The East Carolinian, April 22, 1993






em
Reuse it!
With an award winning recycling
program in Pitt County, there is
no reason why you shouldn't
recycle.
See story page 7.
Today
Sfc
f Partly cloudy
60�
Partly cloudy
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 08 No. 30
Circulation 12.000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, April 22, 1993
14 Pages
SGA debates funding of senior class project
By Jason NX
Staff Writer
In addition to the usual business of
appropriating funds and adopting con-
stitutions, the 22nd and 23rd meetings of
the S A Student Legislature were
marked bv spirited debates on a number
ot issues.
n Monday April 12, the appro-
priationscomi roughtoutabillto
fundaSenioi t, a large clock
to be built near the General Classroom
Building ,in. a covered walkway lead-
ing from Menden hail totheclocl and to
the other side of campus. The cost of the
project is over $10,000, and the appro-
priation bill requested $5,000.
S( A I reasurerBrad )sbomespoke
in favor oi the expenditure in debate. He
explained that Chancellor Eakin origi-
nally considered allowing persons who
donated over $100,000 to the school to
have the clock named tor them. . iter
talking with Senior Class President
Michael O'Hoppe, Eakin agreed to fund
all but $5,000 of the clock and allow the
senior class to raise the additional funds.
In opposition to the expenditure,
several legislatorsoutlined reasons tovote
against the bill. Mike I lad lev pointed out
that the National Panhellenic Council
would be unable to hold an activity if
they do not receive funding from the
S i -V Osbome countered by stating that
the Panhellenic Council was late in ask-
ing for money and said, "We need to
prioritize things
Mike Smith objected to the project
because the senior class did not raise
money for the project. Senior Class Secre-
taryTreasurer George Sartiano said he
learned oi the project only a few weeks
prior to this bill, and indicated that most
seniors would never even know about it.
After four rounds of debate, the hi II
was tabled until Monday April 19. At this
time, Osbome presented an amended
form of the hill that reduced the appro-
priation from $5,(HK) to $3,(HM). He also
said that the appropriations committee
had funded-the Panhellenic Council for
their event
By a slim margin, SGA voted to
bring the hill "off the table" and, by a
single vote, SGA refused to hear debate
on the measure. In a roll call vote, the
legislatureapproved the bill by the count
of 27 to 12 with four abstentions.
After the meeting Sartiano said, "I
know seniors who said they didn't like
the idea. There is a lack of communica-
tion between the senior class officers and
the senior class
In other action, the SGA unani-
mously approved a resolution showing
deep concern" oxer the North Carolina
General Assembly sdelay in funding the
renovationofjoyner Library, and urging
the student body, faculty and alumni to
"voice their concerns" to the General
Assembly, because ECU is in danger oi
losing its accreditation if the library isnot
improved.
Finally, the SGA approved a reso-
lution supporting the restoration of the
William B. Odum Memorial Wetland
Park.
The resolution also urged the uni-
versity to fund a feasibility stud) on the
ana and fund the restoration.
In support of the measure, sponsor
loseph 1 Imieleski said, "This will be the
first naturally restored wetland on auni
versify campus in the nation
Grad student addresses
professional geographers
i
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Melissa Tollmger. a gradu-
ate student in the i 'epartment of
Ceographv and Planning, ad-
dressed professional geographers
in Atlanta on April 8 on the pos-
sible sea level rise in North Caro-
lina.
Tollinger and several ECU
professors (
conferred
with other ge-
ographers at
the 1993 an-
nual meeting
of the Associa-
tion of Ameri-
can Geogra-
phers held at
the Marriott
Marquis.
"It was a
good opportu-
nity to make
contacts with
those in your
field and to make people a ware of
your research Tollinger said.
She told the group th.it
coastal management agencies
should consider the possibility of
a major rise in sea level and its
impact on North Carolina.
In North Carolina, accord-
ing to Tollinger, 22 coastal coun-
ties would experience at least
Melissa Tollinger
some degree oi inundation if the
sea level rises. Inundation refers
to the permanent flooding due to
the rise in sea level.
Tollinger said that if the pre-
dicrionsofthe Environmental Pro-
tection Agency are accurate, their
estimate oi a tWO to six foot rise
over the next 100 years would
submerge half of the land area in
tour counties.
"In ad-
dition to the
loss of land
and the dis-
plai i
coastal resi-
dents, rising
sea level
would result
in accelerated
coastal ero-
sion, intensi-
fied storm
damage and
the intrusion
oi salt water
intoestuarine
waters, disturbing fragile ecosys-
tems and destroying valuable
wetlands Tollinger said.
She used maps of North
Carolina's coastal counties to
show where most oi the damage
from sea level rise would be felt.
Among the counties she stressed
See GRAD page 4
Barefoot
on the
Mall
1993
Last year's
Barefoot on
the Mall
events
included
fake tattoos,
tie-dying
and
painting.
Many of the
same events
have been
planned for
this year's
celebration
to be held
today.
Photo by
Da 11 Reed
Former ECU
staffer faces
rape trial
Staff Reports
A former member of
ECU's faculty is currently fac-
ing rape charges in Pitt County
Superior Court. James Wallace
Stromer is facing several sexual
assault offenses in his trial this
week.
Stromer, a former gradu-
ate assistant at the ECU School
of Industry and Technology,
faces the charges of first de-
gree rape, kidnapping, but
glary and first-degree sexual
offense after being tin tai
of an ongoing investigation
which led to the charges
According to statements
by the Greenville police to the
Daily Reflector, a man alleg-
edly broke into the apartment
oi a 20-year -old Greenville
woman early on the morning
of Nov. 13,1989.The man then
kidnapped herand repeatedly
raped her behind her King's
Row apartment building.
Police reports sta ted that
the woman was taken to the
Riverview Trailer Park where
she was raped again. I hen she
was taken to a wooded area
whereathirdassaultoccurred.
Stromer is already serv-
ing a prison sentence on previ-
ous rape charges
Fall rush dates
announced for
sororities
By Shannon Cooper
Staff Writer
Ihe 1993 Fall Panhellenic Rush is
expected to get under way on August
15, and eight sororities will he looking
for new members.
Dorms will open for fall rushees
five day - before the semester begins
During tins time, women can become
more acquainted with the different
Panhellenic sororitiesand Greek life.
Anna Harrington, a member of
the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority and
Panhellenic President said, "Weexpect
a really big turn out for fall rush. We've
done ,i lot of rush promotion through
dormsand mailings. Its really an excit-
ing time for rushees mm sorority
women We really look forward to this
year's rush Rush begins with round
one. On the first day rushees meet dif-
ferent sorority members. Round two
(i insists of ton ring the different hi oises,
learning about the different personali
besof each sorority. Roun I three;
kn( iwri as skit day where rushees lea m
See RUSH page 4
Habitat dedicates home to Greenville family
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
If you are an ECU student, re-
gardless of the amount of time you
have held this student status, consider
Greenville your home.
Now consider the community of
Greenville. Not everyone has a roof
without leaks, a kitchen without rats
or a floor without holes. Habit.it tor
Humanity of Greenville 'Pitt County,
wants to eradicate this poverty alto-
gether, hut thev need help.
This Saturday, April 24, from 10
a.m. until 2 p.m a house dedication
i eremony will take place for the third
Habitat home built in Greenville, at
the corner of 12th and Pitt Streets.
"This isan opportunity for people
to come out and meet the Parsons fam-
ily, who will be moving into the home
thai Habitat has helped them build
said Sylvia McCreary, chairperson oi
Habitat's Tamil SeIection( ommittee.
"And this js,i (ham e for people to find
out about our organization
I he new house w ill be held open
tnr tours from 10 a m. until 2 p m ! he
dedii ation cen mony w ill take plai i al
11 .i m , and the Par; ons w ill be pre
sented w itha Bible from I labit.it mem
! theii ministei . ill ondui t a
scripture reading.
The public is invited and encour-
aged to attend. Refreshments will be
available, as well as information about
Habitat for Humanity.
Habitat for Humanity is an ecu-
menical Christian
housing organization.
It is non-profit and
does not accept gov-
ernment funding.
Ha hi tat operates
through private dona-
tions, fund raisers and
interest-tree mortgage
payments from those
houses that are built
through the organiza-
tion. I hose housesare
built on land donated
by the i ity, and built
by community volun-
teers no" members of
the family who will
live in the house
"Habitat's
purpose is to
give people a
hand-up,
and not a
hand-out,99
David Snead,
president ot Habitat's
Hoard ot Directors.
a b l ta I s pun
to give
peopleahand up, and not a hand out
said David Sue.id, president oi
I labitat's hoard of I Jirei tots
"V e're no! pr n iding families
with just a housi A'e'n
pn n iding them with a hi ime an
portunity to brine then ei ononiii ta
tus up, and an opportunity to live in a
better neighborhood
Snead said Habitat's goal is more
than a housing issue, it is a community
issue.
"There is a great need for this type
of sen ice in (Ireenville
said Debra Shoenherg.
an ECU student and
Habitat volunteer.
families who are inter-
ested must till out an
initial application. "I
mail out at least five ap-
plications each dav to
people who have
called Shoenbergsaid.
Habitat for
Humanity's family Se-
lection Committee
s reens these applicants
very carefully
Mireary said. Within
two weeks atter tiling
�"��" then application, the
family will receive either a lettei ol
denial, oi a letter informing them that
Habitat is interested in learning more
about the family.
' ui mam ntei i.i is ,e lamiK
reary said, "II theii present
situation is inadequati
Mc rear) cited electrical problems, lack
ot central heat, leaking roots and tire
hazards as some of the main faults
commonly reported by appli ants.
"Our second consideration is
whether the family has sufficient in-
come to repay the interest free loans
UC reary said "Depending upon the
size of the family, an income as low as
$9,000 to $10,000 is able to meet these
requirements
If these priorities are met, the fam-
ily selection committee will choose to
meet with the family to consider othei
factors. McCreary said the committee
looks at debt obligations, employ men!
stability, and basic charactei referem es.
" I he greatest frustration is meet-
ing people with real ni. bul pooi
credit because their poverty le el makes
them unable to establish c � . credit
M reaps- said "We try not to I
someone without giving them some
kind ofdira tion weoften refer them
to counseling
Mi reary said it will usually take
at least 4-6 months p, fore the family
know s it they ha e be ai i e ti d "Bv
tin tune v, e gel ready to make
mendatii in we're ven confident a Knit
imii de ision M n u
Once a famih is i
eHABITAl paa (






�-�
APRIL 22, 1993
Study discovers what makes a voice sexy
Ipril 13
9: 10 a.m
valued .ii $250 fi om ih
11:15 a.Ill
�ne stole � hand-held walkie-talkie from an unlocked
vehicle that wa I near die ��asi side t' the Fletcher Music
Center,
2 p.m.
� guitai valued .u $600 �n stolen from an unlocked room on
ihe fourth Door ol Aycock Residence Hall.
April 11
8:34 a.m.
An unidentified person broke into two coin-operated machines
on the second Boor of Jones Hall.
12:20 a.m.
ALout $60 worth of clothing wm stolen from a dorm room on
the third floor of BeJk Hall.
5:30 p.m.
Two 19-year-old men and an 18-year-old man were found in
possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia in a room on the
founh floor of Scott Hall.
April 15
3:25 p.m.
A j70-parking decal was removed from a vehicle north of Scott
Hall.
April 16
12:48 a.m.
A 19-year-old male was cited for violence and domestic
disturbance, on the third floor of Belk Hall, after ingesting a
combination of non-prescnption strength sleeping pills and an
alcoholic beverage.
10:49 p.m.
A SSO-shin was stolen from a vehicle located on the comer of
9th and Cotanche Street.
April 18
9:14 p.m.
Two youths, aged 15 and 17, were banned from the ECU
campus after being cited for disorderly conduct. As the boys ran out
the lobby door of Fletcher Hall, one of the boys pulled a toy handgun
and aimed it toward the second boy's head.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taker from ECU
Public Safety records.
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
Do you have a sexy voice?
Two ECU scientists havebeen
studying voice patterns to deter-
mine what constirutesa sexy voice.
Hal J. Daniel III and Robert B.
McCabeof the speech-languageand
auditory pathology, ECU School of
Allied Health Sciences, observed
the perception of "vocal sexiness"
in regards todefinitegenderdiffer-
ences.
The two scienri sts compiled a
research group of ECU students,
and their findings are reported in
The Nature of the Sexes: The Sociobiol-
ogy of Sex Differences, a book edited
byJohan van der Dennen and pub-
lished in the Netherlands.
"Even though there were sig-
nificant differences between the
male and female respondents in
their ratings of mid-pitch voices,
both rated mid-pitch voices as'most
sexy the Daniel-McCabe report
said. "These ratings probably re-
flecta preferencefor normality over
pathology as the low-or high-pitch
voices in both sexes cou Id be si mila r
to that ofa voice witha pitchdisor-
der
Theresultsconfirm whatother
scientistshavereported,and that is
mat human gender differences ex-
ist in the perception of auditory
stimuli, for both sound intensity
and frequency.
Daniel said that males and
females respond to vocal pitch dif-
ferently and that "certain aspectsof
humanspeech production and per-
ception have evolved for different
reasons as a function of gender
This distinctiveness in hu-
mans seems to be that humans as-
sociate voice quality with sexual
attractiveness. Researchers suggest
that the highness of lowness of a
speaker's voice has a significant
bearing on how high or low the
speaker scores on a scale of "sexi-
ness
Daniel and McCabe's research
methodology included asking 244
student volunteers to listen to 18
tape-recorded samplesofhigh, mid-
range and low-pitch voices, then
rate each according to degree of
"sexiness
All vocal samples were fur-
nished by native speakers of En-
glish, aged 20-25, who recited num-
bers into a microphone held six
inches from the speaker's mouth.
Males' vocal frequencies ranged
from a low of 101.9 Hz to highs in
the 140s, and females, from 175.2
Hz up to 229.2 Hz.
Surprisingly, the legendary
sex appeal of the husky-voiced was
rated as "least sexy" by males.
"The stereotype of the 'sexy'
female having a low-pitched voice
appears tobea myth McCabe said.
Conversely, females rated thehigh-
pitched male voice as least sexy.
The scientists believe that ex-
tremely high vocal pitch in adult
males is probably associated with
pre-pubescence and that extremely
low pitch in females suggests hor-
monal imbalance � both condi-
tions likely to be unsuitable for suc-
cessful mating and reproduction.
"Certain qualities of speech
and language perception may have
evolved tofulfilldifferingfunctions
in human males and females
Daniel said.
Since the publication of their
research, the two scientists have
been approached by telephone
marketing firms who want them to
apply their studies to a vocal "blue-
print" for selection of the most ef-
fective (i.e. sexy) phone sales staff.
However, these proposals were re-
fused.
MASCOT TRYOUTS
WHEN: APRIL 23-25, 1993
WHERE: MINGES COLISEUM LOBBY
TIME: 7:00 PM

FROG LEVEL MINI STORAGE
"Share Storage Space
With A Friend
10 STUDENT DISCOUNT
vVw.
Out Dickinson Ave. to
Hwy 264 West Alt.
HOURS:
9 AM - 6 PM
Monday - Saturday
756-8256
ATTIC
758-7303 I 209 E. 5th St
Every
Wednesday
The
CoMedY
2PNE
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
Live Music"
1987 1988 1989 1990-1991 �1992
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
Thursday, April 22
COLLEGE NIGHT�COLLEGE NIGHT-COLLEGE NIGHT
PURPLE SCHOOLBUS
990 Highballs � 990 32 oz. Draft � 990 Memberships
Friday, April 23
BLUE
OYSTE
CULT
$ 10 Advance Tickets Available A
MUSIC G'ftIshop
$2.(X)032oz DRAFT
Saturday. April 24
(gQi)03
Video
�(30? lb�� Ik
is here!
?� ��(p5�sof the
Tr ea sure
Chest
SpringZingWingDingFlingThing
ifiraision
$2.00 32oz DRAFT
w3
Tuesday, April 27
READING DAY EVE CONCERT
DILLON
FENCE
be �jQ7�m away
UtOQODf'sd, April to
sOoocsteiafta with wall8(3 ECU
0.�. cards a ft Barefoot � ra
the fiteM). First (2@gm) �-first
8�i?Wift Look tfoop your
3�(py at (h�WZMB DaDO1.
Of
$2.00 32oz DRAFT
5jDsao8s(?�s lb ft foes 33Q0 &fl�cc8a EBocaardl
a tract! ��(pot?(rrao�rrafl' �? 3�airaiJii)ao8scatflJc2tra
4
�� � � � �"� �





APRIL 22, 1993
'
ih,it
1 lelped
n � i i feel
11 VOU I in
tyou
� mid
lid olunteers
me t� � v. .H k an Satur-
Habitat day.BuildinghoursareHa.m to
12 p.m and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. No
hewould one has to stay the entire time,
students i lenn said,
become involved in the pro- "Ifwehave the volunteers,
gram. "My main push is to get the houses .ire built faster'
the students more aware of their Mc reary said,
communit) Habitat is really Anyone interested in vol-
a wonderful organization unteering or receh ing nmre in-
It's ,i re.il interesting formation is encouraged to call
project Snead said, 'Our vol- the Habitat for Humanity office
unteers cm actually work at 758-2947. ECL students may
hands-on, and stand back and alsocallKelleHenryat931-9681.
so m
Henr) is �
becamt in
thrs
like '
COLLEGE CRADMF
IT'S TIME TO RETIRE
YOUR COLEGE LOAN.
M W I ired oi copingwith
ttfcfc ivnicnts? HioArnn can
"� put your college loan toresl
ft W in just
fyou have a loan Dial's
not in default, well payoff 1 3of it up to
a $55,000 limit for each year you serve
asasoldier. And well not onlyretire
your loan, well give you other benefits
to last a lifetime. Ask your Army Recruiter.
Call: 9197569695
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
GET A JOB Check out the April 29
Career Issue of TJw East Carolinian.
3R00KQREEN
LflTORTMENTS
H08E. I Oth St reel
PRE-LEASINC; FOR
JUNE, JULY & AUGUST 1993
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 lull bath units
with all major appliances.
Located within walking distance to campus.
The East Carolinian 3
THE EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
HONORS PROGRAxM
takes pleasure in congratulating the fhilomnjj
graduating seniors of spring 1993 for completing
tin- requirements to become
GRADUATES OF THE HONORS PROGRAM
fill Marie Adams
Gillian Kim Ashley
Melissa I )avn Daniel
fames Quinn Lanier
1'crry Ann I ight
fennifer I ,ynn Wish
Andrew Barl Daniels s.tiuira Rupcsh Kaur Singl
Susan Shumei ilu Elisa Ann Thigpen
eresa Lynn Freeman Kevin Kugcne Varncr
Jennifer Anne Wardrep
ennis John W'ilhclm
CALL 752-8900 or stop by the office
Apartment 1-H Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:30
Headed
home
for the
summer?
Store your "stuff" with us!
U N I I N F N I A L CUISINE
Greenville's Finest
Congratulates ECU's Finest!
TREAT YOURSELF & YOUR FAMILY
TO A SPECIAL EVENING! MAKE
RESERVATIONS AT CHRISTINNE'S!
Free campus pick-up and delivery We Will Be Opening At 3:00 pm
? Individual storage containers
Six 40" x 48x 60"
? You pack it, iou lock it. you keep the key
? IjkuI, climate controlled warelwuse
? Secure, licensed and insured
tudent tofoge Call Now.
nCtlUOfk Container quantities are limited!
800-4U2-LOCK
800-482-5625
Open Monday through Friday
9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. EOT
Checks and major credit cards accepted
When the dorms lock you out,
WC lm k xoit in!
on Saturday, May 8th. So Don't Delay,
Make Your Reservations Now'
CALL 355-9500
Over 51 Entrees to Choose From!
Now Serving Lunch!
Tues-Fri XlL Casm but nice attire
11:30-2:00 SolSR MasterCard
$3.95 - $6.95 ((Jylfyk VISA
Dinner tV&�' American Express
5:00-until
115 Red Banks Rd.
Accepted
Next to Overton 's behind
Blockbuster Video
would you
drink Buffalo wing sauce, shop in the nude
or snap mouse traps to parts of your body?
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEO
invites you to stop by and intrigue them with your
most outrageous act and
GET A FREE CD!
judging is up to the East Coast family of employees
sday, April 27, 1993
from 10:00 - 11 pm
lot any �uest,ons? ca"
Liuuiuuiiill 758-4251
shop East Coast for all your
audio & video needs
1109 Charles Blvd.
OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT ALL WEEK
(Sw
Ja6
RA
. RIDflV. APRIL 23 8:00pm - 2:00am
MUG SHOTS. Downtown Greenville
SPONSORED BY THE VISUAL RR1S
FORUM. ECU. SCHOOL OFRflT
TICHETS: S5.00 STUDENTS
I S8.00 NON-STUDENTS
3 CALL 7S7-0SSB FOR INFO.
IfilE BflLLM
BENEFITING THE BEflUX ARTS SCHOLARSHIP FUND.





.���� .
APRIL 22, 1993
Continued from page 1
to expand.
ma
icientists that global warm-
ing is occurring, Follinger said.
This vs arming is due to an inten-
i�up hergradu-
I in May,
hut w � r n 'u'r "
i n eption and Choice: Sea
Level Rise in North Carolina's
Future
"Due to the uncertainty sur-
RUSH
rounding the prediction of sea
U el rise, the actual estimates may
change' Tollinger said.
"Decision making processes
should include the participation
of coastal residents, and an at-
tempt should be made to increase
public awareness of sea level rise
by offering information concern-
ing the causes and effects of this
potentially hazardous event
Tollinger said.
Continued from page 1
even more about the sororities as the
members entertain them.
On the last night or preference
night, rushees give the Panhellenic
advisor a preference card listing the
sororities the rushee is interested in.
"It'snotnecessarilyuschoosingthem,
but them choosing us Anna
Harrington said.
On bid day, mshees receive
their bid and join their new sorority
sisters. That night is filled with all
sorts of activities and celebrations.
Anyone interested in joining a
Panhellenic sorority should get in
contact with Laura Sweet,
Panhellenic advisor, in VVhichard
204. The deadline for registration
forms is August 9,1993.
Lisa Berting, a member of the
Alpha Omicron Fi sorority and
Panhellenic Chair said, "Sorority
rush is the first step in Greek life. It's
a weekof fun touringhouses, watch-
ing skits, meeting sisters and seeing
what the eight sororities are all
about
I
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
1
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
$200-$500 WEEKLY
Assemble products at
home. Easy! No Selling.
You're paid direct. Fully
Guaranteed. FREE
Inform ation-24 Hour
Hotline 801-379-2900
The '93 Spring Sandals by
GURKEES
Don't be caught in imitations
GURKEES
10 OFF
With this ad
L
BLUE REGION SCOTA
26 Carolina East Centre
Greenville 321-2670
ee
�?ty
FAMOUS FROZEN YOGURT!
SPRING SPECIALS
OF THE WEEK
May l-May 9
� �.
v
99C ZINGER SUNDAE
Show ECU ID for 10 discbunt
1898 Greenville Blvd. M-Sat 11:30-10:30
75Z-9440 Sun 110:3�
WE CAN HELP YOU WITH
EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO
00 ABROAD�from- the
lowest student airfares, your
International Student ID & your Eurail
pass totravel guides, backpacks &
info on work abroadCome by and
talk to us sometime, we'll give you
our FREE "Student Travels" Magazine
& answer any travel questions you
may haveWe've been there!
137 E. Franklin Street, Suite 106
Chapel Hill, NC 27514
919-942-2334
Call NOW
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1-AUG 31
3C0 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373
am inan mm mm mm re mm
UNISEX
HAIR
STYLING
gearges
hair designers
MONDAY- FRIDAY
10 am-8pm
SATURDAY
9am - 6pm
CHARLES BOULEVARD SHOPPES830-5537
5 NEW TANNING BEDS
��
r
JWfl
r
( �
L
George's Hair Designers
$5.00 OFF
10 Visit Tanning Package
t-xpires April 27, 1993
coupon good at Charles Blvd. Shoppes onty
George's Hair Designers
$2.00 OFF
Men'sWomen's Haircuts
expires April 27, 1993
coupon goad at Charles Blvd. Shoppes only
1
CALIFORNIA
STRAWBERRIES
PINT
PtRDUC GRADi "A"
BREAST m
QUARTERS
LIMIT 3 WITH
ADDITIONAL
PURCHASE,
PLEASE
DIET COKE OR
COCA-COLA
HARRIS TEETER LOW PRICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
WORK AT
THE BEACH!
OUR MYRTLE BEACH
AND HILTON HEAD
LOCATIONS ARE
NOW HIRING FOR
THE SUMMER.
IF INTERESTED, APPLY AT THE
MYRTLE BEACH AND HILTON
HEAD LOCATIONS OR MAIL
APPLICATION TO: Xr
WALDENSIAN QUALITY
DESSERT
CUPS
IN THE DAIRY SECTION - CAN
REDDI-WIP
TOPPING 701.
.15 OZ.
PILLSBURY
ALL READY
PIE CRUSTS
HOMESTYLE
BREAD24 OZ. LOAF
.99
I
21
AF �
49
69
49
JERRY ALLEN
HARRIS TEETER, INC.
UTCHFIELD LANDING
SHOPPING CENTER
ROUTE 2, BOX 288
UTCHFIELD, S.C. 29585
Harrisfeeter
A GREAT PLACE TO WORK!
IN THE DELI-BAKERY
LOW SALT
BOILED HAM
LB.
FRESHLY SLICED
TO ORDER
ALL FLAVORS
HIGHLAND CREST
ICE MILK
REGULAR OR SALSA FLAVORED
DORITOS
THINS
HALF
GAL.
J
Prices Effective Through April 27, 1993
��'���� pan






TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
FO ffgf
(1 M PA RIMINI 1
ormid-Mai
SlNGLEROOMSFORRENTrorsum-
mersessionh S250pers.s. includes rent,
uhhties.and phone More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
KINGSTON PLACE 2 bedroom, 2 1
2 bath, furnished units, available May
15 and August 1 $140 00 per month
with 4 people. Call Pro Management
756-1234.
CHARLES STREETTOWNHOUSES
available in May. Located behind the
Pantry on 10th street. 2 bedroom, 11
2 bath units with all appliances. 450.00
per month Call Pro Management of
Greenville 756-1234.
EFFICIENCY APT.FIFTH AND ELM;
IMvateentranceff street parking, S200
plus utilities, 752-5296.
TWO BEDROOM, RINGGOLD
TOWERS SUBLEASE Available in
May. Fully furnished, kitchen appli-
ances, water included, laundry, AC,
great location. No deposit required.
Rent negotiable Call 752-3598.
2 BEDROOM APT. HeatAC, water,
sewer, cable included. 2 blocks from
campus. For rent now. Call 746-4169
SUBLEASE1STSUMMERSESSION.
Fully furnished 1 Bdrm Apt. Kitchen,
bath. Convenient walk to campus
downtown. S360 for entire 1st session
at Ringgold Towers. Call 758-4542.
APARTMENT FOR RENT, available
after exams, 2 BR, 1 bath, Regency
House, spacious, furnished, S400 per
month, call 758-7422 for info.
SUBLEASE: Room for rent. Fully fur-
nished house. Pay 5200 a month plus
13 utilities. Available for summer.
Please contact 7561735.
SUMMER ON LIT - Mid-May - Au-
gust. 3 bedroom 1 bathroom. Front
porchswing. 1102 Cotanche (across
from Travel Express and East Coast
Music) S450 per month. Call Charlie at
830-5582 leave message.
1 BEDROOM, FULLY FURNISHED,
May-July. Ringgold Towers-1st floor
Parking included in 5375month and
utilities (cheap). CaU ASAP 830-6278.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
2 PEOPLE NEEDED to sublet 2 bed-
room apt. over summer. 144 utilities.
Call 355-5986 anytime.
FEMALE NEEDED to share 3 bed-
roomapt �Stratford Arms. 145 utili-
ties Call 355-5986 anytime.
ROOMMATES needed for summer
fall; 3 bdrm. house, 1 block from cam-
pus; low utilities, ac, washerdryer
Ca Stephanie at 752-2560.
BEST PLACE IN GREENVILLE TO
LIVE. Needed: ONE GOOD
ROOM ATE. 3 bedroom house, cathe-
dra) ceiling, fireplace, loft, outdoor pa-
tio, AC, wooded lot, close to campus
ARTIST or MUSICIAN preferred. No
pets (we have the world's smartest cat
already) should be laid back, respon-
sible and courteous. 5200 13 util.
THISISTHELJVINGSPACEYOU'VE
BEEN DREAMING ABOUT Call us
758-7993.
MALE GRADUATE STUDENT
LOOKNG FOR RESPONSIBLE
ROOMMATE toshare2bedroom 11
2 bath Townhouse. One half rent plus
12 utilities. CaU 830-3961 after 6.00
pm.
ROOMM VI h NEEDEDbothsummer
' n room Fullv
Sharon 830-6844
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for apartment 1 2blockfrom ArtBldg,
3 blocks from downtown, and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great for art stu-
dents Call 757-1947.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for Wildvvood Villa Apartment start-
ing Mav 15 (S150 per month plus utili-
ties) please call 757-0321.
URGENT! FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share 2 bedroom apart-
ment in Tar River. 5155a month plus 1
3 utilities. Call Kelly or Linda 931 -7821
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
starring May 10th to share 1 3 of rent
and utilitiesover summer and 1 4dur-
ing fall and spring at Wildwood Villas
call 931-781 lor 931-7786.
2ROOMMATES NEEDED to share4
bedroom house very near campus.
Please caU Brittany 931-8628 or Cathy
931-8637. (For summer only!)
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
both summer sessions S170.00mth
half utilities. Own room. Fully fur-
nished. Call Leigh or Allyson 758-5661
anytime!
FEMALE non-smoker, responsible,
socialdrinker.Toshare3bedroom brick
house 3 miles from campus. S147.00
per month plus 1 3 utilities. Available
fall semester. Call 756-0899 after 5pm.
HOUSEMATEWANTEDQuiet loca-
tion near ECU. 5162.50 per month plus
12 utilities. Available May 1 call 758-
3311.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDEDfor
1st summer session only. Kings Row
Apts. SI 80 plus utilities. Call757-0779.
CHEAP! FBI US SEIZED: 89 Mer-
cedes - 5 200,86 VW - S50,87 Mercedes
- 5100,65 Mustang - S5. Choose form
thousandsstartingS50. FREE Informa-
tion 24 hour hotline 801 -379-2929 copy-
nghtNC 030610.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats,4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DEA. Available your area
now. Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
IBMPC XT - 640K Includes keyboard
nnd RGB monitor. 5350 - Call Rod at
321-1032.
1984 KA WAS AKIGPZ 750: Red, stage
3 carburetor kit, Kerker pipe, one hel-
met. 51000. Negotiable. 754920.
50 GALLON Specially designed tank
with stand. Many accessories. Ask for
Rob 830-5423.
MUST SELL - nice white desk for
studying. Almost brand new. BEST
OFFER. CALL 931-8455.
CLUB FOR WOMEN ONLY MEM-
BERSHIP. Save 559 initiation fee
ONLY 529 per month. UNLIMITED
TAN 510additional. FULL FACILITY
GYM! 321-6831.
SOFA BED AND 2 CHAIRS - S100
Ent.Ctr.S25. Computer desk whutch
-550. Dining tablew4chairs-S50. Call
752-9347andlv.msg.
CRUISER BIKE - S50. Stealth radar
detector - S50. Solcflex wleg ext and
butterfly att. - S500. Tandy PC wcolor
monitor and DWP-S300. Call 752-9347
and lv. msg.
1979 BMW 320i, runs good, only 88,500
miles, AMFM cassette, 4 Pioneer
speakers, rieeds some work, only
51500.00. Call 355-7412
FOR SALE: A nice sofa and armchair
that are in very good condition Ask-
ing S300 � Call 321-3440 and leave a
message.
S10 - 5360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures' Spa re full time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(Cl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
200 - 5500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information-24 hour hotline. 801 -379
- 2900. Copyright NC 030650.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church, 510 South Washington St on
Sunday mornings from 9am until
12:30pm. To work with toddlers
through 3 year olds. Applicants must
be punctual and dependable. Appli-
cants also should have cheerful, friendly
andcaringattitudesintheirinteraction
with children and their parents. For
application information contact the
Church office 752-3101.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED
Great money, great club. Easy hrs
Thurs Fri Sat. 9pm - 2am. Cash SSS
Cash SSS Cash SSS Call Paul (919) 736-
0716 Mothers Playhouse.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tracashstuffingenvelopesat home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Na-
tional Distributors, PO Box 9643,
Springfield, MO 65801. Immediate re-
sponse.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext. P-3712.
ALASKASUMMEREMPLOYMENT
- fisheries Earn S600week in canner-
iesor 54,000 month on fishing boats.
Free Transportation! Room and Board!
Over 8,000 openings. No experience
necessary Male or Female. For em-
ployment program call 1 -206-545-4155
ext A5362.
PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT
NEEDED: beginning end of Spring
semester. Mornings and some week-
ends, transportation required $5.00 per
hour. Call 758-9098.
NEEDED 100 people to lose weight
now. New product recommended by
doctors. 100 natural, 100 guaran-
teed. Call 321-1046.
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT
- Make money teaching basic conver-
sational English abroad. Japan and
Taiwan. Make 52,000 - S4,000 per
month. Many provide room and board
other benefits! No previous training
or teaching certificate required. For In-
temationalEmploymentprogram,call
the International EmplovmentGroup:
(206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
BANQUETWAIT HELP FOR SUM-
MER JOBS Apply Ramada Inn, 203
W. Greenville Blvd Greenville, N.C.
FULL-TIME
POSITION
Applicant must
be able to work
flexible hours.
50 hours per week-$275
weekly. After 90 days-$400
weekly with half paid medical
expenses. Apply in person
between 2-4PM M-F
1534 E. 14th St.
Summer Positions
Vector Marketing has openings for its
summer work program. $9.25 starting
rate No door to door or telemarketing
involved. Build resume and communica
tions skill. All majors may apply
Scholarships awarded to top students.
Raleigh 248-9630
Durham: 549-6934
Greensboro: 333-1519
Charlotte: (704) 527-0073
Hickory: (704) 323-4665
Fayetteville: 630-4000
Knoxville: (615) 691-3214
Greenville, SC: (803) 235-0009
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES We offer
typingandphotocopvingservices. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pages. SDF Professional Computer Ser-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer7 Only S169H Jet there anytime for
only S169with AIRH1TCH! (Reported
in Let's Co! & NY Times.) AIRH1TCH
6212-864-2000.
MINISTORAGE-148Brandnewstor-
ageunits, vervclose to university, cheap
rates, EVANS STREET CENTRE
MINI STORAGE 355-7443.
HANG GLIDE AT NAGS HEAD,
NORTH CAROLINA! Fora weekend
or a week of adventure and fun! Kitty
Ha wkKites'beginner hanggliding les-
son S49 per person (show college ID).
1-800-334-4777. Sun Realty's modern
beach cottages 5250 per weekend or
S350 per week (plus applicable taxes,
fees and security deposit) 1-800-334-
4745. Offer good through early May
1993.CaU today for availabilities. (Some
restrictions apply).
NAILS! NAILS! NAILS! Acrylic tips
S20. Fill-ins S15. Manicures S5. PLUS -
EARRINGS! EARRINGS! EARRINGS!
OverlOO pairs- NothingoverS5 CALL
NOW 931-9939.
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
'Editing Ji Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resumes
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today wilh VisaMC or COD
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
800-351-0222
in C�IH. (213)477-8226
Or, rust) S2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. �06-A Los Angles. CA 90025
OUTTA HERE?
DON'T PAY TO
MOVE IT
SELL IT!
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
IS PAYING
CASH!
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Stereo Equipment
II you .� sHIini) yr.u must be 18
wrth a pcture ID CNCDL. ECU)
EVANS STREET MALL
7523866
Mon 10-12 1-5
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3 Sat 10-12
KEYS LOST! If you found a setof keys
(5-7keyson a plain key ring) in Biology
Dept. of Howell Complex, or possibly
in the large commuter parking lot on
april 19,1993, please call 752-9939.
LA TOY A: Good luck with your step
shows this weekend! Have fun! Your
roomie, Lisa Marie.
HEY, KEITH! The photo shoots were
fun and I'm glad we became better
friends So when are we going to the
Waffle Houseagain?!YourBuddy, Lisa
Marie
EVERYONE Stopby theREA1 Crisis
Center's stand for food and drinks! We
hope to see you a t Barefoot on the MaII
on Thursday.
Page 5
IQP
mm
HAPPY LATE 23RD BIRTHDAY
ROBIN -NO MIDDLE NAME-GRIF-
FIN! We hope it was wonderful! This is
your final present, so enjoy it! - Your
roommates.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Thanks for all the
support at the 1 st Annual Pikefest last
Saturday.PIKES
PIKES: Let's get fired up for Spring
Formal 1993 in Charleston, South Caro-
lina PIKES
CONGRATULATIONSTO ALLTHE
NEW INITIATES OF ZETA TAU
ALPHA: Ashley Good, Amanda Inscoe,
Kimberlee Edgerton, Leslie Chandler,
Jennifer Reed, Amy Hargraves, Suzi
Nesbitt, Amv Willoughby, Jennifer
Coxe, Christi Athas, Shana Rishel, Amy
Barber,CourtneyHinson,SusanStroup
- We love you all! The Sisters.
ALL CAMPUS: Everyone come out
and get a pie from an Alpha Phi, no lie.
Get psyched to throw it at a cop, cause
you m ight not stop! See you at Barefoot
on the Mall - Pie Throwing Contest.
TO THE BETA SIGMAS OF ALPHA
OMICRON PI - Get ready for Satur-
day. It will be a day you will never
forget
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like to
rongratulate �he Softball team ona great
season. We'll get 'em next year
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like to
congratulate Bonnie Hiser on her ac-
ceptance into the Physical Therapy Pro-
gram
ALPHA OMICRON PI congratulates
TamiJohnsononherSAMaward! Great
jobTami.
GREEKS - hope to see you all Saturday
- April 24th at 9:00am for the "Ronald
Run" for the Ronald McDonald House!
It starts at Town Commons Park. For
info and applications call 830-6849! -
Sponsored by Pi Delta.
PI DELTA -Get psyched girls! Satur-
day will be a long day - but guess
what! Semi is on its way! You can get
your dates ready at last - For once
again we'll have a BLAST!
THE COCKTAIL WAS GREAT
Thanks to all of our dates for an awe-
some evening! Love, The sisters of
ALPHA DELTA PI!
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
officers of Sigma Nu for the '9394
academic year. Co-Rush Chairmen -
Jeremy Bolich and Cory Estes; Pledge
Marshall - Mike Collini; Chaplain -
Mac McDowell; Social Chairman -
Brian Murphy; Assistant Social Chair-
man - Steve Mann; Co-Athletic Direc-
tors -Jason Linder and Mike Murphy;
Assistant Treasurer-Jon Tart; Histo-
rian - Bryan Thomas; Scholarship
Chairman - Chris Paith; Reporter -
Jeremy Shirtz; Sentinel - Read
Williamson; Philanthropy - Doni
Peterson.
HEY DZ'S AND THEIR DATES -
Saturday night in Kinston was quitea
bash. Candeeand that palm tree made
quite a crash. Cassie showed up a few
hours late and hey Denise, who was
your date? All the a wards were taken
in fun as N iki go t that lava Her she had
worked so hard to earn. Noland and
Encka were quite the pair, the way
they were dancing made EVERYONE
stare! Becca winning Dream Girl was
a wonderful surprise and Nancy who
was that guy beside you when you
opened your eyes? Douglas and
Christi went for a Midnight Snack
and had one hell of an elevator ride
back! Thanks to the Kinston Police
for letting Shane and Jen off with a
"little" fine so they could return and
have a good time. For those of you
who don't believe, Shannon got it all
on videotape for everyone to see!
BUY IT, SELL IT, OR SAY IT
in The East Carolinian Classifieds
CALL 757-6366
SUMMER CAMPSTAFF: Counselors, Instructors,
Kitchen. Office. Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
Ml l�Y v rwAftti ed youth SUITUner sP�rts camP-Wil1 train- �ver 25
1-AM1 1 liiliWUlfll activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Henderson ville, NC 28792.
Atlantic Beach's No. 1 nightclub for fun, excitement and
great working conditions, is looking for highly motivated,
outgoing, talented, energetic, smiling persons for:
Bartenders, Hostesses, D.Js,
Waitresses and Security
Call: 726-7000
EVANS STREET CENTRE
& MINI STORAGE
� Cheap Rate
� Month-to-Month lease
� Brand New Units
� Share with Roommate
(355-7443) 1528 S. Evans St.
FIELD SCOUTS - Late to Mid-September.
Must be trustworthy, reliable, conscientious, in
good physical shape, love the outdoors and have
reliable transportation. Salary plus milage. Excel-
lent opportunity for college students and teachers
looking for summer work.
Send resume to: MCSI, PO Box 179, Grifton, NC 28530
or FAX to 919-524-3215.
Announcements
ECU PIRATE BASFBAI.I ON
worn
91.3 WZMB-FM will broad-
cast ECU Pirate Baseball on Saturday,
April 24 as the Pirates face conference
opponent George Mason in the first
game of a key three-game weekend
series. Game time is 2pm.
CARF.GIVERS
CaregiversofPittCounty,an
organization of volunteers providing
help to older adults, announces a Vol-
unteer Training session on Saturday,
April 24, 1993 from 9am to 1pm at
Hooker Memorial Christian Church
Trained volunteers are matched to an
older "carefriend" and asked to give
1-3 hours a week including compan-
ionship, transportation, shopping and
errand, or relief for family members
Makea difference in somone's life, call
752-2398 for more information
PERFORMING ARTS SFRIFS
The King's Singers .ire a six-
member internationally known vocal
group which will be performing on
Monday, April 26, 1993 at 8:00pm
They have performed everything from
Renaissance to Rock fornearly twenty-
five years.
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL
HONOR SOCIETY
Golden Key National Honor
Societv wil I meet everv 3rd Wednesda v
of each month, 3:00 pm, GC Rm 3(X)6
Meetings will continue throughout the
summer. Members - attendance and
participation will be officially recog-
nized
REGISTER YOUR
ORGANIZATION BF.FORF YOU
LEAVEFOR SUMMER!
Registration is required for
organizations touse university facilities
and to be eligible to receive funding
from Student Government A ssoriation.
rurnwre information, contact Ms hckie
Jackson or Ms Lisa Shihlev, 757-4796
ATTENTION PHYSICAL
EDUCATION MAIORS
The Physical Education Mo-
tor and Physical Fitness Competency
Test is scheduled as follows: Minges
Coliseum, 10:00am, Wednesday, April
28,1993. A passing score on this test is
required of all students pnor to declar-
ing physical education as a major. 1)
Mi inta in an a verage T-score of 45 on the
six-item test batterv. 2) Having a T-score
of 45 on the aerobics run Any student
with a medical condition that would
contraindicate participation in the test-
ingshouldcontactMikeMcCammonor
Dr. Gay Israel at 757-4688. To be ex-
empted from any portionof the test, you
must have a physician's excuse. A de-
tailed summary of the test components
is available inRoom 371, Sports Medi-
cine Building. Your physician's excuse
mustspecificallvstatefromwhichitems
vou are exempt SIGN UP FOR THE
TESTATMINGESCOLISEUM.ROOM
177, PRIOR TO At�RI L 28TH. BRING A
PICTURE ID.






ThursdayOpinion
Volunteers help community
Students assist local agencies
by giving their time and effort
for good causes
Education � it's not just for breakfast any-
more.
Education is not something that is limited to
a book or a classroom. A person receives educa-
tion his or her entire life � from friends, co-
workers, even from teachers. What is now being
discovered, and has been overlooked in the past,
is a new form of education that exposes people to
new and different perspectives � volunteering.
Volunteering can range from something as
simple as giving blood to something as involved
as working with service clinics such as P1CASO.
The one thing that stays constant, however, is the
fact that the person not only helps others but also
achieves a feeling of pride as well.
ECU currently has a volunteer program that
serves 42 separate agencies in the Pitt County
area. These volunteers are valuable to the opera-
tion of some of these agencies; the time and effort
expended sometimes ensure that the agency stays
open. This community involvement also helps to
bridge any gap between the campus and the
Greenville community.
Some have referred to past ages as the "year
of the woman" or the "me" generation. Maybe
the '90s should be called the "volunteer" decade.
By focusing on others rather than ourselves, our
society can achieve a level previously thought to
be unattainable.
Recycling saves planet
Pitt County and ECU program
pave way for students to
make ecological difference
Aluminum, paper, plastic, cardboard and
glass �just to name a few.
Ring a bell? Remind you of that last trip you
made to the dumpster? Let's hope not, since the
above items comprise the major parts of what
people should recycle.
Pitt County recently won the 1992 Outstand-
ing Recycling Program award from the North Caro-
lina Recycling Association. Based on the program's
extent and the diversity of goods the program
takes in � ranging from appliances to lead acid
batteries to shoes � the award honors Pitt County
for saving valuable landfill space, which currently
has one year left unless other options are explored.
In a smaller perspective, ECU also makes
inroads into this all-important topic in today's
society. Currently, the university has a pickup
program w hert students can bring their recyclables
and drop them off in separate bins. This program
has three different sites on campus for disposal.
The time it takes to set aside a recyclable item
is negligible when compared to the impact it makes
globally. By taking a few more moments to care
about the place you live in, a person can prolong
that life and make it just a little better.
Separate your items before you recycle. Know
what is and is not recyclable, too. Take the time to
show that you care about where you live and its
condition.
� The East Carolinian �
Opinion
Page 6
By Gregory Dickens
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Matthew A. Hege, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassel). Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John BuUard, Ass: Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Ixryout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed. Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies even Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead edilorial in pach edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinum reserves the right to edit or reject letter for
publication. Letters should bt addressed to The Editor, The Eiist Carolinion.
Publications Bldg. ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-435?. For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
w
100 recycled
paper
FBI handling of Waco situation warranted
We all can agree that the con-
clusion to the stand-off in Waco
ended in a manner no one would
hope for. Eighty-six people are pre-
sumed dead at the time of this writ-
ing, killed by oneof the most horrific
means of death: cremation. Appar-
ently several fires were set inside the
compound by David Koresh's fol-
lowers in a ceremony honoring his
threats to employ fire if the FBI at-
tacked.
Such an act, be it for faith or
desperation, puzzles those outside
the situation. There are many ques-
tions that we, the observers, wish
answers to. Why did they follow
him? Why would they restrict them-
selves to thediscipline of such a man,
someone who would sleep with the
v ives of his followers while dictat-
ing the men be celibate? Why were
they convinced the end of the world
was approaching? So many ques-
tions remain about these Branch
Davidians, who are now all gone.
Dead at their own hands.
This lack of understanding is
compounded with the doubts and
second-guessing of the FBI's deci-
sion to move in now being hurled at
Attorney General Janet Reno. Not
only are the complaints and accusa-
tions coming from the cult mem-
bers' families, but the FBI is under
fire from noted psychologists and,
amazingly, Congress as well.
Jerry Mungadze, a cult expert
whoworked with the FBI in negotia-
tions, claimed the use of intrusion
and tear gas was the worst thing
you cou Id do The med ia constantly
asked if President Clinton was more
responsible then Reno claimed or if
the outcome should have been fore-
seen . Senator Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) is
requesting a Senate Judiciary hear-
ing concerning the FBI's actions
throughout the 51-day ordeal.
This is wrong.
The Bureau of Alcohol, To-
bacco and Firearms was dispatched
to Waco, acting on charges that the
cult was modifying semi-automatic
weapons to fire automatically (not
because they had a large amount of
weapons; the NRA would've gone
ballistic) and that Koresh was abus-
ing the children in the compound.
Koresh still has outstanding war-
rants against him in California on
similar grounds. For whatever rea-
son, federal bunglingora tip-off, the
raid becamea mess with four federal
agents dead and 15 others injured.
The stand-off lasted so long
because the FBI hoped to negotiate
Koresh's surrender so as not to risk
harm to the children inside. This
lasted 51 days, longer than the Per-
sian Gulf War. The FBI finally de-
cided enough was enough, warned
Koresh they were coming in and
proceeded to do so. This is a large
complaint of those whoquestion the
FBI and ask, why then? Why not
longer?
The tone of the questions sug-
gest that Koresh was a citizen who
had every right toexpectto be treated
in a civil manner bv his accusers. He
was in fact a criminal who, had he
survived,wouldnodoubtfacemul-
tiple charges for his actions. The
FBI had no obligation to wait as
long as they did and had incentive
to be even more violent in the face
of such a heavily-armed faction.
The FBI can in no way be
held accountable for the mass sui-
cidein Waco. Facing arrest,the cult
had three options: fight, run or kill
themselves. Their choice must be
seen as theirs and theirs alone. The
tear-gasdid not fuel thefireand the
agents met with resistance from
those who could've been rescued.
The cult members acted on their
own,and in the process, killed their
own children.
Koresh, had he honestly
cared for the well-being of his fol-
lowers, should have surrendered.
Instead, he alone is to be held re-
sponsible for the deaths of his cult
members and the pangs of hurt
and doubt being directed at the
FBI.
THIS IS
� Mrbflh devefopn in BsviV
�Kt rcwtAms or c"iwrKS W�4
�be- Settrte cUlxrte
�CObrucVcY totskap v
. TW DMm HaI)
Ma yes -to ke
Kansas G-u CUicfi
�Tke T&fcidrt Show vJh
LeftarMM juts �CG5
1
d
QuoteoftheDay:
As life is action and passion, it is required of man
that he should share the passion and action of his
time, at peril of being judged not to have lived.
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
Letters to the Editor
Bible-thumping omits human need for caring
To the Editor:
I am writing in response
to Keith Webb's recent letter
which was in turn written in
response to Jim Senyszyn's let-
ter.
I've noticed there seems
to be a lot of Bible to Bible com-
bat going on lately. As far as I
know, no one has the answers
in the back of the book, so how
is everyone so exactly right? I
read Romans 1:23, and I sure
didn't get the same interpreta-
tion that Webb did and that is
exactly my point. The Bible is a
book. Albeit the word of God, it
still had to be handed down to
a man to be put on paper.
Wehaveall seen firsthand
through TheEast Carolinian just
how much of a difference a
single translation between two
men can be. Much less hun-
dreds of translations between
hundredsofmen,culturesand
languages.
Every priest, psalmist and
scribe using their favorite edi-
tion and adding their own per-
sonal twist to the scri ptures over
literally thousands of years has
had to have had more than a
little impact on God's original
intent. But I'm not here to ar-
gue individual scripture.
No matter which side of
the Bible you 're thumping (and
some of us aren't thumping
Bibles at all, but maybe Korans
or Buddhas or trees or what-
ever) we all seem to be missing
the point.
Love. Love a little more
people! Wehaveenough todeal
with in life without always be-
ing ready to serve an all-you-
can-eat buffet of it to our un-
suspecting or nghtfully suspi-
cious neighbors. Besides, no
matter what a person's gender,
race, creed, sexual orientation or
religion is, I haven't met a per-
son yet who didn't want to be
happy and loved on at least one
level. A little acceptance goes a
long way and a lot of acceptance
goes even further.
If you want to be "right
then fine, be "right but I don't
see heaven being any sweeter
because someone is roasting in
helland IknowtheBibledoesn't
say that anyone other than God
has the right to make group res-
ervations. Yes, my glasses may
be rose-tinted, but the prescrip-
tion is fine; I simply believe that
everyone has a right to be here.
Tracy Stanley
Senior
English
Issue of gays and Bible should focus on response
To the Editor:
In response to Jim
Senyszyn's claim that neither
Leviticus 18:22 nor
Deuteronomy 23.18 make ref-
erence to homosexuality,
Leviticus 18:22 does.
The verse is part of a
chapter devoted to the prohi-
bition of various sexual prac-
tices, including but not lim-
ited to incest, adultery, homo-
sexuality and bestiality.
The particular command of
verse 22 is to "not lie with a
male as one lies with a female
The word "lie"isa trans-
lation of the Hebrew word
shakab, meaning to lie down,
as upon a bed. The Old Testa-
ment uses its n ot form 52 times
to refer to the act of sexual
intercourse. Note David, who
"went in to Bathsheba and
lay with her; and shegave birth
to a son" (2 Samuel 12:24), and
the wife of Potiphar, who de-
sired Joseph and insistently
cried, "Lie with me (Gen.
39:12).
The context of Leviticus
18:22 and the Old Testament
usage of shakab in reference to
the act of intercourse make it
clear that the verse refers to
sexual intercourse or activity.
The only question remaining
is, does the verse prohibit the
male from homosexuality, or
the female from heterosexual-
ity? The second option seems
unlikely.
Deuteronomv 23:17, 18
also refer to homosexual itv, al-
beit indirectly. Senyszyn's ref-
erenced author, Dr. Ide, is cor-
rect that the context of 23:18 is
the barring of qadesh, temple
prostitutes, but he disregards
the habit of the male prostitutes:
the practice of homosexuality.
The mention of maleculticpros-
titution brings the issue of ho-
mosexuality into this passage.
I would be happy to an-
swer the rest of Senyszyn'scom-
ments in detail. Since theEible's
stance on homosexuality is
clear, the important question is
not "What does the Bible say?"
but rather, "What is my re-
sponse?" God says to straight
and gay alike, "Come, let us
reason together " (Isaiah 1:18)
Jeff Gross
Non-student
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
Book buyback
policy deemed
rape of students
If you happened to read last week's
installment of RtM, you may recall that I was
discussing the philosophical aspects of educa-
tion. Well, never one to cut a topic loose before
its time is done, I feel the need to express my
views on the monetary aspects of "higher
learning
They suck. The aspects, I mean. Perhaps
the people that cause these aspects as well,
beca use tha t's another way to make a fast buck,
although slightly less acceptable.
I'd like to share the reason why I'm
about to launch into the following tirade. Re-
cently, while thumbing through a used book I
purchased from a certain bookstore down- -
town, lea me upon theprice sticker in thefront.
Curious as to what the original price of the
book was, I peeled back a few of the "used"
pricetags underneath. I paid $2250 for this
book; being the last used one available, it was
in such poor shape that 1 will likely not be able
to sell it back. Imagine my shock seeing the
pricetagfrom several semestersagoread $1650.
Now, being an English major with little
skill in mathematics fail tooomprehend many
mathematical concepts and I accept that �
that's what accountants an? for. Still, I was
always under the impression thatasa product
falls in quality, particularly if that product fits
into the category of "used the price of that
product should fall at some comparable rate.
"Not so the bookstore seems to say.
"We can sell substandard books to ya for
jacked up prices, but you can't sell 'em back to
us. Period
They can be nasty about buying their
own wares back, too. Last semester I bought a
used textbook in poor cond ition from the pre-
viously mentioned store and took excellent
careofit,keepingitinthesameconditionfrom
when I bought it. So I wait a half-hour in line
during buyback, reach the front of the lineand
the woman behind the counter tells me that
they won't buy it back because it has a few-
pages loose. All were present, but a few were
loose. Socan you guess what I d idYup, I went
to the back of a different line, ripped out the
loose pages, wadded 'em upand sold the book
back not five feet from where I had been.
The difference between the bookstore
and me is the fact that I felt guilty about
depriving whoever bought the book after me
of those pages. The bookstore couldn't care
less about education, they just want to see
thosepresidentsstacked in their cash registers.
This, ladies and gentlemen, is a good
example of "screwing the consumer Why?
Because they can, and will continue to do so
because it's profitable.
Every time I go to resell my books, and
even when I buy my books, 1 feel monetarily
raped. Yes, raped. Doesn't it feel like we're
being taken advantage of? Doesn't this piss
anyone else off? I understand that this is some-
one else's livelihood, but it could at least be
done with some degree of fairness, no?
It could be that I'm overreacting, and
you, dear reader, may think so too, but I think
we'll both react the same way v hi "i we get15
for a book we paid $45 for, then watch help-
lessly as they turn around and sell it to some
other shmuck for $40, regardless of its condi-
tion.
What can we do? I don't think there's
any escape, lt'sgreed, and it's very frustrating.
That doesn't mean we have to like it.
Now Stop t ead ing, think about it, go get
a pizza, and watch some cartoons
�� -
BggglpBgsg � i �"
MMHMHMBHM





The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
Bard's tale to conclude theater season
St.it! Writer
Violence, passion and intrigue.
AIIof these, and more, will evpkxte m
staged mightwith EastCarolina Playhouse's
dosing mainstage of the 1992-43 season,
VVilliamShakespeareV'Romeoand Juliet
Performances begin at 8 p.m. on April
22-24 and April 2h-27. A special matinee
performance will start at 2 p.m. on the
aftermxm of April 25. Two special high
school matinees will be held at noon on
April 23 and 26.
Can Faircloth, Playhouse general
manager, said that high school matinees
have traditionally been held to give the
students an opportunity to experience the
theater. Previous performances of "Ham-
let "Our Town" and 'TheCmcible"lvve
also hosted sold-out performances to high
school students.
"We chose Romeo and Juliet' be-
cause they teach it in the school system
here Faircloth said. "We always try to
offer onematineeforhighschoolstudents
As many know, "Romeoand Juliet" is
the quintessential story of tragic romance.
Virtually synonymous with any definition
of love, "Romeo and Juliet" has survived
for its 400th anniversary (first produced in
1593) and transcends its original bound-
aries to become one of the Bard's greatest
works.
Though many have termed the story
to be one of "two star-crossed lovers
"Romeoand Juliet" goes beyond thissimple
definition and includes stories of intrigue
and passion beyond the two lead charac-
ters. Subplots unfold continuously, inun-
dating the theater-goer with action as he or
she watches the saga of the Montague and
Capuletfeud.
Though "Romeo and Juliet" focuses
on many different themes, they all revolve
around the love and romance of Romeo
and Juliet. Any person who has been told
thattheyaretooyoungtofeelwhattheyare
Alecia
Hillis and
Kirk
Wilson
rehearse
for their
leading
roles in
'Romeo
and
Juliet
7
Bike irex to
raise funds
this weekend
By Gregory Dickens
feeling will sympathize with the two char-
acters as the audience watches their love
transcend even the grave.
Ali Hillis, whoplaysJuliet,saidthather
characterismulti-dimensional, flesh ingout
whatsomemayconsidera very simple role.
"0 u liet has so many d intensions to her,
more so than most people would think
Hillis said. "She's got the youngness, she's
very spunky, she's vulnerable
Though Hillis sees her characterasvul-
nerable, she said that this feature is soon
overwhelmed by the factors that force Juliet
to grow up.
"She's vulnerable at first, and then she
has to grow up very quickly Hillis said.
"By her circumstances, she's forced to ma-
ture very quickly
Kirk Wilson, whoplays Romeo,echoes
Hillis'sen timentinthatRomeo'syouth plays
an important part of his character. He said
tha t Romeo is a person caught between two
stages of growing up.
"I see Romeo as a helpless romantic, a
very passionate young man Wilson said.
"He's at a stage between manhood and
childhood, wimallofmoseoonflictmgemo-
tions.
This leads him to be a very virile, pas-
siorwteperson.Themterestingthingis,after
he meets Juliet, that 'puppy love' he has
transcends to a love that he's willing to die
for
Ticketsfor"RomeoandJuliet"are$750
Photo by
Garrett Killian
for general public and $450 for students
with valid l.D. Individuals may purchase
tickets in person at the McGinnis Theatre
box office, Monday through Friday from 10
a.m. to 4:15 p.m. and until 8:15 p.m. on
performance nights; by Visa or MasterCard
by phoning 757-6829; or by mail addressed
to East Carolina Plavhouse, ECU, Green-
ville, N.C. 27858-4353.
Season tickets for East Carolina
Playhouse's 1993-94 season go on sale Au-
gust 23 for S40. The upcoming season will
include Broadway great "Guys and Dolls
'The Road to Mecca "The Servant of Two
Masters Tony award-winning "Dancing
at Lughnasa"and EastCarolina Dance The-
atre.
Staff Writer
The American Lung Association
Of North Carolina (ALANC) is now
taking registrations for its 10th An-
nual Coastal Carolina BikeTrek.The
Bike Trek is conducted to both raise
money for ALANC and raise con-
sciousness of lung disease, which
affects over 650,000 people in the
state and is the third-leading cause
of death in North Carolina.
Money goes to varied projects
including Camp Challenge for chil-
dren withasthma,school health edu-
cation programsand efforts to com-
bat pollution.
Two treks are scheduled this
year; Trek I is April 23-25and Trek II
is April 30-May 2. Touted as "the
finestridealongthecoast'both treks
begin and end in Kure Beach. The
route runs through New Hanover
and Brunswick Counties and passes
by such attractions as Fort Fischer,
Greenfield Lake Park and the Cape
Fear River channel over a two-day
period.
Participants must raise a mini-
mum of $250 in pledges or dona-
tions and pay a $25 registration fee.
Both fees entitle bikers to two nights
hotel lodging food and opportuni-
ties to win prizes according to how
much each biker raises.
Trekkers who raise $300 receive
biking accessories while $500 earns
a $50 gift certificate from Two
Wheeler Dealer in Wilmington. A
See TREK page 9
Fitting chemistry, vocal harmony for EJS
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
On the inside sleeve of their
second and recently-released LP,
The Survivors Parade, The Ellen
James Society writes: . .and
thanks to The Jody Grind for your
constant inspiration, although
we'll never be as nice a band as
you are
Perhaps true, but also EJS
sadly comes nowhere close to be-
ing as good a band as The Jody
Grind, who's now defunct.
To play O'Rockefellers Friday,
April 23, The Ellen James Society
� a gender-split quartet from At-
lanta � will bring their uninten-
tionally minimalist scrag rock to
Greenville to win new fans and
jam the town violet. Tribal Lulla-
bies opens the show.
With a unique sound of iden-
Photo courtesy Daemon Records
Tire Ellen James Society
tity crisis-ridden '80sovergrowns
Scandal, The Fixx, The Alarm,
Cher), EJS has persevered five
years of band personnel changes
and mega-extensive touring
throughout the US. For all that
jazz, credit is due.
Also, the band has one of the
coolest mottoes in rock: "girls,
guitars and Guiness the latter
component most crucial.
Sadly, The Survivors Parade,
EJS' follow-up to their 1990 debut
Reluctantly We (both albums are
onDecatur,GasDaemon Records,
Amy Ray's (Indigo Girls) non-
profit label which is also home to
acoustic folkrock greats Kristen
Hall and Gerard McHugh),carries
a heavy load of mediocrity among
its 10tunes,someof which, though,
are quite good.
"Squinting at the Sun "Say
Goodbye" and "Falling" are lyri-
cally rich compositions about
women's struggles as humans
snagged up in the human condi-
tion, and with men-affected rela-
See EJS page 9
Ijp Bititi
Thursday April 22
The Attic:
THUPurple Schoolbus
FRI. -Blue Oyster Cult with
Fall From Grace
SATIndecision (Final Appearance)
Corrigan's
THUBruce Frye
SAT King Bees

(Band
NIGHTCLUB
Mug-Shots
THUBus Stop with
The Mosaics
FRIBeaux Arts
Ball
SATRolly Grey
& Sunfire
Today: Moles
Answered by Jeanie
Tomkalski
Barefoot on the Mall kicks off at noon with bands, food, fun
and games. The festivites are on the center mall area of campus.
The recent need for Health Care reform will be discussed in
a the program The Insiders and Governmental Perspective on
Health Care Reform The program begins at 7 p.m. in the Brody
Building and will feature Sen. George Daniel( D-Almanance) and
Suite Rep. Karen Gottovi (D-New Hanover). Contact; Linda
Bolin, School of Nursing, 551-4303.
The fictional work by William Carios Williams and a 20th
Century physician, -Old Doc Rivers will be dramatized by die
Medical Students Readers Group. The show stains at 7:30 p.m.
and will be at the Humber House in downtown Greenville. For
more information call 551-2797
The ECU Plavhouse opens its run of "Romeo and Juliet"
at 8 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre. The play will be performed on
campus through April 27. All of die performances are in the evening
except on Sunday when the play begins at 2p.m. For ticket infor-
mation call the Playhouse Ticket Office at 757-6829.
Saturday April 24
A doubleheader between ECU and George Mason begins at
2 p.m. at Harrington Field.
Sunday April 25
ECU plays George Mason in a second day of baseball.
Game time at Harrington Field is 2 p.m.
A matinee performance of "Romeo and Juliet" begins at 2
p.m. in McGinnis Theatre. For tickets call 757-6829.
The ECU Wind Ensemble will perform at 3 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. The concert is free.
Q: 1 have a number of moles on my
body. How can I tell if they are cancer-
ous?
A: The only way to know for sure, is
toseea physician. But, there are specific
signs you can look for.
Just about everyone has a number
of small colored spots � moles, freckles
or birthmarks � on their bodies. Some
of these spots are present at birth, while
others may develop during the first few
decades of life. Once fully de-
veloped, a mole normally re-
mains the same size, shape and
color.
However, if a mole or spot
on the skin begins to change, it
may be an early sign of some
type of skin cancer.
In its earlystages skin can-
cer may appear as just a discol-
oration of theskin. Therefore, vou should
not ignore any unusual or persistant
skin condition. Pay particular attention
to any of the following changes:
� a skin growth that increases in size
and appears pearly, translucent, tan,
brown, black and multicolored;
Student Health Services
� a mole or
borthmark that changes
color, increases in size
or thickness, changes in
texture, or is irregular
in outline;
� a spot or growth
that continues to itch,
hurt, crust, scab, erode
or bleed;
� or an open sore or owund on the
skin that does not heal or persists for
mroethan four weeks, or heals and then
reopens.
Anyone can be affected by skin can-
cer, butr it is prevalent among two
groups; people with fair skin, light hair
and eye color, and people of any skin
type who allow themselves consider-
able exposure to the sun. Skin cancer
also tends to sun in families.
Exposure to the sun has cumulative
effects. Even though a suntan may dis-
appear, the signs of skin cancer can show
up years later. Repeated suntanningalso
contributes to wrinklesand blotchy dis-
coloration of the skin.
You can still have fun in the sun. Just
be especially careful to protect yourself
from its effects.
� Apply a liberal amount of high
sun protection factor (15 plus offers the
best protection)sunscreen at least 15-30
minutes before going out into the sun.
� Avoid direct exposure between 10
- 2 p.m. when the sun's rays are stron-
gest.
� Avoid using indoor sun lamps or
tanning beds.
� Perform regular skin checks for
any new growths amd for changes in old
growths.
If you notice any abnormal skin
changes, please call the Student Health
Service and schedule and appointment
with a physician.
If you haveany health-related ques-
tions, please direct them to Jennifer
Phillips, Student Health Services, ECU
campus.
Hi1, " �
!T-�-T�.�P-





�1
APRIL 22, 1993
lard Cranium's Flying Circus
. a anuntUTstandingot
itbysayingrodc,we
are not invoking "rockness No, we
are inw king a human conception of
nxkness.
So consider this. We all have
dittenjntrtTceprjoniMvunderstiixl-
ing nt 'rode" may he different from
yours, Kitweboth know whata rock
js. lor this er'reason, transplants of
the sensory organs will never be suc-
cessful. If on sawarodc through my
eyes, although we both understand
lodcness, the differences in my sen-
sory perceprionswouldcreateanalien
presence in your sensory inputs; you
. erload.
transnd all
� � � hing and
Witha
i - � lisdain, we take
one last look at our abandoned o
laundi ourselves into the
poBen-ladenair. As we flutter and flit,
.1 robin, on her maiden flight, awk-
wardly dashes down and snap you
up into her beak and gulp � you're
dead.
That's right 1 want to talk about
spnng. Spring they say, is mat season
when a young man's fancies turn to
thoughtsdflove.Wellladeda.rvegot
a love thing going on. So I definitely
don't need pollen floating in my open
windows and clogging up my stereo
vents and a bunch of bees trying to
gently place their stingers in my flesh
when I reach under a bush to retrieve
a frisbee that went soaring way over
� ad. But I love the spring.
1 he on !v tiling I don't I ike is that,
ixio1 again, mv winter indulgences
prevent me from squeezir�gmyfatass
into mv cool spnng ensembles. Oh
woe is me! So now, I'm sipping up
egg vi 'Iks and bacon grease and grits
and trench tries and hot dogs and
bacon cheeseburgers with lard
slathered on top of them and then
breaded and fried. Then,I turn the TV
ti i one of those fitness programs. I'm
stirring to feel like a new man!
But look around. All the trees are
blooming and the birds are singing
tl peoplearegoingtotanningKxiths
and galsare wearing their short shorts
and the guvs are sporting their tank
tops and oh it's a beautiful thing. I'm
gushing with spring emotion.
I'm glad I don't have allergies.
Spring reminds me of Vandora
Springs Elemen ta ry School. Iremem-
ber those pans of rolls, all brown on
top,and how they'd beall hard if they
sattcxilong.UmmmAndthatgravy
and those mashed potatoes. I had a
little girlfriend named Mandi Green.
Her whole name, I still remember,
was Amanda DorisGreen. Westayed
at the same nursery after school,
Ridoutt's. Yes I kissed her. Her and
Lisa Grossman. Mandi did my math
one afternoon while I roughhoused
wi th the fellas, and this nutty kid fell
off his chair and hit his head and it
started bleedingCool! And you know
what? Mandi did my homework all
sloppy and stuff, not neat like hers, I
loved her. Oh Mandi! Oh Spring!
Spring is here. Spring is us. We
are spring. We are nature. I love you.
The End. p.s. If you don't like it,
don't eat it, and don't run my life.
Kingston
Place
Don't pass this upBIG Savings!
SUMMER SPECIAL
May 24 - August 4, 1993
Parking, laundromats, bus service,
:lubhouse, basketballtennis courts nearby,
swimming pool & large patio
CALL 758-5393
CALIFORNIA
HAAF
AVOCADOS
2 for $1
1534 E. 14,h St.
BROCCOLLI
99bunch
M-F 10-6:30pm
SAT 8-6.30pm
757-3311
COOL DOWN & RELAX!
with an ice cold
MARGARITA
or enjoy these
Drink Specials!
Sunday Bloody Mary $2.25
Monday Draft 950
Tuesday Sangria $1.25
Wednesday Mexican Imports $1.25
Thursday Lime Margaritas $2.50
Mondays
12 Price Pitchers of Draft Beer
Sunday- Wednesday
12 Price Appetizers
after 9:00 pm
Maxlcan Bestauxaai
2?
521 Cotanche Street-757-1666
Serving Vegetarian Caryy-out Meals. Sandwiches
Salads and Assorted Goodies 11 30 � 2 00. Mon Fn
Hot and Thirsty?
Tree of Life Unfiltered East Coast
APPLE JUICE
$4.25Gallon
M
BL.UE PLANETLjfeFoods
If
Organic Groceries & Proc
Bulk Foods Herbs
3
405 EVANS STREET MALL
758-0850
Hours 10-6,M-Sat
& Beauty Aid.1-
v.
EasLCarplina
PlayhOUSe presents
19924993
oeason
April 22, 23, 24, 26 and 27 at 8:00 p.m.
April 25 at 2:00 p.m.
Tickets: $4.50
McGinnis Theatre
Call - 757-6829
Greenville 1 Athletic I Club
The Place For Heart And Soul
Steam & Sauna
Hot Tub
Gymnasium
Indoor Track
Juice Bar
Free Weights
Cardiovascular Center
Year-Round Swimming Pool
Racquetball
Pro Shop
Nautilus
Aerobic Exercise
Nursery
Call or visit us today!
We've got a membership plan
just for you!
REGULAR HOURS
Mon-Fri 6am- 10pm
Sat & Sun 8am-7pm
STUDENT HOURS
Mon-Fri 6am-4:30 pm
Sat & Sun 8am-2:30pm
140 Oakmont Drive Greenville, NC 756-9175





APRIL 22, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
for an
missi . sophomon
EJS. The band Chris McGuire
(lead vocals, guitar), Cooper Seay
(bandfounder,guitar,vocals) Scotl
Bland (drums) and Bryan Lilje
(bass) � enlist the studio assis-
tance of producer George Fappas
and guru augment musicians Bar-
bara Marino on percussion, lane
Scarpantoni (Tiny Lights, Lounge
Lizards) on cello, and Yvonne Tol I
an underde-
- r�gv � iting
� sa dispar-
ate tawdrii i
rode that's n t d a m thing,
though heartily underlined with a
capital E for effort.
The critics, on the other hand
from mine, tend to laud the band.
College Music Journal (CM) writes:
EJS successfully incorporates
abnormal, artsier arrangements
and words, and blends them with
the good parts o( sweaty rock and
Continued from page 7
roll. Lor a debut, Reluctantly We
refreshes with tight playing and
inspired lyrics'OpfioH magazine,
reviewing live EJS, notes: "(Their)
performance positively blew me
away. CooperSeay,a LeeRenaldo
(of Sonic Youth)-inspired guitar-
ist, dug deep into her instrument,
while Chris McGuire, the band's
Tatti Smith-inspired singer, lyri-
cally confronted some tough emo-
tional issues. Meanwhile, the bass-
ist and drummer provided a rock-
solid rhythm foundation for the
musical muscle of the two
fronrwomen. "That's what thecrit-
ics said. Go see for yourself at
O'RocksFridavnight,and remem-
ber, in this Society, women rule.
TREK
Continued from page 7
collected total o( $1LXX) gamers a
$100gift certificate, gloves, bikelight
(Vista or Cateye Halogen) and
VVinner'sCircle Jacket. Three thou-
sand dollars in pledges will earn a
Trek 850 SHK or 750 Hybrid Bike.
The biker with the most pledges
will be able to choose between a
Norwegian Cruise Lines trip or a
vacation for two in San Francisco.
Teams with threeor more mem-
bers may participate with each
member meeting the registration
requirements.
For more information, call
ALANC at 1 -800-849-59498:30a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. or (919) 445-5008 eve-
nings.
HAVE FUN AT BAREFOOT TODAY
VARSITY CHEERLEADING
TRYOUTS
WHEN: APRIL 23-25, 1993
WHERE: MINGES COLISEUM LOBBY
TIME: 5:00 PM
For more information contact Shannon Smith at
Gain Valuable Sales Experience
TODAY
For Your Resume
TOMORROW
The East Carolinian
is currently accepting applications in the
award-winning Advertising Department for an
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
�Work with leaders in the business
community
�Create advertising campaigns
�Unlimited income potential
�No previous sales experience necessary
Apply at The East Carolinian
r A CT 2nd floor Student Pubs building
SUB STATION J
Sand�lch Shop"
215 E. 4th Street
Greenville, NC
(919)752-2183
31 6 S.W.Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC
(919)756-7171
CAROLINIAN
757-6366
Thursday Night Is
TACO NIPHT
Two Great Tacos
for only 99
60 oz. Pitchers
$1 99
Offer godtiftom 6 pm to Close
IF YOUVE COT
A CREATIVE BONE
IN YOUR BODY,
AND IT CAN WRITE,
DROP US A NOTE.
WE WERE IN COLLEGE ONCE, TOO, AND WE
KNOW WHAT ITS LIKE TO EAT BOLOGNA SAND-
WICHES AND DREAM OF THE REAL WORLD. SO WERE
OFFERING A CERTAIN ONE OF YOU HUNGRY,
CREATIVE COLLEGE STUDENTS AN OPPORTUNITY
THAT WILL RATTLE YOUR CREATIVE BONES �
THAT IS, IF YOU WANT SOME BIG TIME EXPERIENCE
WORKING IN AN AO AGENCY.
IF YOU THINK YOU'RE CREATIVE AND YOU
POSSESS STRONG WRITING AND GRAMMAR SKILLS,
WE WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM YOU FOR A PART-
TIME POSITION THAT WILL GIVE YOU THE CHANCE
TO WORK WITH AN AWARD WINNING CREATIVE
TEAM. NOW, WE ARENT GOING TO LET YOU RUN
LOOSE, SO YOU'LL HAVE TO BE ABLE TO TAKE
DIRECTION WELL. AFTER ALL, WE DONTWANT
YOU TO FALL ON YOUR FACE AND POSSIBLY BREAK
ONE OF THOSE CREATIVE BONES.
IF YOUVE GOT WHAT IT TAKES AND ARE
LOOKING FOR PART-TIME WORK THAT WILL
PROVIDE YOU WITH EXPERIENCE THAT WILL PAYOFF
WHEN YOU'RE SENDING OUT RESUMES, SEND
US A NOTE AND CONVINCE US THAT WE SHOULD
HIRE YOU. IF WE LIKE WHAT WE READ, WE'LL
SET UP AN INTERVIEW AND SEE JUST HOW MUCH
MEAT YOUVE GOT ON THEM CREATIVE BONES.
ROSENBERG
&ASS0OATES
ADVERTISING, INC
llOO S. CHARlES BLVD. � SUITE 103 � OREENVILLE, NC
ECU STCCSHCW
Friday, April 23rd
"
y
A
V.


-3S�2
vL
V
�&�
�C

a
A
i
;r

H
Poors Open
At 5:30 PM
Minaes Coliseum
$5
3BfcP

A
f!
V

Cl
$8
-c.

-

tit
u:
t

Am"
n 0
3

'm
�J
?V
K
i? .
'h

V
:W
MU
Featuring:
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
DELTA SIGMA THET4
PHI BETA SIGMA
ZETA PHI BETA
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
7rt.
For Ticket Info: 757-2594 � 752-9512 � 931-7370





0
Adventures of The Wombat
By Chaissori
TheSlory r�rThus
Thr mI Dmioand hi
1 Slolh In"
1i�srd� grneiills bad
1� topvmonr nh
ihrntiblefhut
t onfirr NtA Ihr
Mfmpi
4,1,1 air thr Ml hopp
I MijpP ,h "
- "I ' in
IINM.I '
Rich's Nuthouse
5oK ft LfiSE VAT Of fVEI�
fLFtR TO THC SCHOOL FOOMTAXJ
ArWo tCOLA.O AND VJEAU-
De-Composition
bv Angela Raper
juerrrD
x on't REALLy
WANT To kNoW
THAT
Pagliacci
WA.?ToclCE-D-
by Mark Brett
4 WOwT'IIPKCorrf-W �
our i�i4?mw
0�t. Off � B f W0G- "
r40.OS.T�AHe0
n�5 v AAOUOO WS7RC?
MIKO.OK RZ.FLEC.TIOM
,vl� WHEW 1 W�S A
i�itvi cc i , .
Example For.He4
:Oo�5HA�Si�,






"�"�� II
The East Carolinian
Sports
Page 11
Pirates fend off Campbell Camels, 4-2 at Harrington:
Whitfield pulls it
together after a two-run
first inning
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
Howard Whitfield survived a
shaky two-run first inning to shut
down Campbell in the final eight
innings to lead East Carolina's 4-2
win over the Camels in college base-
ball action Tuesday at Harrington
Field.
After allowing four hits in the
first Whitfield (4-1 )surrendered only
" two more hits in thegame, both com-
ing in the sixth inning, and walked
four batters for his third complete
game of the season.
Campbell (15-26) scored twice
when Paul Curlee knocked a two-
out double to left and scored on a
single up the middle by Andy Priest.
Kent Cox then smacked a double
over right fielder Pat Watkins' head
for a run-scoring double.
The Pirates (31-12) struck back
in the fourth on a leadoff triple by
Watkins, whoconnnuestoswingthe
hot bat for the Pirates with three hits
in four at bats for his fourth consecu-
tive three-hit game and sixth straight
multi-hit game. Steven Pitt followed
wi than opposite field, two-run homer
to right for his fourth of the season.
Frank Fedakgave ECU the lead
for good in the fourth with a run-
scoring double down the third base
lineoffCampbell starter Bob Wharton
(0-8). The Pirates added another run
in the fifth after Jason Head walked,
took second on a single by Watkins
and scored on two wild pitches by
Wharton.
The Pirates return to action this
weekend with a three-game series
against CAA leader George Mason
beginning with a Saturday double-
header at 2p.m.
Baseball This Week
&�org. Mason
Ota Dominion
East Carolina
UNC-WflmlngtoR
Jam Madison
WIKiam i. Mary
Ricnmond
COLONIAL ATHymC ASSOCIATION BASEBALL STANDINGS
�M�Pet. 'Owrall Pet. Homa Away Nautral Str.sk
1.000
000
.750
.500
.000
.182
.167
15
25
27
17
14
16
17
6
4
10
16
12
12
12
714
862
.730
.515
538
.571
586
10
18
22
10
11
9
10
3
0
9
10
9
6
6
Won 4
Won 7
Won 3
Losi 1
Lost 2
Lost 3
Lost 3
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION BATTING LEADERS
Batting Avaraga ci��� Po�. G AB H AVG.
PAT WATKINS, ECU
Rob Mummau, JMU
Kevin Gibbs, ODU
Mark Baron, ODU
LEE KUSHNER, ECU
Greg Deares, GMU
Sean Casey, UR
Geoff Edsell. ODU
Brad Edsell, JMU
Jeff Dausch, UR
Corey Broome, UNCW
Jude Donato, ODU
Turner Williams, ODU
Lonnie Goldberg, GMU
Mike Cowell, ODU
WINS
No. PlayerTeam
JR
SR
FR
SR
SR
SR
FR
JR
FR
JR
SR
JR
SR
SR
SO
RF
ss
OF
CF
1B
OF
1B
42
30
34
34
42
26
34
147
113
116
108
142
109
119
66
48
48
42
55
42
45
1BP 34 120 44
3B
OF
C
2B
LF
2B
c
29
34
39
34
32
26
32
97
116
155
127
93
107
78
35
41
54
44
32
36
26
W L
7 JOHNNY BECK. ECU 7 3
7 LYLE HARTGHOVE. ECU 7 2
7 Geoff Edsell. OOU 7 3
7 Sean Hennessy, OOU 7 3
STRIKEOUTS
Wo. PlayerTeam
.449
.425
.414
.389
.387
.385
.378
.367
.361
.353
.348
.346
.344
.336
333
Innings
SAVES
No. PlayarTsam
6 Heath Altman. UNCW
4 Wayne Gomes. OOU
4 Adam Butler. W&M
65 JOHNNY BECK, ECU 74 7
58 John Smith. ODC 64.7
40 Geoff Edsell. OOU 46.7
48 MIKE SANBURN, ECU 66
47 Brian Smith. UNCW 56
46 RICHIE BLACKWELL. ECU 37
45 Scott Foster. JMU 46.3
3 1 44 Wayne Gomes. ODU 20.3
1 1 44 Heath Attmsn. UNCW 32.7
2 2 44 Sean Hennsssy, ODU 70.3
W L
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION PITCHING LEADERS
Earned Run Average Class W L IP R ER ERA
Bobby Walker, GMU
Geoff Edsell, ODU
RICHIE BLACKWELL, ECU
MIKE SANBURN, ECU
John Smith, ODU
Sean Hennessy, ODU
JOHNNY BECK, ECU
Mike Ragadale, W&M
Bobby St. Pierre, UR
Greg Whlteman, JMU
LYLE HARTGROVE, ECU
DOUBLES
No. PlayecTaamGames
16 Corey Broome. UNCW 39
15 Sean Casey. UR 34
14 LEE KUSHNER, ECU 42
14 Rob Mummau. JMU 30
SR
JR
SO
JR
JR
SR
JR
SO
FR
SO
JR
37.0
46.7
37.0
69.0
1 64.7
3 70.3
3 74.7
1 52.7
2 38.7
2 40.3
2 66.7
8 5 1.22
15 10 1.93
12 8 1.95
23 16 2.09
21 19 2.64
25 21 2.60
29 23 2.77
27 18 3.07
18 14 3.26
20 15 3.35
31 27 3.64
No.
RUNS BATTED IN
PlayerTeam
TRIPLES
No. PlayerTaam
Games
4 Kevin Gibbs, ODU 34
HOME RUNS
No. PlayerTeam Games
42
42
39
47
43
40
38
31
31
No.
Geoff Edsell. ODU
LEE KUSHNER. ECU
PAT WATKINS. ECU
Mike Ruberti. W&M
Corey Broome. UNCW
Jude Donato. OOU
STOLEN BASES
PlaysrTeam
37
42
42
35
39
34
17 PAT WATKINS. ECU
10 LEE KUSHNEa ECU
10 Corey Broome, UNCW
36 Kevin Gibbs, OOU 34"
31 Shawn Knight. W&M 32
19 PAT WATKINS, ECU 42
17 JAMIE BOREL. ECU 42
15 Kevin Nehnno. JMU 30
EAST ROLINA
CAMPBELL
tampball200 000 000-2
East Carolina020 110 00x-4
CAMPBELLabrhbl bbso
Maddocks.lf401000
Stanley, 2b300011
Curlee. ss311010
Priest, dh412100
Cox, 3b402100
Brinson, r!400000
Rogers, lb300011
Huckt.c100010
Gay, el300001
Total.2926243
Batting-2B:Curlee, CorSH:Hucks.
Baa (running TeemLOB:5.
Flek�n0DP. 1.
EAST CAROLINAabrhblbbo
Boral.cl400001
Hasd.lt310012
Vt.3b300011
Mbenrter, lb VVa�!ins, If400001
413000
Pitt,221211
Clark. 2b301012
Antal, c400001
Fedek.se302111
TotalsJQ.473510
� 2B: Fedsk. 3B: Welkins. HR: Pin
Batting-
(4). SH: Borel
Baserunning � Team LOB: 9.
Rawing � DP: 2.
Photo by Biff Ranson
Outfielder Pat Watkins (22), the CAA player of the week for the second time, was safe but called out
due to batter interference against the Camels of Campbell.
CAMPBELLthrer bb so
Wharton (L 0-8)1744 5 if?
EAST CAROLINAIPhrer bb ee
Whitfield (W, 4-1)9622 4 3
iy
HBP: Pitt by Wharton.
GAME DATA � T: 2:06 A: 474. Temp: 70.
UMPIRES � HP: Satterfield. IB: Kennedy. SB:
Brock.
Charlotte beginning NFL marketing
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) � The
NFL's expansion committee on
Tuesday gave the go-ahead to the
five cities in line for new franchises
to begin marketing campaigns for
luxury boxes and other premium
seats.
The committee made thedeci-
sion after hearing from represen-
tatives of Charlotte, N.C which
will finance its new stadium by
selling those seats. Its plan is simi-
lar to ones used to build Texas
Stadium by the Dallas Cowboys
and Joe Robbie Stadium by the
Miami Dolphins.
But NFL officials stressed that
the merchandising also will ben-
efit the other four cities in the run-
ning for two new teams � Mem-
phis, Tenn Jacksonville, Fla St.
Louis and Baltimore. The league
hopes to announce the new cities
next fall with the teams to begin
play in 1994. It also hopes to have
a formula for the prices the new
teams will pay to enter the league
at its meetings in Atlanta at the
end of May.
Jerry Richardson, a
Spartanburg businessman head-
ing the bid to bring an NFL team
to the North Carolina-Sou thCaro-
lina region, called the action "won-
derful, the best news we could
have at this stage of the game
The decision allows
Richardson to begin a plan for
financinga 71,042-seat stadium in
downtown Charlotte based on
sales of the right to buy rickets for
stadium events.
Organizers could raise more
than $100 million if they can sell
50,000 ticket rights for about $2,500
each, he said. The estimated sta-
dium cost is $160 million.
"The process now comes
down to lOmillionfansintheCaro-
linas Richardson's son, Mark,
said. "The fans have had to sit on
the sidelines for a long time. Now
they get to get involved and make
a difference
The Richardsons and market-
ing consultant Max Muhleman
presented their financing plan to
NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue
and three expansion committee
members Tuesday morning.
Jimmy V roasted in Greensboro
GREENSBORO(AP)�ESPN and ABC bas-
ketball commentator Dick Vitale will be the guest
of honor at a celebrity roast that will benefit the
Jimmy V Cancer Foundation.
The roast is scheduled forjune 1 atthe special
events center at the GreensboroCoiiseu m. It was
organized by the basketball coaches committee of
the Atlantic Coast Conference, chaired by North
Carolina State coach Les Robinson.
All nine coaches will participate in the roast,
Robinson told reporters at a news conference
Monday afternoon.
The Jimmy V Cancer Foundation was
formed earlier this year by former N.C. State
basketball coach Jim Valvano and ESPN to
fund cancer research programs.
Valvanohasbeen receivingperiodic treat-
ments for cancer. HewashospitalizedatDuke
University Medical Center until early April,
and is resting at his home in Cary.
Tickets for the event are $100 per person
and $1,000 per table of 10, and reservations
may be made through the Greensboro Coli-
seum.
Clinton runs with world elite
President runs 2.9 miles in 25
minutes with 18 Secret
Service Agents
WASHINGTON (AP)�PresidentClinton
jogged with a group of the world'selite runners
Wednesday when he ran with the various divi-
sion winners of the Boston Marathon, includ-
ing overall champ Cosmas N'deti.
U.S. presidents traditionally invite sports
champions to the White House. But Clinton
took the six winners of Monday's Boston Mara-
thon an extra step.
They met Clinton, Boston Mayor Ray Flynn
and Boston Athletic Association Director Guy
Morse at Washington's waterfront for an early
morning jog.
Could he keep up with this crowd? "You
know I can he said at the outset.
He did. Or perhaps the marathoners re-
sisted the urge to up the pace.
The pack, 18 strong with Secret Service
agents, ran 2.9 miles in 25 minutes � a
shorter and slower jog than Clinton has run
in recent weeks.
Asked if he had ever run a marathon
before, Clinton said, "Never. But I did run
one in 1992, and it looks like I'm about to run
another one apparent references to the
presidential campaign and the ongoing fight
in the Senate over his stimulus package.
Along for the jog, in addition to N'deti,
a Kenyan, were Olga Markova of Russia,
the women's winner; Jean-Michel
Charbonnel of France, men's masters divi-
sion; Bernardine Portenski of New Zealand,
women's masters division; Jim Knaub of
Long Beach, Calif overall wheelchair divi-
sion; Jean Driscoll of Champaign, 111
women's wheelchair division.
Chiefs hopes
fulfilled wiih
Montana
(AP)-Thereare precedents for this
kind of thirty even if rndstof them ended
Sadly.
There was Johnny Unitas and his
crew cut in San Diego, hanging on long
after footballand evenfashionhadpassed
him by. There w-Rick Barry struggling
toget hisshots inHouston long after they
- re being parceled out to somebody
use. And Bobby Orr skating unsteadily
to his last shift in Chicago.
And maybe the saddest ending of
them all: Willie Mays in New York on
the wrong side of twilight In his lumi-
nous career, stumbling so badly after
routine fly balls that he wasn't beyond
asking for pity. Growing bid Mays
explained once, 'is a helpless hurt
And now we have Joe Montana go-
ing . going gone to KansasCity. The
same Joe Montana who has a recon-
structed elbow that is every bit of 36
(even if the rest ijf him isnt who hasn't
thrown a meaningful pass in two years,
and who leaves the franchise inhispast,
the San Francisco 49ers, an emotional
wreck, and the one in his future, the
Chtefsexpecngfhe rnoon.
But before weforget, this Is also the
same Joe Montana who never met a
clock or a defense he could not manipu-
late, who wort four Super Bowls and
who came back twice after being left for
deadon the football fieldi And thesame
Montana who wouldn't surprise all that
manjpeople by doing it all one mo -
time. V
s Montanapage 13
N'deti of Kenya, Markova of Russia win Boston Marathon
BOSTON (AP) � Cosmas N'deti
glanced at the men struggling to stop his
surge into marathon history. He looked and
looked and saw them running out of steam.
CHga Markova would have needed a
telescope to spy her competition.
N'deti'scome-from-behind upsetin the
Boston Marathon was surprising. Markova's
runaway win was expected. Both triumphs
confirmed Monday that at the 26.2-mile test
of endurance, the country of Kenya and the
skills of Markova dominate.
Led by N'deti's 10-second win over
Kim Jae-Yong of Korea in 2 hours, 9 min-
utes, 33 seconds, Kenyans claimed seven of
the top 24 spots on an unseasonably warm
day.
Markova, of Russia, won her second
consecutive women's competition at the
Boston Marathon in 2:25:27, a whopping
433 over runner-up Kim Jones of Spokane,
Wash.
"Olga is the undisputed queen sixth-
place finisher Joan BenoitSamuelson said.
IbrahimHussein,whostood apart from
all other runners by winning the last two
Boston Mara thons,wasisolated again Mon-
day. But this time, he was a rare Kenyan
disappointmentashedroppedoutatabout
ISmiles after beingamongtne favorites and
part of the early lead pack.
For most of the race, N'deti, 23, gave no
clue he was about to win just four months
after running his first marathon, a second-
place finish at Honolulu. He didn't lead at
anyofthefirst24checkpointsspacedatone-
mile intervals andwasllthat the mid point.
The race had been shaping up asa two-man
duel between Kim and Lucketz Swartbooi
of Namibia.
Butatthe22-milemark, the li toe-known
Swartbooi pulled 20 yards ahead. And at
243 miles, the little-known N'deti pulled
alongside Swartbooi.
Forty secondsafter he caught up, he left
Swartbooi way behind. N'deti was 90 sec
onds away from crossing the finish line
when Kim surged back into view as the
Korean turned the last comer.
"Because he was so far away, I knew it
would be very difficult Kim said.
Again and again � four times in 56
seconds�N'deti swiveled hishead tokeep
a concerned eye on h' s opponent.
"There was no way he could catch up
with me N'deti said.
Because of the weather�60degreesat
the starting line at noon, 73 degrees at the
finishlinewhenN'deticrossedit�the first-
half pace was slow. That allowed N'deti to
stay in contention with energy to spare. His
time wasl :4$slower than thecourse record.
Swartbooi wasthird in2:0957,followed
See MARATHON page 12
!Wm.mmmim.





APRIL 22, 1993
suffering through worst streak of best season
thi, we
them all.1 can't sa)
jt this team coach
5ttn.iv 1 omjanovich said after the
ii k kets won for the 10th straight
JJJme and their fifth consecutive
Joad game, 111 -97 over the Suns.
ST Houston concluded a four-
MARATHON
3
�I
5 Continued from page 11
ft Hiromi Taniguchi of Japan in
11:02and Sammy Lelei of Kenya in
�12:12. Mark Piaatjes, a South Afri-
Jgm about to become a US. citizen,
JSvas sixth in 2:12:39. The fastest na-
SBve-born American was Keith
�Brantlv, whocamein ninthin2:1258.
game Western Conference trip
with four .straight wins, giving
the Rockets 13 victories in their
6 away from the Summit.
For the Suns, the defeat was
their third straight, their longest
losing streak of the best season in
franchise history.
" Absolutely We were embar-
rassed said Danny Ainge, who
missed the two previous games
with the flu.
Richard Dumas sat out with
the flu, but the big absence for the
Suns was Charles Barkley, who
has been on the injured list for
five games while the Suns have
slumped to 1-4. Barkley is ex-
pected to return in time for a
ThursdaynightgameinPorUand.
The Rockets were aggressive
from the opening tip, forcing the
Suns into their worst 24 minutes
of the season.
"Our defense really closed
the middle said Hakeem
Olajuwon, who had 30 points, 14
rebounds and five blocks.
"They are missing a key
player and a lot of leadership in
Charles Olajuwon said. "You
lose some confidence with a guy
like that out. I don't know if that's
what happened, but you see him
play every night, and you know
how much he means
Olajuwon got all five blocks
in the first half, when the Rockets
took a 33-13 first-quarter lead and
stayed ahead 57-37 at halftime.
He then scored 12 pointsafter the
Rockets took an 88-67 lead into
the fourth period.
Houston, which went 15-0 to
start a 27-4 stretch since Feb. 13,
set a franchise record by winning
10 straight for the second time in
a season.
The Suns, who have streaks
of 14 and 11, are the only other
team to accomplish that this sea-
son.
CHEAP! FB1U.S. SEIZED
89 MERCEDES$200
86 VW$50
87 MERCEDES$50
65 MUSTANG$50
Choose from thousands
stalling at $50.
FREE Inl"ormation-24 Hour
Hotline. 801-379-2929
AI FR EDO'S HOME OF THE k,ller slices
NvYorkWzToBySeSlk? 21 8 E. 5th St752-0022
Alfredo
, Specials
PITCHERS
with I Topping
$5.45
2 Large Pizzas
witfi 1 Toppng$it QQ
Carry Out Only f�rW
2 Large Pizzas
FREE DELIVERY TO DORMS & STUDENT APARTMENTS
SOUTHERN EYES SUNGLASSES
Sunglasses and Accessories
Ray BanRevo Oakley
PorscheHobie Bolle
VarnetGargoyles Carrera
Christian DiorGiorgio Armani
ECU STUDENTS RECEIVE ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTS
Comic Books Baseball Cards
T-Shirts singles, packs & boxes
Supplies
Carolina East Mall 355-7695
Mon-Sat 10-9 Sun 1-6
We accept

HON
26 Carolina East Centre
Greenville 321-2670
Opening April 17th
Come in May 1-15 during our
Grand Opening to register for a trip
for two to the Cayman Islands
STUDENT SPECIAL
AMICO
Turbo Fin Reg. $119.95
Mask
Snorkel
$ 89.95
Winner of three National CNBAM Awards
Winner of the Most Outstanding Medium
East Carolina University
THE
EAST
Natual
"Quick Cash "
BUSCH
Budweiser
Jeffreys Beer & Wine will buy back
EMPTY A-B KEGS
Please return them to:
Jeffreys Beer & Wine, N. Greene St.
Greenville, NC, 758-1515.
Closed from 12-lpm
ONE OF THt ANHtu&EH BUSCH COMPANIES
�mmm-sT
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed
advertisements using sound design principles. Also
responsible for creating advertising promotions and
ali in-house documents. Great portfolio builder for
printed pieces. Requirements; Minimum 2.0G.P.A
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications
PageMaker, Freehand. Quark XPress and Image
scanning. Open to all majors.
COPY EDITOR
This position edits stories for spelling and grammatical
errors. Must be able to understand newspaper style
in accordance with the guidelines set by the
Associated Press Stylebook. Requirements: Minimum
2.0G.P.A. Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
This job requires working knowledge of 35mm
camera and darkroom operations and will work with
a staff of photographers to supply the photo needs
of various media. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
Work well with other staff members and meet
deadlines. Open to all majors.
CIRCULATION MANAGER
The Circulation Manager is responsible for all aspects
of distribution and circulation of The East Carolinian,
both on and off campus. The manager also Is
responsible for sales of new subscriptions, location
and maintenance of all newspaper boxes, the
scheduled maintenance of The East Carolinian van
& other assigned tasks. Requirements: Minimum 2.0
G.P.A. Must be an East Carolina student and have a
working knowledge of Excel. Open to all majors.
Apply at The East Carolinian,
2nd floor of the Student Pubs building
757-6366
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time and
possibly money. The following options are available:
FAST, FREE DELIVERY
Receive $1.00 OFF
Any Size Pizza or
Pokey Stix
by showing us your rented
video. Pick-up only.
Get A Small
Cheese Pizza
or Small Pokey Stix
for $1.88 with any purchase at
our already low coupon price
Additional items 50� each.
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or af
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th
Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of
credit" from yourparenls' power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
arc as follows: wilh gjj OT wout electric
gas space healing or gas space heating
Electric Only $100$75
Electric & Water $100S85
Electric, Water & Gas $110$85
Electric & Gas SI00$75
III
YOU NEED A BREAK?
SNACK
ATTACK
large
2 item pizza
$6.74
TRIPLE
TROUBLE
3
small
1 item pizzas
$9.99
PIRATE
SPECIAL
X-Large 1 item
& 2 sodas BLOWOUT
$7.36
Greenville
You can save time by mailing the deposit
in advance. Be sure to include your name, where
service will be required, when service is to be cut
on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
Utilities
2 small
2 item pizzas
& 2 sodas
$8.18
EXAM
SPECIAL
Medium
2 item pizza
$5.18
CARRY OUT SPECIAL
Large 1 item pizza
$4.99
BURNOUT
2 large
2 item pizzas
& 4 sodas
$12.38
STUDY
BREAK
large
1 item pizza
& small Pokey Stix
$7.17
PURPLE
PEOPLE EATER
3
large
1 item pizzas
$14.99
Prices Do Not Include Sales Tax�Offers May Expire Without Notice�$5.CO Minimum for Delivery
HOURS
SUN-THURS.
11:OOAM-1:30 AM
FRI-SAT:
11:00AM-2:30 AM
321-GUM-B
315 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
Located next to Blockbuster Video
PERSONAL CHECKS
50c Check OMfC





APRIL 22, 1993
The East Carolinian
13
Montana
Continued from page 11
RpH Soy
play in a game
i er played said
rtJe'vlan-
iheir
fourth straight victory, iohn
Valentin and Mike Grenweli hit
home runs. Clemens (3-0), who
has a history of fast starts, allowed
only one run on tlixee singles,
walked six and struck out two.
In his fourth start of the sea-
son, the three-time AL Cy Young
Award winner lowered his ERA
to 1.48 in 301-3 innings.
Greg Harris pitched two in-
ningsand leftwith the basesloaded
and one out in the ninth.
Valentin, activated Tuesdav
after being sidelined because of a
broken right ring finger, homered
off the foul pole to break a 1-all tie
in the seventh.
� i ford
'I let;
h now coaches at
d Montana out
d directed the 49ers
ree oi their tour titles.
"Personal accolades have
never been a factor with Joe. Win-
is all that matters. He wants
to be in the competitive arena
doing what is of great enjoyment
and satisfaction to him Walsh
added, "and that's plaving foot-
ball
In fact, the beauty of this
move is not simply that it could
turn out well for Joe; it could turn
out to be the best thing that hap-
pened to ail involved.
For all the wailing and
gnashing of teeth that will be
aired on call-in shows in San
Francisco, it allows the 49ers to
crawl out from under Montana's
impenetrable shadow.
It means that ever)' time quar-
terback Steve Young throws an
incompletion, he won't have to
look over his shoulder, feel the
crowd buzz, and watch a legend
he can't fairly compete against
unlimbering on the sideline. It
means coach George Sei fert won't
have to ramble on incomprehen-
sibly about the "designated
starter" into the fall. Montana is
not stupid enough to believe that.
And by the time the ink on the
deal dries, it means San Francisco
will have a feu- newcomers.
At the same time, on paper at
least, it makes the Chiefs the
AFC's best team, while sparing
them a little cash and a lot of
embarrassment.
In another precedent for this
kind of thing, the San Francisco
49ers traded away an agingquar-
terback to the New York Giants
some 30 years ago. And 36-year-
old Y.A. Tittle went on to take his
new teammates to the NFL cham-
pionship game three years in a
row.
STORE YOUR STUFF!
IPM Mini-Storage
Student Discount
$15-$50 per month
757-2471 10th STREET
Professor
Eating &Drinkiqgv TJ Saloon
has Your Sports!
NBA PLAYOFFS and
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Great Daily Food and Drink Specials!
Located behind Quincy's on Greenville Blvd.
355-2946
M ?
Watch for
� TROPICAL TUESDAYS
Coming Soon!
Eye Exam, Frame & Lenses
Includes a comprehensive eye exam by our
doctor, Value ! ine frames, and our best
plastic CR-39 single vision lenses. Add '36
for ST 28 bifocal lenses.
$
99.
00

No-Line Progressive Bifocal Lenses
$99oo
Our highest quality no-line plastic CR-39
bifocal lenses. 100 satisfaction
guaranteed. Includes Sola VIP or XL, and
Silor Adaptor lenses.
Eye Exam, Fitting & Contact Lenses
Includes a comprehensive eye exam by our
doctor, then you will be fitted with daily wear
disposable contact lenses (one month supply).
Professional fees for extended wejr'MOO
additional. FREE starter lens care kit included
$
99.
00
PA
OPTOMCTUC
�Y�CAR�C�N1�K
Superoptic Service In One Hour!
Dr. David L. Fitzgerald, Optometrist
nn- - Garv M- Harris, Optician
70S E. Greenville Blvd. (Across From The Plaza Mall)
Open MonFri. 9-6, Sat. 9-1 Phone 756-4204
So Other Discounts Apply � Brand Names You Trust � Walk-ms Welcome � Offer For A Limited Tw
�m
M
�I'JM-Mi'iUIXlA-M.
PRICES GOOD THROUGH APRIL 24, 1993
AAAAAA
V F "�
fc �� mi mi m 4fc
MEAT DEPARTMENT
SPECIALS
FRESH
GRADE A
FRYER
BREAST
QUARTERS
U.S.D.A.
WESTERN
BONELESS
RIB EYE
STEAKS
98 $48.8
dm
BUDWEISER,
RlinnruT 9 KINGSFORD
BUD LIUH I MATCHLIGHT
OR BUD DRY CHARCOAL
$049 r$Q49
mj 6 pack V m m m
12 0ZCANS W bW
TEXAS PETE
HOT DOG
CHILI SAUCE
8 LB BAG
TROPICAfM
PURE PREMIUM
CHILLED
ORANGE JUICE
smrmmiwrm�K





UNION
DA.
sK
fSS
k
:�

S?V-

fi
?:��
.
�'
:&5
PB?:
?�� ��kkk'
S �-���
. ALL OF THE A
AND MORE


To Remove: Rub with fingernail or edge of coin.
Brad Lowery
Master of Ceremonies
� ft
12:00
Roily Gray & Sunfire
2:00
Col. Bruce Hampton &
The Aquarium Rescue Unit
4:00
" 1964" as The Beatles
Rainsite: Mendenhall
PLEASE NO: DOGS, BIKES, ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, COOLERS OR GLASS CONTAINERS





Title
The East Carolinian, April 22, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 22, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.940
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy