share your be-
liefs or strongly supporting
legislation that fits with your
beliefs.
As you pointed out, not
everyone shares the same be-
liefs as you do; therefore,
someone will lose out if you
get your way.
Christians are not the
only people on the face of
this earth who want people
to think like they do. Liber-
als do, atheists do, feminists
do � the list is endless. This
is why we all fight for what
we believe. We all want the
world to be a certain way. It
is ignorant, arrogant and
hypocritical for you to single
out Christians.
Melody W. Cutler
Junior
Spanish
Truth's definition does not hinge on belief
To the Editor:
Truth is truth. No mat-
ter how we look at it, or how
we want to look at it, truth is
still truth. Even if we decide
in our own wisdom that
something else is truth, that
doesn't change the original
truth from being truth.
It seems that we all have
fallen away from that con-
cept to believe that truth is
relative to whoever per-
ceives it. So, in essence, we
are saying that even though
we all have different views
of the truth, our views are
just as much truth as what
everybody else sees as truth.
Another view of the truth
that has become widely ac-
cepted is to equate truth with
absolutes and say, "The only
absolute is that there are no
absolutes
Both of these philoso-
phies are erroneous ideas.
How can something really
be tru th i f the exact opposite
is truth also? By definition,
truth has to agree with itself.
Therefore, if two "truths"
oppose each other, one (or
both) cannot really be truth.
The other idea that
states that the only absolute
is that there are no absolutes
is problematic because taken
to its logical end, it contra-
dicts itself. If the only abso-
lute is that there are no abso-
lutes, then the absolute of
there being no absolutes can-
not be absolute, and there-
fore, there must be absolutes.
If there are absolutes, then
there must be a truth, be-
cause for something to be
absolute, there must be in
itself an element of truth.
What is truth then?
Jesus said in John 14:6, "I am
the way and the truth and
the life. No one comes to the
Father except through me
Jesus proclaimed himself to
be the truth. So, if what Jesus
said was true, then by defi-
nition there can be no other
truth, because he proclaimed
that he was truth and there
are no others.
I realize that not every-
one believes that Jesus is
truth, but logically if we
don't believe he is tru th, then
we must believe that he is a
liar, because the definition
of truth only allows for one
truth. Just because there are
people who don't believe he
is truth does not change the
fact that he is. In the same
way, truth does not depend
on what I believe. The truth
is just what it simply is. No
one has to believe it to make
it truth, it just is.
Stuart Mizelle
Junior
Music Education
By Amy E. Wirtz
Pro-lifers faced
with voicing
complex message
After 12 years as outsiders, sup-
porters of abortion rights are trying to
make the most of their new influence in
the White House and on Capitol Hill.
However, leaders of the movement are
finding that success brings a different
set of problems.
They have to decide how hard to
push their new allies on issues like fed-
eral financing of abortion and the pro-
posed Freedom of Choice Act; already,
there is disagreement over how much to
compromise, and when.
They have a far more complicated
message for the American people than
they did during the years of Presidents
Ronald Reagan and George Bush, when
the abortion rights movement was sim-
ply defending the constitutional right to
choose an abortion.
Now they are trying to move be-
yond the debate about keepingabortion
legal toward the goal of making it more
accessible and free of state restrictions.
They now deal with taxpayer financing
of abortions for poor women, which is
encountering little public support.
At the same time, they have to fight
complacency among many of their sup-
porters who saw the battle won with the
election of President Clinton. Polls show
that public opinion remains stuck be-
tween the orthodoxy of both sides in the
abortion debate. The New York Times
CBS News Poll, for example, has shown
that a majority of Americans support
keeping abortion legal and generally
available.
However, polls have not shown a
majority behind taxpayer financing of
abortions for poor women or for includ-
ing abortion services in any basic ben-
efits package as part of health-care re-
form. These are the primary goals of the
abortion rights movement this year.
In the midst of all this, a squabble
has broken out among various support-
ers of abortion rights over just what is
attainable in a Freedom of Choice Act.
At issue is how much ground to give in
two areas of dispute: state laws that re-
quire parental involvement in cases of
minors seeking abortion and state laws
that ban public financing of abortions
for poor women.
While President Clinton has deliv-
ered much to the abortion rights move-
ment in the first few months of his ad-
ministration, including calling for the
repeal of the ban on federal financing of
abortion, it is not yet clear how far he is
willing to go � pushed or unpushed.
One thing remains: The voters have
been repelled by what they perceive as
pro-life extremism, but there's no rea-
son to believe that they won't be just as
turned off by pro-choice extremism.
In the words of President Clinton
during his campaign, I believe I would
be content with abortion being "safe,
legal and rare ou can be anti-abor-
tion and pro-choice. What needs to be
understood is that none of us have the
right to make a decision for another ra-
tional human being. It is, very simply,
unconstitutional.





�I ,I 111. � ��"�
The East Carolinian
Biography on Hunter
S. Thompson reveals
all the nasty details
By John Bullard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Tottedelightofrnanv college students thatread "Fear and Loathing
inLisVegasibkigraphyofHunterS.TrKirnpsxri,theinspirarionforthe
Unde Duke character in "Doonesbury was released in February. And
what a biography it is!
"Hunter. The Strange and Savage Life of Hunter S. Thompson is
written in a style that pays great homage to the "Gonzo" journalist that
brought us "Hell's Angels "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas 'The
GreatSharkHunt"and "Fearand Loathing:On theCampaignTrail 72
The author of "Hunter E. jean Carroll, gives us a story that rivals
Hunter S. Thompson'sown writing style that changed the way writers
write. The biography can be seen to lay somewhere between Studs
Terkell, with his interview style, and HST himself, with his "Gonzo"
appnwch to writing.
The structureof "Hunter" juxtaposes chapters of interviews includ-
ing people that surrounded Hunter S. Thompson his whole life with
chapters of a fictional account of E. Jean Carroll's stay with Thompson.
Theprerruserftr fictional chaptersishilarioustosaythe least These
chapters tell the story of Miss Laetitia Snap the super-intellectual debu-
tanteandformerMissIndiara(aixt-sofe
herself) that was lured to HSTs farm, seduced by "The Doctor" and
forced by Hunter S. Thompson to write a biography of him in his
backyard cesspool.
This is where the outrageous style of E jean Carroll comes out The
See HUNTER page 10
VNCSS��WNVW v
.S. -isSKKSiiXX
sl fa nee
and sktvape
Hunter S.
ThompsofK
t.
f
E . J e a n C a r r o 1
Hunter S. Thompson
Lifestyle
Page 7
Barefoot'n
1993
Col. Bruce
Hampton & the
Aquarium
Rescue Unit
jammed out
Barefoot, joining
Roily Cray and
1964 on the
stage.
Photo by
Dail Reed
Barefoot festivities successful despite cold weather
By John Bullard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
As a veteran of six Barefoot On the Malls, I
woke early Thursday and put on my favorite
pair of shorts and a long sleeved T-shirt. It was
cold that morning, but I just knew it would
warm up for the festivities. It didn't Disap-
pointed, I hurried home after the one class I had
to go to and put on some warmer gear.
Used to tiie blaring sun of past Barefoots, I
didn'tplan on stayinglong.Of course thatdidn't
last long when Eric G a student and self-help
employee of ECU, came up to me and declared,
Tm drunk and have taken the whole day off
Eric had just gotten out of the human bowling
ball and was trying to fight off the desire to hurl.
"Man, this is going to be a blast he said, walk-
ing sideways towards the Velcro Fly Wall.
Bumpingintosomeonehavingsomuchfun
put me in the right spirit. Then again, just about
everyone was having a good time. That is of
course if you don't count the priest that was being
dunked in the BallTossor the two guys that were
having real coconut cream pies thrown at them.
Shortly afterlarrived,RollyGray and Sunfire
hit the stage to a small crowd that quickly grew
larger. They were the perfect band to get things
goingbecause they got everyone jumpingaround
with their reggaecalypso beats.
Not to break tradition, a score of miscella-
neous freebies were thrown at the crowd all day
long by those hardworking Student Union folks
and a lot of prizes were given away to boot,
including a CD player and a free CD every week
for a year for naming some tunes.
Whatwould Barefoot on the Mall be without
a trio of bands? I'm not sure cause there have
always been at least three and it was so this year.
Col.Bruce Hampton cameonwithhis Aquarium
Rescue UnitafterRolly and his bunch had warmed
up the crowd. His sound was very bluesy with
somejazz,rockandbluegrass thrown in. The band
wasalotoffunandtheaowd,likemyself,seemed
especiallyreceptivetothetalentsofthebassplayer.
Tobreak with tradition, the Barefoot commit-
tee went with a look at the past and the Beatles.
With pastacts like OceanBlueJohnnyQuestand
Love Tractor giving a taste of new alternative
music, this year's headline band 1964 gave us a
look at yesterday. I was skeptical at first, but once
the memories of my parents hopping around to
"Can't Buy Me Love" came flooding into my
head, I started having some real fun.
The day, like all other Barefoot On the Mall
days, wasa complete success. Where else, besides
ECU, could you catch a cool buzz, head for the
central campus mall, buy greasy food, take spins
in human bowling balls, fling yourself at Velcro
walls, have free stuff thrown at you and see and
hear some really great music?
Thank You ECU Student Union!
-School's Out
By Richard Cranium
Staff Writer
I've often wondered that if
a black cat crosses your path
and you rum and wa Ik the other
way, is it still bad luck? I ask
about luck because it's about
that tirne. Some of us � you,
not me � will be needing luck
soon.
Here we are, the last day of
school. Tomorrow is reading
day, a day of fun and frivolity.
Unless, of course, you have one
of those turd teachers that has
class on reading day for what-
ever ridiculous reason. Then it's
the old exam gambit. What about
this: look at "exam it becomes
"X-a.m So the key here is to
watch porn videos the morning
of exams. Try it, you'll like it.
And look, before you start
bitching, statistics show that
women rent dirty movies more
than men (of course, maybe men
just buy them). I read that a new
film-makeris producing porn for
women now. Mercy.
But Idon'twant to talk about
porn. Or exams. It's that last day
of class thing and I want to talk
about the last day of school. And
people.
I know a few folks that will
have the pleasure of retaking
some of their classes. I feel for
them; no, 1 don't. It seems to me
when you go off to college you
have committed yourself to sev-
eral years of reading, writing,
and brown-nosing. It's an edu-
cation. It's knowledge. It's the
perpetuation of culture! Care,
why don't you. So why don't
peopledowhatthey're supposed
to? Take it from the Cranium-
Man: you got to go baby go!
Just do the work, make the
grade, you can graduate.
And what about those
graduates? Hopefully, there's
a business in the family. Other-
wise, it's who they know or
who they blow. Or graduate
school. Rrrretchhh!
Remember that Dallas sea-
son when it was all just a dream?
It's like that. Or let me tell you.
I had this woman once who
used to stomp on me regularly,
See SCHOOL page 9
Coping with the end of
the semester
By Jennifer Phillips
Student Health Service
Question:
I have two papers to write, one presenta-
tion to give, four final exams to study for, and
if that wasn't enough, I'm searching for sum-
mer employment. Talk about STRESS! What
can I do to better manage it?
Answer.
Stress is the body's phj'sical and emo-
tional reaction to change or to a situation that
may be dangerous, confusing, irritating or
boring.
Stressisa part of everyday life and itmay
be either positive or negative. Graduating
fromcoUegeorgettingmarried are the typical
examples of positive stress. A breakup in a
relationship, wrecking a car and final exams
are examples of negative stress. Although
negative stress situations can, at times, be
avraded,negativesfresscanrotbeeUminated
entirely. In fact, life would be rather dull and
purposeless without it The trick is to face and
manage these stresses appropriately.
Signsof stress include,butare not limited
to: concentration problems, insomnia, eating
disorders, cramps, body aches, irritability, fa-
tigue,diajrr,headachesaml'butterfliesin
thestomachSorTWwaystoreducesrress,par-
ticularly for the end of the semester, include
� Finding a quiet place to study
� Plan your study time on a calendar,
devoting blocks of time to specific subjects.
See STRESS page 10
lWC� BveOt . � � UPWi 6vfr . .UfW
Today and Tonight:
ECU hosts a scries of summer institutes for grade school science and math beginning today. The institutes
provide in-service and continuing education in areas of mathematics and science.
The final show of "Romeo and Juliet" plays tonight at McGinnis Theatre at 8 p.m. The show ��
member cast of ECU students and faculty. Ticket to the show are S7.50 for the general public and S4.50 for ECU
students. Call 757-6829 for more information.
See EVENTS page 8
Beaux
Arts
(LtoR)
Dail
Reed,
Billy jean
Snuggs
and
Dietrich
Maune of
Flat Sided
Buffalo
were
joined by
Seven
Feathers
and St. &
M Friday
night at
the Beaux
Arts
Festival at
Mug
Shots.
Photo by
Jason Bosch






" It
William Shakespeare's
Timeless Love Story
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APRIL 27. 1993
The East Carolinian
9.
as his weapon
i 1432 photomontage of
I Spouts
: he Fuhrer,
ns,a swastika tor a heart.
- - m tfthi most
e century, in a new exhibition
Many are originals that have never
ecauseofhis leftist political leanings,
;ld's work has rarelv been shown in
i learrfield (1891-1968) was an artist-activist who helped invent
photomontage and used it to fight Nazism in bitterly satirical images,
mam designed for book and left-wing magazine covers. He manipu-
lated news photographs, snipped, re-posi tioned and re-touched them,
and sharpened them with witty captions to skewer the hated regime.
The exhibition, "John Heartfield: Photomontages will remain
on show at the museum through July 6. It will then be shown at:
- The San Francisco Museum of Modem Art, July 23-Sept. 19.
- The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Oct. 7-Jan. 2,1994.
SCHOOL
Continued from page 7
God bless her. She went out of
town after we had been fighting
orsomethingand I wentoutwith
the fellas and drank just enough
to say that I had drank too much.
1 called her answering machine
all night and blubbered all over it
like a drunk, blubbering fool, talk-
ing 'bout love. She used to play
that tape for her friends. That
hurt me.
So try to understand. It's
exam time. Don't shove books
under your pillows and don't
form al 1 night study sessions with
that cutey-pie across the room. If
you don't know it, you don't
know it. What are grades any-
way? If I look at your grades, do
I get a sense of the person? The
humanity? The light you bring to
this world? No! All 1 know is
whether or not you're a stupid-
ass.
The world is about people.
I'm people, you're people. If I'm
refraining from being the harsh,
cynical RC to which you're ac-
customed, it's because I know the
year is about over. I'm feeling the
orgiastic release of summer thun-
deringoverthehorizon. And I'm
sensitive. You need support right
now.
I remember those last days of
school years ago when you'd get
little treats and everybody was
all happy and teachers were nice
and stuff and life was good. The
bus once dropped me and Steven
and Benji and Tootsie off at the
end of our dirt road. We went in
Steven's house and called WKIX
and asked the D) to play Alice
Cooper's "School's Out We
must have waited an hour for
that redneck to get on the good
foot. But we heard it and we
knew what life was all about. It
was about happiness. And
friends. Oh, the impetuous ide-
ology of youth!
Anyway, it's been a great
year.
I know because I've seen the
ECU Video Yearbook (thank God
it's free!). Grrr Good luck on
your exams. And if you have a
chance, stop by the Writing Cen-
ter in the General Classroom
Building.
That's where you'll find C. A.
She's one of the kindest, cutest,
wonderfullest people you'll ever
meet, but she'll drink you out of
house and home if given the
chance. Nahhh Say hey to her.
So look, be good and be
happy.
If you're a shithead and ev-
erybody tells you what a peon
you are, remember, Richard Cra-
niumlovesyou. And I mean that.
And hey, if a black ca t crosses
your path, kick it in the ribs and
say, "Don't run my life
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
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�Ill don't have any family history of heart disease, what is my
risk?
� How does blood pressure affect heart disease?
� How long does it take tor a low-fat diet to reduce cholesterol
levels?
Eric B. Carlson, M.D.
Presents
"Early Warning Signs of Heart Disease"
A Short Lecture Followed by a Question and Answer Session
Free to the Public � Refreshments Provided
Monday, May 3rd. 7 to 8 PM, at the Gaskins-Leslie Center, Conference Room "A" (Turn
onto Stantonsburg Road off of Memorial Drive, then right at the 2nd light. Enter the 4th
driveway) Call 757-1000 lor more information.
golden
corral
STEAKS, BUFFET & BAKERY
Golden Choice Buffet
with carved meats nightly
$5.19
Weekend Buffet Breakfast
$4.49
present school I.D. and receive a
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THANK YOU SENIORS!
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15 OFF
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coupon expires
May 9. 1993
SELL YOUR BOOKS
We buy all books with current market value
AND MAYBE WIN A GREAT PRIZE
WRIGHT PLACE SODA SHOP
April 29
April 30
May 1 (Sat)
May 3 - 5
May 6
8:30 AM
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ON THE HILL & ON THE MALL
April 29 & 30 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
May 3 - 5 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
lWF�KASh
Student Stores
More than just books Your dollars support student scholars
Wright Building � 757-6731
Mon-Thurs 8am-8pm
Fri 8am-5pm
Sat llam-6pm





APRIL 27, 1993
HUNTER
nued from page 7
published in such m
quire, Playboy and
The interspersing ot the fictional
chapters vith the interview chapters
gives insight into the childhood, ado-
lescence and adulthood of Humter S.
Thompson. Carroll tracked down
those that either love him or hate him
(sometimesboth). Those interviewed
irKJudeHSThimself,mLstresses,Hell's
Angels, drug dealers, pom stars, edi-
tors and pals from childhood to the
present
The interviews cover many top-
ics of Hunter S. Thompson's life in-
duding the first time he was arrested,
the literary dub thatgotitall started for
rurrvhistravels,hisnriningforaColc-
rado sheriff position under the Freak
Power ticket (and almost winning)
and his outrageous lifestyle.
: rom angry as
� mother said: "Hunter was
i. Hnthemomaitofhisbirth"
j when lim Harrison was
saying Hunter his been
t kting journalist of our
�rung with the motorcycle
book ("Hell's Angels"). In terms of
journalism, Hunter gave tiv lead. I
always though totHunter as basically
an artist Certaintv you wouldn't
think of the Vegas book ("Fear and
Loathing in Las Vegas") as journal-
ism There are also those quotes that
show his personality outside of writ-
ing.
"At the Pittsburgh-Minnesota
Super Bowl 1 offered him (HST) a
cough drop. He said, 'Oh thank you.
Here let me give you some add said
DickSchapp, television journalist and
sportswriter. Carroll's biography
breaks the typical mold for the genre
and rightly so. The structure of
"Hunter" puts the life of a very differ-
ent and eccentric American Hero into
a light that reflects the true essence of
what Hunter SThompson 'sail about.
Continued from page 7
� Take breaks from studying! ten
minute breaks for every hour can be
energizing. (Don't take "beerbreaks")
� Maintain healthy eating habits.
All tooften, "stressed" students binge
on caffeine, alcohol and high sugar
foods � all contribute to fatigue and
irritability.
� GET ENOUGH SLEEPIItis
not uncommon for students to study
all night for exams and then sleep
through then or during them.
� Try stretching and progressive
music relaxation. The ECU Counsel-
ing Center has information available
on relaxation techniques; 757-6661.
� Allow time for exercise.
� Keep your sense of humor.
Stuck here this
summer? Need
some extra cash?
Can you write?!
I need people to
check out books,
movies, food,
bands, parties,
plays, festivals,
symphonies, con-
certs, comics,
people, etC. I itestyle
'V
S
WtfAOUS FROZEN YOGURTj
�A SPRING SPEC!
�SgFpt THE WEEIP
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Show ECU ID for 10 discount
1898 Greenville Blvd. M-Sat 11:30-10:30
759440 Sun
staff writer positions open tor
both sessions of summer
school. Please apply with Dana
or Deborah at Tl C, Student
Pubs building.
Need Temporary
Medical Insurance?
? LAID OFF
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For more information, contact:
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SENIORS!
DIPLOMA
15 off complete orders for diplomas
UNIVERSITY
Frame Shop
and
Art Gallery
IJULIt
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DavkiL Harrell 3219 Landmark Sl
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?Tj� Greenville, NC
1 355-8855
�posters �creative matting
�limited edition prints �jewelry
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Hours: Monday-Friday 9-6, Saturday 10-5
520 S. Cotanche Street
752-4620
DID YOU GET ONE?
We gave away 2,000 copies ot the
TREASURE CHEST
a
YEARBOOK
at Barefoot on the Mall
WE HAVE MORE
to distribute between
8:30AM and 4PM
TUESDAY & THURSDAY
in Mendenhall Student Center
Pick up your copy of the
1990JBID
and the year-end issue ol
EXPRESSIONS
Congratulations to the
newly elected officers of
Gamma Beta Phi
National Honor Society
for the 1993-1994 school year.
They are:
RuthannBass President
Rob Gluckman Vice-President
Bobbie Sue Burgess Roll Secretary
Allison Fulghum Corresponding Secretary
Laura Siegal Treasurer
Kelly Kellis Reporter
Penny Ashley Historian
The inductions took place on April 20th, 1993 and Gamma Beta Phi wishes
to thank the Master of Ceremonies and current advisor Dr. Don Parkerson
of the history department for all of his help this year.
ECUfs Closest Beach
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Located on the Pamlico River in Washington
�Sandy Beach �$ 1.00 per person
�Conviently located Mini-Mart -$2.00 per person on weekends
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�:��� �� ��





The East Carolinian
Sports
Page 11
vinning streak ends over weekend
home
winning
streak was
i arr a
fourgame
loosing
streak.
Pholo by
Bift Ranson
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
Mtcr winning 19 straight games at
the friend lyconfinesof Harrington Field,
the f'CU baseball team (31-16, 11-7)
dropped four straight at home with an
extra inning loss to Virginia Common-
wealth and ,i three-game,weekend sweep
K.eorge Mason.
On Wednesday, April 21, Jim
I ewentowicz knocked a one out, solo
home run in the 10th inning to propel
V i 1(21-14)toa4-3winoverthe Pirates.
1 .ew entowicz' homer, his fifth of the sea-
son, i ame after HCU scored two runs in
'bet ighth and another in the ninth to tie
the score .it 3-3.
The Rams took the early lead when
Luke Berry singled with one out in the
fifth, Mole second and scored on con-
secutive singles by Mike Bell and Eric
Sauve. Jeff Yarbrough continued VCU's
scoring with a leadoff home run to start
thesixthandasingleby rodd Campbell,
who later scored on RyanDixon'sdouble.
VCU Starter left Bounds baffled the
Pirates, allowing only three hits in six
scoreless innings before yielding to
Michael Ketterman to start the seventh.
After striking out the side in the sev-
enth, Ketterman allowed two runs in the
eighth aftera leadoff walk to Frank Fedak,
who Uxik two bases on a wild pitch and
scored on a sacrifice fly by Jamie Borel.
One out later, Jason Head hit his fifth
homer of the season in to right field to put
the Pirates within one at 3-2.
With VCU closer Adam Bryant (2-3)
pitching, Pat Watkins led off the ECU
ninth with a bloop double into right field,
took third on a bunt single by Steven Pitt
and scored on a shallow pop fly to left by
Chris West to tie the score before ECU
lost in the 10th.
On Saturday, George Mason (26-7,
10-1) clinched its second straight first-
place finish in the Colonial Athletic As-
sociation by sweeping ECU 12-10 and 7-
4 in college baseball action Saturday at
Harrington Field.
In game one, the Patriots were led
Micky Storie, whose three-run homer to
right field capped a five-run fifth asCMU
took the lead 5-4 over the Pirates. GMU
added two more runs in the eighth and
three in the ninth to take what seemed to
be a secure 10-4 lead.
See BASEBALL page 14
Ward breaks ECU, NCAA record
Sports Information
East Carolina University
Michelle Ward broke former
ECU player LauraCrowder's record
of 69 stolen bases in 1W2, and set a
new NCAA single season record
Sunday against theTarht vlsi iNx rth
Carolina, to o include the 1993 regu-
lar season.
The Lady Pirates split thedouble
header, winning garni: i toe 1-0, giv-
ing senior Jenny Parsons her 101st
career victory on a four hit shutout,
and dr pped game twi , 2 -1 b i finish
the tegular season with a record of
33-20.
'Today a highlight film could
have been made from both teams'
defense ECU Head Coach Sue
Manahan said. Both teams' outfield-
ers made diving catches at crucial
points in both games.
Michelle Ward led off the first
inning of game one with a walk and
then stole the record King base. Lisi
( orprew hit behind Ward to move
her to third. Senior Cheryl Hobson
flieddeep to left to bring Ward across
the plate.
The Pirates jumped out to an
early lead in game two, but the
I arheels rallied in the sixth inning.
Ward led off thefirstinningwith
a high ch pper ti sh rt and beat out
the throw to first. Two pitches later
Ward stole her 70th base of die sea-
son. Corprew and Hobson followed
w ith singles toaccount U r the Pi rates
solemn.
Titcher Jenny Parsons allowed
only two hits until the sixth inning
when three hits, two sacrifice bunts
and a bad throw latter, UNC ttxik the
lead. ECU tried to rally in the seventh
but could not convert the tying run.
"We got great leadership from
our three seniors Manahan said.
"Everyone played well when they
had to and we hope to get to play
more in May
ECU will not find out if they an
invited to the EC AC post-seasi m tx ur-
nament.
Mediate follows through in GGO
Great Scott!
GREENSBORO, N.C (AP) �
It all added up this rj me a round for
Rocco Mediate.
Mediate, who led after three
rounds of last year's Greater
(Jreensboro Open only to fall vic-
tim to Davis Love Ill's record-set-
ting 62, birdied the fourth playoff
holeSunday to beat Steve flkington
and win the $1.5 million even
Mediate, whose other PC A
Tour win came in a playoff at the
1991 Doral Open, overcame a
double bt gey i in the par-515th and
then had to save pars on the second
and third extra holes before sink-
ing a 4-foot putt to finish it.
Mediate trailed 34-hole lead-
ers El kington and MikeSulli van by
four strokes, marking the biggest
final-day move by a tournament
winner this season. I ledosed with
a.3-under-par69 Sunday fora four-
day total of 2H1.
Elkington, who is now 1-3 in
playoffs, matched that figure with
a 1-over 73.
The drama tic playoff was held
on the Course's last three holes, con-
sidered among the most difficult
on the695H-yard ForestOaksCoun-
try Club layout. And with w inds
gusting to30mph, the players took
turns scrambling to keep alive.
Elkington sank a 4-footer for
par on the first playoff hole. Medi-
ate got up and down from the sind
See GGO page 13
File Pholo
Former offensive tackle (No. 7.3) Tom Scott went in the sixth round
of the NFL draft, 148th overall, to the Cincinnati Bengals.
Wallace ready
to contribute
in Chapel Hill
immediately
PHILADELPHIA (AP) ��
Rasheed Wallace can make good on
his commitment to attend North
Carolina
Wallace, a 6-foot-ll center for
Simon Gratz High, scored above a
combined 700on his Scholastic Ap-
titude Test, his mother confirmed
Saturday.
"I always thought he would
come through, but I'm still relieved
now that he has Jackie Wallace
told The Philadelphia Inquirer. She
dki not disclose her son'sexact score.
Schools in the Atlantic Coast
Conference require student-athletes
to score at least 700 on tine SAI.
When he announced his choice of
North Carolina on April 8, Wallace's
latest score was 690.
Although he had signed a na-
tional letter of intent with North
Carolina, he would have been re-
jected for admission if he had not
scored more' than 7( M) before July 31.
Wallace now will be eligible to
play in his freshman year for the
1993 nation,tl champion Tar Heels
next season.
The " ore also ensures he will
become the firs! member i f his im-
mediate family to attend ollege.
NBA playoffs offer breath of fresh air
PHOENIX (AP) � The final regular-sea-
son meeting between Houston and Phoenix
meant more to the Rockets than theSuns,and
both teams played like it.
"Onanvidtriplikethis,wegooutandget
fJiemall.Ican'tsayanymoreaboutthisteam
coach Rudy Tomjanovich said after the Rock-
ets won for the 10th straight time and their
fifth consecutive road game, 111-97 over the
Suns.
Houston concluded a four-game Western
Conference trip with four straight wins, giv-
ing the Rockets 13 victories in their last 16
away from the Summit
The Rockets (54-25) also stayed a game
ahead of Seattle in the battle for homecourt
advantage between the No. 2 and 3 seeds in
the Western Con ference. The Su perSonics kept
pace with a 96-89 victory over San Antonio in
the only other NRA game Monday night.
For the Suns, the defeat was their third
straight, their longest li sing streak i if the best
season in franchise history.
"Absolutely. We were embarrassed
said Danny Ainge, who missed the two pre-
vious games with the flu.
Richard Dumas sat out with the flu, but
the big absence for the Suns was Charles
Darkley, who has been on the injured list for
fivegames while theSuns have si umped to 1-
4. Barkley is expected to return in time for a
Thursday night game in Portland.
During their skid, the Suns clinched
homecourt advantage throughout the play-
offs when the New York Knicks lost to Indi-
ana.
"This does not mean that we will nc it be
ready for the playoffs when the playoffs n ill
around, but it does mean that we have
some work to do Suns coach Paul
Westphal saiil.
The Rockets were aggressive from the
opening tip, forcing the Suns into their
worst 24 minutes of the season.
"Ourdefensereallyclosedthemiddle
said I lakeemOlajuwon,whohad30points,
14 rebounds and five blocks.
"They are missing a key player and a
lot of leadership in Charles Olajuwon
sud. "You lose some confidence with a guy
like that out. I don't know if that's what
happened, but you see him play every
night,and you know h iw much he means
Olajuwon got all five bkxks in the first
half, when the Rockets tmk a 33-13 first-
See ROUNDUP page 12
NFL draft not effected by free agency
NEWYORK(AP)�Iftherewasachangein
theM'l. draft in the first yearoffa-eagency,it was
a subtle one.
After quarterbacks went 1-2 in Sunday's
draft for the first time in 22 years, teams got down
to the basks. As in rrx Bt years, the big guys went
quickly �- a half di OBI I rflensive linemen in the
first 19 picks ami an equal number of defensive
linemen in the first n Hind.
"It's always a land' (if the elephants gen-
eral manager (ieorgje Young of the New York
( SantS said after the first round. "You got five
offensive tan klc-s that go. All the big guys go,
whether they're linebackers or defensive line-
men I hey always goearry
there were nosurprisesal tin top other than
the trade by the NewVe.ms Stints ot line
backer Pat Swilling, the 1991 defensive MVP, to
Di-troit. In return, the Saints got the eighth over-
all pit kin thedraft, which they ustil on offer isie
tickle Willie RoafofLi uisiana I eif.
Iew Bledw e, die Washington Sta tequar-
terlK'k,wtTitUiNew England and RickMirerof
Notre Dame to Seattle. Hill I 'andl the Patriots'
newt oach,sakiBledsoehadbeenhisteam'sfirst
choice all along, although heo nsidered !th
Mirer ami a trade.
TeamslikeAtlanta, I li usb m, Washington,
Philadelphia, San Francisco and Indianapolis
drafted sperifJcaDytofiUholeslostbydefei ting
bee agents, and there were seven first round
tr.K tes sixswapsiif draft position, theseventh
(me Ihe Swilling deal.
But there were others who went to the
Ut available athlete theory, like Pittsburgh,
which needs ltoebackers, had plenty ofdefen-
sive backs and sti II went fi r u MTterback De m
Figures of Cotorada
"When you're drafting 23rd in the first
round, von don't always hive fix luxury of
(k ling tiiat Steetersam h Hill'owner siid.
So itwasa typical draftday. After Btedsoe
and Mirer, no quarterbacks went until
Washington's Hill vloe I lohertwenttotheLos
Angeli s Raiders on tlie last pick i il tlie second
round and was the onlv oilier quarterback
See DRAFT page 13
NFL draft too
long, teams
take their time
(AP)�This was supposed to
be an easy one.
For a change, most NFL clubs
knew exactly what they were
shopping for and the merchan-
dise on the shelves was plentiful,
properly tagged and, best of all,
cheap. On top of which,any pieces
a cl ub missed or still needed for a
matched set could be purchased
via free agency until July 15.
So how come it took some of
those guys seated behind the hel- j
mets and in front of the phones
five hours to get through the first
round of the draft?
Assuming the phone bills
were paid, the only other expla-
nation was to make the draft look
harder than it really was.
In recent weeks, everyone
with a 1-900 line � including
"Sabrina! YourPersonal Psychic"
and even ESPN draftnik Mel
Kiper Jr.�had Washington State
quarterback Drew Bledsoe
pegged as the No. 1 pick by New
England. Yet Bill Parcells played
the suspense for a 11 itwas worth.
He dutifully hid out in a "bun-
ker" since assuming the post of
do-it-nli for the Patriots three
months ago to mull things o
He held just three news confid-
ences over tha t span . And he d i s-
missed questions about the draft
at his last public appearance only
Wednesday by saying, "There's
no one who knows. No one.
"My wife hasasked Parcells
added, "and she doesn't have a
clue
Wrong.
She knew. And he probably
knew she knew. Even without
telling her.
Fact is, so much of the first
round went according to form
this year that with a little bit of
study, Judy Parcells might a!so
have known that Seattle wen f
take Notre Dame quarterba. k
Rick Mirer with the second pi I
And that somebody would fleet e
Phoenix in a trade. And even that
wheeler-dealer Bobby Beathard
� now employed by the Ch.
era but still wearing his Red
thinking cap � would ba
away a first-round pick to get his
hands on some guy even the
psychics haven't heard of.
The selectionsof Bledsoe and
Mirer were virtual gimmes, b
cause the only way to turn a fra
chise around fast is to hire a gu; �
who can throw the forward pass.
And taking Phoenix or Beathard
for a ride on draft day are fast
becoming time-honored tradi
lions.
No wonder the Cardinal
ways draft high; they're alway
running in place. With all the
holes that needed plugging, this
year the club's braintrust traded
SeeUTKEpagen





�1
APRIL 27,1993
-� in s
treaks

� omplish that this season.
Kevin fohnsonsoored 18points
for the Sun while Kennj Smith
had 18 points and 12 assists for the
Rockets. His Thorpe had 16points
andWinstonGariand I4afterstart-
ing for Vemon Maxwell, who has a
strained wrist.
"They respect Hakeem so
ibout
hi 's Inpointsand
pvetheSuns
h edge over the Rock-
iminated the re-
boum ' '� h period but the
fourth en route to a 51 -42 margin.
"1 think we re just coasting a
little bit. It's nothing to worry
about Kmht said.
Phoenix heat the Rockets 133-
110 here Dec. 30 and got out of
I loustonwitha I06-104victoryjan.
5, but the Rockets solved the Suns
after the All-Star break, allowing
Phoenix a previous season-low 17
points in the first quarter of a 131-
104 rout at the Summit on Feb. 25.
I he Suns hit just 23 percent in
theopermigquarter of the final regu-
lar season mwtingand missed nine
of their first 10 shots in the second.
Phoenix appeared to have got-
ten momentum when Dan Majerle
hit a 3-pointer with 6:20 left in the
first quarter, leaving the Rockets
ahead 13-9.
But Smith sank a pair of out-
side shots during a 14-0 run while
the Suns went4:35withouta point
Houston opened a 20-point lead on
a hook by Olajuwon with 1.6 sec-
onds to play.
"Wecameoutwithagreatdeal
of intensity Smith said. "We
played well, trying to get ready for
Continued from page 11
the playoffs
Carl Herrera made a pair of
jump hooksearly in thesecond quar-
ter, and the Rockets were up 39-13.
Ma tt Dullard hit two3-pointers
before halftime and sank a third
with 503 left in the game, cutting
off a Phoenix rally and putting the
Rockets ahead 101-83.
SuperSonics 96, Spurs 89
Seattle beat visiting San Anto-
nio for the first time in four tri's this
season behind Ricky Pierce's 27
points on 8-for-13 shooting from
thefield and 11-for-12accuracy from
the free-throw line.
Dale Ellis scored 17 points for
the Spurs, who had a season-high
27 turnovers.
Tuesday, April 27
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APRIL 27, 1993
The East Carolinian
13
� d the hole
� ediate hitting out of a fair-
ia bunker, chipped to 6 feet and
made the par putt
I returned again to the 16th
ocontinue the playoff, but this
time Mediate won it.
'Once it lett the putter it was
right in thecenter Mediate said of
his winning putt.
Gil Morgan, Faul Azingerand
Dudley Hart were tied at 282. r fart
shot 71, Azinger 72 and Morgan 73.
Sullivan, who led for the first
three rounds, ballooned to a final-
round 77 and finished at 285.
m the
tn't sit
Witi ind last pick in the
first round after winning the Super
Bowl he traded itawayforthreelater
1 k aces. Then his first two pickscame
from the college he used to coach �
vwdereoenKevinWifliarnsand line-
backer Damn Smith of Miami, who
will join a half-dozen other ex Miami
players on the Cowboys.
SanDfego'sBobby Beathard, who
nevermetafirst-n iund pick hewan ted,
got stuck with taking Stanford defen-
sive back Darrien Gordon with his
first pick.
But BeathaRl, who had just one
No. 1 in his dozen years in Washing-
ton, niadeupforit in thesecond round
Continued from page 11
bj tradingtoSanrrancisconextyear's
tip pick to rnove up and take running
bade Natrone Means of North Caro-
lina, fhatwasa reprise of whathedid
twoyearsagowhenhetraded his 1992
o 1 totheRedskmstomoveupinthe
second round tor guard Eric Moten
atxttl-i.itpickrum�.1outtobeDesnxind
Howard.
Parcells' choice of Bledsoe was
hardly a surprise. But unlike Troy
Aikman, who was made an instant
starter in 1989, when Johnson took
him No. 1 for a 3-13 Dallas team,
Bledsoe may not be an instant starter.
"In the final analysis, we thought
Bledsoe had a little more ability to
throw the ball effectively Parcells
said.
LITKE
Continued from page 11
away one very good running back,
Johnny Johnson, to move up one
place to No. 3 and draft � what
else? � another very gtxxi run-
ning back, Georgia's Garrison
Hearst. Think the New York Jets'
general manager was happy that
his phone bill was paid Sunday?
With one call from Phoenix, he
picked up Johnson AND a prom-
ising linebacker in Florida's
Marvin Jones with the No. 4 pick.
And it wasn't even his quarter.
Beathard is another story.
Trading top draft picks for veter-
ans worked in Washington be-
cause the Redskins were a player
or two from reaching the Super
Bowl nearly every season. It'squite
another matter, however, in San
Diego. Two years ago, to get Eric
Moten � Eric Moten?�Bea tha rd
gave away the first-round pick
that was eventually used to get
Desmond Howard. This time, as
part of a multi-pick swap with San
Francisco, he gave away a 1994
first-round rounder to come up
with Natrone Means. Bet on this:
The Chargers are not just a
Natrone Means � Natrone
Means? � away from reaching
the Super Bowl.
The maneuvering aside, it
should seem scary to everyone
that it took well-paid, full-time
football men two monthsof prepa-
rationsand five hours toannounce
enough names to complete one
round of the draft.
Because the bad news is it
could get longer.
With free agents getting richer
and a salary cap of about $30 mil-
lion set to go into effect one year
from now, the clubs' only source
of cheap labor will be draftees,
whose wages are already artifi-
cially depressed because of a sepa-
rate salary cap on rookies. Mak-
ing the right picks will become
more important than ever and the
guys hiding behind the helmets
will want more time than ever.
And everybody won't have the
chance to draft behind Phoenix or
deal with Beathard.
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.� -
Continued from page 11
t the year.
he Pat:
rtj-run
itthita blast to
ifthhome
ok the lead for
in the 11th in-
double bv Ken

ne run in the
fourth fora l-01ead,and J.J.Picollo
followed in the fifth with a two-
run homer.
The Pirates leftrunnerson first
and second in the last inning as
nk, the potential tying
J out to the second
man in foul territory.
son Hoffman (4-1 (pitched
md one-third innings for the
win and Wastey picked up his
third save tor the Patriots while
Johnny Beck (7-4) took the loss for
the Pirates.
On Sunday, Munoz hit a two-
run homer with one out in the
ninth inning to lead George Ma-
son to a 6-4 win over the Pirates at
Harrington Field.
Although ECU scored first
with a run in each of the first two
innings, the Patriots battled back
to take a 4-2 lead in the seventh
inning when Frulioledoff with a
triple and scored on a sacrifice fly
by Goldberg. Frulio also had two
doubles on the day for GMU.
The Pirates did come back to
tie the score 4-4 in the eighth in-
ning when Pitt hit a one-out home
run into right field, but Munoz,
who finished with two hits and
three RBIs, followed in the ninth
with his game-winning homer.
GMU starter Jamie Campbell
(5-2) went the distance for the Pa-
triots while Howard Whitfield (4-
2) pitched one-third of an inning
in relief of Mike Sanbum and took
the loss.
The Pirates will play again
against the Tarheels on Wednes-
day, April 28, at 3 p.m. in Chapel
Hill.
We would like to thank
all the sports writers
who turned in their
stories on time and
attended the required
meetings. Thanks for
your help, whoever
you are. The Editors
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 27, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 27, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.941
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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