The East Carolinian, April 20, 1993






� mm ����
rate fans
to watch the
Pirate defense beat the
Pirate offense in the
PurpleGold game.
See page 10.
Lifestyle
BarefootirV
Roily Gray and Sunfire will headline
this year's Barefoot on the Mall festivi-
ties to be held Thursday April 22.
See page 7.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 29
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, April 20,1993
12 Pages
Campus police hope to curb spring rape rate
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
With the emergence of the spring
season, police officials in the Green-
ville area are bracing for the increased
number of sexual assaults that typi-
cally are reported at the onset of warm
weather. With reports of an alleged
rape taking place on campus as re-
cently as this weekend, campus and
Greenville officials are stressing edu-
cation and awareness as preventative
measures against such crimes.
This weekend, the ECU Public
Safety office received a report of a rape
that allegedly occurred around 2 a.m.
Saturday morning behind the Spilman
Building. The victim was allegedly as-
saulted on Fifth St dragged through
the hedges that separate campus from
the street, and raped on campus
Students find
volunteerism
rewarding
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Classrooms and textbooks
may be one way to get an edu-
cation, but ECU students are
finding that volunteer work can
also prove to be rewarding.
Currently, students in
Health 1000 classes have the op-
tion of volunteering their time
to 42 agencies located in the Pitt
County area. Started in 1989,
the student volunteer program
distributes opportunity sheets
to students listing the organiza-
tions and contact people need-
ing volunteers. Organizations
range from PICASO, the non-
profit AIDS support group, to
the Little Willie Center, which
deals with latcn-key children.
Bobbie Beck, volunteer of-
fice manager of PICASO, said
that student volunteers have
been crucial to the success and
working of the organization.
"The students save my
sanity Beck said. "The ones I
have are extremely dedicated,
highly effective and highly pro-
fessional. They have literally
kept this office open when it
might not be. I can't speak
highly enough of the ECU stu-
dent and their work
The student volunteers
work at a variety of tasks at
PICASO, ranging from
fundraisers, designing training
manuals, answering questions
on HIVAIDS and filling out
client forms.
The volunteer program
does not require students to par-
ticipate; rather, it offers partici-
pants extra-credit incentives,
such as an additional 10 points,
in the class the student is cur-
rently attending. Project direc-
tor Judy Baker said that this for-
mat is designed so as not to take
away from the students who
don't participate.
"Our program is designed
to stimulate volunteerism
among college students Baker
said. "It's one way to get them
involved in the community
Dr. Dee Dee Glascoff, as-
sociate professor in health edu-
cation, echoed Baker's senti-
ments, saying that a student's
first volunteer experience may
foster a second or third time.
"Students find out how re-
warding volunteering is, and
See VOLUNTEER page 4
grounds. According to ECU Public
Safety's Lt. Keith Knox, the incident is
still under investigation.
A 15-year veteran of crime pre-
vention, Knox said that his office re-
ceives more reports of rape during
spring months than at any other time
of the year. Knox said he had no con-
crete proof on why this phenomenon
occursduring this time, but speculates
that it is because people tend to be
more relaxed with their awareness
during the spring than at other times
of the year.
"People just don't take precau-
tions now like they do at other times of
the year Knox said. "They may have
a tendency to leave doors and win-
dows open or unlocked for ventila-
tion. That leaves them less protected
against sexual assault
Knox also believes that people
are uneducated as to exactly who can
be assaulted by rapists.
"Everyone is a potential victim,
no matter what age, no matter what
social status, no matter what gender.
When you're talking about rape it is a
very complex problem, only by educa-
tion and by changing attitudes can
rapes be prevented
Supporting Knox in this senti-
ment is Mary Smith, the director of the
REAL Crisis Center. Smith's office of-
fers counseling and assistance to vic-
tims of rape on a regular basis.
Smith said her office has received
nine new rape clients so far this month
and given the current trend (since Janu-
ary there have been 37 new victims of
rapes reported to the center), said there
will undoubtedly be more cases as the
warmer weather continues.
"Many people have speculated
on the increased occurrences of rape
during the spring Smith said. "Some
say it is because oi depression, some
attribute it to the fact that more people
are out moving around, some say it is
because of hormonal changes people
go through during the spring. People
are simply less guarded during the
spring and are therefore more
succeptible to violent crimes
Smith also said that numbers of
rapes that go unreported are astro-
nomical as compared to those few rapes
that aie actually prosecuted in court.
Smith said that out of 142 rape clients
last year, only 33 reported the inci-
dents to authorities.
Through his experiences as a po-
lice officer, Lt. Knox urges everyone to
commit themselves towards being edu-
See RAPE page 4
Greenville police investigations
have proven three reported incidents
of rape involving ECU studentsasfalse
charges, according toLt. Keith Knox of
ECU Public Safety. The incidents, all
off-campus, werereported totheGreen-
ville police department within a four-
day period of one another and were all
reported from apartmentand housing
complexes popular to students.
Knox said mat it is rare that his
office sees false reports filed, particu-
larly in this ratio. Knox said, "Gener-
ally thereareunderlyingproblemswim
individualswho would do something
of that nature. A lot of times they're
trying to get attention or trying to get
back at a boy friend, something of mat
nature. A lot of times this person has
some psychological problems mat the
See POLICE page 4
Recycling
bins can
be found
in various
locations
around
campus,
including
in many
residence
halls.
Pitt County recycling
program recognized by state
By Karen Hassell
Photo by
Jason Bosch
Assistant News Editor
With the diversity of recy-
clable good sin the U.S. increas-
ing, Pitt County is striving to
meet the challenge of enabling
citizens to recycle these items,
and the ECU campus is part of
that challenge.
Pitt County recently won
the 1992 Outstanding Recycling
Program award from the North
Carolina Recycling Association.
"The citizens participating
are the key said Joy Hudson,
county recycling coordinator.
"We provide all kinds of pro-
grams, but the citizens make it
work
Pitt County's recycling
program includes much more
than just paper and plastic. Ma-
terial categories include: alu-
minum scrap, lead acid batter-
ies, beverage cans, cardboard,
eyeglasses, green, brown and
clear glass, paper, newspaper,
plastic 1, plastic 2, and other
plastics such as farm chemical
containers, used oil, white
goods (appliances), used
clothes, shoes, cloth and yard
waste.
ECU has a pickup pro-
gram already in use around the
campus. The recycling trailer
will accept glass bottles and jars,
1 plastic soda bottles, 2 plas-
tic bottles, beverage cans, news-
papers, office paper and other
papers.
Currently, all collection
centers require separation of
materials before acceptance.
"The worst thing is people
putting contaminants in with
the recyclables such as glass and
plastic containers with food
Hudson said. "Food and wet-
ness are examples of contami-
nants. We don't ask that you
remove labels or anything like
that. We do ask that you re-
move lids and keep materials
contaminant free
Hudson said that another
problem, especially on the cam-
pus, is with people not sorting
materials correctly or putting
unrecyclable items in the col-
lection trailer.
The campus collection
trailer changes locations dur-
See RECYCLE page 4
Panhellenic council
receives regional award
By Joe Horst
44
Staff Writer
East Carolina's
Panhellenic Council walked
away from the annual South-
east Panhellenic Conference in
Lexington, Ken tucky with their
heads held high ?nd a trium-
phant smile on
their face.
Panhellenic
received the
"Outstanding
Panhellenic
Award" for the
third year run-
ning. The con-
ference includes
schools from 25
states, ranging
up and down
the East Coast
and as far west
as Kentucky.
Unity, philan-
thropy,commu-
nity service,
scholarship and
rush activities
all comprise the
criteria looked
at for the award.
Anna Harrington, presi-
dent of Panhellenic Council,
said that this award reflects
the council's drive for the im-
provement of the Greek sys-
tem.
"The Greek system isfeel-
ing a lot of changes now and in
the future Harrington said.
"The ability to cope with those
changes is what is making and
breaking Greek systems
around the country. It's a mat-
ter of existence versus extinc-
tion
Panhellenic is the larg-
mmimt est women's
organization
on the ECU
campus, with a
roster of over
1,000 women.
Focusing on
Hoffman speaks
Panhellenic
is an
umbrella
organization �;
combining
individual
sororities to
unite together
for a single
y
service and
scholarship,
Harrington de-
scribes the
council as an
organization
devoted to
uniting for one
cause.
Tanheflaic
is an umbrella
organization
combining in-
�"� dividual so-
rorities to unite together for a
single cause Harrington
said.
Panhellenic's efforts to-
ward philanthropy focus on
their work with Operation
Sunshine. Members of
See AWARD page 3
cause, "
Anna Harrington,
Panhellenic President
������� Pholo by Dsll R�H
WNCT-Channel 9 anchor, Allen Hoffman spoke to a group of students Monday on campus concerning
distortion in the media.
Waco standoff ends in tragedy
WACO, Texas (AP) � Fire
engulfed a religious cult com-
pound today after FBI agents in
an armored vehicle smashed the
buildings and pumped tear gas
into them in an attempt to end a
51-day standoff. The fate of
Branch Davidian leader David
Koresh and the 95 people inside
the compound � believed to in-
clude 25 children � wasn't im-
mediately known. One person
could be seen jumping off a roof;
one emerged with his hands up.
Huge clouds of smoke rose
into the air from the complex of
interlocking buildings. About 20
minutes after the fire began, a
huge fireball erupted from the
compound. A watchtower that
had become familiar in televi-
sion shots of the siege collapsed.
Waco fire trucks were called
in, but there was no immediate
sign of efforts to put the blaze
out.
The fire began shortly after
noon, moments after an armored
vehicle rammed one of the build-
ings as part of a six-hour assault.
At dawn, FBI agents in an ar-
mored vehicle had begun ripping
holes in the walls of the com-
pound. Agents were met by
heavy gunfire but no injuries
were reported.
MI!Blfljr' JIliMli -
�"�
�0





APRIL 20. 1993
StateNeWS! Officials end
investigation of suicide attempt
EasLCatplina
ayhOUSe presents
19924993
Season
Students bare breasts in protest
!�
ice were called to break up a student protest that
female students who bared their breasts during a
student government meetingat Rutgers University's Douglass
College "There were no arrests said college spokeswoman
I'am Orel. "As far as we know, there will no disciplinary
actions, either Kern- Riordan, 20, a sophomore and political
science major, said the demonstration was in protest of the
student government's treatment of some of some of the stu-
dents that included "gavelingdown" studentsin meetings who
attempttoquestionauthority-Thedemonstration, said Riordan,
was modeled after a gesture made by Soujourner Truth, a 19th-
century abolitionist who bared her breasts toprove that she was
a woman afterbeingcriticized for "notbehaving likea woman
Strike over at university of Cincinnati
A week-long strike by faculty membersat the University
of Cincinnati is over, and school officials said all scheduled
classes are now being held. The 1,916 full-time faculty mem-
bers represented by the American Association of University
Professors went on strike March 29 over several issues, in-
cluding pay and concerns about university governance and
working conditions. A tentative three-year contract was
reached April 2, and classes resumed April 5. At least 50
percent of the classes were held during the strike, and a
university spokesman said the 10-week quarter will be fin-
ished in nine weeks. "The administration says there are no
bitter feelings, but the faculty says there are said spokesman
Jim Dexter. "It all depends on whom you ask
Sexually oriented pinball machines?
Three Elvira pinball machines have some students, faculty
and staff members at Ohio State University on "tilt" because of the
character's suggestive statements and clothing. Some students
have asked that the pinball machines, which are located in the
lobbies of three dormitories, be removed. "Students and staff are
concerned about the graphics. They tend to be sexually exploitive
or really focus on violence and lack of human regard said
Rebecca Parker, the university'sassocia te director for resident life.
When points are scored on die Elvira machine, her breasts lights
up, and a recorded voice makes such statements as, "Don't touch
me there One student said she saw only men playing the
machine. "I've never seen any women play the machine said
Suzanne Yingling. "If you take a close look at the machihe, I
suppose it could be offensive to some people, but not to me
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
KiXbTON, N.C (AP) � Au-
thoritieshavecalledoff an investiga-
tion to determine how a woman
a mvicted of murder got plastic and
pills for a suicide attempt.
Martin County Shenff George
Ayers Jr. said his department made
the decision after consulting with
the district attorney and the State
Bureau of Investigation. Sylvia
White, 56, attempted to commit sui-
cide after she was sentenced Friday
to life in prison for suffocating her 4-
yearold stepson with plastic in 1973.
She also faces charges in the death of
her husband last year.
She locked herself in a bath-
roominsidethesheriffsdepartment
and tned to swallow plasticcontain-
mg several white pills. Ayers and
Deputy Cader Ward removed the
plastic from Mrs. White's mouth af-
ter kicking in the door.
Ayers said some members of
his department could receive repri-
mands for allowing Mrs. White to
lock herself inabathroom.Shecould
receive thedeathpenaltyifconvicted
of planning her husband's 1992
murder.
William Shakespeare's
Timeless Love Story
jxmtn nub
PiggirY out
April 22, 23,24, 26 and 27 at 8:00 p.m.
April 25 at 2:00 p.m.
Tickets: $4.50
McGinnis Theatre
Call - 757-6829
Photo by Bitt Ranson
Thousands of Pirate fans attended the 10th annual Great Pirate
Pigskin Pigout Party Friday through Sunday.
golden,
corral
STEAKS, BUFFET & BAKERY
Golden Choice Buffet
with carved meats nightly
$5.19
Weekend Buffet Breakfast
M.49
present school I.D. and receive a
FREE BEVERAGE
504 SW Greenville Blvd.
WEDNESDAY
S2.00 ADMISSION WITH GREEK I.D.
GREEK MIXER

$1.00TALLS 0$ DRAFT 75 KAMIKAZES
LADIES FREE UNTIL 10:00 ADMISSION - $3.00
Video
W� (ST lb�� Ik
THURSDAY
� '��'� �� '����
i ?: Iff C-
!�
N
:
DLLAR NIGHT
a
Wc)c
is here!
@ of the
$1.50 Impb
�iMiio,
$�5Q;FROZEN DRINKS
Domestics
hafna MamasPitchers
&275$ Kamikazees
FRIDAY
FRENZY
BALLOON DR
$50.00 IN CASH will drop from the ceiling
every FRIDAY before Midnight
FREE ADMISSION 8-10 Dm
Take Advantage Of Our Great Drink Specials!
$2,50
Ice Teas � PJ's
Bahama Mamas
75 Kamikazes Pitchers 504 Jello Shots
Tr ea sure
Chest
wqQLI be (�)8�go away
UtoGr�, April to
3i(yd�mft� with vgQ8sl ECU
Q.ID. cards a ft Barefoot � qd
the fiflolllli First (&�m�-first
8�i?�(2l. Look �gp your
s� at ftihWZMB iteiaiJ;
jHHMnMH �
- �
'� ��





f
1
APRIL 20, 1993
grants
Peking Palace
Restaurant
W & CANTONESE CUISINE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
LUNCH & DINNER BUFFET
7 DAYS A WEEK
The East Carolinian 3
AWARD
?

Family
Dinner
Specials
Lunch
Specials
Mon-Sat
All ABC
Permits
Exotic
Mixed
Beverages LmQn
Mon-Fri llam-2:30pm
DINNER
Mon-Thur 5-9:30pm Friday 5-10:30pm
Open All Day Saturday & Sunday
Saturday llam-10:30pm
Sunday llam-9:30pm
Take Out Orders Available
Panhellenic work with at-risk
children, providing attention
and tutoring at times when par-
ents, or schools cannot provide it
themselves.
The council also holds
fund-raisers for Operation Sun-
shine, aiding the group in their
works.
Panhellenic works several
different events to provide ser-
vices to ECU and the Greenville
community. Members have par-
D
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Blvd. across from The Plaza
756-1169
ticipated in relief food drives for
victimsof Hurricane Andrew, as-
sisted with the running of intra-
mural events and more recently,
volunteered at the 10th annual
Great PurpleGold Pirate Pig-
skin Pigout Party.
In the realm of scholarship,
Harrington said that the sorority
average is higher than that of the
overall woman's average at ECU.
With tutoring sessions and
awards for high grade point av-
erages, Panhellenic stresses
"scholarship as a high priority in
Greek life Harrington said.
When asked to sum up
Panhellenic, Harrington said that
Continued from page 1
the council promotes education
through personal experience.
"Panhellenic gives a per-
son opportunity through friend-
ship good citizenship and lead-
ership they can't get out of a
textbook Harrington said.
"Panhellenic is a uniting body of
individual sororities that brings
individuals together to work in a
non-competitive environment
for the betterment of the Greek
system
Harrington said that the
award symbolized everyone's
hard work and effort through-
out the year.
"I congratulate all of the
Greek women on campus for this
award Harrington said. "It is
truly their award. Laura Sweet
and Dean Speier have been es-
sential to the success of the Greek
system
Sweet, Panhellenic advisor,
echoed Harrington's sentiment
of the award's impact on ECU
and Greenville.
"The award is representa-
tive of the hard work of lastyear's
council and sororities Sweet
said. "It showcases service to the
community and theirown mem-
bership. They offer well-rounded
student activities programs for
members
ON SALE
1 oq pure fun!
Bauer. Rent skates
that are oesigned
for comfort and
performance. Rent
TODAY. HAVE a blast.
Then say good-bye
TO YOUR LAST WALK IN
THE PARK. SKATE!
Whisper
Power Filters
li!
Overtoil's
fr�
111 Red Banks Rd.
355-5783
Greenville, NC
919-355-7600
8am-7pm M-F
8am-6pm Sat
14.99 16.99 17.99 24.99 29.99 32.99 49.99
Whisper Bio-Bag sale ends 43093
fffik sjask HMssk zjask
4.w �.99 to9199t)
UNIVERSITY CENTER � 14th & CHARLES ST
CMmt�!4L Monday-Friday 11-9
JV'UUSO Saturday 10-9 � AmexDisc
Sunday 1 -6 � MCVisa
MASCOT TRYOUTS
WHEN: APRIL 23-25, 1993 .
WHERE: MINGES COLISEUM LOBBY
TIME: 7:00 PM
� 3 Mascots wiiibe selected
For more information contact Shannon Sn
COLLEGE CHAD MF
IT'S TIME TO RETIRE
YOUR COLEGE LOAN.
Tired of coping with
payments? The Army can
put your college loan to rest
injust3years.
If you have a loan that's
not lndefault, we'll pay off 13 of it up to
a $55,000 limit for each year you serve
as a soldier. And we'll not only retire
your loan, we'll give you other benefits
to last a lifetime. Ask your Army Recruiter
Call:
919-756-9695
ARMY BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
BROOKGREEN
APARTMENTS
1108E. 10th Street
PRE-LEASING FOR
JUNE, JULY & AUGUST 1993
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 full bath units
with all major appliances.
Located within walking distance to campus.
CALL 752-8900 or stop by the office
Apartment 1-H Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:30
FAST, FREE DELIVERY
Power & Authority
Presentation
By Valerie Langford
& Eddie Darton
Open Meeting
& Presentation
Wednesday, April 21,1993
5:00 pm, MSC 109
LEAD Is Now Accepting Applications.
Applications Accepted Until Positions are Filled.
Have Questions?
Call The LEAD Info Line: 757-4796
VIDEO
1 PIZZA
r
$l
88
Receive $1.00 OFF
Any Size Pizza or
Pokey Stix
by showing us your rented
video. Pick-up only.
Get A Small
Cheese Pizza
or Small Pokey Stix
for $1.88 with any purchase at
our already low coupon price.
Additional items 50t each.
321-GUM-B
HOURS
SUN-THURS:
11 00 AM-1:30 AM
FRI-SAT
315 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
Located next to Blockbuster Video
11 ooam2 30am 'CARRY OUT SPECIAL I
� Large 1 item pizza
$4.99 :
n
(i
VISA .
5(V Check Charge
lir
GUMBY
CHALLENGE
2 large
I 2 item pizzas,
& 4 sodas
$12.88
TRIPLE
TROUBLE
3
small
1 item pizzas
$9.99
T
I GUMBY SUPREME
Small-$6.08
Medium-$8.25
Large-$8.86
X-Large-$10.00
Giant -$13.49
PURPLE
PEOPLE EATER! S !
�J large I
large ' 2 item pizza I
1 item pizzas $6 74
$14.99
tl$9-9?L ! $21i9 !
I �BL I GUMBY DOUBLEJ P0KEY STX p,RATE 7
BUSTER
Medium
2 item pizza
$5.18
I
,��� " SmiT-sosT SPECIAL P,G-�UT
2 item pizzas Medium-$4.05 X-Large 1 item ' Giant 20"
& 2 sodss Large - $5.05 � 4 I 1 item pizza
� $8.43 I X-Large-$7.05 , sodas $1015
Pnces Do Not Include Sales Tax.Qffens May7p7e WouTncT.sI. " for D "





APRIL 20, 1993
cepteu at trie '
can distribute them
VOLUNTEER
ans.
,nt-rmation in-
I k-up locations
d Pitt County, i all oy
in at the Clean Sweep of-
391.
Continued from page 1
may continue with that agency
or any other long after they're
done Glascoff said.
Glascoff stressed the im-
portance of giving blood as a
volunteer experience. She said
that students who give one unit
of blood receive the full credit
available, also overcoming any
past fear of giving blood. "Giv-
ing blood is a very good thing
Glascoff said. "If that's the only-
wonderful thing, that's great.
But it may be one of the minor
things
Funded by a grant from the
Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation,
the student volunteer program
has won two national awards,
one state award (the 192
Governor's Award for
Volunteerism) and numerous
other local awards for their ef-
forts to the community.
ilwith.
VI ctorofthe
is Center said that
been aware of such re-
i the past,butstresses that
i asion isverv rare. Smith
�aid she hates to see such cases
because it may lessen the cred-
ibility of genuine rape victims.
"It hurts in the fact that it
tendsto lessen whatpeople think
about the word of the victim
she si id. 'Teople forget tha t ra pe
is not a sexual crime, there is no
sexuality toit.Itispureiyacrime
ofviolence.Someonewhowi.Hild
falsely report a rape is not a very
trustworthy or honest person,
obviously'
Law enforcement officials
from the Greenville Police and
Public Safety are currently in-
vestigating an alleged rape that
was supposed to have occurred
this weekend.
RAPE
Continued from page 1
cated about the dangers of rape.
He said that by replacing the
locks on doors and windows,
installing motion lights on resi-
dences and taking a self-defense
class geared towards rape de-
fense, the chances oi becoming
a victim of rape can be inexpen-
sively and significantly reduced.
Knox vehemently urges a
victim of rape to report the inci-
dent to the police immediately
to help them combat the
criminal's actions in the future.
"One thing about rapists,
if they rape once, they will do it
again that individual is count-
ing on the victim not reporting
the rape through fear and in-
timidation. It is very important
that a rape victim prosecute so
that we can remove that indi-
vidual from causing harm in the
future
Rapists are traditionally a
hard criminal to prosecute, and
Knox said that tremendous im-
provements have been made in
medical investigation that make
tracking rapists quite a bit easier.
Most major hospitals now
use a rape kit full of investiga-
tive devices coupled with
samples of the perpetrator's se-
men or blood to help them trace
the criminal.
The East Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for staff
writers.
CHEAP! FBIU.S. SEIZED
89 MERCEDES$2(X)
86 VW$50
87 MERCEDES$50
65 MUSTANG$50
Choose from thousands
starting at $50.
FREE Intbrmalion-24 Hour
Hotline. 801-379-2929
Al CDCnO'S HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
SeVylrkwSLKSIk? 21 8 E. 5th St.752-0022
1 Large Pizza i
with 1 Topping Jj
$5.45 u
$1.75 PITCHERS
2 Large Pizzas
with 1 Toppng$L OO
Cany Out Ontyr �'
2 Large Pizzas
wirti 1 Topping
FREE DELIVERY TO DORMS & STUDENT APARTMENTS
CUFF'S
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
LUoshmgton Highway (NC 33 6ct-2 miles post 1 Oth St. Putt-Putt) i
MONDnV-THURSDflV NIGHTS1
�Shrimp Plate $3.95
Shrimp & Trout $4.95
Steamed Oysters & Shrimp
Beer, Wine Si Brown Bogging OK.
752-3172
TONIGHT - APRIL 20
Finals Will Be April 27
Doors Open At 9 PM � $2.00 Cover After 9:30 PM
Over $2000 In Cash & Prizes!
All New Contestants Will Be Presented Each Week
DRINK SPECIALS
$1 Draft
$1.50 Special Shooters
$1.75 Hi-Balls
Located in the Hilton Inn
i 207 SW Greenville Blvd.
355-5000
77?e Only Local Official
Hawaiian Tropic Contest
WED & SUN, APRIL 21 & SUNDAY 25
to
aii The Mornings
of The World
THUR, FRI, & SAT, APRIL 22, 23 & 24
"A FLASH DEBUT!
Picks up where Scorsese's 'Mean Streets'
left Off - Jim Hoberman. PREMIERE
RESERVOIR DOGS
� LIVE
UN - c
C 199? Miramax Films an nghtt '�mkvwj
8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
For More Info Call The University Unions Program Hotline at 757-6004
c
GREENVILLE
FUN PARK
ing
GO-KART RIDES
MINIATURE GOLF
& GAME ROOM
l-lO Mon-Thur
1-11 Fri & Sat
2-8 Sun
PARTIES & GROUPS
757-1800
2 Miles South of
Burroughs Wellcome on 264





TheEastCarolinian
April 20. 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
LOOKING FOR A NEW PLACE?
Don't wait till Fall! We have hundreds
of vacancies for May through August,
within walking distance and access to
the ECU busline. Let us help, call 752-
1375. Home Locators fee (555).
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT 1
BLOCK FROM CAMPUS. Laundry
access, swimmingpool,bigenough for
2. Starting beginning or mid-May! Call
now 756-2628.
SINGLEROOMSFORRENTforsum-
mer sessions. $250per s.s. includes rent,
utilities,and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
SUBLEASE FOR THE SUMMER at
Georgetown Apartments. Furnished
and available the first week in May.
Call 752-0009, ask for Heather.
FULLY FURNISHED SUMMER
SCHOOL APARTMENT 2 bdrm 365
month utilities. Great location 752-
0085.
KINGSTON PLACE2 bedroom, 21
2 bath, furnished units, available May
15 and August 1. $140.00 per month
with 4 people. Call Pro Management
756-1234.
CHARLES STRECTTOWNHOUSES
available in May. Located behind the
Pantry on 10th street. 2 bedroom, 11
2 bath units with all appliances. 450.00
per month. Call Pro Management of
Greenville 756-1234.
112FLETCHERPLACE-3bedroom,2
bath house available now. Large
greatroom with fireplace. 620.00 per
month. Call Pro Managementof Green-
ville, 756-1234.
TWIN OAKS - 3 bedroom, 212 bath
to wnhouse available May 1.585.00 per
month. CallPro Managementof Green-
ville 756-1234.
AVAILABLE JUNE 1. Spacious, clean
4 bedroom 2 12 bath. 1 block from
campus, safe,off street parking, central
air, wd hookup, prefer 3 females. No
smokers. No pets. After 5 758-7515.
EFFICIENCY APT. FIFTH AND ELM;
Private entrance, off street parking, $200
plus utilities, 752-5296.
TWO BEDROOM, RINGGOLD
TOWERS SUBLEASE. Available in
May. Fully furnished, kitchen appli-
ances, water included, laundry, AC,
great location. No deposit required.
Rent negotiable. Call 752-3598
2 BEDROOM APT. HeatAC, water,
sewer, cable included. 2 blocks from
campus. For rent now. Call 746-4169.
1 BEDROOM, FULLY FURNISHED,
May - July. Ringgold Towers - - 1 st
floor Parking included in $375.00
month and utilities (cheap). Call ASAP
830-6278.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
downtown, and 2 blocks from super-
market . Great for art students. Call 757-
1947
2 PEOPLE NEEDED to sublet 2 bed-
room apt. over summer. 144 utilities.
Call 355-5986 anytime.
FEMALENEEDEDtoshare3bedroom
apt. �Stratford Arms .145 utilitiesCall
355-5986 anytime.
FEMALEROOMM ATE NEEDEDbe-
ginning in May. 2 Bdrm, close to cam-
pus, $200month 12 utilities and
phone. Please call Lesley at 757-9647,
leave message.
ROOMMATES needed for summer
fall; 3 bdrm. house, 1 block from cam-
pus; low utilities, ac, washerdryer.
Call Stephanie at 752-2560.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share apartment this fall. Must be re-
sponsible,non-smoker.CallMikeat757-
1994.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEEDED start-
ing May 10th to share 1 3 of rent and
utilities over summer and 1 4 during
fall and spring at Wildwood Villas call
931-7811 or 931-7786.
BEST PLACE IN GREENVILLE TO
LIVE. Needed: ONE GOOD
ROOMATE 3 bedroom house, cathe-
dral ceiling, fireplace, loft, outdoor pa-
tio, AC, wooded lot, close to campus.
ARTIST or MUSICIAN preferred. No
pets (we have the world's smartest cat
already) should be laid back, respon-
sible and courteous. $200 13 utdl.
THIS IS THE LIVING SPACE YOU'VE
BEEN DREAMING ABOUT. Call us
758-7993.
MALE GRADUATE STUDENT
LOOKNG FOR RESPONSIBLE
ROOMMATE to sha re 2 bedroom 11
2 bath Townhouse. One half rent plus
l2utilities.Call 830-3961 after6:00pm.
ROOMMATE NEEDED both summer
sessions. $140mth. Own room. Fully
furnished. Call Sharon 830-6844.
26" MEN'S TAKARA BICYCLE, 12
speed, red. 5125. Also 6'2" Hotline
surfboard, Tri-fin, exec cond S175.
(830-9348) Ask for David.
1989 CBR 600, two helmets, tarp.
$2600.752-0392.
19" FISHER ADVANCE MOUN-
TAIN BIKE, and accessories $300 752-
0392.
REMINDER - SPRING IS HERE!
Need to get in shape? The club is the
answer for you. Aerobic classes,
weight room, free babysitting and
tanning! Looking for someone to take
over contract membership - best deal
in town. Call Kate, at 757-3437 now.
1983 YAMAHA 550 MAXIMA MO-
TORCYCLE red, low miles, new
brakes; tires, tuned, inspected, 2 black
CRUISER BIKE - S50. Cobra Stealth
Radar Detector - $50. Soloflex wleg
ext. and Butterfly Att. - 5500. Tandy
PC w color monitor and DWP- $300.
Call 752-9347 and leave message.
IBMPCXT-640KIncludes keyboard
and RGB monitor. S350 - Calf Rod at
321-1032.
1984 KAWASAKI GPZ 750: Red,
stage 3 carburetor kit, Kerker pipe,
one helmet SI 000. Negotiable. 758-
4920.
FOR SALE: A nice sofa and armchair
that are in very good shape. Asking
S300 � Call 321-3440 and leave a
message!
sf��"�ssragg
mi '
MATE WANTED for apartment 12
block from Art Bldg 3 blocks from
CHEAP! FBI US SEIZED: 89
Mercedes -200, 86 VW - $50, 87
Mercedes - $100, 65 Mustang - 55.
Choose form thousands starting 550.
FREE Info rmation24hourhotline 801-
379-2929 copyright NC 030610.
SINGLE MATTRESS AND
BOXSPRING only used this semes-
ter and still has two years left on
warranty. Make me an offer 830-3691.
FOR SALE IMMEDIATELY - all in
good condition: sofa, S90; box spring
and mattress, $50; glass end table $20;
small appliances and fan, $9 each;
washing machine, $90; 1986 Toyota
Tercel (70,000 miles and good condi-
tion), $2,750. Call 756-5488 between
10 AM and 12 noon (ask for Berry)
call 752-7824 after 8:30 PM.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DE A. Avail-
able your area now. Call 1-800-436-
4363 ext. C-5999.
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED $100;and
chest of drawers 530: Both in great
shape! Call 758-5213.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own
hours! RUSH stamped envelope: Pub-
lishers (GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
200-$500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information - 24 hour hotline. 801 -
379 - 2900. Copyright NC 030650.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church, 510 South Washington St
on Sunday mornings from 9am until
12:30pm To work with toddlers
through 3 year olds Applicants must
be punctual and dependable. Appli-
cants also should have cheerful,
friendly and caring attitudes in their
interaction with children and their
parents. For application information
contact the Church office 752-3101.
WANTED: Experienced wait staff at
Greenville Country Club. Apply in
person. Tues. - Thurs 2-4pm.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS REST, ac-
cepting applications for wait staff and
bar staff - 2-4pm daily No phone
calls accepted. Located behind
Quincy's Steakhouse.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS REST, ac-
cepting applications for cook and
dishwasher. 2-4 daily No phone calls
accepted. Located behind Quincy's
Steakhouse.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON to care for
small children in our home. Tuesday
and Thursday, 7:30 - 5:00. Call 756-
0417 after 6:00p.m.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED
Great money, great club. Easy hrs
Thurs Fri Sat. 9pm - 2am. Cash $$$
Cash $5S Cash $$$ Call Paul (919)
736-0716 Mothers Playhouse.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All ma teria Is provided. Send S ASE to
National Distributors, PO Box 9643,
Springfield, MO 65801. Im mediate re-
sponse.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext. P-3712.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT - fisheries Earn S600week
in canneries or S4,000month on
fishing boats. Free Transportation!
Room and Board! Over 8,000 open-
ings. No experience necessary. Male
orFemale.Foremployment program
call 1-206-545-4155 ext. A5362.
PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANT
NEEDED: beginning end of Spring
semester Mornings and some week-
ends, transportation required S5.00
per hour. Call 758-9098.
NEEDED 100 people to lose weight
now. New product recommended by
doctors. 100 natural, 100 guaran-
teed. Call 321-1046.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOY-
MENT - Make money teaching basic
conversational English abroad. Japan
and Taiwan. Make S2,000 - $4,000
per month. Many provide room and
board other benefits! No previous
training or teaching certificate re-
quired. For International Employ-
ment program, call the International
Employment Group: (206) 632-1146
ext.J5362
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typingand photocopyingservices. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaran-
teed typing on paper up to 20 hand
written pages. SDF Professional Com-
puter Services, 106 East 5th Street (be-
side Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-
3694
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer? Only SI 69 Jet there anytime for
onlv5169 with AIRHITCH! (Reported
in Let's Go! & NY Times.) AIRHITCH
�212-864-2000
MINI STORAGE - 148 Brand new
storage units, very close to university,
cheap rates, EVANS STREET CEN-
TRE MINI STORAGE 355-7443.
HANG GLIDE AT NAGS HEAD,
NORTH CAROLINA!Fora weekend
or a week of adventure and fun! Kitty
Hawk Kites' beginner hang gliding
lesson 549 per person (show college
ID). 1-800-334-4777. Sun Realty's mod-
ern beach cottages S250 per weekend
or$3 50 per week(plusapplicable taxes,
fees and security deposit). 1-800-334-
4745. Offer good through early May
1993. Call today for availabilities.
(Some restrictions apply).
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VbaMC or COD
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
800-351-0222
in Calif. (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. �206rA. Los Angles, CA 90025
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
�Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Composed Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
BOOKTRADEK
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
EQJV! USED CD'S
FULL-TIME
POSITION
Applicant must
be able to work
flexible hours.
50 hours per week-$275
weekly. After 90 days-$400
weekly with half paid medical
expenses. Apply in person
between 2-4PM M-F
. 1534 E. 14th St.
ClIFF: Thanks for going to the G 'n' R
concert with me! It was a blast! Defi-
nitely an experience to put down in the
ECU memory books! Your "purple-
shirted" buddy, Lisa Marie.
SEAN: Thanksa lot for letting Cliff and
me borrow your car. We really appre-
ciated it! Good luck with the TKEs!
Love, Lisa Marie.
LOST: Black backpack containing
sketchbook and notebook. Last seen at
lawn area in front of Jenkins Art Build-
ing. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT I
need these books to finish the semester.
Reward offered for their return. Please
help. Call 931 -7825 and lea vea message.
FOUND: Set ofkeys in first floor
women's bathroom of D wing on 4-15-
93. If these are yours pleaase contact Jy
at 931-7397 for return.
BASKETBALL CARDS - buying
Hoops Redemption Set and other insert
and star cards; paying cash. Call 756-
0685 after 6pm.
DELTA ZETA PLEDGES: Thank you
for a great big-sis night! Mug Shots was
a great gift! We are so proud of you!
Hang in there you're almost done!
LOVE THE SISTERS.
CONGRATULATIONS to BECCA
GILLIAM on your engagement to PAT
MUNLEY. Good luck to you both! (oh,
and uh, thanks KAPP ASIGMA for sup-
porringPatatthecandleligh ting!) Love,
the sisters and pledges of Delta Zeta.
BE-LATED COGR ATS to Sigma Nu's
Lambda class: JasonLinder, Corey Estes,
Brian Thomas, Mike Murphy, John Tart
and Jeremy Shirtz.
CONGRATULATIONS toSigmaNu's
new ExecutiveCouncil: Pa ul Kenned y -
President, Jonathan Keith - Vice Presi-
dent, Anders Andersen - Treasurer and
Chris Goedtel - Recorder.
ALPHA PHI. Congrats "Brass Mon-
keys" on the win at Bogies! You guys
were great!
ALPHA PHI: Keep up the hard work
softball players. You are all doing aft
awesome job. Way to go on our win! j
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors, Instructors,
rLitchen, Office, Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
��?� tfAAii e(voutn summer sports camp. Will train. Over 25
LAMl I liVKnUUIl activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792.
EVANS STREET CENTRE
& MINI STORAGE
� Cheap Rate
� Month-to-Month lease. �'
� Brand New Units
� Share -with Roommate T '
(3SS-7443 1528 S. Evans St.
FIELD SCOUTS - Late to Mid-September.
Must be trustworthy, reliable, conscientious, in
good physical shape, love the outdoors and have
reliable transportation. Salary plus milage. Excel-
lent opportunity for college students and teachers
looking for summer work.
Send resume to: MCSI, PO Box 179, Grifton, NC 28530
FAX to 919-524-3215.
or
Announcements
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
fifflP.
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study God's
word, be involved in social and ser-
vice projects? Need a refuge form time
to time? Campus Christian Fellow-
ship may be what you are looking for.
Our weekly meetings are at 7pm
Wednesdays at our Campus House
located at 200E. 8th St directly across
Cotanche St. from Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Everyone is welcome.
For more information, call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister, at 752-7199.
PARENTS WITHOUT PARTNERS
The Greenville Chapter of
Parents Without Partners will hold a
monthly meeting on Tuesday, April
20, 1993 Orientation will begin at 7
PM, followed by a guest speaker at
7:30 PM. The regular planning meet-
ing will beginat8:30PM The meeting
will take place at the First Presbyte-
rian Church located on the corner of
14th and Elm Streets.
ECU PIRATE BASEBALL ON
WZMB
91.3 WZMB -FM will broad-
cast ECU Pirate baseball on Wednes-
day, April 21 as the Pirates face Vir-
ginia Commonwealth at Harrington
Field. Game time is 7pm.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The final Gamma Beta Phi
meeting for the semester will be held
on Tues April 20 at 5:00pm in
Mendenhall 244. In addition to the
regular meeting, we will have officer
inductions for the 1993-94 school year.
There will also bet-shirts and Gamma
Beta Phi stuff on sale at this meeting.
Hope to see you there! Questions, call
931-9274.
BIOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
The Biology Graduate Stu-
dent Association will meet at 5:00 pm
in room B5-412 of the Howell Science
Complex.
LEAD OPEN MEETING
Leaders Educating and De-
veloping, a new student group, is re-
cruiting members for 1993-1994. At-
tend an open meeting and see a lead-
ership presentation Wed April 14,
and21,1993,5pm,109MSC For more
information call 757-4796
ECUCHEERLEAPINGMASCOTS
ComebeEastCarolina's BIG-
GEST fan Pirate mascot tryouts - April
23rd - 25th. Minges Coliseum lobby.
Or come by for the Varsity
Cheerleading Tryouts. April 23 - 25,
Minges Coliseum lobby 5:00. For in-
formation on tryouts call Shannon
�Smith 757-4672.
ATTENTION PHYSICAL EDUCA-
TION MAJORS
The Physical Education Mo-
tor and Physical Fitness Competency
Test is scheduled as follows: Minges
Coliseum, 10:00 am, Wednesday, April
28,1993. A passing score on this test is
required of all students prior to de-
claring physical education as a major.
1) Maintain an average T-score of 45
on the six-item test battery. 2) Having
a T-score of 45 on the aerobics run.
Any student with a medical condition
that would contraindicate participa-
tion in the testing should contact Mike
McCammon or Dr Cay Israel at 757-
4688. To be exempted from any por-
tion of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse. A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is avail-
able in the Human Performance Labo-
ratory (Rcxim 371, Sports Medicine
Building) Your physician's excuse
must specifically state from which
items you are exempt PLEASE SIGN
UP FOR THE TEST OUTSIDE OF
MINGES COLISEUM, ROOM 177,
PRIOR TO APRIL 28TH. ALSOBR1NC
A PICTURE ID THE DAY OF THE
TEST.
FCU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
TUES April 20 - Kathy
Batts, voice,and Tracey Age,clarinet,
Senoir Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall,
7 pm,Free); James Green,
composition, Senior Recital (Fletcher
Recital Hall 9 pm, Free). WED, April
21 � The ECU Symphony Orchestra,
Robert Ha use, conductor (Wright
Auditorium, 8 pm, Free). THURS
April 22 - School of Music Awards
Assembly (Fletcher Recital Hall, 3 pm,
Free); Vevlyn Parks, piano, Senoir
Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 pm,
Free); ECU Guitar Ensemble, Elliot
Frank, director (Fletcher Recital Hall,
9 pm, Free) FRI, April 23Christo-
pher Bunch, piano, Senior Recital,
Fletcher Recital Hall, 7 pm, Free);
Jennifer Smith, piano, Senior Recital
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�Ail ads must be pre-pakJ
Announcements
Any organization may use the Annoince-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
omesfreeof charge. Duetothelmitedamoirit
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of annoireements.
Deadlines
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 9 pm, Free)
SAT April 24 Edward Trunage,
Double brass (Fletcher Recital Hall, 4
pm, Free); ECU String Orchestra,
Fritz Gearhart, conductor (Fletcher
RecitalHall,8pm,Free). SUNApril
25 - ECU Symphonic Wind Ensemble,
Scott Carter, conductor (Wright Au-
ditorium, 8 pm, Free). TUES April
27 John Hilliard, guest composer
recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm,
Free). For'more information call 757-
6851.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisments may be
cancelled before 10a.m. thedayprior
to publication however, no refunds
will be given.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
1

a���'� i mi�





The East Carolinian
�p
IK XU,
993
TuesdayOpinion
Rape problem addressed
Education essential to prevent
rapes; false rapes detract
from severity of situation
Recently, th Greenville police department
logged in three separate incidents of rape in a four-
day period. All three incidents, which occurred off-
campus, have been proven to be filed under false
charges.
Typically, rape reports rise in the spring sea-
son. Reasons for this increase have ranged from
hormonal changes in people to depression to more
people being outside enjoying the weather. As a
whole, people are less guarded and therefore more
susceptible to this violent crime.
Though often misunderstood, rape is a crime
of anger and violence, rather than one of sex. Rap-
ists commit this crime to exert a type of control over
their victims. Rapists also commonly count on vic-
tims not reporting the crime, thereby allowing the
rapist to continue unknown and unstopped.
Current improvements in medical technology
exist that allow police and doctors the ability to
trace the offender with a greater degree of accuracy
and also help make convictions stick. However,
these improvements'
effect fades away to
nothing if the rape is
not reported.
Accusing a per- m j �?�
son of rape falsely � Jy 1
detracts greatly from
the few actual rapes
that are reported.
Sometimes used as an
excuse to get back at
a boyfriend or girl-
friend, these false accusations are what lead some
people to believe that a real rape has not occurred.
Rape is too great and important an issue to be
trivialized on the whim of a person's momentary
anger.
Education is probably the most important fac-
tor that will deter a potential rape from happening.
Blind trust in your fellow man cannot be followed
here; sad to say, but a person has to be a little
paranoid in today's society in order not to be vic-
timized. A few simple precautions can mean the
difference between safety and harm.
� Keep your doors locked and your windows
at a low level. With the weather warming up, people
are prone to open their windows wide to let in the
fresh air. This action can allow a person to enter
your house without your knowledge.
� Be aware of your surroundings and if there
are any people around you. Walk with your head
forward, not constantly looking down at the ground
or up in the air. This precaution will allow you time
to react if someone approaches you.
� If walking at night, try to stay in lighted
areas as much as possible. Also, try not to walk
alone if at possible; if you must, keep an extra-alert
eye out for strangers.
These guidelines may seem old and overused
to some, but they may be life-savers to others. Rape
is not a crime that will just go away if it is ignored;
more than likely, it will happen at a greater rate
rather than decline. Only when people realize the
severity of the problem will any progress be made.
Realize that there is a problem. If you are
raped, report it. If you know of a rape, report it. The
three monkeys � see no evil, hear no evil, speak no
evil � is not a graphic that applies here. This matter
is too serious to be trivialized. Don't perpetuate the
problem that already exists.
Opinion
Page 6
The East Carolinian
Lindsay Fernandez, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hasse,AiSt. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Bullard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Maruigei
Jody Jones, Cm ulatitm Manager
Cori Daniels, layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst lMyoul Manage:
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday The masthead editorial in each edition a the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letter fa
publication Letters should be addressed to The Editor, Vie East Camhnmn.
Publications Bldg, ECU, Greenville, N.O 27858-435?. lor more minima
tton, call (919) 757-6366.
By T. Scott Batchelor
Women's bicycle no threat to male's identity
It's easy to tell when spring
has sprung here at ECU. No, it's
not the sweet smell of fresh-cut
grass nor the vivid blossoms of
the cherry trees. It's the sight of
numerous scantily-clad female
students lying about in any avail-
able patch of sunshine.
Ah, the joys of spring!
Wa tching the goings-on out-
side my apartment the past few
weeks,itoccurred to me how much
we homosapietis (which, ironically,
means "wise man") are connected
to the cycles of the seasons, re-
gardless of how "civilized" we
become. Of course, when I speak
of cycles, I mean bicycles. Which
is a corny but effective segue into
my next topic.
Three weeks ago I didn't
have a bicycle. I had one once � a
nice 10-speed model � but in a
moment of poor judgement I let
my erstwhile roommate borrow
it, whereupon he proceeded tolose
the thing straightaway.
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
That's right, he lost a full-
grown bicycle. Just couldn't re-
member where he left it. So there's
probably a rusted-out frame of a
bike chained to a "No Parking"
sign somewhere on campus, i nat's
no matter, because I have a bicycle
now.
Three weeks ago, I com-
plained to my father that my four-
block walk to campus everyday
was becoming quite stressful.
"Only four blocks?" heasked quite
incredulously, like fourblocks was
some cake-walk or something.
Then he said, "Well, why don't
you just call a cab?" I think he was
kidding, though.
Anyway, he said that mom
had a bicycle she hadn't ridden in
a while and asked me if I wanted
to use it. "Sure 1 said, because I
hadn't had much sleep in the past
few days.
We went out to the garage
where my family keepsitsbicycles,
l3v.i;i!iOv.vr: nare tires and just
about everything else but auto-
mobiles. Dad showed me mom's
bike.
It was a pretty blue color.
The color wasnice. Oh, and itwas
painted a pretty shade of blue,
(did I cover that already?). Well,
to be as inexpensive as it was
(FREE!), the bike had some great
features, like two genuine rubber
tires and a beautiful, matching set
of handlebars.
But it was a woman's bike.
Now for those of you males
out there who wonder why men's
bikes have the bar and women's
bikes don't, the answer is obvious:
the bicycle was invented by Gloria
Steinem. Seriously, though, it'sgot
something to do with back in the
old days when women used to
wear dresses. The bar was re-
moved to keep the dresses from
bunching up on it. I think.
1 brought the bicycle home
and took it out of the back of my
car. I was a little nervous concern-
ing the reaction I would get from
my neighbors, but as soon as
they saw me on the bike, they
began to yell such reassuring
phrases as, "Wooo-weee, look
at that little sissy-boy ride and
"Peddle that thang, sweetheart,
and be careful you don "t break a
nail
Of course, being com-
pletely secure in my manhood, 1
took my friends' good-natured
ribbing like a real sport, al-
though I do think the rock-
throwing incident was a bit
much. The fact that I haven't
ridden my bicycle since that day
has absolutely nothing to do
with it being a women's bike.
It's just that I'm waiting for the
weather to warm up. Like
around 100 degrees or so.
On second thought, if you
happen to see a rusted-out, ten-
speed bicycle chained to a "No
Parking" sign, give me a call. I'd
surely appreciate it.
�e,
VefrT l� iht
u
Ville.UA
?ot
elxes ?1 'Tm, and � ccvfph A cotAftt Ar�ci.
QuotesoftheDay
Force rules the world
not opinion; but it is opinion that makes
use of force.
All cruelty springs from weakness.
Seneca
Letters to the Editor
Christians should not hold others to beliefs
To the Editor:
What is so difficult about
accepting lifestyles unlike our
own? Does it really matter
whether the Bible condones or
condemns homosexuality?
Having read the letters to the
editor over the past few weeks,
I became frustrated over the
tendency of Christians to hold
non-Christians to their code of
morality.
To the Christians who
wrote letters to the editor re-
cently, I say keep your religion
to yourselves. Not everyone be-
lieves in God or Jesus Christ as
you do. Holding non-Chris-
tians to the moral standards
you set for yourselves is abso-
lutely ludicrous!
The statement "through
the help of Christian counsel-
ing, homosexuals can be set
free from the sin of homosexu-
ality" is ignorantand arrogant.
Sendingahomosexual tocoun-
seling to "cure" him or her is
like sending a person to coun-
seling to cure him of eating and
drinking. Sexuality is an innate
drive in each of us, whether the
attraction isheterosexual or ho-
mosexual. Perhaps you should
keep in mind Alinsky's Rule
for Radicals: "Those who are
the most moral are farthest from
the problem
Shouldn't people be less
worried about sexuality or race
and more concerned with is-
sues such as child abuse, drugs
and illiteracy? Americans fo-
cus easily on moral issues, but
they make little effort to solve
the problems of this country
which are destroying its very
fabric.
Rhonda Peacock
Junior
Physical Therapy
Clinton uses 'false association' with history
To the Editor:
There is a deceptive prac-
tice in the marketing industry
known as "false association"
whereby manufacturers of
lesser products cloak their
wares in the guise of successful
competitors, often adopting
their color schemes or type
styles. The premise being that
if the illicit item appears to be
the same as the genuine article,
the buyer will probably associ-
ate it with the real McCoy and
make a hasty purchase. Most
patent attorneys make an ex-
tremely good living by keep-
ing these products off the
shelves since copies often in-
volve the theft of intellectual
property and therefore violate
federal law.
In his book Class (1981),
Paul Fussell refers to the com-
mon practice among the lowly
society of donning tee shirts or
caps emblazoned with impor-
tant trademarks like
"Budweiser " This action al-
lows the wearer to achieve a
small degree of fame through
mere association with those
who are legitimately success-
ful.
Woody Allen, in his film
Zelig, made light of a similar
premise when he fashioned a
pathetic character who found
popularity by affecting the
mannerisms of those around
him. By carefully observing the
language, lifestyles and quirks
of his associates, he was able to
pass himself off as intelligent
and educated There is, as you
probably guessed, a limit to the
longevity of a charade like this
one.
Most recently, Bill Clinton
has latched onto the idea that
he, too, can be a man of sub-
stance by aligning himself with
the right people. The funny part
is that most of the associations
he concocts for himself are to
the deceased. I suppose this is
lessabout being funny than it is
crafty since he knows that no
corpse, no matter how great in
life, is able to reject such an
unwelcome partnership.
FDR, Jack Kennedy, Mar-
tin Luther King, and, just this
week, Thomas Jefferson, have
been exhumed and paraded
about as the unwitting men-
tors of a slick hypocrite and his
systematicbilkingof the Ameri-
can people. Even Hillary has
seen the merit in this tactic, and
has wasted no time in procur-
ing postmortem advice from
Eleanor Roosevelt's ghost.
When scholars in the next
century write about Clinton,
I'm certain that all equations
which compare him to those
who forged history will be cu-
riously missing. Or, perhaps
his life will be more aptly com-
pared to the rogues, liars and
infidels who came before him
and to whom he secretly as-
pires.
Craig D. Malmrose
Associate Professor
Communication Arts
By Amy E. Wirtz
Japan's economic
plan could boost
global economy
The Japanese government Wednes-
day unveiled a record package of spend-
ing and tax breaks aimed at reviving its
slumping economy and reducing its mas-
sive trade surplus. Top U.S. officials indi-
cated that they think Japan must do con-
siderably more to contribute to global eco-
nomic growth.
Japanese officials asserted that the
package, which they valued at about $115
billion, would be enough to lift the
economy out of its worst recession in two
decades. A recovery, in turn, should boost
Japanese purchases of foreign goods and
thus help shrink the trade imbalance.
Of course, there is a great deal of
dispute over how much of the package
will provide a real boost to the economy
and how much is artificial. Much of the
spending in the Japanese plan is in the
form of public works, not just for tradi-
tional roads and harbors, but also for high-
tech projects such as data and communi-
cation networks.
The Clinton administration has been
prodding Japan to increase demand in
order to boost imports and give the global
economy a jump start. The economic slow-
down in Japan has curbed demand there
for U.S. exports, dampening efforts to
boost the U.S. economy.
However, top administration offi-
cials have strongly indicated that they are
not impressed by the Japanese
govr-nment's effort. Secretary Lloyd
Bentsen said Japan is in a particularly
good position to contribute to the growth
of the world economy because, unlike
other major industrialized cities, Tokyo
enjoys large trade and budget surpluses.
Secretary of State Warren Christo-
pher said that while the package is "a
useful first step the world economy
needs several years of strong Japanese
growth, not just a quick lift
Both Washington and Tokyo agree
that stimulating the Japanese economy is
one of the important ways Tokyo can re-
duce its trade surplus, which was reported
at a record $111.34 billion for the fiscal
year ending March 31. However, the ques-
tion is whether the package announced
will do the trick. It should spur an in-
crease in demand that would raise Japa-
nese purchases of foreign goods by about
$8 billion this year.
Add to this the fact that Japan's aid
to Russia will total about $1.8 billion,
slightly higher than the $1.6 billion re-
ported last week, and Japan is in quite an
uncomfortable, world-wide spotlight.
The Russian aid will consist mainly
of trade credits and insurance, especially
for the gas and oil industry, but it will also
include some modest grants to improve
safety and nuclear facilities, help small
businesses and provide food and medi-
cine.
This comes as a surprise considering
the dispute over the four islands off the
northern coast of Hokkaido. Their involve-
ment in the Group of Seven's economic
plans is a welcome sign for the future of
our economic situation. I guess it's taking
the actions of all nations to get out of this
mess.





The East Carolinian
APRIL 20. 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
;
Barefoot f 1993
By Kris Hoffler
Staff Writer
Warmer weather, pollen on your car,
greener grass, and the arrival of the birds
and tfie bees can only mean on thing: it's
spring in the Emerald Gty.
After a long and rainy winter it is a
welcome experience. As a college student
you can expect exams to follow the wanner
weather and summer to follow the exams.
We here at ECU also have the spring tradi-
tion of Barefoot on the Mall, a good way to
lower your spring fever while kicking back
with some good music and good friends.
This year it looks like we have a pretty
decent entertainment lineup, so get out and
enjoy it (after all, you have already paid for
it).
Barefoot'93 is thisThursday, starting at
noon and lasting until around 530p.m. The
lineup of bandsis sure to have something to
please most anyone, along with a good MC,
some free stuff givenawayand yournormal
col lection of mindless, but fun, college ga mes.
Although alcohol is not encouraged by ECU
security, I swear I smelled a little beer last
year and it was not encouraged then either.
The day will begin at 12 noon with a
giveaway and will be followed by the MC
for the day, Brad Lowery. You may have
seen Brad before on HBO's "Def Comedy
Jam "Inside the NFL" or even on the
" ApolloComedy Hour Hehasopened for
such acts as Dennis Miller and Sinbad. We
may have a good comedian on our hands
here folks and only a nihilist would knock
that.
Next up is Roily Gray and Sunfire at
12:31, whom you mayhaveseen downtown
before. R.G. and Sunfire play even-thing
from reggae to calypso to soca (calypso and
American funk). The majority of the band
members hail from Trinidad but have re-
sided in the United States for over 10 years
now. Their sound is certainly fun and
definately danceable.
Sunfire is to be followed by more give-
aways and Brad Lowery's comic relief be-
tween set changes. Then at 2 p.m. Col. Bruce
Hampton (ret.) & The Aquarium Rescue
Unit will take the stage. The good Colonel
delivers a combination of blues, jazz, rock,
country, bluegrass and a little of his own
stylings to tease the ear. He has stated the
band's purpose to be trying to capture the
joy and spirit of Southern root music � a
fine objective by anyone's standards. They
will be followed by even more giveaways
and the verbal trickery of Brad Lowery.
Finally we come to what is known as
the headliner. Last year was The Ocean
Blue, a look at the future of music; this year
we will have a glimpse at an era most of us
(of college age that is) probably missed. At4
p.m. 1964 will take the stage and the British
will invade once again. They have been
hailed as the most authentic and endearing
' tribute to the Beatles, bar none. Their sound
and appearance is so close to the real thing
it is uncanny, a flashback if you will. They
cover Beatles' material from 1964 to 1966
with incredible detail, down to John
Lennon's straddling stance and gum chew-
ing during songs.
Although they won't play anything
from Sgt. Pqrpers's, Abbey Road, or the White
Album you can expect such songs as: "Can't
Buy Me Love "Help "Drive My Car
'Twist and Shout" and "Yesterday De-
spite not being able to hear the later stuff,
this sounds promising.
There will also be the Velcro Fly Wall,
Human Bowling, and Temporary Tattoos
for those who get bored with the bands.
Who knows what else will go on? Those of
you that were here for last year's Barefoot
may remember thehugevatof mud created
by a dunk tank leaking into a volleyball
court. This vat of mud was probably the
most fun of anything that day. People, mud
and clothes were flying about.
In my opinion that was one of the best
experiences I have had since I've been at ole
ECU, reclai ming childhood probably. Secu-
rity will no doubt take extra measures to see
that it won't happen again.
I would pay money to see that again.
Enjoy.
Photo courtesy Capricorn Record
Col. Bruce Hampton & ARU will headline this year's Barefoot. They'll be joined by
Roily Cray & Sunfire and 1964, an early Beatles cover band.
Widespread Panic leaves smiles behind
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
There's a widespread panic.
Fumytowitrrakeseverybody smile
so damn hard.
Like forever ecstatic gypsy
nymphs of the good sage, Athens,
Ga sextet Widespread Panic man-
aged to herd up a sweaty mass of
happy people last Tuesday at the At-
tic for more than three hours of splen-
did southern rockgrass sounds, ex-
tended grooves that bent around
rafters and wafted through cybercells
and loads of dancing dancing danc-
ing, like such an electrically earthified
celebration could actually happen ev-
eryday.
In support of the band's third LP
Everyday (Capricorn), Widespread
rolled into Greenville in the midst of
the NorthSouth Carolina leg of its
current tour, one of the band's most
extensivesinceitsinceprion more than
six years ago.
The band played aggressively
enriched versions of almost all of
Everyday's 11 tracks, mostnotably the
groundsweU-tuiTied-thundersuiick
downpourof "Hatfield" (thestoryof
arairtmakeratthetumoftheoHntury),
the melodic "Diner" (in which the
town beggar is befriended by a short-
order woman chef), and the irresist-
ibly high "Wondering" (Everyday's
first single and video). Die-hard
spread4eads know the three above-
mentioned tunes&omtherafher stan-
dard live Widespread catalog.
Recorded insix weeksatMusde
ShoalsSo mdStudiosin Alabamaand
released less than a month ago,
Everyday featuresWidespreadPanic's
rewestmeiriber,kiv�HenTBnn,play-
ing piano and Hammond B-3 organ.
Hermann, an old friend of the band
ardaformermeniberofHSecultgroup
Widespread Panic played a solid three-hour show at the Attic, leaving behind smiles and past-dancing
exhaustion last weekend. Check out School Bus, BOC and Indecision this weekend.
Beanland,isasonicpleasurelive,ably
accompanyingsingerrhythmguitar-
ist John Bell's occasionally ineffective
acousticstrurrirningwith meaty chord
stomping, right-hand comping and
wonderfully crafted piano solos.
Bell's voice rang loud and raspy.
Driving through each song with sel-
dom a breath and nary a break, Bell
delivered an exceptionally impas-
sioned performance, usually eyes-
dosed and often strumming his gui-
tar lethargicallyabouthalfway up the
neck, oblivious to his six-string par-
ticipation and more concerned with a
lakf-badc-though-crucial vocal deliv-
ery and more importantly with the
grooveofitallCajwd favcaitesinduded
"Space Wrangler" (from Space Wran-
gler), "Walking (for your love)" (from
Widespread Panic) and Evenday's
"Pickin' Up the Pieces of which the
album version includesguestmando-
linistMattMundyofCol.BruceHamp-
ton & The Aquai ium Rescue Unit (to
play ECU'sBarefooton theMall Thurs-
day at 2p.m.).
Indeed, Widespread's recent
Greenvilleshowwouldnothavebeen
thedelightitwaswithoutthe spirited,
oftenhypercrowd.Packed toitsgills,
the Attic swayed, swirled and sallied
as its innards flopped, floundered and
fondled every minuteofWidespread's
three hours on stage.
Bassist Dave Schools plays the
smoothest six-string bass around;
percussionist Domingo S. Ortiz pro-
vides the clinching element to
Widespread's eclectic rhythmic con-
cubine of a tribally twisted, improvi-
sational musical phenomena with his
rampaging timbales and gently tex-
tured hand-played bongos and
congas.
Thoughessential totheband's
near-Dead cohesive mind-reading
congeniality, yet less animated and
spotlight-driven than the rest, drum-
mer Todd Nance and lead guitarist
MichaelHouserkeptapace with their
bandmatesall nightlong,asthepeople
smiled and eveiybody'srnind wailed
in bliss.
Join Recreational Services and its
outdoor adventure staff in an Earth
Day celebration Friday, April 23.
Tar River is the target spot for this
second annual service project to
protect Mother Earth.
From 2 - 6 p.m. participants will
.�njoy a relaxing canoe ride along the
Tar River and help clean up the
banks of this natural resource. Last
vear, over 600 lbs of trash was col-
lected by the group.
A S3 donation is requested to
cover the nanspoitation and equip-
ment costs. Participants are asked to
wear "river clothes" and boots.
With die 18 person enrollment
limit, interested individuals should
sign up prior to April 21 at the Rec-
reation Services office, Christenbury
Gym.
Come enjoy Greenville's most
natural resource while helping the
environment.
Ms
pertinent
By Richard Cranium
Staff Writer
Mama Cass sang a really swell version
of "Dream a Little Dream of Me It makes
mecry. Bobby Goldsboro's "Honey" makes
me cry too, but hey � mat's because I'm a
sensitive man, damnit! But, I don't want to
talk about sensitivity, I mean, God bless
Mama Cass and all that, but haven't we
heard enough about sensitivity? I'm a sen-
sitive man and that's that!
I kick ass when I have to, though.
Anyway, have you heard about these
programs where needlesaredistributed to
drugaddicts? Nonow, get this: need lesare
distributed to drug addicts! We live in a
country thatwon'tlegalize pot, butwe give
needles to drug addicts so that, when they
do their drugs and break the law, they
won't get AIDS or hepatitis. Silly.
Let's keep the users alive. That way,
when they kill a young newlywed couple,
full of hopes and dreams for an ever-so-
blissful future, in order to get some cash �
and maybe a ring to pawn � so they can
buy more drugs, we can prosecute them
and shove them in one of our vacant jail
cells.
Well, I think we all know Clinton isn't
going to legalize pot. But could you imag-
ine? We could cruise into a bar and order a
joint! And what about the other organics?
Hev, we could hop, skip rind jump into the
ABC storeandpickupasixpackof'sh rooms
or peyote buttons, complete with govern-
ment warning labels, of course.
Look, we get high, The Man gets his
cut,organizedcrimeisoutofbusiness,and
life would be good! But it ain't gonna hap-
pen. No, the administration would rather
pump billions of bucks into shit like tele-
scopes that don't work, planes that don't
fly, and studies about dumb things like
how much weight a rabbit can bear on its
back.
Don't forget these little ridiculous
things about violence in movies and ex-
plicit lyrics in music that most people don't
listen to anyway! It's all at our expense!
And don't think I've forgotten the Meese
Commission! All them bucks spent so's
they could look at dirty magazines and
movies. Right. And whodoyou think paid
for all their lunches? You know they
couldn't stand up! They had to have their
meetings catered! It's the same with Tipper
Gore and her stupid hearings. Well, they
could stand up.
This country is like an army. The
taxpayers are the infantry, stuck in the
trertches and trying to get out alive. The
Government is the officers, high and dry,
taking care of their big, fat, spotty asses.
But I've got a plan.
Sure,let'sdistribute those needles.First,
however, lace them wi th cyan id e or a rsen ic
or some cool poison. That way, we kill of a
lot of addicts, who, in turn, nipssome crime
in the bud. It's a beautiful thing.
Next, take all those hard-core crimi-
nals, the murderers, rapists and especially
the child molesters,and use them formedi-
cal experiments and stuff like that. Take
some others, put bombs with seven-day
timers in their heads, drop 'em off in
Baghdad, and tell 'em to raise hell. See?
We're cleaning out the prisons, dis-
covering lots of new, useful things, and
taking care of Iraq all at the same time. Life
is good.
If there's still too many criminals left,
put the death penalty to good use. Kill 'em
and make fertilizer with their remains. Now
we have enough room in the prisons and
guess what else? By getting rid of all that
deadweight, weeliminatesurpluslawyers.
Thev can't waste our time and money ap-
See WORLD page 9
KHKBHMHHMMi





APRIL 20. 1993
festival is a welcome treat while in Aruba
Travel tips and a bit of island info for those
suffering from severe Spring Fever.
asometii
iomel - � at'sa
bfendofDutch,Spai ortu-
guese withseveral Airicandialects,
some English and a little Arawak
Indian mixed in.
Dutch is the official language,
but the more widely used
Papiamento reflects the multi-eth-
nic rootsof Aruba's 70,000 people.
"Bon bin i" is the first
Papiamento phrase tourists learn.
The words are on banners at the
airport and on docks where cruise
ships disembark. They are shouted
to passershv by kids playing along
the road side and a re the greeting tif
hotel clerks and shopkeepers.
The words "bon bini" genu-
inely express the island's friendli-
ness, as dvies the Bon Bini Festival
organized by Aruba s institute de
Cultura. The festival is a showcase
for local bands, dance groups arti-

�" .

erfe t spot to; greei
in
linst marauding tlu
a'sHis watt
um, It tall, proud arc perfi I
WillemIlIbelltower,addedin 1867
rlooks Oranjestad's narrow
Streets lined with houses with pastel 18 ki
les and red tile roofs and clus- island k�
i duty-free shears.
festival is also a great placs inti
for tourists to meet locals - and to Fei
leam more Papiamento. Although
almi - me on Aruba speaks windmills
English- plus Dutch and Spanish
rms "bon dia" for "good �;
and "m.isha danke" foi sid
"thank you" can come in handy. In tht
Aruba about 15 miles from U
Venezuela's northern coast, is the shap
smallest and most vvesterh of the
Netherlands Antilles KBi islands
ruba,Bonaireand uracao.TTie sculpl I
miles long and so. miles
wide, has unusual natural wonders
andissumuindi 'arblueseas I i
iitiium .mo sun-
eral of the tarmshave
lssuKel986 The island, ongi
nalh inhabited by Arawak andarib
Indians, wasd is o'ered and claimed
forSpainin l499byAlonsodeOjeda.
fhel utchgained possession in 1636
and, except for a brief British, OCCU-
patu n in 1800, Aruba has been part
1rf the Netherlands ever since.
from 1825to 1916,gold mining
madetheisland prosperous. In 1924,
an oil refinery the world's largest
at the time � was built near St.
Nicolas, Aruba's second largest
town It created a boom economy
untilthemid-1970s At present, tour-
ism is Aruba's biggest industry.
�II YOU CO: American Air-
lines' five daily flights to Aruba in-
clude one mn strip from New
York s 1K and twoeach froi
ami and Sin uan, V R. Passengers
from am LS (it) canconne twith
Miami or San luan (lights. Viasa
(lies tu Aruba from 1 louston.
Modem resort complexes, with
air-conditioning and all of the
amenities, a reava liable The Aruba
Hyatt Resort is considered the
island'sbesthotel, with rooms from
$120 double occupancy doc. sea
son summer months) Bushiri Re-
sort, a popular self-contained re-
sort, is priced tn in 15220perdav per
person during the low season.
l)n mg in Aruba is,m adven-
ture. In town, streets are narrow
and traffic can he hea but driv-
ers are generally polite. Outlying
roads are well-tended, but some
stret chesareun paved so beware die
ruts.
( or rental rates varv, with Dol-
lar i barging J4-a day for a compact
with unlimited tree mileage, Hertz
4v and Budget $50 with a two-day
minimum.
Main restaurants feature sea-
Hxxi, often spicv stews. Steak and
grilled iguana- it tastes likechicken
also are popular. Fxxl in most
restaurants is fresh and wholesome.
lot further information: The
Aruba Tourism Authority, 521 Fifth
Ave New York, N,Y. 10175 Tele-
phone l-800-TO-ARUBA or 1-212-
246-3030.
$2()0-$500 WEEKLY
Assemble products at
homo. Easy! No Selling.
You're paid direct. Fully
Guaranteed. FREE
nformatioh-24 Hour
Hotline 801-379-29CX) i
GREENVILLE � TOYOTA
COLLEGE GRAD PROGRAM
? SPECIAL FINANCE RATE
? NO DOWN PAYMENT
? NO PAYMENT FOR 90 DAYS
? 6 MONTHS PRIOR TO GRADUATION
321-3000
V7
BLUE PLANET CAFE IS OPEN!
Serving Vegetarian Caryy-out Meals, Sandwiches,
i Salads and Assorted Goodies: 11:30 - 2:00. Mon - Fri
Hot and Thirsty?
Tree of Life Unfiltered East Coast
APPLE JUICE
$4.25Gallon
fwTTty w AWfT r ir.ri A ' " ' STREET MALL
(BUE PLANET LjfeFood�) 75Q.0&50
j :C-6.M-Sat
Organic Groceries & Produce VitaminsSupplements
Bulk Foods Herbs Health & Beauty Aids
Winner of three National CNBAM Awards
Winner of the Most Outstanding Medium
East Carolina University
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed
advertisements using sound design principles. Also
responsible for creating advertising promotions and
all in-house documents. Great portfolio builder for
printed pieces. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications
PageMaker, Freehand, Quark XPress and image
scanning. Open to all majors.
COPY EDITOR
This position edits stories tor spelling and grammatica
errors. Must be able to understand newspaper style
in accordance with the guidelines set by the
Associated Press Stylebook. Requirements: Minimum
2.0 G.P.A. Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
This job requires working knowledge of 35mm
camera and darkroom operations and will work with
a staff of photographers to supplv the photo neeas
of various meaia. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
Work well with other staff members and meet
deadlines. Open to all majors.
CIRCULATION MANAGER
The Circulation Manager is responsible for all aspects
of distribution and circulation of The East Carolinian,
both on and off campus. The manager also is
responsible for sales of new subscriptions, location
and maintenance of all newspaper boxes, the
scheduled maintenance of The East Carolinian van
& other assigned tasks Requirements: Minimum 2.0
G.P.A Must be an Eas1 -a student and have a
working knowledge � � pen 1 i majors
Apply at The East Carolinian,
2nd floor of the Student Pubs building
757-6366
� �' WAHDPItlCtS
'J JC� 18 THK0UCHSAT API! 24
� TO LIMIT QUAN-
KBITS
ADVERTISED HEM POLICV Each o these advertise '
Kt -jo' Store e�cept as speolically noted m this aa It �
cho.ee ot a comparable em. when available, reflecting the same -
chase the advertised item at the advertised pnee wilhm 30 days Only - �� ��
� .ised





APRIL 20, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
BtXjgg
re
although it's
� i ar � the long,
entually futile war
tnam- and it humor is far
blacker.
It also sums up in fewer pages
and f.neruri ting the ultimate ab-
surd; ty of war.
McAfee, who saw combat in
Vietnam as a Green Beret, says in
a note: "Fiction has been de-
scribed as truth-and-a-half. So it
is within these pages. I have seen
Slow Walk in a Sad Rain
by John P. McAfee
published by Warner
most ol these events. Those I
haven't have been told by the old
warriors, who talk of such things
around poker games, over beers,
or when they're alone and think
no one is listening
His story is told by a name-
less Green Beret officer in charge
of a Special Forces camp in Viet-
nam that is less than a mile from
Cambodia.
The motto of the camp, and a
summation of the novel, is: "Nor-
mal is a cycle on a washing ma-
chine
When the troops in the camp
aren't warding off enemy attacks
or guarding against sappers
("Sappers are the elite athletes of
the other team. They're trained
to infiltrate camps like ours for
no other reason than to blow
things up � like us, for instance"),
they are kept busy trying to un-
derstand orders coming down
from headquarters. Orders such
as: "Silence must be maintained
between the hours of 7 p.m. and 5
a.m. nightly in order to maintain
silence
Suddenly, the small group of
troopers is ordered on a mission
into Laos, and stumbles onto a
plot involving the CIA, North
Vietnam and drug smuggling.
This brings them under fire from
both sides � ours and theirs. It is
only through the combat exper-
tise of a hardened sergeantnamed
Shotgun, a veteran of World War
II, Korea and Vietnam, that some
of them survive.
This is a remarkable first
novel.
WORLD
Continued from page 7
pealing stupid cases. They have to
go back to chasing ambulances.
Maybe we could even outlaw law-
yers and just all carry guns.
Hmmm
Anyway, I hope you see what
I'm getting at. Vote for me. I'm put-
ting my platform together now.
Cranium in '96. If you're for the
death penalty, abortion, pom, legal
drugs and a lot less lawyers, you're
for Richard Cranium.Joe Walsh will
be my running mate. Please send
yourtax-deductable campaign con-
tributions to me, care of this paper.
I love va!
And remember, when some
dumb waiter or waitress tells you
that yes, it's Budweiser, when your
taste-Buds are tellingyou it's Miller
Li te, turn the table over, grabhimor
her by the name tag, and say, "Don't
run my life
The ECU Club
presents
31st ANNUAL
FASHION SHOW
"Escape to the Island of Cool, Pink Sands"
The ECU Club invites you lo join us,
and Master of Ceremonies Henry
Hinton, General Manager of Classy
98.3 & 103.3 FM. for a special
.ittemoon of fun, food & Fashions. Alter
a delightful luncheon, we'll srxjtlight
fashions from Certain Things,
C. Heber Forbes, Shoe Splash,
Snoofy Fox, Susan's & Steinbeck's-
Mens Shop.
t )l ourse, it you're lui ky, ou may get
to wear some ol these ex ittng designs
.)�� you lly down to warm, beautiful
Bermuda, courtesy of American
EagleAmerican Airlines.
SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 1993
12 NOON
HILTON INN, Greenville
Contact
Sheila Church at 551-2436 or
Lorraine Mailol
at 792-5831 or 551-5228
SI 5 ADMISSK )N per person supporting
ECU Club's Single Parent Scholarships;
clip
. hours . . . days . . .
weeks . . . years.
You've put a lot of time
and care into ypur Senior
Show to make it your best.
We, at Morgan Printers, inc
realize your poster will
introduce and reflect your
show. We also understand
quality and believe our
standards will meet yours.
MORGAN 3001 s- Evans St-
I PRINTERS, Inc. 355-5588
Headed
home ,4
for the
summer?
Store your "stuff" with us!
Free campus pick-up and delivery
? Individual storage containers
Size:W"x48"x60"
? You pack it, you lock it, you keep the key
? Local, climate controlled warehouse
? Secure, licensed and insured
VARSITY CHEERLEADING
TRYOUTS
tudent toroge
network
When the donns lock you out.
ive lock you in!
Call Now
Container quantities are limited!
800-4 U 2-LOCK
800-482-5625
Open Monday through Friday
9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. EDT
Checks and major credit cards accepted
WHEN: APRIL 23-25. 1993
WHERE: MINGES COLISEUM LOBBY
TIME: 5:00 PM
For more information contact Shannon Smith at 757-4672
THE LEO JENKINS MEMORIAL
FUN, FOOD & EXERCISE
GUARANTEED FOR ALL!
APRIL 23-24
FUN, FOOD & EXERCISE
GUARANTEED FOR ALL!
Starting Time: 6 PM
Registration begins at 4:30 PM at East Carolina University track. Get your team of 8-10 people together to walk,
run or jog against cancer. Team members run or walk in shifts for 24 hours.
For more information call
321-2836
HOSTED BY:
Alpha Phi Omega
American Cancer Society
AMERICAN
'CANCER
SOCIETY
SPONSORED BY:
Bud Light Tom Togs
Eastern Carolina Coca-Cola WCZI -Classy 98.3
Greenville Athletic Club





The East Carolinian
Sports
Pigskin pigout showcases renovations
Page 10
Ficklen, football
team trying to
improve on last year
By Biljy Weaver
Staff Writer
Ficklen Stadium, like the ECU Pi-
rate football team, is in the early stage of
renovation. There's a huge hole in the
stadium that will eventually be filled to
accomodate50,000fans. Fortunately for
ECU coaches, players and fans, the Pi-
rates hope that the holes in the 1993
team will also be filled.
For this year's PurpleGold game,
Head Coach Steve Logan had three main
objectives to improve last year's squad:
reduce turnovers, improve the kicking
game and develop the defense.
Logan said he was pleased with the
outcome. Junior college transfer punter
Bill Wilson showed promise with a 45.7-
yard average.
Although the offense did turn the
ball over five times, Logan said he was
pleased with the turnover ratio for the
entire spring.
The defense out scored the offense
34-28. In spring drills, the defense re-
ceives three points for forcing the of-
fense into three plays followed by a
punt, two points for a turnover, and one
point for any other drive stop.
The Pirate
defense
out-scored
the offense
in
Saturday's
culmination
of spring
practice.
Marcus
Crandell is
likely to
man the
helm of
the
Pirates'
ship next
season. He
gave a
glimpse of
things to
come.
Photo by Blft Ranson
Freshman Marcus Crandell started
at the quarterback position Saturday,
replacing lastyear's primary quarterback
Michael Anderson. Anderson is sus-
pended from participating in spring
drills and will be evaluated for the up-
coming season. He is not expected to re-
turn.
Crandell's first pass from scrim-
mage was a 35-yard bomb that fell in-
Pirates pound Tribe
as Overton wins 300th
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
WILUAMSBURG, Va. � The East
Carolina baseball team took twoof three
games from CAA-rival William & Mary
over the weekend to give Head Coach
Gary Overton the 300th victory of his
nine-year career.
After losing the
opener on Saturday 9-3,
the Pirates (30-12, 11-4)
bounced back with a
doubleheader sweep
against the Tribe (19-15,
3-ll)on Sunday, 7-2and
19-2.
In Sunday's first
The CAA named
Watkins the
Colonial Player of
the Week for the
second time this
season after a
game, Pat Watkins and monster week duim
which he batted
.684 (13 for 19)
with four home
runs, six RBIs and
13 runs scored.
Lee Kushner hit back-to-
back home runs on con-
secutive pitches to help
chase Tribe starter Scott
Spears (3-2) in the fourth
inning.
Watkins, who had
hit another home run
earlier in the game, now
has 17 home runs and ranks second to
Arizona's George Arias (18 in in 186 at
bats) for the national lead. On Monday,
the CAA named Watkins the Colonial
Player of the Week for the second time
this season after a monster week duing
home runs, six RBIs and 13 runs scored.
Lyle Hartgrove (7-2) pitched a three-
hit complete game and is now tied for
the CAA lead in victorieds as well.
In the nightcap on Sunday, the Pi-
rates pounded out 19 runs on 20 hits to
complete the doubleheader sweep over
William & Mary.
Mike Sanburn (6-2)
pitched eight innings and
allowed only one run on
four hits before Stancil
Morse closed out the
game with one inning of
relief.
Jamie Borel led the Pi-
rates with four hits, in-
cluding two triples, and
five RBIs, and catcher
Brian Antal, making his
second start of the season
(with the other start in
game one), went three for
four with one RBI.
Steven Pitt also went
three for four with his
third home run and four
RBIs.
The Pirates return to action today at
7 p.m. against Campbell at Harrington
Field and on Wednesday at 7 p.m. at
home versus Virginia Commonwealth
before closing out their conference
schedule with a weekend home series
April 17,1993 �Game 1
WILLIAM & MARY
EAST CAROLINA
East Carolina
William & Mary.
EAST CAROLINA
010
.102
200 000-3
032 01x-9
Borel, cf
Fedak. ss
Head, II
Kushner, lb
Walkins, rf
Pitt, dh
West. 3b
Clark, 2b
Cronan. c
Triplelt. ph
Antal, c
ab r hb bb �o
totals
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
2
1
0
0 1
0 0
33 3 7
Batting � 2B: Kushner. HR: Watkins (15).
Baserunning � Team LOB: 4.
Fielding �E: Whittle Id
WJLUAM JWARY
Knight, ss
Wilson, 2b
Ruberti, H
Bestick, rf
Laskolski, 1b
Rush, dh
Spears. 3b
Zaslow, c
Kuester, ct
ab
Totals
4
3
3
4
4
4
2
2
4
h bi. bb so
0
30 9 10 8l4 3
1
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
Batting � 2B: Wilson, Bestick 2. 3H: Wilson
Zaslow. SF: Ruberti, Knight.
Baserunning � CS: Knight Team LOB: 5.
Fielding � E: Broughton, Laskolski. DP: 1.
EAST CAROLINA ip h r er bb so
Beck (L, 7-3) 5 8 7 6 2 2
Whitfield 1 2 1 0 0 1
Layton 2 0 112 0
William I Mary
Broughton (W, 4-2)
ip h
9
er bb so
11 3
whichhebatted.684(13forl9)withfour againstCAA-leadingGeorge Mason
GAME DATA � T: 2:25. A: 225. Temp: 64
UMPIRES � HP: Dengan 2B: Green.
Jones, Blake return to Ficklen
ByWarrenSumner
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU Pirate football fans were treated
to the return of five former standout play-
ers to the Ficklen Stadium
field during Saturday's
spring football game. The
small spring crowd
cheered the return ofLuke
Fisher, Robert Jones,
Vinson Smith, Jeff Blake
and Junior Robinson with
a standing ovation.
Several former Pirate
standouts were available
forautographsduringthe
gjt Purple and Gold Pigskin
- PigoutParty,withFisher,
Blake and Jones being the
most sought-after signa-
tures. The Pirate fans swarmed the Peach
Bowl veterans, searching for signatures on
sports cards, footballs, T-Shirt, bottles of
Evian spring-water and anything else they
could find. Former Piratestar Jeff Blakedid
his share of autographing the fans memo-
rabilia, and endured endless questioning
about his future with the New York Jets.
JeffBlake
Blake said he wasexcited
aboutthejetsdecisiontopick
up Cincinnati's Boomer
Esiason and looks forward to
working with the veteran
when thenew sea-
son begins.
"Its a plus for
me because there
are a lot of things
that I don't really
know right now
Blake said. "There
are plenty of
things that he can
help me out with Blake said
he has accepted his current role
on the Jets' bench and said he is
taking things "step by step" to
become a starter.
"Itwas(frustrating)atfirst,
but I had to accept my role of what I had to
do Blake said. "My role was really to just
be prepared to play whenever I got called
on
Robert Jones, of the Super Bowl Cham-
pion DallasCowboys, received callstoplay
all season. As the Pirates only number one
draft pick, he was the major hit of the
Robert Jones
Pigout party. Jones' Super
Bowl ring, valued at over
$15,000, was absent from
the day's activities, but his
warm demeanor was not,
as Jones graciously signed
all the Pirate fans memora-
bilia.
After being selected
No. 24 in the 1992 draft,
Jones said that he had to
begin makingtoughadjust-
ments to makeiton the pro-
fessional level.
"Everything had to
raise a step higher Jones said. "That in-
crease in competition made things a lot
more intense
Jones said that being at the celebration
brought back memories of his freshman
and sophomore years in college, when he
played in the spring games. He also said
that his return evoked remembrances of
the Pirates' Peach Bowl victory in Atlanta.
"To me the Peach Bowl ring meant a
lot,becauseitwasmyfirstringthatshowed
the achievement of a goal I had set at the
See PIRATES page 12
complete but showed thatCrandell does
have the arm strength to go deep.
"I have every confidence in him that
he can do what is necessary to putting
our offense in the end zone Logan
said. "It's just a crash course situation.
That's the only negative
For the last 10 years the Pira He de-
fense has been ranked near the bottom
of the NCAA. Even in 1991, the yea r they
won the Peach Bowl, the Pirates ra nked
82nd in the NCAA Div. I-A out of 105
teams and managed to post an 11-1
record.
Larry Coyer is a new asset to the
ECU defense. Coyer is not a defensive
back or linebacker, he is the new P irate
defensive coordinator and assistant
coach.
Coyer has come into the Pirate orga-
nization with a plan to eliminate indi-
vidualism and to create a more team-
oriented atmosphere.
So far Coyer's plan has been suc-
cessful. No one player stood out �is a
dominate force in the PurpleGold
game. Gang tackling and seven offen-
sive plays were stopped for losses as the
Pirate defense showed promise for ithe
upcoming season.
On the offensive side of the ball,
Junior college transfer Jerris McPhail
proved to be a valuable addition to t he
Pirate backfield.
McPhail rushed for 51 yards, 30 cm
one play, one touchdown and a two
point conversion. "I think that Jerris is
going to be a legitimate component for
us to use Logan said.
The big test for the Pirates will be
televised on ESPN, Sept. 9 as ECU hosts
Syracuse University in Ficklen Stadium.
April 18,1993 �Game 1
EAST CAROLINA
WILLIAM & MARY
April 18,1993� Game 2
EAST CAROLINA
WILLIAM & MARY
East Carolina010 420 0-7
William & Mary000 200 x - 2
iMTJLARpUNA
Borel, cf
Head, H
West, 3b
Kushner, 1b
Walkins, rf
PUt, dh
Clark, 2b
Fedak, ss
Antal, c
�b r h bi
Totals
4
3
4
3
4
4
4
4
3
33 7 13 7
bb so
ibrhj
2 4
11
(10)
Batting � HR: Watkins 2 (16. 17), Kushner
Baserunning � Team LOB: 7.
2 2
4 3
2 3
0 0
0 0
2 1
1 1
bb to
East Carolina00(10) 303 102-19
Wmiam a Mary100 000 001 - 2
EAST CAfiOLiNA
Borel. d
Clark. 2b
Obholz. ph-2b
Head. II
Kushner. 1b
Watkins, rf
Pit. dh
Triplet ph
West, 3b
Antal, c
Cronan, ph-c
Fedak, ss
PuckeM. ph-ss
Totili
1
1
0
4
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
I
10
WILLIAM & MARYabrhbibbSO
Knight, ss3010nn
Wilson, 2b31000n
Ruberti, dh31?70n
Crekjhlon, 3b300n0n
Bestick, rf300n01
Laskolski, lb400nnn
Stone, II300001
Zaslow, c1000nn
Kuester, cf200000
Bauer, pr0000n0
Rush, c.000000
Totals30910e43
49 IB 20 17
Batting � 2B: PHt, Puckelt.JB: Head. Borel 2.
HR: PHt (3) SH: PHI.
Baserunning �CS: Walkins. TeamLOB: 11
Fielding � E: Mora.
Batting � HR: Ruberti (7).
�aserunning � Team LOB: 2.
Fielding � DP: 1
WJLLIAMAMARY
Knight, ss
Hott.ss
Wilson. 2b
Hubert), It
Creignton. 3b
Bestick. rf
Laskolski. 1h
Russol, dh
Butler, dhp
Zaslow. c
Rush, c
Kuester, ct
Stone, cf
Totals
. sb r
3
h bi
1
3
3
4
4
4
1
2
1
2
2
1
"32
1 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0 0 0
0 0 1
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 t
0 0
0 0
s
EAST CAROLINA
Hartgrove (W. 7-2)
William Mary
Spears (L, 3-2)
Abraham
Pierce
Olms
Reid
Jph
3.7 9
0.3 0
0 1
1 2
2 1
er bb so
GAMeIjaTA � T: 1:51. A: 248 Tsmp: 66.
UMPIRES � HP: Stuck. 2B: Shockey.
Batting � 2B: Ruberti 2. SH: Russell
Baserunning � SB: Knight 2. Taam LOB: S
Fielding � E: Knight, Creighton 2.
EAST CAROLINA lpHK TZ�Lj�l'�
Sanburn (W. 6-2) 8 4 110 9
Morse11i10 1
Wllllan MaryIp h r sr mTsq
Sandvig (L. 2-8) 2 S 7 7
Pl�zner 12 3 3
Re'd 0.7 3 3 3
Crtins 1.3 3 2 2
Abraham 0.7 1 1 1
Ragsdale 1.3 2 1 0
Fletcher 110 0
Butler 13 2 2
1 1
GAME DATA � T: 2:40. A: 238. Temp: 67
UMPIRES � HP: Stockey. 2B Stuck.
Tennis team's season comes
to a close in CAA toumev
By Misha Zonn
Staff Writer
The ECU men's tennis team's sea-
son ended Saturday in Richmond as
they lost to Old Dominion in the semi-
finals of the Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion tournament. The third-seeded Pi-
rates had made it to the semifinal
match by defeating sixth-ranked
James Madison 4-2 in the opening
round on Friday.
In the first round victory, ECU
was lead by wins from Anders Ahl,
Tim Johnstone, Tommy McDonaldand
Jamie Holt However, against JMU, the
Pirates could only manage two points.
On the NCAA tennis system, one point
came from the overall doubles victory,
while the remaining point was manu-
factured from Jamie Holt's singles vic-
tory. A win would have put the Pirates
into a finals match up with top seed
Richmond. A CAA title does not war-
rant a NCAA birth however, wi th only
the top four teams from each region
making the tournament. The Pirates fin -
ishtheseasonat7-3intheCAAand 14-13
overall.
The Pirates entered the stretch of the
season undefeated in the conference, bu t
then proceeded to lose two tough CAA.
matches before making a strong show -
ing in the tournament. The team was.
fueled for most of the season by the strong
performances from the fourth, fifth and
sixth seeds.
Junior captain Tommy McDonald,
who along with Tal Frydman, and Jamie
Holt solidified the middle of the order,
says thatfinishing third in the conference
was about where the team expected to
finish, even though their goal was to win
the conference. "Wefeltlikeitwasagood
year. We beat six teams mis year that had
beaten us last year. This was a sign of
improvement McDonald said. "Our two
biggestwinsoutsidetheconferencewere
against the University of Virginia and
Temple
See TENNIS page 12





APRIL 20. 1993
The East Carolinian
11
iornets vieing for post-season spot
is important,
said after
the Hornets slid past Atlanta and
into sixth place in the Eastern Con-
ference playoff race.
"I think we need one more win
tomakesurewe'reintheplayorrs
Gill said. "Everybody stepped up
for us tonight, just like last night
against Detroit when Charlotte
poasted a franchise-record margin
in a 127-93 victory.
If the Hornets hold, it will be
their first appearance in the play-
offs.
Larry Johnson broke a tie with
a driving layup with 32 seconds
left, and Muggsy Bogues made four
free throws in the last 13 seconds to
seal the victory.
"I loved it Bogues said.
"That's what every basketball
player dreams about
The Hawks' Dominique
u
ed 41 points � the
he's been over 40 this
tie missed four free
the fourth quarter and
also Hewa layup which wouldhave
tied the game with
IS seconds left.
"1 wasn't wor-
ried until the last
couple of games,
but I'm starting to
get worried now
WilkinssaidIt'sa
very close race for
those last three mhbmh
playoff spots.
About four teams and only a couple
of games separating them. Wehave
to win at least three of our next four
just to secure a spot
Charlotte is 41-38, a half-game
ahead of Atlanta, which in turn has
a half-game lead on Indiana.
"We won two huge games this
weekend and managed to slide up
to sixth place and we plan to stay
there Hornets coach A Han Bristow
said.
Johnson had 23 points, 9 assists
and 8 rebounds and Alonzo Mourn-
ing had 22 points and 12 rebounds
to follow up his 36-point, 22-re-
bound effort against Detroit.
Kevin Willis, who made 16 of
24 shots, added 34 points and 14
rebounds for the
mm �� Hawks, who have
lost three in a row
and four of their
last five.
Gill added 21
Its a very
close race for
those last three points and Den
� Curry 19 for the
playoff spots.
rry
Hornets.
Willis tied it
104-104 on a hook
with 49 seconds left. Then Johnson
drove on Willis along the baseline
for the basket, putting the Hornets
ahead to stay.
After Wilkins missed his layup
try, Willis made only one of two
free throws to make it 106-105 with
14 seconds left. Bogues, fouled by
Mookie Blaylock, made two free
throws at 13 seconds, then Wilkins
cut it to 108-107 with nine seconds
left on a short jumper.
Bogues made two more free
throws at eight seconds, then
Blaylock missed a 3-point try at four
seconds and the Hawks could not
get another shot.
The Hornets, who halted a
three-game losing streak to Atlanta
this season, overcame a nine-point
deficit early in the fourth period
with a 12-2 run, highlighted by a
pair of three-point playsby Moum-
ing- � �
The victory gives Charlotte a
21-19 road record, assuring them of
their first winning seasonal record
on the road in the team's history.
The Hornets, fighting for their
first playoff spot ever, are 11 games
ahead of lastyear's pace when they
were 30-49 at this point.
SUPERMAN
IS BACK.
BUT IS ANY
OF THEM
THE REAL
MAN OF STEEL?
"REIGN OF
THE
Supermen"
BEGINNING IN
ADVENTURES OF
SUPERMAN 501
ACTION COMICS 687?
SUPERMAN 78
SUPERMAN: THE MAN
OF STEEL 22
ALL ON SALE THE SAME DAT
THE LAST WEEK OF APRIL, 1993
THE COMIC BOOK STORE
919 Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, NC 27834
OPEN 7 DAYS (919) 758-6909 Mon-Sat 9:30-6
A WEEK Sun 2:00-6
SOUTHERN EYES SUNGLASSES
Sunglasses and Accessories
Ray Ban
Porsche
Varnet
Christian Dior
Revo Oakley
Hobie Bolle
Gargoyles Carrera
Giorgio Armani
Kingston
Place
Don't pass this up BIG Savings!
ECU STUDENTS RECEIVE ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTS
Comic Books Basebal cf dus
T -�� K singles, packs & boxes
15niris Supplies
Carolina East Mall 355-7695
Mon-Sat 10-9 Sun 1-6
We accept
HONOR
SUMMER SPECIAL
May 24 - August 4, 1993
"Sandwich Shop "
215 E. 4th Street
Greenville, NC
(919)752-2183
316 S.W.Greenville Blvd.
(919)756-7171
Every Ttiesday is
COLLEGE NIGHT
7 PM till Close
990 SUBS
Your Clwice
Ham & Cheese I iam.Botogna & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese Turkey & Cheese
All Provolone I laraSalami & Cheese
1 lam.Turkey & Cheese
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
includes tax
Parking, laundromats, bus service,
clubhouse, basketballtennis courts nearby,
swimming pool & large patio
CALL 758-5393
FAMOUS FROZEN YOGURT,
,SRING SPECIALS
& OF THE WEEK XX
May l-May 9
99C ZINGER SUNDAE
Show ECU ID for 10 discbunt
1898 Greenville Blvd. M-Sat 11:30-10:30
75X-9440 Sun 110:3�
ATTENTION STUDENTS
AnENTION STUDENTS
FEATURI
THE
Order your college ring NOW.
JOSTENS
AMERICA S COLLEGE RING
Date: APRIL 1 9-21 Time: 1 0-3:00 Deposit Required: $20.00

VI'
Place: ECU BOOKSTORE Payment Plans Available
Meet with your Jostens representative for full details. See our complete ring selection on display m y
r
� ; � � � � �� �
Rave
CLASSICS NIGHT
$3.00 Members $4.00 Guests
0 DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � 504 Jello Shots � 754 Kamikazes
SWEET 16 NIGHT
$1.00 Domestics � $2.75 Pitchers � $3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas
50C Jello Shots � 151 Kamikazes � 75C 100 M.P.H.
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for All 7 til 9:00
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � $2.75 Pitchers � 50c Jello Shots
750 Kamakazes � 750 100 M.P.H.
�cf l i i j -a i:mmmmmmmm
weEkend
DflNcE PaRTY





10
nan
APRIL 20. 1993
Marlins make most of inning
�rida scores nine in game to set
record against Houston
Benito
Sant imaBlue,
had a homer and a two-run
double in Florida's seven-run
seventh inning, and Jack
Armstrong pitched a strong
game, leading the Marlins to a
9-4 victory Saturday night over
the Houston Astros.
The inning not only was
the most productive ever for
the expansion team, but sur-
d its run total for any previ-
ous game. Florida scored six runs
on two occasions.
Armstrong (1 -2) didn't allow
a hit over the first four innings
until Eric Anthony singled to start
the fifth.
The Astros scored twice in
the inning � on Andujar
Cedeno's RBI grounder and
Eddie Taubensee's double.
Armstrong, not feeling well,
team
allowed three hits, struck out
eight and walked two in eight
innings. Anthony hit a two-
run homer in the ninth after
Jeff Bagwell singled to start
the inning against Trevor
Hoffman.
After Eric Bell replaced
Williams (1-1), Orestes
Destrade hit an RBI single and
Santiago doubled home two
more runs.
PIRATES
Continued from page 7
beginning of the season You can
and you can't compare that to a
Super Bowl ring because that is
something that most players will
never get. That's something you
can look at and cherish for the rest
of your life. It's a totally different
thing entirely
After helping his team win a
Super Bowl in his debut season, the
Cowboy star said he has no prob-
lem finding new goals to motivate
TENNIS
him.
"Some of the goals that I set for
myself have already been accom-
plished so now my goal is to do a lot
better so I can hopefully make it to
the Pro-Bowl Jones said.
Continued from page 7
With minimal losses from
graduation and a solid recruiting
dass on the way, McDonald says
that next year should be a good one
for the men's tennis team consider-
ing the amount of experience re-
turning.
"Basically we played eightguys
mis year. So next year we have six
out of the eight coming back
McDonald said. The returning six
players will indude McDonald as
wellas risingseniors Dave Wallace,
Markku Savusalo,and number one-
seed Camiel Huisman. Tal Frydman
and freshman Tim Johnstone will
also be back to shore up the middle
seeds. With the strong team mat
will be returning next season, the
Pirates should once again compete
for the CAA crown.
The last sports writers' meeting
of the Spring will be held this
Thur. @ 5 p.m. BE THERE!
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1-AUG 31
The East Carolinian is now
accepting applications
for the position of:
COPY EDITOR
This position edits stories for
spelling and grammatical
errors. Must be able to'
understand newspaper
style in accordance with
the guidelines set by the
Associated Press Stylebook.
Requirements: Minimum 2.0
G.P.A. Open to all majors.
Gain Valuable Sales Experience
TODAY
For Your Resume
TOMORROW
The Ekist Carolinian
is currently accepting applications in the
award-winning Advertising Department for an
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE
�Work with leaders in the business
community
�Create advertising campaigns
�Unlimited income potential
�No previous sales experience necessary
Apply at The East Carolinian
jr a j 2nd floor Student Pubs building
CAROLINIAN 757-6366
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
7f 7-0373 jj
Adult
Entertainment
m Center
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
MONDAYS
Sports Night
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE ?s
'Contestants need fecall & register in advance. Must umvr by 800 rr@rftfirt�fTs
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS Siver Bu�et Bartender
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
r
i
i
i
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
Eating & Drinking r,$aloon
has Your Sports!
NBA PLAYOFFS and
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
Great Daily Food and Drink Specials!
Located behind Quincy's on Greenville Blvd.
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
jHP Call 756-6278
I r.p�-iK; s miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
t W. Dlckin�on Av.
I
I
355-2946
mm
Watch for
m TROPICAL TUESDAYS "
W Coming Soon! w
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
Secretaries
Week
Specials
April 19-April 23
Combination Platters - $6.95
Served With Fried Ice Cream For Dessert
El Gato Gordo � El Toro Bravo
Tres Mosque teros � El Polio Flojo
Sangria $1.25
Mexican Restaurant
u
Call for reservations - 757-1666
521 Coianchc Si.
Revive with VIVARINf
U�only���cl.CoUciW��qiih(wt�o2cu(�o�col1w c 1W3 SmWMOHw B�t�m
i.li�-�IH.IHIH �





Title
The East Carolinian, April 20, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 20, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.939
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy