The East Carolinian, April 15, 1993






�-ft' iHa
nrr-H
1
Outta here!
After a successful
reign, General
'ana'ger, Jim Knisely,
abdicates his crown.
See page 6.
Lifestyle
See Spot run!
A classical Disney
feature comes to life on
Wright Auditorium stage
on Saturday at 2pm.
See story page 7.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 27
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, April 15,1993
12 Pages
Lancaster holds town meeting on campus
By Jason Williams
Photo by by Dail Reed
(D-N.C. 3rd District) Rep. Martin Lancaster discussed the deficit, health care, gays in the military and how
the government can help students pay for their education in his ECU town meeting on Monday.
Staff Writer
To gather input from con-
stituents in his newly re-config-
ured district, Representative
Martin Lancaster recently held
a town meeting on the campus
of ECU.
The event, held Monday
night in the Brewster Building,
was part of a day-long tour
around the 3rd District in which
Lancaster called together
groups of interested citizens to
discuss current political issues.
A sizable crowd was on
hand to hear Lancaster present
a brief speech and later ques-
tion the congressman on issues
ranging from the federal deficit
to gays in the military.
He began by expressing
hope in the new Administra-
tion.
"Bill Clinton is a very dif-
ferent president than Bush or
Reagan. He brings a new per-
spective, a higher energy level
and new ideas to the job
Lancaster said.
"So far we have taken ac-
tion on the budget proposal by
adopting the Budget Resolu-
tion. The reason it moved so
quickly is because of the impe-
tus of the president
Lancaster said the issue
that has drawn the most fire
from republicans is the
president's stimulus package,
a $16 million increase in new
spending. Included in this
package is the funding of com-
munity development block
grants.
"Republicans have la-
beled the grants as 'pork but I
think it's stretching it to call it
pork Lancaster said. "This is
just a continuation of the
gridlock and an attempt by the
republicans in the Senate to flex
their muscle
On the whole Lancaster
called the budget package re-
cently passed by Congress a
good one. He said the most im-
portant piece of the package
was the investment program.
"It will expand the women,
infant and children health pro-
grams, fully fund Head Start,
provide for the immunization
of children and refocus ener-
gies toward education
Specifically Lancaster
cited the national service pro-
gram as a positive new idea.
"This program will finance a
college education in return for
a community service kind of job
after school Lancaster said.
Also benefiting college
students are increased funding
for Pell grants, more money for
student loans and increased
funding for job training at the
college level, Lancaster said.
"Health care is also a big
issue that has yet to be dealt
with he said. "I think the Presi-
dent made a wise choice in Mrs.
Clinton to head up the task
force. I think she is a very able
person
Asked how he voted on
the Family Leave bill, Lancaster
See LANCASTER page 3
Health care
task force
member to
speak tonight
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
ECU's Schools of Medicine
and Nursing are hosting the last in
a series of Ethics & The Technologi-
cal Revolution in Health Care lec-
tures on April 15.
Daniel Callahan, co-founder
and director of the Hastings Cen-
ter, will speak at the lecture on
"The Technological Imperative and
the U.S. Health Care System: A
Moral and Policy Appraisal
"He is the director of the
Hastings Center and he also is of
member of the Hillary Clinton task
force on health care said Loretta
Kopelman, chair of the department
of medical humanities. "He is one
of the two or three best people mis
field has. He has had a profound
inflrence on this areaThe
HastingsCenter is world renowned
as an institute for generating policy
and scholarly activities.
"It puts out a journal called
the Hastings Center Report said
Kopelman. "People travel there to
study. It is a think tank of a sort
Caliahan focuses on an issue
that is of top concern today. How
should we ration healthcare? What
sort of abortion policy should we
have? Should healthcare be limited
by criteria such as age?
"He is concerned with the
kind of knee-jerk reaction there is
to advance technology Kopelman
said. "Many peopledon'twant that
and would be better off with other
forms of treatments
This lecture is the fourth in a
series of presentations supported
by the GTE Foundation, the East-
ern Area Health Education Center
and the ECU Schools of Medicine
and Nursing.
Callahan is the AuJior of Set-
ring Limits: Medical Goals in an Ag-
ing Society and What Kind of Life: The
Limits of Medical Progress.
The lecture will take place to-
day at 7:30 pm in the Brody Medi-
cal Science Building Blue Audito-
rium.
A reception will be held after
the lecture and the public is invited
to attend.
Alumni and fans to attend pigskin pigout
10th annual
festival kicks off
football season
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
The 1993 Pirate football season will
kick off this weekend in the annual
PurpleGold game. The game is one of
many events that will take place this
weekend during the Great PurpleGold
Pirate Pigskin Pigout Party.
The first of the weekend events will
be the Golf Classic Social and Auction.
The Golf Classic will begin Friday at 830
a.m. There will also be a tennis tourna-
ment to begin at 9 a.m. on Friday.
This year's Pigskin Pigout is a 10th
anniversary celebration. The first Pigout
featured Miller Lite All-Stars as well as
L.C. Greenwood. In 1984, the Gold team
defeated the Purple 12-6.
"The initial purpose was to have a
family-oriented event in the spring in our
athletic program that our fans would
enjoy coming back to do, and to offer a
way toartractnew people to our program
that do not normally attend ECU athletic
events said Lee Workman, assistant ath-
letics director for special events and ticket
sales.
Ten years later, the Pigskin Pigout
is adding new events to its list. Included
is a "First DownPIRATES" Sound-a-
like Contest to be held at 12:15 p.m. on
Saturday. The 25 contestants will be
Fans of all
ages will
attend the
10th
annual
Great
Purple
Gold
Pirate
Pigskin
Pigout
Party to be
held this
weekend.
Fair rides,
a football
games and
a concert
are just
some of
the events
planned.
Photo by
Blft Ranson
narrowed down to five for a half-time
contest. The first-place winner will re-
ceive season tickets for the 1993 home
football games, and a chance to work in
the pressbox with John Moore during the
second half of the game. Second-and
third-place winners will also receive
prizes.
"I t has become an event that alumni
and fans from all over come back to en-
joy, from as far away as Georgia, Florida
and Washington, D.C Workman said.
The annual PigCookin' Contest will
begin Friday at 10 p.m. The contest win-
ners will be announced at 10:30 a.m. on
Saturday.
Barbecue plates will be available
beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday. Plates are
$3.50 in advance or $4 event day.
Other events scheduled for Friday
are carnival rides from 6 p.m. until 12
a.m the Black & Blue liveband(Featuring
BeachTop 40), a parade of pigs at 9 p.m
and fireworks beginning 9:45 p.m.
Saturday's events will tip off with a
judging of pigs from 7-9 a.m. Outstand-
ing student athletes will be honored Sat-
urday morning at the Texasgulf Break-
fast of Champions at 9 a.m.
The Carnival, as well as the ticket
booth, will open at 10 a.m. The Pirate
football team will be signing autographs
from 1230 p.m. until 1:30 p.m.
The Suntan Bikini and Best Leg
Contest will be held at 1:15 p.m.
PeeDee will be in the Toyota tent
from 1:45 until 2:30.
The Fat Ammon's Band will per-
form from 11:30 a.m. until 3 p.m.
Tickets are available at the Minges
Ticket office orby calling the ticket office
atl-800-DIAL-ECU.
Workman said he strives to make
the event better every year. "There's still
a lot that can be done with the Pigout that
can make it better and better he said.
CNBAM awards newspaper advertising department
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
Think back to February. Were you
ready to choose? Were you ready to
become a statistic? Were you ready to
discriminate? Were you ready for your
lifestyle condom?
These were the questions run in The
East Carolinian's "Safer Sex" campaign, a
seriesof four advertisements for Lifestyle
condoms. Those ads were among three
separate published advertisements to re-
ceive awards at the national convention
of College Newspaper Business & Ad-
vertising Managers, Inc. (CNBAM), held
in Charlotte over the April 3rd weekend.
The East Carolinian (TEC) sent six
representatives to the convention: Jim
Knisely,general manager; Andy Sutorius,
advertising director; Woody Barnes, cre-
ative director; Lindsay Fernandez, ac-
count executive; Matt Hege, account ex-
ecutive; and Karen Bilyj, account execu-
tive.
The "Safer Sex" campaign adver-
tisements received third place for Best
Newspaper Promotion Campaign, larger
than 14 page.
Second place for Best Newspaper
Promotion Ad went to a TEC Help
Wanted ad, placed in the July 8, 1992,
edition.
A Mardi Gras advertisement from
the February 25 edition of TEC received
second place for Best Display Ad Color.
These threeadswereplaced incom-
petition with newspapers from across
the country, including UCLA, the Uni-
versity of Hawaii and the University Daily
Kansan, a newspaper called "the best in
the country" according to Knisely.
All of these newspapers were di-
vided into two categories � those with a
weekly distribution under 20,000 and
those with a weekly distribution over
20,000.
TEC, with distribution at 24,000,
fell into the "over" category, thus com-
peting with newspapers that have as
many as 100,000 papers distributed each
week.
"TEC has limited resources, but
we managed to beat every other school in
the state Knisely said.
Knisely pointed out that TEC, with
an annual budget of less than $250,000,
was up against schools with annual bud-
gets over $2 million.
Knisely said that some of the com-
peting schools are staffed by profession-
als who have graduated from school, and
therefore have ample time to focus on
their newspapers. The situation at TEC is
different because it is completely stu-
dent-staffed, aside from the secretary.
"That shows that we're really do-
ing something Knisely said, and noted
that the advertising department has un-
dergone an entire transformation.
"Woody Barnes, in my opinion, is
the best creativedirectorwe've ever had
Knisely said.
Bames joined TEC'sstaff in the sum-
mer of '92, and immediately began to
change the quality of TEC's ads, Knisely
said.
"Woody is on top of everything
See AWARD page 2
MHHHM1





'�mOmtmmnm-
APRIL 15. 1993
April 1
10 p.m.
. 20-veaj �' woman in Tyier Hall by
on the fir Socr. The
man.
April 5
6:39 p.m.
On the second floor of the Health Services Library, a man
assaulted a woman by grabbing her behind.
2:34 a.m.
Two men, ages 44 and 39, were arrested on the west
commuter lot and College Hill Drive for (hiving while intoxicated,
resisting arrest and obstructing justice. The men resisted arrest by
breaking free from the officers.
April 6
4:lo p.m.
An unknown person stole a woman's bookbag and wallet
with a total value of $86, from the third floor of the Science
Complex Building.
8:54 a.m.
Almost $600 worth of computer equipment was stolen from
the media board office.
April 7
10:30 a.m.
A room in Garrett Hall was entered by an 18-year-old man
who proceeded to steal a wallet from the room's occupant. The
matenals stolen amount to about $140.
April 9
9:15 a.m.
An unknown person broke the back windshield of a 1990
white Mercedes south of Scott Hall in the parking area.
3:25 p.m.
The back passenger window of a green 1991 Mitsubishi was
broken out south of Fleming Hall by and unknown person.
12:14 p.m
The passenger window of a white 1988 Acura was broken
out at the south end of Jarvns Hall.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from ECU
Public Safety records.
Kingston
Place
Don't pass this upBIG Savings!
SUMMER SPECIAL
May 24 - August 4, 1993
AWARD
Continued from page 1
Knisely said, "He's got to be the
most talented and mostdedicated.
We couldn't have gotten these
awards without him
Knisely said Bames brings
the newest ideas into the depart-
ment, staying ahead of "what's
going to be next" in the advertise-
ment world.Bames said he wanted
TEC to really take a stand on is-
sues that are important through-
out campus. "I think my biggest
disappointment concerning the
"Safer Sex" campaign is that it
didn't cause quite the stir across
campus that I hoped for Barnes
said.
"College is the only time in
your life where you get to explore
and become aware of different
people with different cul hires, val-
ues, ideas and personalities
Barnes said. "I wanted these ads
to say 'look beyond appearances,
look at the individual
The "Safer Sex" campaign
incl uded four full-page ads, and a
day of passing out free condoms
to students at the Student Stores.
Knisely said the campaign
was a group effort. Joe Horst, opin-
ion page editor, wrote the text for
the ads, with information pro-
vided by Jennifer Phillips, healLh
educator for Student Health
Services.Bames said he hopes to
produce more series promotionals
in the future. "We're trying not to
leave anybody out Bames said.
"If we save a life, change an
attitude I know of one business
professor who took 20 minutes at
the beginning of his class time to
discuss these ads and condom
awareness Bames said.
THE LEO JENKINS
MEMORIAL
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while you wait
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Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
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Starting Time: 6 p.m.
Registration begins at 4:30 p.m.
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Team members run or walk In shifts for 24 hours.
For more information call 321-2836.
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APRIL 15, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
f "TT Fit
feff
Continued from page 1
Una, he explained that President
Clinton has not yet proposed a
tax on to � iroducts "He
assured me that everything will
be on the table, however
Lancaster said.
He said that a tax of $1
would eliminate a projected
811,000 jobs and a tax of $2 would
"put us out of business for all
practical purposes Lancaster
continued, "I think some people
want to kill a program rather
than raise revenue to pay for
healthcare
Discussing the deficit,
Lancaster said, "If the budget is
ted over the next five
w ill reduce the deficit.
� 4 percent of GlOSS
tic Product (GDP) goes to-
g the federal deficit.
t years 2.7 percent of
will go toward that end
Lancaster warned, how-
ever, that reducing the deficit
will take time. "The debt that
we built up in the last 12 years;
we will still be paying for well
into the 21st Century
Lancaster closed express-
ing support for a line-item veto.
He then invited participants to
stay for refreshments.
Lancaster, a Democrat
from Goldsboro, is a Vietnam
veteran and a former member of
the North Carolina House of
Representatives.
He has served in the U.S.
House since 1986.
News Writers - don't show
up at 4:00, there's no
meeting.
Have a nice day.
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Amy Elizabeth Fletcher
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Melissa Bahnick
Katrina Ixc Barker
Susan Rebecca Bartlctt
Dcbra Rcgina Bcaman
Tara Lyn Bcauchemin
Allen Perry Bennett
Amy Elizabeth Bonds
Sara Christian Boswcll
Stephen Gregory Boyd, II
Tammy IMonica Boyd
I,cslic Rcncc Boyles
Kimberly Ann Brookbank
Christina Cencal Brown
Heather Laurie Brown
lennifer Susan Bullard
I,avnine AfetK Bycr
Elain Nancy Calmon
Kenneth Drew Campbell
Heather Irene Carroll
Cynthia Nicole Carte.
IJoyd Ixe Cauldcr
Heather Danac Chapman
Helen Marie Civils
William Staccy Cochran
Annamaria Bartram Cogan
Julie Lee Coleni.m
(harles Lawrence Comiso
Wendy Michelle Conglcton
Michael Brandon Conlcy
Laura Dcnisc Cope
Rebecca Caroline Cowan
Jennifer. Card Crisp
Phyllis Ann Davis
Sarah Kay Deans
Kristina Anne Demc
Antoinette Theresa DeRosc
Erin Cathcryn Oonegan
Brian Dopkowski
Theresa Anne Dud.ish
Charles Kcndrick Dunham
Emily Robinson Dunn
Allison Elizabeth Hakes
('h.iMty Ciayle F.dniondson
Jennifer Lynn Edwards
Joseph Edward Elder
Hrm Elizabeth Flliott
Jack Raymond F.mbrce, III
Melissa Shawn Ferrer
Jason Michael Foil
Tara Katherinc Folan
Tabitha Ann Foss
Meredith F.lizabeth Gardner
Scarlctte Kaye Gardner
Dayna Williams Gilliam
Alisa Nicole Godwin
Dcana Michelle Grccnup
Curtis Wilton Griffin, III
Douglas Fdward GrindstaH
Brandie Iec Harkcr
Vance Alan Harritan
Knstyn Noel Hartley
Virginia Sutton Heath
Shannon Denec Helvcy
Holly Katherine Henries
Regan Hillcbrccht
Laura Ann Hincs
Ginger I.ynctte Hinson
Brcnda Fayc Hodowaruc
Jennifer O'Neal House
Amy Dcannc Jackson
Heather D-igh James
Janine Leigh Jason
Laurie Heather Johnson
Wendy F.lizabeth Jones
Wendy Pilar Jones
Nicole I.ynctte Joyce
Michael Albert Kachman
Andrea Winslow Kight
Holly Kristcn Kight
Kent M Knorr
Rhonda Michelle Irwis
Kaye Lynn lng
Robert Franklin Long
John Michael Lewi
Daniel Fdward Mackison
Jennifer Dawn Malecki
Jamie Brent Marsigli
Joseph John Martc, Jr.
Chkora Heather Martin
Michael Anthony Martin
Kcllic Jean McClung
Maureen Lynn McKenna
John Patrick McNeil
Leslie Vanora Meirs
I any Dean Michael
Heather F.llen Mkkschutz
Robert Fdward Miller
Angela Dcnisc Moore
Charles A Morct, Jr
Debra Ann Ncgclc
John Paul Nardella
Fllie Harrell Nay
Lining Hoc Ngo
cir initiation into the
their academic success
college:
Heather Danielle Okland
Carrie Elizabeth Olcson
Jonathan David O'Neal
Trcva Rose Outlaw
Jennifer Lynn Owen
Gladys Suzanne Paschall
Elizabeth Anne Patterson
Angela Marie Pcarcc
Ryan Donald Perry
Elizabeth Lee Petty
Jean Anne Picarclli
William Robert Pierce
Melissa Dale Pittman
Marie Louise Platccl
Tamika Candccce Powell
Debbie Rcncc Raper
William Van Ratliff
Angclia Dcnisc- Respass
John Thomas Ranker
Joseph Paul Rislcy
Shannon Marie Rochcllc
Wendy Dcnisc Rowland
Luke Andrew Sanders
Katherinc Amanda Seism
Kelly Dcnisc Shaw
Tiffany Lynn Schiller
Rcncc Andrea Sflber
Rachcllc Lynn Simmons
Matthew Howard Slate
Paul Jonath n Smith
Wtedy 11 'ssell Smith
Suzanne Michelle Snydcr
Cindy Ciail Spann
Chandra Lcnclle Speight
AmvSuzcttc Stanley
Kimbcrlcy Dale Starling
Jen.ii Eileen Stem
Richard McKinley Sugg
Jennifer Dawn Tcttcrton
Kristin Anne Tomasctti
Misty Snow Triplctt
Shanata I xlestc Waist on
Adricnnc Elizabeth Walter
Catherine Elizabeth Weaver
Clover 1 cab Webb
Diane Lynn Welch
( htiMiin Marie Wcrrell
Barbara Ann While
Paul ltoiiglasWhitlock
Angela Thereac Willis
Amy Mh lulle Wilson
( h.ules 1 ec Wilson
Kristcn KimberleyWissel
Gma Ann Woody
Wendy Lcavitl Worsky
Initiation: April 15, at 6 pm, in Jenkins Auditorium
SE INDECISION
S2.(K) 32 02 DRAFT �
. 1.





By Sean Parnell Phoebe
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ECU STUDENTS RECEIVE ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTS
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BROOKGREEH
APARTMENTS
1108 E. 10th Street
PRE-LEASING FOR
JUNE, JULY & AUGUST 1993
Brand new 2 bedroom, 2 full bath units
with all major appliances.
Located within walking distance to campus.
CALL 752-8900 or stop by the office
Apartment 1-H Monday - Friday 9:00 - 5:30
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Corolinion is
currently accepting
resumes for the
following positions:
ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
This job entails prospecting new clients, selling
creative advertising campaigns and
supporting advertising clients. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. No previous sales
experience is required but is helpful. Open to
all majors.
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed
advertisements using sound design principles
including; contrast and focal point. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of
Macintosh applications; PageMaker, Freehand,
QuarkXPress, and image scanning. Open to all
majors.
Goodbye, Jim Knisely. We'll miss working with you.
It's been real fun. And good luck Lindsay Fernandez.
We look forward to working with you.
� The staff of The East Carolinian
Leadership Transitions
ECONOMY MINI
STORAGE
USE YOUR
STUDENT
DISCOUNT
SHARE WITH A ROOMMATE
SPECIAL RATES MAY 1 � AUG 31
300 FARMER ST
GREENVILLE
757-0373
Today!
Thursday, April 15,1993
3:30 pm,
109 Mendenhall Student Center
Call 757-4796.
red by Student A LeadershipDevelopment Programs, 757-4796
Today!





TheEastCarolinian
LOOKINGFOR V. NEWhe EC U busline
Let us helpHome Locator
fee ($55).
NEED AN APARTMENT THIS SUM-
MER? 1 Bedroom Apt clean, new, close to
campus. Sublease 1, 2, 3 months. Call 752-
4721.
SUMMER APT. FOR RENT, comer of 4th
and Meade, 1 block from campus, single
Bedroom, 758-7361.
A GREAT DEAL - Sub-lease for Ringgold
Towers from May to August. Onebedroom
for two people. Furnished. Close to campus
and downtown. Rent5300month. Call 757-
3475.
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT 1
BLOCK FROM CAMPUS. Laundry ac-
cess, swimming pool, big enough for 2.
Starting beginning or mid-May! Call nov
756-2628.
APARTMENT FOR SUBLEASE, summer
only. One room efficiency unit at Ringgold
Towers. Clean, private, close to campus.
Call Dennis at 757-0905.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT. Discount in
summer months, if 12 month lease is signed
- TWIN OAKS, 3br, 212 bath. Available in
May - For further details, call 752-2851.
Thanks, W. Martin.
NICE TWO BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment downtown across from campus.
S450mo. rent. Sublease May through Au-
gust with option to renew lease in August.
Call 757-1244. HURRY!
1 BEDROOM, FULLY FURNISHED, May
- July. May rent paid Ringgold Towers -
1st floor Parking included in S375.00
month utilities (cheap). Call ASAP 830-
6278.
SINGLE ROOMS FOR RENT for summer
sessions. S250 per s.s. includes rent,
-utilines,and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
lAVAaABLE JUNE 1. Spacious, clean 4
-bedroom 212 bath, 1 block from campus,
We, off street parking, central air, wd
hookup, prefer 3 females. No smokers. No
pets. After 5 758-7515.
SUBLEASE FOR THE SUMMER at
Georgetown Apartments. Furnished and
available the first week in May. Call 752-
0009, ask for Heather.
FULLY FURNISHED SUMMER
SCHOOL APARTMENT 2 bdrm 365
month utilities. Great location 752-0085.
KINGSTONPLACE2bedroom,21 2bath
, furnished units, available May 15 and
August 1. $140.00 per month with 4 people.
Call Pro Management 756-1234.
CHARLES STREET TOWNHOUSES
available in May. Located behind the Pan-
try on 10th street. 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath
units with all appliances. 450.00 per month.
Call Pro Management of Greenville 756-
1234.
112 FLETCHER PLACE - 3 bedroom, 2
bath house available now. Large greatroom
with fireplace. 620.00 per month. Call Pro
Management of Greenville, 756-1234.
200 LEWIS STREET - 3 bedroom, 2 bath
house available June 1. 630.00 per month.
Call Pro Management of Greenville, 756-
1234.
TWIN OAKS - 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath
townhouse available May 1. 585.00 per
month. Call Pro Management of Greenville
756-1234.
SUBLEASE: Room for rent. Fully furnished
house. Pay S200 a month plus 13 utilities.
Available for summer. Please contact 756-
4735.
Roommate wanted
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED for
apartment 1 2 block from Art bldg 3
blocks from, downtown, and. 2 blocks from
�ni.ii kit. Criit tor .irt students. Call
757-1947
URGENT! ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 1 bedroom apartment in Tar River.
Must be responsible social drinker and
non-smoker 5155month plus 13 utili-
ties. Call Kelly or Linda 931-7821.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for twobedroom
apartment located across the street form
downtown and campus. Call 8301617,
leave a message and I'll get back with
you.
2 PEOPLE NEEDED to sublet 2 bedroom
apt. over summer. 144 utilities. Call 355-
5986 anytime.
FEMALE NEEDED to share 3 bedroom
apt. �Stratford Arms. 145 utilities Call
355-5986 anytime.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED begin-
ning in May. 2 Bdrm, close to campus,
5200month 12 utilities and phone.
Please call Lesley at 757-9647, leave mes-
sage.
ROOMMATES needed for summerfall;
3 bdrm. house, 1 block from campus; low
utilities, ac, washerdryer. Call
Stephanie at 752-2560.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED to share
apartment this fall. Must be responsible,
non-smoker. Call Mike at 757-1994.
NEED MALE ROOMMATE FOR FALL
of '93 to live at Eastbrook (pool, bus,
cable) two-bedroom S185 rent plus half of
utilities. Call Randy 758-9961.
oC
Classifieds
Page 5
Qd,ppi5g
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now lairing Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
19" FISHER ADVANCE MOUNTAIN
BIKE, and accessories $300 752-0392.
REMINDER - SPRINC IS HERE! Need
to get in shape? The club is the answer for
you. Aerobic classes, weight room, free
babysitting and tanning! Looking for
someone to take over contract member-
ship - best deal in town. Call Kate, at 757-
3437 now.
1983 YAMAHA 550 MAXIMA MOTOR-
CYCLE red, low miles, new brakes; tires,
tuned, inspected, 2 black helmets, S700
ask for Dylan, 752-2429.
1979 BMW 320i, runs good, only 88,500
miles, amfm cassette, 4 Pioneer speak-
ers, needs some work, only SI 500.00 call
355-7412.
fPM
ypyya
CHEAP! FBI US SEIZED: 89 Mercedes
- S 200,86 VW - S50,87 Mercedes - SI00,65
Mustang - S5. Choose form thousands
starting S50. FREE Information 24 hour
hotline 801-379-2929 copyright NC
030610.
SINGLE MATTRESS AND
BOXSPRING only used this semester and
still has two years left on warranty. Make
me an offer 830-3691.
FOR SALE IMMEDIATELY - all in good
condition: sofa, S90; box spring and mat-
tress, S50; glass end table $20; small appli-
ances and fan, $9 each; washing machine,
$90; 1986 Toyota Tercel (70,000 miles and
good condition), $2,750. Call 756-5488 be-
tween 10 AM and 12 noon (ask for Berry)
call 752-7824 after 8.30 PM.
THULE surf racks for sale - good condi-
tion - with locks. $75. ELECTRONIC KEY-
BOARD with synthesizer, rhythms and
percussion, great for beginners. $100.00.
Call Cori at 752-2478.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS, trucks,
boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI,
IRS, DEA. Available your area now. Call
1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
MOVING, MUST SELL all furniture, 2
couches, end tables, recliner, lamps, cof-
fee tables, and dishes. Please call 758-
5213.
LOFT FOR SALE: Sturdy L-shaped loft
fully carpeted and painted white $100 or
best offer! Call Kelly 931-7821.
CLUB FOR WOMEN ONLY MEMBER-
SHIP S29 per month. Save $59 initiation
fee. 321-6831.
QUEEN SIZE WATERBED $100; and
chest of drawers $30: Both in great shape!
Call 758-5213.
TWO GUNS -N- ROSES TICKETS for
sale for the concert on April 16. Contact
Anna at 757-1053.
26" MEN'S TAKARA BICYCLE, 12
speed, red. $125. Also 6'2" Hotline surf-
board, Tri-fin, exec. cond. $175. (830-9348)
Ask for David.
1989 CBR 600, two helmets, tarp. $2600.
752-0392.
ft

$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers (GI)
1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC
27705
200 - $500 WEEKLY. Assemble products
at home. Easy! No selling . You're paid
direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free Informa-
tion - 24 hour hotline. 801 - 379 - 2900.
Copyright NC 030650.
TIRED OF BEING A POOR COLLEGE
GIRL? Earn 100's a day escorting in Gre-
enville. Must have transportation, own
phone, and outgoing personality. Must
be very self conscious and well groomed.
We offer flexible hours to work around
classes and nights. For more information
call 757-3477 and ask for Amy. All infor-
mation held in strictest confidence.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church, 510 South Washington St on
Sunday mornings from 9am until
12:30pm. To work with toddlers through
3 year olds. Applicants must be punctual
and dependable. Applicants also should
have cheerful, friendly and caring atti-
tudes in their interaction with children
and their parents. For application infor-
mation contact theChurch office 752-3101.
WANTED: Experienced wait staff at Gre-
enville Country Club. Apply in person.
Tues. - Thurs. 2-4pm.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS REST, accept-
ing applications for wait staff and bar
staff - 2-4pm daily. No phone calls ac-
cepted. Located behind Quincy's
Steakhouse.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS REST, accept-
ing applications for cook and dishwasher.
2-4 daily. No phone calls accepted. Lo-
cated behind Quincy's Steakhouse.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON to care forsmall
children in our home. Tuesday and Thurs-
day, 7:30 - 5:00. Call 756-0417after 6:00p.m.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED Great
money, great club. Easy hrs Thurs Fri
Sat. 9pm - 2am. Cash $$$ Cash $$$ Cash
$$$Call Paul (919) 736-0716Mothers Play-
house.
CHILD CARE GIVER FOR SUMMER. 2-
3 children, ages 5-7. Experience or relevant
education preferred; transportation and
references required. 758-2106 after 5:30.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All mate-
rials provided. Send SASE to National Dis-
tributors, PO Box 9643, Springfield, MO
65801. Immediate response.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many posi-
tions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-436-4365
ext. P-3712.
PART-TIME STOCK PERSON. Apply at
Youth Shop Boutique Arlington Village.
PART TIME - Set own hours - Full time
pay! Leads provided to sell aCancer Policy
that will sell itself. Highest commissions in
industry. Call for info. 321-3434.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT -
fisheries Eam $600week in canneries or
$4,000month on fishing boats. Free
Transportation! Room and Board! Over
BASKETBALL CARDS - buying Hi.ips
Redemption Set and other insert and star
cards; pa ying cash. Cal 1756-0685 after 6p m.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOT O-
COPYINCSERVICES:Weoffertypingand
photocopying services. We also sell soft-
ware and computer diskettes. 24 hours in
and out. Guaranteed typing on paper up to
20 hand written pages. SDF Professional
Computer Services, 106 East 5th Street (be-
side Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this summer?
Only S169 Jet there anytime for only $169
with A1RHITCH! (Reported in Let's Go! &
NY Times.) AIRHITCH @ 212-864-2000.
PAINTBALL: This is the most fun you can
have with your clothes on! Call 752-8380 for
Information and Reservations. WE BREED
EXCITEMENT.
PIRATE PAINTBALL: We are on the cut-
ting edge of high-energy entertainment. Call
752-8380 for reservations and Information.
MINI STORAGE - 148 Brand new storage
units, very close to university, cheap rates,
EVANS STREET CENTRE MINI STOR-
AGE 355-7443.
RESEARCH INFORMATION!
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
OLL FREE
HOTLINE
in Calif. (213) 477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. �206-A, Los Angles. CA 90025
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
�Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Comprised Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
ATTENTION GRADUATES!
YOU CANT TAKE IT
WITH YOU
SELL ITI
Student Swap Shop
EVANS STREET MALL
IS PAYING CASH
for
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Stereo Equipment
Video Equipment
It you ore selling you mid be 18
with a picture 10 (NCDL. ECU)
Don't pay to move it!
752-3866
Mon 10-12 1-5
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3
Sat 10-12
Pork behind Globe Hardware
8c use our new rear entrance
THANKS TO THOSE WHO PLAYED
PAINTBALL LAST FRIDAY Green
team, that'll teach you to mess with Blue
team. That secession the Alamo was De-
fended. Come out and paint a friend. Next
game Ls April 18th - Sunday. Call Paul at
752-8380.
MONKEY WOULD LIKE TO THANK
BABY GIRL and Amanda for his wonder-
ful surpriseyesterdayaftemoon. Itsmelled
great and 1 just wanted to eat it up � but
what we did was much better. See you
soon, with a surprise of my own.
GALE: riey girlfriend! How'sitgoing? So
wasn't the other night just a blast wonder-
ing if we were going to make it to our
destination or not! 1 almost got us lost and
then I thought the cop was definately go-
ing to give us a breathalizer! Of course we
made it to BFE and back and all the cop
wanted was to let you know your tail light
was out! And on top of that he was a total
babe�NOT! Well, I can't wait to see what
happens the next time I look at you and
sayDo you want to get a pitcher at Sub
Station?" If 1 ever say any thing like that
again please be strong enough for the both
of us and say NO! Of course I know you
won't be "cause you're weak Gale-you're
weak! Just kiddin Later Gator! MO
JENN1: Hey honey. Just taking the time to
drop you a little note in the personals. See
what you've started? It never would have
gotten this bad if you hadn't had to play
tricks. Just kidding, you know I appreci-
ated the thought and the action. Hope
everything is going alright down in SA
and I look forward to hearing from you.
Love, Joe
TO WAYNE "RAGAZZ1 MANBleach
your own sleeves, pal, or get a new job!
Love ya
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA will be holding
a 'Take a Chance for Saint Jude's Children's
Hospital" April 12-16 in front of the Student
Store. Take a chance for only SI .00 and win
lots of prizes.
HOLUE: It's Alpha Phi Omega Adventure
Time! Be ready and stay on your toes. You've
been a Great Uttle Brother! Love your Big
Brother, FRY BABY.
TO THE BETA SIGMAS OF ALPHA
OMICRON PI - Won't be long now, keep
go jig - the best is yet to come
CONGRATULATIONS to the Alpha Omi-
cron Pi softball team on their win last Wednes-
day. Keep up the good work girls
, - -t � SUMMER CAMPSTAFF: Counselors, Instructors,
f A �kjk, Kitchen, Office, Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
i tmi i tvmirAAn ed youth sumiIier sP�rts camp WiJ1 lra3n �ver 25
CAMI PI EWOOD activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
art Cool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792.
FIELD SCOUTS - Late to Mid-September.
Must be trustworthy, reliable, conscientious, in
good physical shape, love the outdoors and have
reliable transportation. Salary plus milage. Excel-
lent opportunity for college students and teachers
looking for summer work.
Send resume to: MCSI, PO Box 179, Grifton, NC 28530
FAX to 919-524-3215.
or
Atlantic Beach's No. 1 nightclub for fun, excitement and
great working conditions, is looking for highly motivated,
outgoing, talented, energetic, smiling persons for:
Bartenders, Hostesses, D.Js,
Waitresses and Security
Call: 726-7000
A
-
-
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Exceptional Value
Available Immediately. One and two
bedroom apartments close to campus.
Water and sewer is FREE.
Laundry facility and ECU bus service.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
HELP! I'VE LOST MY KEYS: They a.eon
an Outward Bound - engraved blue Swiss
Army knife keychain and a brass "D
They havebeenmissingsince Spring Break,
and were lost somewhere between Stu-
dent Pubs Building, Biltmore St and
maybe Tar River Apts. Call Dana with
clues, 931-7825 - Please
JOHN: I am so proud of your awesome
accomplishment! Who would have
guessed you could go downtown without
getting arrested? I guess "Molly" kept you
out of trouble! Love ya - KT
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Eam $4,000-85,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1 -800-251 -4000 Ext. 1576
EAST
Advertising Account Executives & Turn to Page4
Creative Director
for more infer?"
Announcements
GREENVILLE IAYCEES
The Greenville Jaycees will
present a Magic Show Variety Revue
in Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theater on Monday, April 19th -
Show times areat5:30and 8:00. Tickets
will be sold in Central Ticket office for
both shows on show night for $6.00. All
proceeds go to benefit charity, namely
the Leo Jenkins Cancer Center and the
Summer Moore Foundation for United
General Palsy. This is a professionally
performed benefit. For more informa-
tion, contact Lynn Sullivan, Project
Chairman, at 757-3413.
mmwmmmmw
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
Thel993Greenville-PittCo.
Special Olympics Spring Games will
beheld on April 20thatE. B. Aycockjr.
High School in Greenville (rain date:
April 22). Volunteers are needed to
help serve as buddieschaperones for
the Spec ialOlympics. Volunteers must
be able to work all day-from 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. An orientation meeting will be
held on April 15 in Old Joyner Library
room 221 from 5-6:00p.m. (The first
ones there will be assigned a position.)
Free volunteer t-shirts will be provided
the day of the games to all volunteers
mi�ii�a��WILH tS �imi u
who ha ve attended the orientation ses-
sion. For more in forma tion,contact Lisa
Ihly at 830-4551.
POTTER'S HOUSE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
David Fowles was a young
man raised on the streets of LA. look-
ing outfor himself wasthe only wayof
life he knew. This lead him to spend 5
years in prisons before he was 21 years
old. His parole officer and those in
charge of him told him he would al-
ways be involved in drugs, alcohol,
and violence because men like him
could not change. But he did change.
Come see how. Sunday April 18th at
11:00am and 7:00pm Potter's Christian
Church 3026 E 10th St. (Across from
Hasting's Ford) 752-0805.
THE EAST CAROLINA COLLEGE
DEMOCRATS
The East Carolina College
Democrats invite you to meet most of
Eastern North Carolina's elected offi-
cials on April 17. The 1993 Pitt County
convention and Pig Pickin' sponsored
by the College Democrats is Saturday
atl 1:30, followed bv the South Roanoke
Fellowship. This is your chance to
munch on some BBQ and cha t with the
Governor and many other elected offi-
cials. Pla y a role and get involved! Ca 11
the College Democrats at 931-8970 for
more information. Hope to see you
there!
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will
meet on Monday, April 19,1993at5:15
pm in21 SRagsdale. New membersare
welcome to attend. Our guest speaker
will be Tom Johnson, Attorney at Iaw.
Hope to see you there!
TRYOIJTS FOR THE 1993
GOLDEN GIRLS
The Golden Girls are the
dance line affiliated with the Marching
Pirates.This group performseach year
at all home football games, parades,
pep-ra Hies and band exhibitions. Plea se
wear suitable clothes and sneakers for
tryouts.Bepreparedtoleamtwodances
and a short marching routine. If you
have any questions or require addi-
tional information, please contactKelly
at931-7829,orCarterat931-7604. Sat-
urday, April 17, from 10:00am-4:00pm
in Christenbury Gym Room 112.





mmtttmmtmmasmmsgir
� m i �
The East Carolinian
ThursdayOpinion
Time for goodbye
General Manager Jim Knisely's
successful one-year term in
office ends with promise
It's official, J am now unemployed. I have spent two
years of my life across from Joyner Library, on the second
floor of the Student Publications building working for
this fine newspaper. An unlikely place for an accounting
major.
Being general manager has been the most exciting,
stressful, beneficial and interesting experience of my
life. You learn a lot in this position. I won't spend the time
to list the many experiences. I will, however, tell you the
biggest lesson I learned � If you can recruit a talented,
cohesive and dedicated staff, vou can accomplish jst
about anything. It is of this lessor that I am most proud.
We have, without a doubt, one of the finest staffs on
campus including Public Safety.
As many of you already know, we gave the paper a
face-lift this year. Color pictures were added and for the
first time ever, we started publishing full-color graphics
(a most difficult task when all the computers' monitors
are black-and-white) and we even changed how we write
the words "The East Carolinian The layout was com-
pletely upgraded to a more modern and progressive
look. We put a great deal of time into all those changes, all
for the benefit of our readers. When all the budgets and
cash are put aside, what remains is a newspaper that
operates with the best intention of improving our univer-
sity.
The advertising staff has also been extremely suc-
cessful. The newspaper won three national awards this
year for our advertising department, which might help
explain why we are well on the way of exceeding last
year's sales, and then some. Because of our success, we
were able to purchase $35,000 worth of new computer
equipment � equipment which will save us $8,000 a
year, increase the resolution of our paper by three times,
and increase our computer network's speed by 5,000
percent.
All of these accomplishments and the many not
listed are the result of the hard work and dedication of The
East Carolinians' staff. I owea great deal of thanks to them:
� Andy Sutorius, advertising director and stud-man
of the paper, reorganized the advertising department
into a very productive and profitable team.
� Woody Barnes, the most talented creative director
we've ever had, designed our logo, advertising rate card,
letterhead and endless ads for the paper. It is a result of his
talent that enabled thepaper to win three national awards.
� Michael Albuquerque, business manager and my
primary consultant, was with me from the very begin-
ning. I couldn't have made it through the year without
him.
� Matt MacDonald, a very talented, knowledgeable
and mild-mannered systems manager, was the brain-
storm behind our computer acquisition.
� Blair Skinner, managing editor and one of our
most ambitious and eager employees, consistently kept
the editorial board working together.
� Cori Daniels, layout manager and the reason I
stopped drinking Maalox Plus for lunch, has worked
with the staff better then any other manager before her.
She redesigned the layout for the opinion page, and
developed our full-color graphics .
�Deborah Daniel, our secretary and good friend, is
loved and worshipped by everyone that works here.
Deborah, we love you!
�Lindsay Fernandez, the paper's new general man-
ager, ; one of the most hard-working people I have had
a chance to work with. I wish him and his staff a very
successful year.
Finally, I would like to send my deepest thanks to all
the editors, account executives, writers, cartoonists, pho-
tographers and typesetters for making it a great year.
Thank you!
Opinion
Page 6
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabt-th Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Billiard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed. Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call f919) 757-6366.
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
By Gregory Dickens
Land of opportunity poses multiple questions
America has perpetually
acted as a planet of ego since its
inception (or is that "planet of id"?).
We have taken the "land of oppor-
tunity" motto to its extreme and the
psychological result has made us
mad with power.
We have a tumultuous moral
crisisonourhands,especially where
life and death are concerned.
The oft-repeated statistics on
the increase of violence in our soci-
ety immediately conjure images of
Washington, D.C (the nation's
"murder capital") or even Miami,
where seven tourists have been
killed sinceOctoberbecauseof their
foreign origins, and high schools
where 100,000 handguns are taken
daily by students. Maybe you con-
sider the feared riots in L.A. Or the
Baltimoreshootingof 12 peopleover
a crap game.
Perhaps this wave of violence
isa symptom of an ethical dilemma
instead of its cause. Americans are
dealing with lifeand death in greater
proportions and in a new arena: the
domestic front. Wenowruntherisk
of being cavalier with our souls, in
various philosophical definitions,
and thesoulsof others. What'sworse
is the politicizing of such abstract
beliefs and the enforcement of laws
on opposing faiths.
The dilemma entails causing
death at various stages of life and
the judgement of when death is
appropriate. The debatesteel cage
match over abortion rages over who
has the right or the reason to termi-
natealifebeforeitleavesthewomb.
Is an economic basis enough to de-
termine if a baby is to be born? Is the
parent's desire to have the child
groundsenough forabortion?Then
again, who else but the parent
should decide if they will carry and
care for a baby? When is an unborn
child considered a human as op-
posed to a tiny ball of biochemical
goo?
Religious debate on the last
question seems immediately moot;
should I impose my faith onto a
mother who may not want her child
just so I can sleep better at night?
Have I ensured a life at the cost of
the quality of that life?
The counter to this is capital
punishment, which isoverwhohas
the right or the reason to tenriinate
a life after a crime. Who can decide
who has deserved death because of
a crime? What crimes establish the
border between life and death sen-
tences? Doesn't killing someone
constitute a crime itself?
Why should a mrninal who
has ended another's life or liveli-
hood be spared from equal suffer-
ing? Should we follow
Hammurabi's precedent and ren-
der unto him (the criminal) what he
has rendered unto others or under-
take a more accepting system of
justice and try to rehabilitate mass
murderers and the criminally in-
sane?
Can a person even choose to
kill themselves? Dr. Kervorkianhas
made an issue of this with his sui-
cide machine. Can I choose when I
want to die? If not me, who? My
doctor if I'm in a coma? My family?
A judge? In Europe, if you unsuc-
cessfully attempt suicide, you are
tried and jailed. You're made a
criminal. To what extent should a
religious viewpoint enter into the
decision?Catholicism denounces
suicide but Eastern monks have
previously immolated themselves
as a form of protest.
We condemn a man who
killsanarxrtion-performingphy-
sician and yet, laud a mother for
killingthemanaccu�ed of molest-
ing her son. The battle in the
Northwest concerns employment
over the lives of indigenous ani-
mal life.
Can any future decisions
and laws balance out our beliefs?
If we rule against abortion but
legalize the death penalty nation-
wide, what are we saying to those
outside our country? What are
our collective congruent thoughts
on life and death? What, dear
reader, do we believe in?
America is toutedasthe land
of opportunity. It remains to be
seen what moral decisions will be
made with the numerous oppor-
tunities given to us.
to jet W MeshCoW
CocUtom
omasa

Cheat on
me0S
Journalism is the ability to meet the challenge of filling space.
Rebecca West
Journalism: A profession whose business it is to explain to others
what it personally does not understand.
Lord Northcliffe
Letters to the Editor
Campus minister disputes atheist's claims
To the Editor:
In response to the letter
entitled, "Atheist uses Bible to
show error of homophobes I
believe theauthor ismisguided
in some of his assertions.
Leviticus 18:22 reads "Do not
lie with a man as one lies with
awoman TheHebrewword
for "lie with" is shakab which
means "to have sexual rela-
tions This clearly is referring
to homosexuality.
Deuteronomy 23:18 is refer-
ring to cult prostitution, but
has nothing to do with the pre-
vious text.
Romans 1:24-27 clearly
identifies homosexual acts as
being "unnatural relations
among other things. Consid-
ering that procreation requires
male and female and that our
sexual anatomy is perfect for
male and female sexual rela-
tions, it is obvious what God's
intentions were when He cre-
ated us. That is what is natu-
ral.
Senyszyn's view that
Jesus said Sodom was de-
stroyed because of its "inhos-
pitality to strangers" is way
off base. The text indicated that
Jesus was not commenting on
why Sodom was destroyed,
but said "it would be more
bearable for Sodom than for
that town" which had rejected
His disciples. The notion that
the story of Sodom was a "ruse
to cover the incest of Lot and
his daughters" is ludicrous.
Why would the story even be
included in the text if the au-
thor wanted to cover it up?
The view that David and
Jonathan or Naomi and Ruth
were homosexual is a stretch
of the imagination. Can men
love one another without hav-
ing a sexual interest in each
other? Certainly! It is called
friendship. Our society cannot
be so jaded as to believe that
whenever men or women are
this close, they must be homo-
sexual.
Senyszyn'sassertion that
the Song of Solomon is
"homoerotic poetry" is his
apparent ignorance of that text.
Male and female speakers are
indicated in the margins by
the captions "lover" and "be-
loved" respectively. We know
the gender because of the He-
brew pronouns used. This is a
heterosexual couple.
Toclaimthatjesuswasa
homosexual is blasphemous
and not even worth reply. I
simply say that the relation-
ship between Jesus and His
disciples was spiritual in na-
ture, not sexual! The Bible does
teach that "the time will come
when men will not put up with
sound doctrine. Instead, tosuit
their own desires, they will
gather around them a great
number of teachers to say what
rheiritchingearswanttohear
(2 Timothy 4:3) That day is
here, but I don't need an athe-
ist to explain God's word to
me. God gives us a choice to
ei ther accept or reject what His
word says. Some people would
rather change what God says
than to live accordingly.
I do not hate nor fear
homosexuals. They are people
just like me, struggling with
sin. The good news is that God
does love usand desiresa rela-
tionship with us. We can come
to Him, but we must acknowl-
edge our sin and repent.
To love people is to be
honestand truthful with them,
not hide the truth which can
savp them. I truly hope we can
all look to God for the answers
and thatSenyszyn can find the
faith in God his soul yearns
'or.
Tim Turner
Campus Minister
Campus Christian Fel-
lowship
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
Exams, grades
place undue
stress on students
Ah, tite sweet sunshine the heat the
bikinis the Exams.
Whoops! How did that get in there?
Through some tragic error in Nature, exams
pollute this time of year for students across the
world. Thisweekl'dliketosharewithyouaslice
of philosophy thatyou would do well tocutout
and display on your refrigerator, preferably
somewhere your parents will see it
Now, if you are like many college stu-
dents, exam time brings far too much stress,
sleeplessnightsand increased antacidcaffeine
consumption.
There isnoparticularneed to worry exces-
sively aboutanyoneexam more than you would
any normal test (unless, of course, you need a
certain grade on said exam to pass the course)
simply because if s just another test. Perhaps a
larger test, but a simple test nonetheless.
The thing that often amazes me is that so
many people get so tense about exams, but they
didn't give an ounce of bat guano about any of
thenumerous tests that they had throughoutthe
semester. Why start to care at the end? In most
cases, the final exam only makes up about one
third of your course grade, so if your academic
shipissinking,adecentgradeonyour exam will
not likely fix the gaping hole in the hull.
On a higher plane, let us now discuss the
grades themselves,sincethat'swhatalltfusboils
down to, right?
Simply put, gradesareevil. Noifs,andsor
butsaboutit Theyarethestihkinghellspawnof
the devil himself.
Do you remember back in kindergarten
when you learned to count to 20 or say your
ABC's without messing up? Remember when
you would lather up your hands with non-toxic
fingerpaints and slap up a horrendous misrep-
resentation of Mom for the prestigious Refrig-
erator Gallery?
Doyou ever remember getting a grade on
any of those things? An "A" in Sharing 2000,
perhaps? certainly don't. What I remember is
a time filled with wonder, one of discovery; a
time when I could leam at my own pace, unfet-
tered by the trivialities o the glorious grading
system. If you did well, you were given a pat on
the head, and perhaps a gold star.
Times were simpler then, and a hell of a lot
more fun. There was no such thing as a final
exam or even a grade, but something far more
important in education � there was a love of
learning.
This is really my point. The love of learn-
ing isall bu t lost in college, murdered by the fear
of grades and the vicious competitive drive that
says "You must do better Ask yourself why
you're here and answer honestly. 'To get a
better job and make more money right? That,
my friends, is the wrong reason. We need to get
the joy back into the learning process. We need
to slow down and releam what it's like to learn
something because we want to, not because we
have to. Only then will any of this make any real
difference at all.
Maybe what we need todo is harken back
to the days of the golden stars, the milk breaks
and nap times. Weneed tobreakoutofthiscycle
of learn-worry-forget and enjoy what we do,
team what we need and perhaps break for
cook'esand milk with our neighbors before nap
time. When you really lookat itdosely, we'reall
in the same grand Simon Says game anyway.
Now stop reading, think about it, go get a
pizza, and watch some cartoons
wmmmmmmmmm
�-





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ilT m m
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
Duran Duran makes successful comeback
Staff Writer
n you say (cough) comeback7
Well, probablv the only pop band
with two self-titled albums, the undis-
puted Tiger Beat pin-up princes oi the
19S0s, the creamy steamy lust hunk glam
boys from Britain � Duran Duran � is
back. They're back with a new record
that's flirting with alternative charts (get
that), the Top 10 smash "Ordinary
World" that's flirting with Kasey
Casern's 1 slot and a collective ego not
unlike the too-puffy wad in Markv
Mark's Calvin Klein briefs.
In a recent phone interview, The
East Carolinian spoke with D2 (short for
Duran Duran) bassist and founding
member John Taylor via teleconference
from Los Angeles. Among the more than
30questions asked, Taylor candidlv and
articulately covered topics ranging from
a 1980s music revival to the "acid-rave"
component in his band's music to the
Gulf War to how D2 compares to the
Beatles.
henwe first startedTaylorsaid
in response to why their new album,
Duran Duran, sounds so 'dance-ori-
ented "we were attracted to that
electrodance, four-on-the-floor thing.
There was that feeling from (the song)
"Planet Earth" (off their 1981 debut
Duran Duran) on
The new album, with 12 original
tunes and a lame cover of Lou Reed's
"Femme Fatale was composed in gui-
tarist Warren Cuccurullo's London flat
between 1991-1992 on acoustic guitars.
Funny though, since it's a predomi-
nantly mechanized, synthesized and
mildly industrial sounding record.
Even Taylor admits, "the drum ma-
chine on most tunes makes the grooves
in those songs angular, though not too
impersonal
Actually, despite D2's utter lack of
a drummer (Taylor said "we'll just pick
drummers up as weneed them"), Duran
Duran maintains a fresh edge of
chunkified dance music, not anesthe-
tized like Jesus Jones' or dehumanized
like Ministry's, but "yuppyized" per-
haps, softer round
the edges and
gooey like cheap
gum.
Despite the
minimalist acous-
tic appeal of "Or-
dinary World
most of the album
favors early Duran
Dur" (circa their
debut, Seivn and the
Ragged Tiger and
Arena) in its beat-
heavy thump song
structures, pep-
pered with tasteful
guitar splashes
and Taylor's often brilliant bass lines.
Vocalist Simon LeBon dominates the
D2 sonic mix (as always) with his flappy
though full George Michael-ish voice.
Stand-outs on Duran Duran include
"Drowning Man "Come Undone" and
"Too Much Information the latter of
which is a "hard rocker that maintains
its acoustic edge Taylor said.
Duran Duran
Regarding
Duran Duran's
'sound' and the
band's somewhat
surprising come-
back to heavy-hit-
ter pop machine sta-
tus, Taylor had
lots to say. Seem-
ingly defensive
and a tad jaded
about D2'shistori-
cal dismissal by
serious music rock
critics' as
candycane poster
boys for drooling
pre-pubesccnts,
Taylor likened his band to the Fab Four
(you know the Beatles used to be on
the cover of TeenBeat he chimed) and
often portrayed a rather gilded image of
his quartet.
"A misconception about us is
'they're not musicians�they're a video
band Idon'tfeellikewe'reTheCure
because you never know what you'll
get when you buy one of our albums
We haven't been subject to the hysteri-
cal attention like in the early 1980s. . .
The idea of an early 80s revivial is abso-
lute nonsense. We're not living off nos-
talgia. We're not part of a revival and
neither is Annie Lennox or Boy George.
"When you start out (as a rock band)
you don't discriminate among the me-
dia, such as TeenBeat, you just want to
communicate with as many people as
possible
Taylor also expounded on the mood,
backdrop and flavor to the writing and
recording of Duran Duran.
"When I first started making music
I was really into escapist music. But as
time went by, it was impossible not to
get caught up in society's conflicts. We
made this (new) record during the Gulf
War, which influenced (songs such as)
'Drowning Man' and 'Too Much Infor-
mation Frank Zappa told us to cover
'Femme Fatale' three years ago so we
finally did The album itself wasborne
See DURAN page 9
Young audiences will see black spots
Photo courtesy Stuart Secttor
Scene from '101 Dalmations'
By John Bui lard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
ThisSaturday, Wright Audito-
rium will be over run by a hundred
canines�plus one. "The 101 Dal-
matians" will be played out on the
campus stage beginning at 2 p.m.
The Arvada Center Childrens'
Theater's Terry Dodd adapted the
story from theclassicchildren'stale
by Dodie Smith. The show is being
brought to Greenville as part of
ECU'S '9293 Young Audiences
Performing Arts Series.
If you haven't read the book or
seen the movie, "The 101 Dalma-
tians" relates the adventures of a
family of Dalmatian dogs. Missus
and Pongo are the parents of pup-
pies that are "dognapped They
must race against time to rescue
theirpuppiesand retumhomewith
a little more than they had bar-
gained for.
Retaining much of Smith's En-
glish flavor, Dodd has written an
excellent, literate adaptation of the
classic that has been the favorite of
youths and parents alike for 40
years.
Dodd also kept true to the aims
of The Arvada Center Childrens'
Theater by adapting the story in
such a way as toallow for audience
participation. Thus, "The 101 Dal-
matians" to be put on here at ECU
is an interactive, participatory
children's production, as the audi-
ence helps Pongo and Missus find
their puppies. The audience's par-
ticipantsactually "become" the 101
lost Dalmatians as they join the
escape and return home.
The production is fully cos-
tumed and features multiple sets
and music
The Arvada Center Childrens'
Theater, based in die Rocky Moun-
tain region, is the leading provider
of professional theatrical experi-
ences for young people. The ACCT
produces two original mainstage
works each season and plays host
to over 60,000 youths annually in
itshometheaterat the Arvada Cen-
ter for the Arts in Denver.
The production, lasting just
under an hour, is suitable for all
ages, even the very young. The
Rocky Mountain News exclaimed,
"We barked. We rolled in make
believe soot. We crawled over a
makebelieve fence toget away from
a frighteningly real, mean old
womanAdmission is by Young
Audiences Performing Arts Series
season tickets or by single ticket.
Single tickets for the Arvada Cen-
terChildrens' Theater performance
of "the 101 Dalmatians" are $8 for
adults, $6 for ECU faculty and staff
and $5 for ECU students and
youths.
Tickets are on sale at the ECU
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center. Orders may be
charged to major credit cards by
mail or by phone (1-800-ECU-
ARTS)
Superman can be found in Greenville
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
When Superman died last No-
vember, some said he would return
someday to the planet he loved and
protected. In Superman The Adven-
tures of Superman 500, that seems to
be true.
The issue, which goes on sale in
Green villeFriday, April 16,atNostal-
gia Newsstand, features a story in
which Jonathon Kent, Superman's
foster father, is revived from a heart
attack and declares that the Man of
Tomorrow is alive.
At thatexact instant, four differ-
ent beings appear and each claims to
be Superman. One is a cyborg, one a
ruthlesssuperbeing,oneasuper-pow-
ered teenagerwho thinks he'sadone,
and one is a steelworker inspired to
create armor and weapons thatmake
him a literal Man of Steel.
Charles Lawrence of Nostalgia
Newsstand, located a t919 Dickenson
Ave isenthusiasticabout these latest
developments.
"People were moved at thestory
of Superman's sacrifice in Sufierman
75 Lawrence said. "Now they're
excited at the possibility of his return.
Each character will be introduced in
Adventures 500, then each will star in
oneof the regular monthlySuperrnan
books, Superman,Adventureso)"Super-
man, Action Comicsand Superman: The
Man of Steel. Every day since word
leaked out, I've had customers, new
andold,comeintothestoretofindout
when they can buy these issues
Superman 75 made headlines
around the world as people stood in
line to get a copy. This time, La wrence
says, there will be plenty for every-
one.
"I know how much people care
about Superman, and I've ordered
enough so everyone who comes in
will be able to read this historic issue.
I think this new storyline, "Reign of
the Supermen will be an important
chapter in the Superman mythos.
Sure, people will want to try to guess
which, i f any of these guys, is the real
Superman, but I think these stories
will also show what makes Super-
man so important to all of us, espe-
cially these days
Nostalgia Newsstand isopen for
business Monday through Saturday
from 930 am to 6 p.m. and Sunday
from 2-6 pm. In addition to the
monthly Superman comic books,
Nostalgia Newsstand carries a full
line of DC Comics and graphic nov-
els, including Sitpertnarv Panic in the
Ski and The Death ofStqxrman.
Hootie's comin' to town!
Hootie & The Blowfish will rock O'Rocks Friday night.
Who's There
The Attic:
Thu-Panic
Fri-Hooty and the
Blowfish
Sat-The Sex Police'
Mug-Shots
Thu-Captain Cook and the
Coconuts
Fri-Follow For Now
Sat-Mother Nature
Moodswings
provides 'Moodfood'
as
By Andy Sugs
Staff Writer
Imagine this:
you'repilotinga flying
Lamborghini station
wagon through the
cosmos, with your co-
pilot, wearing a bath-
ing suit. The canteens
are filled with cham-
pagneand thebackseat
isan air mattress. Now
then, this is the sensa-
tion you get listening
toMoodfood.
JJ.T. Hood and
Grant Showbiz,
known collectively
Moodswings, spent five years on
Moodfood, their debut album.
Moodfood's 12 tracks add up to
about73minutesofmusic,or"au-
ral medication for tired minds
I agree with this appellation.
Moodfood is relaxing, pleasant and
motivating, and, while if s all dif-
ferent, it all flows together. The
music is jazzy, funky and light,
with plenty of heavy riffs thrown
in here and there.
The album features several
guest performers: guitarist Jeff
Beck, vocalist Chrissie Hynde,
John Andersonand Linda Muriel,
and pianist LizUpchurch,toname
a few.
"Spiritual High (Part m)" fea-
tures excerpts from speeches by
Dr. Martin Luther King.
One of its incarnationsSpiri-
tual High with vocalsbyHynde,
is featured in Single White Feitmle,
thernovie.Despitesomebignarnes
behind the mike, Moodfood is pre-
dominantly music. One of my fa-
vorite numbers is "Skinthieves
featuringhotguitarvvorkbyBeck.
Anyone who likesjammin'guitar
will want tobuy Moodfood for this
track.
There's "Rainsong a beau-
tiful number that goes from
speaker tospeakerand all around
thehead; if smagic. Beforegetting
into the jams, 'Troblem Solved"
Moodswings
begins with some absolutely beau-
tiful piano work. And if you wantto
talkaboutflowingmusic,talkabout
"Microcosmic"
The tracks are all fairly long,
with the exception of "100 Total
Success a funky little dilliance
which runsa mere 351. "Hairy Pi-
ano the final number and another
of my fa vori tes (with Liz Upchurch
on theSteinway)runs857.The three
segments of "Spiritual High" flow
in and out of each other likea creek
in a rainstonn for almost sixteen
minutes.
Butwhatifthey'relong?You'll
want to listen to the whole thing at
one sitting, anyway. In their press
release, Mood swings says they're
not interested in "sales, units, radio
playlistsor potential chart position
Mootifood is meant to help "fight
pessimism, lonliness and grief
AndniteIlyou,Iheldontothis
disc for weeks (months) before fi-
nally turning in my review, and I
was never pessimistic the whole
time.And, just take a look at the
jacket It folds out and has a cool
collageofthingsthatrepresentearth,
air, fire and water. It's fun
Moodfood is a beautiful thing. I
recommend it for everyone with a
stereo Even if your preference is
Brazilian tree-tribe musicyou 11 like
Moodfood.
So, look here, on a scale of 1 to
10, Moodfood is a 10.
ATTIC
Cat's Cradle (Chapel Hill):
Thu-Bettie Serveert
Fri-Poster Children,
Sat-Archers of Loaf �
O Rockefeller's k L
Thu- W
Fri-Friction Wheel with
Breed 13
Sat-Dear Dead Deliah
� ���- mnHM





APRIL 15, 1993
ench film in platform release
ivier
Holland has established herself
asaieofEun'smostacxjonUshed
newdirectors. 1 ler 19&S " Angry 1 lar-
vest" received an Academy-Award
nomHTatkjnasbestforeign-language
film, L.ast year, her "Eun pa Europa
won a Golden Globe and New York
Film Critics prize. It could have won
the Oscar, except that German au-
thorities declined to name it as the
country's entry. (They were accused
of touchiness over the film's depic-
tion of Nazi brutality.)
"Olivier Olivier" is more chal-
lenging than "Europa Europa" but
not as well realized or convincing.
Likeanymysterytrequires ultimate
logic, and the filmgoer is left ponder-
ing matters remaining unexplained
Yetthereisfascinarionintheoriginal-
ity of the story.
Olivier is the 9-year-old darling
of a tense provincial family, evoking
thejealousyofhisolder sister, Nadine.
One day Olivier leaves on his bicycle
to deli ver food to his grandmother (a
curious reference to Red Riding
Hood). He fails to return.
His mother, Elizabeth, is
destroyed by the disappearance. His
iarianfather,Serge, is listresst d
th's breakdown and takes
.HiasvignmentinNorthAfrka.Nadine
seems little concerned about her
brother'sabsenoe.
.cars pass. A police officer
who had investigated thedisappear-
ance has been transferred to Paris. He
arrests a 15-year-old street rat who
seems to bear a resemblance to the
missing01ivier.Whatr'smore,rheboy
tells things that only Olivier could
know.
The delinquent is taken to the
parents, who accept him joyfully as
their lost am. Nad ine is unconvinced.
Her doubts deepen when the boy
seduces her. Is this incest or? The
truth is revealed inashocking climax.
Plot d iscrepancies cannot be dis
cussed here without disclosing the
surprise. At any rate, Holland pre-
sents an intriguing story (inspired by
a newspaper item) and directs a tal-
ented cast, especially Gregoire Colin
astheretumingboyand BrigitteRouan
as his distraught mother.
"Olivier Olivier" is a Sony Pic-
tures Classics release produced by
NLirifcLaureReyre.TheratingisRfor
sexuality, language and adult situa-
tions. In French with English subtitles.
Running time: 110 minutes.
Please recycle
Tlie East Carolinian.
Thank you.
Sm�tcti Shap-
215 E 4th Street
Greenville, NC
(919)752-2183
316 S.W Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC
(919)756-7171
Thursday Night Is
TACO NIGHT
Two Great Tacos
or only 99'
60 oz. Pitchers
$1.99
Offer good from 6 pm to Close
PROCTOR BARBER SHOP
Men's Hairstyling
222-D Cotanche St.
758-3802
1.00 OFF
for all ECU Students
Corner of 3rd &
Cotanche
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Greenville 321-2670
Opening April 17th
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STUDENT SPECIAL
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KiVER BIRCH TENNIS CENTER
$30.00 per Doubles Team - Men or Women
GREAT PRIZES Fisrt & Second Place in each division
T-Shirts to all participants
� Round robin format � Balls provided � USTA rules apply
for more information call 530-4559 or 755-2030
in the event of inclement weather, the tournament ivill he canceled
and all entry fees will be considered donation to the Boston work team
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APRIL 15, 1993
The East Carolinian
i on can 11'�,
when . that.
1 herefort, there s an ui
nastiness
Taylor�who cites Bernard
Edwards, James Jamison, Dill
Wyman, John Entwhistle and
Paul McArtney as his chief musi-
cal influences�indicated pro-
gressive musical strivings with
the new album.
"I wanted many of the songs
to have that hard, rave-acid kind
Continued from page 7
.Warren (a founding
eroi Missing Persons who
ed m Zappa's hand) is
into John Milton so he was also
influence on this record
Regarding Duran Duran's
mellower, more relaxed image,
Taylor said: "We're getting older.
In the two to three years since our
last album we've had marriages,
divorces, babies, bankruptcies
and crises, and you can't help but
keep it all out of the lyrics. We
never could'vewritten 'Ordinary
World' in the 80s. Things then
were 'party' and gratuitous.
Things move more slowly now.
Now, there's more humanity in
our band
POSITION AVAILABLE
CIRCULATION MANAGER
The circulation manager is responsible for all
aspects of distribution and circulation of The East
Carolinian, both on and off campus. The manager
also is responsible for sales of new subscriptions,
location, and maintenance of all newspaper
boxes, the scheduled maintenance of The East
Carolinian van & other assigned tasks.
Must be an ECU student, maintain a
2.0 average and have a working
knowledge of Excel.
Apply at The East Carolinian,
2nd floor Student Pubs building.
757-6366.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
FOOD & DRINK
AT HALF THE PRICE!
12 Price Appetizers
Sun-Wed 9:00 pm-12:30 am
EVERY MONDAY!
All Day
12 Price Pitchers of Beer!
Vtf EVERY WEDNESDAY!
All Import Beers $1.25!
MialccmBBStcruianl 71
521 Cotanche St. � 757-1666
Large Selection of
ROLLERBLADES" and PADS
GOLF & SKI SHOP
200 E. Greenville Blvd
Greenville, N.C.
756-1003
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails creating computer designed layout for all
sections of fhe newspaper by incorporafing up-fo-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand. QuarkXPress, and imdge scanning.
Open to all majors.
ASSISTANT LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails working with the Layout Manager creating
computer designed layout for the Opinion and Classifieds
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand, QuarkXPress, and imdge scdnning.
Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
This job requires working knowledge of 35mm camera and
darkroom operations ana will work with a staff of
photographers to supply the photo needs of various
media. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Work well with
other staff members and meet deadlines. Open to all
majors.
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
The chief duties are to create or oversee the creation of
artwork using both traditional and computer-generated
artwork to compliment the newspaper text and
advertising. Also, supervise the comics section. Minimum
2.0 G.P.A. Knowledge of Macintosh applications,
illustration, design and cartooning. Open to all majors.
BUSINESS MANAGER
This position is responsible for administering the
newspaper's funds available by controlling all requisitions
for purchases and analyzing financial data for the
Advertising Director and General Manager. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of marketing,
management, finance and economics and experience
using Excel. Open to all majors.
Apply at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the
Student Pubs building � 757-6366
J





Page 10
The East Carolinian
Sports
April 15, 1993
Q and A:
Logan reveals hopes for '93 season
This Week in Baseball
ByWamenSumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Q. How does the teamlooksofar
in spring practice?
Steve Logan, ECU's head foot-
ball coach: Based on what I've seen,
1 think we have a chance to have a
better football team, and by that I
mean all three units (offense, defense
and special teams) complementing
each other.
Last year, because of some defi-
ciendes we had on the defense and
the kicking game, it got to where if we
didn't outscore somebody, we
wouldn't win the football game. We
have brought in a new junior college
punter by the name of Billy Wilson,
who has punted the ball extremely
well this spring I've brought in a
new assistant head coach and defen-
! srveccordirator,Coach(Lany)Coyer.
He's got a personality that has begun
totakerootonthedefensivesideofthe
.football I think next year we can
realisticallypunttheballand expect to
play ?ome defense. That is a football
team, those are three units comple-
menting each other, the offense not
turningtheballover,thespedal teams
punting the ball effectively and the
defense going down there and put-
tinga stop to'em so wecan get theball
back-Fromthataspectlthinkwehave
� a better team.
Q: Coach, you mentioned that
Coach Cover's personality has taken
iover on the defense. How so? Is he
,1 more aggressive?
A;CoachCoyerisanexperienced
.ardprofesaonalfcotballcrachinthe
� sensethathe'sgot30yearsofcoaching
� underhisbelt That isexactry the kind
lot man I wanted to bring in the pro-
� gram. Larry came in here and just
iover the course of spring ball, there
"has been a very aggressive attitude
Injected into the kids, a unity that
hasn't been here in sufficient quanti-
tiesprevtoustohimbeinghere.Ithink
that if well continue to foster that
personality as a group, our defense
will be a much improved unit next
year.
QWithlastyear'sdefensivedis-
appointment, and the toss of Tony
Davis toacademkprc4jtems,thepres-
CM STANDINGS
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOC.ATION BASEBALl� �TN�N�
CAA Pet, owrlt Pet. Homa Awy Nauttl Sttasfc
George Meson
Old Dominion
East Carolina
UNC-Wllmlngton
Jamas Madison
William Mary
Richmond
5
5
9
4
2
2
1
01.000156.71410
1.000254.86218
3.750271073022
4.5001716.51510
6.000141253811
B.1821612.5719
5.167171258610
4
5
5
7
3
3
6
3
0
e
10
9
8
6
0
2
0
0
0
4
2
Won 4
Won 7
Won 3
Lost 1
Lost 2
Lost 3
Lost 3
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Bitting AvsrsasClass Pos.
BATTING LEADERS
O AB H AVO.
PAT WATKINS, ECU
Ksvln Qlbbs, ODU
Stan Casty, UR
Mark Baron, ODU
LEE KUSHNER, ECU
Corsy Brooms, UNCW
Rob Mummsu, JMU
QsoR EdssIL QMU
Tumsr Wllllsms. ODU
Jay Johnson, JMU
Jsson TroMo, JMU
Juds Donato, ODU
Drag Dssrse, QMU
Jsff Dsusch, UR
Rysn Bsard, ODU
JR
FR
FR
SR
SR
SR
FR
JR
SR
FR
JR
JR
SR
JR
SO
RF
OF
IB
OF
1B
C
SS
1WP
OF
DH
C
OF
IF
2B
36
126
100
69
93
122
130
62
101
76
62
79
37
29
29
29
37
33
24
29
28
21
23
29 106
21 66
29
26
99
62
63
40
36
36
47
49
34
37
28
22
26
37
31
34
26
.414
.400
.394
.397
385
.377
370
.366
.359
355
.354
.352
362
.343
.341
CAA batting leaders
No.
CrandaUisperfonningwellforthe been frightened of vingcreguy
teaminsprigdrills-Howwouldyou M-MfgJJ
comparehissryfetoMktaelAnder- STf
scanTjeffBlake? ingasr�p.That'srsmartWways
A:Marcusisgotngtobeaquar- try tohavebothguyssoldon thaveto
terbac�toftr�mokiofeffBlakein w(adsa, .
totl'mgoingtotavetomowMarcus Q: ECU has developed, over fhe
aroundalotHe'snotapurepocket �St
passer.Hecertainlyhastheabilityto gram for its athletes. Will that con-
Fila Photos
ECU'S head MM coach, S.eve Logan, lJya� "� "K"M
. academic l- ZZZ'��'miZ�EZ
sure is on the defense. Who has
stepped up so far this spring?
A: I think when you look at
indiiduals,and quitehonestlywe've
tried to downplay individuals this
vear�we had some individualism
last year that I think hurt our football
team. Everything we've done this
year is team, team, team, team, team.
Thaf s all we've talked to our kids
aboutButlknowthatthereare times
whenyouhavetolookatindividuals
and as far as the defense goes I think
Bernard Carter has thechancetobea
'bellcow' for us I think that where
Bernard goes, our defense may go
along with him so to speak. I think
that Morris Foreman also has the
chance to improve upon a real solid
freshmanyear. 1 think those twokids
will be good football players.
Our talent on the defensive side
of the football issufficientenough for
us to be competitive. I believe that
andlhavealwaysbelieved thatand
IexpectCoachCoyertodrawthatout
of us.
Q: As a freshman, Marcus
DOUBLES

15 Corey Broome, UNCW
14 Sean Casey, UR
12 LEE KUSHNER. ECU
11 Rob Mummau, JMU
TRIPLES
No. PlsvarTssm
Gsmss
33
26
37
24
Gsmss
RUNS BATTED IN
No. PlayeriTeam
3 Kevin Glbbs, ODU
No.
HOME RUNS
PlayerTeem
29
Game
40 LEE KUSHNER, ECU
36 Geoff Edeeil, ODU
34 PATWATKI'S.tCU
31 Mike Rubertl, WAM
28 Corsy Brooms, UNCW
25 Juds Donato, ODU
STOLEN BASES
No, PlsyarT�m
37
29
37
29
33
29
13 PAT WATKINS. ECU 37
9 LEE KUSHNEa ECU 37
7 Corey Broome. UNCW 33
26 Kevin Glbbs. ODU
26 Shawn Knight, W&M
16 PAT WATKINS, ECU
17 JAMIE BOREL, ECU
14 Kevin Nehrlng, JMU
29
26
37
37
24
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION PiTCHINO LEADERS
be that, but he's also 5 feet 11 inches
tall. Ifs going to be my job as head
coach to develop an offense like we
had with Jeff where I'm moving him
outof the rxxiet Marc Crandall has
tremendouspaceon theball andgood
accuracy. He's a bright young man
and I have trerrtendousccnMencein
tinue during your coaching career?
A; It'sgottennoeasier, ifs gotten
nxxesbingmtifanything-Asklefrom
the demands that the university puts
on our kids, aside from the demands
that the NCAA puts on our kids, I've
gone forward personally and I'm de-
rnanding what we call '100 percent
ami rave nTemerwuuMxsuiucisiii ��-o . �
Earned Run Average
Bobby Walker, QMU
Qeofl EdssIL ODU
Sssn Hsnnsasy, ODU
John Smith, ODU
MIKE SANBURN. ECU
JOHNNY BECK, ECU
Greg WMteman, JMU
Mlk. Ragedala, WAM
Chris MeBrMs, UNCW
BRIAN SMITH, UNCW
Class
SR
JR
SR
JR
JR
JR
SO
SO
SO
JR
W
3
6
7
5
5
7
1
5
2
3
IP
31.0
40.3
62.7
51.7
61.0
66.0
36.7
483
33.7
40.7
P. M Wt
1.16
1.79
2.01
209
2 21
225
2.62
296
3.20
3.32
4
6
14
12
15
17
10
16
12
16
CAA pitching leaders
back at East Carolina next year.
Q: Will Marcus see action next
year even with outstariding perfor-
mances by Michael Anderson?
A; Hell see action regardless.
Last year I had a good two-quarter-
back system with Michael and Sean
(McCctrinell).CMroffensive system is
not simplistic at all. It takes a tot of
thinking under center. I've always
tendance. Our football team is ex-
pected togo toeverydass,everyday.
IkrsowftiataveragestLKimtprob-
abtyctoesn'tctothatbutfootbaU play-
ers aren't your normal students. We
have very high standards that we set
for them.
This is something I put into op-
See LOGAN page 12
WINS
No. PlsvarTaamLL
7 JOHNNY BECK, ECU 7 2
7 Sean Hennessy, ODU 7 2
6 LYLE HARTGROVE. ECU 6 2
6 Geoff Edsell. ODU 6 0
STRKEOUTS
PIsysTfTaam
swings
SAVES
No. PlayerTeam
W L
1
5 Heath Altman, UNCW 2
3 Wayne Gomes, OCHJ 1 1
3 Adam Butler, W&M 1 2
60
45
43
43
42
39
37
35
36
35
JOHNNY BECK, ECU 68
John Sm�h, ODU 51.7
Geoff Edsell, ODU ��3
Scoff Foster, JMU ��
Sean Hennessy. ODU 62.7
MIKE SANBURN, ECU 61
RICHIE BLACKWELL. ECU 29.7
Keith Pettus. UNCW 51.7
Brian Smith, UNCW 40.7
Mark Foster, UR �-7
ZzZTdtenvMpKS- Q: As a freshman, Marcus thinking unoer center. - mr �w -
Hobson sisters provide Bucs leadership on and ott held
i��t,r and believe important, but fiery when it's on the Cheryl isoff to aJorric.starttwj
"By Dave Pond
Staff Writer
Providing leadership and outstand-
ing play, sisters Cheryl and Stephanie
Hobson are critical to the success of Sue
Manahan's 1993 Lady Pirates Softball
team.
The sisters are each seniors and are
two of the Lady Pirates' captains, along
with fellow senior pitcher Jenny Par-
sons, but this is where their similarities
end and their differences begin.
Stephanie is a four-year starter at
third base, out of Lee Davis H.S in
Mechanicsville, VA. Her sister Cheryl
attended Virginia Commonwealth Uni-
versity before transferring to East Caro-
lina.
"I came here because I wanted the
chance to play softball in college with
my sister Cheryl said.
Coach Manahan liked what she saw
in both players in high school and noted
their differences.
"Cheryl is good defensively and has
great bat strength. Steph has a great
glove and loves to get dirty - Cheryl
likes to stay clean Manahan said
jokingly.
When the
Lady Pirates
are in the field,
Manahan
commented
on the
smoothness of
the infield's
play when the
Hobson sis-
ters are man-
ning the cor-
ners of the dia-
mond.
"They
know what's
going on
Manahan
said. "I can tell
a definite dif-
ference when someone else is at first (in
Cheryl's place), or when someone else is
at third for Steph
The sisters agreed with their coach
that being sis-
ters gives
them a great
deal of in-
sight to each
other's play.
"We can look
at one an-
other and tell
what we're
thinking and
what's going
on Cheryl
said.
Off of the
field, the sis-
ters are have
their similari-
ties and dif-
ILCheryI Hobson ferencesalso.
L- Stephanie Cheryl is de-
Hobson scribed by
her sister as "laid back, and 'tunnel-
vision silly
Coach Manahan said with a laugh
that Cheryl is "clueless when it's not
important, but fiery when it's on the
line.
Cheryl enjoys relaxing, dancing and
hanging out with friends. She is a fifth-
year senior majoring in Physical Educa-
tion, holding a 3.2 G.P.A. and has been
inducted into two honor societies here
at East Carolina.
Stephanie is majoring in Industrial
Technology and is planning a career in
drafting or design.
She enjoys relaxing, especially by
fishing and sleeping.
She is also a good student, holding a
G.P.A. close to 3.0, "which would have
been higher except she took too many
businesscoursesatonce Manahan said.
"Steph is the boss Cheryl said.
"When we go on road trips, she packs
the bag. We share everything, though,
even lip stuff
Coach Manahan agreed, "Steph is in
charge, on and off the field. She knows
what's going on
On the field this season, the Hobson
sisters are putting up the kind of num-
bers that are expected of them, and more
Cheryl is off to a torrid start with her
bat, hitting .448 with 32 RBIs, striking
out only five times in 31 games.
Stephanie is hitting .277, has only
struck out once this season, and has
been excellent with the glove everywhere
she has played.
Through 33 games the Lady Pirates
have a record of 20-i3, which is excellent
when you look at the trials they have
encountered. They were 4-10 after the
first two weeks of the season, due to
weather and injuries.
The weather has gotten better, but
the injuries haven't. The Lady Pirates
have already lost two shortstops this
season, which might move Stephanie to
short during this week's games. She has
also caught this week in practice.
"Both players are very competitive
and versatile Manahan said.
When asked about duplicating last
year's accomplishments, the sisters
agreed that it will be difficult, but pos-
sible. "It'll be hard to match last year,
with all the injuries and all, but I think
we can do it Cheryl said.
Ladies of summer split
doubleheader with Camels
(SID) � The ECU softball
teamplayedhosttotheQmnelsof
Campbell University in a double
reader Tuesday. The Pirates won
the first games, 2-0, and dropped
the second, 6-3, moving ECU's
recordto 25-17and Campbell to
2S9.
In game one, Jenny Parsons
collected her 93rd career win and
23rd of the season. Senior Cheryl
Hobson provided all the run sup-
port the Bucs would need with
two-out solo home run in the bot-
tomofthefirstinning.Ingarnetwo,
ECU jumped out to an early lead
wifttworureinfrs?firstJTuTing,but
could not muster more than one
iroreruniroppingtheirfethc
game of the year.
Mk�s2lleWardcVoubledtolead
off thegameand stotethird (her51st
of the season). The next batter, left
fielder Lisa Corprew, walked and
stofeseoarsd.Hcrwever,Campbell's
catcher threw wildly to third and
the ball rolled into left field. Ward
scored and Corprew took third.
Corprew would score the Bucs'
only other run in the bottom of the
third inning.
ECU Head Coach Sue
Manahan,whopicked upher340th
win in the first game, said, "We
wereabittired after the tongweek-
end and playing twogames today.
I think that Campbell wanted the
game today more than we did
teams announced
RALEIGH (AP) � Here is
The Associated Press 1992-93 all-
state high school basketball
teams for North Carolina as
voted upon by a statewide panel
of prep sportswriters, with
player's name, school, number
of points in parenthesis, height,
class and scoringaverage. NOTE:
A first-team vote was worth two
points and a second-team vote
one:
MEN
FIRST TEAM
Player, School, HT, YR, AVG
Jeff Capel Hope Hills South View (36)
6-4 SR 242
Thad Bonaparte, W. Charlotte (34)
(A SK 21.0
Roderick Howard, Gastonia Ashbrook
(29) 5-10 SR 27.7
Larry Lucas, Rocky Mount (15)
63 SR 24.0
Daymortd Forney, S. Mecklenburg (14)
U SR 18.0
SECONDTEAM
Player, School, HT, WT, AVG
Steve Thompsoa NW Guilford (13)
63 SR 303
DeMarco Johnson, N. Mecklenburg
(12) 6 SR 230
Patrick Lee, Monroe Parkwood (11)
60 SR 27.9
Dexter Carmort Trenton Jones (11)
63 SR 215
Joe Buna N. Nash (10)
6-5 SR 220
HONORABLE MENTION:
(players receiving at least five
points): Mike Broadnax, Eden
, Morehead; Alton Mitchell, Wilson
Beddingfield; Chase Metheney,
Charlotte Latin; Tyrone Outlaw,
Roxboro Person; Joseph Pryor,
RkevilteAycock.
WOMEN
HRSTTEAM
Player,School HT
WT AVG
Konecka Drakeford, Providence Day
(35) 5-10 SR 403
Tiffani Johnson, Charlotte Garinger (32)
6-5 JR 27.0
Laura Cottrell, Hayesville (23)
6-1 SR 22.8
CharleneReid,FannvuleCentral(21)
5-11 SR 26S
StaceyBuxhannoaHighPointCentral
(18) 60 SR 135
SECONDTEAM
Player, School . HT
WT AVG
Jennifer Howard, Newton Foard (14)
5-7 SR 22.3
Charlotte Hargrove, Pinecrest (13)
6-3 SR 21.3
Karen Curtis, Cary (9)
5-2 SR 19.0
Raeanna Mulholland, Fay Pine
Forest (9) 6-1 SR
24.8
Teresa Perkins, W. Guilford (9)
6-2 SR 186
HONORABLE MENTION:
(Players receiving at least five
points): Jill Longordo, Wilmington
Hoggard; Tonika Sanders, Wilson
Fike; Andrea Grissett, W. Rowan;
Todder Clark, Hickory; Keeta
Robinson, Bunker Hill; Laquanda
Dawkins, Shelby Crest.





APRIL 15. 1993
The East Carolinian
11
droppi
Alan K
firxi a new - -
rary driver.
hose efforts .�
withthecompaiv footersoffi-
aaLs told The Charlotte Observer.
"The relationship between Hoot-
ers and Alan Kulwicki was unique
Hooters dvirmwlxib Brooks said ina
statement '1 started with Alan on a
handshake basis and we developed a
specialbrrd.Itisunrealistk to think that
such a relationship could be farmed
witha new owner and driver in soshort
a time
Baxks'scri,Mark,w7asoneohhree
other men who died in the plane crash.
Felix Sahates,who has been asked
byKulwTcki'sfethenGeraldmanae
Hteam
p was
reement abiH.it
Iriver.
oy Allen Jr who
sponsored car in the
rrtericaARCA)
etan Cup car,
perienceon
the V insh r Cup oiruitSahates said
Kutw; dl iensieytotakeover
'iGanmlwvpressmydisappoint-
ment in Mr. Brooks and Hooters that
thev will rvtstand behind the team that
gave them a Winston Cup champion-
ship Sabates sad will continue to
find an appropriate buyer and a new
sniirtHTb)htvx-)rMr.(Gerry)KulwTcki's
(Alan'sfather) requestsand Alan'swin-
ninglegaov.
KuKvicki won the 1992 Winston
Cup points championship. Hensley is
KheduledttstartinaFTrdThiinderbird
farmerly driven by Alan Kulwicki in
Sunday's First Union 400 race at North
Wilkesboro Speedway.
For those who looked forward all week to showing up, don't.
NO SPORTS WRITERS' MEETING
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Rent includes
�Water "Sewer �Cable "Draperies
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�Patio with Fence 'Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks �Walk-in Closets
featuring
�Swimming Pool "Basketball Court
�Tennis Court "Laundry Facilities
located
4 Blocks From East Carolina with Bus Service
�Yearly Lease "Security Deposit
I GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN
FIVE MINUTES WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
3C
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'Am6
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WHEN: SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1993
WHERE: CHRISTENBURY GYM ROOM 112
TIME: 10:00 AM-4:00 PM
The Golden Girls are the dance line affiliated with the
Marching Pirates. This group performs each year with the
Marching Pirates at all home football games, parades,
pep-rallies, select away football games and band
exhibitions.
Please wear suitable dance clothes and sneakersf or tryouts.
Be prepared to learn two dances and a short marching
fundamentals routine. If you have any questions or require
additional information, please contact Kelly at 931 -7829, or
Carter at 931-7604. We hope to see you on April 17.
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off-campus, you can eliminate at least one long
line by arranging your utility service in advance. By planning
ahead, you can save valuable time - and possibly money.
The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parent's request, your utility service may be put in
their name. Just pick up a "Request for Utility Service appli-
cation from room 211 in the Off-Campus Housing Office,
Whichard Building or at Greenville Utilities' main office at 200
W. 5th Street.
Have your parents complete the application (which must be
notarized) and mail to GUC, PO Box 1847, Greenville, NC
27835-1847, attn: Customer Service.
'Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your parents power
company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in your name, a
deposit will be required. Deposits are as follows:
with electric or gaswithout electric or
spare heatinggas space heating
Electric only$100$75
Electric & Water$100$85
Electric, Water, & Gas$110$85
Electric & Gas$100$75
You can save time by mailing the deposit in advance. Be
sure to include your name, where service will be required,
when service is to be cut on, and a phone number where we
may reach you prior to your arrival at the service address.
Greenville
Utilities
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OF Ti
MONDAY-FRIDAY 10am-8pm
SATURDAY 9am - 6pm
23
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George's Hair Designers
$5.00 OFF
10 Visit Tanning Package
expires April 27, 1993
coupon good at Charles Blvd. Shoppes only
T
L.
George's Hair Designers
$2.00 OFF
Men'sWomen's Haircuts
expires April 27, 1993
nupon good at Charles Blvd. Shoppes only
ALL
tlL W.
98 $10.98
This Summer, Take
ACoastal Course.
Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, is famous for its sun, sand
and surf, but do you know it's also a great place for summer
earning and (earning?
You can make your beach break
count by enrolling in summer
courses at Coastal Carolina.
Whether wanting to get ahead or
just catth up, you can accumulate a
full semester's credits through Coastal's May semester and
two summer sessions. Plus, you can live in our campus
apartments for only $75 a week, and our Job Placement Office
will help you in your search for a summer job.
If you're taking a spring bleak in Myrtle Beach, stop by our
Admissions Office Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m or call us toll-tree for more information.
Then, t.ike a Coastal course this summer.
COASTAL CAROLINA COLLEGE
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TIL MIDNITE
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803-349-2026





APRIL 15, 1993
Continued from page 10
away
Q �
A;WeU,everythingand nothing.
I learned that there area lot of different
angles toeverything you 're d t ring as a
head coach and yet that all the situa-
tionsaresomuch like all thesituauons
you dealt with before. Its kind of like
what Solomon said, "there's nothing
new under thesun I've become very
sensitive to image because, sadly
enough, I'vefound that imageisstron-
ger than truth. That's one of the sad
things about coaching.
Q: What is effective about Steve
Logan as a disciplinarian?
A; Whenl became thehead coach,
someone asked me about discipline
and I said that my style of discipline
concerns natural consequences. The
ttydo
t-r, strict
- iplinarymea-
team
right now than at any other time that
I 've been heieatECU. They kiK w, th.it
thenatural consequences ifactingbke
afiKi inanoftkampusMxn.il situation
will mean that they won't be part of
mv fixitfwll team. They know that the
natural consequences of not going to
class will he that they won't be part of
thisprogram Idon'ttakeany prison-
ers concerning discipline. I tell my
plavers its a privilege to play, and a
I irivilege to be part of my program. It
is not their right. If they blow that
privilege, thev'regone.
Q: How d es it fed to have Jeff
(Blake)oiming back h-thecampus for
tli( spring game this weekend?
A: leftisayoungman who is very
dear to my heart. In the course of
coaching therearea few relationships
thatgobeyond pLiyer-awch.JeffBlake
btameaclose,personal friend of mine.
I had the opportunity to coach Jeff for
three years and watched him grow
from a young man to a real man in
every sense of the word I watched
Jeff support a child and a wife I think
Jeff is one oi the special things that
happen to you every once ina while in
college coaching.
now in
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 15, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 15, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.938
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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