The East Carolinian, April 13, 1993






Sports
�BaSSUS. ����air BBBBBrBiB �����all "��IbTJ �mmmWM '���IklMaking a racket The ECU women's tennis team is succeeding despite a young squad. See story page 10.
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Lifestyle
Top Gun
Falcon MC for the Macintosh is a
sure shot for computer gamers.
see story page 7.
Today
WHigh:65
2k


Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 24
Circulation 12,(00
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, April 13,1993
12 Pages
SAM takes international award
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
ECU students don't always
walk away from Orlando, Florida
with a suitcase exploding with
Mickey Mouse paraphernalia and
a pair of DonaJd Duck slippers.
April 3 found six ECU stu-
dents and one faculty advisor try-
ing to pack an abundance of a ward s
received at the international Soci-
ety for Advancement of Manage-
ment (SAM).
ECU's SAM chapter, one of
the first student business organiza-
tions on campus, sent seven repre-
sentatives to Orlando: Jon
Matthews, president of the ECU
chapter; Gary Beamer, SGA repre-
sentative; Eric Jumper, VP of Pro
grams & Promotions; Tami
Johnson; Kathleen Jablonski;
Michael Rhodenhiser; and faculty
advisor Dr. Rick Hebert, associate
professor in the school of manage-
ment.
The conference, while based
onadifferentthemeeachyear,holds
competitions in various divisions,
in which any of the 193 nation-wide
campus chapters may participate.
Eric Jumper, Tami Johnson,
and Jon Matthews comprised an
open division management case
team, and consequently won the
Thomas R. Greensmith Award.
"This proves to me that ECU
students are the best, and if they
put their minds to it, they can top
any students in the nation Hebert
said.
Info-medoftheirtopicinearlv
March, the team's goal was to re-
search and present a case study on
Seven SAM
representatives
travelled to
Florida
where their
chapter
won the
Thomas R.
Greensmith
Award.
the Associated Press, specifically
addressing a problem area and
suggesting a sufficient solution
with supporting evidence.
Chapters from across the
country competed in thisdivision,
each presenting their case to three
judges, all business professionals
from the Orlando area.
Each team followed a strict
guideline of rules, and were re-
stricted from obtaining any assis-
tance from a faculty member or an
actual member of the Associated
Press.
Ericjumper credited hisStra-
tegic Management class with pro
viding the analysis formula, theo-
ries and concepts with which to
prepare the case study that ulti-
mately received the national
award.
ECU was also represented
by a team comprised of Gary
Beamer, Kathleen Jablonski, and
Michael Rhodenhiser, who com-
peted in the undergraduate divi-
sion of the case competition.
As the resu 11 of ea rlier nomi-
nations, several add i tional awards
were presented to ECU students.
Eric Jumper, Jon Matthews,
and Karen Rough ton received
Outstanding Regional Student
Awards, and Jon Matthews re-
ceived an Outstanding National
Student Award.
Dr. Hebert received an Out-
standing Faculty Advisor Award
as well.
"It was a great conference
Matthews said, "we proved that
we're one of the strongest chapters
in the nation
Hebert said he hopes thatthe
a wards brought back from the con-
ference will spark interest in SAM,
and encourage students to gear up
Phcrto courtesy SAM
for the competitions next year.
The SAM organization "pro-
vides interested business majors
with opportunities to make con-
tacts in the real business world
Jumper said.
"It's a great organization
Jumper said. But he also said that
many students are not aware of
the society's existance on cam-
pus.
"We're working on a way to
get thesestudents interested inSAM
as soon as they have their feet on
the ground during their freshman
year Hebert said.
Hebertsaid a meeting of SAM
will take place Wednesday, April
14, in the General Classroom Build-
ing, room 1031.
Hebert said any business
majors are encouraged to attend.
For more information, Dr. Hebert
can be reached at 757-6582.
Students penalized for
bouncing checks
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Students who bounce a
check at ECU may find them-
selves unable to attend the
classes they are currently at-
tending.
Currently, the university
has two methods of dealing
with a student who writes a
check with insufficient funds.
A student
' Stopping a
student from
going to class
is not a
disciplinary
measure.
Dean Spcicr
may find his
or her records
tagged or, af-
ter all other
means have
been ex-
hausted, the
Dean of Stu-
dents office
may issue a
letter holding
the student
from attend-
ingclassesun- "bbbbbbbbbbi
til the matter is cleared.
Though differentdepart-
ments on campus handle a
bounced check their own
ways, similarities do exist.
When a check is first classified
ashaving"insufficientfunds
the department which re-
ceived it will send it back to
the bank for a redeposit. If the
check is still insufficient, the
school will send it through the
bankingsystema second time.
After sending the check
through the system twice, if it
still bounces, the department
will send the student a letter
requesting that they makegood
on the check within a set period
of time, usually 10 days. If that
letter is unansvered, the stu-
dent is mailed a certified letter,
one that requires a signature to
receive it. Finally, if the student
still fails to make good on the
check, the department refers the
matter q the
Dean of Stu-
dents office.
When
asked why his
office handles
matters such as
this, Dean
Ronald Speir re-
plied that the
�� university set up
his office to
handle such
functions.
�BBBBBBBBBBl "Stopping
a student from going to class is
not a disciplinary measure
Speir said. "It is an administra-
tive function of this office
The Dean of Students of-
fice will run the student's name
through a computer, generat-
ing letters that will be sent to
each instructor the student cur-
rently has. These letters, which
are signed by the vice chancel-
lor for academic affairs, Dr.
See CHECKS page 4
Computers
stolen from
campus office
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Computersand equipment valued at
$8735.73 were stolen from the offices of u
fcCU Media Board in two separate break-
ing and entering incidents last week.
Late Monday evening or early Tues-
day morning an unknown perpetrator en-
tered the office of Greg Brown, the Student
Media Advisor, and stole his computer, a
Macintosh 2CX. Also missing were a color
monitor and an external hard drive. The
total value of the stolen goods was esti-
mated to be $5768.79.
The following night, or early morn-
ing, an unknown perpetrator entered the
�office Yvonne Moye, the secretary for the
Media Board, and stole her computer, a
Macintosh 2CI. The val ue of thi s computer
and related hardware was estimated to be
$2966.94.
"I noticed the computers missing
when I came in on Tuesday morning. I
called the cops at that time Brown said.
"They came, fingerprinted the office, asked
a few questions, and said they would get
back to us
"On Wednesday the police came
again to take more fingerprints and they
also took some items back to the lab for
further analysis Brown said.
There appeared to be no sign of a
forced entry at either of the Media Board
offices. Public Safety would not comment
further on the investigation.
Brown said that no other articles be-
sides the computers were taken. "I losta lot
of software, and some other things that I
had been working on
"I was working on a 105 page hand-
book that was on the hard drive. Unfortu-
nately I didn't have all of it on backup
discsBrown said.Police Chief Ronnie
Avery would only say that PublicSafety is
working hard on the investigation. "Cap-
tain Suggs and his team have developed a
few leads,and they havedone a gi tod job so
far Avery said.
Get psyched!
Along with
PeeDee and
the Pirate
football
team,
thousands of
Pirate fans
will attend
the 10th
annual
Great
PurpleGold
Pirate
Pigskin
Pigout Party
this
weekend,
April 16-18.
Photo by
Bift Ranson
Five inmates dead in Ohio prison riot
LUCASVILLE, Ohio (AP) � Five
prisoners died at the hands of fellow in-
mates who also held eight guards hostage
early Monday in the tense aftermath of a
riot at one of Ohio's toughest prisons, au-
thorities said.At least 15 other people were
injured at the maximum security Southern
Ohio Correctional Facility, including 10
guards and five inmates, said Sharron
Komegay, spokeswoman for the Depart-
ment of Rehabilitation and Correction.
The eight male guards being held
hostage told authorities they were being
treated well, Ms. Komegay said.
The disturbance apparently began
Sunday afternoon asa fightamonginmates
from the L block, a housing unit for 761
prisoners, authorities said.
Seven guards responded, but by the
time they arrived the fight had escalated
intoa full-blown riot,authorities said. Those
guards managed to escape.The inmates
were armed with batons taken from guards,
Ms. Komegay said. Authorities would not
say how many prisoners were involved.
Negotiators persuaded the inmates
early Monday to release the bodies of the
five dead prisoners, who apparently had
been beaten to death, Ms. Komegay said.
The inmates released a list of 19 de-
mands, including a request to speak to the
media, Ms. Komegay said. She would not
say what the other demands were.
Prison officials negotiating with the
in ma tes were considering designating a re-
porter to talk to the prisoners by telephone.
A demand by inmates to appear live on a
Columbus TV station wasrejected by prison
officials.One guard was hospitalized today
in fair condition. At least 10 other people
from the prison were treated athospitals for
minor injuries and released. Conditions of
the others were not immediately available.
About 200 prisoners who didn't want
to be part of the disturbance were moved
from a recreation yard early this morning to
an adjacent gymnasium secured by prison
officials, Ms. Komegay said.
The remaining500 inmates remained
in the cellblock talking to negotiators.
Trial begins for Durham attorney
DURHAM (AP) � A Durham at-
torney said in a sworn deposition that
she sought a prostitute for her para-
lyzed brother and periodically shut off
his breathing tube.
A doctor supported shutting off
the breathing tube, according to an affi-
davit provided by Marie Sides, the at-
torney.
The deposition was taken in the
office oi lawyer JormConstantinou, who
represents three nurses suing Ms. Sides
on charges that she demanded that the
nurses perform manual sexual stimula-
tion on her brother.
The Herald-Sun of Durham ob-
tained a copy of the deposition through
sources close to the case. The newspa-
per also obtained copiesof N.C. Memo-
rial Hospital records in which Sides'late
brother, Robert Sides, is quoted as say-
ing he was afraid to go to his sister's
See TRIAL page 4
Springtime
Photo by Jaon Bosch
Taking advantage of recent spring weather, students can be seen in scenes like this
all over the campus.





2 The East Carolinian
APRIL 13, 1993
T)emon' toilet casts spell on newspaper
Sometimes, a newspaper just has to wade through it. When
Ed Barber, general manager of The Independent Florida Alliga-
tor, arrived at work March 18, he happened upon a toilet ce-
mented to the sidewalk in front of the building. But this was no
ordinary-commode. This toilet was adorned vvith various satanic
markings. It wasn't difficult to see the writing on the bowl. It
included the number 666 with a happy face above it and a
statement which read, "May thedead rise and smell the incense
A note also was sent with the toilet. It contained various German
phrases, including one which translated to, "He is ringing thebel I
at the door Another phrase read "The sweater shall be done
soon "These are the kinds of things that newspapers can expect
to experience, since unfortunately there are some sick people or
some people with sick senses of humor Barber said.
Traveling van brings technology
A Juniata College van roams the Pennsylvania highways,
bringing state-of-the-art science technology to more than 45 high
schools in Pennsylvania. Dubbed the "Science in Motion" van, it
is staffed by a certified science teacher from the college who
introduces new teaching methods to high school instructors and
shows modern laboratory equipment to aspiring scientists. The
visiting science teacher often works with small budgets for chemi-
cals and equipment. The van is equipped with gas chromato-
graphs, incubators, infrared spectrophotometers, a microvideo
system, and a dozen microscopes.
Ohio athletes excel
Ohio University's athletics program was recognized for its
commitment to the academic success of its athletes by Athletic
Management magazine, which named the school its winner in the
academic support category in the third annual national Awards
of Excellence contest. "We're committed to the academic success
of our athletes said Harold McElhaney, the school's athletic
director. Ohio University's graduation rate for scholarship foot-
ball athletes was the best in the nation among public institutions
playing at the Division I-A level, according to the National
Collegiate Athletic Association. The school graduated 76 percent
of its six years, the NCAA says. Its graduation rate for all schol-
arship athletes was third in the U.S. among public institutions
and firstin the Mid-American Conference. Its overall graduation
rate for athletes - 73 percent - ranked third nationally among
public schools and first in the Mid-American Conference.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
CUFF'S
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Joshington Highway (NC 33 Gct-2 miles post 1 Oth St. Putt-Putt) i
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Beer, UUme S Brown Bogging OK.
752-3172
StateNews
Health care for elderly denied
-1
RALEIGH (AP)�Thenum-
berof North Carolina residentsaged
85 and older is expected to more
than double over the next 30 years,
from 70380 to more than 162,(XX1
That increase could add to
problems in what some say is an
inadequate system of long-term
health care for the elderly.
List year,foreample, thestate
spent five dollars on nursing and
rest home ca re for every dollar spen t
on in-home services such as meals-
on-wheels, transportation, home
heal th a ides and housekeeping help
for the elderly.
"These figures underscore
how poorly spending priorities and
choices match the needs of older
adults, the majority of whom prefer
to live in their own homes and re-
ceivesupportiveservice there if pos-
sible states a 1993 planning report
for the Division of Aging.
The report charges that North
Carolina's "policy by default" fa-
vors institutional care over home
care, The News & Observer of Ra-
leigh reported.
Last week, experts satdownat
Duke to talk about how to turn the
report of the Center for the Study of
Aging into action. Their conclusion
was that the system requires major
changes, but the political wil 1 to make
them might not be there.
Jane Smith Patterson, an ad-
viser toGov. Jim Hunt, warned that
the state can offer ideas, but little
money towa rd solving the long-term
care crisis.
As the daughter of an 86-year-
old-woman who occasionally suf-
fers from memory loss, Ms. Patterson
offered a personal perspective on
the problem.
"We have to have someone
stay with her to keep her at home,
and it's extremely expensive she
said of her mother. "We all face be-
comi ng ca re-givers
Signs of change can be found,
though. About half of the state's
counties participate in the Commu-
nity Alternative Program, which
provides funds to establish a padc-
ageof home-based services for Med-
icaid recipients who would other-
wise be placed in nursing homes.
Continuing care retirement
communities acnss the state offer
comfortable housing and in-home
services, but only to those who can
afford to pay hefty entry fees.
Catherine Hawes, a policy ex-
pert on long-term care at Research
Triangle Institute, said home and
community-based care play a vital
role, but will never replace the need
for nursing home care.
Ms. Hawes favors a public in-
surance system similar to Medicare.
That way, she said, the nation's eld-
erly can kxik forward to spending
their last years in dignity, not bank-
ruptcy.
"No one wants to go into a
hospital she said, "but when they
need to, they're damn glad they're
there
The task force's long-term care
working group favors a shift in
spending from nursing homes to
community services, but reports in-
dicate that the task force wants to
takeon broader health reform issues
before it addresses care of the eld-
erlv.
One of the Best Chinese Resturants
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Valid N.C. I.D. Required
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is advertising account executives
currently accepting
resumes for the
following positions:
I te Mi
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This job entails prospecting new clients, selling
creative advertising campaigns and
supporting advertising clients. Requirements:
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CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed
advertisements using sound design principles
including; contrast and focal point. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of
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810 East 10th Street (next to Post Office) 830-6686 . ,






APRIL 13, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
National News
Astronauts begin to retrieve solar science spacecraft
SPACE CENTER, Houston
(AP) � Discovery's crew fired
the space shuttle's jets Monday
and began positioning the shi p to
fetch a retrievable satellite they
had dropped off for an auto-
mated, two-day solar study.
The crew of five freed the
shiny little gold-cclored space-
craft Sunday and plans to pick it
up today.
The astronauts Monday also
sailed past the midpoint of their
eight-day voyage, which ends Fri-
dav and is devoted largely to in-
vestigating the Earth's fragile
ozone layer.
The $6 million reusable
Spartan spacecraft is about the
size of a large air conditioner and
weighs 2,8(K) pounds. It is carry-
ing two telescopes for observing
the sun's brilliant halo, or corona.
The telescopes, which have flown
before on small rockets, are de-
signed to investigate how solar
wind is generated in the corona.
Spartan is independent �
the astronauts and ground crew
have no control over the craft af-
ter its release and cannot tell how
well it's working. It must be re-
turned to Earth so scientists can
analyze the data it records.
The shuttle should reach a
maximum distance of about 200
miles from Spartan. Commander
Kenneth Cameron and pilot
Stephen Oswald will fire the jets
several more times as they close
in for Tuesday morning's rendez-
vous, when astronaut Ellen Ochoa
will use Discovery's robot arm to
grab Spartan and return it to its
berth in the cargo bay.
After releasing the satellite
early Sunday, Discovery's astro-
nauts launched into the second of
their four planned sets of solar
observations.
The shuttle holds four in-
struments to measure solar en-
ergy and three to study the atmo-
sphere, in particular the dwin-
dling protective ozone layer over
the Northern Hemisphere.
SOUTHERN EYES SUNGLASSES
Sunglasses and Accessories
Ray Ban Revo Oakley-
Porsche Hobie Bolle
Varnet Gargoyles Carrera
Christian Dior Giorgio Armani
ECU STUDENTS RECEIVE ADDITIONAL DISCOUNTS
Comic Books Baseball Cards
T-Shirts singles, packs & boxes
Supplies
Carolina East Mall 355-7695
Mon-Sat 10-9 Sun 1-6
We accept
&
Teen welfare moms get bonus to graduate
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) �,
Four years ago, Yavonna Prophet
was a high school drop out, head ing
for a life as another welfare statistic.
"I was 16, and had a baby, and
dropped out Ms. Prophet said.
But an experimental program
in Ohio that pays teen-age mothers
on welfare to stay in school helped
hergetherdiploma. She isnow pur-
suing an associate degree in radiol-
ogy technology at Columbus State
Community College.
Hers is not the only success
story .Astudy released today showed
the state's Learning, Earning and
Parenting program, known a s LEAP,
is reducing dropout rates.
But it is too soon to tell if the 4-
year-old program can achieve its
long-term goal of reducing adult
welfare dependency.
"There could be a substantial
return on the investment said Dan
Bloom, one ot four authors of the
studvconducted forthestateby non-
profit Manpower Demonstration
Research Corp. in Mew York.
"Wedon'thave the final num-
bers on that yet
Participation in LEAP is man-
datory for all pregnant teens and
custodial parents who receive wel-
fare and do not have a high school
diploma or equivalent.
Those who enroll are given a
$62 sign-up bonus,and $62 more per
month in Aid to Dependent Chil-
dren benefits. Teens whodo not par-
ticipate or have more than two
unexcused absences a month face
the loss of $62 a month until they
comply.
As a result, a teen parent who
regularly attends school would get
$124 more a month than another
who was absent or dropped out.
The policy is the only one na-
tionally that uses incentives as well
as penalties. A similar program in
Wisconsin cuts benefits to dropouts
but doesn't increase them for those
who go to school. Human Services,
said he could not comment specifi
cally on the study.
More than half of all welfare
households are headed by women
who had their first child while still a
teen-ager.
John Hahn,director of human
services in Franklin County, said the
program produced 137 graduates
last year.
"You're providing an incen-
tive for people to go back to school
Hahn said. "Butif someone does not
want to cooperate, you have the le-
verage you can use to say, 'We're
taking mis money away from you
then
LEAP cost about $10 million
last year.
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails creating computer designed
layout for all sections of the newspaper by
incorporating up-to-date design principles.
Reguirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working
knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand, QuarkXPress, and
image scanning. Open to all majors.
resumes for the following positions:
COPY EDITOR
This position edits stories for spelling and grammatical
errors. Must be able to understand newspaper style in
accordance with the guidelines set by the
Associated Press Stylebook. Requirements: Minimum
2.0 G.P.A. Open to all majors.
Apply at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the
Student Pubs building � 757-6366
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4
The East C arolinian
APRIL 13. 1993
TRIAL
Continued from page 1
:ht
:nt'ii p a c hmi .tl �-o-
Robert Sides died in A
aftei I plegicfoi sev-
ears as the result of a 185
althj

�v d the
� i which
.� shutting
"t In D- 1it ersitvMreathingtube. Ken,hi nt edical Center
said intMarch lraffidavitthat
corkiithetracheotomy
in� Sides was
couragement
th.itconsid-r foi his air-
ivapn ents irses who ird it'll ther and
i ti.tiplughis � ix)
suppK1,accord-
CHECKS
MarleneSpringer, instruct thepn �
lessors to stop the student from
attending class until they have
cleared the matter with the de
partment ini emed and the Dean
ot Students office
The alternative t suspend-
ing .i student from class is t.iing
their records, which prevents the
student from obtaining tran-
scripts, registering forclassesand
or dropping or adding .1 class.
s Parking and Traffic office
will tag .i student record on a
returned cheek and then give the
students a determined number of
days to make good on the check.
If a student fails to make
�iKi on the check after that time,
the office will then issue a sum-
mons for a worthless check, ac-
cording to Patricia Gertz i f Park-
ing and Traffic Services.
Speier said that his office
handles matters that have gone
through the business office, or
through LaytonGetsinger,ass hi
ate chancel lor for business affairs,
and that other departments usu-
ally tag ' student's recordswhena
had check is received.
"If I receive a had check for
ludicial Affairs, I'll tag a student's
records Speir said. "My office's
policy is only for checks that have
gi Tie th ri lugh the business ffk e
( letsineersaid that in thecase
Continued from page 1
ximc
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Thursday, April 15
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EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
COPYEDITOP
staff members and meet deadiir.es
Open to all majors.
-�sition edits stones for
; � rvg end grammatical
errors. Must be able to
understand newspaper style
. rice with the
?iinessetby t1
iated Press Stylebook.
Requirements: Minimum 2.0
Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
- �� .
-� � � �
BUSINESS MANAGER
This position is responsible for
administering the newspaper's
funds available by controlling all
requisitions for purchases and
analyzing financial data for the
Advertising Director and General
Manager. Requirements: Minimum
2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of
marketing. management, finance
and economics and experience
irk with using Excel. Open to all majors.
ersto
Requirements. Minimum 2.0
G.P.A. Work well with other
Apply at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor
of the
Student Pubs building � 757-6366
of an ind i ji present studi
a stud� torney II noi malh u .
i General fio I first
into the It th.it doesn't work, then
He said that this i totheStati ttorne) l len-
also used as a last resort with a eral
Don't forget to recycle Tlw
East Carolinian.
ECU ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT
F5ENTS
THE 10TH ANNUAL GREAT
PIRATE PURPLEGOLD
PIGSKIN PIG-OUT PARTY
Presented by:
Toyota and Texasgulf
Featuring:
SUNTAN BIKINI AND
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Sponsored by:
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SATURDA, APRIL 17 AT 1:15 pm
WOMEN MEN
mm BEST LEGS
IER $100 $100
R-UP S50 r
TO REGISTER CONTACT
UHEATHLETICMAP . DFFICE
AT (9 1530.
DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION:
5 P.M FRIDAY, APRIL 16
ECU ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT
PRESENTS
THE 10TH ANNUAL GREAT
PIRATE PURPLEGOLD
PIGSKIN PIG-OUT PARTY
Presented by:
Toyota and Texasgulf
Featuring:
THE
"FIRST D0WNPIMTESr
SOUND-ALIKE CONTEST
SATURDAY, APRIL 17 AT 12:15 pm
Contestants are judged on
their best impression ot
John Moore's famous:
First DownPirates
1st PLACE
2 Season Tickets & the chance
to work in the press box during second
half of the PurpleGold Game
2nd PLACE
Dinner for Two at
STACCATO CAFE & GRILLE
3rd PLACE
ECU Sweatshirt frorr, UBE
TO REGISTER CONTAC
THE ATHLETIC MARKETING OFFICE
AT (919) 757-4530.
DEADLINE. FOR REGISTRATION
5 P.M FRIDAY. APRIL 16
ECONOMY MINI
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USE YOUR
STUDENT
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Finals Will Be April 27
Doors Open At 9 PM � S2.00 Cover After 9:30 PM
Over $2000 In Cash & Prizes!
All New Contestants Will Be Presented Each Week
,f Located in the Hilton Inn
'I 207 SW Greenville Blvd.
355-5000
'The Only Local Official
Ha waiian Tropic Contest





TJieEastCarolinian
April 13, 1993
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Classifieds
Page 5
iMyremirC wfollflgf C3"l
LOOKING FOR A NEW PLACE?
Don't wait till Fall! We have hundreds
of vacancies for May through August,
within walking distance and access to
the ECU busline. Let us help, call 752-
1375. Home Locators fee ($55).
NEED AN APARTMENTTHIS SUM-
MER? 1 Bedroom Apt, dean, new, close
to campus. Sublease 1,2,3 months. Call
7524721.
SUMMER APT. FOR RENT, comer of
4th and Meade, 1 block from campus,
single Bedroom, 758-7361.
2 BEDROOM Tor rent starting June 1st.
Justtosubleaseforsummeroriora year.
AC, close to ECU and downtown, at-
tic, WO hookups, $360month. Call
752-9618.
A GREAT DEAL - Sub-lease for
Ringgold Towers from May to August.
Onebedrcomfortwopeople.Furnished.
Close to campus and downtown. Rent
S300month. Call 757-3475.
NEEDAPLACEFORTHESUMMER?
Sublease an efficiency apt. at Ringgold
Towers.Excellentlocationtoboth school
and ca mpus. $260 per month utilities.
Available May 1st- July 31 st. Call Jeff at
758-3087 and leave message.
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT 1
BLOCK FROM CAMPUS. Laundry
access, swimming pool, big enough for
2. Starting beginning or mid-May! Call
now 756-2628.
APARTMENTFORSUBLEASE,sum-
mer only. One room efficiency unit at
Ringgold Towers. Clean, private, close
to campus. Call Dennis at 757-0905.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT. Discount
in summer months, if 12 month lease is
signed - TWIN OAKS, 3br, 21 2 bath.
Available in May - For further details,
call 752-2851. Thanks, W. Martin.
NICE TWO BEDROOM unfurnished
apartment downtown across from cam-
pus. $450mo. rent. Sublease May
through August with option to renew
leaseinAugust.Call757-1244.HURRY!
1 BEDROOM, FULLY FURNISHED,
May - July. May rent paid Ringgold
Towers -1 st floor Parking included in
$375.00month utilities (cheap). Call
ASAP 830-6278.
SINGLEROOMSFORRENTforsum-
mer sessions. $250per s.s. includes rent,
utilities,and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
started May 8th, 2 Bedroom apartment
at Stratford Arms, behind Belk and
across from stadium. $180 mo, 12 utili-
ties. Call Jackie 355-8924.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for apartment 12 block from Art Bldg
3 blocks from downtown, and 2 blocks
from supermarket Great for art stu-
dents. Call 757-1947.
URGENTtROOMMATENEEDEDto
share 2 bedroom apartment in Tar
River. Must be responsible social
drinker and non-smoker. $155 month
plus 1 3 utilities. Call Kelly or Linda
931-7821.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for two bed-
room apartment located across the
street form downtown and campus.
Call 830-1617, leave a message and 111
get back with you.
LOFT FOR SALE: Sturdy L-shaped
loft fully carpeted and painted white
$100 or best offer! Call Kelly 931-7821.
CHEAP! FBIUS SEIZED: 89 Mercedes
-$200,86 VW-$50,87Mercedes-$10O,
65 Mustang - $5. Choose form thou-
sands starting $50. FREE Information
24hour hotline 801-379-2929copyright
NC 030610.
SINGLE MATTRESS AND
BOXSPRING only used this semester
and stillhas two years left on warranty.
Make me an offer 830-3691.
MOUNTAIN BIKE, 21" Men's
Schwinn crosscut - all accessories in-
cluded: computer, seat leash, lock -
must sell. Paid $500 - selling for $250.
Call 752-9618.
MEN'S MOUNTI AN BIKE, 18speed,
grea t sha pe, extras included: $125. Call
Jim 756-1389.
FOR SALE IMMEDIATELY - all in
good condition: sofa, $90; box spring
and mattress, $50; glass end table $20;
small appliances and fan, $9 each; wash-
ing machine, $90; 1986 Toyota Tercel
(70,000 miles and good condition),
$2,750. Call 756-5488 between 10 AM
and 12 noon (ask for Berry) call 752-
7824 after 8:30 PM
THULE surf racks for sale - good con-
dition - with locks. $75 ELECTRONIC
KEYBOARDwithsynthesizer,rhythms
and percussion, great for beginners.
$100.00. Call Cori at 752-2478.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boa ts, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DE A. Available your area
now Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
MOVING, MUST SELL all furniture,
2 couches, end tables, recliner, lamps,
coffee tables, and dishes. Please call
758-5213.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Setownhours!
RUSH stamped envelope. Publishers
(GI)1821HillandaleRd.lB-295 Durham,
NC 27705
200 -$500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
ucts at home. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information - 24 hour hotline. 801 - 379
- 2900. Copyright NC 030650.
TTREDOFBEING A POOR COLLEGE
GIRL? Earn lOCs a day escorting in
Greenville. Must have transportation,
own phone, and outgoing personality.
Must be very self conscious and well
groomed. Weofferflexiblehourstowork
around classes and nights. For more
information call 757-3477 and ask for
Amy. All information held in strictest
confidence.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church, 510 South Washington St on
Sunday mornings from 9am until
12J30pm.Toworkwith toddlers through
3 year olds. Applicants must be punc-
tual and dependable. Applicants also
should have cheerful, friendly and car-
ing attitudes in their interaction with
children and their parents. For applica-
tion information contact the Church of-
fice 752-3101.
WANTED: Experienced wait staff at
GreenvilleCountryClub. Apply in per-
son. Tues. - Thurs. 2-4pm.
PROFESSOR CCOOLS REST, accept-
ing applications for wait staff and bar
staff - 2-4pm daily. No phone calls ac-
cepted. Located behind Quincy's
Steakhouse.
PROFESSORCCOOLSREST.accept-
ing applications for cook and dish-
washer 2-4 daily. No phone calls ac-
cepted. Located behind Quincy's
Steakhouse.
RESPONSIBLE PERSON to care for
small children in our home. Tuesday
and Thursday, 7:30 -500. Call 756-0417
after 6:00p.m.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED
Great money, great club. Easy hrs
Thurs Fn Sat. 9pm - 2am. Cash SSS
Cash $$$ Cash SSS Call Paul (919) 736-
0716 Mothers Pla yhouse.
FAST CASH -Part-time -Full positions
open for sales reps and managers. Flex-
ible hours and excellent income. Train-
ing available and can work anywhere
you desire. Call Cindy at 752-6560
CHILD CAREGIVER FOR SUMMER
2-3 children, ages 5-7. Experience or
relevant education preferred; transpor-
ts tionand references required. 758-2106
after 5:30.
ATTENTION STUDENTS:Earn extra
cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
materials provided. Send SASE to Na-
tionalDistributors,POBox9643,Spring-
field, MO 65801. Immediate response.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Greatbenefits. Call 1-800-436-
4365 ext. P-3712.
PART TIME COLLECTORS - the
Credit Bureau of Greenville is now ac-
cepting applications for part-time col-
lectors. Hour available 8-12 Mon. - Sat.
Please apply at 1206 Charles Blvd.
PART-TIME STOCK PERSON Ap-
ply at Youth Shop Boutique Arlington
Village.
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
�Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Composed Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
DRIVER WANTED
To drive to Yellowstone Park
area arriving by May 17.
Details: 355-1399
iIHOMMi
� I 1HTYAND TRADE
I" PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOW! USED CD'S
WZMBI
is hiring for the following
executive staff positions:
Program Director
Production Manager
Music Director
Business Manager
Snorts Director
Promotions Director
Grants Manager
Assistant News Director
Traffic Coordinator
Personal inquires only.
Some restrictions apply-
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VIsaMC or COD
800-351-0222
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
rypingandphotocopyingservices.We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pages. SDF Professional ComputerSer-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer? Only $169 Jet there anytime tor
only SI 69 with AIRMTCH! (Reported
in Let's Co! & NY Times.) AIRHTTCH
�212-864-2000.
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
In C�IH. (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave K06-K Los Angles. CA 9O02S
SEX! Now that I have your attention,
all SWF who desire interesting cor-
respondence and friendship, write
me: HAWK, P.O. Box 8663, Green-
ville 27835.
SHANE: Sorry about your frisbee
boo-boo. Glad you're healing
quickly. I've been told to kiss it and
make it batter. Looking forward to
semi-formal - Deb.
HELP! I'VE LOST MY KEYS! They
are on an Outward Bound - engraved
blue Swiss Army knife keychain and a
brass "D They have been missing
since Spring Break, and were lost some-
where between Student Pubs Build-
ing, Biltmore St and maybe Tar River
Apts. Call Dana with clues, 931-7825 -
Please
COORS! HeyWitch! Howthehellare
you doing you nosey noser you! Later,
Your Indecent Roommate!
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA will be
holding a "Take a Chance for Saint
Judes Children's Hospital" April 12-
16 in front of the Student Store. Take
a chance for only SI .00 and win lots of
prizes.
JC, KJ - Deep thoughts by your favor-
ite sister: Have fun, have sex, but be
safe! Dump him before he dumps
you Roll'em up
CONGRATULATIONS "Daisy
Dukes Good luck toaamorrow
night! You Go Girls! Love, your Pi
Delt Sisters.
NICHOLEMAYBINThankx for be-
ing a great lit' sis! Love, your Big Sis.
" "i SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors, Instructors,
A 4 Kitchen, Office, Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
; JasSfaKi ' cd youth summer sports camp. Will train. Over 25
CAMP PLVEW00D activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792.
FIELD SCOUTS - Late to Mid-September.
Must be trustworthy, reliable, conscientious, in
good physical shape, love the outdoors and have
reliable transportation. Salary plus milage. Excel-
lent opportunity for college students and teachers
looking for summer work.
Send resume to: MCSI, PO Box 179, Grifton, NC 28530
FAX to 919-524-3215.
or
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-35,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-80O251 -4000 Ext. 1576
F AT BE A PART OF AN AWARD-WINNING TEAM
cXroliman Turn to page 2 for an excellent advertising job opportunity!
Announcements
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
SHIZ
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study God's
word, be involved in social and ser-
vice projects? Need a refuge form time
to time? Campus Christian Fellow-
ship may be what you are looking for.
Our weekly meetings are at 7pm
Wednesdays at our Campus House
located at 200E. 8th Stdirectly across
Cotanche St. from Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Everyone is welcome.
For more inf orma tion, ca ll Tim Turner,
Campus Minister, at 752-7199.
ECU STUDENTS FOR LIFE
Stud en ts for life will meet on
Thursday, April 15th at 7:00. Please
call 758-7698 for further details and
location.
FAST CAROLINA HONORS OR-
GANIZATION
ECHO - Our next meeting is
Wednesday, April 14,1993 at 5:00 pm
inGCBRm. 2017. We will be electing
officers for next fall. You honors stu-
dents should be concerned with who
represents you. Everyone with a 3.4
GPA or above is invited.
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY CLUB
The pre-physical therapy
club will be having a meeting Tues.
April 13. The meeting will be held in
Mendenhall, room 221 at 7:30. Elec-
tions for 93-94 officers will be held at
this meeting. All are welcome If you
havequestions, please call Dawn 757-
0573.
GQLBEH KEY NATIONAL
HONOR SOCIETY
Meeting will be held April
14 (Wed.) 3:00 pm in General College,
Room 3006. Members please attend!
FRISBEE GOLF
Singles Information Meeting
will be held on Tuesday, April 13 at
5:00 pm in Biology 103. For more info
call Recreational Services at 757-6387.
HOW ABOUT SOME 3 ON 3?
Rec. Services 3 on 3 Basket-
ball will beheld on Wednesday, April
14 3:00 pm Belk Residence Hall! For
further info call 757-6387.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1993Creenville-PittCo.
Special Olympics Spring Games will
be held on April 20thatE.B. Aycockjr.
High School in Greenville (rain date:
April 22). Volunteers are needed to
help serveas buddies chaperones for
die Special Olympics. Volunteers must
be able to work all day-from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. An orientation meeting will be
held on April 15 inOldJoyner Library
room 221 from 5-6:00p.m. (The first
ones there will be assigned a position.)
Free volunteer Nshirts will be pro-
vided the day of the games to all vol-
unteers who have attended the orien-
tation session. For more information,
contact Lisa Dily at 830-4551.
THE EAST CAROMNA COLLEGE
DEMOCRATS
Get involved in the political
system! The East Crolina College
Democrats invite you to meet most of
Eastern North Carolina's elected offi-
cials on April 17. The 1993 Pitt County
convention and PigPickin' sponsored
by the College Democrats is Saturday
at 11:30, followed by the South
Roanoke Fellowship, one of the larg-
est parties in Eastern North Carolina.
This is your chance to m unch on some
BBQ and chat with the Governor and
many other elected officials. The col-
lege Democrats want student voices
to be heard by our representatives in
government. Play a role! Call the Col-
lege Democrats at 931-8970 for more
information.
FCU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will
meeton Monday, April 19,1993 at 5:15
pm in 218 Ragsdale. New members
are welcome to attend. Our guest
speaker will be Tom Johnson, Attor-
ney at Law.
TRYOUTS FOR THE T� GOLDEN
GIRLS
The Golden Girls are the
dance line affiliated with the March-
ing Pirates. This group performs each
year with the Marching Pirates at all
home football games, parades, pep-
rallies, select a way football games, and
band exhibitions. Please wear suitable
clothes and sneakers for tryouts. Be
prepared to learn two dances and a
short marching fundamentals routine.
If you have any questions or require
additional information, please contact
Kelly at 931-7829, or Carter at 931-
7604 We Hope to see you on Satur-
day, April 17, from 10:00am -4:00pm
in Christenbury Cymnasium Room
112.
ECU SETA
ECU students for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals (SETA) will
have a meeting on Thurs. April 15 at
6:30 pm in GC 2020 to finalize plans
for our information tables for Earth
Day (April 20) ard Barefoot on the
Mall. At 7:15 pm Dr. William Pryor,
the University Veterinarian, will speak
on animal research.
I FAD OPEN MEETING
Leaders Educating and De-
veloping, a new student group, is re-
cruiting members for 1993-1994 At-
tend an open meeting and see a lead-
ership presentation Wednesday, April
14, and 21, 1993, 5m, 109 MSC. For
more info call 757-4796.
SCIFNCFFTCTIONANDFANTASY
ORGANIZATION
We are having a meeting on
April 17,5:00pm in the Mendenhall TV
Room. Activities will include: a paper-
back book swap, preparations for Bare-
foot on the Mall and after the meeting
the club will watch both episodes of
StarTrek. Anyone interested in Science
Fiction andor Fantasy is invited to
attend.
MFD1CINEWHFFI GATHERING
This and other traditional
Native American Ceremonies Satur-
day, April 17,10am-3pm.UnityChurch
of Eastern Carolina, Rotary Bldg. -
Corner of Johnston and Rotary St. Free
- but love offerings accepted. For more
info or reservations Call 756-2637.
NAME THE SNACK BAR!
The Mendenhall Student
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Snack Bar needs a name ;po Campus
Dining Services wants you to come up
with it. Write down your ideas and
drop them by and Campus Dining lo-
cation in the box provided. Sugges-
tions accepted until the last day of
classes - Tuesday, April 27th. Your
imput is appreciated
FPSII.ON SIGMA ALPHA
Epsilon Sigma Alpha will be
holding a fund raiser for Saint Judes
Children's Hospital April 12-16
Chances for prizes will be SI.00 and a 11
donations will go to the Children's
Hospital. Hope to see you there!
HOLE IN ONE!
Golf Singles Information
Meeting will be held on Tuesday, April
13, at 5:30 pm in Biology 103. For fur
therdetailscall Recreational Services
at 757-6387.
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof char ge.Duetothelimited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisments may be
cancelled before 1 Cam. the dayprior
to publication, however, nc :
will be given
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
1





April 13, 1993
TuesdayOpinion
Technology before teachers?
Students' education depends on
more than latest technology;
focus should be teachers
That age-old question � man versus machine.
Can a machine do a job as well as a human
being? In terms of speed, a person cannot even come
close to competing against even the slowest com-
puter. Able to compute multiple equations in the
time it takes a person to inhale and exhale, a com-
puter (or any other machine invented to make life
just that wee bit easier) definitely has its advan-
tages.
What about that personal touch, though1 Do
we really want to sacrifice that je ne sais qitoi of
human invention for a few minutes more? Some
experts would state that the only difference be-
tween humans and animals is the ability to think on
a higher level than the animals. This so-called pal-
try ability imbues every aspect of our lives � from
art to music to even this opinion you're reading
right now.
The communications department at ECU is
facing this question right now. The department is
looking to integrate computer and video industries
in order to offer the most current level of education
possible. Chair of the communication department
Dr. T. Harrell Allen has said that the updating of the
department would "get the students ready for those
kinds of jobs,
those kinds of
skills that will be
required
The problem mil V
that arises with
this decision is
that the depart-
ment is losing teachers right alongside updating the
level of their technology. Allen has said that it "will
be more of an individual instructor's decision" as to
what instructors teach in the future. He also cited
that the General Assembly will have an important
effect on the hiring of future instructors.
Allen has said that he wants his department to
be able to graduate students with an education that
will bring them into the 21st century. The problem
is this: how can anyone graduate if they can't get the
classes they need? With a drop in the number of
instructors in the department, the number (and
availability) of classes will also show a drop. Al-
ready at a level that requires a student to invest five
or six years in an undergraduate education, this
future drop makes it nigh-near impossible to get a
degree in the standard four years.
Bringing a department up to the current level
that graduates can expect to see in the work force is
an admirable endeavor. Doing it at the expense of a
student's education is not. Students need instruc-
tors, good ones, who will teach the student more
than a book (or computer) could ever do. The ability
to interact with another human being is a gift that
no machine could ever do.
Is a machine better than a man? Good question;
one that will probably be argued more and more
often now that our technology is surpassing anyone's
expectations. However, let's not forget who made
those machines, who spent long and sweaty hours
designing them so they could work just a little bit
better.
A person, a human being.
Try coming to a computer with a problem, or a
shoulder to cry on. Try asking a computer what love
or anger is. Try asking a computer to write a poem.
Somehow it's just not the same.
The East Carolinian �
Opinion
Page 6
By T. Scott Batchelor
Driving in Emerald City hazardous at five p.m.
" r ��� Ttc Thpsp folks 1 thinkouehl
If you'veever tried todrive
in Greenville from First Street
to the outskirts of the city at 5
p.m. on a Friday, then you un-
derstand why I feel a need to
write this column. It's a cathar-
sis of sorts.
1 realize that the number of
au tomobi les on the streets at any
one time is going to increase as
the city's populations rises, but
does this growth have to be in-
versely proportional to the level
of driving competence? Judg-
ing from my motoring experi-
ences this week, it apparently
does.
In an effort to help ed ucate
Greenville motorists, I have
painstakingly identified and cat-
egorized thathandful of drivers
who make cross-town trips seem
like a spiralling journey into the
bowels of highway hell.
First, there's the most
fiendish and frustrating driver
of all, THE STOPPER. This per-
son is cursed with the need to
decelerate from 50 mph to an
almostdead stop in order to turn
into the driveway of a home or
business.
He is called THE STOPPER
for two reasons: because of the
habit of stopping to make a
simple turn, and because this
person acts as a momentary
stopper in the flow of traffic,
like a cork in a wine bottle.
To combat this problem, I
propose that g-meters with gi-
ant LED readouts be installed
on the front and rear of every
automobile.
When a driver makes a turn
into a driveway, his "turn g's"
will be displayed. If this num-
ber falls below, say 1.5 g's, then
he gets an expensive traffic
ticket.
The next traffic culprit is
one I call THE IDIOT WHO
DOESN'T KNOW WHAT THE
TURN LANE IS FOR. By way of
explaining that cryptic name,
this driver is apparently oblivi-
ous to the existence of the cen-
ter, or turn, lane which exists on
many four-lane city streets. This
person comes almost to a com-
plete stop (similar to THE STOP-
PER) in the left-most lane of
travel, then makes a left turn
across the turn lane and two lanes
of oncoming traffic to enter a
parking lot or driveway, thus
drastically slowing the flow of
traffic behind him.
(My idea for curbing this
behavior, 1 was recently in-
formed, conflicts with some silly
statute in the U.S. Penal Code,
so I'll have to get back to you
later on how to deal with these
drivers.)
The exact opposite of THE
IDIOT WHO DOESN'T KNOW
WHAT THE TURN LANE IS
FOR is THE IDIOT WHO
THINKS THE TURN LANE IS
A TRAVEL LANE. This type of
driver can be seen merrily
speeding past you in the center
lane while the other four lanes
of traffic are at a near standstill,
(probably because of a STOP-
PER making a turn).
These folks I think ought
to be left alone. You've got to
admire their creativity and
their pioneering spirit of re-
bellion.
Another motorist who is
rebellious, but who lacks the
element of class, is THE
CREEPER. This cat pulls up to
the white line at the intersec-
tion just like everyone else.
Then he begins to creep into
the intersection little by little,
until by the time the light turns
green, he's a lmost on the other
side.
Putting a halt to this be-
havior is simple: just install
razor-sharp spikes that pop up
for the white line when the
light at an intersection turns
red.
If that doesn't work, per-
haps we could send him for a
week's worth of driving on an
L.A. freeway. We supply the
gasoline, he supplies the ar-
mor.
I think that's a fair deal.
ANOTHER. MOMENT IN THE
MEET MR. H. WI6WAS
(CHIROPRACTOR
U&TTIfAE THO� 4NN0HM TURUMG CASJG (PtOTS
QuoteoftheDay
To say that a man is made up of certain
chemical elements is a satisfactory description
only for those who intend to use him as fertilizer.
Herbert J. Muller
Letters to the Editor
Students complain of SGA funding problems
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Assi. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Billiard, Axs. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Assi. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assi. Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday anil
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is die opinion of die
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes leant, limned to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Kditor, The East Camlmum.
Publications Bldg.ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353.1 or more informs
tion, call (919)757-6366 v
To the Editor:
This is a story about a
small organization. We are the
Society of Physics Students
(SPS) which includes the
Physics Honor Society, Sigma
Pi Sigma. Never heard of us,
right? Even though we are
small, we still feel we are en-
titled to the rights and privi-
leges that other, larger orga-
nizations receive. We are writ-
ing today to discuss the fund-
ing problems we are having
with the SGA.
Last semester, we sub-
mitted a bill for funding to the
Student AppropriationsCom-
mittee. We were to defend our
bill on Nov. 2,1992. Our rep-
resentatives who went to the
meeting found that our bill
had been lost! You can imag-
ine our frustration, but we
were willing to overlook what
was obviously a mistake. But
wait, it gets better
Because of our academic
load, we were not able to sub-
mita bill until Jan. 29. This bill
managed to stay found and
we were allowed to defend it
(at least we got to do that!)
However, it seems that we
were required to have 30 per-
cent of the amount we were
asking for. Now, this wouldn't
have been a problem if we
had been given the correct in-
formation during the Fall se-
mester. We had been informed
that we needed only 15 per-
cent for which we held a fund-
raiser. We weren't sure if the
rules changed during Christ-
mas break or if we were mis-
informed.
At this point, we decided
then some money would be
better than no money at all, so
we began checking every few
days to see if our bill had
passed. Millie, the SGA secre-
tary, is sick of seeing us! After
three weeks of checking, we
were told our bill couldn't be
passed because our Constitu-
tion needed to be renewed. It
seems they couldn't find it.
We took care of this last fall
on Sept. 29! This is the second
thing they had lost!
We decided to drop off
copies of our Constitution
with the SGA secretary. This
was week four. We received
no response from the Com-
mittee.
During week five, weat-
tempted to contact Courtney
Jones for an appointment to
discuss these problems. We
were told that she was out of
town and would contact us
when she returned, which is
fine, except that, again, we re-
ceived no response.
Weeks six and seven (we
won't count Spring Break as a
week) brought unanswered
messages left with Ms. Jones.
Currently, we are in week
eight of our quest and still
have vet to receive any fund-
ing whatsoever for the '9293
school year. We hated to have
to resort to a letter to the edi-
tor to try and get attention
from the SGA, but it seemed
to be our last resort. Who
knows, maybe we will get
funding before exams!
The Members of SPS
Printed on
1007 recycled
papa
letters to the Editor must be signed with a daytime,
working telephone number. They must also include year
and major if the author is a student. Letters over 250 words
may be edited for the sake of brevity, decency and style.
By Amy E. Wirtz
Special interests 3
could rip health-
care to shreds
Over the next six weeks, President
Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton will '
settle on the details of the health-care
package, which will be presented to Con-
gress. A host of interest groups are ready
to pounce.
White House of ficials are hoping to
build early public support by disclosing
in advance the plan's most attractive con- I
tours. Among these are health security
and the freedom to choose one's own r
doctor. No final decisions have been made �
yet by the president, but directionally,
the administration knows where it's go-
ing.
In this system, every American
would possess a national "health secu-
rity card" with the freedom to seek treat-
ment either from a health maintenance
organization or by private doctors orga-
nized into their own networks.
As it stands now, an estimated 37
million Americans currently lack health ,
insurance. This will change significantly ,
under the new plan, assuming that Con.
gress passes it. The guarantee of treat-
ment would be portable from job to job, ;
and patients could not be dropped or
denied coverage because of existing medi-
cal conditions.
Sound good so far? Also under the
program, which would.take years to
implement fully, people would be able to
change from one plan to another at least
once a year or if they move to another ,
state or coverage area. No unnecessary
hassles there.
Employers and individual citizens .
would be required to pay an undeter-
mined amount for the comprehensive
coverage, although the government
would subsidize the poor. The payment
scale would not be determined on the
basis of current health, but perhaps on
age.
Employers would be expected to
provide at least the minimum national 1
health-care guarantee, and officials said I
large, self-insured companies would have I
to offer employees a "degree of choice"
on their health-care plans.
Many other crucial issues, such as
the size of the individual network bud- j
gets and how to prevent the system from
dividing into rich and poor networks,
still are being discussed by the task force, i
I would rather see it done now, instead of j
vears down the road wnen a problem
occurs and no one can pinpoint the in- l
consistency.
To counter possible opposition, the
task force is emphasizing problems with ;
the current system and in promoting the
program, officials are emphasizing popu-
lar sentiments about existing government
programs. The unloved Medicaid pro-
gram for the poor would be folded into
the new system and the more popular
Medicare program for the elderly would
be enhanced.
This calculated promotion is likely
to be repeated in many shapes and places
over the next six weeks, but the end prod-
uct will look and feel quite similar. That
is, it the interest groups don't tear it to
pieces. Good luck, Hillary. ' I
5 � 1





� Jlie East Carolinian
APRIL 13, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
rams
ByJohnBullard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Two recent releases for MS-DOS and
Apple's System 7 came across my desk.
Both are great for the college student �
serious or not.
Monarch Notes on Floppy for the PC
and Falcon MC for the Macintosh both
offer advantages for the student that
needs to relieve some tension.
The first provides last minute study
help and the other provides hours of fun
for after-exam stress relief.
For all you people outtherewhohate
to read but love to put off studying for
those sticky, wet English exams, do I
have news for you!
You can now get Monarch Study
Guides on floppy disks. Yes, the age of
the computer has hit the college student
smack in the face. No more running to
the Student Store and hoping that they
keep the study guide to War and Peace in
stock.
With all five disks in the Monarch
Notes on Floppy, released by Bureau De-
velopment Incyou can have every liter-
ary stumbling block in your way thrown
aside.
The first four disks sell for $49.95
eachand includeThe Literary Tradition,
19th Century Literature, 20th Century
Literature (A-L) and 20th Century Litera-
ture (M-Z).
The fifth disk includes the complete
works of Shakespeare with study guides
and sells for $59.95. Bureau Develop-
ment points out that each disk costs half
of what the paperbacks sell for if bought
completely. Hey folks, that's just under
$200. What a deal. Not!
Come on, who's kidding who? The
materials that came along with Monarch
Notes on Floppy included a bunch of BS,
Pavement's earlier
works released
on new LP
ByJohnBullard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The first time I heard Pave
ment, I was really excited but I
didn't really know what to think.
After a few listenings, I decided that
the band was a godsend. Tired of all
that Chapel Hill rock, they got me jnter
ested in college radio again.
Pavement's debut albumrSlanted and
Enchanted, gave me something new and
different to listen to and reminded me of
some of the earliest alternative rock, most
notably The Velvet Underground. I hadn 't
been so up about a band since The Pixies'
first album.
Now, after Slanted and one great show
at the Cat's Cradle, I stumbled upon the
band's newest release, Westing (by musket
and sextant). Needless to say, I was very
interested.
Well, after the first listen, I thought it
sucked. Disappointed that I had spent 15
hard-earned dollars for it, I almost went
back to see if I could get my money back.
Luckily, I didn't take it back. Some of
the greatest music I've ever heard had to
grow on me and this was the case with
Falcon MCfor the Macintosh
and 1 don't mean Bachelors of Science,
about how thedisksare"revolutionizing
the way professors teach and students
learn about great literature
What ever happened to just plain old
reading the great literature, going toclass
to find out what it all means and then
using that knowledge to pass the test.
Honestly, everyone I've ever known that
read Monarch Notes, or Cliff's for that
matter, didn't know what the hell was
going on and flunked their tests anyway.
These disks, like their ancient paper-
back predecessors, are a sham. In fact, the
disks are a bigger sham. They include a
lot of stuff you'll never need to worry
about. Over four years of college, the
average Joe probably isassigned lObooks
to read, unless you're an English major
and read anyway.
The lOMonarch paperbacks will run
you about $50 � with the rest of the
money, you can drink for at least a couple
of days.
If you're one of those that have slipped
through the public school system and at
theageof ISand up still don't read,here's
some more information for you.
The programs will only run on MS-
DOS systems with 550K of free RAM, a
3.5" high density drive and 19 megabytes
of free hard disk space. For those with
CD-ROM capabilities, the collection is
available on CD.
Bureau also has History of the World
on CD-ROM for History majors who hate
research. Hooray! pretty soon we won't
have to do anything.
If you like your mother to dress you
and clean yourmesses, call Vanessa Trezza
at Warner, Bicking, Morris & Partners
(212)759-7900. Then again, if you want to
blow everything off anyway, keep read-
ing.
So, now it's on to the good stuff �
Falcon MC (Macintosh Color). This pro-
gram, by Spectrum Holobyte (the same
company that gave us Tetris) gives the
student a valid reason to blow off study-
ing and class.
Think of flying your very own F-16
Flying Falcon against Russia's MiG-29,
all the while trying to knock out the
enemy's advancing offensive and you've
got Falcon MC. The game has everything
except simulated G-force. The game is so
real,thepeoplewhoprogrammed Falcon
MC were contracted by the government
to upgrade their test flight simulator fa-
cilities.
Playing Falcon MC reminds me of
watching all those films of the Desert
Storm War and having full control.
The game comes with a 100 page
manual that gives you the background
history of the F-16 and MiG-29, a flight
school, briefs to the 12 missions, some
tactical advice and information on all the
weapons available.
The object of Falcon MC is to protect
a smaller country against one of it's ag-
gressive neighbors. The neighbor has
been building up forces to attack and the
only thing that stands in its way is you.
There are five levels in which you
can carry out your campaign: training,
easy,medium, hard and expert. Once out
of the training level (you can't crash or be
shot down), the higher levels provide
some serious excitement.
AHofthemissionsareaimedatwip-
ing out some aspect of the enemy's
ground attack. To do this, you have to use
three different types of air-to-ground
missiles, two of which are television
guided. What makes this all difficult are
those pesky SAM (surface-to-air) mis-
siles and MiG-29s.
The views you get to see are plenti-
ful. There are seven views from the cock-
Death metal
emerging as
new genre
By Andy Sugg
Pavement's
latest:
Westing
M
Student Health Services
Westing. After
another listen, I be-
gan to pick up the catchy
guitar ry thyms that I had before
dismissed as noise.
The album contains 23 tracks of out-
takes and demo tunes. If you want to hear
how The Velvet Underground can influ-
ence a band, this is the album for you.
All the tracks sound straight out of the
garage. Westing begins with "You're Kill-
ing Me" which gives you a definite taste of
the album � Scratchy guitars with a lot of
feedback and a whiny voice.
The next track, "Box Elder sounds
more like the most recent Pavement, but it
disrupts thecontinuityofWesfng. The band
See PAVEMENT page 9
Today: AIDS
Answered by Jennifer Phillips
Q: After having sex, how long
should you wait to get tested for AIDS
to be sure it will show up after that one
partner? I heard it was six months.
A: If a person believes they may
have been exposed to the HIV virus
that causes AIDS, it is generally rec-
ommended they be tested at three
months, six months and one year after
initial exposure. The "AIDS TEST" is
really a HIV antibody test. When the
human body is exposed to a virus or
bacteria, it produces antibodies. How-
See COMPUTER page 9
ever, in the case of HIV, it takes the
human body up to six weeks or more to
produce enough antibodies to trigger a
positive test result. This six week period
is often referred to as the "window pe-
riod in which a person may be HIV
positive and infectious, but has not pro-
duced enough antibodies to indicate a
positive HIV test result. Over 90 percent
of people that are HIV positive test so at
the six month mark. A one year test is
generally recommended to confirm a
negative HIV status. For a very small
section of the general population, it may
take up to three years to develop enough
antibodies to test positive for HIV.
The most important thing to remem-
ber about the HIV testing cycle is that if at
any point in the process of a person en-
gaging in risky behavior (risky being
oral, anal or vaginal intercourse, particu-
larly without a condom, or IV drug use),
theymuststart the whole cycleoveragain.
For example, if Susan tests negative for
HIV at the six mr .th mark and then
engages in further risky behavior, she
will have to start the cycle anew.
Anyone interested in being tested
for theHIVvirusmaydoso by calling the
Pitt County Health Department at 752-
4141. The test is free and guarantees ano-
nymity.
See HEALTH page 9
Staff Writer
Every now and then, I reckon, an
album comes along that really charac-
terizesa genre. Disincamate's Dremnsof
the Carrion Kind is such an album.
Disincamate is a type of metal I've
never heard of until now; death metal.
I've heard of thrash metal, speed metal,
heavy metal, but never death metal.
Dreams of the Carrion Kind, I'm sure,
typifiesand exemplifies this metal genre.
Fronted by death metal super-gui-
tarist James Murphy (of Death, Obitu-
ary and Cancer fame), Disincamate is a
band unlike any I've heajd before.
In a press release. Murphy said,
"People often say to me that I have a
uniquestyleofwritingand thatthey can
tell my playing right away. That's the
best compliment mat I can get People
can also differentiate between a howler
monkey, a goat and a burning arm,
don't you know. But, I guess there's no
accounting for taste. He does jam, how-
ever. Despite the breadth of variety in
thiscacophonoussymphonic melange,
it just all ends up sounding the same.
Disincamate suffers from the same
malady as many of today's big name
metal bands, Guns 'n Roses, Metallica
and Megadeath: strong, inspired guitar
fronted by a singer with eggshells in his
throat. The vocalist � well, the guy
credited with vocals�for Disincamate,
Bryan Cegon, sounds like Dr. Claw, the
villain on "Inspector Gadget
Murphy'slyrics,though,areabeau-
tifv.il thing. Thank goodness the lyrics
are included because thereain't noway
to understand 'em. They are dark. They
are deep. They are almost Lovecraftian,
in a dank, dismal, death-like, .uiosyn-
craticway.
Consider this passage from "Soul
Erosion "A weakened state of being
Which leaves thesensesnumb Victim-
ized by despair And unrelenting de-
pression. The death of innocence
Virtue's decay Engulfed by selfish-
ness As the soul begins to fade
And the beat goes on. I understand
why it's called death metal. But, wait!
Here's "Deadspawn "Deathless be-
ing, from beyond A sepulchral voice,
incorporeal. Entity of immense evil
Lying stagnant, shackled in the earth
Undead and buried for centuries Cry-
ing out in crimson lust
Hey � I'm not making these up!
Murphy's lyrics, while black, have
thatcertain panache, matsauoz'rnirethat
makes them only too pertinent and ap-
plicable to society. The music and lyrics
reflect this world, with its free hypoder-
mic needles and its John Wayne Gacys
and its black Bill Clintonesque future.
A lot of people won't like
Disincamate's album, probably a lot
morelikesthandislikes.Butthatdoesn't
make it bad. Life is an ever-changing
path that leads to wisdom, and that
wisdom is only gained through thecon-
tinuousand immutableassimilation and
pyroflatulation of culture.
Disincamate is culture. We are cul-
ture. We are Disincamate. Take me to
the bridge.
UP60f�vf�� Evedt, . . .
Continuing through April 17:
�ECU School of Art Undergraduate Show
Wednesday April 14:
�ECU Jazz Festival (through April 16)
�University Chorale Concert, Recital Hall,
p.m.
� Howard's End, Hendrix Theater 8 p.m.
Thursday April 15:
�The Exer-safety Association will be giving a
workshop at the Gates County H.S. on de
signing aerobic workouts. Contact Debbie
Kiefer at (919)357-0277 after 6 p.m.
�Masters Thesis Art Show, Gray Gallery,
p.m.
� Daniel Callahan, author, to give lecture:
Technological Imperative
and the U.S. Health Care System: A Moral
and Policy Appraisal. Brody Blue Audito-
rium, 7:30 p.m.
Don't Panic!
Widespread
Panic will
jam at the
Attic
tonight!
Doors open
at 9 p.m
the band will
start at
10:15 p.m.
Tickets are
$10 and are
available in
advance at
The Attic,
Quicksilver's,
Pearson
Music Co.
and East
Coast Music
& Video.
Photo courtesy Capricorn
�4.
i
����MMH
.b� ���nji.mn.i 'i.





8 The East Carolinian
APRIL 13, 1993
Role of women emerging
in new scroll studies
Adrift on the Nite
by Naguib Mahfouz
(AT) � In "Adrift on the
Nile'Nobel Prize-vvinningEgyp-
tian author Naguib Mahfouz
blends many intriguing angles:
The serious vs. the absurd; drift-
ing through life vs. taking it into
one's own hands; the individual
in the single dimension of the
presentorthe threedimensionsof
present, past and future.
The civil servant Zaki Anis,
whose wife and child have died,
lives and regards life under the
influence of the kif he and his
friends smoke when they gather
around the water pipe on the
houseboat where heliveswith his
books. To him, his imaginings are
just as real, or even more so, than
the people around him.
He sees a huge whale on the
Nile. It identifiesi tself as the whale
thatsavedJonah.He'ssurehewill
see it again.
He doesn't notice, one day,
that the report he has given his
department head is nothing but
blank pages�hispen had runout
of ink after a few words.
The houseboat is cared for by
an old man of vague background
and imposing presence who also
gives rhecalltoprayeratrhenearby
mosque. "He was like something
greatand ancient, rooted in time
The handful of people who
gather for their nightly smoke in-
clude other government workers,
a lawyer, rhepopularactorRagab
al-Qadi, a young girl just out of
college and a critic. One night, the
critic introduces a colleague, the
renowned journalist Samara
Bahgat,intothecompany.Shehad
asked to come. She keeps coming,
but never smokes the water pipe.
It is she who is bent on the
themeof theseriousvs. theabsuai:
absurdity, "the loss of meaning,
the meaning of anything and se-
riousness, which "n leans belief,but
belief in what?"
She has tagged the members
of thegrou p around the water pipe
innotesshehasmade,supposedly
for a play about that very conflict.
One holiday, when tine smok-
ing has started earlier than usual,
mostofthegroupgooutinRagab's
car � and near the end of their
drive, as Ragab is driving faster
and faster, the oir hits and kills a
man on the road in the country-
side. They are appalled, but they
don't stop. And the incident shif-
ters their unity as they discuss
whether they should report the
dea th to the pol ice, w ith the conse-
quences that would surelv follow.
Samara and the usually silent
Anis � who in Samara's journal
"has managed toforget completely
what it is he is escaping from. He
has forgotten himself"�turnout,
in a way, to be two sides of the
same coin. Both feel the accident
should be reported.
Afterward, as the twodiscuss
theaccidentand life in general, she
talksabouthope.He,drinkingcof-
feespikedwithkif,isexpectingthe
whale to appear.
It's thought-provoking tan-
talizing writing that makes read-
ers determined to read more of
Mahfouz.
(AT) � The veil of invisibility
that has covered research into the
role of women in biblical times is
slowly being lifted.
New scholarship is showing
that women played prominent roles
in both synagogues and churches
during the Greco-Roman period
when Christianity and rabbinic Ju-
da ism were being developed.
One of the more dramatic ex-
amples of shattered stereotypes is
developing with new research into
the Dead Sea Scrolls, originally
thought to be thework of agroupof
celibate men.
The availability of new texts
and scholars exploring feminist
readings of the texts suggests not
only the presence of women in the
community, but that they mayhave
been full members.
The discoveries are part of a
pattern of expanded research into
ancient texts which show that
women did more than cook meals
and raise children in biblical times,
scholars say.
"We live in a culture which is
stillenormously influenced by those
texts says Ross Kraemer of
Franklin and Marshall College in
Lancaster, Ta. "To show that
women played major roles in Jew-
ish communities in antiquity un-
does centuries of claims women
never played those roles and
shouldn't therefore play those
roles
Kraemer, author of the 1992
book "Her Share of Blessings:
Women's Religions Among Pa-
gans, Jews, and Christians in the
Greco-Roman World said there is
a growing body of evidence show-
ing that women held important
posts in governing synagogues in
Greek-speakingcommunitiesdur-
ing the period.
In Christianity, she said, there
is considerable evidence that
women played not only leadership
roles, but priestly roles in the early
church.
Much of the evidence comes
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from Christian writers who con-
demned as heretical the practice of
women leading churches, but it is
not clear those writers who later
became accepted by the church
wereinthemainstreamoftheChris-
tian Church in the ancient world,
she said.
The Dead Sea Scrolls, the an-
cientbiblical manuscriptsand corn-
men tariesdiscovcred in caves near
the Dead Sea in 1947, were origi-
nally thought to have been written
by an ascetic Jewish sect called the
Essenes, who were described by
some early historiansas a male celi-
bate gTOU p.
Further research and the pub-
lication of new fragments such as
theCairoDamascusDocumentthat
refer to women and children have
raised new questions of the scroll's
authorship and the role of women.
In a talk at a recent interna-
tional conference on the Dead Sea
Scrolls sponsored by the New York
Academy of Sciences and the Ori-
ental Institute of the University of
Chicago, Eileen M. Schuller of
McMaster University in Hamilton,
Ontario, called for further study of
the role of women reflected in the
scrolls.
Schuller in an interview em-
phasized that scholars are still at
theinitial stages of discovering what
the texts say, but she said it is im-
portant to be sensitive to the role of
women to avoid "back reading"
into texts attitudes that presume
male dominance.
That type of thinking, she said,
goes something like this: Few
women are in leadership roles to-
day, women probably were not in
leadership roles in antiquity.
Kraemer said scholars may not
find evidence that women were
egalitarian participantsinjudaism
and Christianity in ancient times,
but determining their role is still
important.
"It reminds us that there were
women in antiquity she said. "We
do sometimes forget that
SPRING DfiNCE
Friday, fipril 16
9-12pm
Methodist Student Center
501 E. 5th Street
call 758-2030 for more information
to benifit the Boston Work Team
WITH
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Greenville, NC 27834
(919)758-6909
OPEN 7 DAYS Mon-Sat 9:30-6
A WEEK Sun 2:00-6
UDEN1S BE A PART OF THE EXCITEMEN
THE 10th ANNUAL GREAT PIRATE
PURPLEGOLD PIGSKIN PIG-OUT PARTY
THURSDAY APRIL 15
7:OOPM
FRIDAY, APRIL 16
8:30AM
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9:00PM
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10:OOPM
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TENNIS TOURNAMENT
CARNIVAL opens - More rides than ever!
(ferris wheel, merry-go-round)
Pig-Out Awards Dinner
Live radio show begins
BLACK. & BLUE- live band (BeachTop 40)
Farade of Pigs (delivery) - public invited
TOYOTA FIREWORKSdisplay over stadium
Pig Cookin' Contest begins
-public invited to walk "midway" beneath football stadium and
visit with ECU Pirate Mascot as Pig Cookin' contest gets underway
SATURDAY APRIL 17
7-9:OOAM
9-10:30 AM
10:OOAM
10:00 AM
10:00 AM-
Z:OOFA
10:30 AM
11:OOAM-
3:00PM
11:30 AM-
3:00PU
12:15PM
12:30-1:30PM
12:45-1:30PM
1:15PM
Judging of the pigs
Texasgulf Breakfast of Champions - at Hilton Inn
CARNIVAL opens (roller coaster, scrambler)
BarbecueSpring Game ticket booth open
BARBECUE PLATESserved ($3.50advance - $4.00event day)
CRAFT SHOW
Pig Cookin' contest winners announced
DUNLIN' BOOTH
FAT AMMON'S BAND Live (Beach, etc.)
FIRST DOWNPIRATESI PA SOUND-A-UKE CONTEST
AUTOGRAPHS WITH ECU FOOTBALL TEAM
KIDDIE GAMES
Suntan Bikini Contest (girls)
Suntan Best Legs Contest (guys)
Autographs with PIRATE MASCOT at Toyota tent
Airtime for ru ,� -old spring game broadcast
ANNUAL SPRING GAME fUCKOFF
$1.50advance - $3.00at the gates
HALF-TIME OF SPRING GAME - FIRST DOWNPIRATES PA SOUND-A-UKE FINAL
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CARNIVAL
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AND WHILE YOU'RE THERE LOOK FOR THE
STUDENT PIRATE CLUB BOOTH 3E3IPE I E3
I





APRIL 13, 1993
olinian
Continued from page 7
Happy Spring!
Please recycle!





Women's tennis succeed



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ByMishaZonn
Staff Writer
Entering the 1993 season, the ECU
women's tennis team anticipate!i a
stru ggle with maturity. The team sported
four freshmen on the six-woman squad
However, Li sa Hadelman, Ashley Kn t1
Allison DeBastiani and Chelsea Earnhart
have all made strong contributions in
their firt vear of college tennis.
Dr. Bill Moore ECU'S tennis
sa) s it's very rare for youi :
� in and not struggle with the
environ mi

develop imn �
- irst year '�' �' �
getevei hi
the) ttleexperiei
their belt. 1
m because of our excellent r
� � . ass
This year the two veteran: i
team are sophomore 1 Ike Garti
senior ennifer Fenton. Fenton has
stepped up to lead the young team after
being the number-two see I
play for the past three seast
Moore said that Fenl adership role
eei in important part of th
. -
-ho � � � aturir
- team i


ich Moon


irates
ECU runners cross
tape first, three times
Two-sport star Charles Miles
sets CAA record
By Ricky Chann
StaffWriter
This weekends' CAA championship
meet at UN'CW was host to several out-
standing performances. ECU runners
broke two records and claimed three first-
place and two set ond-place finishes. Both
the men's and women's teams placed
fourth in the team standings for the meet.
George Mason, for the fourth consecu -
tiveyear,captured the women's titles and
William and Marv, for the second consecu -
ti ve vear, captured men's cr wn. The meet
suv,) total of seven meet recordsfall with
four coming from the women and three
from the men.
EC !U'sCharles Miles, whoalsoplayed
varsity football, was the star of theday n
themen'ssidet if tiie meet Miles was voted
the outstanding malt ithleti i the meet
for his first place finishes in the IfN) � I
� meter dashes In the 100 meti i
Miles ran 10.4secondsedgii . I i
rrom( ieorge Mas n 1 ie ran the 201 I meter
dash in a f A A ret i ird time of 20 f seconds
to capture his se i md v ictt -
Janita R �sel
female athlete oon eting in the n et I
Rosebon iran 1 ' set i mdsinthe 100 �� i
dash, a time identit al ti i the w inner A the
event, h i plat e secoi I
Lpset about the out ome in the KX),
Roseborocameba( anddemt ilishe
field" in the
Head . i harlie Justice Hei I
� - ndssmashed hen iv : nferi
record I - � et -ar
Freshman I JarleneVick, "had an awe
some day placing in three events usrJce
said. Vick placed third in thedis us,fourth
in the she it put and fifth in the javelin. Her
competition came mainl) frt imSusan Moats
from George Mason who was voted the
outstanding female athlete of the meet ft n
her three victories in field events.
S �meother ti p perft rmances, f� ;
i amein the w i imen's4x II I relay heteam
of Roseboro, Carla Powell, Nicolerews,
and Shantellarter were edged by a few
steps at the finish line bva ven gcxxl rela
hani frt m leoi ge Mast n
ell als i lii et i ti in I in the 1 "
meter dash behind Rosebt tro, with a time
of 12.0 seaxxls rew s pla i
triple f teai He Michellt
hurdle Christ
the! � � � � th her til
� �
meterintt I lit � � � � - �
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teson he lean ��
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m. mt f, tvt��?
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s mm W'twMmrma' - - " ' �ml V
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KL -f 1 - jm � s ��'�
mmm� t. . � m sm7 . �c
runt row 'L-K Bill Moore, Ashlev Knott, Elke Garten, Lisa Hadelman, Allen
Farfour. Hatk rtn (L-R): Allison Debastiani, Jennifer Fenton, Chelsea Earnhart.
Pirate golfers dominate
CAA championships
9
WILSON, NC (SID)
East Carolina put together a
final round 291) to overcome a
four-strokedeficitand win tix'ir
fourth consecutive Colonial
Athletic Association Golf
Championship,theirsutlu AA
golf title in se en years.
ECU scored H93 in the 54-
hole Championships. Rich-
mond carded a 293 Sunday to
takesecond with a overall score
of 904, followed by Old Do-
fj minionandUNC-VVilmingttm
at 907. UNCWled for the
tirst t() n Hinds but shot

m �
on the final
dav. Wil-
liam & Man grasped fifth with a 420,
followed byjames Madison at936, George
Mas n at 2 and American at 977.
LXC'vV Seahawk Oiris Buffakx1 led
the entire tourruiment, and garnered indi-
vidual medalist honors with a 72-73-
73 2is. Matt Kohut shot a 1993 tourna-
ment low hh to grasp second with a 74-77-
68219. East Carolina senior Mike Teague
placed third with a score of 77-74-70221.
Pirate sophomore Dave Civites grabbed
fourth place with a 73-74-75222. ECU
freshman josh Dickinson (79-72-72) tied
with Richmond's Mike (.nffith (7b-772)
lor fifth at 223.
East Carolina will next he in action at
the Cavalier Classic in Char ttes lile, Ya
April25-28, on the I'ird w ink t �lf( t hi rse.
ECU football alumni to pay
Greenville a visit at Tig-Out7
� � nesand Vins�n n tl
� �� � ebackersford upei Bti!
Da lasmvb . highlighted a
� � l rmei i atarolina L i liversirv atl i
- � i- luleil i ila) in theireat Pirate
Purple ' �ItllV.v-I inPig- 'utl'arKlolf las-
Fridav.April 1( '� nlle tHintn.1
pate in the annual ev ent.
fhegt ill tournament is open to the gen-
eral public and there is no harge for admis-
sion I he Itlassk i- part of the 10th
Annual Great Pirate Purple Cold Pigskin
Pig-c utPartv,heldatEast arolina,April 15-
17. Pnxeeds trom the eolf tournament and
'ut weekendgoUnvardathletu scholar-
li-t,ilsoiin ludest hi Hi it New York ships at Eastarolina.
ROBERTJONES -4yr letterman,3
yi starter at linebackei . 478 career tackles
(2nd in school history). 1991 All-America
iiarterbat k let) Blake, Minnest . i-
tighttnd Luke Fisher and former Piratt
� � nebiicker Ken Bumette, mnninij hack
Buren, wide rei'eiwi l laton (onlyunanimouschi)iceamoneiineback-
re eivei Petei Zoph andquat
ers) Finalist for the Butkus Award in
lvi in! i. iund selet tion in 1992 b the
A'est
Set PIG page i j

� . enth rani
team in the nation, Florida Mate
retained their title defeating East
(arolina in the championship game
of the tournament 13-0.
Florida Stateoutscored theirop-
ponents in the tournament54-5 and
boosted their record to 39-3 for the
season.
East Carolina won two and lost
two games in the final days' plav.
their record now stands at 24-16 for
the season.
East Carolina lost their makeup
game toGeorgia Tech 1-0, defeated
No. 19 ranked Virginia in the
quarterfinals 4-2 and crushed the
host Lady Tarheels, in the semifi-
nals, 8-0 before losing in the cham-
pionship game to Florida State. For
the tournament, three ECU players
were named to the All-Tournament
team.
Pitcher lenny Parsons, who
pitched in all seven games, out-
fieldeis Michelle Ward and
Georgeann Wilke each made the
All-Tournament Team.
Parsons record is now at 22-13
for the season and needs just eight
more wins to reach the 100 mark for
her career.
In the championship game, the
Seminoles scored six runs in the
first and six in the fourth inning,
piling up 15 hits in the process. ESL
pitcher Toni Gutierrez pitched a
no-hitter in the game and was
named the Most Outstanding
Plaver.
SCORES FOR ECU
GAMES: (Sunday Only)
Makeup game
i! 1 ist(ia rech arolina1 04 4
TournamentPLn
Quarterfinals
1 . i-tarolina rginia4 1"5 t
Semi-finals
E;orth istC( arolina arolina0 s4 S
I inals
East i an lina II
Florida State 1'





4
APRIL 13, 1993
The East Carolinian
11
BASEBALL
Continued from page 10
West, who had been in a 1-for-
12 mini-slump, seemed to return to
form with the eighth-inning blast to
right field for his fourth home run
of the year.
"I came out early today and
worked on my swing a little more
West said. "Thefirstcoupletimesat
the plate today I struggled and then
1 finally got the hangof it last time
Mike Sanburn (5-2) allowed
only two earned runs and worked
into the eigh th before bei ng rel ieved
by Stancil Morse with twooutsand
runners on first and third.
"A very good job by Mike
Sanburn, he pitched very well
Overton said. "He tired late, but he
had thrown a number ot pitches.
He probably threw more pitches
today thanduringany other outing
this season
With two outs in the ninth, the
Spiders threatened to score with
the bases loaded, but Billy Layton
struck out Tom Scioscia looking on
a 3-2 pitch to end the game and
record his second save.
On Saturday Lyle Hartgrove
and Johnny Beck both outdueled
their Richmond counterparts with
complete game wins, leading ECU
in a doubleheader sweep over Rich-
mond at soggy Harrington Field.
Although Saturday's games
were held up by three separate rain
delavs, all four starting pitchers
went the distance and pitched well
despite the rain.
"It was a pitcher's day
Overton said. "All four pitchers
threw exceptionally well. Not only
were we pleased with Hartgrove
and Beck, but I'm sure that Rich-
mond has to be pleased with both
(Mark) Foster and (Dalton) Maine
The Pirates took game one 2-1
as Hartgrove (6-2) bested UR's Fos-
ter (4-2), ending ECU's three-game
losingstreak. Both pitchers allowed
only four hits each, and Foster also
struck out a career high eight bat-
ters in the losing effort.
The Spiders struck first with a
two-out double by Jeff Dausch in
thefirst inning. SeanCasey,wholed
UR with three hits, followed with
an RBI single lined over third
baseman Chris West.
The Pirates tied the score in the
third when Jamie Borel singled with
two outs, stole second and scored
on West's single on the ground into
right field.
ECU then tcxk the lead for good
on Borel's sacrifice fly to left scoring
Kevin Obholz from third.
Game two on Saturday featured
another pitcher's duel and a gritty
performance by Beck (7-2) as he
outlasted Maine (3-4) for the 3-2
win. Beck, who struck out seven
and leads the CAA in wins and
strikeouts, stranded the potential
tying run at third base in the final
inning for his fifth consecutive win.
"Down the stretch I couldn't
find the plate with my fastball" Beck
said. "My curve ball had to come
through for me, and that's what
helped me out today
PIG
Shrine Game Native of
Blackstone, Va.
VINSON SMITH - 4 yr.
letterman, 3 yr. starter at linebacker
294 career tackles 118 tackles in
1987 as a senior and 116inl986asa
junior Free agent selection by the
Atlanta Falcons out of college Na-
tive of Statesville, N.C.
JEFF BLAKE - 3 yr. letterman, 2
yr.starteratquarterbackThrewfor
5,133 career yards (school record),
including 3,073 yards as a senior in
1991 (school record) 2nd Team All-
America in 1991 by College & Pro
Football Newsweeidy 1991ECAC
Player of the Year ECU Offensive
MVP for the 1992 Peach Bowl-
Played in the Japan Bowl Broke or
tied 32 school records during ECU
career 6th Round pick by New York
Jets in 1992 Native of Sanford, Fla.
LUKEFISHER-4T.letterman,
3 yr. starter at tight end Came to
AyFaijtastic San7s
the Original Family Haircutters
South Park Shopping Center
115 Red Banks Road
ECU as a quarterback and played
linebacker as a redshirt freshman in
1988 Has 102 career receptions
(school recoai) for 1,462 ya rds (school
record for tight ends) and 11 touch-
downs(school record fortrghtends)
Honorable Mention All-America by
Football News 7th Round pick by
Minnesota Vikings in 1992 Played
in East-West Shrine Bowl Native of
Medford,N.J.
KEN BURNETTE - 4 yr.
letterman, 2 yr. starter at linebacker
Had 197 total tackles in career, in-
cluding 82 as a junior in 1990 and 77
in 19911. a senior Two-time GTE-
CoSIDA Academic All-District III
Team Has earned his MBA from
EastCarolinaNativeofSprucePine,
N.C.
CEDRIC VAN BUREN - 4 yr.
letterman, 3 yr. starter at running
back Fix)tba 11 career came toan end
inl992whendcxtorsdiscoveredVan
Buren had a form of spina bifida
Finished career with 1,278 rushing
yards on 302 carries and caught 62
passes (school record for running
backs) for 604 yards Pirate coach
Steve Logan calls Van Buren, "the
toughest football player I've ever
coached NativeofCharleston,S.C.
SEAN McCONNEL - 2 yr.
letterman, 1 yr. starter at quarter-
backStarted lOgameslastseasonat
quarterback for the Pirates Com-
pleted 48 of 95 passes for 560 yards
and 4 touchdowns During career,
completed 55 of 106 passes for 614
yards Overcame serious knee in-
jury to play in 1992 Tranfer from
Cerritos (CA) Junior College Na-
tive of Downey, Gil.
PETER z6PHY-2yr. letterman,
1 yr. starter at wide receiver Came
to ECU as a walk-on and earned a
scholarship Last season, caught 44
passes for 4"v yards and 2 touch-
UR again scored first with an
RBI double to left by Ed Tober to
score JeffDausch from second base.
The Pirates responded with three
in the bottom of the first on a two
out, two-run homer to left by
Kushner (No. 8) and a ground ball
through the legs of UR third
baseman Kevin McNamara allow-
ing Pat Watkins to score from sec-
ond.
The Spiders touched Beck for
their final run in the sixth with a
one-out triple to center field by
Tom Scioscia, who then scored on
agroundoutbypinchhitter Gerald
Dorman.
"(We had) three conference
winsthisweekend thatweneeded
so very badly Overton said.
"Hopefully that will be a catalyst
for us going into the remainder of
the year
The Pirates will play again on
Tuesday and Wednesday at 7p.m.
against UNC-Chapel Hill at Five
County Stadium in Zebulon, N.C.
Continued from page 10
downs Duringcareer,had 56ca tches
for 637 yards and 3 scores Nativeof
Burke, Va.
IKE COPELAND - 4 yr.
letterman,4yr.starteratcenteronthe
Pirate basketball team Finished sec-
ond in school in history for career
rebounds (808), 7th in career blocked
shots (41) and fifth in career steals
(89) Finished 1992-93 tied for 7th in
season rebounds (282) Averaged
85 points and 8.0 rebounds during
Pirate career Led CAA in rebound -
ing last season Named to the CAA
All-Tournament team in 1993 Na-
tive of Rocky Mount, N.C.
CLAYTON DRIVER - 3 yr.
letterman, 2 yr. starter at wide re-
ceiver Finished career with 88
catches for 1,280 yards and 17 touch-
downs(school record) Last season,
as a senior, had 43 catches for 624
yards and six touchdowns Native
of College Park, Ga.
wmm
Ota nan
mm i
WHEN: SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1993
WHERE: CHRISTENBURY GYM ROOM 112
TIME: 10:00 AM-4:00 PM
The Golden Girls are the dance line affiliated with the
Marching Pirates. This group performs each year with the
Marching Pirates at all home football games, parades,
pep-raHtes, select away football games and band -
exhibitions.
Please wear suitable dance clothes and sneakersfortryouts.
Be prepared to learn two aances and a short marching
fundamentals routine. If you have any guestions or require
additional information, please contact Kelly at 931 -7829, or
Carter at 931-7604. We hope to see you on April 17.
rTrTrTi
AAA
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mmammsr
STUDENT
UNION
To Remove: Rub with fingernail or edge of coin.
FIND OUT AT
BAREFOOT ON THE IV!ALL-
STUDENT UNION HAPPENINGS
MOVIES
I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
"A MASTERPIECE
HOWARDS
END
MINORITY ARTS & I JAZZFEST 1993
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC FRI, APRIL 16, 8 PM
f�M
WED & SUN,
APRIL 14 & 18
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Featuring
THE BUCK HILL QUINTET
& RAY CORRINGTON
"THE FIRST
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THURS, APRIL 22, 12 NOON
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ROLLY GRAY & SUNFIRE
FOOD, GAMES &FUN
THUR, FRI, & SAT,
APRIL 15, 16 & 17
For More Info Call The University Unions Program Hotline at 757-6004
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 13, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 13, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.937
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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