The East Carolinian, April 1, 1993






-���!
Sports
PiSgin' Out!
Tickets can now be
purchased for the 10th
Annual Great Pirate
PurpleGold Pigskin Pig-
Out party.
See story page 10.
Lifestyle
SGA ELECTION RESULTS:
Healthier Options
Eating right is now easier to
I w I do in campus dining facilities
I jbeca use of a new ECU Dining
Services program
See Story page 7.
A
PRESIDENT:
Keith Dyer
VICE PRESIDENT:
Troy Dreyfus-519
Rick Erazo - 260
TREASURER:
Rich Paravella
SECRETARY:
Micheal Carnes
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 21
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, April 1,1993
�"���� ��"�� l nursday, April 1,1993 12 Pages
Task force seeks solutions to parking problem
The Parking and Transit Task Force is searching for solutions to replace the 300 parking spaces that will belostwl the building
of the new recreation center. 6
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
The Parking and Transit Task Force
has been meeting recently to formu late new
ideas to address the loss of parking spaces
due to the new construction.
Building of the Recreation Center is
expected to begin this summer.
The Task Force met Wednesday for
the seventh time proposing short-term so-
lutions to replace the lost spaces.
"As of right now, the parking lot by
Mendenhall will lose about 300 spaces
said Ryland Walters of ECU transit.
Of the ideas proposed, a shuttle ser-
vice could be started from lower Minges to
the Brewster Building on 10th Street. This
new service would have two shuttles leav-
ingevery lOminutesfrom 7:30a.m. to2p.m
and between 2 p.m. to 530 p.m, one shuttle
would leaveevery 20 minutes. As an incen-
tive for students to utilize the shuttle, a
reduced priced commuter-fringe parking
sticker would be offered for $40.
"Itmightoccurtosomeof these people
thatwepushed off campus into thecommu-
nity when we went to $70 to come back to
the program said Layton Getsinger, chair
of the task force and associate vice-chancel-
lor for business affairs. "I am aware that the
city is going to be looking into some type of
enforcement program where they can iden-
tify cars that are university vehicles as op-
posed to neighborhood vehicles to enforce
the parking on that side of the street
The sticker for the Minges lot would
be the mandatory freshman sticker and an
option forallotherstudents. Itcould beused
only in the Minges parkinglot. Eveningand
night parking in this lot could be limited in
lieu of activities at Minges Coliseum.
'To the south end of the iot the fresh-
men would be parking, and the commuters
would be parking to the north end said
Richard Brown, vice-chancellor of business
affairs. "And this is only for commuting
freshmen not if they're warehousing their
cars 24 hours a day
Brown said that regular bus service
See PARKING page 3
State auditors report on ECU finances
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
According to Richard Brown,
ECU vice chancellor of Business
Affairs, the university passed a
recent state audit with "flying col-
ors
The State of North Carolina 'a
Financial Audit Report on ECU for
the fiscal yearendingjune30,1992,
made no material audit findings
and indicated the total resolution
of all previous recommendations.
"If there is such a thing as a
perfect audit report, this is it
Brown said. "It's a situation that
rarely occurs in an audit of any
organization
The audit was part of a state
requirement mandating a report
University passes with
"flying colors"
of all financial activities. State au-
ditors spent five months at ECU
reviewing records for payroll
sheets, purchase orders and other
university records.
State auditors reported that
their audit "did not disclose any
material weakness in the internal
control structure, deficiencies in
the accounting records, or non-
compliance with rulesand regula-
tions
The report found total ex-
penditures for the entire univer-
sity to be in excess of $250 million.
Brown said thatthisfigure includes
all state and local government
funds, grants, and contracts, and
expenditures for residence halls
and food services.
Theauditalsoconcluded that
any recommendations from pre-
vious years "have been resolved
by the university State Auditor
Ralph Campbell Jr. sent a letter
with the report stating that all fi-
nancial statements on revenues
and expenditures conformed with
accepted accounting principles.
"The recommendations from
previous audits mostly dealt with
procedural accounting techniques
and internal controls Brown said.
"We changed a few things like
payroll segregation of duties, and
we passed easily
"This is what is known as a
'clean' opinion. Any administra-
tively and financially sound orga-
nization should receive such an
opinion Brown said.
Hecredited ECU'sfavorable
report to the people within the
variousdepartments whokeep the
booksand process the transactions.
"It reaffirms that East Caro-
lina University is managed by pro-
fessionals who consistently dem-
onstrate the highest levels of com-
petency, integrity and dedication
Brown said. "Theyaregood stew-
ards of the resources entrusted to
them
Science education for
children improves
with Starlab projector
By Sharon Anderson
Professor wins state award, advances program
mm
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Within one month Dr.
David A. Dosser Jr director of
the Marriage and Family
Therapy Program at ECU, re-
ceived The David and Vera
Mace Award and witnessed the
full accreditation of ECU's Mar-
riage and Family Therapy Pro-
gram, the first accreditation of
such a program in North Caro-
lina.
The David and Vera Mace
Award, given by the North
Carolina Association for Mar-
riage and Family Therapy
(NCAMFT), annually honors an
individual who has made out-
standing contributions to the
field of marriage and family
therapy (MFT). Dosser came to
ECU in 1988 and began the MFT
Program. Dosser worked to es-
tablish the program, and said it
is currently one of the finest on
the country.
Dosser, as chair of the
NCAMFT Legislative Commit-
tee, has campaigned to pass two
bills through the legislature that
would change the current regu-
lation of marriage and family
therapy in North Carolina from
certification to licensure. This
change would ensure that any-
one seeking marriage or family
therapy would receive such
�gat-
therapy from an experienced
therapist with the proper cre-
dentials.
Dosser said he is "opti-
mistic that the bills will do
well and will pass through leg-
islature "hopefully by the sum-
mer
Before coming to ECU,
Dosser was the director of Fam-
ily Therapy, Family Studies In-
stitute, at North Dakota State
University. Dosser is a clinical
member and Approved Super-
visor for the AAMFT, and a cer-
tified Marriage and Family
Therapist.
Dosser said he has strived
to build the Marriage and Fam-
ily Therapy Program at ECU to
be committed to the students
and the community.
The ECU clinic has therapy
rooms with one- and two-way
mirrors used to supervise both
the students in training and
families during their therapy.
Dosser said this is beneficial be-
cause the faculty can collabo-
rate on the best way to handle
the family's therapy, and make
suggestions to the students so
that the therapy can be turned
in the direction necessary for
that situation.
Video is also used, with
the permission of the families,
for further analysis with the stu-
dents. Dosser said this evalua-
�� We help our
students learn
how to
collaborate with
those profession-
als, and other
service
99
providers
Dr. David A. Dosser Jr.
tive type of therapy is veryef-
fecti ve. The students in the pro-
gram each receive five hours of
supervision per week by the fac-
ulty, which Dosser says is "more
than twice as much supervision
as is required by the accredita-
tion standards
Dosser said each year 12
students are accepted into the
program, and there are approxi-
mately 24 at any given time.
Dosser said the program focuses
on student's thoughts and feel-
ings about the demanding na-
ture of marriage and family
therapy.
Dosser said one of the
greatest challenges in prepar-
ing students for careers in mar-
riageand family therapy is"be-
ing able tohave a balance of
support for them as they work
with the familiesand having a
way to help them feel that they
are making progress
The NCMFT's motto is
"Champions of the Family In
terms of living up to such an
important and influential role,
Dosser said one of the greatest
challenges is often the "collabo-
ration and coordination with
other professionalsand with
See DOSSER page 3
Staff Writer
Texasgulf of Aurora, N.C
sponsored the purchase of an
inflatabledomewith acomputer
opera ted projector,called Starlab,
toaid teaching methods for chil-
dren.
The Eastern Partnership of
theScienceand Mathematics Al-
liance is a group that wants to
improve science and mathematic
education in their location, and
to ensure continuing focus and
preparing for work or continued
studies.
"There is an intensified in-
terestin education in North Caro-
lina because we are on the bot-
tom end of the scale said Lynn
A. Smith, director of the Science
and Mathematics Alliance East-
ern Pamership at East Carolina
University. "People are con-
cerned because businesses will
not come into our region if they
cannot get technically-qualified
employees
"We are training the pub-
lic school science teachers to use
the system Smith said, "There
are tentative plans to buy an-
other one because their is only
one STARLAB for 14 eastern
North Carolina counties
In 1992 the East Carolina
Partnership was developed.
They received a $7 million grant
from the National Science Foun-
dation. This five-year grant is to
be used for science education.
The counties where the
STARLAB will be available are
Beaufort, Hyde, Dare, Washing-
ton, Tyrell, Martin, Pitt, Lenoir,
Wayne, Greene, Tamlico, Cra-
ven, Jones and Carteret.
East Carolina Partnership
will draw support by enhancing
classroom activities by provid-
ing lcKal industry presence in
class,and continuousencourag-
ing of parent and community
involvement.
Thisprocesswillensureal-
liance of community, business
and education to reduce to gap
between classr(X)mleamingand
workplace application.
The Starlab is a 10.5 fixit
dome that can be inflated by a
ordinary window fan,and takes
fi ve to lOminutes to reach its maxi-
mum height. It seats 30 adults.
Thedomeismadeofflame-
retardant, polymer fabric that has
light transmission of less than .001
percent. The bottom of the lab is
entirely open for emergency exit.
There is a 5.5 foot entrance tube
thatallowseveryonefrom thechil-
dren to adults to enter. It also al-
lows wheelchair access.
Starlab has a month scale,
an hour scale and an adjustable
latitude lamp. Using these, the
projector can be set for any month
of the year, or time of day.
The system is easy to store
and transport. It packs down to
two suitcases and a duffle bag.
Computer generated cylin-
ders are fitted over the projection
lamp to create the learning im-
ages. The lamp portrays realistic
simulationsfor easier demonstra-
tions.
The cylinders have created
several different curriculum ar-
eas. They have cylinders that aid
teaching of stars, constellations,
the earth, seasonal changes, plate
tectonics, geology and the biologi-
cal cell. The dome itself can be
used asa media center for movies,
orforexcellentacoustics in sound
experiments.
Learning Technology Inc.
was the originator of the first por-
tebleplanetarium.TheSTARLAB
was invented by scientists and
educators from the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology and the
Harvard School of Education. The
curriculum manual is a 350-page
compendium of the very best
teaching programsand activitit"
The price for the dome of
the STARLAB is $5,(XX). There is
also a basic STARLAB svstem fi r
$9,000, or the deluxe STARLAB
systemfor$l l,(XX).TheSTARLAB
wasdemonstratec' fi u the first ti me
on March 5-h at the Eastern North
Carolina Students Challenge '93
at Washington High School.
"We have had tremendous
positive response" said Smith
"One principle told me that he
had two students that were al-
ways in trouble. After the
STARLAB demonstrations, thev
actually catted the school to get a
ride because their parents had left
for work

'





2 The East Carolinian
APRIL 1, 1993
l
und Other
Medical students encouraged to practice rurally
Washington Greeks to face stricter rules
Fraternities and sororities living in off-campus houses will
face tougher restrictions next fall, particularly in regard toalcohol
consumption, as a result of a new University of Washington
policy. A task force, appoin ted by PresidentWilliamP.Gerberding,
was formed last fall after a young woman lost vision in one eye
after being struck by a bottle during a drunken fraternity brawl.
"That tragedy was the catalyst for us to take a good, hard look at
our relationship with fraternities and sororities said Ernest R.
Morris, vice president of student affairs, who headed the task
force. The task force spelled out tougher regulation on Greek
behavior, with an emphasis on control of alcohol consumption.
Swastika found in Harvard dormitory
Students recently found a swastika and graffiti on a wall in
a dormitory where several Jewish students live, the Haroard
Crimson reported. Abigail S. Kolodny, a sophomore whodiscov-
ered the vandalism, told the paper she was "deeply offended " by
the act. Kolodny, who is Jewish, said others in her dorm were
similarly horrified. The incident was under investigation by the
Harvard police. Because Lowell House was open to outsiders for
a recent opera and other events, officials said there was a possibil-
ity thatnon-students were responsible for the incident. According
to the newspaper, several swastikas appeared in the elevator of
another residential buildingin November, prompting students to
respond with a written petition condemning the act.
Broadcasting class tests nerves
Learning to think on your feet is an understatement in the
"On-Camera Reporting" classat Columbia College, whereaspir-
ing TV anchors broadcast from the streets of Chicago and are
given 90 seconds to pull together a 45-second news story. Roger
Schatz, a 25-year veteran broadcaster known for his gruff ap-
proach, pushes students to the limit in his advanced broadcast
journalism class. "Students takeall the skills they're trained inand
present an erudite and substantive piece of journalism in 45 or 90
seconds Schatz says. "If you blow it, you don't get a second
chance While Schatz's methods seem to work some students
have found the experience too unnerving. During thefilmingof a
remote, one student hailed a taxi and never returned to the school.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Maureen Rich
Staff Writer
Medical students at ECU in-
terested in rural practice have sev-
eral opportunities available that are
quickly attractingother medical stu-
dents from across the country.
Dr. Dean D. Patton, Directorof
the Residence Program for Family
Medicine, said that while "the inter-
est is growing in primary care spe-
cialties, vve'redoinglots of things to
make the rural practice attractive
One such effort is a new rural
residency program, slated to begin
in July, 1993. This program is for
medical graduates about to enter
their residency training.
Residencies last forthreeyears,
during which the graduate receives
on-the-jobtrainingatahospital.The
rural residency program follows a
slightly different schedule.
The first 13 monthsof the rural
program are devoted to intensive
training at the University Medical
Center of Eastern Carolina-Pitt
County.
The students then spend two
years at either of two chosen resi-
dency sites: Roanoke-Chowan Hos-
pital in Ahoskie and Martin General
Hospital in Williamston. Dr. James
Nicholson is the site coordinator in
Williamston. Dr. Colin Jones, the site
coord inatoratAhoskie,saidthegoal
of the program is to get these physi-
cians "accustomed to rural educa-
tion, as well as rural living
Dr. Dana E. King, director of
the rural residency program, said he
hopes the rural residency program
will break down barriers for the stu-
dents, barriers that King said "are
really psychological She said the
program is to get the students ad-
justed to being "isolated from hu-
man medical resources
King sa id tha t in ru ral practice
physicians are often working alone,
and "it's scary" when the doctor is
faced with a medical situation that,
unlike in a big city hospital, cannot
be turned over to a specialist for a
solution.
The rural residency program
is focused on easing such anxieties,
King said,and through intense train-
ing the students come to realize that
they are able to handle such situa-
tions.
Patton said thi rural areas of
North Carolina are "n. desperate
need of ruraJ physicians fi u. rural
residency program is just one of the
ways ECU is trying to encourage
rural practice.
Patton said a program called
"Partners which has been utilized
for the past couple of years, eases
another area of concern to many
students considering rural practice.
"The isolation of a rural area
discourages physicians, because it's
hard for them to go on vacation, to
educational meetings, or to medical
conferences Patton said For the
"Partners" program we've hired
family physicianswhoareabletogo
out to the rural areas and take over
the physicians' duties said Patton.
This relief system allows the
physicians to take a break from the
demands of being on-call 24 hours a
day, Patton said.
Patton said he is "very opti-
mistic" that the "Partners" program,
along with the rural residency pro-
gram, will peak students' interest in
rural practice.
Only four other states have
rural residency programs, Dr. King
said. They are Washington, Colo-
rado, New York, and Kentucky.
Jones said last spring a large
number of "highly qualified" stu-
dents from Texas, New York, and
North Carolina showed interest in
the program. Jones said this was
"delightful'because therearemore
rural physician positions available
than there are students interested in
rural practice.
Two students, from New York
and North Carolina, have broken
ground by seriously committing to
the program.
Spike!
Easter Seals to
benefit from
volleyball marathon
By Sharon Anderson
Correction
The March 30 article "Area agencies organize to instruct
wellness" incorrectly described activities in the Health Fair today at
Mendenhall's Great Room from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Vision testing will
be done by Services for the Blind, while hearing tests will be done by
the ECU Sign Language and Audio Pathology Department. We
apologize for any inconvenience.
Staff Writer
The Easter Seals Volleyball
Marathon will be held April 3 and
4 at Minges Coliseum. Phi Sigma
Pi fraternity, along with 37 other
teams from North Carolina will
participate.
The marathon will takeplace
from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday,
ind from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sun-
day.
The Easter Seals organiza-
tion helps physically disabled per-
sons. The donations they receive
t.re distributed to the disabled
throughout North Carolina, rather
than nationally.
Bridgette Wiggs, who orga-
nized this event, said this is the
largest volleyball marathon in
North Carolina. "We give mara-
thons all over the state, but for
some reason this is the one every-
one goes to" Wiggs said
This event is sponsored by
businesses as well as individuals.
WDLX 93.9, Michelob and Diet
Pepsi are some of the larger spon-
sors. Each team who registers for
the volleyball marathon are re-
sponsible to sign up their own
sponsors.
"I have organized this event
for 10 years, and there has always
been a large amount of support
from Eastern North Carolina
Wiggs said.
Wiggs said Pi Sigma Phi fra-
ternity is one of the biggest sup-
porters of Easter Seals.
"Minges is the best location,
"Wiggs said. "Everyone loves East
Carolina because it has the best
facilities There are four courts,
so eight teams can play at one
time. This allows a large partici-
pation rate. Wiggs said they have
always picked April weekends to
have the event. "For some rea-
son she said, "we always pick
the best time to have it
Thirty-eight teams will par-
ticipate ithiseventTeoplecome
from all over just for this event
Wiggs said. Some of the teams
are the City of Washington, K-
Mart of Wilson, Orthopedic Com-
pany from ECU, Greenville vol-
leyball league, and individual
teams from Elizabeth City and
Wake Forest.
To organize teams for the
marathon, Easter Seals sends bro-
chures out through ECU, Green-
ville Parks and Recreation and past
participants. There is a $175 fee
for each team to play. The teams
send in $50 of the fee with the
registration form to be scheduled
in the marathon. Each team will
be sent a schedule to see what time
they play. The Easter Seals gives
the teamsabouta month to gather
sponsors, and send in the forms.
There are first, second and
third place prizes for the indi-
vidual and the team who raises
the most money. The first place
prize for the individual is a $100
giftcertificateatOverton's. Ateam
dinner at Pizza Hut is first prize
for the team who raises the most
money. There is also a drawing
for vacation at Days Inn Central at
Myrtle Beach.
" I deal with a lot of people
Wiggs said, "but the people in
Eastern North Carolina are just
the nicest I have ever met. It is just
the best event
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APRIL 1, 1993
PARKING
Continued from page 1
would still run during the needed
hours. The task force has agreed to
re-stripe the lower east end of the
College Hill commuter lot to pro-
vide 13 more spaces.
There are plans to gravel the
center parking lot on Reade Street,
between 2nd and 3rd, for a gain of
120 spaces to use as freshmen park-
ing. The comer lot on Reade and 5th
willberedesignatedasstudentpark-
ing.
The James House is to be de-
molished, which will bring 40spaces.
If possible, while Umstead Hall
is being renovated, 39 spaces on the
east and west sides may be used for
staff parking. The area may be
needed as a lay-down space for the
construction team.
State vehicles that are pres-
ently warehoused on campus will
be moved to a central motor pool.
The "Green Bam" will be de-
molished to provide some space for
delivery vehicles and landscaping.
Other recommendations in-
clude:
One or two additional buses
could be acquired for the Student
Government transit system.
About 242 spaces could be
designated, in the upper part of the
Minges lot and 200 spaces in the
lower lot, forcommuterparking. The
task force wants to create a bus stop
in the Brewster parking lot.
They also plan to study strip-
ing of the remaining parking lots
within the core of campus for addi-
tional creation of spaces.
The task force wants to look
into purchasingaltemative property
for relocating Intramural Services
playing fields, now located north of
Ficklen Stadium. If these recommen-
dations pass, they should be accom-
plished before the Fallsemester 1993.
The parking spaces are to replace
those being lost by the construction
of the Recreation Center.
DOSSER
Continued from page 1
other service providers.
"We help our students
learn how to collaborate with
those professionals, and other
service providers, .we spend a
lot of time in that area Dosser
said.
Dosser said while families
are changing with the times, so
is the field of marriage and fam-
ily therapy. He said that one of
the advantages to being in a fac-
ulty position, as well as remain-
ing clinically active, is his abil-
ity to keep up with the litera-
ture and teach the students the
new ideas that are constantly
being introduced.
Dosser attributes the in-
crease of families seeking
therapy to several factors:
"There may be a greater accep-
tance for families coming to see
a family therapist than maybe
five years ago or it may sim-
ply be that the community is
finally discovering the ad-
vanced resources and profes-
sional service available at East
Carolina University's Marriage
and Family Therapy Clinic.
"The services that we offer are
unique and different, so we're
getting more and more refer-
rals Dosser said, "I'm very
pleased with this program
To receive more informa-
tion, or to make an appointment,
call 757-4236. All inquiries to
the Marriage and Family
Therapy Clinic are treated with
complete confidentiality.
IBM's new leader faces tough road
NEW YORK (AP)�At IBM,
the news works in mysterious
ways. As the troubled computer
company was laying off 2,600
workers at three New York state
plants, its board approved poten-
tial 1993 pay of $8.5 million for
new chairman and chief execu-
tive Louis V. Gerstner Jr.
'The two items reflected the
challenge facing IBM'snew leader,
who takes over Thursday. He's
going to be paid well, but he hasa
tough job.
"It would be surprising to
me if Mr. Gerstner understands
what he's gotten himself into
said Charles Ferguson, a computer
industry consultant and co-author
"Computer Wars a recent book
about IBM.
IBM said Tuesday that
Gerstner will receive a 1993 salary
of $2 million, an incentive for $1.5
million tied to IBM's performance,
and a one-time payment of about
$5 million to offset income and
benefits he forfeited by leaving
his job as chairman and chief ex-
ecutive of RJR Nabisco Holdings
Corp.
Under the package, Gerstner
also gets stock options that could
reap him millions more if his per-
formance improves the company
and boosts its languishing share
price.
Gerstner takes over during
the worst crisis in IBM's 79 years.
The company lost nearly $5 bil-
lion in 1992 and is in theprocessof
making cutbacks that bv the end
of 1993 will have reduced employ-
ment more than 100,000 in three
years.
On Tuesday, IBM laid off
l,400workersat plants in Kingston
and Poughkeepsie, N.Y north of
New York City. IBM also is laying
off 1,200 workers this week at a
nearby plant in East Fishkill, N.Y.
The layoffs, reflect a reshap-
ingoflBM'scoremainframebusi-
ness, based at the plants. Sales of
mainframes � trailer-sized com-
puters used forcorporateand gov-
ernment computing � still repre-
sent about half of IBM'b revenue,
but are being eroded by faster,
more compact machines.
The East Carolinian 3
News writers
meeting today
at 4 p.m.
sharp. Be
there!
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756-1003
WILSON ACRES
2 & 3 BEDROOM
ENERGY EFFICIENT APARTMENTS
Rent includes
�Water �Sewer Cable �Draperies
�Self-cleaning Oven �Frost-free Refrigerator
�WasherDryer Connections �Utility Room
�Patio with Fence �Living Room Ceiling Fan
�Deadbolt Locks �Walk-in Closets
featuring
�Swimming Pool 'Basketball Court
�Tennis Court "Laundry Facilities
located
4 Blocks From East Carolina with Bus Service
�Yearly Lease 'Security Deposit
I GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN
FIVE MINUTES WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS
752-0277
Equal Housing Opportunity
J
One of the Best Chinese Resturants
in Eastern north Carolina
Peking Palace
Restaurant
FAMOUS MANDARIN, SZECHUAN & CANTONESE CUISINE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
LUNCH & DINNER BUFFET
7 DAYS A WEEK
t

4G p-
Family
Dinner
Specials
Ql
Lunch
Specials
Mon-Sat
All ABC
Permits
Exotic
Mixed
Beverages LmCH
Mon-Fri 1 lam-2:30pm
DINNER
Mon-Thur 5-9:30pm Friday 5-10:30pm
Open All Day Saturday & Sunday
Saturday llam-10:30pm
Sunday llam-9:30pm
Take Out Orders Available
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Blvd. across from The Plaza
756-1169
1-1
?
N
�i
SGA JUDICIAL BRANCH
Still Accepting Applications for the
Academic Year 1993-94.
The following positions are available:
SGA ATTORNEY GENERAL
SGA PUBLIC DEFENDER
HONOR & REVIEW BOARD
MEMBER
All applicants will be screened by the SGA Executive Council.
REQUIREMENTS:
2.0 Grade Point Average.
Good Standing with the University.
Applications Available' At:
Secretary's Office (255 Mcndcnhall Student Center)
Attorney General's Office (236 Mendenhall Student Center)
DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS:
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1993
5:00 PM
ECU'S Annual Health
and Wellness Fair
Thursday, April 1
Mendenhall Student Center,
Great Room
10:00 am- 4:00 p.m.
ECU Student Health Services
ECU SARC (Substance Abuse
and Rehab. Counseling)
PICASO (Pitt County AIDS
Service Organization)
� The Bicycle Post
� PUSH (People United to
Support the Handicapped)
� REAL Crisis Center
� ECU Career Services
� Debra Casavere,
Massage Therapist
� GAMMA (Greeks Advocating
the Mature Management
of Alcohol)
� American Red Cross
� ECU Peer Health Educators
� ECU Human Performance Lab
� And Many Morel
o�
Sport sore
Office of Health Pro
Recreational Services
Student Health Services





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by Haselrig
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Thought for Billy Ray Cyrus fans:
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and Elvis did it better.
Billie will never have his own stamp, either.
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By Ferguson & Manning
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��' �B-
TheEastCarolinian
pril 1, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
SINGLE ROOMSFORRENTforsum-
mer sessions. $250 per s.s. includes rent,
utilities, and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE this
summer. One room efficiency apart-
mentatRinggold Towers. $260month.
Call Dennis at 757-0905.
SUBLEASE a one bedroom apartment
for the summer months (Approxi-
mately Mav thru August.) CLEAN and
EFFICIENT! Cal 752-9120 today
SUBLEASE - SUMMER ONLY. Fe-
male Nonsmoker. Private bedroom
furnished. Near ECU. $162.50month
plusl2utalities.Call321-1904or leave
message.
LOOKING FOR A NEW PLACE?
Don't wait till Fall! We have hundreds
of vacancies for May through August,
within walking distance and access to
the ECU busline. Let us help, call 752-
1375. Home Locators fee (S55).
SUBLEASE HOUSE FOR SUMMER
3 bedroom, 2 bath, washer-dryer, A C,
partially furnished. 1 block from cam-
pus S530 Mo. Call 752-8526.
SUMMER APARTMENT. 1 bedroom,
fully furnished, AirCond 1 blockfrom
campus, Scottish Manor, sublease
S290mth. Call 752-6130.
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT S350.00
month plus utilities. Need someone to
take over lease. Call 758-7063.
GUARANTEED APARTMENTatTar
River. Lease Starts August 1st. Two
bedroom, 112 bath, monthly rent of
$485 00. Will need a security depositof
$300.00. Call Marsha 758-8402. Mon-
day-Wednesday.
APARTMENT FOR RENT, one bed-
room Perfect for summer school. Call
Angela 757-2437.
2 - TWO BEDROOM APT. Across
from Mendenhall 205 E 9th St Avail-
able May 1st. Phone 7564)151.
SUBLET2-bedroom furnished duplex,
1 block from campus, avail, may 15-
Aug. 8 or portion thereof; $325 per 4
weeks plus utilities. Faculty or mature
students Security Deposit and Refer-
ences required. Tel. 830-9125
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
.commareWnL7d
UNIQUE SITUATION FORFEMALE
ROOMMATE Full house privileges,
unfurnished room,adjoiningbath, pri-
vate entrance, smoker o.k small pet
o.k. 13 utilities, Winterville area. Call
after 5pm 756-5467.
ROOMMATE wanted Must be re-
sponsible and mature. 1 2 mile from
campus, ECU bus. CALL: 752-1538,
leave message.
M OR F ROOMMATE WANTED:
Moving to New York City, looking for
responsible person to split rent and
util Greenwich Village area. Moving
May 12 call 830-8868
WANTED. FEMALE ROOMMATE
to share two bedroom apartment
$150.00 per month 12 utilities fur-
rushed except bedroom must be able to
tolerate cats Leave message. Chervl
758-6925.
ANYONELOOKINGforafaD semes-
ter Roommate please cal! Holly - 931-
8802
ONE FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share a fully furnished condo in
Nags Head this summer. Rent is S25O.00
per month. For more information please
call 931-9333.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
needed to share rent in Wildwood Vil-
las Apartments. Each person pays
$127.00 and 1 5 or utilities. For infor-
mation call 931-9333.
FEMALEROOMMATEMaythrough
August; large furnished apartment;
Rent negotiable. CALL Dawn at 756-
5134.
URGENT! FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share 2 bedroom apartment
in Tar River. Move in on May 3. Must
be responsible, socia 1 drinker, and ha ve
a good sense of humor. Call Melissa
931-8505 or Mia 931-8519.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share 2 bedroom apartment located 1
mile from campus. S175mo includes
heat Please call 830-1312 and ask for
Jennifer.
MALEROOMMATEWANTEDMust
be responsible and non-smoking.
Needed ASAP. CallRobertat931-7112.
ROOMMATES needed for summer. 3
bd rm ho use,l block from campus;ac,
low utilities, washerdryer. Call
Stephanie at 752-2560.
SUMMER ROOMMATE NEEDED,
FEMALE. 200Rent, 12 Util. Own
room. Twin Oaks Apt. One mile from
ECU. May - Aug. Non-smoker, and
relatively neat! Call 830-0443, ask for
Heather.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share room. 125Rent 1 3 Util. Non-
smoker and relatively neat! For fall.
Twin Oaks Apt 1 mile from campus
Ask for Heather or Jackie, 830-0443.
TWO PEOPLE NEEDED to sublet 2
bedroom apt. during summer. 144
utilities each. Call 355-5986 anytime
Need to know by April 5.
Ofl

��'f.Jk� '� -v:
CHEAP! FBI US SEIZED: 89
Mercedes -200, 86 VW - S50, 87
Mercedes - SI00, 65 Mustang - $5.
Choose form thousands starting S50.
FREE Information24hourhotline 801-
379-2929 copyright NC 030610.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DE A. Avail-
able vour area now Call 1-800-436-
4363 ext. C-5999.
YUMMY GIRL SCOUT COOKIES
for sale! Call 7 to midnight 931-7959
before April 1 st. Campus Girl Scouts
thank you!
DODGE CHARGER 1986, $1500, In-
cludes AC, heat, AMFM radio,
cruise control and power steering.
Call 752-0659.
3 PIECE ANTIQUE Bedroom suite
wmattress and box spring. $450.00
neg. call 830-8868
COIN OPERATED DRINK MA-
CHINE Holds up to 80bottles. 500.
O.B.O. Cail 830-8887.
3 PIECE RATTAN DEN SET plus
three tables; $225.00. Squire III
Stratocaster guitar; $220.00. Call 355-
3636.
20" SCHWINN IMPACT MOUN-
TAIN BIKE. Good condition, Scott
Aero Bars, Red. Perfect for summer
riding, MUST SELL S150 or best of-
fer Jeff 756-8854.
DOT MATRIX PRINTER for sale
Wide carriage, bottomback paper
feed, printer stand and extra ribbons
included. In excellent condition. Call
758-4135.
'84 HONDA 700 InterceptorS500 73
MGB S500. Misc. RX7 Parts S5-S100
830-0364.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Spare full time. Setown hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
200 - $500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information - 24 hour hotline 801 -
379 - 2900. Copyright NC 030650
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many po-
sitions. Greatbenefits. Call 1-800-436-
4365 ext. P-3712.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -Earn
S2,000 month world travel (Ha-
waii, Mexico, theCaribbean, etc.) Holi-
day, Summer and Career employment
available. No experience necessary.
For employment call 1-206-634-0468
ext. C5362
NEED A SUMMER JOB? Make
S1880month and get great Resume
Exp. working with the Southwestern
Co. If interested Call (919) 933-1699.
TIRED OF BEING A POOR COL-
LEGE GIRL? Earn 100's a day escort-
ing in Greenville. Must have transpor-
tation, own phone, and outgoing per-
sonality. Must be very self conscious
and well groomed. We offer flexible
hours to work around classes and
nights. For more information call 757-
3477andaskfor Amy All information
held in strictest confidence
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT
- Make money teaching basic conver-
sational English abroad Japan and
Taiwan. Make S2,000-S4,000 per
month. Many provide room and board
other benefits! No previous training
or teaching certificate required For
International Employment Program,
call the International Employment
Group: (206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED at
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church, 510 Sou th Washington St on
Sunday mornings from 9am until
12:30pm. To work with toddlers
through 3 year olds Applicants must
be punctual and dependable Appli-
cants also should have cheerful,
friendly and caring attitudes in their
interaction with children and their
parents For application information
contact the Church office 752-3101.
NEED Mature responsible person to
care for4 month old twins 10-15 hours
per week, flexible hours, must have
references and transportation Call
756-7385.
HELP! HELP! HELP!
Hostessess, Cashiers & Wait
Staff, Full-time & Part-time
Apply in person, Mon-Fri, 2-4pm
GOLDEN CORRAL
504 SW Greenville Blvd.
LAW FIRM NEEDS TWO FULLY
FURNISHED APARTMENTS dur-
ing the summer 1 bedroom May 22 -
June 27; 2 bedroom May 22 - August 1
Contact Bert Speichor 355-3030.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES We offer
typingandphotocopyingservices. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand wntten
pages SDFProfessional Computer Ser-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer7 Only S169 Jet there anytime for
only $169 with AIRHITCH! (Reported
in Let's Go! & NY Times.) AIRHITCH
�212-864-2000.
WHERE'S THE PARTY? Wherever
there'saMobileMusicProductionsdisc
jockey. Proven HOTTEST D.J. service
in the area. Don't wait too late to book.
Call 758-4644.
CARPET CLEANING SI 2 per room 2
room minimum. Steamex cleaning
servingGreenvillefor4 years Call Marc
at 758-1079.
LET'S PARTY! Experienced D.J. from
Bogies available for all occasions: Fra-
ternity and Sorority Socials, Weddings,
Birthdays. All typesof music from Clas-
sic Rock to Top 40 Dance. HIGHEST
QUALITY BEST PRICES Call Rob @
757-2658.
PAINTB ALL Come and play this Sun-
day form 1pm -6pm Wear your cam-
ouflage and take advantage of this
Spring weather. Call Rich at 752-2573
for more info!
PAINTB ALL: It's the most intense and
electrifying sport you will ever play
Call 752-8380 for Information and Res-
ervations WE BREED EXCITEMENT.
PIRATE PAINTB ALL: We are on the
cuttingedge of high-energy entertain-
ment. Call 752-8380 for Reservations
and Information
PAINTB ALL: this is the most fun you
can have with your clothes on Call
752-8380 for Information and Reserva-
tions WE BREED EXCITEMENT.
PAINTBALL: You know people who
have played, and you've always
wanted to � Here's yourchance Call
752-8380 for Information and Reserva-
tions WE BREED EXCITEMENT.
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
'Editing & Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resumes
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
il you quality. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
Guys and Gals
It's Time to Clean out
your Closets!
and the
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
ON THE EVANS STREET
MALL
IS
Paying Cash
for your
Old Clothes!
ff you ore selling you must be 18
wtthuptcturelDCNCDl. ECU)
752-3866
Mon 10-12 1-5
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3
Sat 10-12
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in Calif. (213)477-8226
Or, rush S2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave t206-A, Los Angles. CA 90025
FROM PIRATE PAINTBALL TO THE
CREWWHOPLAYEDONSUN28MAR
93: All of you played with intensity and
courage. Thanks and come again. - Paul
Shaw
"FLAMER" LYONS, You messed your
britches and mined your rep, Don't know
how you got home or where you slept.
KEY WEST will forget, but the memory
remains,whatagreatlaughitwas,youand
your stains. We've tned to keep quiet but
this just can'tsitstill. You'rea "FLAMER"
in your own right Just like "OLDBILL " -
Crock and Co.
PAINTBALL-For all thoseguys(andgirl),
whocameout we had a greattime -JackC.
that'll teach you to charge and Jimmy R.
Watch out for them goggle shots! ANY-
ONEELSE interested in Joining theFun we
ha ve a game planned April 9th from 11am
-4pm. S15(depositgamefee)to guarantee
you a spot Just call Rich at 752-2573.
HEY PI DELTA! We had a blast at
Corrigan's last week. Let's do it again
soon! The brothers and p ledges of Ka ppa
Delta Rho
y QPwyggp��
KAPPA DELTA RHO would like to
thank Anna Harrington and Holly
Fleming for doing a great job represent-
ing us Monday at Greek Goddess.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
SG A Executive Board You haveoursup-
port - the Kappa Delta Rho gentlemen.
GREEKS: Hope everyone is having a
fun and exciting Greek Week1 Love, the
Alpha Phi's.
ALPHA PHI: Danielle and Jo Brent you
two looked great at Greek Goddess. We
are so proud of you. Love, Alpha Phi's.
KAPPA SIGS:Rainorshine we wereall
there, with lots of sop suds to spare. The
car wash was great, and we all showed
up to dinner not a minute too late. We
had lots of fun, have to do it again. Love,
The Alpha Phi's
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: We all had an
awesome time Saturday night. Thanks
forputtingsomuch time into it. Wecan't
wait until next time. Love, Alpha Chi
Delta
CONGRATULATIONS to Chi
Omega's New Greek Goddess Repre-
sentative - Robbyn Shulman. Way to
show your stuff! Also, thanks to Dee,
Chnsty, and Bonnie - you did a great job.
Let's keep up the Greek God and God-
dess tradition Love, The Chi Omegas.
THE RADICAL FOURSOME: Chi
Omega, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Sigma Pi,
and Beta: Looking forward to this
weekend's festivities! The Chi Omegas.
. "i -�, SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors, Instructors,
;�' A � Jl Kitchen, Office, Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
i Ifiliv tniir Ann e 'OLUh summer sports camp. Will train. Over 25
I.AiMl I liilVnllUli activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
art Cool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792.
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-35,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Exceptional Value
Available Immediately. One and two
bedroom apartments close to campus.
Water and sewer is FREE.
Laundry facility and ECU bus service.
Call7520from83mto500iTr
NOW HIRING
$400.00 PER WEEK
(Minimum Guarantee To Start)
FULL-TIME � NO LAYOFFS
Our company needs 15 to 20 Full-Time
individuals to start work immediately. Positions in
our marketing & display department requires that
you have your own transportation, be neat in
appearance. Our company offers Medical
Benefits, Advancement Opportunities and Paid
Vacations.
Call Thursday; April 1, 9 am to 6 pm
355-2111
Announcements
READING TEST RESULTS FOR
NURSING 1000 STUDENTS
Students who were enrolled in
Mrs Belinda Lee's block section of
Nursing 1000 during the first half of
Spring 1993 semester may pick up
Nelson-Denny Reading Test Scores in
Mrs Pam Smith's office - Rm. 257,
Nursing Building.
SPECIALOIYMPICS
The 1993 Greenville -Pitt Co Spe-
cial Olympics Spring Games will be
held on April 20th at E B Aycock Jr.
High School in Greenville (rain date
April 22) Volunteers are needed to
help serve as buddieschaperones for
theSpecialOlympics Volunteersmust
be able to work a II da y-from 9 a m to 2
p.m An orientation meeting will be
held on April 15 in Old Joyner Library
room 221 from 5-600p m (The first
ones there wil 1 be assigned a position )
Free volunteer t-shirts will be provided
the day of the games to all volunteers
who have attended theonentahon ses-
sion For more information, contact Lisa
fhly at 830-4551
MLSLIM STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Seeks fellow students to actively
participate We meet regularly to dis-
cuss current topics For more informa-
tion contact ADIB FARHADI at 355-
6707
YARDSAI.F
Saturday, April 3rd, in front of
Brewster Building East Tenth Street,
ECU campus. To benefit sociology
honor society Furniture, clothes, toys,
wall hangings, jewelry and other cool
stuff
THESHVITZ?
The shvitz! come see Jonathon
Berman'sexcitingnewfilm MSCApnl
1, at 8 p.m Room 244 Come shvitz
with us! Refreshments will be served.
ATTENTION RUNNERS'
Applications will be availablenext
week in area businesses for the 5k run
forthe Ronald McDonald House given
by Pi Delta Sorority on April 24 at
9U).im There will beaSlO 00registra-
tion fee in advance and SI2 (XI at the
race There will be T-shirts given to the
first 5(X) applicants
ACQA
New meeting time isTuesday, 5:15
p.m.� The Methodist Student Center
located at 501 E Fifth St
Recreational Services Softball In-
vitational Information Meeting will be
held on Monday, Apnl 5 at 5:00pm
Biology 103 For more information call
757-6387.
ZETATAU ALPHA
Asa part of Zeta Tau Alpha's na-
tional April Fool's Day project, DON'T
BE A FOOL, DO SELF-EXAMINA-
TIONS, the Iota Rho chapter of Zeta
Tau Alpha is reaching out to the com-
munity in an effort to raise breast can-
cerawarenessandgiveGrevnville-area
women a tool to complete monthly
self-examinations Chapter members
will offer free waterproof cards that
illustrate how to complete breast self-
examination and can be prominently
displayed in the shower Cards will be
available Thursday, Apnl 1st, from 10
to 3, at Harris Teeter and the Plaza.
ECU WOMEN'S STUDIES
PROGRAM
Presenting the Swami
Chetanananda on The Hindu Vision
of God as Mother Friday, April 2,
10:00am, Rawl 105 Admission is free
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will meet
Monday, April5,1993at5 15 pm in218
Ragsdale New members are welcome
to attend Our guest speaker will be
Jerome Raney, Attorney at Law Also,
we are planning a trip to Campbell
University School of"Law on Wednes-
day. April 7,1993.
LOST CAT
A cat has been found around
Speight building He was first seen on
March 23and it is rumored that he mav
have come to campus on an East Caro-
lina Bus Heiscurrentlvbeingcared for
by the ELEM M1DG faculty He is an
orange cat with a white nose, white
paws and white rings around his tail
He has a black and gray collar with
pink and vellow triangles - no tags If
you have information that can help us
find his home please call office 757-
6833orsopbySpetght204 Thank vou





The East Carolinian
April I. 1993
Opinion
ThursdayOpinion
Riding the Mobius
Page 6
By Jason Trembiay
AiiHitran'fWH 1 Euthanasia Provides dignity to terminally ill
UUU CaR l niQe PSt ��.your watched Reissue that hits closest to myselOtheoptionshouldbeava humans denied the same rich,
Wiretapping must be dealt
with before university can
achieve top ranking
Da-dumm Da-dumm Da-dumm.
Just when you thought it was safe to go back
to college. Just when you thought that the bureau-
cracy couldn't reach any farther than it already
had. From out of the depths of ECU's past �
where some, including students, wished it had
remained � comes the terror from the deep, the
scourge of the seven seas.
"Wiretapping VI � Jason Takes ECU Ap-
propriate human screams, slasher music, dark
lighting, etc. please.
Smiles have been seen, laughter and cheers
have been heard. ECU has passed its most recent
financial state audit with what has been called
"flying colors according to Richard Brown, ECU
vice-chancellor of business affairs. Hurray! The
sun is shining, the birds are singing and all's right
with the world.
Wrong. Sorry. Hate to break it to everybody
out there in Mr. Roger's Neighborhood, but every-
one seems to be forgetting a little something. Ac-
tually, it's more like two or three things. Try over
$250,000 in out-of-court settlements. Or how about
a web of civil lawsuits against former and present
ECU employees? Ring any bells? Probably not,
judging by the amount of apathy that happens
when the subject is brought up.
Granted, a university should be commended
if they can pass an audit that
"did not disclose any mate-
rial weakness deficiencies
or noncompliance with
rules and regulations As
Brown states, it does show
that the quality of perfor-
mance at East Carolina is at
an optimal level. The thing is, only a year ago,
Brown was vehemently defending his position (or
lack thereof) in the wiretapping scandal toa federal
grand jury.
If the university had settled this haunting
issue, then the point would be moot. However,
this scandal keeps recurring, no matter how many
shots of penicillin (or dollars) that the administra-
tion gives it. A reasonable person would follow
the reasoning that if your previous attempts had
failed, maybe you should find a new approach.
Maybe honesty?
Once again, the administration should admit
that they screwed up. Can it really be any worse
than having to pay off thousands of dollars in
settlements? If this school could put this problem
behind it (and most wish it would do just that),
then it could focus on the good points that have
happened.
ECU has made many prominent and positive
steps to improving its status within the commu-
nity and in the state also. Administrators are striv-
ing to show that this institution is a comparable
alternative to any other college in North Carolina.
However, gagging any outbursts that might tar-
nish this image will not make the problem go
away.
Pull this skeleton out of the closet before its
creaking and groaning draws any more unwanted
attention. Don't shut the closet door; don't hold
the skeleton, firmly until it shuts up. Give it a
decent burial, complete with a 21-gun salute and
flowers. Only then can this university hope to
aspire to the level of quality that it desires.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmcl, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Bullard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asr; Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Hasehig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead edilonal in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to Ihe Editor, The East Carolinian
Publications Bldg , ECU, Greenville. N.C, 27858-4353. For more .niorma-
tion, call (919)7576366.
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
Have you ever watched
someone you love die?
i, as well as many others,
have done just that. There's no
cute euphemism for it, no way to
dress it up to make it less painful
� you just watch and mourn.
I don't particularly mean vio-
lent, sudden death; these are per-
haps kinder ways to go than the
topic of today's "literary sun-
shine which is lengthy terminal
illness and its effects on people.
Doubtless you have heard of
the infamous Dr. Kevorkian and
his "suicide machine and with
good reason. The whole concept
of mercy killings, particularly
when aided by members of the
medical profession, seems to be
ruffling some political and social
feathers.
The problem, as I understand
it, is far more a moral issue than it
is a legal one. I'm sure that there
are countless legal problems in-
volved, perhaps the most obvious
of those legalities being that mur-
der is illegal. However, I do not
feel the need to go into the legality
of the matter because it is a fright-
fully boring topic, and one that
cannot be rationally resolved out
of court (which is not to say that
the matter will be rationally dealt
with in court).
The issue that hits closest to
home is the moral one, and sadly,
is one which most people are able
to examine from their own per-
sonal experience.
At this juncture in our lives,
most people ha- � lost someone
close to them. The individual cir-
cumstances of these losses are for-
ever seared into the mind (a fact
which I can personally attest to).
When I was a little boy, my
grandmother was stricken by can-
cer brought on by genetic predis-
position, heavy smoking and sac-
charine usage. She was very ill for
a long time and was in great pain
for her last few weeks. She spent
all but the last few days of her
existence attached to a wide bat-
tery of medical machinery until
the doctors decided it was hope-
less and decided to let her die at
home.
Although I was very young,
I can still remember the strain it
put on my father, as well as the
restof my family, vvhowereforced
to watch his mother waste away
before his eyes. This was the
miracle of medical science: the
prolonging of my grandmom's
agony.
If the same thing were to
happen today to my grandmom,
or anyone else I know (including
myself) theoprion should be avail-
able for a person to die with dig-
nity and the smallest amount of
pain possible.
Debilitatingdiseasessuchas
cancer do not allow the graceful
transition between the physical
world and the spiritual, but slowly
drag the afflicted clawing down
into the abyss, a process all too
often complicated by overzealous
physicians.
The preservation of life at al 1
costs is immora I if the person does
not wish to live. If peoples' expec-
tationsarebelowwhatthey would
consider the minimum, they
would live miserable, desolate
lives, and quite understandably
wish to die.
Take for example, your pet
dog, Spot. Spot is getting along in
years, a: ,d although you still love
him, you can see that his health is
rapidly failing. So you pack Spot
up for one final car trip to the vet.
You lay him gently on the steel
table and stroke his fur as the vet
injects the clear liquid into his
body, and Spot gradually fades
into his final sleep with dignity
and peace. He is no longer in pain,
and has perhaps gone on to some
better place.
If animals are given the privi-
lege of an easy death, why are
humans denied the same right?
The symptoms that Spot exhib-
ited are common in terminally ill
patients in the latter stages of
various afflictions, and yet these
people are forced to suffer and
wait for the inevitable.
What about execution?
Does this not strike a paradoxical
chord withanyoneelse?Ourgov-
ernment isagainsteuthanasia,yet
in most states, healthy people are
killed for committing various
crimes. What are the moral im-
plications of this little contradic-
tion? Where exactly is the line
between govern ment sanctioned
justice and murder? The line, my
friends, is awfully fuzzy.
The point I'm trying to
make here is that we're all going
todie. There just isn'tany getting
around it; it is one of life's only
unchangeable givens. "Be you a
king or a street sweeper, sooner
or later, you'll dance with the
Reaper It should be up to each
individual to determine what
kind of dance it shall be, not left
in the hands of disinterested and
uninvolved doctors or legislators.
Freedom of choice: learn it,
live it, die by it.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza and watch
some cartoons
T�ftDfiBPfc
Apcu5ff�5
iNTHEwAltJE:
APCU5ftiCg
WiHEvWl
MU'Wy0rW5J
.Wttft
Ffitoiay,
ft!)
WpcFUE
APCuSttkus
WUNEtyfcfS
'BWATrJE
QuoteoftheDay
A university is what a college becomes
when the faculty loses interest in the
students.
John Ciardi
Letters to the Editor
Atheist's argument distorts Bible, scriptures
To the Editor
I have seen a lot of things
in your newspaper that upset
me. However, being open to
the ideologies which others
hold dear, I was never pro
voked into writing a response
to any of the articles I read.
The March 30 edition of
The East Carolinian changed
that. Jim Senyszyn's letter to
the editor endorsing the use of
the Bible as a defense of homo-
sexuality was not only mis-
guided but totally wrong.
I urge Senyszyn, who is a
proclaimed atheist, to pick up
his Bible and read a little closer.
His proofs are a little off the
mark.
First, there is no possible
waySenyszyncan beanatheist
since proclaiming disbelief in
God admits that Heexists. Point
made.
Second, though his argu-
ment sounds extremely Bibli-
cal I ad mit, Senyszyn did his
homework the ideas are not
totally represented in an accu-
rate light. When Leviticus 18:22
states "Thou shall not lie with
mankind as with womankind:
it is an abomination I don't
know wha t he sees there, but to
me the idea is pointedly clear
� homosexuality is not Bibli-
cally acceptable.
More importantly,
Senyszyn left out the most ex-
plicit piece of scripture that
points out the wrongness of
homosexuality.
The New Testament book
of Romans chapter 1, verse 23
first points out how men wou Id
corrupt the scriptures to serve
their own ends (i.e. defend ho-
mosexuality). Moreover, the
chaptergoeson to say that God
givesusfreewill � "gave them
up unto vile affections"� and
allows us to choose what
lifestyle we live.
In Romans 1:27, the Bible
points out that lust between
men is wrong, period, and fin-
ishes by saying that those who
do such things and those who
associate with those who do
such things "areworthy of death
eternity in hell Although it
maybe hard to accept, the Bible
does not condone homosexual
behavior.
Tosithereandargueeach
of the individual scripture
would be an exercise in redun-
dancy. Senyszyn is reporting the
scripture from a very distorted
and one-sided point of view. To
distort what is written in the
Bible will not make what it says
is wrong any more right.
Popular criticisms of the
Bibleareextremely biased, usu-
ally against the credibility of
the Bible (which, by the way,
has sttxvl up to intense scru-
tiny). Again, I urge Senyszyn,
and anyone who believes the
argument he presented, to read
his or her Bible and the scrip-
tures he points out a bit more
closely to see what they are re-
ally saying. You might be joy-
fully surprised at what you find.
Keith A. Webb
Graduate
English Education
By Gregory Dickens
Society should
focus on future,
not nostalgia
Sometime in the last 10 years, someone
decided to put ourculture into constant retro,
. and now we dwell in nostalgic kitsch. It's
annoying. Most of our society either refers or
steals from the past 30 years.
Our popular music is a rehash jambo-
ree that nods with affection or non-creative
envy at the blues-inspired swagger of the'60s
(Black Crowes, Ju-ju Hounds) or at the shal-
low pap of the 70s (the return of disco via
Whitney Houston and a plethora of Top 40
songs). Remember the Dirty Dancing craze?
Some of the homage is done with sin-
cere appreciation of respected works (most
beer commercials apply). Some is in subtle or
blatant mocking; Faith No More covered The
Commodore's "Easy" and some thrash band
did a rendition of Air Supply's "Making Love
Out of Nothing At All" (don't stare at me like
that, I heard it on VVZMB). Also there is Ugly
Kid Joe demolishing "Cat's In the Cradle"
and Michael Bolton (pick one) for whom
death itself is too good a punishment.
There's the hip fashions. USA TODAY
reports that the trends from Europe for Fall
'93 is "part 70s, part swashbuckler, part
Edwardiandandy Yes, ladies, now you can
freely admit that the man of your dreams is a
lanky, unwashed fop in a poet shirt with the
God-help-us bell-bottoms that somehow
avoided bonfires in the '80s.
Even tattoos are the rage again which
causes flashbacks of either "Fantasy Island"
or Schneider from "One Day At A Time
These examples may seem trivial, but
at college, what else is there to put effort into
during personal time? Sure, there's the pur-
suit of the opposite sex, but what is he or she
wearing? What are they listening to at the
clubs? Even the recreational drugs of choice
on campuses across the nation are the "old
standards" � marijuana, mushrooms and
LSD. Everything old is new again.
Even our movies are rehashes. The re-
cent'Tointof No Return "Sommersby "A
Few Good Men" and "Dracula" are all re-
makes. The plots of the majority of recent
releases are derivative.
Diet Coke used stunning effects to al-
low Paula Abdul to perform with Louie
Armstrong, Groucho Marx and Humphrey
Bogart. Do we need to be entertained with
plagiarized film clips of dead entertainers in
order to sell carbonated syrup? More impor-
tantly, do we need Paula Abdul?
We seem to be lost in a Jim Beam maga-
zine ad where our bathing suits, Christmas
trees and road signs reflect our desire to
"return to the basics Do we tend to look
upon the gocxloledays with too much enthu-
siasm? Are we losing ouroriginalitytotrends
and nostalgia? It seems too soon to write off
progress entirely.
Then again, the latest soundtrack single
to be released is that Listerine song, "Tarzan
Boy which originally came out in 1985.
They're remaking "Godzilla" again. And
whose bright idea uvss it to make the Brady
Bunch cool?
1� "i i





The East Carolinian
APRIL 1, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
Original, gutsy
Controversial curator and museum director to judge and speak
Tom Sokolowski
By Pam Revels
Staff Writer
The words original, provocative, gutsy, ad-
venturous and politically heated have all been
used by critics to describe artist Tom Sokolowski's
jurored and curated shows.
This week, East Carolina gets a taste of
Sokolowski'soften controversial style. He issched-
uled to juror the ECU Undergraduate Art Show
that opens tonight, April 1, at 7 p.m. inGray Gallery.
When Sokolowski jurors a show, he's known to
create quite an uproar.
It will be interesting to see which works (out
of 500) he will select for the first, second and third
place winners of cash prizes and Certificates of
Merit.
Sokolowski, notorious for picking art that is
meaningful and concerned with pertinent issues,
will also give an informative and enlightening
lecture on Friday, April 2 in the art auditorium
called "Art in the Missionary Position The title
falls right in line with his reputation for creating a
stir.
One look at Sokolowski's academic achieve-
ments reveals his deep knowledge of art.
After graduating from the University of Chi-
cago in 1972 with a B.A. in art history, Sokolowski
attended the Institute of Fine Arts at NYU and
earned his Masters' and Ph.D. His major area of
study was 17th and 18th Century European Art.
Sokolowski received six awards during his aca-
demic years, including The Ford Foundation Fel-
lowship and the John Anson Kilrredge Fund Fel-
lowship.
Sokolowski then began to pave his way into the
professional circles. In 1981,hebecameCuratorof
European Painting and Sculpture at The Chrysler
Museum in Norfolk. After only a year in this posi-
tion, he moved up to Chief Curator. Sokolowski
left The Chrysler Museum in 1984 to serve as the
Director of the Grey Art Gallery and Study Center
at NYU, where he currently works.
Sokolowski has tucked many accomp 1 ishmen ts
into his own impressive niche of the art world. The
artist has done over 20 exhibitions and has pro-
duced over 15 publications � not to mention his
slew of lectures and other professional activities.
One of his exhibits, "Precious was showcased in
eight colorful pages of Art in America and received
a more than favorable review.
Sokolowski continues to create controversy
with his preference for meaningful art and his
provocative lectures. After all, Sokolowski once
wrote in an essay that "good art bothers people
Come to the Undergraduate Art Show and
Sokolowski's lecture, and be bothered.
Check it Out
Sokolowski to speak "Art in the
Missionary Position" Friday, April 2 at 11
a.m. in the art building auditorium
HEALTHY
CHOICE
ECU dining services
now provide
"Healthier options"
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
Recently, ECU Dining Services
made "healthier options" the unde-
clared motto of the Treat Yourself
Right program.
In case you haven't noticed,
brightly colored stickers are now be-
ing placed on certain foods in all of the
campus eating areas. These stickers,
which catch your eye with the phrase
"Treat Yourself Right indicate foods
that meet the standards of the American
Heart Association.
Contrary to belief, college students
are becoming increasingly aware of the
foods they eat. This is not to suggest the
entire campus population is giving up
hamburgers, beer, and late night pizzas.
A healthy lifestyle doesn't necessar-
ily mean you have to give up all the
foods which provide a high caloric plea-
sure, but it does take moderations and
adjustments.
"The main objective is to provide
choices said Jeanie Tomkalski, Direc-
tor of Campus Health Promotion. "We
haven't taken away the foods that are
already there. We just are interested in
providing options and to educate stu-
dents to eat better
She said that many students talked
with her and expressed their concerns
about nutrition on campus. The univer-
sity decided the demand for healthier
foods had reached the campus and im-
mediately adopted the "Treat Yourself
Right" program through ECU's food
distributor.
After the ARA was contacted, a nu-
tritionist was hired toexarnine the menus
that had been compiled.
The healthier options are foods
which contain less than 30 percent
fat. Among the additions are: bagels
fruitsalads, turkey burgers, fish sand-
wiches, blended yogurts and more
vegetarian choices.
"It's Treat Yourself Right al-
ways going to be a part of campus
dining and as our customers demand
healthier choices, we will respond
said Frank Salamon, director of the
Dining Services.
This program also hopes to edu-
cate students about the misconcep-
tions about foods we come into con-
tact with on every aisle of the grocery
store.
Companies have begun to play
with the knowledge of consumers,
claiming foods to be better than they
actually are.
Tomkalski explained how com-
panies have used false advertising
on simple foods such as peanut but-
ter.
Some peanut butter labels read
"nocholesterol" when in fact peanut
butter never had cholesterol, just a
high fat content.
"We're going to keep building
on this program, because there's a lot
of misinformation out there
Tomkalski said. "Eating better will
improve all aspects of a students life
and we want them to realize that
African-American
slide-talks in April
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
The African-American Advisory Board
to the North Carolina Museum of Art will
presentthreeeducational programsacrossthe
state in April.
The slide-talks will be held in Charlotte,
Raleighand Winston-Salem,and will focuson
African and African-American art.
All are free and open to the public.
At 7 pm on Friday, April 2, Dr. Mario
Azevedo, professor of African and African-
American Affairs at the University of North
Carolina at Charlotte, will present a slide talk
and discussion titled "Understanding and
Appreciating African Art"
He will address specific aesthetic values
of African artandthedifference between West
and East African artistic expression. The lec-
ture will be illustrated with slides of works in
the collection of the North Carolina Museum
of Art.
The program will be held at Ubiquitous
Artspace in the Branch Banking and Trust
building at 200 South Tryon Street in Char-
lotte. It is sponsored by Ubiquitous Artspace
and the North Carolina Humanities Council;
a reception will follow.
At 7 pm on Saturday, April 17,Norman
Peixiergraft,directorofArtMuseumatNorth
Carolina Central University, will present a
slide lecture on works by African-American
artists in collections across the state of North
Carolina.
Representatrvsfromthosemuseumsand
galleries will alsobepresentTheprogram will
be held in the auditorium at the North Caro-
lina Museum of Art. It is sponsored by the
Raleigh chapter of Links, Inc a reception will
follow.
At 7 p.m. on Friday, April 30, Dr. Aln�
AdamsofBennettCoUegein eaisboropre-
sents a slide lecture titled "African-American
Artists: Visions and Accomplishments She
will examine theworkofWilliam T.Williams,
Jacob Lawrence,and other African- American
artists, and explore their space in the larger
artistic community.
The program is at the Diggs Gallery on
the campus of Winston-Salem State Univer-
sity, which houses twolargemurals by nation-
See FILM page 9
Hindu monk to provide insight
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
A Hindu monk will give the
first lecture in a new ECU lecture
series on religion tonight, April 1.
Swami Chetanananda, a
Hindu spiritual leader, will deliver
the first Umesh and Usha Gulati
lecture on World Religions at 730
p.m. in Room 1031 of the General
Qassroom Building. His topic is
"Vedanta: Its Theory and Practice
The lecture is sponsored by the ECU
Religious Studies Program.
Asecond lecture is onFriday at
10 a.m. in Room 105 of the Rawl
Building. It is titled "The Hindu
Vision of God as Mother This lec-
ture is sponsored by the ECU
Women's Studies Program.
Both programs are free and
open to the public.
The Gulati family of Green-
ville established the lectureship as
a way to offer the communi ty some
insights about other religions.
"The purpose of the lecture-
ship is to promote the common
features of ail religions Said Dr.
Umesh Gulati, a professor in the
ECU School of Business. He said he
hoped the series will make people
more conscious of the spiritual di-
mension of everyday living and
provide a better understanding of
eastern religionssuchasHinduism
and Buddhism.
Under the terms of the lectu re-
ship, speakers and topics are se-
lected by the ECU Religious Stud-
ies Committee. The comm i ttee al so
oversees the ECU Religious Stud-
ies Program.
"An important purpose of the
Religious Studies Program is to
provide lectures, seminars and
other related activities that will
serve the community said Dr.
Calvin Mercer, Director of the Reli-
gious Studies Programs. "Our lec-
ture events have been very well
Swami
Chetanan-
anda will
deliver the
first
Umesh and
Usha
Gulati
lecture on
World
Religions
tonight.
attended in past years, and given
the growing interest in eastern reli-
gions, I expect the same to be true
this year
Mercer explained that this
year's topic, "Vedanta literally
means "the supreme knowledge"
and is the sacred wisdom of the
Hindu sages. Hesaid itsmajordoc-
trines are taken from texts called
the"Upanishads
Some of the ma jor tenets of the
Vedanta include: there is only one
true reality; Brahman (God) is the
Universe, the reality beneath the
apparentand continuously chang-
ing outer world of appearances;
human beings are themselves di-
vine; and various yogk practices
help manifest the divinity within.
Swami Chetanananda gradu-
ated from Calcutta University in
1957 and became a monk of the
Ramakrishna Order of India. He
has served in the Vedanta Society
of Southern California and cur-
rently directs the Vedanta Society
of St. Louis. He has written, trans-
lated, or edited over a dozen books
in English and Bengali.
The ECU ReligiousStudiesPro-
gram is now in its fourth year. As
part of the College of Arts and Sci-
ences, the program draws on
courses from a variety of depart-
ments including anthropology,
English, history, philosophy, psy-
chology, and sociology. It offers an
See HINDU page 9
Photo courtesy Adam SchonDrun
IN THE BUFF: Filmmaker (onathon Berman and his crew encounter patrons of the steam baths
during the filming of his documentary, "The Schvitz The sneak preview is tonight at Hendrix.
New film gets sneak preview tonight
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
"TheSchvitz ("The Rus-
sian-Jewish Bath") a new
documentary film by
Jonathon Berman, will get a
sneak preview at ECU tonight,
April 1.
The screening, sponsored
by Hillel, the Jewish student
organization, is set for 8 p.m.
in Room 244 of Mendenhall.
It is free and open to the pub-
lic.
The film was completed
in February and is scheduled
to be shown at the M useu m of
MtKiern Art in New York, and
in film festivals in San Fran-
cisco, Australia and Spain.
"The Schvitz" looks at the
unlikely community' . gedinthe
240-degree heat of the last tradi-
tional steambaths in the U.S. �
those frequented by Jewish men
in New York City. According to
filmmaker Berman, thebathshave
been described as a "proletarian
country club "a wet Disneyland "
and "the best damn place to get
smoked fish and vodka in the
neighborhood
The film's various characters
include gamblers, New Age mas-
seuses, cab-drivers and rabbis �
forming a sometimes conflicting,
yet often compelling voice. "When
wesitinthisintenseheatvve'reall
the same � millionaire and pau-
per says one schvitzer.
Production of "The
Schvitz" was supported by
funds from the National En-
dowment for the Arts, New
York's State Council on the
Arts and Coucil for the Hu-
manities and several private
foundations.
Berman will be present at
the ECU screening and will
offer remarks about the film.
His career has included work
asa film and television editor
and TV production assistant.
Further info about the
sneak preview is available
from Hillel's faculty advisor,
Adam Schonbrun oi the En-
glish department, 757-6719.





8 The East Carolinian
APRIL 1. 1993
ything you want, you got ft.1
By Richard Cranium
Cheers is my
favorite TV
show. I'm sad
that it's in its last
season.
Thursday night is my TV
night, y'understand: Cheers reruns, The
Simpsons, Martin, Cheers, and Wings
(one-word titles, how Freudian). Life
is good. But look, I don't watch much
TV. Those shows and sports are all I
watch. And Bugs and Daffy. Some-
times old syndicated shows and mov-
ies and Quantum Leap, but mainly just
Thursday nights, and CNN in the morn-
ing.
Anyway, that Norm, he kills me. Him
and Cliff. And Frazier.Ican'tbelieveLilith
ran off with another man. Bitch. Did you
seethatepisode with Kevin McHa)e?yes
no What about when Norm and Cliff
were outside making Frazier's car alarm
go off? Oh mercy.
But 1 don't want to talk about Cheers.
I want to talk about prissy people. Thev
bugme. You know whatl'm talkingabout?
I'm talking about potpourri, spiced tea,
the way they bend their wrist when thev
walk, condescension, being too good for
people or restaurants, damn little porce-
lain things, crochet or needlepointorwhat-
e er it is, oh God does it ever end?
I like women. 1 love 'em. But keep
them prissy women locked up tight! "Ooh!
How can you drink beer? It's nasty Hey
look, I'm getting mad just writing about
prissy things! Everything thatisnota little
prissy thing is "nasty
Hey, here's a way to find out if a guy
or gal is prissy. Go to their house to eat
and, no matter what they are serving, ask
for some ketchup or mustard or mayon-
naise or Tobasco. When they ask why, tell
them you're goingtoputiton the chicken,
fish, pork, crown roast, London Broil or
whatever. If they go, "Nasty they're
prissy.
My woman says she wants me to
name our first daughter "Brittany No
thank you. I told her that sounds like the
name of a prissy little spoiled girl. She
said, "Too bad I told her I would name
our son Ernie or Roszxcoe, nice, fun, mas-
culine names. She opted for Michael or
lames. Prissy, prissy, prissy! She's not nor-
mally a prissy person, in fact, she hates
prissiness as much as I do. I'm not sure
I want to have chirrens with her now if
they're going to turn her into a pot-
pourri-buying, needle-pointing, cup-
cake-baking pnss-pot.
Anyway, love thy neighbor and all
that. But give me a break! So many of
my friends are priss-pots I can't watch
Diane Chambers on Cwprs reruns with-
out wanting to smash my electric pot-
pourri burner! Helpful hint: take eggs
outof the refrigerator twohoursbefore
you plan to use them; it's best to use
them at room temperature.
The Devil at Large
(AP)� Henry Miller's 'Tropic
of Cancer" is the kind of book that
used to be read by people who
skimmed through "looking for the
good parts
Because he wrote about sex so
forcefully in the autobiographical
fiction abouthisdays in Paris in the
1930s, Miller vas mistaken for a
pomographer.
And shortly after he was per-
mitted in print in the United States
in the 1960s, he was denounced as
With "The Devil at Large
Erica Jong gives the devil his due.
In her first nonfiction book,
Jong defends Miller's use of ob-
scenity and apologizes forhischau-
vinism. She nails down the bio-
graphical details of his family,
women, friends and books with
the expertise of a former Ph.D.
candidate.
Jong also writes engagingly
about how Miller befriended and
encouraged her after her own no-
torious book, "Fear of Flying
came outin 1974. "Devil"contains
many of the letters they exchanged
and Jong writes of visiting Miller
in Los Angeles when he was in his
80s.
If she can redeem Miller, her
�"�
By Erica Jong
Published by Turtle Bay
kindred spirit, Jong also hopes her
work will find a place in American
Literature. She wants to be remem-
bered for more than an unusual use
of the word "zipless
Of course the biggest obstacle
to taking Miller seriously is the
anarchistic Miller himself, who
urged would-be biographers to
"make it all up
Jong worked to reconcile her-
self with his sexism, egoism and
plenty of writing that was merely
indulgent.
What makes Miller memorable
is his vitality, his here-I-am voice,
his life's-a-bancjuet attitude and
transcendentaloptimismthatfinds
joy where others would find de-
spair.
In the opening of "Tropic of
Cancer Miller writes: "I have no
money, no resources, no hopes. I
am the happiest man alive and
"This is not a book, in the ordinary
sense of the word. No, this is a
prolonged insult, a gob of spit in
the face of Art, a kick in the pants to
God, Man, Destiny, Time, Love,
Beauty
Miller writes of using women
likeappliances.Jongwhosaysher
own books valida te women'serotic
fantasies, says obscenity was
Miller's method, not his message.
"He used the obscene to shock and
toawaken,butonceweareawake,
he wants to take us to the stars
she writes. Millersaid the purpose
of his writing was self-emancipa-
tion.
Jong says Miller's best book is
not "Cancer" or other books a bou t
his Bohemian Paris days, but .he
Colossus of Maroussi a spiritual
travel book about Greece, in the
tradition of "Walden
feRjo
lecture by
mr. torn sokolowski
director
grey art gollery
new york university
friday april 2 1993
1 lam
Jenkins auditorium
school of art
east Carolina university
of
To feminists who say Miller is
a chauvinist, Jong admits it's true,
but that does not invalidate every-
thing Miller had to say.
While in Seattle on a tour to
promote the book, Jong said Miller
was a better talker than a writer.
Even as an old man who needed a
walker togetabouthishouse, when
he spoke, Miller "gave off heat like
a blazing fire
She says he wasa word-drunk
perbon, an artesian writer whose
stories overflow, someone worti.
noting before literature is over-
whelmed by virtual reality, and
more of an angel than a devil.
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APRIL 1. 1993
The East Carolinian
$
FILM
ally known African-American artists
John and James Biggers of Gastonia,
North Carolina. A reception will fol-
low the program.
The African-American Advisory
Board to the North Carolina Museum
of Art was created in 1992 to increase
the Museum's collection of art by Af-
rican-Americans and people of Afri-
can descent for the enjoyment, appre-
ciation, education, and inspiration of
all North Carolinians.
In addition, the board aims to
increase the participation of African-
Americans in all Museum activities
and programs.
Continued from page 7
The board currently has three re-
gional subcommittees: Raleigh
DurhamChapel Hill;Charlotte;and
Winston-SalemGreensboroHigh
Point. For more information, contact
Deborah Reid-Murphy,assistantout-
reach coordinator at the Museum, at
(919) 833-1935, ext 199.
Campus Paperback Bestsellers
The Autottoyaphy ol Malcolm X, wrr Ax Haley
(Battantine S5 99 The War leaders lite stcy
HINDU
2. Rising Sun. by Michae Cncrtion (BaBantine $5 99
A no holds-barred confhcr for control ot a vital American technology
3. The Firm, by John Gnsham (isiandtteu $599 i
Young lawyer confronts rhe htdden workings ol his firm
4. Jurassic PanV by Michaet Cnchton (BaHanhne.$5 99 j
A theme park's cloned dinosaurs are creating a world cnsa
5. The Pelican Brief, by John Gnsham (Defl $6.99 ; Law student
finds herselt on (he run trom kUers o two Supreme Court .ustces
6. Backlash, by Susan Fatudi (Anchor. $12 60) Powerful and
Inghtening look at the undeclared war against American women
7. A River Runs Through U. by Norman Maclean
(Unrv of Chicago Pess $9 95Stones of western Montana
B. Lrte's Little Instruction Book, by H Jackson Brown jr
(RuOedge Mill. $5 95 Advice for attaining a full Irf
9. All Around the Town, by Mary Htggms Clark (Pocket. $6 50 j
A college student is accused of kmg her protesso'
10. A Time to tOH. by John Gnsham jlsiand-Doli $5 99 (
Racial terwon nuns rwgh durmg a trial
New & Recommended
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view - the Western mind and spint as seen through the pivotal interac-
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JsjH by Tor. Marnsor. (Plume $10 00Set in Harlem m the 1920 s
the story captures the rhythms of the city and the brttersweet mood of
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Continued from page 7
academic minor for students.
TheWomen'sStudies Program,
which is sponsoring the second lec-
ture, is alsoan interdisciplinary pro-
gram that currently offers an un-
dergraduate and graduate minor
course of study.
Dr. Susan McCammon, direc-
tor of the program, said a new
course, focusing on the image of
God as woman in Hinduism, Bud-
dhism, and Taoism, is currently
being developed
"The lecture on this topic is an
excellentfirststep toward develop-
ing the syllabus for this course
McCammon said.
Information about Religious
Studies is available from Dr. Mer-
cer at 757-6121 or about Women's
Studies from Dr. McCammon at
757-6268.
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efc-i " MM�
��
The East Carolinian
Page 10
Sports
April I. 1993
Kushner embodies team concept for Bucs
ByWarren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
In every sucessful athletic or-
ganization, there is at least one
player who provides an important
level of consistency ever)' outing.
Often these athletes provide lead-
ership to the team and can be
counted on todrive their teammates
to success. They are the types of
contributers that every coach
dreams about and the that every
athletic program hates to let go. For
ECU baseball, the player is Lee
Kushner.
Kushner, a senior first-
baseman, has provided steady play
throughouthiscareer playing ECU
baseball. The Marlboro, N.J. native
batted .353 as a junior and led the
team in runs, RBls, doubles, home
runs and waJks. With this season's
386battingaverage,and vocal team
leadership, Kushner onceagain has
been one of this year's most reliable
Pirates. But despite the individual
success he has enjoyed thus far,
Kushnersaidheismorefocusedon
the team's success.
"Numbers and home runs and
things like that just come with per-
forming Kushner said. "I'm just
more concerned with doing the
things that are necessary to win. I'd
like to better my last year's totals
and I think that's a pretty good
goal, but I don't care who hits the
home runs, whether it's Pat
(Watkins) or Chris (West) or me
I don't care who hits them indi-
vidual records don't really excite
me
Kushner said he would like to
put himself in a position to be
drafted as a professional, but said
he would rather be there to pro-
vide the push that his team may
need for victory.
"If we need a bunt, I'd like to
hit the bunt, if we need a run I'd
like to be the one to hit that home
run Kushner said.
The Pirate star said that while
he is aware of the expectations
placed on him, as a senior, to per-
form on the field, he has decided
not to let those expectations cause
him undue stress.
"I made a deal with myself, at
the beginning of the year, to play
the season and to not look back
and say 'what if 1 had this game
over?' I'm just going to try and
play hard all the time and let things
fall where they may
Kushner said he is really en-
couraged abou t the way the team's
chemistry has developed and feels
that the lack of ego on the club has
contributed to the club's success.
"What'sreallygoodaboutthis
team is that there's no jealousy,
there's no 'I'm better than him' or
1 have to do it because my num-
bers are here
There's no egos on this team.
I'm thrilled to death with Pat, I
think he's doing a great job and I
hope he hits 30 home runs this
year
Kushner transferred his after
hissophomore year from Rice Uni-
versity in Houston, preferring
ECU's university atmosphere.
While he said he left the school on
good terms, Kushner said itwould
be a dream come true to meet his
former school later in the season.
"I hope they continue to do
well this year, I'd really like to play
them, maybe get bottom of the
ninth, two guys on, down by a run
and hitahomerto win the game off
one of my friends to win the game,
maybe to go to the college World
Series, that would really be the ul-
timate
Kushner said that the game of
baseball has provided him with
some of the greatest moments of
hislife.Kushner speaks pf the game
almostasa religon, with reverence
and patriotism.
"Baseball builds a common
bond between those who play it
he said. "It's really a way of
lifewhat could be more Ameri-
can than baseball? It's something
that everybody can relate toit's
something that is a very important
in my life
Kushner said he is maintain-
ing hopes of turning professional
after his playing career is over.
While he feels his hitting is ad-
equate for the next level, he said his
. , File Photo
Firstbaseman Lee Kushner has provided a steady glove and a tremendous bat for the Pirates since
transfering to ECU from Rice University in Houston, Texas.
major weakness is his speed. Like
many others in his position he ac-
cepts the possibil i ty that he wi II not
play professional ball,butonlyasks
for that "one shot
Kushner said that regardless
of whether he has a professional
career, he still plans to stay around
the game, either as a college coach
or possibly as a broadcast com-
mentator. He said that he seeshim-
self settled down in five years and
does not discount the possibility of
a family.
Kushner said that while he
would encourage baseball on a fu-
ture son, he would not push the
sport, instead supportinghischild's
interest.
"Ifmy son wanted tobeaballet
dancer, I would do every possible
thing Icoulddotomakesurehegot
the best training he could get to be
the best ballet dancer he could be
Baseball this week
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION BASEBALL STANDINGS
GeorgeMasonCAAPet.OverallPet.Horn AwayNeutralStreak
3 0I 00094.6926 12 310Lost 1
East Carolina5 183322775918 1 4 60cWon 3
UNC-Wilmington3 2.60012125009 6 3 600Lost 2
Old Dominion0 0.00016384212 1 2 022Won 6
Richmond0 0.0001 156888 2 3 300Won 2
JamesMadison0 3.000593572 13 800Lost 3, 1
William & r'Try0 5.0001075888 2 2 500Won 2
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION BATTING LEADERS
Batting AverageClassPos.GABHAVG.DOUBLESRUNS BATTED IN
Sean Casey, UR PAT WATKINS, ECUFR JR1B RF16 2955 9924 43436 434No. PlayarTaam 12 Corey Broome. UNCWGamaa 24No.PlayarTaamGamaa
34LEE KUSHNER. ECU29
Mark Baron, OOUSROF195723.4049 LEE KUSHNER, ECU S Rob Mummau. JMU29 IE31 28PAT WATKINS. ECU Geoff Easel I ODU29
Kevin Gibbs, ODUFROF1962254039 Sean Casey. UR1426Mike Ruberli, W&M18
Geoff Edsell, GMUJR1BP196827.39722Corey Broome, UNCW24
Lonnie Goldberg, GMUSR2B135321.396TRMJ317three players
Rob Mummau, JMUFRSS145622.393No. PlayerTeemGamaa
3 Kevin Gibbs. ODU19STOLEN BASES
John Dorman. URFRss16471H.383
Ryan Beard, OOUso3B195521.382HOME RUNSNo-PlayarTaamGamaa J
19Kevin Gibbs. ODU19 !
Turner Williams, ODU LEE KUSHNER, ECUSR SROF 1R18 2950 9519 35.380 .368No. PlayarTaamGame17 15Shawn Knight. W&M PAT WATKINS. ECU16 i 29
12 PAT WATKINS. ECU29
Mark Foster, URSRDH1652183467 LEC KUSHNER, ECU 6 Corey Broome, UNCW28 1614 10JAMIE BORE! . ECU Keith Bamhardt. UNCW29 j 24
Corey Broome, UNCWSRc249733.340
JAMIE BOREL, ECUJROF299933333
Shawn Knight, W&MJRIF166321.333
COLONIAL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION PITCHING LEADERS
Earned Run AverageClassWL IPRERERAWMS No. PlayarTaamwLNo.STRKEOUTS PlayerTeamGamaa
Anthony Eannacony, ODUFR2o 19310 47
Bobby Walker, GMUSR10 15210.57S LYLE HARTGROVE. ECU b147JOHNNY BECK. ECU52 !
Geoff Edsell, ODUJR3o 19331 405 Sean Hennessy. ODU5130MIKE SANBURN, ECU45.7 ,
Greg Whiteman, JMUSO12 24.7541.465 JOHNNY BECK. ECU 4 MIKE SANBURN5 42 ?29 26Keith Pettus, UNCW Greg Whiteman. JMU42.7 24.7
Sean Hennessy, ODUSRS1 41971.5326Brian Baucom. UNCW40
John Smith, ODUJR30 26.7751.69SAVES26Sean Hennessy, OOU41.3
David Fletcher, W&MSR00 21.7852.07No. PlayerTeamWL26LYLE HARTGROVE, ECU44.7
Keith Pettus, UNCWJR31 42 712m2 113 Heath Attman. UNCW1025RICHIE BLACKWEIL, ECU20.7
MIKE SANBURN, ECUJR42 45.714112.172 six players25 25Scott Foster. JMU John Smith. ODU21 26.7
JOHNNY BECK, ECUJR52 52.C17142.42
Women's soccer club
downs Seahawks, Tack
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Women's Soccer
team continued to build on its already
impressive record by winning two games
this past weekend. On Saturday, the Pi-
rates squared off against UNC-Wona rain-
soaked field. The Seahawks started strong
in the opening minutes, but as the first half
wore on, the Pirates began to take control.
Jennie Haines scored a goal off of a beauti-
ful assist from Kerri Griffiths to put ECU
up 1-0 and scored one more for the win,
2-0. The game was a physical one, and
ECU's tough team defense was led by out-
side fullback Courtney Bucka. The Pirates
remain undefeated in outdoor play at 3-0,
and at 13-4 overall.
On Sunday, the Wolfpack of N.C. Sta te
came into Pirate country to take on the
Women's Soccer Team, a trip that proved
to be hazardous. ECU started strong and
never let up. Just five minutes into the
match, winger Alison Russell was fouled
in the penalty area and ECU was awarded
a penalty kic1 Sophomore fcw�"��d Amy
Warren promptly tucked the ball into the
back of the net and first blood was drawn.
State came in without any substitute play-
ers,and EastCarolina tookfulladvantageof
that. As the game flowed up and down the
field, the Wolfpack players began to drag.
The depth and conditioningof ECU led toa
continuous attack at the NCSU goal area
Sophomore forward Jill Metzger led the
Pirate attack as she had her first career hat-
trick. Her first goal was assisted by Alison
Russell. Just eight minutes later, she scored
her second goal on a follow up shot of Kiki
Anderson's. At halftime, ECU led 3-0.
In the second half, theonslaughtcontin-
ued. Jennie Haines put the Pirates up 4-0
with 12 minutes gone. At the 27 minute
mark, something extremely rare happened.
ECU allowed a goal. Until that point, the
Pi ratedefense led byjuniorgoalkeeper Jaime
Pierce and her twin sister Joelle had not
allowed a single goal inan outdoor gameall
season. State had a free kick from 20 yards
out and crossed it in to Pirate territory where
it was headed past a diving Jaime Pierce.
Following thatgoaljill Metzger finished off
her day by headingan Amy Warren corner
kick in for a 5-1 lead. The game ended in
victory for the Pirates, and their record out-
doors is a perfect 4-0.Following the game,
coach Doug Silver commented, "This team
just continues to improve every game. The
level of dedication and effort that these play-
ers put ou t is tremendous and they deserve
all of the credit for the unbelievable success
that they have had so far this season
This Saturday, the Women's Soccer
Team travels to UNC-W for a scrimmage
game, a nd on Sunday, ECU wi 11 look to lock
up a spot in the league tournament with a
win against Fayetteville
Final Four
Tarheels hungry for
national championship
in New Orleans
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
George Lynch has that hungry look.
"I definitely see the spark in
George's eyes said Derrick Phelps,
the North Carolina point guard.
Brian Reese can feel it in his
bones, literally.
"It's just me and him Reese
said of North Carolina's practices
through the season and throughout
the NCAA tournament. "He gets to
the ball. He's got a feel of where it's
going to drop or whatever the case
maybe
"Now, I just let it hit the floor,
bounce and just make sure he's out
of the way Reese added. "And then
I get it. I don't try to get it off the
glass
Lynch is coming to the end of his
Tar Heel career, and he's stepped up
his game with the intent of bringing
home North Carolina's second na-
tional championship under Dean
Smith. The Tar Heels will be in the
opening semifinal game Saturday
against Kansas in New Orleans,
where they took Smith's first title 11
years ago.
Phelps said Lynch has become a
more emotional player in the last
several weeks.
"I think he's being more aggres-
sive Phelps said. "I know coach
gets on him a lot about boxing out
and getting rebounds. I think he takes
it to heart and just wants to improve
on it and just get every rebound out
there on the floor
Part of Lynch's motivation is the
fear of ending his career early.
" 1 think that this time of the game,
I have a lot more to lose than any
other player on the team said
Lynch, one of five seniors on coach
Dean Smith's ieam.
"I'm out there playing like each
time out is my last time out, which is
true he said. "During the NCAA,
I've been probably the one player
who most doesn't want practice to
stop I'mprobablyappreciatingprac-
tice at this point more than any other
player besides the rest of the seniors
See LYNCH page 12
Pigskin Pig-Out set for April 15-17
Sportshfbrmation Dept
East Carolina University
Tickets are now on sale for the
events included in the 10th anniver-
sary Great Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin
Pig-Out Party, to be held at ECU, April
15-17.
The feature attraction of the Pig-Out
is the annual spring football game at
Ficklen Stadium, beginning at 3 p.m. on
Saturday, April 17.
All tickets for the game are $3 at the
gate and $1.50 in advance.
Barbecue plates for game day will
be on sale for $3.50 in advance, $4 on
April 17.
The weekend gets started April 15
with thePig-OutClassicSocial and Auc-
tion, with the golf and tennis tourna-
ments starting the next mourning.
Friday night, the carnival and pig-
cooking contest begins with fireworks
and Black & Blue, a beach music band,
performing live.
The carnival opens again Saturday
morning with a craft show, dunking
booth, kiddie games, suntan-bikini con
test and autogra ph session with the 1993
ECU football team. Also, the Fat
Ammons Band will be performing be-
Flle Photo
The ECU football team's spring practice will culminate in the Purple Gold game
held as part of the annual Pigskin Pig-Out.
fore the start of the annual spring foot-
ball game.
ECU will also hold a "First down . .
. Pirates sound-alike contest. Pirate
fans will try to emulate ECU public ad-
dress announcer John Moore's popular
call during football girrH's. There will
also be a breakfast at the Hilton Inn
Saturday to honor FCU's scholar ath-
letes.
For tickets and more information,
call the ECU Atlili'lii Ticket Office at
757-4500 or toll free in North.irolin.i,
1-K0O-DIA1ECU.
l:
�4






APRIL 1, 1993
The Fast Carolinian
11
Hornets overpowered
by expansion rival
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) �
lna battleofNB A expansion rivals,
the Miami Heat looked like the
grownup kid against theCharlotte
Hornets.
The Heatposted the third-larg-
est margin of victory in franchise
history Tuesday night as Rony
Seikalv had 20 points and 15 re-
boundsina n69whippingof the
Hornets.
It was Charlotte's firth-con-
secutive loss and worst home de-
feat of the season.
"It was some night Heat
coach Kevin Loughery said. 'The
second half was unbelievable.
When you play defense that good
and shoot the lightsout, you'll win
games
The Heat have won 15 of their
last 21 games to pull within 25
gamesof the No.8playoff position.
Seikalv says the difference is
the return of point guard Steve
Smith from a knee injury that side-
lined hi m for !M garr. The Heat is
21-13 since Smith's return.
"We'd be playingfor the third
or fourth seed if we had had him
the whole way "Seikaly said. "The
key for us is winning on the road "
Miami is only 10-24 on the
road and plays six of its last 13
games away.
"It seems like we always win
here and they always win at our
place Seikaly said. "But if we're
going to be a playoff team we've
got to win our games whether
they're at home or away.
'The playoff pool is getting a
lot more interesting. We hope Or-
lando, Indiana and Charlotte will
keep slipping
Miami is 9-7 all-time against
the Hornets and 5-3 at the Char-
lotteColiseum. The teams finished
theseastmserie.deadlocked at2-2.
The Hornets two wins in their
last nine games came against Min-
nesota.
"If I had the answer, we'd be
winningrightno w Homersguard
Kendall Gill said. "If s still frustrat-
ing for us, especi ally when we had
gotten to the point where we were
winning games c consistently. Then
we turn around and go on a losing
streak Miami broke open a tight
game in the third quarter by
ourscoring the Hornets 33-17 to
pull ahead 90-68. The Heat forced
seven tumoversi n rheperiod while
committing just one.
Leading 57-53, Miami went
offonanl8-3run fueledbySeikaly's
eight points to go up 75-56 with
5:42 to play in the quarter. By the
end of thequarter, the Heathad six
players indouble figures.TheHor-
netshadtwo.
Alec Kessler gave the Heat
their largestlead of thegameatlll-
80 with a 20-foot jumper with 2:09
to play.
Glen Rice hadl9pointsforthe
Heatand Harold Miner added 18.
Alonzo Mourning led Charlotte
with 22.
Charlotte playseight of its last
12 gamesathome, whereitis 17-16.
TheHeatplaysevenoftheirlastD
athome.Miami is9-25ontheroad.
Neither teamledby more than
rburpointsinthefirquarter,whJch
ended with the Heat ahead 27-25.
The game was tied nifieti mes and
there were seven lead changes in
thequarter.
Michigan criticized for playground habits
ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) �
As the NCAA tournament's villain-
come-lately , Michigan is in a no-win
situation.
Michigan's five supremely tal-
ented sophomore starters are criti-
cized for their flamboyant style and
playground-bred habit of talking
trash.Butaftertoningdowntheiract
in the opening roundsof the tourna-
ment, the Wolverines were accused
of playing without emotion.
"Our kids have been criticized
for not playing with emotion, for
playing bored coach Steve Fisher
said. "Butwedon'tgyrateand point
fingers to taunt. We don't
Michigan (30-4) and Kentucky
(30-3) traveled opposite paths to their
matchup Saturday in the NCAA
semifinalsin New Orleans. Kentucky
blew out its four opponents by an
average 31 points. Michigan
trounced Coastal Carolina, but
struggled to beat UCLA, George
Washington and Temple.
Forward Ray Jackson
said high expectations and
a No. 1 seed in the West
cramped the Wolverines'
exuberant style.
"There was a lot of
pressure, and everyone
was really cautious he
said. "That's not how our
team plays. We were
worried about what ev-
eryone wassayingabout
us, and that got us down
and too cautious
Last Sunday's 77-72 win over
Temple in the West Regional final
took much of the pressure off the
Wolverines. But it also provided a
forum for the Wolverines' harshest
critic thus far, Temple coach John
ChaneyT will not comment
Chaney said when asked how
Michigan might fare against Ken-
tucky. "It might express a bigger
problem 1 have with Michigan
Later, Chaney said: "When 1
1993 NCAA seetauntingandallkindsof
gyrations, 1 don't like it. I
don't like coaches who al-
low it to happen
Fisher admitted his
team has battled an image
problem ever since the Fab
Five � Jackson, Juwan
Howardjalen Rose, Jimmy
King and Chris Webber �
� became a national phe-
?r � nomenon.
OR& "(Theimage)haskindof
come and gone Fisher said. "After
the Duke game (Dec. 5) it kind of
died off. Now, for whatever reason,
ithasre-emergedonanational level.
"I don'tneed todefend our kids.
I've had national people, as well as
officials, tell us our kids have been
terrific,inadditiontotheir30wins
You ask coaches in the Big Ten, 1
think eight, nine, maybe all 11 of
them would say positive things
about ourkids. Not about their abil-
ity, but about our kids
Ironically, it was Temple's
Chaney who was accused of mis-
conduct during Sunday's game.
Chaney was heard cursing Fisher
when the M ichigan coach screamed
for an intentional foul after Webber
was knocked to the floor on a drive.
"I don't think I have to defend
the behavior of our team Fisher
said. "1 do think 1 have to defend
their safety. In the last game there
were some blatant fouls that could
have affected that.
"It was a defini te thought pro-
cess or game plan for Temple not to
be intimidated. As a result of that, it
led to'Chris Webber maydrive,but
he's not going to get a good shot, I
don't care what I have to do
Chaney was called for a techni-
cal with 1:49 left and Michigan lead-
ing 67-62. An NCAA postgame re-
port said the technical was assessed
for profanity and unsportsmanlike
conduct. Chaney said hewastalking
to one of his players.
Gun control
Other teams
should copy
Denver's idea
(AP) � The Phoenix at Den-
ver basketball game on April 25
has been sold out for weeks, yet
anyonein theMileHigh City with
a Smith & Wesson lying around
the house can still get tickets. And
here's the real beauty of the
scheme:
It's legal.
That'sright. No fuss, no muss,
no need to threaten, intimidate or
hold anyone up.
As part of a program devel-
oped in meetings with a mayoral
task force, the NB A's Denver Nug-
gets are offering two tickets to the
Phoenix game, free parking, food,
a chance to meet young star
LaPhonso Ellis and an armload of
souvenirs � retail value, about
$130 � to anyone who turns in a
gun (of any Kind) at one of four
Denver churches on April 18.
So long as it's unloaded and
in working condition,simply drop
it in a box and take home a pair of
ducats to see Charles Barkley come
to town. No age limit. No ques-
tions asked.
"Sure, a lot of people are skep-
tical team spokesman Jay Clark
said, "and we're not naive enough
to think a drug dealer is going to
rush down and hand over an auto-
matic weapon for N uggets tickets.
"I'll put it another way: We
held back 500 seats for the pro-
gram, but realistically, we don't
expect to get anywhere near that
number of weapons turned in
"But realistically Clark
added, "the best thing we're hop-
ing for is to get people talking
about it
The really scary thing is that
the Nuggets might be selling the
idea short. Try out the same sce-
nario in, say Chicago, where there
were a near-record 925 homicides
recorded the same year, and where
the Bullshavesold outevery home
game since the middle of Michael
Jordan's second season. And say
the opponent is New York and the
game is the seventh game of the
Eastern Conference finals. And say
the pair of seats are at courtside.
The fact is, a team in that posi-
tion with that offer could ask for
anarsenal�and almost certainly
get it. But it's not likely to happen
anytime soon.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is advertising account executives
currently accepting
resumes for the
following positions:
This job entails prospecting new clients, selling
creative advertising campaigns and
supporting advertising clients. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. No previous sales
experience is required but is helpful. Open to
all majors.
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed
advertisements using sound design principles
including; contrast and focal point. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of
Macintosh applications; PageMaker, Freehand,
QuarkXPress, and image scanning. Open to all
majors.
riMTSirc
ECU Biology Club
THURSDAY, APRIL 1
FRIDAY, APRIL 2
7:30 am -1:00 pm
at the Biology Greenhouse
RoomS-111
Singles M ,
" soundtrack
CASSETTE C D
NOW OPEN
TIL MIDNITE
7 DAYS A WEEK
TRADE FOR CASH
CDs
Nintendo
We NOW Buy & Super Nintendo
Sell Used Sega Genesis
IM 1109 Charles St
758-4251
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails creating computer designed layout tor all
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Reauirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker. Freehand, QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to ail majors.
ASSISTANT LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails working with the Layout Manager creating
computer designed layout for the Opinion and Classifieds
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker. Freehand. QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
This job requires working knowledge of 35mm camera and
darkroom operations and will work with a staff of
photographers to supply the photo needs of various
media. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Work well with
other staff members and meet deadlines. Open to all
majors.
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
The chief duties are to create or oversee the creation of
artwork using both traditional and computer-generated
artwork to compliment the newspaper text and
advertising. Also, supervise the comics section. Minimum
2.0 G.P.A. Knowledge of Macintosh applications,
illustration, design and cartooning. Open to all majors.
BUSINESS MANAGER
This position is responsible for administering the
newspaper's funds available by controlling all requisitions
for purchases and analyzing financial data for the
Advertising Director and General Manager. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of marketing,
management, finance and economics and experience
using Excel. Open to all majors.
App'y at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the
Student Pubs building � 757-6366
THE FIRST ANNUAL
ECU STUDENT
CAR SHOW
IS GOING TO HAPPEN
IT'S BEEN
MOVED TO
SATURDAY,
APRIL 3
IN THE COMMUTER LOT AT
THE BOTTOM OF THE HILL
ITS NOT TOO
LATE TO ENTER!
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL 757-6935
OR COME BY
THE AYCOCK HALL OFFICE
�WMWMMNMMMMi
�iiiiEniiii" ��iiMHW-P





12
The East Carolinian
APRIL 1, 1993
Roseboro finishing career
runner down the home stretch
By Ricky Chann
Staff Writer
During her track career at ECU,
CtanitaRoserxjrohassprintedtornanv
victories. This past weekend she won
the 100m dash at the Raleigh Relays
and last season she was CA A cham-
pion in the 100m and 2(X)m dashes.
Shereoognizes these three raoesas the
highlights of her track career, to this
point She has also set school indoor
records in the 55m and 200m dashes
this season.
Roseboro, a senior marketing
major from Winston-Salem, has set
lofty goalsfor final seasonatECU.She
would like to qualify for nationals in
the 200m dash and repeat as ctWer-
ence champion in both events. The
combination of the indoor and out-
door track seasons will have her com-
peting from early January to the end
of May.
Roseboro has had three differ-
ent coaches in the four years she has
been at ECU. Her coach for the past
two seasons has been Charlie J ustice,
whomRoseborodescribesas the first
coach to emphasize team unity.
"Danita has been, without a
doubt, the key to what success (the
team) has had in the past year and a
half said justice. Justice also said
Roseboro has set an attitude or image
for the team. Her success, he said, has
shown girls team that they can aim-
pete against programs like George
Mason, Chapel Hill, and Seton Hall.
Her first coach at ECU was a
stressed individu
aJismasthemoti
vating factor. She
u
ZXtZX been, without a
Athletic AdvisoryCouncil forthepast
twoyearsas the woman's track repre-
sentative. This year she is serving as
thecouncirsvice-president. Roseboro
describes the SAAC as an organiza-
tion made up of representatives from
each sport that serves as the ECU
athletic voice in the
Danita haS community and
,f - riii within theathleticde-
partment.
Roseboro savs
manvearbutsays dOUht, the keV tO sheenjoystheathletic
program at ECU be-
cause, "they have al-
ways stressed aca-
demics over athletics,
but have im-
proved a lot over
the years She
says this shows
that the people in
the athletic pro-
gram care about
their athletes which has made her ca-
reer that much better.
After this season is complete and
snehasgraduated,Roseborohopes to
be able to look back upon her ECU'
track career as a very successful one.
She should beable to use her competi-
tive drive and winning attitude to
achieve continued success.
LYNCH
that Justices
aiachingstylehas
madeherstronger
than she has ever
been. She is hop-
ing to use this
what success
(the team) has
had in the past
t Y�r and a half.
Charlie Justice,

fastest timesofher
career this spring.
After graduating in May,
Roseboro would like to get a job in
sales in the Winston-Salem area. She
also aspires to return to school and
receive her MBA at either Appala-
chian State or UNC-Greensboro. De-
scribing herself as shy and quiet, but
outspoken at times, Roseboro is in-
volved in other extra curricularacti vi-
ties on campus.
She has served on the Student
ECU track oach
Lynch is going into his 16th
NCAA game.
He's averaging 12.1 points
and 7.9 rebounds per game in
national postseason play, and
did his best work over the last
weekend.
The 6-foot-7 forward scored
23 points in the East Regional
semifinal against Arkansas, then
grabbed 14 reboundsand nearly
hit the game-winning basket
against Cincinnati.
In this year's tournament,
Lynch isaveraging22 pointsand
9.8 rebounds per game.
The pace put him on the all-
East Regional team, but he's not
resting. Smith commented dur-
ing a news conference how his
players seem less willing to raise
their clinched fist, the North
Carolina sign indicating that a
player is tired and needs to come
out.
"I think each player is play-
ing just as hard so 1 don't have to
play as hard each time down the
floor where I've had a chance to
rest on defense because other
guys are getting the job done
Lynch said.
"And other guys have
stepped it up offensively, which
has made things easier for me
coming into the game so I don't
have to give the tired signal as
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Continued from page 10
much more enthusiastic and more in-
Lynch is showing a lot more tense hecause l want my career to
emotion as well continue he says.
It's part of the drive for an- "If it takes me talking more
other championship. on the court, I'm going to talk as
"During the game, I've been much as possible
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 1, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 01, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.934
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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