The East Carolinian, April 6, 1993







The East Carolinian
-m- U�Z� t Anril 6. 1993 10 Pages
Greenville, North Carolina
Tbesday, April 6, 1993
V)l. 6H No. 22 � �
'Expressions' excels at state conference
o ,� i i k �ij�- �diah��iPH on the niaeazinechanged both
Photo by Dail Reed
Genera. Manager of the campus minority magazine, Expressions, Kathy Harris shows her gratitude for ,11 of
the hard work that won three awards for the magazine's appearance and des.gn.
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Receiving three awards in
the recent North Carolina Inter-
collegiate Press Association
(NC1PA) convention, East
Carolina's minority magazine,
Expressions, proves once again
their quality on this campus.
Expressions received a third-
place certificate for appearance
and design based on their two
most recent fall issues. Courtney
Miller, associate editor of Expres-
sions, received a first place certifi-
cate for her features story in the
first fall issue entitled "The Break-
down Expressions rounded out
theconvention w ith the 1993 Addy
Award, awarded for the artwork
for the cover of Expressions' sec-
ond fall issue. Artist Stanton
Blakeslee and staff illustrator Lee
Misenheimer collaborated on the
cover's design.
1992 served as the first year
that Expressions contributed to the
annual NCIPA convention. Win-
ning second place in overall excel-
lence under the University of North
Carolina's Daily Tarheel that year,
Expressions hopes to achieve more
and better accolades in the future.
Kathy Harris, general man-
ager of Expressions, said that these
awards help promote the maga-
zine on campus with more work-
ers.
"The awards show growth
and I think it makes it worthwhile
to be a staff member Harris said.
"Everyone wants to be part of a
winning team
Expressions first started pub-
lication in the mid-to-late 70s un-
der the name, The Ebony Herald.
Published in a tabloid format, the
magazinechanged both its format
(to a 5" x 7" magazine) and its
name (to Expressions) in 1985. For
the last three years, the magazine
has updated itself into a full-sized
magazine.
Harris stated that Expressions'
purpose is to provide an alterna-
tive form of media for any and all
minorities on campus.
"Expressions i s to give a voice
to minorities on campus Harris
said. "That does not just mean ra-
cial andor ethnic minorities; it
also means older students, physi-
cally challenged students � any
minority on campus Harris also
said that the current staff repre-
sents the diversity of students on
this campus and approaches is-
suesother media shiesaway from.
"We look at things the rest of
the press doesn't look at Harris
said.
Graduates should look for
commencement information
Health kick!
By Shannon Copper
Staff Writer
Gettingcommencement information
out to all spring graduates may prove to
be difficult because of a mix-up with the
commencement committee memoran-
dum.
The memo, sent to all spring gradu-
ates on March 25, was
mailed to the addresses
on file for the students,
which is usually their
home address.
"A lot of students
havecalled mewithques-
tions concerning com-
mencement C.C. Rowe,
chair of the commence-
ment committee said.
"They don't know that
commencement informa-
tion was bent to the ad-
dress we have on file
about a week ago
Parents keep misin-
formation at home and
don't send it to the stu-
dents
The memocontains
information concerning
the time of graduation, rehearsal, guest
tickets, dresscode, graduation caps, gowns
and announcements.
"lt'simportantthatstudentsreceive
this information because the deadline for
requesting and receiving guest tickets is
It's important
that students
receive this
information
because the
deadline for
requesting and
receiving guest
tickets is
April 16
C.C. Rowe,
commencement committee
April 16 Rowe said. "If they haven't
received a commencement memorandum,
they should contact home
The speaker for the 1993 springcom-
mencement will be John Jackson Beard 111.
Beard is a 1975 graduate of ECU,
where he received his Bachelor of Fine
Arts degree in drama and speech with a
broadcasting minor. Currently, Beard is
employed as a news an-
chorcommentator for
KNBC-TV, Los Angeles.
The format for
spring commencement
will be trad i tional. Honor
cords for graduates who
are graduating magna
cum laude, summa cum
laudeand cum laude will
be available.
"Traditionally, uni-
versity honor graduates
don't wear anything to
distinguish them from
other graduates, but this
has been changed upon
request of students
Rowe said.
"We will recognize
thefirstdoctorateofEdu-
� cation and we are going
to allow a graduate from N.C. State Uni-
versity to receive her Ph.D. during East
Carolina'sceremony because herhusband
will be graduatingfromECU'Rowe said.
"This is an example of two universities
working together
amv Photo by Dail Reed
ECU'S annual health fair, held last Thursday, offered information for
students and faculty on all aspects of good health.
Student wins
presidency
ofCFYD
By Jennifer Wardrep
Staff Writer
Adding to the growing list of ECU
students participating in state politics, the
College t ederatk n of Young Democratsof
North Carolina elected Bill Gheen as their
president. Gheen, vice presidentof the ECU
College Democrats, said his enthusiasm
and dedication will helphimsucceedinhis
new position.
"This position requires someone with
a li it (f time, energy and dedication for the
next year he said. "It requires a person
who wants to get a lot accomplished with
little or no reward and I want to do that
t ,heen, w hi was also elected second
chair of his distrk t for Young Democrats,
said he hopes to increase communication
feS between the satellite groups of the
Federation, which a insists of 24 organiza-
Photo courtesy College Democrats
After beingelected president oflheColleReFederationofYoungDemocrat'spresident,
Bill Gheen was able to meet Democrat Harvey Gantt
tions of College Democrats from schixils
throughoutthe state. rfeabosatdhewouW
like to "add a younger perspective" to the
Demcxrratic Party of North Carolina.
In addition tohisparty involvements,
Gheen is also chair of COST (Committee
on Student Tuition)and a Day Representa-
ti e on SGA. C.heen said he hopes to con-
tinue his work in opposition to the state-
proposed tuition increase, the bond issue
involving oyner Library and any other
student issues.
"We hope to hold the existed groups
the Federation together as well as bring
some more into the fold he said. "We
need to convince young people to either
stay involved or become involved
Gheen said it is important to keep
people involved in the Democratic party
who became involved in the Clinton cam-
paign, because of current and upcoming
issues that will affect young people and
college students.
Gheen, a junior political science ma-
jor, worked on theClintonGore campaign
aspressccwrdinatorforECUCollege Demo-
crats. He helped coordinate the Clinton
visit to W ilson in October and the Rock the
Vote event on campus.
Gheen said he enjoys working on
campaigns but does not think he is inter-
ested in running for political office in the
future. "In whatever field I am in, I would
like to continue to try and see some re-
form he said. "I think our system is al-
ways in need for reform; we can always do
better
Gheen was elected and inducted at
the state convention of North Carolina
See GHEEN page 4
Honor fraternity
receives national
excellence award
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
Dr.HalJ.Daniel,president-electof
ECU'S Sigma Xi chapter, an honor soci-
ety in scientific research, -aid "this is not
just some Sears and Roebuck award
we're talking about here. This is a Sak's
Fifth Avenue award
Daniel spoke oi the Certificate of
Excellence the chapter received at the
annual national Sigma Xi Assembly of
Delegates in San Francisco in February.
Sigma Xi's motto is "Companions
in Zealous Research and is one of the
mostprestigious interdisciplinary honor
societies in the country, Daniel said.
ECU's chapter is one of seven
across thecountry to receive such recog-
nition, which isbased on exemplary per-
formancesduringthepreviousacademic
year.
"Winning this award speaks to the
credibility of ECU'S science faculty
Daniel said. Daniel, a professor in the
ECU Department of Biology and School
of Allied Health Sciences, accepted the
award in California on behalf of ECU.
Dr. Robert Bernhard t, president of
Sigma Xi for the '9293 academic year,
said the main program this award rec-
ognizes is a symposium directed by Dr.
Scott W. Snyder, chair of the Geology
Department and president of Sigma Xi
for the '91cv2 academic year.
Snyder's symposium, entitled
"North Carolina Estuaries: Assessment
of the Present and Prospects for the Fu-
ture brought together 23 scientists from
various backgrounds to discuss the
North Carolinaestuaries,theirproblems,
and potential solutions.
The program consisted of a full
day of activities involving speakers, pan-
elists, and the public, Snyder said. The
people involved represented very dif-
ferent disciplines, Snyder said, ranging
from universities to the state and federal
government
Snyder said the symposium was
very weil received, especia 11 v beca use of
the public's involvement At the end of
the day the public participated in a suc-
cessful panel discussion, Snyder said.
The ECU chapter of Sigma i also
rutionfor
received a Certificate ot Re,
increasing its active membe rship by five
percent. Bernhardt said the chapter is
consistent in sending people to meet
ings and conferences. "We're a good
club, a good chapter, with very good
citizenship.
A Sigma i General Information
sheet lists approximately 270 members
in the ECU chapter According to the
See AWARD page 4





2 The East Carolinian
APRIL 6, 1993
Volunteer program leaps forward with success
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
March 24,1993
4:30 p.m.
An unknown person removed an unsecured bike from a bike rack
on the east side of the General Classroom Building. The bike was valued
at $400.
11:53 p.m.
A 14-year-old boy and a 16-year-old boy attempted to steal a
bicycle with a pair of wire cutters. The boys ran from ECU Police before
they were caught near the south end of Belk Hall.
March 26,1993
1:45 a.m.
Three unknown people assaulted a 19-year-old man in Suite 41 !
in Scott Hall. The victim was hit in the stomach and face by the assailants.
12:15 a.m.
A28-year-old man and a41 -year-old man were caught possessing
a handgun on campus in the freshman parking lot on 5th and Reade
Street.
9:58 a.m.
An unknown person stole plants and pots from the greenhouse on
the east side of Slay Hall. The artifacts were valued at $60.
March 28, 1993
2p.m.
Almost $400 worth of materials were stolen from Room 116 B,
Scott Hall. No suspects have been caught.
In m
An unknown person stole a $150 bicycle from the bike rack
between Jenkins Art Building and arvis Hall.
March 29,1993
10:30 a.m.
An unknown person knocked out the driver's side window of a
1992 gray Mitsubishi Eclipse at the comer of 3rd and Reade streets.
March 30,1993
12:51a.m.
A 23-year-old man was caught intoxicated and disorderly on the
northwest side of Fletcher Hall. The man ran from reserve officers using
profane language.
March 31,1993
2:45 a.m.
Two men aged 18 and one man aged 20 were caught taking two
traffic barriers west of Mendenhall Student Center.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from ECU
Public Safety Crime Reports.
TheHealth Education Depart-
ment has, for its fourth year, had a
successful student volunteer pro-
gram. Headed by Judy Baker,project
director and health education lec-
turer, the program has over 700 ac-
tive volunteers.
"Last semester we had 755 stu-
dent volunteers who worked 5,006
hours Baker said.
Four years ago the program
began with six agencies, and less
than 250 volunteers. Today the pro-
gram is volunteering for 42 agencies,
and has quadrupled the number of
volunteers.
"We have exceeded all our
goals and objectives every semes-
ter Baker said.
The program is designed to
promote volunteerism among col-
lege students. Through health edu-
cation courses such as Health 1000
students are given the opportunity
to select agencies where they would
like to volunteer.
"Health 1000 is our primary
vehicle for obtaining volunteers
Baker said.
Debra Tavasso, Baker's assis-
tant, is one health education faculty
member who said she uses her class
time to encourage the students to
become involved in this program.
Although the main source of
volunteers comes from health
courses, anyone is eligible to partici-
pate. The only stipulation is that a
minimum of five hours of volunteer
work is required.
The ECU student volunteer
program was given a two-year fed-
eral ACnONgrantwhenitwas first
started. When thatgrantexpired,the
program was given a grant from the
private Z. Smith Reynolds Founda-
tion. This grant usually lasts a year,
but Baker said the program was
awarded a continuation grant be-
causeofthegreatprogressitdemon-
strated.
Besidespromoting
volunteerismamongstudents,Baker
hopes that the students will become
more interested in their community.
"We hope that students will
continue tobe life-longvolunteers
Baker said. "Students can also use
the experience to look at career op-
tions
The program has participated
in a Valentine's Fund Raiser for the
Ronald McDonald House.
"We are very appreciative of
all of the hours our student volun-
teershaveputin said Suzy Walker,
house manager of the Ronald
McDonald House.
Other studenrvolunteerswere
responsible for the house's spring
cleaning.
"We get splendid volunteer
work, especially from the ECU stu-
dent volunteer program Walker
said.
The student volunteer pro-
gram also assists the American Red
Cross, The Boys' and Girls' Clubs of
Pitt County, Real Crisis Center, The
Little Willie Center and many more
agencies in Greenville and Pitt
County.
"The majority of our help
comes from ECU said Renee
Arrington, co-founder of the Little
WillieCenter for Latchkey Children.
"The volunteers are able to work
one-on-one with our kids. They tu-
tor in math,helpwithartsandcrafts,
take the kids outdoors and some
even take the kids to the library
Arrington said that The Little
Willie Center depends on the com-
munity for support "ECU students
help uscarry the load, and I owe a lot
of gratitude to Judy Baker and her
program
The Little Willie Center is now
accepting children for their summer
program. "We need more volun-
teers, especially for the summer pro-
gram Arlington said.
Theprogramislookingforany
students, group of students, or stu-
dent organization interested in vol-
unteering. The student or students
will be matched with a project that
best suits their needs.
"We hope to expand so that
clubs and organizations on campus
will call us Baker said.
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SGA JUDICIAL BRANCH
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Academic Year 1993-94.
The following positions are available:
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HONOR & REVIEW BOARD
MEMBER
All applicants will be screened by the SGA Executive Council.
REQUIREMENTS:
2.0 Grade Point Average.
Good Standing with the University.
Applications Available At:
Secretary's Office (255 Mendenhall Student Center)
Attorney General's Office (236 Mendenhall Student Center)
DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS:
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1993
5:00 PM
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APRIL 6, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
StateNews
Governor's task force releases report on violence
(AH�A task force on school
violence established by Gov. im
Hunt is expected to release its find-
ings and issue recommendations
Thursday.
The Governor's Task Force on
SchoolViolenceheldsixpublichear-
ings across thestate last month. More
than 1300 people � from parents
and teachers to police and ministers
� testified.
From Asheville to Greenville,
parentsdelivered the same message.
'Tarentswantus tofind a place
for the troublemakers said Bobby
Etheridge, superintendent of the
Department of Tublic Instruction.
"They want them out of the schools
where there are plenty of other kids
who want to learn
The hearings taught Etheridge
something about parents' tolerance
for attacks on their children.
"Parents understand that
fights are part of the school day. It's
been thatwayforeverhe saidBut
they are unwilling to accept guns
and knives in the schools
"They want the weapons out
no matter what it takes Etheridge
said. "That's a good sign, because
we can't beat the problem until par-
ents demand it
Betty Connors of
Hendersonville is one of the con-
cerned parents. Her 13-year-old son,
Hal, suffered permanent damage in
one eye after he was struck with an
unknown object while leaving his
locker at Edneyville High.
"Hal knew the boy who hit
him. He'soneof those kidswho was
always looking for a fight Ms.
Connors said. "I don't understand
why they leta boy likethatin school
Based on a new statewide sur-
vey, Hal's assault was a relatively
minor matter � even though it
changed his life.
Almost 700 students were ar-
rested for assault and battery last
year. More than 1,300 students were
suspended for assaulting a teacher.
More than 50u were suspended for
bringing a gun to school.
Twenty-four students were
arrested for using a gun.
Most parents suggested that
violent students be sent to alterna-
tive schoolsinsteadofbeingrelega ted
to the streets.
"They realize they need to go
toschoolErheridgesaidIfachild
falls so far behind he can't catch up,
hedoesn'thavereason tobea model
student
Few school districts have al-
ternative schools and most don't
have the money to replace or main-
tain their regular buildings.
Thestatewidesurveyorvschool
violence found mostadministrators
want more authority to deal with
offenders. They also want laws that
clearly hold parents responsible for
the actions of their children.
Schoolofficialsalsowantmore
social workers and saystudents need
to take part in mediation programs.
Mediation programs use different
approaches, but most have the goal
ofbringingstudents together towork
out problems In some cases, the
students develop the ground rules
for what will be tolerated and how
students should be punished.
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4 The East Carolinian
APRIL 6, 1993
� NationalNewsJ AWARD
Continued from page 1
Child vaccination studied
ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP)
� The first U.S. study of vac-
cines for children with HI V will
be conducted in 12 cities, in-
cluding one in North Carolina,
to see if the inoculations will
boost their immune systems
against the virus, which causes
AIDS.
The vaccines have been
tested on adults, said thestudy's
chairman, Dr. John S. Lambert
of the University of Rochester
Medical School. Preliminary
evidence from tests on adults
has shown that some vaccines
can boost the immune system's
fightagainst HIV and stimulate
new immune responses, accord-
ing to the National Institutes of
Health, which is involved with
the study.
Ninety children will be re-
cruited for the study of three
experimental vaccines at 12
sites, including Rochester's
Strong Memorial Hospital. The
other cities are expected to be
New York City; Durham, N.C
Worcester, Mass San Francisco;
Boston; Syracuse, N.Y Los An-
geles; Houston; Denver; New-
Brunswick, N.J and Chicago.
The study will seek chil-
dren between 1 month and 12
years old, withdocumented HIV
infection but no symptoms other
than swollen lymph glands or a
midly swollen liver or spleen.
The children will be given
immunizations every four weeks
for six months, and then be moni-
tored for 24 weeks.
Lambert said he suggested
the study because some parents
of children with HIV asked that
their children get a vaccine in-
stead of the drug AZT, which
attacks the virus but doesn't
boost the immune system-
sheet, membership in Sigma Xi
requires nomination and subse-
quent election by peers.
A full member will have
demonstrated contribution to
original research through pub-
lished works in a peer-reviewed
journal.
Many of ECU's administra-
tors are active members in Sigma
Xi, including Chancellor Eakin.
GHEEN
Snyder said the Certificate
of Excellence award indicates the
level of excellence to which ECU's
science department has truly as-
pired. "This is the kind of thing
ECU needs Snyder said.
American Scientista maga-
zine published by Sigma Xi, pub-
lished an article and photograph
concerning the awards in- their
spring issue.
Continued from page 1
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Young Democra ts held in Cha rlotte
Mar. 26-27.
The College Federation also
elected Christy Agner of North
Carolina State University as vice
president, Matt Lauer of UNC-
Wilmington as secretary and
Donald Lassiterof UNC-Chapel Hill
as treasurer. Gheen also appointed
Darren Thompson of Wake Forest
University as executive assistant.
During the convention, the
YDNC also passed a resolution op-
posing the state tuition increase that
would affect North Carolina uni-
versities. The resolution was both
authored and proposed by Thomas
Blue, president of ECU College
Democrats.
The ECU College Democrats
attending the convention took part
in several activities, including a re-
ception hosted by 1990 democratic
gubernatorial candidate Harvey
Gantt and a luncheon at which
North Carolina Democratic Party
chair Tom Hendrickson spoke.
North Carolina Secretary of State
Rufus Edminsten also spoke at the
convention.
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Bused Cans 75 6-9�� Daily
Draft 35 4opir, Daily
1 Large Pizza
with 1 Topping
5.45
2 Large Pizzas
wi 1 Topping Or qq
Carry Out Only O.TrTr
FREE DELIVERY TO DORMS & STUDENT APARTMENTS
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
ACCU-DEMIC
EXHIBITION GAME
ECU Pirates
vs
KINSTON INDIANS
Grainger Stadium
Wednesday, April 7, 7:00 PM
-e-
Fast Copies For Fast Times
Limited Free Student Tickets Available at Accu-Cdpy
Discover a challenging,
rewarding future that puts
you in touch with your skills.
Today's Air Force offers ongoing
opportunities for professional
development with treat pay and
benefits, normal working hours.
complete medical and dental care,
and 'M) days vacation with pay per
year. Learn how to qualify as an
Air Force physical therapist. Call
USAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS
TOLL FREE
1-800-423-USAF
4F
EPISCOPAL CAMPUS MINISTRY gTH
St. Paul's Episcopal Church V
401 E. 4th Street
(across 5 th Street in front ofGarrett Hall; walk down Holly St. to 4th St.)
You Are There!
m HOLY WEEK
Wednesday - Holy Eucharist 7am; 5:30pm
Episcopal Student Fellowship supper follows 5:30pm service
Maudy Thursday Liturgy - 7:30pm Holy Eucharist-Stripping of Altar
Good Friday - 12:10pm Good Friday Liturgy
Easter Day
5:30am - The Great Vigil Holy Eucharist
9am - Holy Eucharist
1 lam - Holy Eucharist
WEDNESDAY
WEEK 3
BATTLE OF THE GREEKS
LYP SERVICE CONTEST
$1.00TALLS ()� DRAFT 75 KAMIKAZES
CHAMPIONSHIP WILL BE WED, APRIL 14, 1993
LADIES FREE UNTIL 10:30 ADMISSION - $3.00
THURSDAY

m �"��. - ���� v �-���
Or your hoiceBatter-dipped" or "BroiledSpecial $2.99
LIMITED
TIME
ONLY
o
Captain D's new lightly breaded fish is lighter
and crispier than ever before. Dinner
includes coleslaw, golden fries and hushpuppies.
This offer won't last long so get yours today!
SEAFOOD
626 South Memorial Drive
7b8-6761
SUPER SENIOR WEDNESDAY
ANY DINNER
Plus Free Drink
Lxilude Planers and Paiki. (.t. 60 & OVLRi
$329
KIDS EAT FREE
ON THURSDAY
Kids 12 & younger Limit 2
with each adult dinner at reg
price. Dining room only.
THURSDAY
STUDENT DOLLAR NIGHT
NOW 6N SPECIAL $2.50 FROZEN DRINKS
�$1.00 Domestics
�$2.50 Ice TeasBahama MamasPitchers
�$1.50 Imports �504 Jello Shots �75y Kamikazees
Members $2.00 LADIES FREE ADMISSION Guests $3.00
FRIDAY
FRI DAY
NIGHT
FRENZY
LLOON DR
$50.00 VS CASH will drop from the ceiling
every FftlgAY before Midnight
FREE ADMISSION 8-10 pm
Take Advantage Of Our Great Drink Specials!
Ice Teas � PJ's Igggjg"
Bahama Mamas �Pct'
75 Kamikazes Pitchers 504 Jello Shots





I
-�iii mMM feiM
KIIMT I1-�TT' �lil�ia�HHIi
, wv� .��� -� BBaMWM
� TJieEastCarolinian
SUBLEASEaonebedroom apartment
for the summer months (Approxi-
mately May thru August.) CLEAN
and EFFICIENT! Cal 752-9120 today.
SUBLEASE - SUMMER ONLY. Fe-
male Nonsmoker. Private bedroom,
furnished.NearECU.S162.50month
plusl2utilities.Call321-1904orleave
message.
LOOKING FOR A NEW PLACE?
Don't wait till Fall! We have hundreds
of vacancies for May through August,
within walking distance and access to
the ECU busline. Let us help, call 752-
1375. Home Locators fee ($55).
SUMMER APARTMENT 1 bed-
room, fully furnished, Air Cond 1
block from campus, Scottish Manor,
sublease 5290mth. Call 752-6130.
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT $350.00
month plus utilities. Need someone to
take over lease. Call 758-7063.
GUARANTEED APARTMENT at
Tar River. Lease Starts August 1st.
Two bedroom, 1 12 bath, monthly
rent of S485.00. Will need a security
deposit of S300.00. Call Marsha 758-
8402. Monday-Wednesday.
2 - TWO BEDROOM APT. Across
from Mendenhall 205 E. 9th St. Avail-
able May 1 st. Phone 756-0151.
EFFICIENCY FOR RENT. Available
May 15. Ringgold Towers. $260
month. Laundry, Mailroom, security,
private parking included, call ASAP
830-1969 for Lauren.
SUBLEASE THIS SUMMER - 1
BDRMforl or2people,bath,kitchen,
TV, microwave, convenient walk to
campusdowntown. $300. JUST
MOVE IN! Call 758-4541
NEED AN APARTMENT THIS
SUMMER? 1 Bedroom Apt clean,
new, close to campus. Sublease 1,2,3
months. Call 752-4721.
SUBLEASE: Fully furnished apart-
ment. Available the first week in May.
Rent 150.00 plus 1 2 utilities. Please
call 758-8399.
SUBLE A S E for the summer. 2 Br Apt.
in Wilson Acres 752-1644.
SUMMER APT. FOR RENT, comer
of 4th and Meade, 1 block from cam-
pus, single Bedroom, 758-7361.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FEMALEROOMMATEWANTEDto
share 2 bedroom apartment located 1
mile from campus. $175mo includes
heat. Please call 830-1312 and ask for
Jennifer.
MALEROOMMATEWANTED Must
be responsible and non-smoking.
Needed ASAP.CallRobertat931-7112.
LOOKING FOR A RESPONSIBLE
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share an
apartment or house for the next aca-
demic year. If interested please call
Deidra at 931-7999.
ROOMMATENEEDEDforFall'93.2
Br Apt. in Wilson Acres 1 3 rent. 1 3
utilities 752-1644.
ot
URGENT! FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share 2 bedroom apartment
in Tar River. Move in on May 3. Must
be responsible, socia 1 drinker, and ha ve
a good sense of humor. Call Melissa
931-8505 or Mia 931-8519.
CHEAP! FBIUSSELZED 89Mercedes
- $200,86 VW - $50,87 Mercedes - $100,
65Mustang-$5. Choose form thousands
starting $50. FREE Information 24 hour
hotline 801-379-2929 copyright NC
030610.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DEA. Available your area
now. Call 1-8004364363 ext. C-5999.
SINGLE MATTRESS AND
BOXSPRING only used this semester
and still has two years left on warranty.
Make me an offer 830-3691.
BASS RIG: 400W Peavey head w 215"
BW cabinet. Good condition $500 919-
7584642 Kevin.
UNIVERSAL FRAGRANCES: Inter-
ested in perfume oils? All popular brand
names available. Contact Joseph Single-
ton (919)756-3873. Display April 10th on
Town Commons off 1 st street. Call now!
SMALL REFRIGERATOR - Great for
dorms or apts. Great shape - ice tray
accessible - $60.00 o.b.o. 830-9442.
1990 ACURA Integra LS - Pearl Red,
AM FMcassette,power sunroof, Alloy's,
andonly45,000miles.$10,900neg.Chris
758-7002.
1989 DODGE DAYTONA, Carole
ShelbyCollector'sEdition,anti-lockdisk
brakes, air bag, infinity stereo, 7 switch
lumbar support system, cruise, fully
loaded. CallTraciTreatat321 -1242, leave
a message. PX negotiable.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -Earn
S2,000month world travel (Ha-
waii, Mexico, theCaribbean, etc.) Holi-
day, Summer and Career employment
available. No experience necessary.
For employment call 1-206-634-0468
ext.C5362.
NEED A SUMMER JOB? Make
S1880month and get great Resume
Exp. working with the Southwestern
Co. If interested Call (919) 933-1699.
TIRED OF BEING A POOR COL-
LEGE GIRL? Earn 100's a day escort-
ing in Greenville. Must have transpor-
tation, own phone, and outgoing per-
sonality. Must be very self conscious
and well groomed. We offer flexible
hours to work around classes and
nights. For more information call 757-
3477 and ask for Amy. All information
held in strictest confidence.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church,510South Washington St on
Sunday mornings from 9am until
12:30pm. To work with toddlers
through 3 year olds. Applicants must
be punctual and dependable. Appli-
cants also should have cheerful,
friendly and caring attitudes in their
interaction with children and their
parents. For application information
contact the Church office 752-3101.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT: Law
Firm has openings for Mail room Mes-
sengers.Part-time 20-30 hoursweek,
5 days week. Mornings 7:30 to 1:00 or
Afternoons 2:00 to 6:00. Applications
form Receptionist, Ward and Smith,
120W.FiretowerRd.
BRODY'S is accepting applications
for a Part-time Office Associate forour
Credit Department. Must have good
Ma thematica 1 Comm unication skills
and be computer familiar. Excellent
hoursClothing discounts. Apply at
Customer Service, Brody's The Plaza,
Mon. -Wed 14pm.
IMMEDIATE OPENING for Sales
person and Secretary position. Apply
2-5pm atSDF Computer, 106E.5th St
Greenville, 752-3694 (besideCubbie's).
WANTED: KEYBOARDIST for local
working classic RnR band. Creative
and original call 758-4642 leave mes-
sage.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Spa re full time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
200 - $500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information - 24 hour hotline. 801 -
379 - 2900. Copyright NC 030650.
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many po-
sitions. Great benefits. Call 1 -800-436-
4365ext.P-3712.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer? Only $169 Jet mere anytime for
only $169with AIRHTTCH! (Reported
inLet'sGo! &NYTimes) ATRHTrCH�
212-864-2000.
CARPET CLEANING SI 2 per room 2
room m inim urn. Stea mex cleaning serv-
ing Greenville for 4 years. Call Marc at
758-1079.
PAINTBALL Come and play this Sun-
dayform 1pm -6pm. Wearyour camou-
flage and take advantage of this Spring
weather. Call Rich at 752-2573 for more
info!
PAINTBALL: It's the most intense and
electrifying sport you will ever play.
Call 752-8380 for Information and Res-
ervations WE BREED EXCITEMENT.
PIRATE PAINTBALL: We are on the
cutting edge of high-energy entertain-
ment. Call 752-8380 for Reservations
and Information.
PAINTBALL: this is the most fun you
canhave with your clotheson Call 752-
8380 for Information and Reservations.
WE BREED EXCITEMENT.
MOBILE MUSIC PROD the right
choice when looking for the best D.J. for
yourspringformats,socials,partiesand
weddings. Competitive prices, profes-
sional quality, music to suit your occa-
sion. Call Lee @ 7584644.
PAINTBALL HOLIDAY SPECIAL -
Friday April 9th 11am - 4pm. Bring a
friend and waste him with paint. There's
No school that day! CALL RICH AT
752-2573 for info.
LAST YEAR $17 MILLION lN PROF-
ITS WENT TO COLLEGE STU-
DENTS WHO PARTICIPATED IN
OURSUMMERPROGRAM-Lastyear
over90of the students using our place-
ment office found career jobs. It gets
better. Call 1-800437-1525 The South-
western Company.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information la U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today wilh VlsaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
lnC�IH. (213) 477-226
Or, rush $2.00 to: FtMMrch Information
11322 Idaho Ave �206-V Los Anoti, CA 90025
HELP! HELP! HELP!
Hostessess, Cashiers & Wait
Staff, Full-time & Part-time
Apply in person, Mon-Fri, 2-4pm
GOLDEN CORRAL
504 SW Greenville Blvd.
SVJwGrCO j
BJ: It's been a hard and wonderful ride
but we've made it through it all. The
memories we've made will always be
remembered and I look forward to the
memories to make in the future. You are
very special to me and will be always. I
love you! Love, your PITA.
WORDPROCESSING ANDPHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typ-
ingand photocopying services. Wealso
sellsoftwareandcomputerdiskettes.24
hours inandout. Guaranteed typingon
paper up to 20 hand written pages. SDF
Professional Computer Services, 106
Eas 15th Street (beside Cu bbie's) G reen-
ville,NC 752-3694.
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
�Editing & Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resunws
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
N0Wi USED CD'S
y QiipHyppwi
DELTA CHI congratulates Scott Brown,
Todd Holloway, Wes U tley and a U others
who chipped in to make Region TV Con-
ference the true success it was.
ATTENTIONPIRATEFANSComesee
the Pirates play the Kinston Indians to-
morrow night at Grainger Stadium, Bar-
be-que Dinner included.Call 7574540 for
details. GoPiratesMM-StudentPirateClub.
ALPHA PHI: Congratulations to the lip
sync group, you guys did a great job.
Janet, we couldn't have done it without
you. By the way, what kind of clothes are
you going to WEA-AR!
ALPHA OMICRON PI would like to
congratulate all of the fraternities and so-
rorities on a great Greek Week Lefs
continue the tradition
CONGRATULATIONS to the Alpha
Omicron Pi softba U tea m on thei r win la st
Thursda y. Keep up the good work! Could
this be another championship team?
CONGRATULATIONS to the new of-
ficers of Phi Sigma Pi National Honor
FrateiTiify:LindsayFernandez-President,
Margit Sylvester - Vice President, Donna
Botz - Secretary, Amanda Hines - Trea-
surer, Troy Powell - Historian and Ana
Villareal-Social.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
member of Phi Sigma PI: Donald Batts,
Tonya Belljason Blue, Tara Chase, Mark
Chesire, Missy Christenbury, Jason
Ezzelle,ElkeGarten,CrystalHidenbrand,
Michael Horton, Jason Jones, Jessica Keen,
Kelly Kellis, Sloan Kesslerk Bill Lewis,
ThomasMarcinowski, Ashley Neal,Chris
Penny, Romel Racosas, Gina Roberts,
MandySaine,HeatherSalter,MarkJayson,
April Martin, Dina Da vies and Michelle
Myrick.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Phi
Kappa PsiBothersofthe Month: February
-Jimmy Rusrik, March -KyleSutherland
and Craig Jackson. Thank you for your
hard work.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: We stepped into
theblack-li t room,ourshirts wereall aglow.
You broke out the paint and brushes, but
little did we knowpaint was flying ev-
erywhere, on our clothes and in our hair.
I really mast say, we made quite a mess.
Still, this social wasoneof the BEST! Love,
Gamma Sigma Sigma.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA will behold-
ing a 'Take a Chance for Saint Judes
Children's Hospital" April 12-16 in front
of the Student Store. Take a chance for
only SI .00 and win lots of prizes.
DEDEFOLCKand everyonethathelped
with Al l-Sing: Thanks for your ha rd work
- you did great! Love, your Alpha Chi
Delta sisters.
ALPHACHlDELTAwould like to thank
everyone for their participation in All-
Sing. CONGRATULATIONS to Delta
Zeta (FirstPlace), Lambda Chi Alpha (Sec-
ond Place) and Alpha Phi (Third Place).
You all did a great job!
KAPPA DELTA RHO! Sorry so late, but
we really enjoyed meeting you guys!
Karaoke was a blast! Hope we can get
togetheragainsoon! TrvSistersofPi Delta.
�, SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors, Instructors.
A fti Kitchen. Office. Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
� t I11�l�tvmir A nn eti ')ut summer sports camp. Will train. Over 25
LAiVll 1 liiJV ntJlfll activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applic:
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792.
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
fl Congratulations to the
1993 NCAA National
Champions.
Go Heels!
THE
EAST BE A PART OF AN AWARD-WINNING TEAM
cabman Turn to page 8 for an excellent advertising job opportunity!
Announcements
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects? Need a refuge
form time to time? Campus Chris-
tian Fellowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meetings
are at 7pm Wednesdays at our Cam-
pus House located at 200 E. 8th St
directly across Cotanche St. from
Mendenhall Student Center. Every-
one is welcome. For more informa-
tion, call Tim Turner, Campus Min-
ister, at 752-7199.
LSiA
Leaders Educating and De-
veloping all now accepting applica-
tions until the 12 leadership posi-
tions are filled. Cain valuable public
speaking, leadership,and facilitation
skills through planning leadership
seminars and conferences Applica-
tionsare in Mendenhall K)9.Formore
information call the LEAD office at
757-4796 or Susan Howell at 758-
6731
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
Tues April 6 � ECU Student Brass
Ensemble, Britton Thuerer, director
(Fletcher Hall, 7:00 pm, free) Char-
lotte Nichols, clarinet, and James
Green, saxophone, Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall,9:00pm,Free).
Wed April 7�Young Peoples Con-
cert Series with the ECU Symphony
Orchestra, Robert Hause, Conduc-
tor (Wright Auditorium, 9:30 am,
Free); Barry McGinnis, saxophone,
Graduate Recital (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 7:00 pm, Free); ECU Cello En-
semble with faculty artist A Louise
toppin, soprano, Selma Gokcen, di-
rector (Fletcher Hall, 9:00 pm Free).
Tue April 8 � Premier Perfor-
mances of ECU Student Composers,
Mark Taggart, director (Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 8:oo pm, Free) Mon. April
12 � Percussion Players, Harold
Jones, director (Fletcher Recital Hall,
8:00 pm, Free).
N&HH
The next National Resi-
dence Hall Honorary meeting will
be held Wednesday, April 7th at
6:00pm in Mendenhall. If you have
any questions please contact Mel-
issa Smith at 931-7534.
READING TEST RESULTS FOR
NURSING 1000 STUDENTS
Students who were enrolled
in Mrs. Belinda Lee's block section
of Nursing 1000 during the first half
of Spring 1993 semester may pick up
Nelson-Denny Reading Test Scores
in Mrs. Pam Smith's office - Rm. 257,
Nursing Building
STUDENT EXCHANGE
It's not too late to apply for
a National or International Student
Exchange! If you are interested in
paying ECU tuition and attending
one of 107 other universities around
the United States or one of over 40
English speaking foreign locations,
investigate the many opportunities
available to you through the ECU
exchange programs. The last gen-
eral information session this semes-
ter will be held on Tuesday. April 6
at 3;3Q pm in the International Pro-
grams Office on 9th St If you cannot
attend but would like exchange pro-
gram information, call Ms. Stephanie
Evancho, 757-6769, for an appoint-
ment. Pick up a brochure and appli-
cation form now!
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1993 Greenville - Pitt
Co. Special Olympics Spring Games
will be held on April 20th at E. B.
Aycock Jr. High School in Greenville
Classifieds
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
I-
All ads must be pre-paid
(rain date: April 22). Volunteers are
needed to help serve as buddies
chaperones for the Special Olympics.
Volunteers must be able to work all
day-from9a.m. to2 p.m. An orienta-
tion meeting will be held on April 15
in Old Joyner Library room 221 from
5-6:00p m. (The first ones there will
be assigned a position.) Free volun-
teer t-shirts will be provided the day
of the games to all volunteers who
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freecf charge. Duetothelimitd amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
have attended the orientation ses-
sion For more information, contact
Lisa lhly at 830-4551
FPSII ON SIGMA ALPHA
Epsilon Sigma Alpha will
be holding a fund raiser for Saint
Judes Children's Hospital April 12-
16. Chances for prizes will be SI.00
and all donations will go to the
Children's Hospital.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisments may be
cancel led before 10a.m. the day pnor
to publication, however, no refunds
wiil be given
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
1

w�w�� � �





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77e �as Carolinian
April 6, 1993

ft
TuesdayOpinion
What's Up, Doc?
Rural medicine garners new
interest from medical residents;
could bolster medical outlook
The good old days.
The days when a person could ride into a town,
hitch their horse up outside of the saloon and down
a shot of whiskey. A time when you knew everyone
ranging from the Pony Express driver to the town
drunk who collapsed every night between the coun-
try store and the doctor's office.
That brings up the one person that every other
person in town was sure to know or meet at one time
or another � the doctor.
Having to deal with quacks selling miracle rem-
edies, terrible hygiene and what society would now
consider prehistoric medical practices, doctors in the
olden days were faced with many a problem and
crisis. However, one thing that existed in those times
seems to have disappeared in this age of specializa-
tion and high-finance medicine.
That fading-fast aspect is the fact that you knew
your doctor and knew that he or she would come at
a moment's notice. This rapidly fading doctor is more
commonly known as the rural doctor, or just plain
"Doc
North Carolina has become only the fifth state in
this country to offer rural
residency programs to up
and coming doctors. The pro-
gram offers residents a one-year
intensive training period at the Uni-
versity Medical Center of Eastern
Carolina-Pitt County, then interns
them at either the Roanoke-Chowan
Hospital in Ahoskie or Martin Gen-
eral Hospital in Williamston for two
years.
Dr. Colin Jones, the site coordinator at Ahoskie,
aid the goal of the program is to get the residents
'accustomed to rural education, as well a& rural
' "ing
The biggest change that residents can expect in
this rural medicine program is the inability to defer to
a specialist in the event of a condition the doctor
cannot handle him or herself. The program teaches
the residents that they can handle almost any situa-
tion they might be faced with.
Rural medicine could prove to be a vital step in
the improvement of medical care in the United States.
By instructing medical residents in the mindset of
autonomy, the future of medicine can be replaced
with an emotion of hope rather than fear of retalia-
tion.
For too long, doctors have been afraid of practic-
ing medicine for fear of malpractice suits. Only re-
cently has the country pushed for laws to protect
doctors who render assistance to someone in need.
These "Good Samaritan" laws served as the first step
in a long walk that still needs to be undertaken.
Rural medicine takes the next step in this walk
and allows fledgling doctors to gain an equilibrium
and sense of being that is seldom found in the rat-race
of metropolitan hospitals. By having an immediate
and visible effect on the patients they treat, the doc-
tors acquire a sense of contribution that grows with
each patient.
In this day and age, where health care ranks as
one of the top concerns on the public's minds, rural
medicine could serve as an acceptable remedy where
all other attempts have just served as placebos. Al-
lowing doctors a "back-to-basics" approach, rural
medicine could also be a first step in another long
walk � the one towards human security.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Rullard, Asst Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Aist. iMyout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Haseh'ig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacLunald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secreian,
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial id each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board The East Carolinian welcomes leliers, limned to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edil or reject Idlers for
publication. Letlers should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, NT, 27858-4?5? For more informa-
tion, call (919)757-6366
Printed on
&
100 recycled
paper
Opinion
Page 6
By Amy E. Wirtz
Clinton aids Russia in bid for democracy
Russia is struggling; either
toward freedom or tyranny, no one
is quite sure. Russian president
Boris Yeltsin is at the helm of this
political jumble. Is it really all that
surprising that our own govern-
ment is skipping right alongside?
Yeltsin is faced with the chal-
lenge of demonstrating that de-
mocracy can be strong enough to
survive. He declares presidential
rule and calls for a referendum to
decide the issue between himself
and the old order. To carry this
agenda through, he needs political
security and aid from foreign gov-
ernments. Here is where Clinton
steps in.
President Clinton said Thurs-
day that America should heip "not
out of charity" but as a crucial in-
vestment in peace and prosperity.
He plans to fund the first phase of
his aid plan by using about $400
million the Bush administration
obtained but never spent. What is
included in this aid package, you
ask?
� A new programs to pro-
vide housing for Russian army of-
ficers withdrawn from the Baltic
states and Belarus.
� An "enterprise fund" of
$300 million over the next three
years to provide "sled loans" to
small businesses and working capi-
tal to private banks.
� Several small programs
aimed at reviving the Russian oil
and gas industry. The programs
include sending U.S. technicians to
advise Russians on extraction tech-
niques, starting an energy conver-
sation advisory program and of-
fering loans to finance U.S. oil field
equipment.
� More humanitarian aid in-
cluding infant formula, pharma-
ceutical and medical equipment.
Clinton also plans on press-
ing Yeltsin to control the central
bank, which has been printing
rubles with abandon. This has fu-
eled inflation that now runs nearly
one percent a day.
I think the world knows
what's at stake, nereis a rallying
cry of support for Yeltsin heard
round the globe, a cry led byClinton
himself. Clinton understands that
the last thing the world needs as it
emerges from the 20th century is a
Russia returned to its old ways.
Imagine the results just in the
Balkans and the Middle East alone
if Russia emerged again asa night-
marish communist super-power.
Clinton recognizes thisneed
of Yeltsin's to revive the spiiit of
democracy in the eyes of the Rus-
sian people. He admonished
Americans that we have a large
stake in the success of Russian
reform. Clinton also warned that
"if Russia were to revert to impe-
rialism or plunge into chaos, we
would need to reassess all our
plans for defense savings" � po-
tentially costing billionsof dollars
in new spending.
Now certainly those are
wordsthatthepoliticiansandtax-
payerscan understand. Even more
important than our monetary in-
terests, we must recognize
Russia's struggle in its infant
stages of democracy and support
its first fumbling steps.
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QuotesoftheDay:
Financial ruin from medical bills is almost exclusively an
American disease. Roui Turleyl
Wherever the art of medicine is loved, there also is love of
humanity. Hippocrates I
Letters to the Editor
Cartoon offends pro-life supporter with message
To the Editor:
As a pro-life student, I
was highly offended by the
editorial cartoon on March
25. It disturbs me that one of
the few groups it is still po-
litically correct to stereotype
is the pro-life movement.
Being involved in sev-
eral pro-lifegroupsand hav-
ing discussed the killing of
Dr. Gunn extensively, I have
found no one who feels that
this act was justified. We are
adamantly opposed to sense-
less murders, that's what
makes us pro-life. All of us
findGriffinjustasbad as the
people who perform the
more than 4,400 abortions
per day.
I have been appalled by
the so-called representatives
of the pro-life movement the
media has interviewed about
the situation. Where did they
find these people, under a
rock? The vast majority of us
find these people an embar-
rassment to our cause.
Furthermore, I find it
very ironic that this hap-
pened at the same time the
bill that would make it a fed-
eral crime to exercise one's
freedom to protest by stand-
ing in front of an abortion
mill is before Congress. Let
me ask, who has more to gain
by the killing of Dr. Gunn?
Certainly not the pro-life
movement.
Heather Lockey
Senior
Social Work
Columnist urged to research articles in future
To the Editor:
This letter is in response
to the article by Jason
Tremblay concerning the is-
sue of homosexuals in the
military. We feel that we need
to set matter straight concern-
ing his own personal opinion
as well as those of a factual
nature.
First of all, we must say
we do not believe homosexu-
als should be excluded from
society, but yes, at this time
homosexuals should be ex-
cluded from military service.
The real question is whether
we should cater to the wishes
of the minority while at the
same time endangering the
national security of the ma-
jority, lb it really worth it?
Tremblay wagered that
most people reading his ar-
ticle have not or never will be
in military service. While ci-
viliansenjoy basic rights guar-
anteed to them by the Consti-
tution, those who serve in the
military give up certain rights,
one of which is a personal
right to privacy. It is immedi-
ately apparent from reading
what you have to say that you
have never served in the mili-
tary in any capacity, so what
makes you an authority on
the subject? Anyone with ex-
perience in the armed services
understands why a publicly-
pronounced homosexual
would undermine morale,
discipline, unit cohesiveness,
espirit de corps and cause
unnecessary tension in any
unit. We would also like to
say that your notion that
"women are fully accepted in
the military" is not at all true.
After all, how would you
know? How can you make
such a statement when every-
one knows that women are
still not allowed to perform in
combat arms occupations?
Please, Tremblav, do your
homework next time!
Finally, we take offense
to your statement of "just how
much strength or machismo
does it take to fight in a war
todav?" Clearly, you are way
off target here. For example,
infantry combat has changed
very little in the past 200years.
If anything, infantry combat
has become more deadly in
light of the presence of weap-
ons of mass destruction. Sol-
diers must keep themselves
in a high state of physical fit-
ness at all times to ensure that
they can withstand the tre-
mendous rigors of the battle-
field. Again, another concept
with which you would be
unfamiliar. Technology does
not at all ease the burden of
carrying a 100-lb. rucksack,
or engaging in a 30-mile forced
road march in full combat
gear, or pulling guard duty
after being up several days
without rest in sub-zero tem-
peratures, or having to run
five miles or more to reach an
objective, or we think you
get the point.
In closing we would 1 ike
to say that serving in the mili-
tary is not like working for a
large corporation. Its goals
and objectives should not be
compromised by what some
feel is politically correct. We
vehemently disagree with
vour views concerning the
military and invite you to en-
dure six to 12 weeks of mili-
tary boot camp.
Tracy Roberts, Senior,
U.S. Army veteran (Artillery)
Marvin Estes, junior,
U.S.Marine(. rps veteran (In-
fantry)
A View from Above
By T. Scott Batchelor
QVC serves as
entertainment,
insomnia cure
1 have a confession to make. 1 watch
QVC.
I know, many of you probably think
watering QVC is a mindless, empty exer-
cise, and it is. However, there's a lot to be
said for those fine folks at the Quality
Value and Convenience channel.
It must take a lot of hard work and
training to stand on a hot set and talk for
10 minutes about a crystal ashtray. What
can one possibly say about a crystal ash-
tray?
"Okay, this is item number J-10078,
the Caparaguzzi designer crystal ashtray.
Now, this ashtray is going to give you
years of quality ash-catching use. And
remember, it's a Caparaguzzi
These people always talk about the
merchandise in the future tense. They say
the phrase "is going to" a lot, as in, "This
nail puller is going to make your life so
much easier and "This fluorescent Mr.
Spock poster is going to be an excellent
conversation starter
Don't get me wrong, there are some
truly good deals on QVC. I saw a no-spill
coffee mug one night for $10.37 and a
special collectors' edition of a Wayne
Newton poster � autographed � for
$89.50.
Fortunately, QVC is purely an en-
tertainment source tor me and not an
outlet for purchasing things. I don't even
have a QVC membership card. However,
the network has other benefits.
I think the "V" in QVC stands for
Valium.
Suppose you're lying in bed one
night and you can't sleep because you
keep thin king about the plight of the spot-
ted owl.
Just turn on QVC so you can barely
hear it and then wait for Morpheus to
descend. It works like a charm.
Then there are those people who
call into QVC at 3:30 a.m apparently
unaffected by the soporific effect of the
QVC hosts.
Who are these people? What kind of
lives do they lead? What kind of rifle will
they use on the college kids?
I mean, just how empty does your
life have to be to need to converse with
Johnnv about a crystal ashtrav, or about
how much he has changed your life since
you've been watching? The conversations
are a sociologist's dream.
"Hi, this is Johnny, welcome to QVC,
you're on the air. Who's this please?"
(Three second pause.)
"This is Rose in Kneebuckle, South
Carolina
"And what do you have your eye on
this morning, Rose?"
"Item K-2457
"Oh, that would be our 20-piece
stainless steel skewer set. Planning on
doing a little barbecuing this summer,
Rose?"
"No, I've been having some prob-
lems with the neighbor's cats lately
"Oh, well thanks for the call, Rose"
"1 have vour address, Johnny, and
I'm in love with vou
and 1 hope you enjoy those
skewers . Click.
Of course, this is just one example
and is not representative of everyone who
calls QVC. Some people call simply be-
cause thePsy hie I riends Network line is
busy





April 6, 1993
� Tlie East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Soul Asylum show disappointing
Duke crowd of teeny-boppers labeled as lame
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
Duke sucks hard.
Whaf s worse, that fact greatly
contributed to a lame-o concert held
thereTuesday,March30. When three
excellent musical groups cannot sell
out Duke's 3,500-seat Paige Audito-
rium (albeit it at 15 bucks a head),
something's fishy.
Yesiree � assigned seating, no
standing or rushing the stage,
dorkhead dookie staff running secu-
rity etal and overall crappy aesthetics
make it hard for even godhead rock-
ersSoulAsylumtoshakethetreeabit.
Fortunately fordiehard fans, the
ripped jeaned, Chuck Taylor ragged,
hair aplenty lead dude Dave Pimer
and fellow Minneapolis skanks did
tharjobasBestliveBand in America,
to paraphrase Vilage Voice.
Sadly, however, an 18-song,
hour-and-fifteerHiiinutesenvithonly
one pre-Hang Time tune in the bunch
seemed to woo Top 40 major label
groupiesardboretherestofthethree-
quarterscapacitycrowdtoyaw'ndom.
But Duke still sucks.
Edecto bumpkin Vic Chestnutt
began theeveningpromptryat8p.m.
and played a chunky 35-minute set
that evoked enough laughs from the
scant crowd as it did curiosity.
Cheotnutt, known for his back-
woods Georgia meets Pavement
musicalityandhiswhistlebackwards
while bobbing for apples personality
in live performances, was great de-
spite the brevity erf his gig.
His drummer epitomized
minimalist percussion: an emptied
paint can as a snare (struck with jazz
brushes), an old Ludwig marching
Photo by Dail Read
Soul Asylum was joined by the Coo Goo Dolls and Vic Chestnutt in Duke's Paige Auditorium last week.
band bass drum (struck with a tim-
pani mallet) and a cracked ride cym-
bal dangling conspicuously in front
of his face as he sat on an up-turned
crate of sorts.
The bassist looked like Nigel of
Spinal Tap and played a lethargic P-
bass.
Chestnutt, spry as ever himself,
banged crunchy chords and stinky
single-note solos out of his beat up,
distorted dassical(acousticsix-string)
guitarwhichheplaysataquirky,off-
centered angle given his deft man-
agement of his vocal mic and the
confining nature of his wheelchair.
In wrapping up his all-too-short
set of southern acoustic mud,
Chestnutt cheerfully dismissed him-
self with the genteel words, "Bye, I
gotta go take a dump
The evening's biggest disap-
pointrnentwereGooGooDolls,three
snideBuffalo,N.Ypunkswhosecon-
descending jeering at the crowd for
being so lame (really Duke's fault)
made their teflon cheese metalblade
rock music suck worse than it really
did.
Hey,GooGooDollsmakegood
records, but their 45-minute, 13-song
set deflated expectations of album-
surpassing grandeur and opted in-
stead for reincarnations of the same
stuffwithout(thecrucial)guitar over-
dubs. However, there weretwogems
of thebunch: Cuzyou'reGone"and
'Tailing Down both off the band's
newest LP Superstar Carwash.
Equally as dorky-looking as the
flashlight-wielding Duke student
usher guards, GooGoo Dolls' guitar-
istsinger JohnnyRzeznik looked like
the Cracker jack pin-up geek, full-on
in his tight denim cut-offs, tucked-in,
chest-tight tank top and cornball
See SOUL page 8
Awards given by Sokolowski
. - . r-Tr-ni J- .i ����.i�i� f'nrpvrpllpnrp.
By Gresory Dickens
Staff Writer
Recently, the ECU School of Art was abuzz
over the imminent arrival of noted artist and
curator Tom Sokolowski.
Not only did Sokolowski present a lecture
on "the power of art teasingly titled "Art in the
Missionary Position but he also jurored this
year's Undergraduate Art Exhibition in Gray
Gallery. The exhibit showcases the best works of
ECU'S 600 undergraduate art students.
While tiieexcitementconcemingavisitfrom
the director of Grey Art Gallery and Study Cen-
ter at NYU was considerable, it should not be
disregarded ashubris to suggest that the presen-
tation of the exhibit was regarded equally as
high. It is a tremendous show.
While theGray Gallery hasconsistently pre-
sented fine art for ECU and the surrounding
community to appreciate, a student show may
sound to the average student as a sacrifice of
standard for the purpose of self-promotion.
The Jenkins Building houses North
Carolina's largest studio art program and the
only state program accredited by the National
Association of Schools of Art and Design
(NASAD). With suchcredentials, the high grade
and strength of the undergraduateexhibitshould
come as no surprise.
The works are grouped according tol 1 cat-
egories representing the areas of concentration
available to students. Awards were given for
merit (denoted by purple ribbons) and excel-
lence (gold ribbons) in each division and were
presented by Sokolowski at the opening Thurs-
day, April 1st. Certificates were given along
with monetary prizes for those receiving awards
for excellence
Foundation: The award for Excellence in
Foundation was given to Adolf Mizzell for his
"Coat
Wood: The award for Excellence in Wood
Design went to Eric Osbome for "Leggy an
animated,minimal tableconstruction comprised
of wood and steel. Excellence for Furniture
Accessories was given to Timothy Cherry's "My
Box" and Simon Barth was cited for Excellence
in Major Furniture for "Body Snakes
Painting: Sean Livingstone was awarded
for Excellence inPaintingfor"Untitledadark,
ruminatingmixed-mediaworkthatwaspainted
on a surface of masking tape, which also was
used for the matte border.
Communication Arts: Excellence
See EXHIBIT page 8
in
Page 7
Photo courtesy ECU News Bureau
Roger McVey
Student to perform with
Raleigh Symphony
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
ECU student Roger
McVey, a Jacksonville resi-
dent, is one of four winners
of the Raleigh Symphony Or-
chestra Concerto Competi-
tion. An outstanding young
pianist, he will perform a
movement of Prokovief's Pi-
ano Concerto No. 3 with the
Symphony tonight, April
6th.
McVey, who has lived
most of his life in Jackson-
ville, began studying piano
at age 9. Currently he is a
junior at ECU where he stud-
ies under Dr. Henry Doskey.
Besides playing piano,
McVey loves to surf and to
snow ski. Other interests in-
clude reading, playing pool,
playing chess, or just relax-
ing at the beach. He has won
or placed in several competi-
tions and will perform with
the ECU Symphony as a win-
ner of their concerto compe-
tition.
In addition, he was
awarded the Wooten Piano
Scholarship from ECU and a
competitive scholarship
from the N.C. Women's
Club.
The Raleigh Symphony
Orchestra Concerto Compe-
tition is a state-wide compe-
tition for young musicians
ages 15-23 who are residents
of or are attending school in
North Carolina. Up to four
winners are selected to per-
form a movement of their
winning concerto with the
Symphony on a subscription
concert, to be followed by a
reception with the winners.
The concert will take
place tonight at 8 p .m. in Jones
Auditorium, Meredith Col-
lege. Tom Lohr, professor of
music at Meredith College
will give a pre-concert lec-
ture in room 223 (behind
Jones Auditorium) from 7:15-
7:30 p.m. Works in the pro-
gram include Mendelssohn's
Fingal's Cave, Brahms
Double Concerto for Violin
and Cello, Lalo's Symphonie
Espagnol, Saint Saen's Piano
Concerto No. 2, and
Prokovief's Piano Concerto
No. 3.Advance tickets are $9
for adults and $7 for senior
citizens and students. All tick-
ets at the door are $10. For
information or to order tick-
ets, call 832-5120.
Health
Watch
Student Health Services
Today: Suicide
answered by Dr. Steve Dauer
Question: "What should I do if I believe
another student may be suicidal? Is it right to
assurnethatmostsuitideuhreatsarejustaway
cgettingattention?IfIfeelnervousor shocked,
should I try to laugh itoff or tell the person n it
to say things like that? I've heard people say
after someone they know has committed sui-
cide, "I didn't think they were serious' or 1
didn't think they'd really do it
Suicide is one of those troubling topics
and traumatic events that makes all of us
anxious. Often, when we feel anxious about
something, we avoid talking or even thinking
about it, perhaps in the illusory belief that
Ignoring a danger will make it go away or,
�Bonversely, out of a superstitious fear that
" acknowledging one might cause it to become
a reality. Depending on our own personal
anxieties, we may avoid discussing subjects
such as alcohol and drugs, terminal illness or
emotional problems like suicidal depression.
Nevertheless,itcanbevitalforstudentsto
be able to recognize warning signs of severe
depression and suicide in their peers and to
take appropriate action. Suicide, and suicid-
ally self-destructive behaviors (e.g. fatalities
due to reckless driving, abuse erf alcohol and
drugs, unprotected sex or self-starvation) are
major causes of death in the college-aged
populatton-Forastudentin acute psychologi-
cal pain toentertain a fleeting wish todie is not
uncommon. However, in a recent survey of
freshmen at a public university, only a small
mirnritv (2 percent) of the respondents ad-
mitted tohav .ng actually made an intentional
suickieattemptatsometimeduringtheprevi-
ous 12 months. Completed attemptsareev en
rarer;yetthe potential outcomemakesevenits
low probability too devastating to disregard.
Those who have made previous attempts are
at especially high risk because they may try
again with greater lethality. Individ uals using
drugs or alcohol are more likely to act impul-
sively, sometimes without even consciously
planning to hurt themselves.
Here are some indications to watch for. 1)
A directly stated intention to kill one's self or
indirect remarks such as, "I have nothing to
live for Nobody would miss me if I died" or
"My friends and family would be better off
.vithout me 2) Inexplicable changes in be-
haviororrxraTtality,aswhen someone famil-
iar to you acts very uncharacteristica lly (e.g. a
reinrwllyoutgotogpersongrowsvvithdrawn;
astudiousonestopsgoingtodasses).3)Mak-
ingfinal arrangements, giving away personal
possessionsortellingpeople goodbye. Pro-
longed deep depression, recognizable by the
foUovvingsvTnptonrdespondentmood;loss
of energy, motivation,and pleasure;disturbed
sleepingand eating; feelingsof guiltand wonh-
lessness;dimtoisheda)ncentration;social with-
drawal and isolation;and impaired daily func-
tioning (e.g. not going to class, completing
assignments). Often the most dangerous time
is when the depression begins to lift, and the
individual has the power to act decisively.
Suicide threatsshould be takenseriously.
If someone confides in you or shows indica-
tions that he or she is thinking about suicide,
encourage the person to talk to you abou t it. Be
a good listener; try to understand and sympa-
thize with whather shesays. Don'tbeafraid to
askquestionsaboutthethoughtsand feelings
and the reasons for them. Don't worry that
openly airing these might encourage suicide.
On the contrary, turning off their expression
can be isolating and lead to increased hope-
lessness. Yourwillingnesstodiscuss troubling
ideas and emotions acknowledges that they
exist, not that it is acceptable to act on them.
Advice such as, "You should appreciate how
lucky you are" or "Thinkhow much better off
you are than other people will only produce
more guilt and alienation. Persuade the indi-
vidual to get help, but don't try to talk him or
her out of how he or she feels Be supportive,
but don't give false reassurances that every-
thing will be OK. To assess the degree of risk,
inquire calmly if a method has been consid-
ered.havespecificplansbeenrrwde,arKl have
steps been taken toward earning these out?
See HEALTH page 8
Jellyfish's 'Spilt Milk' offers
richly written music, lyrics
By Blair Skinner
Staff Writer
Although I promised to write a review
of Spit Milk, the latest album by Jellyfish, I
put it off for a week or so.
At the time I didn't know how I felt
about the album. I listened to it once, and
slid it into a CD rack with other disappoint-
ments. Overproduced, out there, I thought
Rippingoff the Beatles, the Beach Boys and
Queen, I thought Ick, wasted money, I
thought.
To soothe my injured wallet I played
the disc once more. And once more, and
again. Pardon the pun, but I'm not crying
over Spit Milk anymore. An impulse buy,
it'stumed out tobe the best$16and change
I've spent all year.
RememberPop Rocks?Thatcandy that
fizzled and popped and was all sparkly,
sweet and tartwhenyoudumped the whole
pack in your mouth? Thaf s Spit Mik � a
collection of richly produced songs with
vibrant lyrics. The San Francisco-based
band's songwriting team of Andy Sturmer
and Roger Manning have surpassed the
tongue-in-cheek fun of their 1990 debut
Bellybiittoti
Since BfibKttOTJellyfishdropped two
members: guitaristJasonFalknerand Roger's
broerChrisManning.Sturmer,vvhoplays
drums and guitars, and Roger Manning,
who plays keyboards, remain with Tim
Smith now on bass. Smith, Sturmer and
Roger Manning worked their tails off this
time�maybe too much.
Almost every song on Spit Milk could
be called overproduced. Instruments are
layered upon each other: Calliopes,
balalaikas, banjos, harpsichords, brass and
strings sections battle for a listener's atten-
tion, witheachotherand thelyrics. Manning
and Stunner's singing has been heavily in-
fluenced by Beatles' and Beach Boys' har-
monies. Don't be frightened off, though.
Jellyfish isn't a throwback, l-wanna-be-a-
hippie-in-the60sband.
It'seasytomakethatrnistake,andpass
Jellyfish off as nostalgic goofs, but their mu-
acprwesotherwise.LookpasttheDr.Seuss
hats, foppish shirts and bellbottoms made
from Union 76 gas station flags from their
Belhbutton days, and listen to thewordsand
music
Sturmer and Manning are good, very
gocd.Anythingbutnostalgic,theirlTicsare
cynical, jaded and based soundly in the
things-dorit-turn-out-right-and-I-kinda-
know-why90s. Each song contains fun,
surprising lyrics that will keep you listening
close.
The album opens with a lush lullaby,
"Hush and someday, when I'm a father, 1
will sing this song to my child as 1 tuck the
chip off the old block in. A strange song to
open an album with, "Hush" could be a
message to listeners to relax and prepare for
See JELLYFISH page 8
'�,






8 The East Carolinian
APRIL 6, 1993
HEALTH
Continued from page 7
Are the means (e.g. a gun, pills) available?
o However, under no. circumstances,
should you try to handle the situation alone.
Urge the suicidal person to speak toa profes-
sional counselor or trusted helper, such as an
RA or RC. (This is just as important to do if an
attempt has already been made as itisduring
an immediate crisis.) If heshe refuses to get
help,takeituponyourselftoshareyour knowl-
edge with others�residence staff, teachers,
parents, friends, etc.�and seekothers'advice
as quickly as possible. Don't try to protect the
person by agreeing not to betray their secret.
Doing so only puts you in the unfair and
untenablepositionofassumingalltheburden
for another human being's survival. Don't be
afraid to appear disloyal if breaking a confi-
dence may save a life. Remember that, al-
though a suicidal individual's thoughts and
feelings need to be heard and respected, his
her judgment has been temporarily clouded.
Have confidence in your own judgment and
follow it. Takingactiondemonstratesthatyou
care. As a student at ECU, you have several
resourcesavailableeither to die person who is
JELLYFISH
incrisisortoyourself.(YouyourselfareequaUy
in crisis when you are called upon to respond
to a life-threatening situation.) If you live on
campus, you can inform your RA or the RC of
your dorm (Resident Education, 7574264).
They, in turn, may call the Counseling Center
(757-6661) or the Student Mental Health Ser-
vice (757-6795);or,duringtheday,youcancall
thesenumbersdirectly.After normal working
hours, contact Public Safety (757-6787) to ac-
cess the counselor on call. If counseling is
desired that is anonymous or unconnected
with the university, the REAL Crisis Center
(7584357) or or Pitt County Mental Health
Center(551-1200)havetelephonehotiinesand
24-hour emergency services. When there is
irnminentdanger,makeeveryattempttostay
wi th the person un til help arrives. Finally, you
too should consider consulting with someone
for assistance in dealing with the stressful
effects of this whole experience on yoii.
If you have a question concerning any
health-related topic (exercise, diet, smoking,
sexuality, etc.) please forward quei tions to
JerriiferPhillips,StudentHealthService,ECU.
Continued from page 7
EXHIBIT
Continued from page 7
Graphic Design went to Tony Chadwick
for his packaging of "Del Sol a fictional
brand of salsa. Lisa Eagle won for Excel-
lence in Illustration with "Dog Gone It a
scene of a small girl and a gigantic dachs-
hund ala Sanford.
Environmental Design: The award for
excellence in this category went to Robert
Guinon Dixon for his schematic plan and
model for the Pitt County Physical Therapy
and Mental Health Center.
Sculpture: ThecernficateofMeritwent
to Erin Becker's "In Memoriam to Eliza-
beth a wrenching monument of resis-
tance and tormentgiven in wood and twine.
Matt Bua was cited for excellence for "The
Handsome Ever Present Twitching Ma-
chine a metallic collage of a menacing
entity that suggests childhood suspicions
of all intimidating contraptions.
Ceramics: Excellence in Ceramics was
given to Jamie Kirkpatrick's "Untitled
FabricSurface Design: Julie Bracey's
"Inverted Howers" won Excellence in Fab-
ric Design. Laura Sharar was awarded for
Surface Design Excellence for "Dolphins
a pattern of cascading porpoises that seem
to mirror their natural element via compo-
sition.
Metal: Bess Andrews won Excellence
in Metal Design for "Just Hanging Around
anecklacecomposed of intertwined clothes
hangers with various articles of clothing as
accessories.
Printmaking: Catherine Broadhead
won for her moody, photorealistic "Keith"
print.
Art Education: John Lohman was
awarded for his "Footed Bowl an archaic
basin that suggests both gothic and indus-
trial origins.
Three other awards were given by
sponsors of the event. The Visual Arts Fo-
SOUL
rum presented an Award in Excellence to
Robert Ellis for his photograph,
"Westbound The Windsor-Newton
Award for Excellence in Drawing went to
David Roberts for "No Justice, No Peace
Student Stores awarded Best In Show to
Todd Houser for his poster for his Senior
Exhibition.
While these awards represent what
works were chosen as the best of the ex-
hibit, they should inno way suggest the full
bread th of the show. Each category is well-
represented by a variety of works. There
are other efforts that should not be missed,
such as David Isenhour's "Passive Preda-
tor" sculpture, JeanetteStevenson's "Unity"
ceramic or John Bateman's untitled char-
coal portraits.Works are also for sale with
prices ranging from $2-$1000.
The exhibit is open until April 17th.
Gray Gallery isopen 10-5 Monday through
Saturday and 10-8 on Thursdays.
Continued from page 7
the songs to come.
Furtheralcrtheotheopeninglyrics
'to "Sebrina, Paste and Plato a testament to
grade-school playground puppy love, sets
the scene. 'Tar behind the forest of flying
paper aeroplanes, grazing on the grounds of
ponytails,thesubstituteiscountingdownher
facks till recess, hammering down to size her
fingernails the song goes. Later in thesong
a boy, Chesney, professes his love for Sebrina
�during lunch: "But she's a lovetarian espe-
cially in the form of puppies. So he keeps his
elbowsoffhertable,butspillsthebeansthathe
loves thegirl behind theboysenberry punch
The funky bass line and fun lyrics of
"He's My Best Friend " will warm theheart of
any male listener. In the song, Stunner and
Manning sing of their "best friend and they
don't mean each other.
There's also "Ghost at Number One a
swipeatone-hit-wonders; thetranquil,acous-
tic "Russian Hill and 'Too Much,Too Little,
Too Late an obituary for old rock stars; and
more fun stuff.
doggie tagsdandngaround his Bonjovi head
as he whipped bar chord boredom at many
decibels too many.
The hyper conscious bassistsinger
RobbyTakacmissed a lot of notesandannoy-
inglydidtrackpractice around thestage most
unnecessarily.
PoordrunmierC-eorgeTutska:hisdrum-
ming was wimpier than Mike Tyson's voice
or Bobby Hurley's haircut
The drums sounded more awful than a
stuck blender.
Thank heavens Soul Asylum was there.
A saving grace to a quick-to-call graceless
evening, the dirty stankin' quartet of nine
years played a sweary-though-impersonal
(again, Duke's fault) show, mostly covering
material off their newest and first album on
Columbia, Grave Dancers Union and their last
on A&M, and the Horse they Rode In On.
Singerguitaristgrunge-skunk icon
Dave Pimer let no one down (especially, and
unfortunately, all the many screaming teenie
boppers who probably saw him first falling
down wasted with Bill Clinton on television).
Equipped with the best hair in rock, Pimer's
impassioned performance graced Paige
Auditorium'smeeknesswithgut-beltingren-
ditions of "Cartoon "Spinnin "Home-
sick "Sometime to Return "Somebody to
Shove" and the surpriser "Nice Guys Don't
Get Paid
Musician of the Night Award was a tie
between guitaristsinger Dan Murphy and
power fun drummer Grant Young, both of
whom work harder than the average punk-
turned-mainstream hype kitten rocker.
Murphy stood in his classic bent-low-at-me-
laiees-so-he-has-to-strain-like-a-constipated-
moose-to-sing stance. It rules.
Two mangled cliches apply to last
Tuesday's show at Dook Universissy you
can't teach an old band new tricks and if vou
takethedogoutofttiedoghousethegrassisn't
greener, but the fire hydrant is yellower.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is
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IN THE ARMY,
NURSES AREN'T JUST IN DEMAND.
THEY'RE IN COMMAND.
Any nurse who jusr wants a job can
find one. But if you're a nur
ing student who wants to be in
command of your own career, conside
the Army Nurse Corps You'll be treated as
a competent professional, given your own
patients and responsibilities commensurate
with vour level of experience. As
an Army officer, you'll command the
respect you deserve And with the added
benefits only the Army can offer-a $5000
signing bonus, housing allowances and 4
weeks paid vacation-you'll be well in com-
mand of your life Call 1-800-USA ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
Please, read and recycle The East Carolinian,
as well as all other newspapers.
Attention
Returning Students
If you plan to live off campus, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging
your utility service in advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and
possibly money. The following options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility
service may be put in their name. Just pick
up a "Request for Utility Service" applica-
tion from room 211 in the Off-Campus
Housing Office, Whichard Building or at
Greenville Utilities' main office, 200 W. 5th
Street.
Have your parents complete the
application (which must be notarized) and
mail it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
N. C. 27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
Remcmber to attach a "letter of
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If you wish to have the utility service put in
your name, a deposit will be required. Deposits
are as follows: . . , .
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You can save time by mailing the deposit
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TJie East Carolinian
April 6. 1993
Sports
Bucs drop two of three to No. 25 ODU
By Michael Albuquerque
StarTWriteT"
NORFOLK, Va. � No. 25-
ranked Old Dominion (20-4,2-1 in
the CA A) won two of three games
from the Pirates in weekend col-
lege baseball action to remain the
favorite to win the CAA regular
season title.
East Carolina (24-9, 6-3) ap-
peared to have the series won on
Sunday beforeeverything fell apart
with two outs in the bottom of the
eighth. Two Pirate errors and the
bullpen's collapse keyed ODU's
comeback with six unearned runs
in the eighth inning for a 9-6 win.
ECU struck early againstODU
left-hander John Smith as Jason
Head hit his fourth home run of the
season � a two-run blast to right,
and Pat Watkinsand Chad Triplett
each hit two-run home runs (Nos.
13 and two, respectively) in the
sixth inning to complete the Pirate
scoring.
ODU closer Wayne Gomes (1-
1), a potential first-round pick who
throws a 92 mph fastball, pitched
the lasttwoinnings in relief of Smith
for his first win of the year.
ECU starter Mike Sanburn,
who threw 114 pitches in the game,
pitched brilliantly for the Pirates
but left the game after surrender-
ing a two-out single in the eighth.
Billy Layton (0-2) and Stancil
Morse followed in relief for ECU,
but three singles, two errors and
onewalk later, ODUhad scored six
runs to escape with its 20th win in
The Pirates looked on as ODU scored six runs in the eighth inning to
by two errors and the collapse of the bullpen.
1993 due mostly to a schedule
padded with weak NCAA Divi-
sion 1 and II teams.
The Monarchs came into the
weekend series thinking they were
world-beaters with a team batting
average of .364 and a team ERA of
2.49 and seemed a bit surprised
when the Pirates took game one on
Saturday 6-3.
ECU left-hander Johnny Beck
(6-2) allowed only five hits, struck
out six and walked one for thecom-
plete game victory. By outdeuling
ODU's lefty Sean Hennessy (5-2),
Beck now stands alone as the CAA
leader in wins.
Game two on Saturday fea-
tured another outstanding pitch-
ing performance.
However, this timeitwasODU
starter Geoff Edsell (5-0) who
pitched a gem, allowing only four
hits and one run while striking out
File photo
win 9-6. The comeback was keyed
seven in a seven-inning complete
game win.
Lyle Hartgrove (5-2) pitched
effectively for ECU allowing only
three runs in six-innings, but the
Pirate bats were unable to get to
Edsell until doubled to lead off the
fifth and Head followed with an
RBI single.
For theirnextgame, the Pirates
will travel to Buies Creek to play
Campbell at 3 p.m. today.
Second scrimmage best of spring practice
Head
Coach
Steve
logan is
preparing
the
football
team for
a grueling
1993
schedule
File Photo
Sports Information Dept.
East Carolina University
ECU'S football team held its
second major scrimmage of spring
practice on Saturday in Ficklen Sta-
dium.
Head Coach Steve Logan
praised thePiratessayingthe scrim-
mage was the best overall perfor-
mance of the spring.
"This was a very, very com-
petitive scrimmage said Logan.
"It was the best one of tlie spring
with all units acting and perform-
ing like units
Offensively, red shirt freshman
Marcus Crandell threw for 330
yards and three touchdowns in-
cluding a 65-yard touchdown pass
to Allan Williams. Williams, also a
redshirt freshman, led all receivers
with five catches for 135 yards and
two touchdowns. Carlester
Crumpler also read ted the 100-yard
mark with 10 catches.
Damon Wilson led all rushers
with 94 yards on 13 carries and
JuniorSmith rushed for77yardson
20 carries and two touchdowns.
"Our defensive unit continued
to show well even though they were
tired toward the end. Punting was
also good, but also a little erratic at
the end
Junior college transfer Bill Wil-
son punted 13 times for a 403 yard
average.
Logan was pleased with the
low number of turnovers in the
scrimmage as the Pirates had two
interceptions and twolostf umbles.
"We had one turnover on our
first team unit (Crandell intercep-
tion)andourmain goal isto reduce
turnovers. That was step in the right
direction
Linebacker Eric Meyers inter-
cepted Crandell late in the scrim-
mage while freshmen redshirt E. J.
Gunthrope recorded the other in-
terception off Sean Richards.
Rising sophmore Chris
Haywood had two fumble recov-
eries on the day. Hank Cooper
caused a fumble and freshman
redshirt Kevin Stormer, from
Farmville,N.Chadtwosacksfora
loss of 12 yards.
Thetwo-and-a-halfhourscrim-
See FOOTBALL page 10
Page 9
Edwards staring in
two sports for Pirates
'Neon' Deion and Bo
may soon know Lamont
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU outfielder Lamont
Edwards is much like any
other student-athlete at ECU.
He goes to class, goes to prac-
tice and plays in games, just
like any other athlete in the
ECU program. What separates
Edward s from many other ath-
letes is the fact that he does all
of these things during the
course of two different ath-
letic seasons.
Edwards,
a native of
Clinton,
N.C plays
both football-
and baseball
at East Caro-
lina. While
playing in his
freshman
year of base-
ball eligibil-
ity, Edwards
is simulta-
n e o u s 1 y
practicing
hard in ECU
football's spring practice drills
as a receiver.
Edwards, an extremely
versatile athlete, has experi-
ence adapting to different
sports from his high school
days, as he was an all-confer-
ence player in football, bas-
ketball and baseball. Edwards
said that this experience pre-
pared him for participating in
both sports, but things are a
little tougher on the college
level.
"College sports are a lot
harder to get used to
Edwards said. "The level of
competition is a lot higher
Steve Logan has asked
Edwards to return to the Pi-
rate football team early this
spring, to help shore up weak-
nesses in the receiving corps.
Edwards will have to fill a
position at the wide-out slot
and adapt to the intricacies of
a Pirate offense adapted to fit
a two-back set.
Rumor has it that Logan
was at first displeased with
Edwards' participation in
baseball, but Edwards said
that it was just Logan's con-
cern blown out of proportion.
"He only wanted me to
play baseball if I got (playing
time) Edwards said. "He
didn't want me to split my
concentration if I didn't get to
play Edwards said that be-
ing a part of ECU football this
year was a great experience for
him, but admits that he was
nervous, despite his lack of
playing time.
"Even though I didn't get
to play that much it was still
exciting to be on the field. To
have all those people in the
stands screaming can make
you a little nervous. There's a
big difference between seeing
around 100
people in the
stands for
baseball, and
30,000 for
football
However ex-
citing ECU
football is for
Edwards, it is
quite appar-
ent that his
first love is
baseball.
Edwards
was coached
by Jimmy
Raynor, a
former pitcher for the Los An-
geles Dodgers, at Clinton High
School. He said that the em-
phasis put on getting an edu-
cation at Clinton has prepared
him for the commitment that
he said ECU has for its ath-
letes.
A computer science ma-
jor, Edwards said he hopes to
work for a technical organiza-
tion like IBM when he gradu-
ates from college, but still har-
bors a dream for going pro.
"I don't want to rely on
going pro because a lot of play-
ers get bounced around in the
pros, but it is definitely my
dteam to play in the big
leagues Edwards said.
Edwards said that his
athleticism and speed may pro-
vide him with an advantage
when the professional scouts
look his way in a couple years,
but right now he is concentrat-
ing on "giving 100 percent" in
both sports and hopes he can
gain success in each.
"It would be a big fantasy
of mine to help ECU (football)
win a big bowl game, and then
turn around and win a NCAA
baseball championship
Given Edwards' potential
at both sports, avid fans of ECU
athletics can expect to see much
more of him in the future.
:l

Gloves off
Opposites attract in
NCAA final in New
Orleans
NEW ORLEANS (AP) � "It's not
Larry Bird and Magic�Chris Webber on
his matchup against Eric Montross Mon-
day in the NCAA championship game.
No, it'll be a lot rougher, more like the
Terminator and the Hulk.
Pity anyone who gets sandwiched
between North Carolina's Montross, 7feet,
270 pounds, and Michigan's Webber, 6-9,
245, when they collide on rebounds.
As agile as they are, Montross and
Webberwon'tbedancingaballet under the
backboards. They'll be crashing hard and
often, goingateach other with slamdunks
forward and reverse, in a game that is 1 ikely
to be a bruising affair.
Webber will rotate with Juwan
Howard,6-9,240,and EricRiley,7-feet,245,
in guard ingMontrcteS-ButneitherHoward
nor Riley has the brawn that Webber has to
cope with the monstrous Montross, whose
arms seem chiseled from granite.
Webber had 27points,eightrebounds
and five blocked shots, including three
rejections against Montross, when Michi-
gan beat North Carolina 79-78 in Hawaii in
December. Montross finished with 14 points
and 10 rebounds.
"Blocking shots is going to happen
Montross said with a shrug. "He got me. I got
him.It'splayingwellasateam,not individual
matchups, that counts
There were other crucial matters, such as
North Carolina's press. Michigan broke
Kentucky's press Saturday night, but North
Carolina did it differently with bigger players
and causes lots of steals
Jalen Rose, who scored 22 against North
Carolina in December andwonthegame with
a last-second shot,had tohavetohaveanother
big game and limit his turnovers.
When Howard wasn't helping out on
Montross,hewastanglingvrithGeorgeLynch,
who scored 14 points and had 10 rebounds
againstKansasonSatorday.Mkhigan'sJimmy
King, an excellent defender, had a 2-inch
height advantage in trying to stop Donald
Williams, who hit five of seven 3-pointers in a
25-point show against Kansas.
Ray Jackson, perhaps Michigan's best
defender, was switched between Lynch, Wil-
liams and Brian Reese as they got hot.
Each team was loaded with talent and
experience among the starters and on the
bench, but they were virtually opposite in
image and style.
NorthCarolinawasbuttoneddownwith
ties knotted tight, just like coach Dean Smith.
Michigan washangingloose in bagg-warmup
gear, and i t's OK by a �ch Steve Fisher even i f
it doesn't suit his taste.
"I think 111 get in trouble for anything
1 say about this, you know, the squeaky
dean against the bad guys, if you want to
call it that Montross said AtCarolina, a
lot of people have thought that we've al-
ways done just the right thing at the right
time, and we're perfect and we do every-
thing just right I mink that Coach Smith is
just that typeof person thathedoesn'tsettle
for anything but the image that he has.
"He always makes us shave. We're
always dressed in a suit and tie wherever
we go, whether it's going to the airport, on
a bus, going out to eat. I think it's just an
image thathe has because he'sa very classy
person.
"And notthatMichigan isn't�5'mnot
saying mat at all. I think if s just different
personalities that a team has and different
things they allow them to do
Michigan stamped its image on the
nation as they grew up in front of oureyes.
Fivekids just outofhigh school wentall the
way to the championship game, losing 71 -
51 as Du ke repeated. The love affair turned
sour quickly as the trash-talking became a
negative and the playground look a detri-
ment.
Fisher always maintained the charac-
terizations were unfair.
This is the smartest group of kids I
haveeverbeenassociatedwithasacoach'
he said. "It's also the most talented
Hensley taking over for
Kulwicki according to report
1992 Winston Cup rookie of the
year trying to fit behind big wheel
BRISTOL, Tenn. (AP) � Jimmy
Hensley, the 1992 Winston Cup rookie
of the year, is the choice to take over the
driving duties for the late Alan Kulwicki,
according to a published report.
"Alan told me a year ago that if
something happened to put Jimmy
Hensley in the car Felix Sabates told
the Richmond (Va.) Times-Dispatch for
a story the newspaper published today.
Hensley, a resident of Ridgeway,
Va hasbeen looking for a Winston Cup
ride since his 1992 team owner, Cale
Yarborough, replaced him with former
Daytona 500 winner Dernke Cope.
Sabates, whoowns the WinstonCup
cars driven by Kyle Petty and Kenny
Wallace, has been a close friend of
Kulwicki's for years. At the request of
Kulwicki's father, Gerald, Sabates has
been helping to handle Alan Kulwicki's
affairs since the reigning Winston Cup
champion was killed in a plane crash
Thursday.
Sabates said he had not discussed
the matter of the racing team's future
with Kulwicki and would not do so until
after the funeral, which is scheduled for;
Wednesday in Greenfield, Wis.
"Thursday morning, I'll ask Mr.
Kulwicki what he wants to do, then go
on Sabates said.
Alan Kulwicki left his racing team
to his father in a recently drawn will
Sabates said. But Gerald Kulwicki, he
added, "is not in a position financially
to take over this team. He has to have
time to think it through.
"Alantook good care of his finances.
This team is in better shape than 90
percent of them. Going through his af-
fairs, I've seen how well he looked after
things
Sabates said helping out with
Kulwicki's affairs has not been difficult,
even though he has two other teams to
run.
"This is more important than all of -
them because this is for Alan he said.
"I'll keep running it until we get straight
on what Mr. Kulwicki wants to do. We
have a lot of options





10 The East Carolinian
APRIL 6,1993
Sanitation depts loss is Tarheels' gain I football
Continued from page 9
NEWORLEANS(Ar) �M(M
kids outgrow their childhood
dreams, though not quite the va
Eric Mor.trossdid.
"1 wanted to grow up to be a
fireman or a garbage man because
I liked the big trucks North
Carolina's 7-foot man-child said
Sunday. "But now that I'm bigger
than some of the trucks, I'm a
basketball player
The sanitation department's
loss has been the Tar Heels' en-
during gain, perhaps the single
biggest reason coach Dean Smith
and his boys kept their hotel bills
current in the City that Care For-
got.
Because for all the anah sis all
week touting Carolina's unself-
ishness and discipline, its senior
leadership and ferocious defense,
if Montross and his mean streak
disappeared from the middle, the
Tar Heels would look strikingly
similar to the Kansas team they
sent home only Saturday night.
Even more than the 23 points and
four reboundson his lineat night's
end, Montross' monstrous pres-
ence underneath the basket could
be measured in Carolina scoring
its first 14 points all on the inside.
"If Eric can get his man on his
back, we're going to get the ball to
him teammate Derrick Thelps
said, 'because when you do that,
you know three things can hap-
pen � you're going to get the
score, get a second shot or get
fouled �
Judged by
the scowl
Montross wore
most of Saturday
night, not to
mention the ban-
dages covering
fingers on both
hands and at
least one knee, he
got stuck with
option No. 3 al-
most as often as
the first two. Ei-
ther way, the win
eemed to be
consolation
enough by the
time he dragged
his bruised body
out of bed the
next morning to
get ready for raM��
Michigan in the
national championship game.
By Sunday, Montross had re-
verted to his mild-mannered self.
"It wasn't like I was trying to
make a statement or anything like
that he said. "1 just wanted them
to know it wasn't going to be easy
on the inside Of course, this
wasn't anywhere near the first
time Montross has caused trouble
forpeopleinthecol-
lege basketball
racket. Indeed, by
the time he turned
up at North Caro-
lina for his freshman
season, Montross al-
ready had managed
to get both Michigan
coach Steve Fisher
and Indiana coach
Bob Knight in hot
water for losing the
recruiting war to
I'm bigger than smith
00 , What offended
SOme Of the the Michigan people
was that Montross
would spit so cava-
lierly in the face of a
family tradition.
Both his father Scott,
who was practice
fodder for Cazzie
Russell on the Wol-
verine teams of the 1960s, and his
maternal grandfather John
Townsend, an A11 -American once
dubbed the "Houdini of the hard-
wood played for themaize-and-
I wanted to
grow up to he a
fireman or a
garbage man
because I liked
the big trucks.
But now that
trucks, I'm
a basketball
player. "
Eric Montross
blue. And Eric's mother Janice
went there and his sister Christine
is a sophomore in Ann Arbor.
Hoosiers, though, had an even
harder time believing a red-
blooded kid from Indianapolis,
especially one who stood 7 feet
tall and already sported a crew-
cut, would wind up at Carolina
without being kidnapped. Worse
still, they are reminded of it every
time Montross cruises his home-
town in a black Chevy Blazer with
"TARHEEL" spelled out on the
license plate. "And when I go
home he said mischievously, "I
make sure it's bolted down
Exactly how this contrary side
turned up in an otherwise thor-
oughly agreeable Midwestern kid
is anybody's guess. Montross will
attribute his competitive nature
to his father and, considering that
his father now makes his living as
a personal-injury lawyer, being
antagonistic every now and then
is almost a familial trait. At the
very least, it explains the younger
Montross' menacing haircut.
"We had a bet. My dad grew
up with a cut like this and he said
he'd get one if I did. Well, I was
first in the barber chair Eric ex-
plained, "and you can guess the
rest
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ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY-
Each of these advertised items is
required to be readily available for
sale in each Kroger Store, except
as specifically noted in this ad. If
we do run out of an advertised
item, we will offer you your choice
of a comparable item, when avail-
able, reflecting the same savings
or a raincheck which will entitle
you to purchase the advertised
item at the advertised price within
30 days. Only one vendor
coupon will be accepted
per item nurchased.
CHILLED APPLE JUICE OR
Kroger
Orange Jufce
m9
Gallon
STOKELY'S FINEST WHOL" KERNEL
CORN, SWEET PEAS Or.
Cut
Green Beam
12 oz.
Total
Cereal
$
14.5-15.25 OZ
cans
f
FROZEN REGULAR OR WITH
ONION
Ore Ma
Tutor Tots
2 lb fli �i
LIGHT ICE MILK OR
Breyers
lee Cream
12 galloni
For
mage went for 137 plays, with 56
rushes for 194 yards and 6� passes
for 440 yards.
"We have four more practices
and it is important that we use that
time to the ultimate Logan said.
The Pirates practice again in
full gear on 1 uesday and then have
one practice on April 7, a scrim-
mage April 8 and the annual spring
game on April 17, which rounds
out the spring practice schedule.
TEC is now
hiring for the
3ip�ar3s �dliDir
position. Must
be able to work
over summer
and possibly
take over as
editor in fall.
DAPPER
PAN'S
Vintage Clothing,
jexvelry, Coliectilues,
Antiques, Furniture
I
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown
752-1750
BUY � SELL � TRADE
SE35M
Sait
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Adult
Entertainment
j� Center
MONDAYS
Sports Night
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE 0, .
�Contestonti need to call & rrjnstrr in advance. Musi arrive hu fi 00 rr�rtffjPf
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS Siver Bu�et Bartender
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
P
e do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dicklnaon Av
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid NC. I.D. Required
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails creating computer designed layout for all
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker. Freehand, QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
ASSISTANT LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails working with the Layout Manager creating
computer designed layout for the Opinion and Classifieds
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Reauirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P. A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand, QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
This job requires working knowledge of 35mm camera and
darkroom operations and will work with a staff of
photographers to supply the photo needs of various
media. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Work well with
other staff members and meet deadlines. Open to all
majors.
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
The chief duties are to create or oversee the creation of
artwork using both traditional and computer-generated
artwork to compliment the newspaper text and
advertising. Also, supervise the comics section. Minimum
2.0 G.P.A. Knowledge of Macintosh applications,
illustration, design and cartooning. Open to all majors.
BUSINESS MANAGER
This position is responsible for administering the
newspapers funds available by controlling all requisitions
for purchases and analyzing financial data for the
Advertising Director and General Manager. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of marketing.
management, finance and economics and experience
using Excel. Open to all majors
Apply at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the
Student Pubs building � 7576366





Title
The East Carolinian, April 6, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 06, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.935
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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