The East Carolinian, March 30, 1993






Lifestyle
Shape up!
. famttimmmmm � ������
ECU will hold its Annual Health and
Wellness Fair on Thursday April 1.
See Story page 7.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 20
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, March 30,1993
12 Pages
Elections Elections SGA Elections '93 Elections Elections
Candidate for President:
Candidates for Vice President:
Keith Dyer
Keith Dyer, a junior political
science major and current SGA
vice president, cites internal im-
provement as the most important
issueforSGAnextyear. He said he
would like to focus on increasing
attendance, raising student in-
volvement and solving meeting-
related problems.
"If we can work on SGA in-
ternallv, then we can move out-
ward Dyer said. "We need to
begin improvements on the inside
of the organization
As president, Dyer would
like to create a cabinet consisting
of 15 new positions such as a secre-
tary to community and city rela-
tions and a secretary to minority
affairs. He has already begun an
SGA minority task force and has
assisted in
ABLE and
ing with di
Dyer
SGA since
years ago
experience
negotiations between
downtown bars deal-
scrimination.
has been involved in
he entered ECU three
and said he feels his
speaksfor itself. He has
served as freshman class president,
as a legislator and has worked on
the Screenings and Appointments
,ind Programming Committees.
I his year, Dyer has also served as
Inter-Fraternity Council secretary.
"I understand the politics
and administration of this univer-
sity and have a great relationship
with city officials he said. "I can
do this job and I think 1 can do it
vell
Dyer has also begun work-
ingon thecreationof an SGA news-
letter that would keep students
informed about current SGA leg-
islation and events.
Dyer has also worked with
the city of Greenville on Hallow-
een negotiations and saidhewould
li'ke to continue doing so.
Candidate for Treasurer:
Rich Paravella
Rich Paravella, a junior mar-
keting major, said his previous
SGA work as appropriationscom-
mittee chair will make him an ef-
fective treasurer. Hehasserved on
SGA for three years and currently
holds the position of junior class
president.
"I'veworked closely with the
current treasurer and he's shown
me what todoand whatnot todo
he said. "I feel that I'm easily well-
qualified for this position. I'vebeen
working for this for a while now
In order to facilitate the SGA's
annual funding, Paravella said he
would like to create a mailing list
of all of the SGA funded-groups'
officers. Then, he said the direct
contact with the officers would
assist in the process.
Paravella said he would also
like to continue his opposition of
the changein thedropadd policy.
"We're going to attack that
with a vigor he said. "It's really
pathetic that it went through as
easily as it did. We need to con-
tinue to attack the policy as an
e ecutive council
Paravella said he is also con-
ce rned about student apathy and
would like to see more student
be come involved in SGA. "I've al-
ways pushed student involve-
ment he said. "If I see someone
on campus, I always talk about
SGA and encourage them to get
involved
He said this apathy is mir-
rored in the low number of people
running for office in this election
and he "would have really liked to
see competition
Paravella isalsoa member of
Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity and
has served onvariousFacultySen-
ate Committees.
Rick Erazo
Rick Erazo said his past ex-
perience inside and outside of
SGA makes him a well-qualified
cand idate for SGA vice-president.
He iscurrently president of Sigma
Phi Epsilon fraternity and has
worked on SGA's Rulesanu Judi-
dary and Appropriations Com-
mittees.
"I'm a proven leader and I
know a lot of people in various
organizations he said. "I can pull
people together and make things
happen. I think I'm a well-
rounded person
Erazo, a junior economics
major, has also served as Alumni
Operations Director for Sig Ep,
has coordinated Rush events,
orked on the Customs Board
and has been an Inter-Fratemity
Council representative. He said
he would like to shift his focus by
becoming more involved with
SGA.
"For the past few years, I've
been concentrating on my frater-
nity he said. "I want to start
making a difference here on cam-
pus. 1 want to take a step up
Erazo has several issues on
which he wants to concentrate as
vice president, including campus
safety and the dropadd policy.
He said he would like to increase
security on the 5th Street area of
campus by adding more lights
and emergency phones.
He said he would also focus
on keeping the dropadd policy
the way it is currently. Although
the policy has already been re-
duced to allow a six week drop
period, he said he wants to make
sure the students' views are accu-
rately represented in the future.
Also, Erazo would like to
create a pamphlet for student or-
ganizations which would outline
how to write a constitution for
submission to SGA and how to go
about receiving funds from SGA.
"There's a lot of confusion
out here he said. "The average
student doesn't know about this
and a pamphlet would really in-
crease awareness Erazo also be-
lieves that evaluation results and
past grade ranges for professors
should be made available to stu-
dents in the class schedule book,
in addition to their names. He
said regardless of whether he is
elected, he would like to see these
things carried through.
"I want to be able to be there
and make things happen he said.
I want to be heard. I want to make
a difference now
Candidate for Secretary:
Michael Carries
Michael Carnes,currentSG A
speaker of the house, said since the
speaker and secretary work to-
gether dosely, he would be a valu-
able asset to the new speaker and to
the group as a whole. Cames said
his extensive knowledge of SGA
parliamentary procedure provides
him with experience for the posi-
tion of secretary.
"I feel that I've proven my-
self as far as leadership and service
goes he said. "And I'm not the
type of person thatcan sitbackand
watch thingshappen. Indefinitely
a group effort to represent the stu-
dents' interests
Cames, a junior marketing
ma jor,hasbeen involved with SGA
for two years. He has worked on
the Rules and Judidary Commit-
tee, the Fine Arts Funding Board,
the Faculty Senate in Readmissions
Appeals and on the SGA Transit
Board.
Cames said some of the issues
heisconcemed witharecampusfire
safety and student awareness. He
said he would like to make sure that
students know about SGA happen-
ings.
"I think it'simportantthat stu-
dent, know what's going on he
said. "SGA needs to make sure in-
form ition is available and that word
gets i ut to everyone. This is some-
thing we need to address
Cames is also Spedal Events
and ProjectsCoordina tor for his fra-
ternity, Pi Kappa Alpha, and will be
a leader during freshman orienta-
tion tfiis summer.
He said he is impressed with
thegrnupofpeoplerunningforSGA
executive offices this year and feels
they vill work well together.
I think next year is going to be
a grea t one he said. "We'll all be a
great asset in making sure the stu-
dents are fairly and accurately rep-
resent! :i
Troy Dreyfus
Troy Dreyfus, a senior art
major, said that asSG A vice presi-
dent, he would focus on the drop
add period controversy and trans-
portation issues. He has been on
SGA for three years and said he
his experience and dedication
would make him a valuable
leader.
"My experience speaks for
itself Dreyfus said. "I know that
I can get the job done � I've done
it in the past and I'd like to do it in
the future
Dreyfus has worked as a leg-
islator, sophomore class president,
co-chair of the screenings com-
mittee, SGA chief of staff, junior
class vice-president, chair of the
studentwelfarecommitteeand on
the Fine Arts Funding Board.
He sponsored an SGA reso-
lution against the reduction of the
dropadd period and organized
a student petition against the
change. He also sponsored a reso-
lution in opposition of the state
university tuition increase and one
representing WZMB radio
station's sponsorship of down-
town events. Dreyfus said he has
been involved "in practically ev-
erything that has come through"
SGA.
Dreyfuswould liketowork-
ing on the creation of the Pirate
CART (Campus Area Rapid
Transport), to be implemented in
conjunction with the already-ex-
isting Pirate Ride. He said with
the CART system, which will use
golf carts, students will be able to
call for night transportation and
receive a quick response.
Dreyfus said his main goals
as vice president would be to con-
tinue to represent the students
and to serve as a "watchdog" for
them, mak'ng sure they are fairly
represented. He said he would
also like to see the drop period
returned to the way it was before
the reduction.
"I feel it's really unfair to
students of ECU to limit them in
dropping he said. "I feel they
should be able to drop if they're
not doing well Dreyfus is also a
sportscaster at WZMB, a found-
ing member and treasurer of his
fraternity, Kappa Delta Rho, vice
president of the Student Pirate
Club and a member of the ECU
orientation program staff.
"It would be a great honor
to be elected he said. "I know I
have the most experience and I
know I wouldn't let the students
of ECU down
Chancellor hopes for university
improvements through fundraising
�All SGA profiles written by Jennifer Wardrep, Staff Writer
VOTE!
The SGA elections will be held
Wednesday, March 31, at various
locations around campus. Students must
present a valid ECU ID card between 9
a.m. and 6 p.m. to vote.
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
ECU recently set into
motion a plan to raise $50
million from private donors
to fund new student scholar-
ships, to make improvements
to academic programs and to
renovate and expand facili-
ties.
The administration held
a campaign kickoff presenta-
tion Saturday night, March
20, complete with live enter-
tainment from a star-studdd
cast. Chancellor Richard
Eakin unveiled his plan,
"Shared Visions, The Cam-
paign for East Carolina Uni-
versity "
"This campaign is the
most ambitious ever under-
taken at East Carolina
Eakin said. "Our ultimate
goal is to be the best that we
can be, whether in teaching
Photo by Tony Rumple
The addition of 12,000 seats in Ficklen Stadium is one of the additions
to be included in the "Shared Visions" campaign.
or learning, in the humanities,
in the performing and visual
arts, in scientific research, in
medicine or in athletics
Eakin chose to introduce
the fundraising campaign at the
ECU Chancellor's Society
Weekend, an annual event held
for the institution's most gen-
erous supporters. The event
See FUNDRAISER page 4
�!





2 The East Carolinian
MARCH 30, 1993
Students develop potential through leadership program
Condom lady sings about safe sex
"When you take off your pants, like my mama sayDon't
forget the price you have to pay crooned the grandmotherly
woman as she strummed her guitar in the lobby of the Student
Health Center at Ohio State University. Meet Jane the Condom
Lady A familiar figure on theOSU campus, the 50 somethingjane
Scott belts out prophylactic tunes and passes out condoms in a
one-woman crusade to promote safe sex and raise AIDS aware-
ness on campus. Scott says the packages get people to talk about
condom use. For instance, one package has a tiny gun glued to it
with a card that reads, "Cover me, I'm going in Another Hallow-
een special features a small orange pumpkin affixed to the pack-
age with a card that reads, "Don't get tricked � Use your treat
For Valentines Day, Scott added a tiny red heart and a card that
reads, "I have a heart-on for you
Students explore physical barriers
A program at North Carolina State University teaches archi-
tecture students to become more sensitive to the needs of handi-
capped persons by switching places with people who are blind,
deaf or confined to wheelchairs. "The Sight, Sound and Motion
Workshop which was attended in February by 62 students from
the Department of Design, allowed aspiring designers on the
Raleigh campus to experience life with vision, hearing or move-
ment impairments. "Many come out of the workshop passionate
advocates of universal design said John Tector, the architectural
professor who founded the program. Tector said students also
discuss design ideas and styles that would make buildings more
accessible to the handicapped.
Schools engage in blood feud
Rivalry between Temple University and Penn State was
notched up a bit in February when the Temple Owls beat the
Nittany Lions of Penn State in a month-long blood donor compe-
tition. This is the second year two universities have squared off in
the Lifesaver Cup. The trophy will be moved from Penn State in
University Park, Pa to Temple in Philadelphia. The Nittany Lions
won the first round in 1992. "I though it would be fun for students
to set up a competition for blood collection said Andrea Dunn,
college recruitment specialist with the Red Cross for the Penn-
Jersey region. "Blood collection is a serious thing, but it's good to
have fun at the same time Blood banks in the Philadelphia area
had 67 units of 0-positive blood on hand in February, when the
normal goal is to have 1,600 units.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
A group designed to provide
programs that will encourage stu-
dents to develop their leadership
potential is now available to all
ECU students. The group L.E.A.D.
(Leaders Educating and Develop-
ing), is comprised of 11 leaders
from various organizations.
"Our main purpose is to pro-
videeducation of leadership skills
to others said David Davis, assis-
tant director of L.E.A.D.
L.E.A.D. encourages people
with minimal leadership back-
grounds to become involved. "We
want people that are not only lead-
ers, but also people with any lead-
ership potential said Susan
Howell, L.E.A.D. director. "We
wanttohelppeopleemergeas lead-
ers
The advisors of the group,
Joe Boehman and Lisa Shibley,
agree that the group isdesigned to
be a leadership opportunity, not a
consultant team. "L.E.A.D. is an
opportunity for students with lead-
ership experience to give back to
fellow students said Shibley, who
isalso the Director of Student Lead-
ership Development Programs.
While it is necessary to have
some leadership background to be-
come a member, the programs will
be available to all students. "Pro-
grams that L.E.A.D. will offer will
be available to all students either
through student organizations or
open workshops Shibley said.
To be eligible to become a
member, you must be enrolled in
school at ECU and in good aca-
demic and social standing with the
university. Also, you must have at
least one year's experience in a reg-
istered ECU student organization.
Transfer and freshmen students are
also eligible on the basis that they
were involved in an organization
in the school which they came from.
"It will look great on a re-
sume to haveleamed how tocreate
and promote programs Howell
said. "L.E.A.D. will give me expe-
rience working with groups and
people relations which will help
me adapt to others. I have gained
personal leadership skills as well
as responsibility Davis said.
"Most importantly, I have learned
that fairness in the group is neces-
sary
Programs that L.E.A.D. is
working on for the future are bet-
tering communication skills, lead-
ership styles, power vs. authority
and leadership qualities and analy-
ses.
"Hopefully, in the long run,
L.E.A.D. will create additional op-
portunities to students on campus
Shibley said. Applications areavail-
able in 109 Mendenhall. Alongwith
theapplication, students must sub-
mit a resume and two references.
The deadline for applications is
Friday, April 2.
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MARCH 30, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
ECU College Bowl team excels in Knoxville n
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
ECU was well represented in
several events at the 1993 regional
tournaments of the Association of
College Unions-International in
Knoxville, Term recently.
The Association combines
several leagues of school s from the
Carolinas, Virginia, Tennessee and
Kentucky to compete in events such
asCollege Bowl, billiards, table ten-
nis, chess and bowling.
The ECU College Bowl Var-
sity team was successful in their
tournament, finishing third behind
regional champion Virginia, and
runner-up Vanderbilt.
The team defeated Clemson,
Vanderbilt, N.C. State, UNC-
Chapel Hill and Kentucky before
losing to Vanderbilt in the final
round.
This past weekend the team
traveled to Virginia to compete in
the Wahoo War of the Minds. After
beating Penn State, the team was
knocked out in the second round.
Members of the Varsity
squad include Bryan Collins of
Maidstone, Kent, Great Britain;
John Congleton of Ayden; Brian
Hall of Charlotte, Robert Joyner of
Nashville, Tenn and Dana
Monson of Greenville.
Lynn Jobes, of the ECU De-
partment of University Unionsand
the advisorcoach of the team, de-
scribed the College Bowl format.
"Two teams of three to four play-
ers buzz in to answer 10-point toss-
up questions. If the team answers
correctly, they get a bonus ques-
tion worth 15 to 30 points. A match
lasts for two seven-minute halves
The ECU recreational bowl-
ing team was equally successful in
their tournament, winning first
place as a team and capturing sev-
eral individual awards as well.
The bowling teamconsists of
Chicora Martin of Virginia Beach,
Ray Chilcote of Washington, Will-
iam Whittington of Kinston and
Lynnae Jewell of Wilson.
Jewell won first place in the
Women's All-Events, and the
Women's Singles.
Gregory Scher of Newport
won third place in the nine-pin and
Keith Webb of Moyock won first
place in the Men's All-Events and
the Men's Singles.
In addition to the College
Bowl and bowling teams, ECU was
also represented in the men's and
women's billiards, the men's table
tennis and the men's chess tourna-
ments.
Jobes said that the teams were
composed of the winners of tour-
naments held earlier on campus.
"The College Bowl was held
last fall and we took the team that
won plus the best players from the
other teams to create a varsity
team
"The Campus Co-Rec Bowl-
ing tournament and the other tour-
naments were held in January. We
took the top male and female
bowlers and then made a team
Jobes said.
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" "
4 The East Carolinian
MARCH 30, 1993
Did you know
The Student Govern-
ment Association helps
make rules and decisions
that affect every ECU stu-
dent, and all of their meet-
ings are open to the EN-
TIRE student body.
AND
All of their meetings
are open to the entire stu-
dent body.
Don't sit on
the sidelines
and complain,
GET
INVOLVED,
and vote!
FUNDRAISER
Continued from page 1
was highlighted by a multi-
screen video production detail-
ing the plan.
Headlining the entertain-
ment program was Maureen
O'Boyle, an ECU alumnus and
the anchor of the television show
'A Current Affair To disclose
information about the cam-
paign, O'Boyle used a parody of
her show.
The public phase of the
capital campaign runs through
1995. ECU supporters have al-
ready pledged more than $25
million toward the goal.
"No university can become
truly distinctive without private
support Eakin said. "Public tax
dollars have made East Caro-
lina University a good univer-
sity. Enough private dollarscan
make it a great university
The three foundations of
the university, the ECU Foun-
dation, the ECU Educational
Foundation (Pirate Club) and
the Medical Foundation are col-
laborating for the first time in
the fundraising effort.
Almost half of the money
raised in the campaign will go
toward endowments to support
academic scholarships, gradu-
ate fellowships, teaching en-
hancements, initiatives to im-
prove public schools and pro-
fessorships. Other projects in-
clude a Center for International
Studies and an endowment for
the Visual and Performing Arts.
The university also hopes
to expand Ficklen Stadium to
48,000 seats and renovate
Minges Coliseum into an 8,000
seat arena. Campus beautifica-
tion projects and additions to
Joyner Library and to the can-
cer, diabetes and alcohol and
drug abuse centers are also
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INTF.RFRATERNITY
COUNCIL
Council Representative
SGA Vice President
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
President
Alumni Operations Director
Effective Leadership Working for You! �ZT;cw"r"
ftftflaaftfraaftftfl-afrfrft Rush coo
ELECTION DAY: WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31st � Don't Forget Your Student I.D.
ECU'S
STUDENT
UNION IS
STUDENT UNION
HAPPENINGS
MOVIES I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
ECU'S
STUDENT
UNION IS
1 Nothing $, is as dangerous �� s as the past.
MpMIWifW
jfTLs jl
Mj gj
U ' f2H12SL Mr'H
SUN, APRIL 4
DENZEL WASHINGTON
'Malcolm X'
itr
THUR, FRI, & SAT, APRIL 1,2, & 3
FORUM TONIGHT
ECU'S
STUDENT
UNION IS
FAMILIES & HEALTH
A CHALLENGE FOR OUR NATION
DR. MARK GINSBERG
TUES, MARCH 30, 8 PM
GREAT ROOM, MSC ECU's
STUDENT
UNION IS
For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
planned.
"The Shared Visions cam-
paign will allow us to make im-
provements that will make ECU
a better university' Eakin said.
"It will afford us the means to
move East Carolina University
into the ranks of the truly great
institutions�those which trans-
form lives with the discovery
and applications of new knowl-
edge and technology and pro-
vide additional and better edu-
cational opportunities
CHEAP! FBIU.S. SEIZED
89 MERCEDES$200
86 VW$50
87 MERCEDES$50
65 MUSTANG$50
Choose from thousands
starting at $50.
FREE Inlbrmation-24 Hour
Hotline. 801-379-2929
FAST FREE DELIVERY
$5. OO Minimum For Delivery
OR
10 MINUTE PICK-UP
$
$
88
Get A Small
Cheese Pizza
or Small Pokey Stix
with any purchase at our
already low coupon prices.
Additional items 50a; each.
GUMBY MADNESS
NCAA TOURNAMENT SPECIALS
BUZZER BEATER
14" pizza, one item,
two sodas
$6.26
THREE POINTER
Medium Pokey Stix,
two sodas
$6.19
GUMBY CHARGE
12" pizza, one item,
soda
$5.28
SLAM DUNK
20" unlimited item pizza
$13.49
TIME OUT
16" pizza, two items
$7.78

SWEET 16
2 large pizzas, one item,
16 slices
$10.00
PERSONAL FOUL
2-10" pizzas, one item,
$6.88
BOUNCE PASS
12" pizza, two items,
two sodas
$6.50
HALFTIME SNACK
16" pizza, one item,
two sodas
$7.36
DOUBLE DRIBBLE
2-14" pizzas, two items, I
four sodas
$12.88
WE ACCEPT
CHECKS
Offers May Expire Without Notice
Prices Do Not Include Sales Tax
321-GUM-B
VISA
HOURS
ISUN-THURS:
1:00AM-1:30AMi
Located next to Blockbuster Video 11 :0q am-2:30 am I
315 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
ATiTlC
752-7303
5th St
Every
Wednesday
lie
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CZONE
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
Live Music"
1987 1988 1989 1990 � 1991 �1992
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
$1.00 DISCOUNT ADMISSION with GREEK 1.0.
Wednesday - Saturday
Wednesday, March 31
�The
CoMedY
DAVE HEENANT & A. BRUCE
$1.50 HIGHBALLS & $1.50 TALL BOYS
Thursday, April 1
GIBB DROLL BAND
Guitar Legend In The Making
990 Highballs � 990 32 oz. Draft � 990 Memberships
Friday, April 2
3 -��-� i'
$2.00 32 oz DRAFT
Saturday, April 3
THE EVERYTHING
SPECIAL GUEST
W-NOT
$2.00 32 oz DRAFT
COMING Tuesday, April 13

i





TheEastCarolinian
March 30, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
SINGLEROOMSFORRENTfbrsum-
mersessions.S250pers.s. includes rent,
utilities, and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE this
summer. One room efficiency apart-
mentatRinggoldTowers. $260month
Call Dennis at 757-0905.
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT in
Tar River. Available Mid-May! Just in
timeforsummerschoolllfsignleasein
April you get 1 2 OFF JUNE AND
JULY'S RENT! New appliances and
carpet. Normal rent $460.00 Deposit
required. If interested call 830-1791.
SUBLEASEaonebedroom apartment
for the summer months (Approxi-
mately May thru August.) CLEAN and
EFFICIENT! Cal 752-9120 today.
SUBLEASE - SUMMER ONLY Fe-
male Nonsmoker. Private bedroom,
furnished. NearECU. $162.50month
plusl2utilities.Call32M904orleave
message.
LOOKING FOR A NEW PLACE?
Don't wait till Fall! We have hundreds
of vacancies for May through August,
within walking distance and access to
the ECU busline. Let us help, call 752-
1375. Home Locators fee ($55).
SUBLEASE HOUSE FOR SUMMER
3tedroom, 2 bath, washer-dryer, A C,
partially furnished. 1 block from cam-
pus $530 Mo. Call 752-8526.
EFFICIENCY FOR RENT. Available
May 15. Ringgold Towers. $260
month. Laundry, mailroom, security,
private parking included. Call ASAP
830-1969 for Lauren.
SUMMER APARTMENT 1 bedroom,
fuUyfumished, Air Cond1 block from
campus, Scottish Manor, sublease
$290mth. Call 752-6130.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
UNIQUE SITU ATION FOR FEMALE
ROOMMATE. Full house privileges,
unfurnished room, adjoiningbath, pri-
vate entrance, smoker ok small pet
o.k. 1 3 utilities, Winterville area. Call
after 5pm 756-5467.
ROOMMATE wanted: Must be re-
sponsible and mature. 1 2 mile from
campus, ECU bus. CALL: 752-1538,
leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share two bed room Apt. Non-smoker,
responsible, and neat. $200mo. Rent
and 1 2 util. Needed the end of April.
Call 830-0443, ask for Heather.
M OR F ROOMMATE WANTED:
Moving to New York City; looking for
responsible person to split rent and
util Greenwich Village area. Moving
May 12 call 830-8868.
WANTED: FEMALE ROOMMATE
to share two bedroom apartment
$150.00 per month 12 utilities fur-
nished except bedroom must be able to
tolerate cats. Leave message. Cheryl
758-6925.
ANYONE LOOKING for a fall semes-
ter Roommate please call Holly - 931-
8802.
ROOMMATES Wanted for summer
andor fall. 3 bdrm. house, 1 block
from campus;low utilities, a c, wa sher
and dryer. Call Stephanie at 752-2560.
ONEFEMALEROOMMATEneeded
to share a fully furnished condo in
Nags Head this summer. Rent is $250.00
per month. For more information please
call 931-9333.
TWO FEMALE ROOMMATES
needed to share rent in Wildwood Vil-
las Apartments. Each person pays
$127.00 and 1 5 or utilities. For infor-
mation call 931-9333.
FEMALEROOMMATEMaythrough
August; large furnished apartment;
Rent negotiable. CALL Dawn at 756-
5134.
URGENT! FEMALE ROOMMATE
wanted to share 2 bedroom apartment
in Tar River. Move in on May 3. Must
be responsible, social drinker, and have
a good sense of humor Call Melissa
931-8505 or Mia 931-8519.
CHEAP! FBIUS SEIZED: 89 Mer-
cedes -200,86 VW - $50,87 Mercedes
- $100,65 Mustang - $5. Choose form
thousands starting $50. FREE Informa-
tion 24 hour hotline 801 -379-2929 copy-
right NC 030610.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DE A. Available your area
now. Call 1-800436-4363 ext. C-5999.
YUMMY GIRL SCOUT COOKIES
for sale! Call 7 to midnight 931-7959
before April 1st. Campus Girl Scouts
thank you!
DEN FURNITURE for sale. One sofa,
one recliner, 3 endtables and 1 coffee
table. Call for details: 830-1978.
DODGE CHARGER 1986, $1500, In-
cludes AC,heat,AMFMradio,cruise
control and power steering. Call 752-
0659.
MOTORCYCLEHELMET-Blackfull-
facedFulmerhelmetwairvents. Brand
new, only worn 4 times, x-large. paid
$105 for it new 2 wks. ago, asking $75.
931-7216 and lv. message.
3 PIECE ANTIQUE Bedroom suite w
mattress and box spring. $450.00 neg.
call 830-8868.
SCHWINN CROSSCUT.Hybrid -fast
like road bile - sturdy like mountain
bike. Red, men's 21" - all accessories
included: seat leash, toe clips, com-
puter and more. Paid $500 - will sacri-
fice for $250! Shimano 400XL compo-
nents. Call me - 752-9618.
COIN OPERATED DRINK MA-
CHINE. Holds up to 80 bottles. 500.00
O.B.O. Call 830-8887.
HOME STEREO EQUIPMENT.
Denon 200 Watt Amp & Yamaha Pre-
amp. Mint Condition. Retails at $750.
Asking $550OBO. Mustsell. 637-6527.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time.Setown hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
200-$500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information-24 hour hotline. 801 -379
-2900. Copyright NC 030650.
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many posi-
tions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-436-
4365 ext. P-3712.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP - Sales
Advertising begin immediately part
time. Have 4 weeks summer vacation,
good pay - bring resume to Coopera-
tive Education Office General Class-
room Bldg. Will call for interview.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -Earn
$2,000month world travel (Ha-
waii, Mexico, theCaribbean, etc.) Holi-
day, Summer and Career employment
available. Noexperiencenecessary.For
employment call 1-206-634-0468 ext.
C5362
PIONEER GIRL SCOUT COUNCIL
is now hiring seasonal staff for resident
and day camp. Positions includecoun-
selors, 1 ifegua rd, da y camp director and
crafts director. If interested contact Jill
Rhinehart at 1 -800-627-6031.
RESPONSIBLE ANDDEPENDABLE
babysitterneeded.Referencesandown
transportation required. Flexiblehours.
Ready to start now andor this sum-
mer. Please call 355-7512.
NEED A SUMMER JOB?Make$1880
month and get great Resume Exp. work-
ing with the Southwestern Co. If inter-
ested Call (919) 933-1699.
TIRED OF BEING A POOR COL-
LEGE GIRL? Earn loo's a day escort-
ing in Greenville. Must have transpor-
tation, own phone, and outgoing per-
sonality. Must be very self conscious
and well groomed. We offer flexible
hours to work around classes and
nights. For more information call 757-
3477and askfor Amy. All information
held in strictest confidence.
INTERNATIONALEMPLOYMENT
- Make money teaching basic conver-
sational English abroad. Japan and
Taiwan. Make $2,000-54,000 per
month. Many provide room and board
other benefits! No previous training
or teaching certificate required. For In-
ternational EmploymentProgram, call
the International Employment Group:
(206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
ROTISSERIE BASEBALL MANAG-
ERS NEEDED: Established leaguehas
3 openings for 1993 season. Affordable
price, Call Tripp at 355-1794 for more
information by Thursday. Leave mes-
sage.
LAW FIRM NEEDS TWO FULLY
FURNISHED APARTMENTSduring
the summer. 1 bedroom May 22 -June
27; 2 bedroom Ma y 22 - August 1. Con-
tact Bert Speichor 355-3030.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typingand photocopyingservices. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaran-
teed typing on paper up to 20 hand
written pages. SDF ProfessionalCom-
puter Services, 106 East 5th Street (be-
side Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer? Only $169 Jet there anytime for
only $169 with AIRHITCH! (Reported
in Let's Go! & NY Times.) AIRHITCH
�212-864-2000.
WHERE'S THE PARTY? Wherever
there's a Mobile Music Productions
disc jockey. Proven HOTTEST D.J.
service in the area. Don't wait too late
to book. Call 7584644.
CARPET CLEANING $12 perroom 2
room minimum. Steamex cleaning
serving Greenville for 4 years. Call
Marc at 758-1079.
LET'S PARTY! Experienced D.J. from
Bogies available for all occasions: Fra-
ternity and Sorority Socials, Weddings,
Birthdays. All types of music from
Classic Rock to Top 40 Dance. HIGH-
ESTQUALITYBESTPRICESCallRob
�757-2658.
PAINTBALL HOLIDAY SPECIAL-
Friday April 9th 11am - 4pm. Bring a
friend and waste him with paint.
There's no school that day! CALL
RICH AT 752-2573 for info.
Typing Services
Resumes. Term Papers, Letters
Master Thesis or Presentations
Professionally printed on "LaserJet" printer
Reasonable Rates
Same Day Service available
Call J. Carson at 756-1341
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today wilh VTsaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOTLINE
In CalM. (213) 477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. �206-A, Los Angles. CA 90025
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYWMB &
VTORBPIKESSIN6 SERVICE
'English Literature Major
'Editing A Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resumes
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
Come support your organization. We
hope to see everyone there!
GREEKS: Greek Week is here. It's
time to get loose. Let's make this one a
time to remember. Delta Zeta and Pi
Kapp, we can't wait till Saturday.
We're gonna rock. PHI PSI.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON would like to
remind all students to vote for Rick
EvazoonMarch31 forSGA VicePresi-
dent. Good Luck Rick
ATTENTION TO ALL GREEKS: This
year's Greek Week will be the biggest
and the best yet. To get your Greek
Week sticker, call your social chair or
the I.F.C. office 757-4706. Remember:
the Greek Week sticker must be af-
fixed to a picture I.D, to enter the
events
ONE WORD EXPERIENCE! "Cur-
rent SGA chief-of-staff, Junior Class
Vice-President, Chairman SGA Stu-
dent Welfare Committee, Vice-Presi-
dent Student Pirate Club, and Mem-
ber Fine Arts Funding Board. Former
Co-chairman SGAScieeningCornrnit-
tee, President ECU Sophomre Class.
Make ECU a better place, vote tomor-
row - TROY DREYFUS - VICE-
PRESIDENT!
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOWL USED CD'S
PI KAPPA PHI: thanks for a great
time at the pre-downtown Thursday.
We'll keep the next one a little dryer!
Love, Alpha Xi Delta.
TONIGHT! Alpha Xi Delta 25th AN-
NUAL ALL SING. 9:00 at the Attic.
MAKE ECU A BETTER PLACE!
Elect Troy Dreyfus as your next VP
Make the difference-VOTE TOMOR-
ROW!
JIMMY- How's it going today? Prob-
ably a lot better than yesterday when
you were suffering from the hang-
over from hell! I guess those Italian
Pecker Wackers and Toxic Wastes
really got to ya! Don't shoot too
much pool if you canhelp it and have
a groovy day. Oh yeah, the lion says
hello! Mo
LUIGI- Its not personal, I just don't
like the Italian Pecker Wackers! But
don't fret everyone else drinks the
helloutof'em! By the way good luck
to finding suckers to try the new
Caeser' s Fire! See you Sunday night!
Mo and the rest of the Happy's gang.
JENNI - By the time you get this, all
your hard work will be over (hope-
fully, anyway!) I hope everything
turned out alright and you know where
to find me if you need me. I love you
very much. The prize in your cereal
box.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors, Instructors,
Kitchen, Office, Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
Vi IffP PIVVWAAIl ed y�Uth summer sPOTts camp. Will train. Over 25
L-AiVll 1 liMlnUUIl activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure: 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Hendersonville, NC 28792.
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
DO YOU WANT
Turn to page 1
A CAREER IN ADVERTISING?
1 for an excellent opportunity!
Announcements
READING TEST RF.SUI.TS FOR
NURSING 1000 STi,ipF,NTff
Students who were enrolled
in Mrs. Belinda Lee's block section of
Nursing 1000 during the first half of
Spring 1993 semester may pick up
Nelson-Denny Reading Test Scores
in Mrs. Pam Smith's office - Rm. 257,
Nursing Building.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects? Need a refuge
form time to time? Campus Christian
Fellowship maybe whatyouarelook-
ing for. Our weekly meetings are at
7pm Wednesdays at our Campus
House located at 200 E. 8th St di-
rectly across Cotanche St. from Men-
denhall Student Center. Everyone is
welcome. For more information, call
Tim Turner, Campus Minister, at 752-
7199.
RELIGIOUS STUDIF PRnr.R
Presenting 1st Annual
Umesh and Usha Gulati Lecture on
World Religions Vedanta: Its Theory
and Practice. Speaker is Swami
Chetanananda. Thursday April 1,
1993 at 7:30 pm in GCB Room 1031.
Admission is free.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next Gamma Beta Phi
meeting will take place Tuesday,
March 30 at 5.00 in Mendenhall 244
Becertaintobringdonutmoneytobe
turned in at this time. Hope to see you
there! Questions, call 931-9274.
GAMMASinMASlMA
Jail House Rockon April 1 st.
To buy Warrant call 931-8455.
GOLDEN KFY NATIONAL
HONOR SOCIFTY
Attention all member, espe-
cially new members! There will be a
meeting of Golden Key on March 31 st
at 3pm in Speight 313. Elections for
new officers will be held. We need
motivated juniors to take the officers
positions. Questions, call 756-5381.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION
ECHO meeting March 31,
1993at5:00p.m.inGCBRm.2017.We
will have a leadership program pre-
sented and survey our own leader-
ship abilities. All students with a 3.4
GPA are welcome to drop in.
ECUENVIRONMFMTAJ
HEALTH CII IB
The next meeting will be
held on Wednesday, March 31, at 5:00
in the 2nd floor student lounge of the
Allied Health Bldg
SGA
SGA Executive Elections
Wednesday March 31, 1993 Bring
your student ID and vote between
9:00am and 6:00. VOTE, VOTE, VOTE'
METHODIST STUDFN rFMJFR
Wesley Fellowship Supper
Wednesday 5:30 at Methodist Stu-
dent Center 5th St. and Holly.
PRE-PHYSICAI THFRAfY
CJJLIB
the pre-physical therapy
club will be having a "social
"party "get-together" Wed. March
31 in the Underground at Menden-
hall from 3-5. Fun, games, and food
All are welcome: please come out
and enjoy! If you have questions,
please call Dawn (757-0573).
ECNAQ
The Native American Or-
ganization will have a meeting
Wednesday, march 31 form 7:15-
9:15 p.m. It will be held in the Mul-
tipurpose Room of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
SPECIAl.OIYMPirs
The 1993 Greenville - Pitt
Co. Special Olympics Spring Games
will be held on April 20th at E. B.
Aycock Jr. High School in Green-
ville (rain date: April 22). Volun-
teers are needed to help serve as
buddieschaperones for the Special
Olympics. Volunteers must be able
to work all day-from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
An orientation meeting will be held
on April 15 in Old Joyner Library
room 221 from 5-6:00p.m. (The first
ones there will be assigned a posi-
tion.) Free volunteer t-shirts will be
provided the day of the games to all
volunteers who have attended the
orientation session. For more infor-
mation, contact Lisa Ihly at 830-4551
MUSLIM STUDFNT
ASSOCIATION
-Seeks fellow students to ac-
tively pa rticipate. We meet regularly to
discuss current topics. For more infor-
mation contact ADIB FARHADI at 355-
6707.
ZETA TAU ALPHA
As a part of Zeta Tau Alpha's
national April Fool's Day project,
DON'T BE A FOOL, DO SELF-EX-
AMINATIONS, the Iota Rho chapter
of Zeta Tau Alpha is reaching out to
the community in an effort to raise
breast cancerawarenessandgiveGre-
enville-area women a tool to com-
plete monthly self-examinations.
Chapter members will offer free wa-
terproof cards that illustrate how to
complete breast self-exam ina tion and
can be prominently displayed in the
shower.CardswillbeavailableThurs-
day, April 1st, from 10 to 3, at Harris
Teeter and the Plaza.
ECU WOMEN'S STUDIFS
PROGRAM
Presenting the Swami
Chetanananda on: The Hindu Vi-
sion of God as Mother Friday, April
2,10:00am, Rawl 105. Admission is
free.
ECU LAW SOCIFTY
The ECU Law Society will
meet Monday, April 5, 1993 at 5:15
pm in 218 Ragsdale. New members
are welcome to attend. Our guest
speakerwill be JeromeRaney, Attor-
ney at Law. Also, we are planning a
trip to Campbell University School
of Lawon Wednesday, April 7,1993.
LOST CAT
A beautiful orange male cat

25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
All ads must be pre-paid
Announcements
Any organization may use the Annource-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge Duetothelimited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
has been found around Speight
building. He was first seen on March
23 and it is rumored that he may
have come to campus on an East
Carolina Bus. He is currently being
cared for by the ELEMMIDC fac-
ulty. He is an orange cat with a white
nose, white paws and white rings
around his tail. He has a black and
gray collar with pink and yellow
triangles - no tags. If you are his
owner or have information that can
help us find his home please call
ELEM MIDG office 757-6833 or stop
by Speight 204.
Thank you.
ITSOUT-A-HFRF
The Home Run Derby In-
formation meeting will be held on
Wed, march 31 at 5:00 pm in Biology
103. For more info cal 757-6387 or
stop by 204 Christenbury Gym.
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication, however, no
refunds will be given.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
ror more
information call
757-6366.

,
difw





ruliHiiMii ii inn��
The East Carolinian
March 30, 1993
TuesdayOpinion
Workout for Hope
Mass exercise will benefit AIDS
research, broaden state's
perception of East Carolina
Once again, ECU forges new trails in Greenville
and North Carolina by hosting the national Work-
out for Hope.
Tonight, ECU will be the first university in the
country to host this event designed to provide
funding for AIDS and other health concerns re-
search. Participants are asked to get donations that
will be contributed to the City of Hope research
facility and hospital in Los Angeles.
Researchers at the City of Hope study meth-
ods of combatting diseases such as cancer, diabetes
and AIDS. One of the most recent developments
out of the City of Hope was the discovery of
"ribozymes or RNA molecules that can act like
enzymes. Researchers hope that these "ribozymes"
will effectively halt the spread of the HIV virus that
causes the disease AIDS.
This research is crucial to stopping what has
been termed the "black plague" of the '80s and '90s.
AIDS and AIDS-related deaths increase
exponentially each passing year. AIDS
has made an impact on every demo-
graphic segment of the population
� from men to women, blacks to
whites, heterosexuals to gays.
The disease of AIDS does
not discriminate � it can
happen anywhere, any time,
to anyone. Race and gender
are meaningless to this
crippling disease, only
knowledge and common
sense can stop its attack.
Without further re-
search, this disease
will run rampant
and unchecked
until its too late.
Workout for Hope combines an already posi-
tive activity with an equally strong outcome. People
can not only benefit from the exercise involved �
running from step aerobics to high impact aerobics
� but can benefit on a much higher level. At the
rate AIDS is progressing, experts postulate that, by
the year 2000, everyone will know at least one
person who has AIDS. Helping further along this
research may make this hypothesis null and void.
By being the first university to host this event,
ECU has set an example that many other colleges
and universities will hopefully follow. ECU has
joined an often-forgotten population � college stu-
dents � to an issue that makes headlines every day.
By participating, students can now feel that they
have an impact on matters outside of the realm of
the classroom and the campus.
AIDS forces many students to look at their
lives from a less egocentric perspective. A person's
behavior does affect the world that he or she lives
in, whether it be conscious or unconscious behav-
ior. Recognizing that it does affect others, and mak-
ing efforts to have that effect be a positive one,
speaks well for the development of students at
ECU.
Workout for Hope is an event that bodes well
for the future of ECU. With enough participation �
by both students and community members � this
event could very well become an annual one. Again,
activities at ECU have the potential to put this
college on a state-wide and even a national level of
recognition.
Opinion
Page 6
A View from Above
By T. Scott Batchelor
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, Ni ws Editor
Karen Hassell, .4.1.11 Nens Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Billiard, Asst. Lifestyle Edi.or
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Media, activists distort truth on firearms
purchased as semi-automatic. The
failure of many people who com-
ment on guns to distinguish be-
tween these two categories of fire-
arms leads to perception prob-
lems, and itthenbecomesdifficult
to discuss rationally the subject of
guns in our society.
For instance, itdoesnot mat-
ter one whit how ominous and
deadly a firearm looks�whether
it comes complete with a folding
stock, bayonet and bi-pod or not
� if it is a semi-automatic, that
weapon operates no differently,
and is no more damaging, than
any firearm used by legitimate
huntersand sportsmen. Thenews
media and anti-gun groupswould
have you believe that semi-auto-
matic "assault" rifles are some-
how markedly ditferentand more
dangerous than the basic semi-
automatic big-game rifle.
You can add all the racing
stripes, spoilers, hood scoops and
fins to your Yugo that you want,
but underneath al 1 that stuff is still
a slow, economy car.
Use common sense when
dealing with firearms. Guns are
no different than automobiles,
electricity and fire. If we learn how-
to use guns safely and effectively,
and respect their power, then there
will be no need for strident activ-
ists seeking to disarm the law-
Guess who said this: "I am a
life member of the National Rifle
Association�my entire family is a
life member of the National Rifle
Association � because we believe
in theConstitutionand webelieveit
is our moral obligation to defend
our lives This was spoken on a
national radio program by none
other than the MotorCity Madman
himself,Ted Nugent. Itisararity to
find professional entertainers with
such a rational, thoughtful philoso-
phy.
Nugent's comments come at
a time when the issue of private
firearm ownership has come under
anew waveof attack, thanks mostly
to David Koresh and his well-armed
band of cu ltists in Waco, Texas. The
debate whether our laws should
remain consonant with the second
amendmenttotheConstitutionhas
been raging for quite some time
now. There is a veritable war going
on between those who think we
should honor the Constitution and
those who feel the right of gun own-
ership should be abrogated. As an
all wars, the first casualty is truth.
Nugenrsremarks concerning
the way in which incidents involv-
ing firearms, especially handguns,
are portrayed in the media really
sum up much of the problem. He
says, "I think it is important to note
that the liberal media told the world
pickup truck through Luby's caf-
eteria in Kileen, Texas, withhishigh-
capacity 9 mm's, killed 23 innocent
people. Well, it took 12 minutes to
do mat, and he reloaded three dif-
ferent times. Anybody that wanted
to with a single-shot .22-caliber
squirrel riflecould have killed more
people. Thiswasnota high capacity
situation
"Meanwhile, one month
later continues Nugent, "outside
of Montgomery, Ala a law-abid-
ing citizen with a licensed .45-cali-
ber in his belt stopped the immi-
nent slaughter of 16 individual cus-
tomers in a Shoney's restaurant, but
we did not hear about this because
the gun proved to be the life saver in
that situation and doesn't fall into
the agenda of the anti-gun media
Do you think any of those 16
persons who might have been
against handgun ownership before
that near-tragedy changed their
mindsa little afterwards? I think the
probably did, and for obvious rea-
sons.
Still, many people say that the
times a gun is used to save lives are
far outweighed by the times guns
cause death either in accidentsor in
the commission of crimes.
Almost all accidental deaths
or injuries involving firearms are
avoidable. Most of them occur from
just plain stupidity, like the person
within the reach of children. This
sa me person, man or woman, prob-
ably took great precaution in child-
proofing the home: cabinets locked
or fitted with child-proof latches;
poisonous solvents and cleaners
placed out of reach; medications
stored in a safe place. Then he or she
leaves a loaded .357 Magnum un-
der the bed, or in the night stand
drawer, in easy reach of little hands.
Guns are no more to blame in
these deaths than are a bottle of
sleeping pills left on the bathroom
vanity, or a jug of bleach under the
sink. Inanimate objects have no con-
science and cannot be held respon-
sible for death or injury.
I have come to the conclusion
that most television news reporters
know very little a bou t guns, and, as
the saying goes, a 1 ittle bit of knowl-
edge is Jangerous thing. Let'sstart
with the terms "automatic" and
"semi-automatic An automatic
firearm is one which continues fir-
ingaslongasthe trigger ispulled. In
common parlance, this isa machine
gun. These weapons, contrary to
what the media reports, are very
difficult to legally obtain. To pur-
chase one, you have to pay lots of
money and go through a records
check by the federal government.
A semi-automatic firearm is
one which only fires one round, or
bullet, with each pull of the trigger.
how the bastard that drove his who leaves a loaded handgun Shotguns, rifles and pistols can be abiding citizenry.
EEL2H1
@gJlaJlsl
QuoteoftheDay
Hope is the pillar that holds up the
world. Hope is the dream of a waking
man.
Pliny the Elder
Letters to the Editor
Atheist uses Bible to show error of homophobes
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may he edited for decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
puohcalion Letters should be addressed to The Kditor. Tlie East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353 For more infonna-
lion, call (919)757-6366
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
To the Editor:
Jacksonville's
homophobic bigots wave
Bibles and claim that being
homosexual is a sin. They are
only displaying their igno-
rance of the spuriousness of
the religious basis for many
sexual taboos.
Dr. Arthur Frederick Ide
in his book "Zoar and Her
Sisters: the Bible, Homosexu-
ality and Jesus Christ" claims
"in neither Leviticus 18:22 nor
Deuteronomy 23:18 is there a
reference to homosexuality.
The term is kedesh: cult pros-
titute Cult prostitutes were
seen as unclean and were for-
bidden in purity codes.
Yale University history
professor John Boswell writes
in his book, "Christianity, So-
cial Tolerance and Homosexu-
ality" that Leviticus' "purpose
is to elaborate a system of
ritual 'cleanliness' whereby
thejewswillbedistinguished
from neighboring peoples
He points out that there is a
distinction between intrinsic
wrong and ritual impurity.
Boswell puts Leviticus'
prohibition of cult prostitu-
tion on a par with its other
prohibitions against the con-
sumption of pork, shellfish
and rabbit and its condemna-
tions of hybridization, cloth-
ing of more than one type of
fabric and cutting of the beard
of hair.
Furthermore, other al-
leged Biblical injunctions
againsthomosexualitycannot
withstand scrutiny. In Mat-
thew 10:14-15and Luke 10:10-
12, Jesus publicly stated that
Sodom and Gomorrah were
destroyed because of their in-
hospitality to strangers. Ide
even charges that "the Sodom
story is a ruse to cover the
incest of Lot and his daugh-
ters" in Genesis 19:32-38.
Boswell writes that the
people of Sodom wanted to
know who the foreign strang-
ers were rather than desiring
carnal knowledge of them.
The Hebrew verb "yada" is
very rarely used in a sexual
sense.
Moreover, there are
positive homosexual affairs
reported in the Bible, such as
between King David and
Saul's son Jonathan in 1
Samuel 18:1-4,20:41-42 and2
Samuel 1:25-26 and that be-
tween Naomi and Ruth in the
Book of Ruth. King Solomon
even wrote homoerotic po-
etry in the Song of Solomon
5:4-8, 5:10-16 and 8:1-3.
Ide even portrays Jesus
as a gay male who lived
nearly exclusively in the com-
pany of men and even had a
beloved disciple who was al-
lowed to lay his head on Jesus'
chest while they ate and
talked as described in John
11:36,13:25, 21:7 and 21:20.
Jim Senvszyn
North East Atheist As-
sociation
Letters to the Editor must be signed and accompanied with a work-
ing telephone number, or they will not be printed. Letters should be
addressed to The East Carolinian, Attn. Opinion Page Editor, Student
Pubs. Building, ECU, Greenville, N.C. 27858-4353. Letters should also not
exceed 250 words; those that do may be edited for decency and brevity.
By Amy E. Wirtz
Forest conference
should protect
wildlife, nature
President Clinton travels to Portland,
Ore on Friday for a one-day "forest confer-
ence He has labeled the session a fact-
finding mission similar to his economic sum-
mit in Little Rock, Ark I'm sure this will
prove to be quite a different gathering.
What makes this so special are the des-
perate pleas he will hear from struggling
families and worried biologists to find a
means of saving both the logger and the
Northern spotted owl. Thespotted owl num-
ber fewer than 6,000 and their homes, the
huge old-growth trees, are rapidly disap-
pearing.
Nearly 20,000 loggers and millworkers
have lost their jobs in Northern California,
Oregon and Washington and lawsuits filed
on behalf of the endangered owl have halted
almost all logging in the forests. Both sides
believe the other is in the wrong.
The Clinton administration hopes to
fashion a compromise plan by next fall to
present to Congress and U.S. District Court
judge William Dwyer.lt will designate where
logging can continue without harming old-
growth habitat and may include federal as-
sistance to help alleviate the loss of jobs.
Imagine the difficulty in that.
Administration officialssay the imme-
diate need is to break the political and legal
deadlock that has crippled a large sector of
the Northwest's economy. They believe the
spotted owl and other threatened species
can be protected without completely shut-
ting down the area's timber industry. Envi-
ronmentalists seem to think that it's pos-
sible, so what's the problem?
At stake is up to 6 million acres of
ancient cedar, firand spruce trees in publicly
owned forests in the Pacific Northwest. The
towering trees are the last remaining habitat
for many endangered species. That didn't
stop the U.S. Forest Service from allowing
extensive logging on the land. Surprised?
Two years ago, lawsuits were filed by
environmentalists, which brought us to
where we are now. Dwyer halted almost all
logging in virgin forests by ruling that the
agency had failed to ensure the protection of
the spotted ow! and its neighbors, as re-
quired by law. Hence, the standstill.
The timber industry may already have
harvested 90 percent of the area s virgin
forests. Environmentalists question "below-
cost" timber sales � the Forest Service's
practice of selling rights to public timber for
less than the tax money it costs to provide
access to the wood. The debate is sure to spill
over into the forests of eastern Washington,
Idaho and Montana.
With the numerous legitimate pro-en-
vironmental arguments, one can easily for-
get the loggers and millworkers. Workers
can be retrained; the ancient forestsand deli-
cate eco-svstems cannot be replaced. Protect
what can't protect itself.

�"�
MM MMMM Ml





March 30, 1993
Photo courtesy David Isenti
David Isenhour's work joins Heather Cushman's on display
at the Henry Stindt Photography Gallery.
ECU art students exhibit
excellent senior show
By John Bullard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Saturday night with a few
friends and a case of beer, art
students Heather Cushman and
David lsenhour set out to orga-
nize their Senior Show.
Luckily, I stumbled into the
begin,ningsofanimpressiveshow
of artwork. The showing, located
at the Henry Stindt Photography
Gallery, began Sunday night and
will end with a reception on Sat
April 3. It is open to the public.
Theatrnosphere, very casual,
reflected the spirit of the two art-
ists. "Can I get you a beer?" asked
David lsenhour.
A sitting room off the exhibit
area provided the perfect place to
find out just what the two are all
about.
Cushman and lsenhour met
a couple of years ago in art class.
This semester, they decided to
exhibit their works together.
"Our show is one of irony
said Heather Cushman. "My
paintings contrast with David's
sculptures, yet at the same time,
there isacmbriuitytyingtheshow
together
After a small chat of this and
that, 1 stepped into the exhibit
room to get a feel of their work.
Their art pieces waited here and
there to be placed into the right
place for the show. First off, I
walked around, taking in the
paintings done by Cushman.
Cushman'spaintings reflect
a maturity that goes well beyond
the canvas. Behind the emotion
expressed on the surfaces of her
paintings isa knowledge thatpro-
pels and gives meaning to them.
Interested in religious themes,she
drawsfrom Medieval and Gothic
times to prod uce expressive art
"German Expressionism,
with such artists as Emile Nolde,
greatlyinfluenceswhatldo'said
Cushmaa "G Hhicthemesof sup-
See EXHIBIT page 9
� The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
Live Dead.
A healthier,
spunky Jerry
Garcia graced
Chapel Hill's
Dean dome
during the
Grateful Dead
N.C. visit
Wednesday
and Thursday
nights.
Highlights of
the shows
included "Jack
Straw "Box
of Rain
"Terrapin
Station" and
"The Wait
Photo by Dail Heed
Area agencies organize to instruct on wellness
By Lisa Bauman
Staff Writer
ECU'S Annual Health and Wellness Fair
will be held Thursday, April 1 in Mendenhall
Student Center's Great Room from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m.
The goal of the fair is to inform faculty and
students about die various agencies on campus
and in the community that can promote wellness
of the self. Thirty-seven agencies will be repre-
sented.
"When I ask people what health wellness is,
they always respond about the physical aspect
said Jeanie Tomalski, director of student devel-
opment, health promotion and well-being.
"Wellness is the whole person aspect of the
being
According to the National Wellness Insti-
tute in Wisconsin, wellness can be divided into
sixdimensions.Physicaldevelopment(strejigth
and muscular coordination), emotional devel-
opment(one'sfeeiings), soaal development(per-
sonal satisfaction through career choices), spiri-
tual development (purpose of human existence)
and intellectual development(stimulatingmen-
tal activities throughoutlife)arethedimensions.
The 37 agencies participating in the fair will deal
with these various aspects of well-being.
The Department of Nutrition at ECU will be
giving nutritional analysis and diabetes infor-
mation. ECU student nurses will be there to
check blood pressure and to give sight and
hearing tests. The Physi-
cal Therapy Department
will be on hand to give
back and neck care tips
and to give postural
analysis.
Several new organi-
zations will be repre-
sented this yearatthefair.
The Pitt County Council
on Aging will provide information on the aging
and elderly. The American Heart Association,
American Red Cross, American Lung Associa-
tion and Pitt County Memorial Hospital will all
be on hand with information.
P.US.H. (People United to Support the
Handicapped) will have an obstacle course set
up to help create awareness of the difficulties
handicapped people face today.
G.A.M.M.A. (Greeks Advocating the Ma-
with free samples of non-alcoholic beer. They
will also be providing popcorn and brochures
on responsible drinking techniques.
ECU Department of Recreational Services
and the ECU Human Performance Lab will
have sports equipment set up for those inter-
ested. They will also sponsor
���-��mmimm strength and flexibility- tests for
, those interested.
WellneSS IS the The Student Health Ser-
vices will be at the fair dressed
- vices will be at the fair dressed
WnOle perSOn aSpeCt up as a medical unit from the
of the being
Jeanie Tomalski
TV comedy M.AS.H.They will
be dispensing medical infor-
mation about sexually trans-
mmimim mitteddiseasesandsamplekits
of medicine.
All the events at the Health and Wellness
Fair are free. There will be door prizes, free
party favors and WZMB will be doing a live
remote.
The Student Union will provide transpor-
tation from the ECU Medical School to the fair
fromlla.m.to330p.m.This.e.eritissponsored
by the Office of Health Promotion and Well-
Being, Recreational Services, Student Health
AND THE OSCAR GOES TO
PICTURE
Unforgiven
ACTOR
Al Pacino
ACTRESS
Emma Thompson
SUPPORTING ACTOR
Gene Hackman
SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Mama Tomei
DIRECTOR
Clint Eastwood
ORIGINAL
SCREENPIAY
The Crying Game
ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Howard s End
CINEMATOGRAPHY
A River Runs Through It
ORIGINAL SONG
"A Whole New World"
ORIGINAL SCORE
Aladdin
ART 'DIRECTION
Howard's End
No Return't
VISUAL EFFECTS
Death Becomes Her
MAKEUP
Dracula
COSTUME DESIGN
Dracula
FOREIGN
LANGUAGE FILM
Indochine
DOCUMENTARY
FEATURE
The Panama Deception
DOCUMENTARY SHORT
Educating Peter
ANIMATED SHORT
Mona I Jsa Descending a Staircase
LIVE ACTION SHORT
Omnibus
FILM EDITING
Unfbrgiven
SOUND
The Last of the Mohicans
SOUND EFFECTS
EDITING
Dracula
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
IlK Academy Awards for 1992 were presented Monday night
TONE DEF
. .Continued from March 25 issue
Digable Planets, Reochm' (A new refuta-
tion of time and space), Pendulum.
Here itcomes! Despite MTV's petty
hype about music revolutions, the pick of the
Utter to prove them right is Digable Planets.
The future of rap is ground-zero dead on
blunts,buttsandgangstasandlive,live,liveon
da'music. Thatis,jazz,axl,bebopandwhat
DPespouses in the tide and message of the first
singteofftheirdebutLPRarriiiYThe Rebirth
of Slick
This NYC trio tours with a drummer,
string bassist and fv m players. They rap iced-
down with composed stature net snke
Coltrane on Giant Steps or Davis on bitcivs
Br�W.Thehip-hop revolution is most certainly
upon us, and although Digable Planets aren't
the ,)tepmphets(lestnotneglectDeLa,Brand
New Heavies,and thehonorableTribeCalled
Quest), these cats dish 14 jazzy smooth selec-
tionsthatmakecleartheirintenttosliceaphat
pier" of rap's pie, for them, and for artists to
follow.
Butterfly, Doodle and Ladybug are DP,
andonteictoi' they appoint jazz greats such
as Gillespie, Vaughn, Parker, Coltrane,
Armstrcngand Holidayasproper ancestry to
what's become of the jazz-blues-fusion-soul-
R&B tapestrv. The progressive nature of
Digabfe Planets, in their intneate sampling of
Continued on page 8
John Badham is a director who has
been in charge of some of the most cliche,
derivative, banal and unimportant films
of the past fifteen years. Films like Sarur-
day Night Fever, War Games, Short Circuit
and Bird on a Wire epitomize the mindless
Hollywood productions that predominate
today's cinematic world.
Knowing that Badham's new film,
Point of No Return, details the plight of a
female assassin, my expectations were un-
derstandably low. Incredibly enough,
Point of No Return's banality exceeded my
worst expectations.
The story involves a drug-addicted
woman named Maggie, played by Bridget
Fonda, who kills a police officer while she
is high. Maggie is sentenced to die by
lethal injection, but finds that instead of
death she has been given the opportunity
to live as an assassin.
Thefirsthalfofthishorrendousmovie
chronicles Maggie's training at a secret
installation filled with enigmatic courses
and instructors. Not much is divulged
about the facility or its staff (probably
because the screenwriters were not tal-
ented enough to develop any real charac-
ters). Anne Bancroft plays Amanda, an
etiquette instructor who sees to it that
Maggie learns sophistication. What
Amanda is doing there or what she really
thinks is never explored.
Why Maggie needs sophistication is
never clarified. The only jobs Maggie is
assigned to aftt r graduation are simple
killings where she has only two or three
minutes of work firing a gun or planting a
bomb.
Bridget Fonda has appeared in sup-
porting roles in a fair number of respect-
able features, including Scandal and God-
father .The chanceata starring rolemust
have been an obvious
enticement. Unfortu-
nately for Fonda, Point of
No Return will not be
something she wants to
include on her resume.
She seems stiff in the role;
maybe she realized the
futility of trying top save
the film.
Although Fonda is
not completely to blame
for her character's shai-
lowness, she must take
some responsibility for
her failure to infuse any
subtlety into the role.
Maggie's conversion to
an assassin is not involv-
ing, like wondering if
Charles Manson could be
tamed and trained to
work for the govern-
ment. Her eventual emer-
gence towards humanity
rings false.
Is the audience sup-
posed to believe that an
addict and a murderer
would begin to feel remorse about her
past actions? And why does she fall in
love with a nice quiet artist?
The film never shows Maggie feeling
a twinge of longing for her bygone days.
Never once does she contemplate drug
use. She never even considers finding a
way toend her obligation or, more impor-
tantly, find out who she is working for.
Maggiecomesoffasan idiotic bimbo who
arouses no empathy in the viewer. She
only conjures apathy.
From the opening sequence, which
Badhamshotinfuzzy,jerkyfocustostimu-
late Maggie's drug induced vision, the
film wallows in unnecessary violence
Despite Badham'searlyineptitudein film,
Photo courtesy Warner Bros
Bridget Fonda stars as Maggie, a convicted killer offered a
chance to live if she joins a covert government agency.
he at least provided passable entertain-
ment in the past.
Point of No Return provides no such
pleasure. Too much bloody killing occurs
than most people can stomach. None oi
the characters are interesting and most are
down right despicable.
Brutally honest stories can be com-
pletely captivating, but not when they are
undermined by a Hollywood mentalit
that wants to make a film accessible to
everyone by having every thing work out
in the end.
Theending, like every other aspect of
the film, is contrived and implausible
Oniv after nearly two hours of sheer bore-
dom did this piece oi trash merciful Iv end
MHMM ���������
�WMel mm'jm MOTftMM





8 The East Carolinian
MARCH 30, 1993
TONE DEF
archive tid-bits blended with thick-n-
fresh beatsand their chocked full lyri-
cal monologuedialogues that flow
freely and prolificonahoutevery tune,
islegitimate(noflash-in-the-pan)and
undeniable.
However,an underlyingboneto
pick with artists such as DP is their
staunch direction, their unflinching
Commitment to a "new style, new
style and despite the historical inge-
nuity and cultural importance of
�tteachiti it won't strokeevery listener
to purr. It's scope getsa bitstiff to look
out from the deft musical and lyrical
Statementsand dear racial monogamy
touted, cemented and masterfully
Executed,all neatly bound in the jazzi-
est hip-hop vehicle yet
� Hi-fi at-home aesthetics: A-
Hi-way mileage driving j elly: B
Goo Goo Dolls, Superstar
Canvash, Warner BrothersMetal
Blade.
Goo Goo Dolls is the safest band
in rock music and I love it. Crank
jams with hollow song titles, often
?�ZT
OfFaqtastic Sans
" the Original Family Haircutters,
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cheeze-fiUed lyhcs, candy-sweet har-
monies, super-crunch, guitar-domi-
nated bar-chord rock with predict-
able and ginger-perfect hooks, licks
and chord changes, Goo Goo Dolls'
third LP Superstar Carwash is awash
with on the mark bullseye, hcdes-in-
the-knees-of-my-jeans-because-I-
ripped-them-there-so-what, tour de
force power trio sounds mat never
dash, never argue,never dis,butsinv-
phrock.
The band's saving grace on this
album, on their previous Hold Me Up
and on their debut fed, is that Johnny
Rzeznik (guitar), Robby Takac (bass)
and George Tutska (drums) all sing
quite well. Defying tendencies to hol-
low leaningsdealtwith by many trios
as suave minimalist underpinings,
Continued from page 7
Goo Goo Dolls take creativity by the
hand but never yank the leash.
Tunes such as "We Are the Nor-
mal" (with self-evident lyrics by Paul
Westerberg) bring thoughtful and
heartfelt chest-belted vocal offerings
with a surprisingly hyper and thun-
derousrhythmsection. Guitarsclearly
reign supreme in Goo land, though
overdubs leave one to wonder
whether a live show would sound
frail and less filling or mighty and
dimbing.
The Los Angeles Times raved on
the Goo Goo Dolls as "a blast of
school's-out exuberance, a roar of
youhfulage,finemelodies,adigdose
of tenderness Indeed, no world-
saving ethic or electo-reverb
weirdbrained arty stuff here, but for
the must-be-loud-and-fast-but-still-
fun-like-a-slip-n-slide genre�of
which the leather-tight sadists seem
to have monopolized�here reigns
GooGooDollsas thesuperstar simple-
ton of the bunch.
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TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
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Valid N.C. l.D. Required
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ext. 8016
TIJNIQR.S
Rona L. Adams
Susan L Barger
Julia M. Batchelor
Brian A. Blocher
Caroline R. Brown
Tina C. Catoe
SENIORS
Vickie L. Aldrich
Richard L Allen
Paula C. Anderson
Julie M. Andrus
Gillian K. Ashley
Anthony L. Baker
Shanna P. Baker
Shelley A. Barron
Michelle L. Bartlett
Melanie N. Becton
Trena K. Bonde
Wendy L. Brown
Douglas Burnett
The East Carolina Chapter of
The National Honor Society of
PHI KAPPA PHI
Congradulates the Following Students and
Faculty On Their Election To Membership
Jerry M. Dawson
Alyssa D. Fountain
Philip J. Gaglia, Jr.
Charlie S. Grant
Susan A. Highsmith
Amanda A. Hines
Andre M. Hollier
Cameron E. Campbell
Barbara J. Cassidy
April L. Chrismon
Sheri P. Clark
Cesar H. Colon
Stacy R Comey
Rebecca E. Crepps
Alice E. Evans
Amy B. Evans
Darlene Gardner
Michael W. Gray
Belinda Haddock
Joseph J. Hagler, Jr.
David B. Harrington
Jane G. Howell
Jeri T. Hughes
Stephanie R James
Lucy B. Kelly
Sloan E. Kesler
Anne E. Kleinschmidt
Joseph A. Kraus
Kelle A. Henry
Tonia R. Hodge
Alexis G. Hodges
Clara T. Hodgson
Marguerite I. Hogan
Nancy W. Holland
Michelle E. Honeycutt
Kendra D. Howell
Thomas P. Hughes
Stephen J. Iaboni
Evelyn K. James
Cari H. Johnson
Evelyn L. Jones
Venkata R. Jonnalagadda
Luan B.Lawson
Jessica D. Lee
Loretta A. Lewellyn
Edward T. McBride
Melinda J. McGlohon
Kimberly T. Mc La whom
Matthew E. Mehlich
Kevin S. Joyner
Cynthia T. Lamaster
Cindy O. Lamielle
Joyce H. Lane
Dean F. Lawson
Jennifer A. Lewis
Amy J. Listeman
Susan W. McCallum
Maureen J. McGuirl
Andrea L. Marchese
Cherie K. Matthews
Peter B. Mattsson
Russell C. Mehaffey
Susanne S. Moorhead
Brad E. Nicolajsen
Amy R. Norris
Kristine M. Oakley
Christina K. Pugh
Angela B. Reid
Steven P. Richards
Charlotte A. Sharp
Jane B. Nelson
Amy L. Nordstrom
Deborah B. Phillips
Jonathan R. Powers
Lori R Roberson
Sonya F. Rose
Jessica L. Roseberry
Lauryn A Sawyer
Nell B. Shappley
Christopher R. Shinkle
Jeanne L. Solomon
Carmel Spaulding
Teresa G. Stallings
Nannette B. Stillwell
FACULTY
Dr. Helen Grove, Dean,
School of Human Environmental Sciences
ft-
'OED
Aaron J. Shoemaker
Dewayne L. Smith
Erika E. Studer
Dawn M. Sundene
Christopher T. Whitlow
Michael J. Williams
Karen W. Wingard
Sarah H. Stoudemire
Spencer A. Sykes
Helen S. Taylor
Shelly R Taylor
Elisa A. Thigpen
Craig D. Turn bull, Jr.
Charleen H. Tver
Misty L. Walker
Sara M. Weaver-Hurley
Harry D. Winchester
Donna W. Woolard
Jennifer M. Yell
Betty W. Zimmerman
Dr. Y.J.Lao, Chair,
Department of Environmental Health
Dr. Keats Sparrow,
Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
a
The Chapter also congradulates
Gillian Ashley - Outstanding Senior Award
Finalists - Shanna Baker, Cynthia Rae Christiano, Stephanie Geiger, Harry Dale Winchester
Laurie Heather Johnson - Outstanding Freshman Award
Johnathan David O'Neal - Outstanding Freshman Award
Phi Kappa Phi, one of the most prestigious honor societies in the nation, was the first to recognize superior
scholarship in all fields of study and to take into membership students from any branch of study.
r
'uumjjL mmnmm
T
$r-
� ii
P





mm
MARCH 30, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
EXHIBIT
Continued from page 7
pressed emotion, especially rela ting to
women, have become inherent in my
work. During those times, women
couldn't express pain or anger at the
funerals of their own husbands"
The extraordinary thing about
Cushman's work b that one doesn't
need to ask her these things. The
themes,influencesand inspirationsall
makethemselves known through her
paintings.
Hermostimpressiveworkshang
like tapestries, which reflect her fasci-
nation with medieval times. Theseare
tied in with expressive brush strokes
of figurative shapes that are on the
verge of release. The hangings, all
worked with oils, are complimented
with woodcuts that remind even an
art novice, like myself, of Expression-
ist works.
Her works are deeply spiritual
and comment on emotions that are
gagged and suppressed. The spiritu-
ality of Cushman's paintings flows
intothesubtiespirituaUrycjflsenhour's
sculptures.Theartworkofboth artists
cornbinetogethertocastspotiightson
the other.
TnesculpturesofDavid Isenhour
show a deep appreciation for nature
and spirituality. He works mainly with
stone.
Presently, he works with more
natural types of stone. Before, he was
working with polished marble ob-
tained in Rolesvillefroma Tombstone
manufacturer. He gave me some in-
sightintowhatittakestocreateapiece.
" like to work with the stone, not
against it" said Isenhour. "I get a feel
forwhatitis�whereifstryingtogo.
It's a very spiritual process that takes
plaoeduring the working of thepiece.
This process enables me to express
myself�and to an extent the stone
too
The work of Isamu Noguchi, a
Japanese sculptor,inspires Isenhour's
art. Isenhour's works are done in an
array of materials, but most central to
his ideas are his sculptures in stone
and metal.
Isenhour'ssculpturesareworked
and shown in such a way that pro
ducesadefinitemessagetothe viewer.
Onepiece in particular showed me the
subtle depth which Isenhour's works
travel.
A sculpted stone piece sits on a
cut and shaped metal support. The
piece stands about four feet tall. It
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expressed many ideasand concerns to
me. Throughout my tour of the show,
Isenhour spoke of spirituality and na-
ture and with this piece it became
apparent to me that there is a pull and
tug that exists in his work.
The grayish stone is in a block
form, which at the base becomes one
with the metal. The graphite black
metal seemed cold and modern in
comparison to the stone. At the top of
the stone, it is chipped in such a way
that it seems to be pulling itself away
from the metal base. Thus, it appears
NatureanditsplaceinaModemWorld
is one of the major themes within
Isenhour's art.
Many of his other stone sculp-
tures show a triumph of nature and
spirituality. The stones in these pieces
are idealized forms, which through
the beauty of their forms give the
viewer a sense of the power of nature.
The Senior Show of Heather
Cushman and David Isenhour gives
theartlover,aswellasjustthecurious,
a taste of the artists on the verge of
finding themselves.
Their show possesses a respect
for history and a freshness that strives
to break new ground.
1992J993
The pieces and attitudes of both
Cushman and Isenhour show what
years of intensive education can do.
Their works are mature and on the
penultimate step towards self-realiza-
tion and expression.
oeacson
EAST
CAROLINA
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.j r i
,� r:
SGA JUDICIAL BRANCH
Still Accepting Applications for the
Academic Year 1993-94.
The following positions are available:
SGA ATTORNEY GENERAL
SGA PUBLIC DEFENDER
HONOR & REVIEW BOARD
MEMBER
All applicants will be screened by the SGA Executive Council.
REQUIREMENTS:
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Applications Available At:
Secretary's Office (255 Mcndenhall Student Center)
Attorney General's Office (236 Mendenhall Student Center)
DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS:
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1993
5:00 PM
; '�





Page 10
m
Sports
March 30, 1993
Kushner comes through in clutch; Pirates sweep Flying Fleet
1t kushru �
come-
ount a i�
March 2GGame 1
March 27� Game 2
EAST CAROLINA 51 AST CAROLINA
ERSKINE 31 ERSKINE
March 27� Game 3
EAST CAROUNA
ERSKINE
Mne 300 000 000 3 Erskine
Hna .001 000 04x-5 East Carolina
ab r h bi bb so -
.001 100 0-2
.123 100 x-7
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Erskine
East Carolina
KINE
100 000 0-1
030 000 x-3
ab r h bi bl
-and
I espite
fcrskme
mi lemenl
and e
ltd 1
uno I

i mid turn I
Pirate stai b
survived
1 .itals
Ball

Baserunmng SB:
1 lelding
LAST CAROLINA a!
Photo by Bifl Ranson
weather the Pirates swept a three name series against
venge Mr last year's losses to the Flying f leet
tart working down
I ' ' tund hall
�Ml ' A the 24 oul
� i Baserunmng SB ,
�� " �rtgn � LOB .
rk v the lw - ' �
� eld including 15 toeitht '
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Lhebaeball game and putinpositi
Teaml :
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Batli.
Baserunmng - CS: W Team LOP
F .elding E: Ma
Totals
Batting � 22
Baserunniny
AROLINA

� Team LOB :
ab r h bi bb
EAST CAROLINA
ab r h bi bb
BASEBALI � 12
PB �
AMI DATA
UMPlF
Totals
Batting ;H - . 38 . HH I ��
Baserunmng - SB
Team LOB �
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ip h r er bb so
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Roseboro leads
Pirates once more
Lady
. - � 'pete rhe4xl(T0relav,
Staff Writer� ilanick.and
kS5sectndsfcoplaoefirsl
Sen r I laruta Rosebon set thi�
I'irate Track team at thi-mpeted in
igh Relays. RosebonId ii paced Ihe
wasa memberiifthe4 1 �. -�, ends justaheadof
econds Wienl
(sebororanthe : l1 "4 1 SeCOndS
dshii to the fastest qualjfiei" � K
Saturd � . .enl some it its
winth�
�-
-� uth.
-
art � -t-conds Tie 4
� i Saturdayduetm Allette
� : ivi atheiDeSue 4
impeted n � �laoe
runrn. j k- kend thi . advPiratetrai k team eteattJ


Cremins labeled as 'wacky'
for flip-flopping schools

A n



� �
The ECL goW
team saw
action in
their sister
( The
Pirates
slipped in to
take ninth
plate in the
last round.
noto
Teeing
off8
Senior Mike
Teague shoots
148 to lead
Pirates
: .
verall
he Pu
-
and h
I
-
I to SI -1 he Inter
dual mi
I
i
KrMINS
Ultimate teams trying to catch nemesis from Wilmington
Bucs one of better teams in the country





V
MARCH 30, 1993
The East Carolinian
11
Cremins
Continued from page 10
as he arrived at his decision, maybewe
should have shed a little moredoubton
(Wednesdaj s scene ken Burger
wrote in Ihe (Charleston) Post and
Courier.
Cremins said Saturday thattocome
to South Carolina would be deserting
the lech players and his promise to he
there for their careerv Cremins himself
wasn'tavailabletocomment- helixik
oft for a weeklong vacation, lech ath-
letic director Homer Rice said
But Cremins' wife, Carolyn, said
he barely had accepted theSouthCaro-
lina coaching job when he began hav-
ing second thoughts.
"Bobbv got there and thoughtOh
mv gosh, what have I done? she said.
Mrs. Cremins said she and their
youngest child, 16-vear-old Bobbv jr
did not ask Cremins to return to Geor-
gia Tech
"I encouraged him to go, not be-
cause 1 wanted him togo, but because it
seemed he wanted to go so badlv she
said.
"But once he said he'd made a
mistake, I fought like a tiger to get
him (home) and let him change his
mind
Mrs. Cremins said she was
proud of her husband because it
took great courage toadmithemade
a mistake.
' Bobbv Cren iins' decision to re-
negeonhiscomm itmenttoCarolina
left me amazed, stunned, flabber-
gasted and disgusted. I suspect lam
not alone Bob Spear, sports editor
of The (Columbia) State, wrote.
"How does the king abdicate
less than 72 hours after the corona-
tion? How does a man hailed as a
savior bv literally thousands of ad-
mirersexecutesuci a sudden about-
face?
"It's ridiculous to think you
would even face those questions,
much less try- to an swer them
The school said it would not
ta ke action to force (Zremins to honor
his verbal commitment.
"If he's this unstable or this
untrushsorthv, then 1 guess it's
better tor us to find out now
rather than laterschool trustee
Lilv-Roland Hall said.
if this is some kind of bi-
zarre vendetta for what they did
to McGuire and George Felton,
then that is sick she said.
McGuire, who coached
Cremins, was forced ou t in 1980and
Felton was fired as coach two vears
ago. Despite the anger, Gameaxk
Club member Harry Zeigler told
The Post and Courier that Cremins
deserved some slack.
"A man's got todowhata man's
got to do he said. "Evervbodv's
disappointed, but there is no
Camelot"
What Are Your Plans For
The Summer? ce
maybe a job in
summer camping!
Counselors, Lifeguards,
Sailing, Canoeirig
Crafts, Nature and
Adventure Instructors.
Many other positions!
Now Taking Applications for Positions beginning June 1,1993
For Information and Applications Call 1-800-535-5475
WILSON ACRES
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Rent includes
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�Deadbolt Locks "Walk-in Closets
featuring
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4 Blocks From East Carolina with Bus Service
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FIVE MINUTES WALKING DISTANCE FROM CAMPUS

752-0277
Equal Housing Opportunity
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is advertising account executives
"M irr�ntl nrr&rlrn This job entcils prospecting new clients, selling
VUIItJIlliy 'c4wvv7JIII ly creative advertising campaigns and
� � supporting advertising clients. Requirements:
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. experience is required but is helpful. Open to
following positions: �&s-
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed
advertisements using sound design principles
including; contrast and focal point. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of
Macintosh applications; PageMaker, Freehand,
QuarkXPress, and image scanning. Open to all
majors.
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THE FOLLOWNG RECREATIONAL
SERVICES POSITIONS ARE AVAILABLE
FOR FALL 1993.
Marketing Assistants: (4 Positions)
Qualifications: Enthusiastic, creative, self-motiva ted,
independent worker.
Description: Promote programs and services to target
groups in West Campus. Central Campus, Sororities &
Campus Organizations.
Media Assistant: (1 Position)
Qtialifii ations: Enthusiastic, creative, demonstra ted
written communication skills, independent work er.
Description: Promote programs and services through
press releases, feature articles and various creative
promotional tasks. Macintosh computer skills
preferred.
Self Help and Work study students encouraged to apply. Complete
an application today in 204 Christenbury Gymnasium.
"SILVER PLATTER"
Fresh Assorted
Pork Chops
$f19
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SOLD IN PKGS.
OF 10-10.5 LBS.
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Specials
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H) OFF AH Sundaes on Sundays
Tuesday - Two For One
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ags
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days Only one vendor coupon will be accept-
ed per item purchased.





12 The East Carolinian
MARCH 30, 1993
BASEBALL
Continued from page 10
where we were able to back and win
the game Kushner said. "My hat
goes off to Lyle and especially our
middle guys, Heath and Frank, for
keeping us in that game
ECU Head Coach Gary Overton
agreed with his first baseman and
cited Hartgrove'spitching,theteam's
solid defense and Kushner's clutch
home run as reasons the Pirates were
able to pull out the victory.
"All of that gave us the chance to
win the game, which we were able to
come back and do he said.
On Saturday, the Pirates
outlasted early thunderstorms and
mental errors in the field to sweep a
doubleheader from Erskine 7-2 and
3-1 to close out the series.
"I really thought we did a good
job of making the most of all of our
scoringopportunities Overton said.
"We had some very timely hits so I
don't think there was any real key to
the first game except our hitters did
a good job of scoring when we had
to
Steven Pitt led the team with
two hits, including his first home run
of the season, and two RBls. Clark
went 2-2 with two RBIs and a triple
and Kushner had two doubles and
one RBI for the Pirates. Johnny Beck
(5-2), who struck out si x and walked
three, pitched out of trouble for most
of the day for a seven-inning com-
plete game.
"Johnny hit his spots very well,
and he pitched when he had to
Overton said. "I think that was in-
dicative of giving up lOhitsbutonly
two runs. He hit his spots when he
had to, but he wasn't as sharp as he
had been in past performances
In Saturday's second game, the
Pirates trailed 1-0 off Erskine
lefthander Jim Randall (2-1) until Tat
Watkins connected with his 12th
home run of the season to lead off the
second inning.
'Tat'shomt run I think did give
us a lift Overton said. "We were
able to get some runners in scoring
position after that and manufacture
a few runs so his home run was a
catalyst in inning
Mike Sanbum (4-2) struck out
four and allowed only one run on
five hits in the winning effort.
The Pirates next game will be at
homeagainstCampbell on Wednes-
day, March 31, at 3 p.m.
ECU Biology Club
JHURSDAY, APRIL 1
FRIDAY, APRIL 2
7:30 am -1:00 pm
at the Biology Greenhouse
RoomS-111
ALFREDO'S
HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
2 Large Pizzas
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Philosophy, policy, prevention, treatment,
and selhelp resources for students,
faculty, and staff
CONTENTS
1A Message From The Chancellor
Responsibilities
Policy Dissemination
2 Introduction
Philosophy
East Carolina University Policy on Substance
Abuse
3 Educational Efforts To Prevent Substance Abuse
Counseling & Rehabilitation Services
Disciplinary Actions


a
5
Types Of Alcohol
6 Drugs and Their Risks
North Carolina Laws
East Carolina University Disciplinary Actions
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia for the Purpose of Ingesting
a Controlled Substance
Counterfeit Controlled Substances
8 Federal Trafficking Penalties vw
Federal Trafficking Penalties - Marijuana .
Drug and Alcohol Resources and Clinical Services &M
10
Religious Organizations
Self-Help Resources
"mis publication was sponsored by the Division of Student Ufe and produced by the office of the
Dean of StudentDevdopment. Printing provided byThe EastCarolinian. Design by Wood Barnes.
Illustrations by KlChard rlaselrig. East Carolina University is an equal opportunityaffirmative action university
and accommodates the needs of individuals with disabilities.
-i






���
REAL Crisis Intervention Center, Inc.
312 E. 10th Street
Contact: Mary Smith,
DirectorPhone: 758-HELP
The REAL Crisis Intervention Center is a comprehen-
sive, nonprofit organization designed to accommodate the
need in Pitt County for free, confidential supportive counsel-
ing, information, and referral services. All services operate
on a twenty-four-hour basis, and anyone wishing to contact
REAL may do so by calling the HELP-tine or coming by the
center.
Department of Resident Education
Fletcher Hall - ECU Campus
Contact: Dr. Carla Jones,
DirectorPhone:757-4264
The resident education staff offers information con-
cerning drug and alcohol awareness and education,
implements programs and presentations, provides needed
counseling and referral, and maintains a resource library.
Residents should contact resident advisers, assistant coordi-
nators, or the coordinator for resident education in their
building.
State Employees' Assistance Program
Flowers Building
101 W. 14 Street, Office 103
Contact: Steve WilsonPhone:830-3458
The State Employees' Assistance Program (SEAP) is
a free, confidential assessment, counseling, consultation,
and referral service for all state employees and their family
members. Tempcrory and retired employees are included
in these services. The program is designed to help employ-
ees andor fomily members find solutions to problems that
disrupt their personal or professional lives.
Student Health Service
Student Health Center - ECU Campus
Contact: Jennifer PhillipsPhone:757-6794
The Student Health Service provides short-term
counseling, health education, and referrals. Physicians,
psychiatrists, nurses, and a health educator are available to
provide immediate counseling as well as educational mate-
rials related to drug and alcohol abuse. Speakers are
available to provide programs on drug and alcohol-related
topics for student groups.
Office of Health Promotion and Well-Being
303 Erwin Building - ECU Campus
Contact: JeanieTomkalskiPhone:757-6793
The office of Health Promotion and Well-Being
sponsors and coordinates a variety of healthy lifestyle
programs. With regard to substance abuse, this office
provides programs and information through the Peer Health
Education Program. Peer Health Educators are available
upon request to present educational programs within the
residence halls, fraternities, sororities and for other student
groups. In addition, a wellness resource center is open
daily, Monday through Friday, to provide students, faculty
and staff with pamphlets, books and videos on substance
abuse and other wellness issues.
Walter B. Jones Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Treatment Center
Highway 43 West, Greenville
Contact: Kim BellPhone:830-3426
ADATC provides a twenty-eight day intensive reha-
bilitation program for substance abusers age 18 and
greater. Programs include assessment, orientation, treat-
ment planning, group therapy, family therapy, classes
meetings on AlcoholicsNarcotics Anonymous, NCAARF
module series, leisure counseling, occupational training,
vocational rehabilitation, medical assessment and stabiliza-
tion, and discharge planning. Services are available to meet
the special needs of substance abusing women, IV drug
users, and the deaf and hearing impaired.
Wesley Foundation
Methodist Student Center
Contact: Dan EarnhardtPhone: 758-2030
or 355-2430
�Quarterly programs are presented for residents
and members of our fellowship groups.
�Referral is maintained for persons who come for
personal counseling.
�Twenty-four-hour telephone service is provided for
crisis intervention and support.
The Harbors
211-D Commerce Street
Contact: Dr. W. Mark RiddlePhone: 321-1800
The Harbors is an integrated health-care and inten-
sive outpatient facility that offers treatment for addictive
disorders. In addition, the needs of family members andor
significant others are also addressed to assist the recovery
of all persons impacted by the disease of chemical abuse.
Services offered:
�Evening Chemical Dependency Program
�Eating Disorders Group Therapy
�Co-Dependency Groups
�Aftercare Recovery Group
�Intervention Servies
24-Hour Crisis Helpline
�Referral source for 12-Step Groups: AA, NA
DWI Assessments and Treatment
Department of Family Medicine
East Carolina University School of Medicine
Family Practice Center
Contoct:Dr. Harold MayPhone:551-4616
The Family Practice Center offers counseling, therapy
and referral services to members of the campus community
and their families.
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program
Department of Rehabilitation Studies
School of Allied Health Sciences
312F Belk - ECU Campus
Contact: Jerry LotterhosPhone:757-4421
The program offers a series of six courses in the
drugalcohol area.
REHB 2003 - Alcohol and Drug Abuse:
Health and Social Problem
REHB 5793 -Treotment and Addiction
REHB 5795 - Prevention of Alcohol and
Drug Abuse
REHB 5796 - Contemporary Alcohol
and Drug Abuse Issues
REHB 6350 - Group Counseling for
Addictive Illness
REHB 6330 - Substance Abuse Counseling
Undergraduate students may pursue a minor in
drugalcohol studies. In addition, a master's degree in
substance abuse counseling is available in cooperation with
the rehabilitation studies department. Faculty are available
for speaking, technical assistance, and consultation in
chemical use and abuse issues.
ECU Regional Training Center
A-l 2 Minges - ECU Campus
Contact: Carol-Ann TuckerPhone:757-4661
Provides consultation, technical assistance, and
health education relative to drug and alcohol concerns.
Speakers available on request.
Department of Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Safety
203 Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium
Contact: Mr. Bill CainPhone:757-6000
The health education department offers Health
1000 (Health in Modern Society), which is required for all
East Carolina University students. Drugs, alcohol, and
tobacco are covered as course units. Additional courses
offered by the health education department which provide
drug and alcohol information include:
HLTH 3010-Health Problems I
HLTH 3020 - Health Problems II
HLTH 4323 - Methods of Teaching '
in Health Education
HLTH 5200-Health Education
in the Workplace
Alcoholism in Health Education
Drug Education
A Systems Approach
to Drug Education for Teachers
Health Education Methodology
HLTH 5345
HLTH 5355
HLTH 5375
HLTH 6100
Department of Psychiatric Medicine
ECU School of Medicine
4E-102A Brody Medical Sciences Building
Contact: Alfred HorkleyPhone:551-2661
Offers a comprehensive course in the clinical as-
pects of substance abuse for sophomore medical students.
Faculty are available for clinical consultation, technical
assistance, and speaking upon request.
Department of Rehabilitation Studies
School of Allied Health Sciences
Belk Building-ECU Campus
Contact: Dr. Paul AlstonPhone: 757-4452
�Offers a specialty emphasis in employee assis-
tance programs in the MS degree in rehabilitation counseling.
�Offers a MS degree in substance abuse in coop-
eration with the AlcoholDrug Program and the School of
Allied Health Sciences.
School of Social Work
1 34 Ragsdale - ECU Campus
Contact: Dr. Gary R. LowePhone: 757-4208
Social work provides a course (SOCW 3000),
Addiction, Crime, and the Criminal, which is available to
social work majors and as an elective to others.
Pitt County Treatment Alternatives to Street Crime
123 W. Third Street
Contact: Ivey RhodesPhone:758-0034
or 758-0129
TASC is designed to offer a treatment alternative to
incarceration. This program serves individuals who may
have a substance abuse problem and are involved in crimes
while influenced by their substance addiction.
Pitt County Driving While Impared Program
123 W. Third Street
Contact: Ivey RhodesPhone:758-0034
or 758-0129
The DWI program is designed to cut down on the
alcoholdrug related accidents in North Carolina and to cut
down on the recidivism rate for persons charged with this
crime.
Progressions at Carolina Centre
702 Johns Hopkins Drive
Contact: Crystal VetronePhone:757-0123
Progressions is a stage directed treatment program
that provides assessment and treatment for alcohol and
substance abuse problems in a highly professional and
confidential setting. Progressions at Carolina Centre is
licensed by the State of North Carolina as an official alcohol
and substance abuse treatment facility. Treatment compo
nents include:
�Individual and Group Therapy
MaritalFamily Sessions
�Structured Outpatient Substance Abuse Program
ACOA Issues, Women's Issues
DWI Assessments and Treatment
itment m �





A MESSAGE FROM
THE CHANCELLOR
Dear Faculty, Staff, and Students:
This booklet contains ECU's policy prohibiting substance abuse, a descrip-
tion of the medical and legal implications of such use, and a listing of campus and
offampus resources which are available to assist persons having problems with
substance abuse. It is an excellent booklet representing many hours of
labor by our colleagues and I recommend it to you highly.
Our approach emphasizes education. I hope that learning about the
terrible and lasting effects of substance abuse will act as a deterrent for
those who contemplate such behavior. In addition, anyone who has
problems in this area can use the information in this booklet to find
sources of help. Those who seek help through university services have
my assurance that applicable professional standards of confidentiality
will be observed.
I trust that you share my deep concern for providing you an educational
environment free of substance use. Working together, we can accomplish this goal.
Sincerely,
Richard R. Eakin
Chancellor
RESPONSIBILITIES
Authority to implement the policy shall reside in the chancellor
The chancellor shall designate a coordinator of drug education who
shall, acting under the authority of the chancellor, be responsible for overseeing
all actions and programs relating to this policy.
All employees and students shall be responsible for abiding by the provisions
of this policy. In the case of employees, adherence with the provisions of the
policy shall be a condition of employment.
The chancellor will render an annual report to the board of trustees on
the effectiveness of this policy.
POLICY DISSEMINATION
A copy of this policy shall be given annually to each employee
and to all new employees at the beginning of their employment.
Each student residing in university housing shall receive a
copy, and new students shall be given a copy during orientation.
The policy shall be printed in appropriate student documents
and posted on official bulletin boards of the university.
UA&-
ONE





INTROiUCTIC
This resource booklet has been developed to
provide a comprehensive overview of the health
risks and legal implications related to alcohol and
other drug use, and to serve as a reference for on-
and off- campus resources which are available to
students, faculty, and staff at East Carolina Univer-
sity.
Since substance abuse is one of our primary
concerns relative to the health and welfare of
members of the ECU community, we hope this guide
is helpful to all who need help or who attempt to
provide assistance.
We express our sincere appreciation to the
agencies represented and to the work of the staff
who provided the information.
tional environment. Therefore, East Carolina University is committed to havina PnnU J� I m.mun!iy- . u
a campus that i, free of illegal drug use and drug and alcahal abus�e ha�9 poda? S ttlSjSit
In keeping with its primary purpose, East Carolina University will utilize tion All information SdTh �ll k
iTdt" 7T QS "S T,i�rtTPr0aCh ,0 iS Pr�blem' b one volunta ly avaTAemsXf dlTalcll
d ua orre ,T mT,ber �f 7� comm" who uses illegal counseling or rdwETswbS
drugs or abuses any drug mcludmg alcohol may be subjectto prosecution and dential. It will not be used again'L nvidual
POLICY ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE
East Carolina University is dedicated to the
pursuit and dissemination of knowledge and as
such, expects all members of the academic commu-
nity to behave in a manner conducive to that end.
The highest standards of personal and professional
conduct must be maintained by faculty, staff, and
students. Illegal or abusive use of alcohol or other
drugs by members of the university community
adversely affects the mission of the university and is
prohibited.
2 Accordingly, the East Carolina University
board of trustees adopts the following policy,
O consistent with the UNC Board of Governors'
policy on illegal drugs. The policy is intended to
accomplish the following:
. Prevent drug abuse through a strong
educational effort;
2. Encourage and facilitate the use of
counseling services and rehabilitation programs by
those members of the academic community who
require assistance in stopping drug abuse;
and
3. Discipline appropriately those members of
the academic community who engage in illegal
drug- or alcohol-related behaviors.





EDUCATIONAL EFFORTS TO
PREVENT SUBSTANCE ABUSE
In keeping with its primary mission of
education, East Carolina University will conduct a
strong educational program aimed at preventing
drug abuse and illegal drug or alcohol use.
Educational efforts shall be directed toward all
members of the academic community and will
include information about the incompatibility of the
use or sale of illegal substances with the goals of
East Carolina University; the health hazards
associated with illegal drug or alcohol use; the
incompatibility of substance abuse with the maximum
achievement of educational, career, and other
personal goals and the potential legal consequences
of involvement with illegal drugs or alcohol.
COUNSELING &
REHABILITATION SERVICES
Those faculty, staff, or students who seek
assistance with a substance abuse-related problem
shall be provided with information about drug
counseling and rehabilitation services available
through East Carolina University and also through
community organizations. Those who voluntarily
avail themselves of university services shall be
assured that applicable professional standards of
confidentiality will be observed
DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS
Students, faculty members, administrators,
and other employees are responsible, as citizens,
for knowing about and complying with the provisions
of North Carolina law that make it a crime to
possess, sell, deliver, or manufacture those drugs
designated collectively as "controlled substances"
in Article 5 of Chapter 90 of the North Carolina
General Statutes. Any member of the university
community who violates that law is subject both to
prosecution and punishment by the civil authorities
and to disciplinary proceedings by the university.
It is expected that East Carolina University
students, faculty members, administrators, and other
employees who use or possess alcoholic beverages
will do so as legally prescribed by the laws of the
state of North Carolina, within the regulations of
East Carolina University, and in a manner which
does not disrupt the lives of others. A person whose
conduct is outside these parameters will be subject
to the judicial rules and procedures of the university.
It is not "double jeopardy" for both the
civil authorities and the university to proceed
against and punish a person for the same
specified conduct. The university will initiate its
own disciplinary proceeding against a student,
faculty member, administrator, or other employee
when the alleged conduct is deemed to affect the
interests of the university.
Penalties will be imposed by the university in
accordance with procedural safeguards applicable
to disciplinary actions against students, faculty
members, administrators, and other employees, as
required by Sections V and VI of Appendix D of the
East Carolina University Faculty Manual, by the
Board of Governors' policies applicable to other
employees exempt from the State Personnel Act, by
the East Carolina University Studentjudicial System,
and by regulations of the State Personnel
Commission.
The penalties to be imposed by the university
may range from written warnings with probationary
status to expulsions from enrollment and discharges
from employment.
However, the following minimum penalties shall
be imposed for the particular offenses described.
TRAFFICKING IN ILLEGAL DRUGS
A. For the illegal manufacture, sale or
delivery, or possession with intent to manufacture,
sell, or deliver, of any controlled substance identified
in Schedule I, N.C. General Statutes 90-89, or
Schedule II, N.C. General Statutes 90-90 (including,
but not limited to, heroin, mescaline, lysergic acid
diethylamide, opium, cocaine, amphetamine,
methaqualone), a student shall be expelled and
any faculty member, administrator, or other
employee shall be discharged.
B. For a first time offense involving the
illegal manufacture, sale or delivery, or possession
with intent to manufacture, sell, or deliver, of any
controlled substance identified in Schedules III
through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91 through
90-94 (including, but not limited to, marijuana,
pentobarbital, codeine), the minimum penalty shall
be suspension from enrollment or from employment
for a period of at Ipast one semester or its equivalent.
For a second offense, any student shall be expelled
and any faculty member, administrator, or other
employee shall be discharged.
State personnel policy provides hat employees subject to the State
Personnel Act may not be suspended from employment for punitive
reasons for more than three days. Whenever this policy mandates
"suspension" of an employee subject to the State
Personnel Act as a minimum penalty, that employee must
instead be terminated in accordance with he state
personnel policy.
THREI
��
V.
3






4
� FOUR
ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF DRUGS
A. For a first-time offender involving the illegal
possession of any controlled substance identified in
Schedule I, N.C. General Statutes 90-89, or Schedule
II, N.C. General Statutes 90-90, the minimum penalty
shall be suspension from enrollment or from employ-
ment for a period of at least one semester or its
equivalent.
B. For a first offense involving the illegal
possession of any controlled substance identified in
Schedules III through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91
through 90-94, the minimum penalty shall be probation
for a period to be determined on a case-by-case basis.
A person on probation must agree to participate in a
drug education and counseling program, consent to
regular drug testing, and accept such other conditions
and restrictions, including a program of community
service, as the chancellor or the chancellor's designee
deems appropriate. Refusal or failure to abide by the
terms of probation shall result in suspension from
enrollment or from employment for any un-expired
balance of the prescribed period of probation.
C. For second or other subsequent offenses
involving the illegal possession of controlled substances,
progressively more severe penalties shall be imposed!
including expulsion of students and discharge of faculty
members, administrators, or other employees.
ILLEGAL POSSESSION AND USE OF ALCOHOL
A. For offenses involving the illegal possession,
use, sale, andor distribution of alcohol in violation of
N.C. Genera! Statutes 18B-300 and 12B-301 and
302; 18B-1006 (a); or Greenville Ordinance No.
812-1-2, a student will be subjected to a progressive
penalty system based on the type of infraction and the
circumstances involved. Penalties may be a warning,
probation, fine, volunteer community service, andor
removal from the residence system or the university.
B. In certain circumstances, involvement in an
alcohol education andor counseling program may be
offered to a student in lieu of being referred to the Honor
Board with a recommendation for suspension. Specifi-
cally, a student given this option will be required to
participate in a program of assessment, education, and
counseling and be placed on university probation. A
student may participate in this program only once in
lieu of disciplinary action.
C. University employees subject to the State
Personnel Act may be disciplined in accordance with
the rules and regulations for personal misconduct, i.e
final written warning, which may include a three-day
suspension without pay or dismissal.
State personnel policy provides that employees subject to the State
Personnel Act may not be suspended from employment for punitive
reasons for more than three days. Whenever this policy mandates
suspension" of on employee subject to the State Personnel Act os a
minimum penalty, that employee must instead be terminated in accor-
dance with the state personnel policy.
When a student, faculty member, administrator,
or other employee has been charged by the university
with a violation of policies concerning illegal drugs or
alcohol, heshe may be suspended from enrollment or
employment before initiation or completion of regular
disciplinary proceedings if, assuming the truth of the
charges, the chancellor or, in the chancellor's absence,
the chancellor's designee concludes that the person's
continued presence within the university community
would constitute a clear and immediate danger to the
health or welfare of other members or the university
community; provided, that if such a suspension is
imposed, an appropriate hearing of the charges against
the suspended person shall be held as promptly as
possible thereafter.
In the case of employees, anyone convicted of
a criminal drug statute violation occurring in the
workplace shall notify the university no later than five
days after such conviction. The university will
commence disciplinary action
against such an
individual within
thirty days of
notice of the
conviction.
FOR YOUR INFORMATION
. If any person commits a controlled substance
violation in which the punishment includes imprison-
ment for not more than two years and if heshe has
been previously convicted for one or more controlled
substances violations, heshe shall be punished as a
Class I. Felon. Up to five years in prison and or fine.
2. If the violation includes imprisonment for not more
than six months in prison and if heshe has been
previously convicted of one or more controlled
substances violations, heshe shall be guilty of a
misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment of not more
than two years andor maximum fine of $2,000.
3. Any person eighteen years of age or older who
sells or delivers any controlled substance to a person
under sixteen years of age shall be punished as a Class
E Felon. Up to thirty years in prison andor fine.
,

m
-





TYPES OF ALCOHOL
Malt Beverage
is beer, 1 2 of 1 to 6 alcohol.
Unfortified Wine
is wine not more that 17 alcohol.
Fortified Wine
is wine of not more than 24 alcohol.
Spirituous Liquor
is distilled spirits or ethyl alcohol, including spirits
of wine, whiskey, rum, brandy, gin, etc.
Mixed Beverage
is a drink composed in whole or part of spirituous
liquor and served at restaurants, hotels, and private
clubs licensed by the state.
HEALTH RISKS IHHHHOmMtt
Psychologically and physically addictive; respiratory depression;
depression of the immune system; increased risk of heart disease,
cancer, accidents, hypertension; brain damage; damage to
unborn fetus; impotence at high dosage levels.
For additional information contact your local health care
provider or pharmacist.
penalties maaumammmamam
TO POSSESS, AHEMmO PURCHASE, OR PURCHASE;
TO SELL OR GIVE: Malt Beverages, Unfortified Wine, Fortified
Wine, Spirituous Liquor, or Mixed Beverages to Anyone Under
Twenty-one Years Old:
Maximum Penalty: Imprisonment for a term not exceeding two
years orafine, or both, in the discretion of thecourt (Misdemeanor);
however, to possess, attempt to purchase, or purchase by a
nineteen or twenty year old is an infraction punishable by
a fine not to exceed $25.
AIDER OR ABETTOR:
1. By any person who is under twenty-one years of age to
purchase and who aids or abets another to attempt to purchase,
purchase or possess; sell or give shall be guilty of a misdemeanor
punishable by imprisonment for not more than six months and
or a fine up to $500.
2. By any person over twentyone years of age to purchase
and who aids or abets another to attempt to purchase, r
purchase or to possess; sell or give shall be guilty of a i
msdemeanorpunishable by imprisonmentfor not more than A
two years andor a fine up to $2,000.
For additional information contact your local law
enforcement agency or district attorney's office.
UNIVERSITY PENALTIES:
Progressive penalty system based on the type of infraction
and the circumstances involved. Penalties may be a
warning, probation, fine ($25 minimum), voluntary
community service, andor removal from the residence
system.
In certain circumstances, involvement in an alcohol
education andor counseling program may be offered to a
student in lieu of being referred to the Honor Board with a
recommendation for suspension. Specifically, a student
given this option will be required to participate in a program
of assessment, education, and counseling; pay a fee and be
placed on university probation. A student may participate
in this program only once in lieu of disciplinary action.
�tL.
MflJF





SCHEDULE I
Heroin, LSD, Peyote, Mescaline,
Psilocybin ("shrooms), Other
Hallucinogens, Methaqualone
(Quaaludes), Phenylcyclidine (PCP),
and MDA.
HEALTH RISKS
Psychologically and physically
addictive; depression, withdrawal
symptoms, convulsions, death,
unpredictable behavior with
hallucinogens; possible damage to
unborn fetus.
PENALTIES
To Possess: Maximum Penalty: Five
years in prison andor fine Felony)
To Possess With Intent to Sell or
Deliver, Manufacture, or to Sell
andor Deliver: Maximum Penalty:
Ten years in prison andor fine
Felony).
Possession of Drug
Paraphernalia for the Purpose
of Ingesting a Controlled
Substance
To possess One year in prison andor
$500 fine. (Misdemeanor)
To possess with intent to sell or deliver;
to manufacture; or to sell andor
deliver: Two years in prison andor
$1,000 fine. (Misdemeanor).
-HOWEVER-
Delivery of drug paraphernalia by a
person over age eighteen to a person
under age eighteen who is at least
three years younger than defendant:
Five years in prison andor fine.
(Felony).
Counterfeit Controlled
Substances
To create, sell, or possess with intent
to sell or deliver a counterfeit
substance. (Any substance which is
represented as a controlled substance).
Maximum Penalty:
Five years in prison andor fine.
SCHEDULE II
Morphine, Demerol, Codeine,
Percodan, Percocet, Fentanyl, Dilaudid,
Seconal, Nembutal, Cocaine,
Amphetamines, and other opium and
opium extracts and narcotics.
HEALTH RISKS
Psychological and physically addictive;
withdrawal symptoms, convulsions,
respiratory failure, frequent accidents;
possible damage to unborn fetus;
death; cocaine and amphetamines
increase blood pressure which can lead
to irregular heartbeat and death;
amphetamines can cause agitation,
increase in body temperature,
hallucinations, convulsions, possible
death.
PENALTIES
To Possess: Maximum Penalty: Two
years in prison andor $2,000 fine
(Misdemeanor)
�UNLESS�
1. Exceeds 4 tablets, capsules,
other dosage units, or equivalent
quantity of Hydromorphone.
2. Exceeds 100 tablets, capsules,
other dosage units, or equivalent
quantity.
3. Any amount of Cocaine.
Maximum Penalty: Five years in prison
andor fine (Felony).
To Possess With Intent to Sell or
Deliver, Manufacture, or to Sell
andor Deliver: Maximum Penalty:
Ten years in prison andor fine Felony.
SCHEDULE III
Certain barbiturates such as Amobarito
and Codine containing medicine such
as Fiorinal 3, Doriden, Tylenol 3,
Empirin 3, and codeine-based cough
suppressants such as Tussionex and
Hycomine, and all anabolic steroids.
HEALTH RISKS
Psychologically and physically
addictive; potential liver damage, nausea
and vomiting, dizziness, disorientation,
shallow breathing, cold and clammy
skin, coma, possible death; withdrawal
symptoms include anxiety, tremors,
insomnia, convulsions; possible
damage to unborn fetus.
PENALTIES
To Possess: Maximum Penalty: To
possess less than 100 tablets,
capsules, other dosage units, or
equivalent quantity: Two years in prison
andor fine Misdemeanor).
To possess more than 100 tablets,
capsules, other dosage units, or
equivalent quantity:
Five years in prison andor fine
Felony).
To Possess With Intent to Sell or
Deliver, Manufacture, to or Sell
andor Deliver: Maximum Penalty:
Five years in prison andor fine
Felony).
UNIVERSITY PENALTIES SCHEDULES I & II
To Possess Illegally Any Controlled Substance: Minimum Penalty:
Suspension from enrollment or from employment for a period of at least one
semester or its equivalent.
To Possess With Intent to Sell or Deliver; To Manufacture; or To Sell
andor Deliver: Minimum Penalty: That student shall be expelled and any
faculty member, administrator, or other employee shall be discharged.
i
6
SIX





� I
SCHEDULE IV
Barbiturates, narcotics, and stimulants,
including Valium, Talwin, Librium,
Equanil, Darvon, Darvocet, Placidyl,
Tranzene, Serax, lonamin (yellow
jackets).
HEALTH RISKS
Psychologically and physically
addictive; drowsiness, withdrawal
symptoms, tremors, abdominal and
muscle cramps, insomnia, anxiety,
convulsions, possible death; possible
damage to unborn fetus.
PENALTIES
To Possess: Maximum Penalty:
Same as Schedule III.
To Possess With Intent to Sell or
Deliver,
Manufacture,
or to Sell
andor
Deliver:
Maximum
Penalty: Five
years in prison . (. :
andor fine v
(Felony). JjM
mrf
SCHEDULE V
Compounds that contain very limited
amounts of codeine, dihydrocodeine,
ethylmorphine, opium, and atropine,
such as Terpine Hydrate with codeine,
Robitussin AC.
HEALTH RISKS
Psychologically and physically
addictive; nausea, gastroinfestinal
symptoms, drowsiness, withdrawal
symptoms, including runny nose,
watery eyes, panic, chills, cramps,
irritability, nausea; possible damage to
unborn fetus.
PENALTIES
To Possess: Maximum Penalty: Six
months in prison andor fine
Misdemeanor.
To Possess With Intent to Sell or
Deliver, Manufacture, or to Sell
andor Deliver: Maximum Penalty:
Five years in
prison andor
fine Felony.
J A
m
SCHEDULE VI
Marijuana, THC, Hashish, Hash Oil,
Tetrahydrocannabinol.
HEALTH RISKS
Psychologically addictive; increased
risk of lung cancer; bronchitis, and
emphysema; contributes to heart
disease, fatigue, paranoia, possible
psychosis; withdrawal symptoms,
including insomnia, hyperactivity, and
decreased appetite; depression of the
immune system; decreased sperm count
in men and irregular ovulation in
women.
PENALTIES
To Possess: Maximum Penalty: To
possess less than 1 2 ounce of
Marijuana or 120 ounce Hashish:
Thirty days in prison andor $100 fine
Misdemeanor
To possess more than 1 2 ounce of
Marijuana or 120 ounce Hashish:
Two years in prison andor fine
Misdemeanor).
To possess more than 1 1 2 ounce of
Marijuana or 320 ounce Hashish or
consists of any quantity of synthetic
Tetrahydrocannabinols or
Tetrahydrocannabinols isolated from the
resin of Marijuana: Five years in prison
andor fine Felony.
To Possess With Intent to Sell or
Deliver, Manufacture, or to Sell
andor Deliver: Maximum Penalty:
Five years in prison andor fine
Felony.
For additional information contact
The Dean of Students
209 Whichard Building
UNIVERSITY PENALTIES SCHEDULES III, IV, V & VI
To Possess Illegally Any Controlled Substance andor Any
Drug Paraphernalia:
Minimum Penalty-First Offence: Probation to be determined on a case-by-
case basis. Must agree to participate in a drug education and counseling
program, consent to regular drug testing, and other conditions and
restrictions including community service. Refusal or failure to do so shall
result in suspension from enrollment or from employment for the remaining
period of probation. Second (. subsequent offences involving illegal
possession of controlled substances, progressively more severe penalties
shall be imposed, including expulsion of students and discharge of faculty
members, administrators, or other employees.
To Possess With Intent to Sell or Deliver,
to Manufacture; or to Sell andor
Deliver:
Minimum Penalties-First Offense; Suspension
from enrollment or from employment for at least
one semester or its equivalent.
Second Offense. Any student shall be expelled,
and any faculty member,
administrator, or other employees
shall be discharged.
SEVEN
7





FEDERAL TRAFFICKING PENALTIES DRUG & ALCOHOL
csa,v RESOURCES &
First Offens: Not more than three years. Fine not moregljlll jVls 3EKW I
DRUGQuantity
Methamphetamine10-99 gm or 100-999 gm
mixture
Heroin100-999 gm mixture
Cocaine500-4,999 gm mixture
Cocaine Base5-49 gm mixture
PCP10-99 gm or 100-999 gm
mixture
LSD1-10 gm mixture
Fentanyl40-399 gm mixture
Fentanylanalogue 10-99 gm mixture
CSA I AND II PENALTIES
1st Offense
' Not less than 5 years. Not more than forty years.
If death or serious injury, not less than twenty years. Not
more than life. Fine of not more than $2 million individual,
$5 million other thon individual.
2nd Offense
Not less than ten years. Not more than life. If death or serious
injury, not less than life. Fine of not more than $4 million
individual,10 million other than individual.
than $250,000 individual, $1 million if other than
individual.
Second Offense: Not more than six years. Fine not more
than $500,000 individual, $2 million if other than
individual.
CSAV
Drug All Quantity Any
First Offense: Not more than one year. Fine not more
than $100,000 individual, $250,000 if other than
individual.
Second Offense: Not more than two years. Fine not
more than $200,000 individual, $500,000 if other than
individual.
Alcohol and Drug Education Committee
Contact: JeanieTomkalskiPhone:757-6793
The Alcohol and Drug Education committee makes
policy recommendations to the vice chancellor for student
life and other appropriate university committees and groups
relating to the use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs
among members of the ECU community.
BACCHUS
Student Volunteer Organization
303 Erwin Building - ECU Campus
Contact: JeanieTomkalskiPhone:757-6793
BACCHUS (Boosting Alcohol Consciousness Con-
cerning the Health of University Students) is a volunteer
student organization offering peer counseling and interven-
tion as well as peer education to ECU students concerning
substance abuse problems.
DRUGQuantity
Methamphetamine100 gm or more or 1 kg or
more mixture
Heroin1 kg or more mixture
Cocaine5 kg or more mixture
Cocaine Base50 kg or more mixture
PCP100 gm or more or 1 kg or
more mixture
SD10 gm or more mixture
Fentanyl400 gm or more mixture
Fentanylanalogue100 gm or more mixture
Does not include marijuana, hashish, or hash oil.
FEDERAL TRAFFICKING
PENALTIES-MARUUAN A 531 e-
Wright Building - ECU Campus
Marijuana - Mixture containing detectable quantity
Quantity - 1,000 kg or more; or 1,000 or more
plants.
First Offense - No less than ten years, not more than
life. If death or serious injury, not less than twenty
years, not more than life. Fine not more than $4 million
individual, $10 million other than individual.
Second Offense - No less than twenty years, not
more than life. If death or serious injury, not less than
life. Fine not more than $8 million individual, $20
million other than individual.
Contact Any CounselorPhone:757-6661
The Counseling Center provides short-term counsel-
ing, therapy, and referral services for students. In addition,
educational and consultation services for users or service
providers are provided.
CSA I AND II PENALTIES
1st Offense
Not less than tenyears. Not more than life. If death or serious
Marijuana-Mixture containing detectable quantity
Quantity -100 kg to 1,000 kg; or 100-999 plants.
First Offense - No less than five years, not more than
forty years. If death or serious injury, not less than
twenty years, not more than life. Fine not more than $2
million individual, $5 million other than individual.
njury, not less than twenty years. Not more than life. Fine Second Offense - No less than ten years, not more
of not more than $4 million individual, $10 million if other
than individual.
2nd Offense
Not less than twenty years. Not more than life. If death or
serious injury, not less than life. Fine of not more than $8
million individual, $20 million other than individual.
CSA I AND II
Drug Others' Quantity Any
First Offense: Not more than twenty years. If death or
serious injury, not less than twenty years, not more than life.
Fine $1 million individual, $5 million if other than individual.
Second Offense: Not more than fifty years, if death or
serious injury, life. Fine $2 million individual, $10 million
if other than individual.
CSA III
Drug All Quantity Any
First Offense: Not more than five years. Fine not more
than $250,000 individual, $1 million if other than
individual.
Second Offense: Not more than ten years. Fine not more
than $500,000 individual, $2 million if other than
individual.
School of Nursing
Nursing Building - ECU Campus
Con�act:Dr.GeneTranbargerPhone:757-4319
The School of Nursing faculty is composed of
qualified nurse educators who are knowledgeable about
the problems of substance abuse. They are available to
teach in interdisciplinary courses which emphasize or
include this content. They are also available to meet with
student groups (residence hall, fraternities, sororities) or
individuals to help them better understand the problem, how
to assist others with substance abuse, and how to seek
treatment through referral to an appropriate service. .
Pitt County Mental Health Center
Substance Abuse Program
than life. If death or serious injury, not less than life. Statonsburg Road (By Pitt County Memorial Hospital)
Fine not more than $4 million individual,10 million Contact: Steve Creech,
other than individual.
1200
-
Marijuana 50 to 100 kg
Hashish 10 to 100 kg
Hashish Oil 1 to 100 kg
Marijuana 50-99 plants
First Offense - Not more than twenty years. If death
or serious injury, not less than twenty years, not more
than life. Fine $1 million individual, $5 million other
than individual.
Second Offense - Not more than thirty years. If
death or serious injury, life. Fine not more than $4
million individual, $10 million other than individual.
Marijuana Less than 50 kg
Hashish Less than 10 kg
Hashish Oil Less than 1 kg
First Offense - Not more than five years. Fine not
more than $250,000 individual,1 million other than
individual.
Second Offense - Not more than ten years. Fine
$500,000 individual, $2 million other than
individual.
NOTE. Federal Trafficking Penalties as of November 18,1988.
'Includes Hashish or Hashish Oil (Marijuana is a Schedule I
Controlled Substance.)
DirectorPhone: 551-
Daily crisis intervention service seven daysweek.
EmergencyCrisis program: twenty-four-hour
emergency face-to-face and telephone contact.
�Detoxification program: Residential and
ambulatory services for addicts and alcoholics.
Out-patient treatment: Structured treatment
program for clients and family members.
Forensic program:
DUI court program with evaluation, referral
and traffic schools.
TASC program for chronic offenders with
legal involvement.
Cocaine program: Provide counseling
services for people on cocaine with a desire
to quit. Offers inpatient referrals as well as
work with people on an out-patient basis.
Department of Public Safety
609 E. 10th Street - ECU Campus
Contact: J. Keith KnoxPhone: 757-6266
On a request basis, the crime prevention officer will
provide public awareness programs. These programs offer
o detailed analysis of illegal drugs, symptoms of use, and
hazards. Legal implications of drug use are reviewed. The
"Think Smart" program offered by the Department of Public
Safety uses prison inmates to provide educational informa-
tion.
L tfi





REAL Crisis Intervention Center, Inc.
312 E. 10th Street
Contact: Mary Smith,
DirectorPhone: 758-HELP
The REAL Crisis Intervention Center is a comprehen-
sive, nonprofit organization designed to accommodate the
need in Pitt County for free, confidential supportive counsel-
ing, information, and referral services. All services operate
on a twenty-four-hour basis, and anyone wishing to contact
REAL may do so by calling the HELP-Jine or coming by the
center.
Department of Resident Education
Fletcher Hall - ECU Campus
Contact: Dr. Carlo Jones,
DirectorPhone:757-4264
The resident education staff offers information con-
cerning drug and alcohol awareness and education,
implements programs and presentations, provides needed
counseling and referral, and maintains a resource library.
Residents should contact resident advisers, assistant coordi-
nators, or the coordinator for resident education in their
building.
State Employees' Assistance Program
Flowers Building
101 W. 14 Street, Office 103
Contact: Steve WilsonPhone: 830-3458
The State Employees' Assistance Program (SEAP) is
a free, confidential assessment, counseling, consultation,
and referral service for all state employees and their family
members. Temporary and retired employees ore included
in these services. The program is designed to help employ-
ees andor family members find solutions to problems that
disrupt their personal or professional lives.
Student Health Service
Student Health Center - ECU Campus
Contact: Jennifer PhillipsPhone:757-6794
The Student Health Service provides short-term
counseling, health education, and referrals. Physicians,
psychiatrists, nurses, and a health educator are available to
provide immediate counseling as well as educational mate-
rials related to drug and alcohol abuse. Speakers are
available to provide programs on drug and alcohol-related
topics for student groups.
Office of Health Promotion and Well-Being
303 Erwin Building - ECU Campus
Contact: Jean ieTomkalskiPhone:757-6793
The office of Health Promotion and Well-Being
sponsors and coordinates a variety of healthy lifestyle
programs. With regard to substance abuse, this office
provides programs and information through the Peer Health
Education Program. Peer Health Educators are available
upon request to present educational progroms within the
residence halls, fraternities, sororities and for other student
groups. In addition, a wellness resource center is open
daily, Monday through Friday, to provide students, facuity
and staff with pamphlets, books and videos on substance
abuse and other wellness issues.
Walter B. Jones Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Treatment Center
Highway 43 West, Greenville
Contact: Kim BellPhone:830-3426
ADATC provides a twenty-eight day intensive reha-
bilitation program for substance abusers age 18 and
greater. Programs include assessment, orientation, treat-
ment planning, group therapy, family therapy, classes
meetings on AlcoholicsNarcotics Anonymous, NCAARF
module series, leisure counseling, occupational training,
vocational rehabilitation, medical assessment and stabiliza-
tion, and discharge planning. Services are available to meet
the special needs of substance abusing women, IV drug
users, and the deaf and hearing impaired.
Wesley Foundation
Methodist Student Center
Contact: Dan EarnhardtPhone: 758-2030
or 355-2430
Quarterly programs are presented for residents
and members of our fellowship groups.
Referral is maintained for persons who come for
personal counseling.
Twenry-four-hour telephone service is provided for
crisis intervention and support.
The Harbors
211 -D Commerce Street
Contact: Dr. W. Mark RiddlePhone:321-1800
The Harbors is an integrated health-care and inten-
sive outpatient facility that offers treatment for addictive
disorders. In addition, the needs of family members andor
significant others are also addressed to assist the recovery
of all persons impacted by the disease of chemical abuse.
Services offered:
Evening Chemical Dependency Program
Eating Disorders Group Therapy
Co-Dependency Groups
Aftercare Recovery Group
'Intervention Servies
24-Hour Crisis Helpline
'Referral source for 1 2-Step Groups: AA, NA
DWI Assessments and Treatment
Department of Family Medicine
East Carolina University School of Medicine
Family Practice Center
Contact: Dr. Harold MayPhone: 551-4616
The Family Practice Center offers counseling, therapy
and referral services to members of the campus community
and their families.
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program
Department of Rehabilitation Studies
School of Allied Health Sciences
312FBelk-ECU Campus
Contact: Jerry LotterhosPhone:757-4421
The program offers a series of six courses in the
drugalcohol area.
REHB 2003 - Alcohol and Drug Abuse:
Health and Social Problem
REHB 5793 -Treatment and Addiction
REHB 5795 - Prevention of Alcohol and
Drug Abuse
REHB 5796 - Contemporary Alcohol
and Drug Abuse Issues
REHB 6350 - Group Counseling for
Addictive Illness
REHB 6330 - Substance Abuse Counseling
Undergraduate students may pursue a minor in
drugalcohol studies. In addition, a master's degree in
substance abusecounseling is available in cooperation with
the rehabilitation studies department. Faculty are avoilable
for speaking, technical assistance, and consultation in
chemical use and abuse issues.
ECU Regional Training Center
A-l 2 Minges - ECU Campus
Contact: Carol-Ann TuckerPhone:757-4661
Provides consultation, technical assistance, and
health education relative to drug and alcohol concerns.
Speakers available on request.
Department of Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Safety
203 Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium
Contact: Mr. Bill CainPhone:757-6000
The health education department offers Health
1000 (Health in Modern Society), which is required for all
East Carolina University students. Drugs, alcohol, and
tobacco are covered as course units. Additional courses
offered by the health education department which provide
drug and alcohol information include:
HLTH 3010-Health Problems I
HLTH 3020 - Health Problems II
HLTH 4323 - Methods of Teaching
in Health Education
HLTH 5200-Health Education
in the Workplace
HLTH 5345 - Alcoholism in Health Education
HLTH 5355 - Drug Education
HLTH 5375 - A Systems Approach
to Drug Education for Teachers
HLTH 6100 - Health Education Methodology
Department of Psychiatric Medicine
ECU School of Medicine
4E-102A Drody Medicol Sciences Building
Contact: Alfred HarkleyPhone:551-2661
Offers a comprehensive course in the clinical as-
pects of substance abuse for sophomore medical students.
Faculty are available for clinical consultation, technical
assistance, and speaking upon request.
Department of Rehabilitation Studies
School of Allied Health Sciences
Belk Building - ECU Campus
Contact: Dr. Paul AlstonPhone: 757-4452
Offers a specialty emphasis in employee assis-
tance programs in the MS degree in rehabilitation counseling.
Offers a MS degree in substance abuse in coop-
eration with the AlcoholDrug Program and the School of
Allied Health Sciences.
School of Social Work
1 34 Ragsdale - ECU Campus
Contact: Dr. Gary R. LowePhone: 757-4208
Social work provides a course (SOCW 3000),
Addiction, Crime, and the Criminal, which is available to
social work majors and as an elective to others.
Pitt County Treatment Alternatives to Street Crime
123 W. Third Street
Contact: Ivey RhodesPhone:758-0034
or 758-0129
TASC is designed to offer a treatment alternative to
incarceration. This progrom serves individuals who may
have a substance abuse problem and are involved in crimes
while influenced by their substance addiction.
Pitt County Driving While Impared Program
123 W. Third Street
Contact: Ivey RhodesPhone:758-0034
or 758-0129
The DWI program is designed to cut down on the
alcoholdrug related accidents in North Carolina and to cut
down on the recidivism rate for persons charged with this .
crime.
Progressions at Carolina Centre
702 Johns Hopkins Drive
Contact: Crystal VetronePhone:757-0123
Progressions is a stage directed treatment program
that provides assessment and treatment for alcohol and
substance abuse problems in a highly professional and
confidential setting. Progressions at Carolina Centre is
licensed by the -State of North Carolina as an official alcohol
and substance abuse treatment facility. Treatment compo-
nents include:
individual and Group Therapy
MaritalFamily Sessions
Structured Outpatient Substance Abuse Program
ACOA Issues, Women's Issues
DWI Assessments and Treatment
itment � �
NINE





fr
Services informal international
eople who join because they
rontrol their use of alcohol. Their purpose
stay sober and help others who want to
sober. They do not recruit new members,
new -embers are always welcome. They meet
and talk about their alcohol problems.
Eligibility: Desire to stop drinking
To Apply: Attend meeting. Call for day time
and location.
Fee None.
Area Served: Eastern North Carolina but not
limited.
Phone 758-0787
Services: Support group for persons who
grew up in alcoholic families.
To Apply: Attend meeting. Call for day, time
and location.
Fee: None
Contact: Suzanne R. 830-1 71 8 (pm only)
Services Tc help family members -
ar z roholic ?c dea a rfi to better understand,
help an alec holic.
Des � nterest to h
A- eeting. Call for day f -
and location.
Fee None
Area Served: Eastern North Carolina but not
limirea
758-0787
Services:
�erapy for addicts
'to re � s � e stec



.�
To h:
Fee
Contac
it mo
' ng. Call I
321-162
Baptist Student Union
rhone 752-4646
Bayt Shalom
e 830-1138
Buddhist Meditation & Study Group
Contact: Byron CoulterFrc-e 757-6476
Campus Christian Fellowship
Ffice Box 2613
rrTimTumerPhone-752-7199
Campus Crusade for Christ
ft-E bacco Roaa
Contact: Shane Deike � 3ne 355-8989
Campus Ministries
Ca 758-2030
Church of Christ
7-6 JE Greenvilie Boulevard
�act: Winfred Felton Phone 321-2576
ECU Navigators
tad Kennyjenl Phcre 757-6144
757-0533
Episcopal Student Fellowship
r 4th Street
ntocl MartyGartmonPhone:752-3482
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship
Id Jones 752-2054
Latter Day Saints Student Association
756-6012
Moslem Students Association
551-2885
New Generation Christian Fellowship
757-1134
New Life Christian Fellowship
Williams 830-6814
Newman Catholic Student Center
757-1991
Our Redeemer Lutheran Church
oL - c Irr Streel
756-2377
756 2058
Presbyterian Campus Ministry
752-7240
Unitarian Universalist Fellowship
e. zr a
321-0575
The Way Campus Fellowship
� 355-5164
Wesley Foundation
Phone 758-2030





Title
The East Carolinian, March 30, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 30, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.933
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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