The East Carolinian, April 8, 1993







Sports
Opinion
TrackirY
ECU track teams were hindered at
recent meets because of several
injuries to distance runners.
See story page 9.
SmokirY
Non-smokers are for it,
smokers are against it,
where do you stand?
See story page 6.
Today
High:65 Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 24
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, April 8,1993
10 Pages
ORAU membership offers increased research opportunities
Photo courtesy ECU News Bureau
Chancellor Eakin accepts a plaque commemorating ECU's induction into ORAU from ORAU's president, Dr.
Jon Veigel, during a ceremony April 1.
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
Much to the chagrin of fac-
ulty and graduate students, ECU
does not have a money tree flour-
ishing behind the Chancellor's of-
fice.
Funding for research projects
is a challenge every department
must overcome. ECU, as a new-
member of Oak Ridge Associated
Universities (ORAU), now has
manynew opportunities to receive
financial support for science re-
search.
Dr. Jon Veigel, president of
ORAU,cametoECUtopresentthe
membership plaque April 1.
ORAU, a national organiza-
tion consisting of 65 colleges and
universities, provides its members
information about, and the chance �
to access, federal research facilities.
Possibilities include informa-
tion about stipends for students,
such as scholarships, research ap-
pointments, and fellowships.
Veigel, in a recent press re-
lease, said ECU will receive greater
access to research programs and
grants, including $25 million in
annual fellowship money from the
federal government.
"Our grad uate students need
to take advantage of the opportuni-
ties, such as this, that thev have
said Dr. Daniel D.Sprau, director of
the office of Radiation and Bio-
logical Safety.
"ORAUJisalmostlikeaclear-
inghouse for opportunities, and
many great programs Sprau said.
ORAU began in 1947 as the
OakRidge Institute of NuclearStud-
ies, and in 1965 changed its name to
Oak Ridge Associated Universities.
ORAU manages and operates the
Oak Ridge Insti tu te for Science and
Education for the U.S. Department
of Energy.
With an annual budgetof $70
million, theOak Ridgelnstitutehas
a surplus of available programs:
education, training, basic research,
applied research and analysis and
technical assistance and assessment.
The medical, physics, chem-
istry, technology and environmen-
taldepartmentswillallbenefitfrom
ORAU's resources, Sprau said.
"We're not a huge research
institution, but we do have quality
people and quality programs
Sprau said.
"This is an opportunity to
participate in collaborative research,
and compete for funds for various
agencies said Dr. Diane Jacobs,
associate vice chancellor for re-
search and dean of the graduate
school and ECU's first representa-
tive to ORAU's Council of Spon-
soring Institutions.
"We've been interested in
becoming a member of ORAU for
over a year Jacobs said.
"Weheardaboutsomeof their
great programs, and decided
ORAU was something we were
really wanted to become a part of
Sprau said. The process of becom-
ing a member required a long ap-
plication form, and a presentation
before an ORAU council, Sprau
said. "This is a quite well-funded
organization Sprau said.
"We just need to get the stu-
dents more aware of what ORAU
has to offer

ECU expands degree
programs across state
Adult degree program offered through
Pope Air Force Base
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
ECU has started a college degree
program in Industrial Technology at
Pope Air Force Base in Fayetteville.
The program, open to both military
personnel and civilians, is designed
for adults with full-time jobs.
Through the degree program,
students take accelerated weekend
courses in electronics, technical writ-
ing, materials technology, power sys-
tems and industrial supervision.
"There is a great demand in the
corporate community for people with
this kind of training said Dr. Diana
Henshaw, Director of the ECU Divi-
sion of Continuing Education and
Summer School. The division is spon-
soring the program in association with
the ECU School of Industrial Technol-
ogy-
Campus and military base offi-
cials recently signed an agreement to
offer the program at Tope. Since its
introduction in January, about 70 stu-
dents have enrolled in the classes
taught at the base's Education Center.
ECU faculty members are teach-
ing the Saturday and Sunday classes.
More than 16 hours hours of classroom
time is combined into the two-dav pe-
riod.
The bachelor's degree in indus-
trial technology requires a total of 126
semester hours of course wi rk. ECU
will offer the required 48 hours (16
courses) in the major, with the remain-
der of the hours to come from other
schools such as community colleges.
"Military personnel often have a
long record of attending colleges. They
often come to us with 20 to 60 hours of
credit from other institutions of higher
learning said Dr. Greg Hastings, also
of the Division of Continuing Educa-
tion and Summer School.
Henshaw said completion of the
See DEGREE page 3
Fine art
Photo by Jason Bosch
Students browse through the undergraduate art exhibit on display in the Gray
Gallery in the Jenkins Fine Art Building. Students can view the display until
Saturday, April 17.
Clayton on campus
Representative
Eva Clayton
spoke to a
group of
students
and faculty
in
Mendenhall
on Tuesday.
After a
short
speech,
Clayton
answered
questions
from the
audience
on topics
ranging
from the
smoking tax
to infant
mortality.
Photo by Dail
Reed
Sorority locked up to help
needy Greenville families
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Friday afternoon, ECU students
and faculty jailed each other in an ef-
fort to assist two needy families in the
Greenville area.
The Delta pledge class of Gamma
Sigma Sigma, a service sorority, spon-
sored the ailhouse Rock as their ser-
vice project for the spring semester.
Held at the Central Campus Mall, in-
terested persons could jail others bv
making an arrangement with the so-
rority regarding a preset bail. To bail
the individuals out, the jailing
person(s)had to bring either an amount
of monev or goods as bail.
Persons jailed also were provided
with .i Polaroid of themselves similar
to police mugshots. Ihe picture
showed the person dressed in a prison
outfit with their prison number under-
neath
Gamma Sigma Sigma collected
over $100 in cash and over 300 items
ranging from clothing to food to toilet-
ries. The money and some items will
go to an elderly couple to help with a
down payment for a new home. The
remaining items will be provided to a
single mother with three children.
Pledge classes annually come up
with service projects each school se-
mester. Pledge member Jenna Fazio
said the idea of Jailhouse Rock came
about because of the campus area that
they had to work with.
"We had pledge members and
actives think on possible events Fazio
said. "Greensboro's chapter held a
similar event earlier. It's a good way to
raise what we needed for the families
with the help of college students
The Delta pledge class worked
together with Greenville's Adopt-a-
See SORORITY page 3
Technology
leads future of
communication
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
ECU's department of communica-
tion will usher in the future with innova-
tive plans for educational technology.
AccordingtoT. Harrell Allen,chair
of the communication department, the
department is moving toward educa-
tion in the convergence the computer
and video industries.
"We'll move in the direction of
combining computers and video tech-
nology to create what is now called in
the industry, multimedia Allen said.
"So for our long range goal, the depart-
ment needs to become multimedia in its
orientation
Allen praised the school's acquisi-
tion of the Video Toaster and the devel-
opment of the video yearbook. The year-
book isa multimedia product produced
by students in the communication de-
partment. Allen said it should be ready
around the middle of April.
"There's a story in The Neios &
Observer talking about the conversion of
computers and video technology and its
here said Allen. "You have two giant
companies Intel, that makes a very pow-
erful chip and Microsoft, which is the
world's largest software company;
they're getting together to talk about
producing a product that sits on top of
your television and it takes cable signals
much like a computer that shows us
the reality is here
With planned expansion in tech-
nology, the department may be facing a
loss of faculty in the fall, which could
pose a problem in maintaining the cur-
rent class schedule.
Robert Caprio a lecturer in the
communication department, is one in-
structor who does not know if he will be
returning the in fall.
When asked about Caprio return-
ing, Allen said, "It has to do more with
who is here and who isn't and who
decides not to come back. It's more of a
personnel issue than really mone
Caprio said thatthisisa budgetary
matter out of Raleigh. "We're waiting to
see what the general assembly will do.
It's all up in the air now. No one knows
what's going to happen
"1 think it will be more of an indi-
vidual instructors decision, whether
they'll be here or not said Allen.
Allen said that lean Scafella should
See TECH page 3





2 The East Carolinian
APRIL 8, 1993
National News
starts late for armed V
Florida spring break gone bad
All college students wanted to do on spring break was
toslather on some oil,drinkacoupleofbeers,catchafew rays
and jump up and down at MTV-sponsored concerts, but
those who ventured to Florida in mid-March got more than
they expected from Mother Nature�snow, sleet, ice, hurri-
cane-force winds, the sort of thing that basically rums a
vacation. "It was the worst time of my whole life said Amy
Krell, a junior from Clarion University in Pennsylvania. Krell
was with of group of nine students who were caught in a
massive winter storm that paralyzed the East Coast wUh
blizzard conditions after they left Daytona Beach, Fla. The
trip home in a crowded van turned into a three-day odyssey
through barely passable roads, bad food and shelter snatched
where they could find it. High winds and rain also ripped
down tentssponsoredbyspringbreakpromotersand forced
rescheduling and cancellations of some of the planned out-
door events, such as MTV-sponsored concerts.
Group sponsors anxiety month
As if you didn't have enough to worry about The
National Anxiety Center has declared April to be Nat.ona
Anxiety Month and announced the winners of its third
annual "Chicken Little Awards" taken from media reports.
Killer meteors, a $40 billion space station and margarine
were among those named. "If I tried to dream this stuff up,
I couldn't said Alan Caruba, founder of the tongue-in-
cheek contest. Winners included a report on an asteroid that
was considered a "close call" when it was 2.2 million miles
away fromEarth
Hofstra wins Rube Goldberg contest
Engineering students at Hofstra University in
Hempstead, N.Y captured the 6th Annual National Rube
Goldberg Contest, which demonstrates the most ludicrous,
complicated way to screw in a lightbulb. The winning con-
traption revolved around the creepy antics of a tiny Addams
Family, complete with a graveyard, human eyeballs and a
living hand in a black box. Rules say each machines must
require at least 20 steps to complete the task. Hofstra's entry
required 26. The contest was named for the late New York
Daily Mail cartoonist who drew outlandish machines to do
simple tasks. Judges look for ingenuity in screwing in the
light bulb. Points are taken off for human intervention after
the machine starts or taking more than five minutes to light
the bulb.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
WACO, Texas (AP) � Be-
sieged religious cult members be-
gan celebrating Passover Wednes-
day amid reported friction between
law enforcement agencies and a
fight over a videotape of the
botched raid thatcaused thestand-
off.
David Koresh, leader of the
Branch Davidiancult,hasindica ted
an end to the siege may coincide
with the weeklong Pa ssover obser-
vance ending April 14. But he has
failed to keep promises to surren-
der before.
"This is just another date in a
long series FBI agent Dick
Swensen said Tuesday. "I'm just
nervous if they start bringing up
Christmas
The cult's Passover obser-
vance begins two nights after the
traditional Jewish celebration.
Meanwhile, the Houston
Chronicle reported Wednesday
that Texas Rangers and U.S. Bu-
reau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Fire-
arms agents were unhappy with
FBI negotiators over an alleged in-
advertent tip that led cult mem-
bers to destroy evidence from the
Feb. 28 shootout.
"(FBI negotiators) stated
they're not concerned about what
happens from an investigative
standpoint.They'reconcernedonly
with getting everybody out of
therean unidentified source told
the newspaper.
People who have left the ru-
ral compound say blood stains
werecleaned from wallsand bullet
shell casings were swept up, ac-
cording to the report.
A source said Rangers were
irritated to learn a cult member got
an answer from from the FBI to the
question, "Who are the Texas
Rangers and what are they going
to be looking for?"
The source said he did not
know specifically hew the ques-
tion was answered Swensen de-
clined comment on the newspa-
per report.In federal court on Tues-
day, an attorney who represents
Koresh aide Steve Schneider filed
a motion asking a magistrate to
impound a videotape made by au-
thoritiesduring the raid.Therewas
no immediate ruling.
Jack Zimmerman suggested
in his motion that officials might
tamper with the tape to bolster their
contention that cult members am-
bushed agentsandbeganshoo ting
before authorities did, The New
York Times reported Wednesday.
An ATF spokewoman said
the tape was turned over to Texas
Rangers, declining any further
comment. Texas Ranger officials
referred all calls about the tape to
federal prosecutors, who declined
comment, the Times said.
The siege entered its 40th day
today.FourATFagents were killed
and 16 wounded in the shootout.
At least two cult members died.
Thirty six people have left
the compound, including 21 chil-
dren. Koresh said 96 people re-
main inside thecompound, includ-
ing 17 children.
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APRIL 8. 1993
The East Carolinian 3
SORORITY
Continued from page 1
Family in choosing the two
families Active Heather
DeMaicio said the chi e
was a good one, showing a
fresh perspective.
"1 think it's going
good DeMaicio said.
"Their project had sub-
stance, compassion and a lot
of effort put into it. Not many
projects would raise money
for such efforts
"Weputanawfullotof
work into it pledge mem-
ber Marsha Mills said. "At
the end, we were all happy
with the way it turned out. It
makes you feel good to be
able to help out the less
fortunateThe Delta pledge
class will continue to assist
these families in the Green-
ville area with future ser-
vice projects.
Continued from page 1
degree program offers a variety
of career opportunities. They in-
clude industrial engineering,
design and drafting, electronic
control systems, purchasing,
manufacturing supervision and
engineering sales.
Hastings said, "So far feed-
back from the program has been
positive. "It has been very well-
received by both faculty and
students.
"We hear the faculty say-
ing that they have a motivated
group of students. The students
are equally happy to have the
opportunity to complete their
college education while still on
active duty
The ECU Department of
Ind ustrial Technology is accred-
ited by the National Associa-
tion of Industrial Technology.
All members of the faculty hold
doctorates and are engaged in
research activities in robotics,
computer-integrated manufac-
turing, computer-aided design,
productivity improvement and
pollution reduction strategies
As part of the degree pro-
gram, ECU will staff an office at
the Education Center at Pope
Air Force Base. John M. Handley
is the program administrator
and Karl H. Johnson is the pro-
gram specialist.
The office is located in
Building 308, room 226. For
more information about the
courses offered, call the office at
436-8300.
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Continued from page 1
be returning in tht- fall from a leave
of absence.
"I think what makes the mul-
timedia very exciting is that it's a
growing area industry and that's
where future jobs in the 21st cen-
tury are going to be found and so
we have to get the students ready
for those kindsof jobs, those kinds
of skills that will be required.
"So,ourcurriculum will re-
flect and change and try to match
the future Allen said.
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ECU ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT
PRESENTS
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IMt
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,Vo Offer Discounts Apply � Brand Names You Trust � Walk ins Welcome � Offer For A Limited Time
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails creating computer designed layout for all
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand, QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
ASSISTANT LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails working with the Layout Manager creating
computer designed layout for the Opinion and Classifieds
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand. QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
This job requires working knowledge of 35mm camera and
darkroom operations and will work with a staff of
photographers to supply the photo needs of various
media. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Work well with
other staff members and meet deadlines. Open to all
majors.
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
The chief duties are to create or oversee the creation of
artwork using both traditional and computer-generated
artwork to compliment the newspaper text and
advertising. Also, supervise the comics section. Minimum
2.0 G.P.A. Knowledge of Macintosh applications,
illustration, design and cartooning. Open to all majors.
BUSINESS MANAGER
This position i -esponsible for administering the
newspaper's funds available by controlling all requisitions
for purchases and analyzing financial data for the
Advertising Director and General Manager. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of marketing,
management, finance and economics and experience
using Excel. Open to all majors.
Apply at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the
Student Pubs building � 757-6366
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Wednesday - Holy Eucharist 7am; 5:30pm
Episcopal Student Fellowship supper follows 5:30pm service
Maudy Thursday Liturgy - 7:30pm Holy Eucharist-Suipping of Altar
Good Friday - 12:10pm Good Friday Liturgy
Faster Day
5:30am - The Great Vigil Holy Eucharist
9am - Holy Eucharist
1 lam - Holy Eucharist
J






Fred's Corner
By Sean Parnell
Sou G-At 'tNte"v
Ij0oRkS4& OUT UK&
Tft�s NVit HouR
STpMKPi U)U
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1 -UE UEW-
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De-Composition
by Angela Raper
Adventures ot The Wombat
By Chaisson
by Haselrig

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� I ??
April 8, 1993
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
l mmm
mm mm
mw-
����"� � �� �
SUBLEASEaone bed room apartment
for the summer months (Approxi-
mately Ma v thru August.) CLEAN and
EFFICIENT! Cal 752-9120 today.
SUBLEASE - SUMMER ONLY Fe-
male Nonsmoker. Private bedroom,
furnished. Near ECU. S162.50month
plus 1II utilities. Call 321 -1904or leave
message.
LOOKING FOR A NEW PLACE?
Don't wait till Fall! We have hundreds
of vacancies for May through August,
within walking distance and access to
the ECU busline. Let us help, call 752-
1375. Home Locators fee (S55).
SUMMER APARTMENT. 1 bedroom,
fully fu mished, Air Cond 1 block from
campus, Scottish Manor, sublease
$290mth. Call 752-6130.
GUARANTEED APARTMENTatTar
River. Lease Starts August 1st. Two
bedroom, 112 bath, monthly rent of
$485.00. Will needasecuritydepositof
$300.00. Call Marsha 758-8402. Mon-
day-Wednesday.
2 - TWO BEDROOM APT. Across
from Mendenhall 205 E. 9th St. Avail-
able May 1st. Phone 756-0151.
SUBLEASETHISSUMMER-1BDRM
for 1 or 2 people, bath, kitchen, TV,
microwave, convenient walk to cam-
pusdowntown.$300.JUSTMOVEIN!
Call 758-4542.
NEED AN APARTMENT THIS SUM-
MER? 1 Bedroom Apt clean, new,
dose tocampus.Subleasel, 2,3 months.
Call 752-4721.
SUBLEASE: Fully furnished apart-
ment. Available the first week in May.
Rent 150.00 plus 12 utilities. Please
call 758-8399.
SUMMER APT. FOR RENT,corner of
4th and Meade, 1 block from campus,
single Bedroom, 758-7361.
2BEDROOM for rent starting June 1 st.
Just to sublease for summer or for a
year. AC, close to ECU and down-
town, attic, WO hookups, $360
month. Call 752-9618.
A GREAT DEAL - Sub-lease for
Ringgold Towers from May to August.
One bedroom for two people. Fur-
nished. Close to campus and down-
town. Rent$300month. Call 757-3475.
NEED A PLACE FOR THE SUM-
MER? Sublease an efficiency apt. at
Ringgold Towers. Excellent location to
both school and campus. S260 per
month utilities. Available May 1st -
July31st. Call Jeff at 758-3087and leave
message.
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT 1
BLOCK FROM CAMPUS. Laundry
access, swimmingpool, big enough for
2. Starting beginning or mid-May! Call
now 756-2628.
APARTMENTFORSUBLEASE,sum-
mer only. One room efficiency unit at
Ringgold Towers. Clean, private,close
to campus. Call Dennis at 757-0905.
TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT. Discount
in summer months, if 12 month lease is
signed - TWIN OAKS, 3br, 2 1 2 bath.
Available in May - For further details,
call 752-2851. Thanks, W. Martin.
SINGLE ROOMS FOR RENTfor sum-
mer sessions. S25 per s .s. incl ud es rent,
utilities, and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
APARTMENTFORSUBLEASE: Two
bedroom apt. available for 1st summer
session. S340 for the month of June-the
last part of May will already be paid.
Call Cori or Monique at 752-2478. (Lo-
cated at Village Green on 10th street.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
URGENT! FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share 2 bedroom apartment
in Tar River. Move in on May 3. Must
be responsible, socia 1 drinker, and ha ve
a good sense of humor. Call Melissa
931-8505 or Mia 931-8519.
LOOKING FOR A RESPONSIBLE
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share an
apartment or house for the next aca-
demic year. If interested please call
Deidra at 931-7999.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
tartedMay8th,2Bedroom apartment
at Stratford Arms, behind Belk and
across from stadium. SI 80mo, 12 utili-
ties. Call Jackie 355-8924.
ITMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
for apartment 12 block from Art Bldg
3 blocks from downtown, and 2 blocks
from supermarket. Great for art stu-
dents. Call 757-1947.
CHEAP! FBIUS SEIZED: 89 Mer-
cedes - S 200, 86 VW - S50, 87 Mer-
cedes -SI00,65Mustang-S5. Choose
form thousands starting S50. FREE
Information 24 hour hotline 801 -379-
2929 copyright NC 030610
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA. Avail-
able your area now. Call 1-800-436-
4363 ext. C-5999.
SINGLE MATTRESS AND
BOXSPRING only used this semes-
ter and still has two years left on
warranty Make mean offer 830-3691.
BASS RIG: 400W Peavey head w2
15" BW cabinet Good condition S500
919-758-4642 Kevin.
UNIVERSALFRAGRANCESrlnter-
ested in perfume oils? All popular
brand names available. Contact Jo-
sephSingleton(919)756-3873.Disp!ay
April 10th on Town Commons of f 1 st
street. Call now!
1990 ACURA Integra LS - Pearl Red,
AMFM cassette, power sunroof,
Alloy's,andonlv45.u00miles. SI 0,900
neg. Chris 758-7002.
MOUNTAIN BIKE. 21" Men's
Schwinn crosscut - all accessories in-
cluded: computer, seat leash, lock -
must sell. Paid S500 - selling for S250.
Call 752-9618.
MEN'S MOUNTIAN BIKE, 18
speed, great shape, extras included.
S125. Call Jim 756-1389.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Setown hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
200-5500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information - 24 hour hotline. 801 -
379 - 2900. Copyright NC 030650.
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many po-
sitions. Great benefits. Call 1 -800-436-
4365ext.P-3712.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -Earn
S2,000month world travel (Ha-
waii, Mexico, theCaribbean, etc.) Holi-
day, SummerandCareeremployment
available No experience necessary.
For employment call 1-206-634-0468
ext.C5362
NEED A SUMMER JOB? Make
S1880month and get great Resume
Exp. working with the Southwestern
Co. If interested Call (919) 933-1699.
TIRED OF BEING A POOR COL-
LEGE GIRL? Earn 100's a day escort-
ing in Greenville. Must have transpor-
tation, own phone, and outgoing per-
sonality. Must be very self conscious
and well groomed. We offer flexible
hours to work around classes and
nights. For more information call 757-
3477and ask for Am v. All information
held in strictest confidence.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial Un :ed Methodist
Church, 51 OSouth Washington St on
Sunday mornings from 9am until
12:30pm. To work with toddlers
through 3 year olds. Applicants must
be punctual and dependable Appli-
cants also should have cheerful,
friendly and caring attitudes in their
interaction with children and their
parents For application information
contact the Church office 752-3101
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT: Law
Firm has openings for Mailroom Mes-
sengers. Pa rt-ti m e 20-30 ho u rs week,
5 daysweek. Mornings 7:30 to 1:00 or
Afternoons 2:00 to 6:00. Applications
form Receptionist, Ward and Smith,
120 W FiretowerRd.
BRODY'S is accepting applications
fora Part-time Office Associate forour
Credit Department. Must have good
MathematicalCommunication skills
and be computer familiar. Excellent
hoursClothing discounts. Apply at
Customer Service, Brody's The Plaza,
MonWed l-4pm.
IMMEDIATE OPENING for Sales
person and Secretary position. Applv
2-5pmatSDFComputer,106E 5thSt,
Greenville, 752-3694 (besideCubbie's).
WANTED: KEYBOARDIST forlocal
working classic RnR band Creative
and original call 758-4642 leave mes-
sage.
BOGIES: Help wanted. Call Bogies
752-4668.
WANTED: Experienced wait staff at
Greenville Country Club. Apply in
person. Tues. -Thurs. 2-4pm.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS REST, ac-
cepting applications for wait staff and
bar staff - 2-4pm daily. No phone calls
accepted. Located behind Quincy's
Steakhouse.
PROFESSOR O'COOLS REST, ac-
ceptingapplications for cookand dish-
washer. 2-4 daily. No phone calls ac-
cepted Located behind Quincy's
Steakhouse
RESPONSIBLE PERSON to care for
small children in our home. Tuesday
and Thursday, 7:30 - 5:00. Call 756-
0417after6:06p.m.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typing and photocopying services.
We also sell software and computer
diskettes. 24 hours in and out Guar-
anteed typing on paper up to 20 hand
written pages. SDF Professional Com-
puter Services, 106 East 5th Street
(besideCubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE thissum-
mer? Onlv S169 Jet there anytime
for only SI69 with A1RHITCH' (Re-
ported in Let's Go! & NY Times.)
AIRHITCH � 212-864-2000.
MOBILE MUSIC PROD the right
choice when looking for the best D.J
for vour spring formats, socials, par-
ties and weddings. Competitive
prices, professional quality, music to
suit vour occasion. Cali Lee @ 758-
4644'
PAINTBALL HOLIDAY SPECIAL -
Friday April 9th 11am -4pm. Bring a
friend and waste him with paint.
There's No school that dav! CALL
RICH AT 752-2573 for info'
LAST YEAR S17 MILLION IN
PROFITS WENT TO COLLEGE
STUDENTS WHO PARTICIPATED
INOURSUMMERPROGRAM.Last
year over 90 of the students using
our placement office found career
jobs. It gets better. Call 1-800-437-
1525 The Southwestern Company.
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
'Editing Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resumes
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
GUYS & GALS
TURN YOUR OLD
CLOTHES INTO
NEW CASH
S
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
IS PAYING CASH
FOR YOUR OLD
CLOTHES
If you ore selling you must be 18
wrth a picture ID (NCDL. ECU)
LOCATED ON
THE EVANS STREET MALL
beside the old Brody building
Park behind
Globe Hardware
& use our
new rear entrance
Mon 10-12 1-5
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3
Sat 10-12
752-3866
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in CaW. (213)477-8226
Or. rush $2.00 to: Research information
11322 Idaho Ave �206-A Los Angles, CA 90025
You know who this is from� See ya at
Mug Shots.for a Buttery Nipple!
T1
SEAN: Happy 24th! Hope your Birth-
day is awesome! Good thing you
bought those shades 'cause the fu-
ture must be bright for such an awe-
some guy! How many months now?
Love and kisses, TA.
MEDICINE WHEEL GATHERING
and other traditional Native Ameri-
can ceremonies Saturday, April 17,
10am -3pm. Unity church of Eastern
Carolina, Rotary Bldg. - corner of
Johnston and Rotary St. Free - but
love offerings accepted. For info call
756-2637. For reservations bv April
20th call 919-636-0214.
HELP! I'VE LOST MY KEYS! They
are on an Outward Bound - en-
graved blue Swiss Army knrfe
keycha in and a brass "D They have
been missing since Spring Break,
and were lost somewhere between
StudentPubs Building, BiltmoreSt
and mavbe Tar River Apts. Call
Dana with clues, 931-7825 - Please
COORS- Well, you know what this
is for but hey I have no one else to
write to so vou'll have to deal with an
extremely long personal that sa ys ab-
solutely nothing! Cool huh!? So,
how's trix! That good eh? Mine goes
like a bad movie-on and on and on!
Well good luckongraduating! Mavbe
going to class would help; I mean
vou are onlv taking 8 hours! Later,
Mo
ANNIET- To all the men we love, to
all the men who love us, to all the men
we love but don't love us�TO S
WITH THE MEN HERE'S TO US!
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA will be
holding a "Take a Chance for Saint
JudesChildren's Hospital" April 12-16
in front of the Student Store. Take a
chance for only SI 00 and win lots of
prizes.
WAY TO GO DELTA ZET A! We did
a great "sister" act at Alpha Zeta Delta
all-sing! Thanks Scott Griffin for the
"inspiration Let's do it again next
year, sisters! (Randi and Brittany,
you've redeemed yourself after Greek
. Goddess!)
PHI KAPPA PS1 - We had a great time
with you guys! Let's do it again! Love,
Delta Zeta.
CONGRATULATIONS to Audra
Dunefsky on your engagement! good
luck to you both! Love, your Delta Zeta
girls.
THANK YOU PI KAPPA PHI for a
great time. Hope to see you soon! Love,
Delta Zeta.
KAPPA ALPHA-the sun was shining,
we were cruising the streets, in a red
convertible that was really neat. We
loaded our guns, and our water bal-
loons too, drove by your house, and
squirted all of you. Friday night came,
and some of us arrived, we all played
somehoops,and feltquiterevived The
beer was flowing, Charlotte stood on
her hands, Pat was watching, starter'
giving demands. On the next sunny
day, Rasta and Mandy drove by, we
were on our way home, just stopped to
say HI. Pervis and joe, hopped in their
car, withagreatbig launcher, that threw
those things far. That was it, the chase
had begun, we escaped back home to
refill our guns. This war will connue,
I guarantee that, the next time we u i ii t
you and that's a fact. PS. Be on yor
toes.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors. Instructors.
Kitchen. Office. Grounds for western NCs finest Co-
f , t�j, mVT'WAATl ed y�uth summe: sportscamp .Will train. Over 25
lAiVll 1 i.tr.nUUl' activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville. NC 28792.
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Exceptional Value
Available Immediately. One and two
bedroom apartments close to campus.
Water and sewer is FREE.
Laundry facility and ECU bus service.
Call758320from830amto5�
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5.000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
THE
EAST BE A PART OF AN AWARD-WINNING TEAM
rolniAN Turn to page 10 for an excellent advertising job opportunity!
4

Announcements
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
Tues April 6 � ECU Student Brass
Ensemble, Britton Thuerer, director
(Fletcher Hall, 7:00 pm, free) Char-
lotte Nichols, clarinet, and James
Green, saxophone, Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 900 pm, Free).
Wed, April 7� Young Peoples Con-
cert Series with the ECU Symphony
Orchestra, Robert Hause, Conductor
(Wright Auditorium, 9:30 am, Free),
Barry McGinnis, saxophone, Gradu-
ate Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00
pm,Free); ECU CelloEnsemble with
faculty artist A Louise toppin, so-
prano, Selma Gokcen, director
(Fletcher Hall, 9:00 pm Free). Tue
April 8 � Premier Performances of
ECU Student Composers, Mark
Taggart, director (Fletcher Recital
Hall,8:oopm,Free).Mon Aprill2 �
Percussion Players, Harold Jones, di-
rector (Fletcher Recital Hal 1,8:00pm,
Free). Come out and enjoy the music
and support the School of Music.
READING TEST RESULTS FOR
NURSING 1000 STUDENTS
Students who were enrolled
in Mrs. Belinda Lee's block section of
Nursing 1000 during the first half of
Spring 1993 semester may pick up
Nelson-Denny Reading Test Scores
in Mrs. Pam Smith's office - Km 257,
Nursing Building.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1993 Greenville - Pitt
Co. Special Olympics Spring Games
will be held on April 20th at E B
Aycockjr. High School in Greenville
(rain date: April 22) Volunteers are
needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olympics
Volunteers must be able to work all
day-from9a.m. to 2 pm An orienta-
tion meeting will be held on April 15
in Old Jovner Librarv room 221 from
5-6:(X)p.m (The first ones there will
be assigned a position J Free volun-
teer t-shirts will be provided the day
of the games to all volunteers who
have attended the orientation session
For more information, contact Lisa
Ihly at 830-4551.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA
Epsilon Sigma Alpha will be
holding a fund raiser for Saint Judes
Children's Hospital April 12-16.
Chances for prizes will be SI.00and
a II donations will go to the Children's
Hospital
ACCOUNTIVG SOCIETY
We will be having our final
meeting this year on Tuesday, April
13. The speaker will be from Arthur
Anderson and Co We encourage all
members and interested accounting
majors to attend The meeting will be
held in GCB 1028 and will begin at
3:30 Following the meeting, we will
be having our annual Pig Picking
This year the pig picking will be held
at Elm St j.irk Please reserve vou r-
selfa plateby contacting the Account-
ing office, GCB 3208 by Friday, April
9. All accounting majors and their
guests are invited. For more informa-
tion stop by GCB 3208
ECU MATHEMATICS
DEPARTMENT
1943 Mathematics High
School Contest to be held on April 8,
1993. Approximately 60 area schools
with nearly 1,000 students will par-
ticipate Platform guests include Dr.
John W. Daniels, Chairman, Math
Contest; Dr Robert N. Jovner, Math-
ematics Education, presiding; Dr.
Robert LBernhardt, Chairman Math-
ematics Department, Dr. Keats Spar-
Announcements
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeor charge DuetorhelimitedaiTiount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
row, DeanProfessor College of Arts
and Sciences; Dr. Charles R. Coble,
Dean, School of Education; Dr. Sid
Rachlin, Coordinator, Mathematics
Education;Dr KatherineW.Hodgm,
Director, ScienceMath Center. Mrs
JudvCoutter,Coordinator Mathemat-
ics Education. Individual and Team
Awards are given
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisments may be
cancelled before 10am. thedaypro
to publication however, no refunds
will be given.
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
mmammmmm





April 8, 1993
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
ThursdayOpinion
Parking snafu coming
Administration must arrive at
sound solution to lost spaces
before construction begins
If you clap hard enough to show you believe in
the existence of fairies, Tinkerbell won't die.
If you click your heels three times, chanting
"There's no place like home a tornado will pick
you up and bring you back home to Auntie Em and
Kansas.
If you're a farmer in Iowa, hear a voice in the
middle of your cornfield and build a baseball dia-
mond in that cornfield, "He will come
Finally, if you're a student at ECU who already
has problems finding a parking space on this cam-
pus, act like Jiminy Cricket and "wish upon a star"
for a solution to the loss of 300 spaces as a result of
the new recreation center. Why not? That's what the
administration seems to be doing.
Barring any unforeseen circumstances (don't
we wish?), construction for the new recreation cen-
ter will begin this summer. Come September, a stu-
dent (and any Greenville residents) will have the
unequaled joy of seeing more cars parked on side
streets, more pedestrian traffic on these same streets
and more tickets from both ECU and Greenville
police than you can shake a stick m
at.
What has our wonderful ad-
ministration done about this
pressing situation? Well, in a nut-
shell, not a whole hell of a lot.
The task force that has worked
diligently on this project has only
agreed to act upon two solutions
at the present moment �
restriping the lot at the bottom of
College Hill to provide 13 more H
spaces and designating the lot jB,
next to Howard House as a stu-
dent parking lot. That provides roughly 50 spaces to
make up for the 300 that will be lost.
Granted, the task force that is working on this
problem has come up with a variety of solutions to
the problem. Some include:
� An expanded shuttle service from Minges
Coliseum to the Brewster Building, running every
10-20 minutes. Students would be able to purchase
a commuter-fringe parking sticker for $40.
� The lot on Reade Street, between Second and
Third, would be gravelled to gain 120 spaces as
freshman parking.
� The James House, located at the corner of
Ninth and James Street, will be demolished to bring
40 spaces.
� Over 400 spaces in both the lower and upper
lots of Minges could be denoted as commuter spaces.
A bus stop is also being considered in the Brewster
parking lot.
The solutions that the task force have come up
with are very viable and acceptable alternatives to
this problem. However, each day brings the con-
struction of the recreation center a little closer with
no concrete plan to make up for the lost spaces.
The administration needs to act on this prob-
lem now. All of the steps have been taken to address
this important problem; all that it needs is someone
to have the initiative to sign their John Hancock on
the dotted line. Make the decision before construc-
tion starts; putting the cart before the horse in this
scenario will only ensure that all the apples will fall
out and roll down the road.
Then again, all the parked cars on the street
should keep them from going too far.
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, es Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst Nens Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Bullard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. Layout Marutgrr
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed. Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Sstems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Set retan
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday anil
Thursday The masthead editorial in each edition a the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevn
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication Letters should be addressed to The Hditor. The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C, 27858 4353 For more informa-
tion, call (919)757-6366
Printed on
&
ll)ti� recycle
paper
Cigarette tax necessary for non-smoker health
"(Cough-cough!) Look,
you (cough-hack) inconsiderate
(insert expletive here) why don't
you and your poison go kill
yourselves somewhere else?"
Didja ever feel like saying
something to that effect to some-
one who just decided to plop
down next to you and toke up a
cigarette, inevitably bombard-
ing you with toxic (that means
poisonous, kids) fumes that you
seem to be incapable of escap-
ing?
If you answered "no" to
that question, you're likely a
smoker or a government subsi-
dized tobacco farmer, and
shouldn't bother reading any
further, unless you need some
focus for aggression today.
If, however, you have an-
swered "yes" to this question,
we can talk intelligently about
the pros and cons of smoking
and the impact of said habit on
society as a whole.
Now, right off the bat, it
should be known that I am the
AntiSmoke. I hate smoke and
smoking with a passion, which
consequently led me to this
week's topic. However, I con-
sider myself to be an intelligent
human being, as well as a fair
journalist, so we won't spend
all of our time together ponder-
ing just how asinine I consider
smoking to be, but get on to the
real issues.
The reason 1 chose to con-
front the issue of smoking this
week should be obvious. With
President Clinton's proposed
"Sin Tax" stirring up both sides
of the issue, a few viewpoints
need to be examined before any-
one can reasonably form an in-
formed and intelligent opinion.
On one hand, I believe that
everyone has the freedom to
choose whatever lifestyle they
want, and if their chosen lifestyle
includes inducing numerous
physical maladies on themselves
for no apparent reason, then so
be it. Loathe though 1 am to say
it, people do have the right to
smoke.
Although smoker's rights
are a part of the issue, they are
not the most important part of
the puzzle. The real quandary is
what to do about the tobacco
farmers, particularly in the
South, where a large portion of
industry consists of tobacco
farming.
Obviously, the near-dou-
bling of the price paid by the
consumer will have an adverse
affect on the marketability of
any product, particularly on
non-essentials like cigarettes.
To further complicate mat-
ters, the government subsidizes
tobacco farmers � that means
they pay some of these people to
grow tobacco. Counterproduc-
tive? Yes. Self defeating? Yes.
Stupid? Definitely.
On the other hand, non-
smokers have their rights as
well. The reason many of us have
chosen not to smoke is because
of the destructive effects ciga-
rette smoke has on the body.
Read your cigarette pack: low
birth weight, emphysema, heart
disease, lung cancer the list
goes on and on.
That choice, however, is all
too often compromised by some
inconsiderate smoker who feels
the need to share his or her poi-
son by sitting in the same gen-
eral area as non-smokers. The
effect on the second-handers
is far more devastating than it
is on the smokers themselves.
Here's a fun fact: second
hand or sidestrea m smoke con-
tains twice the tar and nico-
tine, five times the carbon mon-
oxide, and 50 times the ammo-
nia than smoke straight from
the cigarette into the smoker's
lungs. Pretty neat, huh?
That means that it's far
worse, statistically speaking,
for innocent bystanders (or
more the point, bybreathers)
to inhale cigarette smoke than
it is for those with the addic-
tion.
That's right, I said addic-
tion. As in drug. Lethal to any-
one around it drug.
Well, dammit, it's just
plain inconsiderate to ruin
someone else's day, as well as
their health just for a quick nic
buzz. So tax away, Bill, you've
got my support, and my lungs'
too.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza, and
watch some cartoons
9PMEOfiH9S:
Dtftita t � Ouf�f Mn.� S'wcr
WEte5�i
Tftit,
THKEARE
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and Baft!?
OOttNToff
QWcuno
r
Fver since it bought
M su.the Government
W�n'T D�N� A
Foe:
6RW6F Mom
Mpfc WHO
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GETS
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IMPLANT'S
Z�x oh yuPPlES
-TrtH CPHYLMH
T sufcupas
Boring
2?�o on
'THE RiOi WHO CAU-
HiGHSi Taxes
" ClASS
QuoteoftheDay:
The things taught in schools and colleges
are not an education, hut the means of
education.
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Letters to the Editor
Campus minister clarifies distortion of Bible
To the Editor:
After recently reading a
letter sent to the ed i tor concem-
inghomosexualityand the Bible,
I felt a strong need to write and
thusclarifywhatwerecomplete
misinterpretations and distor-
tions of scripture passages.
Space does not allow me
togo through each scripture and
explain their meaning, but I
would like to comment on the
relationship between King
David and Jonathan in 1 Samuel
18:1-4, 20:41-42 and 2 Samuel
1:25-26. The kind of love these
two men shared was one of
brotherly love. They were com-
mitted to the other's well-being
just as many men in our mili-
tary today would die for their
comrades. In noway were there
anysexualconnotations in their
actions. 1 Sam. 20:41 -42 refers to
them kissingeachother. In many
societies today, it is totally ac-
ceptable for men to kiss each
other in the form of greetings.
Of course, this is not the case in
America so I can see the misin-
terpretations of those passages.
1 Corinthians 6:9-10 says,
"Do not be deceived; neither
fomicators nor adulterers
nor homosexuals sha 11 inherit
the kingdom of God
In no way do I endorse
mistreatment of gays nor do I
wish any harm come upon them.
Jesus loves every man and de-
si resall mentorepentandcome
into a relationship with Him.
Throughout the Gospels, Jesus
always reach ed ou t and showed
compassion to the sinner, but
never did He accept their sin.
Jesus always said to repent and
turn from their sinful ways and
follow Him. To coin an old
Christian cliche, "Love the sin-
ner, but hate the sin
In no way are compas-
sionate, caring Christians
homophobes and hate-mon-
gers. We simply want homo-
sexuals to know that through
the power of Jesusand with the
help of Christian counseling,
they can be set free from the sin
of homosexuality.Jesussaid that
He came to set the captives free.
Eddie Hillard
Campus Minister
Existence of God thought to be unprovable
To the Editor:
How interesting. Topro-
claimdisbelief in something is
to admit that it exists. In the
course of my lifetime, I have
expressed disbelief in Santa
Claus, cold fusion and two-
headed monsters that live un-
der the bed. Thanks to Mr.
Webb and the April 1 edition
of The East Carolinian, however,
I can state with confidence that
all of these things exist, for the
simple reason thai in the past 1
have proclaimed their exist-
ence doubtful. Could this ut-
ter disregard of logic haveany-
thing to do with the decline of
religious influence in modern
society1 1 think it's pretty
likely If you can't handle an
intro level Critical Reasoning
dass, who's going to trust you
with thtir immortal soul?
Does the Bible condemn
homosexuality? Does it allow
it? Here's a deeper issue to
resolve. Why should we care
what the Bible says? People
are using the Bible now to jus-
tify discrimination against
women, blacks, Muslims and
others. We all know about the
people in Waco, Texas.
They've got God cm their side,
too. Where is all thisbrotherly
love the Bible is supposed to
be supporting? Not to worry,
though. Twenty years from
now, when decency and com-
mon sense have prevailed,
Christianity will say that it was
in favor of gay rightsall along.
Here's an idea that isn't
very original, but merits re-
peating. Tut this "Dies God
exist?" question on the back
burner for a while, and get on
with our lives. When all is said
and done, we can't prove He
exists, and we can't prove He
doesn't. It's an intriguing no-
tion, but one that's going to get
us nowhere. Let's see if we
can't find something real.
What about moral guidance?
What about a sense of mean-
ing in your life? Try checking
out some Plato, Immanuel
Kant or Henry David Thoreau.
Any of these will at least make
an attempt to answer some se-
rious questions about life. If
the answers aren't always sat-
isfactory, at least it was a genu-
ine attempt, and this crowd
rarely ducks issues by making
an absurd statement and then
saying, "Point made
Dennis Wilhelm
Senior
Philosophy
By Gregory Dickens
Two-cent beer tax
answer to ECU's
money problem?
Throughout the 1992-93 term, this
newspaper has run numerous articles con-
cerning the debate over the expected rise
in tuition for both ECU and the state's
university system.
Several proposals and sets of statis-
tics have been brought forward in order to
find the best way to garner more money in
the least-painful method (painful to whom
is another kettle of carp).
I personally endorse the idea of a
state lottery to generate the much-needed
increase in funds available for education.
Many states already use such means to
run their superior educational systems
(California, Michigan, Illinois, etc.) while
promising huge payoffs to lucky partici-
pants.
Unfortunately, there are obstinate
lobbying groups that believe such mea-
sures will send us all screaming to Hell for
establishing such immoral procedures.
It's gambling, don'tchya know.
So instead, I propose a sin tax. No,
no. Not on cigarettes again . You smokers
have gone through enough economic tor-
ment in order to reduce your lungs to
dreary sacs of carbon But, I think the idea
of "sin taxes" as a quick and near-guaran-
teed source of income via popular vices is
sound.
Withahordeofstudentseagerly par-
ticipating in "sinful acts" every week (No-
tice the quotes, guys. I'm merely extend-
ing a metaphor.), ECU has the opportu-
nity to tap into a potentially-rich well of
moola with little fuss. Here's how.
A city-wide two-cent beer tax.
Imagine it's Friday night. Let's as-
sume that 4,000 students patronize the
local bars. Say each student consumes an
average of five beers Friday night (a con-
servative estimate for some). That's 20,000
beers, each with a two-cent addend. That's
$400 that night alone without counting
beer sold at convenience stores, grocery
stores and so on.
It also doesn't include kegs or multi-
packs (a 12-pack gets 24 cents, a 24-pack
brings in 48 cents, we'll say kegs get $4.75).
The Pantry on East 10th Street sold 625
cases of beer last week, the majority of
those were 12-packs. Let's say 450 were
12-packs and 175 were 24-packs. That
amounts to $192 a week from that one
location.
The ECU Telephone Directory lists
19 convenience stores. If those stores sold
as much as what The Pantry takes in on a
weekly basis with the beer tax, ECU would
ta ke in145,920 a 40-week year from conve-
nience stores alone. That isn't taking into
account sport weekends, graduations,fra-
ternitvsorority organizations or other pe-
riods of increased alcoholic activity.
If the tax was a nickel a beer, that would
result in $364,800 a year from the sale of beer.
These figures do not consider the sale of kegs
or liquor or a tax on alcoholic paraphernalia.
As much as ECU fancies itself a party
school, such a proposal would not greatly
diminish the sale ofakoholinthe area. There's
monev to be had here, folks.
WJ
��.





The East Carolinian
April 8, 1993
Lifestyle
'Rosemary' to be replaced
Dillon Fence sets April
20 release date for
'Outside In'
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
There are four guys who'd prefer you
not consider Dillon Fence a pansy candy
pop Teen Beat weenie band. They're real
cool fellas who live in Chapel Hill and are
namedGregHumphreys,ScottCarle,Kent
Alphin and Chris Goode.
Thekoandcoincidentally shares Dillon
Fence's name, but not their sound. At least
starting April 20, when their new LP, Out-
side In (Mammoth), is released.
Like the patient who's just completed
her first psychotherapy session at the ho-
listic health center, Dillon Fence seems
happier about their existence, more confi-
dent of who they are, yet perhaps more
confused about life than ever.
Outside In, the band's second LP and
fifth release in as many years, marks a
musical departure as distinct as it flanges
sideways intoamurkythematicamalgam.
Which is to say, they're getting a lot better
yet equally as worrisome.
Chief songwritersingerguitarist
Humphreys sheds his bouncy blond surf
rap foradarker, more introspective lyrical
exploration. Song titles exemplify this
Dillon twist, which seems evident after a
steady maturation that's happily evolved
since the band's crispy bop formative frat
days at UNC-Chapel Hill.
"Collapsis "Poor Poor Lonely "One
Bad Habit "Headache "Inward Ho"
and "Hard to Please" make it clear before
Outside In's first listen that something's
new with Dillon Fence. On "Safety Net
Dillon Fence
Ptiolo courtesy Mammoth Records
Humphreys croons: "I can be your safety
net1 can be your blanket1 can forget
you a sentiment quite distanced from
the shallow optimism of lyrically-thin-
mough-moroughly-popsmgs"Something
for You "Summer" and "Playful
The music's a lot stronger too. Boast-
ing 14 tunes, including two suave acoustic
instrumentals, Outside In sounds refresh-
ingly clueless as to what Dillon Fence's
"sound tag" should be. The homogeneity
of their debut LP Rosemary shrunk its half-
life considerable and upped its dust-gath-
ering factor beyond that of Robyn
Hitchcock's Queen Elvis.
Outside In does nothing of the sort;
rather, it wafts carelessly to and fro, look-
ing for angles and gratefully � thanks to
producer Lou Giordano (Sugar, Pixies)�
does so in flowery fashion. Fear not
candycanedancie shinie faithful, the sweet
pop coats Inward Ho likea Hardee'scinna-
mon-n-raisin biscuit, but just a tad dirtier.
Ya' know, scuzzier and distorted an' all.
Besttunesinclude"Collapsis "Safety
Net "Hard To Please" and "Black Eyed
Susan. "Suck-pole tunesare "Waking Up
"Remember" and "Lisa Marie However,
(BIG DISCLAIMER)thereal besttuneson'
Dillon Fence's new record are "One Bad
Habit" and most especially "Hold Me
Down" � both written and sung by other
and cooler guitarist Alphin.
Alphin should start a band of his own
because he is the best songwritersinger in
the band. Goode cut his hair and can slap
that doghouse bass when he wants to, but
never on record.
All in all isoverdone carrot pie, Dillon
Fence is A-OK, so don't dis them like
Martha's fish stick dinners with chewy
fruity peach material desert 'Kay?
Citino featured at poetry reading today
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
David Gtino,a professorof English and
director of the Creative Writing program at
Ohio State University, will be the featured
speaker at today's poetry reading in GCB
1031 at 3:15 p.m.
Among his honors and awards are a
poetry fellowship from the National En-
dowment for the Arts, a book award for
poetry, the first annual poetry award from
the Ohio Ana Library Association, a fellow-
ship from the Ohio Arts Council and the
Alumni Distinguished teachingAward from
Ohio State. He has received publication
awards from Cetitennial Review, The Hollbis
Critic, Poet arJ Critic, San Jose Studies, South
Dakota Review, Southern Humanities Review
and The Texas Review.
Gtino is the author of seven books of
pcietiy,rrK�trecentiy77jeDzscinf:Newfl
Selected Poems, 1980-1992 and The House of
Memory. The new titles arepublished by the
OhioState University Press. Amonghisother
books are The Appassionata Doctrines and
The Gift of Fire.
Over the past 20 years his poems have
David Citino, a
professor of English
and the director of
the Creative Writing
program at Ohio
State University.
will be the featured
speaker at today's
poetry reading in
GCB 1031 at
3:15p.m.
Page 7
Don't Rim My Life
By Richard Cranium
appeared in numerous literary periodicals,
indudingAntibdi Review, Chicago Review, The
Kenyan Review, The Laurel Review, Michigan
Quarterly Review, New England Review, Poetry,
Salmagundi, The Southern Review, Tar River
Poetry and The Yale Review.
Hehas given readings and talks and has
directed workshops at colleges, universities,
librariesand community centers throughout
the country.
He currently serves as president of the
board of trustees ofThurber House, a writers
center located in the restored boyhood home
of James Thurber in downtown Columbus.
Jf you've ever read
Tarzan of the Apes or
The Beasts of Tarzan
(both by Edgar Rice
Burroughs), I think you
know what a man should be. I also
think you know that I am that man.
However, as luscious as I am, I
don't want to dwell on me, I want
to respond to my esteemed col-
league, Stylin' Stephen Conrad.
Mr. Conrad wrote a beautiful
little number, "At Wit's End that
you may have read in the March 23
edition of this particular publica-
tion. Point being, I love that man. I
wonder how many people who
read his piece understood it? Of
course, he lost it in the end, but he
spoke words of wisdom up to that
point. But really, who got it?
Especially freshmen.
I love a freshman as much as
the next guy � hey, I was one! But
if you talk to some of them, their
whole freshman year was a cre-
scendo building up to Spring
Break. What in the world is going
on with that? I have to ask, how
can a student who has only made it
through one semester of college
deserve a Spring Break? Answer
me that! They don't. Especially if
you consider statistics: only one in
three will be back in the fall. But,
God love 'em. Them and their
beautiful tans.
The whole concept is an
anathema to the notion of college.
First, as most of you know, the
whole college thing has now
become part of the trumped-up
American Dream thing: graduate
from high school, go to college,
graduate, get a job, get married, get
a house, have a kid, sell him or her
on the American Dream, die.
But it doesn't work that way.
There is no course offered at ECU
on how to judge when a burger is
finished, or how to rhetorically ask,
"Do you want fries with that?"
Face it, the only way college gets
you a job is if your family owns a
business, or you sell your soul to
ol' Beelzebub.
Now you've got to go to
graduate school. Get the big
degrees.
Take out student loans. At least
that way you can make the sched-
ule at Billy's Burger Barn. Earn that
five bucks an hour.
Get a degree on humanities.
The establishment is against you
anyway, why not make The Man
hate you even more? Knowledge,
baby, knowledge.
Become a poet or an artist; hell,
those are the people that perpetu-
ate culture anyway.
Look here, instead of getting a
job and paying back your student
loans, declare indigence and let
taxpayers support you. Now that
taxes are going to go up, the
economy is getting even worse; it's
a vicious cycle. If Joe Blow knows
he's got to pay more taxes to The
Man, he spends less. Less spending
means businesses have to lay off
the schmucks who got their BAs.
And then everything goes to hell.
Thank you for calling!
I mean, what are we doing?
College is now a business! Every
year, tuition goes up. We pay more
for stickers, more for drinks, more
for the very air we breathe in
academia. Why? So The Man can
get more. Look around, campus
police are twice as quick to write a
ticket as they
are to re-
spond to a
call for help.
More money!
Who's paying
for all that
brilliant
brickwork in
front of the
GCB and the
remodeling
of that
epitome of
capitalist
avarice, the
ECU Student
Store? We
are, baby!
Next year,
plan to pay
$23 for a $4
T-shirt
instead of
$19.
And how about this? Law
enforcement people get in the
movies free! Why? Isn't it enough
we pay them to eat donuts? We've
got to send them to the cinema as
well. Sheesh! They don't get in
free, baby; we buy their ticket. The
Man has always got his hand in
your pocket. I love America. It
don't love me. But, then again, I
voted for Perot.
So, here's the plan. Get your
financial aid. Sell all your stuff.
Buy a gun, a knife and a sketch-
book. Steal the car and drive to
Key West. Sell the car for $100 and
hop on a banana boat. Find your
way to France. Get a shitty job, rent
a shitty apartment and entertain
the locals with inflammatory
writings and drawings about
presidents and royalty.
When you get set up and have
room for me, write me in care of
this paper and I'll join you. Until
then, whenever a cop pulls you
over or asks for some ID, poke him
in the badge and say, "Don't run
my life
Knowledge,
baby,
knowledge.
Become a
poet or an
artist; hell,
those are
the people
that
perpetuate
culture
anyway.
coming events
Thursday, April 8
� Premier Performances of ECU Student Composers:
Mark Tagged, director. Fletcher Recital Hall at 9 p.m free.
� Industry and the Environment: Jack Creighton Jr presi-
dent and CEO of Weyerhaeuser, is the featured speaker for the ECU
Beta Gamma Sigma Distinguished Lecture Series at 4 p.m. in the
Great Room of Mendenhall. The title of his lecture is "Doing Business
in an Environology Era
�Comparisons of Health Systems: Portraits of the health
care delivery systems in China, Germany and the Netherlands will be
presented at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of Brody Building (School of
Medicine). Featured speakers are Dr. oan Uhl, dean of the Collegeof
Nursing at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and Dr. Bradford
Kirkman-Liff, an associate professor in the School of Health Adminis-
tration and Policy at Arizona State University.
�Art Lecture: Stefany Blyn, a visiting artist at the ECU School
of Art, will give a public lecture at 7 p.m. in the Speight Auditorium
of lenkins. Blyn is a painter whose work is exhibited nationally.
� Concert: The ECU Composers Concert will be performed
at 8 p.m. in the Recital Hall of the School of Music.
Monday April 12
� Percussion Players: Harold Jones, director. Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8 p.m free.
Mex-ecanos (Nags Head)
Thursday: The Kill Kids
Griffith
makes "Born
Yesterday"
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Bom Yesterdayisa new film about
the intellectual awakening of a Las
Vegas showgirl.
WATT! Before leaving this cri-
tique based on that superficial syn-
opsis you need to remember the old
adage: do not judge a book by its
cover.
Born Yesterday provides unim-
posing entertainment. The film
sparkles with endearing, if not par-
ticularly creative, energy. The plot is
subordinate to the mirth that per-
vades each scene.
Melanie Griffith, Don Johnson
and John Goodman play the three
leadsinthisjoyouscomedy.Allthree
actorsactresses fit their roles per-
fectly and their talents perfectly
complement the film.
The story opens with a busi-
nessman named Harry Brock (John
GoodmanofTV's Kosenwif )arri ving
(
Former Las Vegas showgirl Billie Dawn (Melanie Griffith) is a diamond
ignorance proves to be a social liability for her bully of a boyfriend, Harry
inWasrungton,D.Ctocmdurtsorne bored with it While lying in bed
high-level business. Brock is accom-
panied by hisgirlfriend ofeightvears,
Billie awn (Griffith).
Billie loves the rich life but is
staringatthe television shemumbles
that late afternoon is the worst time
of day, "after the soaps but before
primetime Billie exerts no energy
Photo courtaay Buana Vista Pictures
in the rough whose spectacular
Broch (John Goodman, center).
except to keep Harry happy.
While at a posh dinner engage-
ment, Billie opens her mouth too
i
See YESTERDAY page 8





8 The East Carolinian
APRIL 8. 1992
YESTERDAY
often, allowing idioticdrivel tospew
' forth. In one conversation the topic
turns to the collapse of the Eastern
bloc. When askedabouther opinion,
Billie replies that as long as no one
was hurt, "when the bloc fell she
doesn't really care.
At another time, a group of
women ask Billie what sights she
wants to see while in D.C Billie tells
them that she likes to see people's
homes so she wants to see where the
Kennedy's lived. Then she proceeds
to explain how much she learned
abou t El vis whi le touringGraceland.
She spends several mintues jabber-
ing about the multitude of telei-
sions in Elvis' house.
Atthispointin the filmthe script
could have deteriorated into a cli-
ched, boring treatment of Billie's re-
venge on a town that thought she
was stupid. Instead, the story really
picks up as Taul Verrall (Don
Johnson) is introduced.
Harry knownsPaul becausepaul
interviewed him earlier in the film.
Beca use Paul isa journalist, and seems
reasonably intelligent, Harry hires
him to tutor Billie. By teaching her a
little about Washington and expos-
ing her to a little culture, Harry feels
that she will be less of a liability at
dinner parties and around town.
Theplot machinations from here
on serve only to bring the story to its
obviousconclusion. But the ultimate
Continued from page 7
outcome of this film matters little
because the fun comes from watch-
ing the interplay among the three
lead
Disliking a film that present,
education as beingsomuch fun seems
impossible. The sheer goodwill pre-
sented in Bom Yesterday is enough to
carry the film.
Billie spends much of her time
reading Tcxrqueille's Democracy m
America. One of the beauties of this
filmisthatitinvolvestheviewerwith
the story while prov iding some pop
philisophical views. The film de-
serves credit for spurring interest in
reading, especially in reading
Tocqueville.
Billie is a wonderful character.
She posesses many charming quali-
ties,iikeaningenouspersonality,but
does not come off as perfect. Gnffith
imbues Billie with just the right
amount of intelligence. By the end of
the story it is clear that Bil lie's 1 ife has
changed by her new-found reading
ability and her intellectual curiosity,
but it is also clear that she will never
teach at Harvard.
In a lesser film, Billie could have
been n iade to resemble Shakespeare
by the denouement.
Bom Yesterdayisarx ideal vehicle
for Griffith and Johnson. It nicely
parallels their personal lives. Both
actors now seem ultimately satisfied
vith their lives and career. Tha t j( ty-
ful sati; 'ction shows on the screen.
Gni ith's career especially re-
sembles theart in thisfilm. She began
as another d u mb blonde in the mode
of her mother, Tippi Hedron, one of
Hitchcock'sditziestfemales. In mov-
ies like Body Double, Griffith was uti-
lized more for her body than her
mirxl But, latelyGriffithhasemerged
as one of the bri gh test actresses of the
'90s. She has manv quality roles un-
der herbeltnow that started with the
breakthrough role in Working Cirl.
Johnson seems to have shed his
sexy macho image in lieu of a more
refined one. In Bom Yesterday he looks
and acts every bit the scholarly jour-
nalist who helps educate another
Eliza Dtxlitle.
I have never seen the original
version of this story which was made
in 1950 and starred Judy Holiday
(she won the Oscar that year for her
role),WilliamHoldenandBroderick
Crawford. Although 1 can not com-
pare the two films, this remake cer-
tainly sparked my interest enough ti i
want to see the original. Perhaps the
fact that this is a remake is the reason
it seems better than most modern
Hollywood films of mis type.
Bom Yesterday should be seen
today. It sparkles with genuine vit
and crackles with good-natured
exuberance.itom Yesterday gives ev-
eryone plenty of reason to look for-
ward to tomorrow.
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The East Carolinian
April 8, 1993
Sports
Page 9
Vick leads ladies in St. Aug. Invitational
By Ricky Chann
Staff Writer
The women's track team com-
peted at the St. Augustine's Invita-
tional this past Saturday, while the
men competed in the NikeAri-
zona State Invitational. The women
were led by
Darlene Vick's
first place fin-
ishes in the dis-
cus and javelin
and Marvina
Hamilton's vic-
tory in the 800- Darime yick
meter run.
Vick won the discus with a
throw of 122 feet-4 inches, which
broke the existing meet record by
over four feet. Teammate Robin
Wooten placed fourth in theevent.
ECU claimed the top three posi-
tions in the javelin competition with
Vick winning with a throw of 88
feet-5 inches.
Danielle Smith placed second
and Robin Wooten was third with
throws of 73 ft5 in. and 66 ft4 in.
respectively.
Hamilton and Gretchen Harley
"both had good races in the 800
Head Coach Charlie justice said.
Hamilton's time of 2:21 was good
enough for a first place finish by
almost five seconds. Harley cap-
tured third with her time of 2:27.
Inthesprintcompetition,Carla
Powell and Nicole Crews placed
fourth and seventh respectively in
the l(X)-meterdash. Powell's time
was 12.53 seconds whileCrews ran
the race in 13.03. Powell also placed
seventh in the 200-meter dash with
a time of 26.6 seconds.
Christy Rogers led ECU hur-
dlers with her third place finishing
timeof 1:102 in the400-meter inter-
mediatehurdles.Smith placed sixth
in the event with her time of 1:13.3.
Rogers also competed in the 100-
meter hurdles and captured sixth
place in a time of 16.58 seconds.
Both the4xl00and 4x400 relay
teams placed fourth in the meet.
The 4xl(Xl team, comprised of all
freshman, qualified for the ECAC
meet with their time of 48.75 sec-
onds. The4x4(X) relay ran a timeof
4:16.13.
H
Justice slid, "it wasgood toget
a meet in with decent weather to
see where we are
at He said he
was pleased with
the team's perfor-
mance even
though two of
their top sprinters
sat out to rest for
this weekends
CAA champion-
ship meet.
"We are not
at full speed be-
cause of some in-
juries to some of
our distance run-
ners" said Justiceabout the upcom-
ing CAA meet at UNCW. With 11
We are not at
full speed
because of some
injuries to some
of our distance
runners.
Charlie Justice,
Track Coach
of the 16 members competing be-
ing freshman, the team is a young
and lacks the ex-
perience and
depth to compete
for a top spot. Jus-
tice said his team
is not going into
the meet with
huge expecta-
tions. He is look-
ing for a third or
fourth place fin-
ish. He is also look-
ing for Danita
Roseboro to re-
peat as 100-and
200-meter cham-
pion and to run on the relays, which
could earn her the MVP award for
the meet. The men's track team
traveled to Arizona this past week-
end to compete in the NikeASU
Invitational.
The meet featured some of the
top competition i n the country. ECU
competed in two relay events cap-
turing a fourth and a fifth place
finishes.
The 4x100 team of Charles
Miles, BrentGibson, Danny Allette,
and R. Crawford placed fifth in a
time of 40.45 seconds. The fourth
place 4x200 relay team of Miles,
Gibson, Corey Brooks, and
Crawford crossed the finish line in
124.10. The men's team will also
compete at the CAA champion-
ship meet this weekend in Wilm-
ington.
Ruggers win
at Guilford
Invitational
By Jason Webb
Staff Writer
This past weekend, the ECU Rugby
team traveled to Greensboro to compete
in theGuilford Invitational Tournament.
After a series of tough matches the Pirates
emerged with a tournament victory and
renewed determination for the rest of the
season.
The Pirate Ruggers, on Saturday,
faced their toughest opponent of the tour-
nament, Appalachian St. ECU dominated
almost every phaseofthecontest,but was
unable to supply a score until after the
intermission, as the ASU squad led 7-0.
As the game wore on, ECU continued
their pressure and after an successful ASU
kick, finally broke the ASU defense with a
penalty kick by Richard "Opie" Moss.
ECU, now trailing 7-3, started to over-
power their opponents, particularly when
their scrum fell to his stronger ECU coun-
terpart. Jay Keller and John Hogan sup-
plied the muscle for an ECU score. Moss
easily scored his kick, and the Pirate squad
quickly tied the score at 10, where it stood
at the end of regulation.
The referee decided to decide the con-
test with sudden death overtime. The bet-
The Pirate
Rugby team
emerged from
the Guilford
Invitational
Tournament
with a victory
and renewed
determination
for the rest of
the season.
Fil. Photo
ter-conditioned Pirate squad continued
their relentless pressure for over ten min-
utes until Sean Miller scored off of a J.J.
McCain pass to the far corner, clinching
the Pirate victory.
The next day, ECU would face an-
other strong opponent, Guilford College.
At first things looked bad for the Pirates,
as mental errorsallowed theiropponents
to take a 7-0 lead.
However the Pirates pulled them-
selves back into the contest as team cap-
tain Jason Webb took advantage of a
quick penalty play and scored right un-
der the goal posts. Moss' point-after kick
was absolutely perfect and the score was
tied 7-7 at the half.
The second period showcased the
dazzling play of the Pirate wing as Kris
Moore was able to sidestep Guilford at
will.
Pirate condition ing once againplayed
a factor as they forced Guilford into com-
mitting costly penalties. Two more penal-
ties sentGuilford packing with a 20-7 loss.
ECU meets ODU on April 17 in Nor-
folk.
The Ultimate Players Association Collegiate Men's Top 15
RankTeam
1 Stanford 1581
2 Humboldt St.
3UCSB
4 Wisconsin
5 Ball State
6 Purdue
7 UC-Santa Cruz
8 Indiana 1356
9 UNCW 1355
10 East Carolina
11 Cal Poly-SLO
12 Arizona
13 Michigan
14 UC Berkeley
15 Los Positas
Men's Rankings
PR.
7-1
1510
1498
1420
1407
1380
1380
10-1
20-3
1222
1252
1234
1211
1201
1190
W-L
3
5-2
4-2
8-3
8-1
9-3
16-4
10
12
1&2
7-3
3-1
6-3
8-5
8-6
File Photo
The East Carolina Men's Ultimate team moved up to 10th nationally with the ladies coming in at 15th. With the recent
fair weather these students found the time to get in a little frisbee practice.
Women's Rankings
RankTeam P.R. W-L
lOberlin 1458 3-0
2 UCSB 1410 9-1
3 UNCW 1406 12-0
4 Indiana 1252 2-0
5 UC-Berkcly 1226 8-3
6 Pennsylvania 1197 4-23
7 Cornell 1 170 7-2
K Hurnboldt St. 1126 4-3
9 Virginia 1003 4-3
10 Colombia 922 3-1
10 UC-Santa Cruz922 3-5
12 Macalester 904 1-1
13 Stanford 813 3-4
14 UC San Diego 752 0-4
15 East Carolina 700 1-7 10
15 Vermont 700 1-3
T.R is the "UPA Power Rating
LW
7
4
5
11
18
8
20.
13
15
6
19
17
LW
5
1
2
7
8
12
9
10
12
Pirate Notes:
NCAAs, games
re-scheduled
Beating the East Carolina basketball
team has been a good way to claim the
national championship recently. North
Carolina is the latest to find it out. The
Tarheelsdefeated Michigan Monday night,
77-71. UNC beat ECU in the first round of
the NCAA tournament, 86-65, in Winston-
Salem on March 18.
Duke defeated ECU in each of their
national championship seasons as well.
The Blue Devils beat the Pirates, 125-82, in
1990-91 and 103-75 in 1991-92.
Only three non-ACC teams have
played the national champions each of the
last three years. The other two being Notre
Dame and Michigan.
The Pirates have also played one of the
Final Four teams in each of the last eight
seasons. The list includes:
1993- North Carolina (national cham-
pion)
1992- Duke (national champion)
1991- Duke (national champion)
1990- Duke (finalist)
1989- Duke (semi-finalist)
1988- Duke (semi-finalist)
1987- Indiana (national champion)
1986- Duke (finalist)
CBS television analyst Billy Packer
said,during the UNC-Kansas game, ECU's
basketball teamwas the only squad able to
handle North Carolina's devastating trap
defense. The i3ucshad only 11 turnovers in
the match-up.
ECU shooting guard Lester Lyons' 27
points (8 of 11 field goals, 5 of 6 three-
pointers, 6 of 6 free throws) was the single-
game high against the Tarheelsduring the
NCAA tournament.
m
SOFTBALL
The softballga me scheduled for Tues-
day afternoon between ECU and UNC
Wilmington was rained out. The games
have not yet been re-scheduled.
ECU's next game is Friday, April 9, in
the first round of the UNC Invitational
Softball Tournament. The Pirates' first
round opponent will be UNC-Charlotte at
10:30 a.m.

BASEBALL
m
The Pirates'game in BuiesCreeksched-
uled for Tuesday, April 6, was cancelled
because of rain. The game has been tenta-
tively re-scheduled for May 6, at 3 p.m.
Other schedule changes:
ECU playsagain on Thursday against
UNC-Greensboro.Thegamewillbeplayed
at Burlington Athletic Park at 7 p.m. and
not in Greensboroat 7:30 p.m. asoriginally
scheduled.
Oija board fails Michigan Head Coach Fisher, Fab Five
NEW ORLEANS (AP) � Some years
ago, when Steve Fisher was coaching high
school basketball in Chicago, his sister-in-
law whipped out a Oija board to do a little
fortune telling.
"She said I would win a national cham-
pionship as a college coach Fisher said.
"We all laughed
Soon, it got even funnier.
"She said itwould beat Northwestern
the coach said. "Then we laughed harder
Monday night, Fisher went after the
national championship for the third time in
five years and second in a row when Michi-
gan played North Carolina. "Crazy things
happen in this world he slid. "I'm in the
middle of it
Nothing could have been crazier than
1989 when Fisher was an assistant under
Bill Friederat Michigan. When Frieder an-
nounced on the eve of the NCAA tourna-
ment that he would be leaving for Arizona
State, he was told not to bother waiting
around and Fisher took the Wolverines on
a magical ride to the national champion-
ship.
"I'm amazed this can be done Smith
sin "You've got to be very lucky and very
good toget here. It'satrernendous tribute to
their player and their staff Smith has
made die trip frequently. This was his ninth
trip to the Final Four, second only to John
Wooden's 12. Monday's title game is his
fifth, and he is the only coach to take a team
tothechampionshipgamein fourdiffer nt
decades.
Still, Smith often hears the whispers.
He'd only won once, in 1982 when fresh-
man Michael Jordan nailed a jump shot in
the final seconds to beat Georgetown 63-62.
"I'mgladwehad one champion shipSmith
slid before the game, reflecting on some of
tin 'disippointments And that one wasn 'ta
sure thing.
"How many coaches have won more
than one1 Quite a few. I'm not one of them
Wooden won 10. If only one coach did it,
(hat's sensational
Still,Smithhaswovenanenviable record
at Carolina with 773 career victories, second
only to AdolphRupp among major col leges,
and no one is more aware of it than Fisher.
"He's been to 17 Sweet 16s the Michi-
gan coach said. "He's going to wind up with
more victories than anyone in history. That
speaks volumes. His players graduate and
they want to come back. They speak of the
experience at North Carolina most posi-
tively
That sounds like a recruiting speech for
the Tar 1 leels, which is something of a sore
spot for Fisher. In his first year on the job at
Michigan,armed with a national champion-
ship, he went after a blue chip high school
prospect, a young man whose father and
grandfather both attended Michigan. The '
mission failed, and as a result Eric Montross
will be playing for North Ca rolina instead of
Michigan tonight.
Fisher was stung by the loss of the 7-toot
center, thinking it might affect the recruiting
of others. 11 d id not, however, as evidence by
the decision a year later of the Fab Five �
Jalen Rose, Chris Webber, Juwan Howard,
Ray Jackson and Jimmv King � to attend
Michigan.
Despite Montross' decision to choose
NorthGnolina,Fishernoteduiatthefamily's
Michigan heritage was maintained.
"We Kit his sister he said.
mm ii l I'IMM





10 The East Carolinian
APRIL 8, 1993
Swoopes breaks tourney records
ATLANTA (AP) It's
Swoopes � as in hoops. And
that's fitting since Sheryl
Swoopes left her name all over
the NCAA tournament record
book and carried her Texas Tech
team to the national champion-
ship as well.
Tech won the title with an 84-
82 victory over Ohio State on Sun-
day and Swoopes, a 6-foot-senior,
won the admiration of everyone
who wa tched with her grace, style
and skill.
She shattered the women's
championship game record by
scoring47 points � an effort that
also topped anything any player
has done in the men's final.
"I don't think I have ever seen
a player who has completely
dominated games as much as
Sheryl has Tech coach Linda
Sharp said.
"I think she'll be a legend in
our sport. 1 think she's the best
one of her time to play it at this
point
It's hard to argue with that
because the numbers are so con-
incing.
Swoopes broke the women's
championship game record of 28
points Dena Head of Tennessee
and Dawn Stalev of Virginia in
1988. She also outdid UCLA's Bill
Walton, whose 44 points against
Memphis State in 1973 is the
record for a Division I men's
championship game.
And the single-game mark is
just the start of Swoopes' list. She
broke the record for points in a
half (18) by scoring 23 in the first
halfSunday, then topped itagain
with 24 in the second.
She also set records for points
(177), field goals (57) and free
throws (56) for the entire NCAA
tournament, plus records for
points (78) and field goals (27) in
a Final Four. Swoopes tied the
mark of 19 free throws in a Final
Four.
When players get hot, they
talk about being in a zone.
Swoopes certainly was in one.
"Sometimes 1 just put it in
my mind that there's no way I
can miss, but obviously I did
he said.
Not often, though.
Swoopes frustrated every de-
fense and defender that Ohio
State threw at her, going 16-for-
24 from the field, including4-for-
6 on 3-pointers, and making ail
11 of her free throws.
For good measure, she
grabbed five rebounds, handed
out three assists, made two stea Is
and blocked a shotWe tried to
keep somebody fresh on her
Ohio State coach Nancy Darsch
said.
"We also tried trapping her
when she had the ball. She an-
swered everything we tried.
Swoopes seems to play with very
little effort
Down by 11 points early in
thesecond half, theBuckeyes ral-
lied and three times led by a point.
Their last lead was 62-61 with
8:30 left tin a three-point play bv
freshman Katie Smith, who led
the Buckeves with 28 points.
Assistant sports editor needed. Apply at
The East Carolinian.
(T
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 8, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 08, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.936
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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