The East Carolinian, March 25, 1993






To,
Sports
One for One
The ECU ladies Softball team split a double
header with UNC-CH.
See story page 10.
Opinion
Changes!
Chancellor Eakin has approved
several changes to the
undergraduate catalog.
See story page 6.
Today
50'
Possible
rain



Tomorrow
T"
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 19
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, March 25,1993
12 Pages
Undergraduate catalog revisions approved by chancellor
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Incoming and transfer students will
be faced with major changes in the under-
graduate catalog in the next semester.
On March 18, Chancellor Eakin ap-
proved the revised section in the under-
graduate catalog dealing with academic
regulations. An ad-hoc committee in the
Faculty Senate proposed variouschanges
in the current dropadd policy, scholas-
tic eligibility and class attendance poli-
cies.
Thedropadd policy hasbeen modi-
fied with the addition of a four-drop limi-
tation imposed on students. Students may
still drop a class up to the first 40 percent
of meetings, but they now only have up to
four drops in their academic career. Also,
the drop option is prorated, which means
that a transfer student entering the uni-
versity with past semester hours will have
less drops than a freshman student.
Course drop options break down
into the following:
� 0-31 semester hours � 4 drops
� 32-62 semester hours � 3 drops
� 63-95 semester hours � 2 drops
� 96 semester hours � 1 drop
SGA president Courtney Jones ex-
pressed the concern about the effect the
new dropadd policy would have on
students.
"Thisdropadd policy doesn'tgive
the students the freedom to choose as
they've had in the past Jones said.
Scholastic eligibility standards have
also been modified in the upcoming cata-
log. Past retention periods, or phases in a
student's education, have placed mini-
mum grade point averages in conjunc-
tion with attempted andor transfer
hours. In the previous catalog, a student
had seven retention periods, culminat-
ing in a minimum 1.95 GPA for anyone
over 96 semester hours.
The revised standardscompressthe
seven periods into two periods, with the
cutoff being at 32 semester hours. A stu-
dent with under 32 hours must have a
1.75 GPA; a student over 32 hours must
have a 2.00.
Though he approved the revised
section, Eakin expressed some reserva-
tions about the effect the changes on
scholastic eligibility' would have on the
student population.
"I'm concerned about the effect on
students Eakin said. "I want to make
sure that there isn't any unforeseen or
undesirableeffect. Upon reflection, I have
a feeling to go back and make sure
Eakin said that he planned to talk
with Faculty Senate members to ensure
that the change wou Id not be a detrimen-
tal one.
Further changes in the regulations
dealt with excused absences from class
attendance. Students may now be offi-
cially excused in the event of a death of a
family member or participation in a reli-
gious holiday. Offsetting this addition is
the deletion of student teachers having
the option of receiving an excuse from
Student Health Services to miss teaching
because of sickness. Both Eakin and Fac-
ulty Senate chairman John Moskop
agreed that they were pleased the Fac-
ulty Senate could reach a compromise
with the student government concerning
changes in the dropadd policy.
"The work of the committee and
the Faculty Senate is to be commended;
they did an excellent job on standards
Eakin said. "I'm pleased that they were
able to work out a compromise with the
student government
"I was pleased the Senate wasable
to find a compromise Moskop said.
"This served both the interests of student
wishing to drop courses and everyone's
interest in getting classes and graduating
more quickly
Though the administration looked
at the changes in a positive aspect, Jones
expressed misgivings about the effect
these changes will have all at once.
"These changes will have a nega-
tive effect Jones said. "Since both (drop
add and scholastic eligibility) will go into
effect at the same time, it will make mat-
ters even worse.
"I understand the need to raise stan-
dards, but it has to be a gradual process.
I feel there are a number of other solu-
tions to some of the problems that were
cited by the ad-hoc committee that were
not pursued
Photo by Jason Bosch
Alex Albright edited the North Carolina Literary Review which was recently nominated for a
prestigious national award.
Literary magazine nominated
for national design award
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
A magazine edited by
Alex Albright, an assistant
professor of English at ECU,
has recently been named a fi-
nalist in a national publica-
tion design competition.
The North Carolina Liter-
ary Review was first intro-
duced in the summer of 1992.
According to Albright, the
purpose of the magazine is to
explore and explain the con-
nections that four centuries of
writers have had with North
Carolina.
The competition fea-
tures over 5,000 publications
from across the nation. The
North Carolina Literary Review
has been named a finalist in the
28th Annual Society of Publica-
tion Designers National Compe-
tition that will be presented in
May.
"We are in a large group
within the contest that is juried
very hard said Albright. "Just
getting in the show is an honor
All entries receiving
awards will be displayed at the
New York Public Library begin-
ning May 27.
Eva Roberts, a graphics de-
sign instructor in the ECU School
of Art, was the magazine's de-
signer and art director.
"The one thing is that this
award signals is its physical de-
sign. We were lucky to have Eva
Roberts designing. This award is
hers Albright said.
The competition this year
is being judged by some of the
top art directors and designers
in the country. They include:
Joel Berg of Harper's Bazaar;
Judy Garlan of the Atlanta
Monthly; Michael Keegan of The
Washington Post; and Michael
Grossman of Entertainment
Weekly.
The Society of Publication
Designers was founded in 1965
to serve the special needs of
editorial arts directors and de-
signers. The society exhibi ts the
best in magazine design and
rewards career accomplish-
ments through its annual com-
petition and additional special
programs.
See LITERARY page 3
Family search service now
available at Joyner Library
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
For the remainder of this
month, users of Joyner Library will
have the opportunity to research
their family trees using an experi-
mental data base of genealogical
records.
North Carolina Librarian
Maury York describes the service as
a compact disc product called
FamilySearch published by Genesys
done in conjunction with the Li-
brary of the Mormon Church mak-
ing available the extensive research
the Church has compiled over the
years.
"The point of this service is to
make information available to
people looking for their ancestors.
Also, it could potentially be of use
for certain academic disciplines
York said. "For example, we were
recently working on a history project
where a student was researching
the women who signed a document
at the Edenton Tea Party, before the
Revolutionary War. Also, ithasuses
in sociological research, especially
in the area of demographics York
said.
The FamilySearch resources
include four different data bases.
These include the International Ge-
nealogical Index, a worldwide list-
ing of more than 147 million names
from the years 1500-1875, the Social
Security Death Index, containing
those 395 million people who died
with social security numbers from
1962-88, the Ancestral File from the
Mormon Church, and the Family
History Library Catalog.
York said that the system was
brought to ECU on a trial basis but
will stay only if the it proves valu-
able for more than researching per-
sonal family genealogy. So far, York
said, FamilySearch hasn'tbeen fully
utilized by the various disciplines.
For researching family histo-
ries, however, anyone can use the
system, including faculty, students,
staff and other users of Joyner Li-
brary. York said that usually a per-
son brings in a name, facts about a
person, when and where that per-
son lived, and other relevant infor-
mation to begin a search. "The sys-
tem hasof course been more helpful
to some than others. I would guess
that about 50 percent of the people
aredisappointed York said.
The system will only be avail-
able until the end of the month. "We
have a limited amount of one-hour
slots left York said. Ihecomputer
is located in Joyner B02.
Anyone interested in using the
records should make an appoint-
mentwith York or Barry Munsonat
757-6601. FamilySearch will be ac-
cessible on weekdays, 8 a.ra-5 p.m.
through the end of March. .
Touchdown!
Recent
warm
weather
brought
many
students
out to
participate
in usual
spring-
time
activities.
Photo by
Jason Bosch
Chancellor selects new executive assistant
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Dr. James Leroy Smith, a profes-
sor of Philosophy at ECU since 1969,
has been selected by Chancellor Rich-
ard Eakin to become executive assis-
tant to the chancellor.
Smith will fill the post recently
vacated by Richard Edwards, whore-
signed last month to accept a similar
position at a science and technology
museum in Ohio
The executive assistant position
is "a combination of external and in-
ternal activities Smith said. "I'm the
person to whom the Chancellor hands
things when he can't do them him-
self
Responsibilities for the position
include serving as assistant secretary
to the Board of Trustees and working
with the Chamber of Commerce as a
liaison for the Chancellor. "I will be
drafting papers and writing responses
for the Chancellor as well Smith said.
He is also responsible for the ad-
ministration of the University Publi-
cations office and the News Bureau
Currently Smith is splitting time
between his duties as executive assis-
tant and teaching a full course load
including three courses at ECU and
one course at Carteret Community
College.
This will continue until May,
when Smith assumes full responsibili-
ties in the Chancellor's office. "I will
still teach one course each semester
and maintain a small research opera-
tion in the Philosophy Department
Smith said.
Smith is a former Philosophy
Department chairman and has had an
extensive background in the field of
faculty governance. He has served .is
chairman of both the ECU Faculty Sen-
ate and the UNC system Faculty As-
sembly.
Hislatestadministrative respon-
sibilities have been directing ECU's
efforts for re-accreditation by the
Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools, and wo: king with state legis-
lators concerning funding for the reno-
vation ofJoyner Library.
Smith credits his internal expe-
rience with landing him the position.
Announcing the appointment, Eakin
referred to Smith's "long and valued
association" with the university.
"Dr. Smith's considerable expe-
See SMITH page 3
V4,
k-a






2 The East Carolinian
MARCH 25, 1993
CRI
S;ene
March 18, 1993
12:15 p.m.
An unknown person broke into the driver's side win-
dow of a 1981 gold Chevrolet Camaro on the east end
of Aycock Residential Hall.
8:15 p.m.
An unknown person broke into the rear window of a
1992 blue Saturn in the freshman parking lot on
Ficklen Drive.
March 20, 1993
10:15 p.m.
Three men were caught intoxicated, disruptive and
fighting near the mail room on the southeast corner
of the Publications Building. Two of the men were 19
and the other was 21.
March 21, 1993
5:51 a.m.
The door of a 1988 blue Jeep Wrangler was forced
open causing the hinge rods to bend. The suspects
include three males, all aged 18.
March 22, 1993
8:30 a.m.
An unknown person broke the window out of a state-
owned green Chevrolet truck in the parking lot north
east of the Brody Building.
March 23, 1993
10:32 p.m.
A 20-year-old man was caught impersonating a police
officer. The man was wearing a police officer's badge
on his waist pocket.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from ECU
Public Safety Records.
There will be another MANDA-
TORY staff writer's meeting today at
4:00 sharp! Anyone interested in
writing is invited to attend.
Minority students eligible for scholarship
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
ECU African-American stu-
dents are now eligible for the
Ledonia S. Wright Memorial
Scholarship. The scholarships are
available to African American
students who have completed 32
semester hours and have a cu-
mulative grade point average of
2.5orbetter Graduateandmedi-
cal students are also considered
for the scholarship and two will
be awarded this year.
The scholarships will be
awarded Saturday, April 17, at a
benefit which will also feature
entertainment by the Black Thes-
pians. The program, "Black
Voices from the Past will be an
entertaining account of black his-
tory. The Black Thespians, a
group consisting of ECU stu-
dents, graduate students and fac-
ulty members, performed a simi-
lar presentation in February in
recognition oi Black History
Month.
Wright was a former associ-
ate professor or community
health in the School of Allied
Health and Social Work. The
Ledonia S. Wright Atro-Ameri-
can Cultural Center bears her
name in honor of her efforts to
encourage multi-cultural educa-
tion and identification among the
university faculty and students.
African- American students
interested should see Jackie
Hawkins.coordinator of health
careers services in room 306
Erwin. 1 he applications must be
submitted by Wednesday, March
31. The $10 donation-tickets for
the Ledonia S. Wright Memorial
Scholarship Benefit are available
from Reginald Watson, General
Classroom 2147 (757-6684) or
from Jackie Hawkins, Erwin 306
(757-4252).
AIDS research to benefit from Workout for Hope
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Exercising usually benefits a
person's body, mind and self-es-
teem. March 30, it will also make a
tremendous benefit to the world of
AIDS research.
On thisday, individuals will
participate in the annual City of
Hope Workout for Hope. Persons
will be involved in a three-hour
workout that will include low-im-
pact and high-impact aerobics,
rubberbands, weights and step
aerobics.
Participants are asked to get
sponsors who will contribute do-
nations to the City of Hope to help
further AIDS research.
TheC ity of Hope isa research
facility in Los Angeles, Cal at the
Cirv of Hope Hospital. Started in
19H3, the facility has studied drugs
such as AZT in pursuit of anti-H IV
ALFREDO'S
it
lfcJ
"�JrTl
Large Pizzas
with I Topping
$8.95
a
HE
rre
therapy. Researchers not only look
foracurefor AIDS, butotherhealth
pioblemsconcerningsociety today.
The latest development in
AIDS research is �
the discovery of
"ribozymes or
RNA molecules
with the ability of
acting like en-
zvmes. Dr. John Jo-
seph Rossi, direc-
tor of molecular ge-
nehcsattheCityof
Hope, has said that
a ribozyme acts
like a scissors, at-
taching itself to the
AIDS virus and
cutting out a section of its genetic
code.
"It's almost like cutting a
cable Rossi said. "Cutting any
part of the cable will render it use-
less
HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
IffilMBHl'
By having the
event at ECU,
we can focus in
on a population
who is
concerned with
AIDS
Cathy Hill,
Recreational Services.
Rossi has encountered two
major problems with the ribozyme
research. The first is targeting the
HIV virus in a living cell.
The detailed
RN A structure may be
too complex for a
simple "snipping" pro-
cess. The other prob-
lem exists with the de-
li very of the ribozyme.
Possible efforts have
been done w i th f a t mol -
ecules and attachment
to proteins.
ECU will be the
first university to par-
ticipate in this annual
event National vice-
chair Mark Brunetz is an ECU
alumni and offered a special invi-
tation to ECU, said Cathy Hill, as-
sistant director of Recreational Ser-
vices.
"The event is traditionally
held in cities, in a club setting Hill
said. "Bv having the event at ECU,
we can focus in on a population
who is concerned with AIDS. In
this age, it's a critical issue. Any-
thing we do positively is a plus
Participants in the Workout
for Hope will receiveawards based
on the level of sponsorship.
For raising $50, participants
will receive a Workout for Hope t-
shirt; $100, a sweatshirt; $225, a
Workout for Hope sports bag. Ad-
ditional sponsorship over this level
make persons eligible for other
national prizes, including trips,
dinners and club memberships.
Activities start at 5.30 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum with participant
sign-in, and end at 8 p.m. The
evening's events will include
warm-ups, a super circuit work
out, cardio funk by Brunetz, STEP
demonstration and low impact fit-
ness workouts.
HAPPY HOUR
Pitchers 99 stiw,
BlJSCh Cans 75 6-�pm Dafly
Draft 35 4-4pm Daily
7 Large Pizza fu
wilK i Topping
5.45
2 Large Pizzas
wlti 1 Topping� QQ
Carry Out Onty �??
:0"KoX'XvZiZCjX'1s2!Xs
DOLLAR NIGHT at the
RAMADA INN takes a
week off
DOLLAR NIGHT will return
FRIDAY, APRIL 2nd
FREE DELIVERY TO DORMS & STUDENT APARTMENTS
tSffiffiftM8�B�
b
b
6 SPEND THE WEEKEND INSIDE
'RAIISVILLE VALL
PRICES GOOD THROUGH MARCH 27. 1993
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a
MARCH 25, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
Lecturer addresses multi-culturalism
Feminist discusses gender studies
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Lillian Robinson, a well-
known feminist, will address
multi-cultural education tonight
at 8 p.m.
"In the last few years, there
has been an increasing attack on
multi-cultural and gender stud-
ies within the academics said
English professor Gay Wilentz.
According to Wilentz,
Robinson's first book Sex, Class,
and Culture
examines
ethnicity,
race and gen-
der within
the cultural
context.
Robinson
is also known
for her
widely an-
66
In the last few years, there
has been an
increasing attack on multi-
cultural and gender studies
within the academics
Gay Wilentz,
English professor, feminist
mmmmhbibmm criticism in
thologized essay, "Treason Out the '90s Wilentz said.
Text In this essay, she dis- Currently, Robinson is a
cusses the questionable relation- visiting scholar at the Univer-
ship of femi-
nist and
multi-cul-
tural stud-
ies.
"She
clearly set
the stan-
dards for
SMITH
Continued from page 1
rienceat ECU and his extraordi-
nary abilities will be of great
benefit to me and to the univer-
sity community as we seek to go
forward with important univer-
sity initiatives Dr. Eakin said.
Smith is a native of Grove
City, Pa and an alumnus of
Penn State University, where he
also received his M.A. degree.
He received his Ph.D. degree
from Tulane University.
"I am looking forward to
gaining new experience and
learning new things. That I have
been here 24 years doesn't mean
that I don't have more to learn
Smith said.
LITERARY
sity of Texas, who has recently
returned from setting up a gen-
der studies program in univer-
sities in Thailand.
The talk is sponsored by
Women's Studies program, the
English Department, the
Colloquium Committee, the
Theory Colloquium and Minor-
ity Arts.
The lecture will be held in
the Mendenhall Great Room at
8 p.m w'th a free reception that
will follow the evening's events
and talk.
Continued from page 1
One of Eastern North Carolina's
Finest Restaurants For Over 14 Years
D
When asked how he felt
about receiving the award on the
first issue ever released, Albright
said, "Its great, and we've gotten
another one since then
The North Carolina Literary
Review also received a merit award
in HOW Magazine in the 'Best in
Design' category.
The ECU Department of En-
glish and the N.C. Literary and
Historical Association publishes
the magazine twice annually. The
magazine is focused toward a gen-
eral aud ience and conta ins articles
and essays dealing with North
Carolina people, places and
events.
The next issue is due out this
spring.
Peking Palace
Restaurant
FAMOUS MANDARIN, SZECHUAN & CANTONESE CUISINE
LUNCH & DINNER BUFFET
7 DAYS A WEEK
The East Carolinian is currently accepting applications for summer staff writers
Applications are in the office in the Student Publications Building.
��
BIG
FISH
SALS
MJ��
2 for 79
Black Mollies
Goldfish Fantails
Green Swordtails Green SailFin Mollies 2�5
We are looking to buy any cracked 10 gallon fish tanks!
RT 6 BOX 321-E
GREENVILLE, NC 27834
(919)758-9359 Call Bob or Sue for directions!
Coming Soon:
Baby Ferrets
ATTENTION
COMPLETE YOUR FOREIGN LANGUAGE
IN ONE SUMMER!
Department of Foreign Languages and Literature
will offer Accelerated Courses in
FRENCH and SPANISH
Summer 1993
FIRST SUMMER SESSION May 18 to June 22
French 1001 - 1002 & Spanish 1001 - 1002
SECOND SUMMER SESSION June 24 to July 30j
French 1003 - 1004 & Spanish 1003 - 1004
For more information call 757-6017
LUNCH
Mon-Fri llam-2:30pm
DINNER
Mon-Thur 5-9:30pm Friday 5-10:30pm
Open All Day Saturday & Sunday
Saturday llam-10:30pm
Sunday llam-9:30pm
Take Out Orders Available
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville Blvd. across from The Plaza
756-1169
d
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
t
TONIGHT
THURSDAY
MARCH 25, 1993
THE
SUfif ��?0�T
In Ass. with VENUS SWIMWEAR
m
SIWENK
CARWOW
WHEN: SATURDAY, MARCH 27th (APRIL 3rd RAIN DATE)
WHERE: THE COMMUTER PARKING LOT AT THE BOTTOM OF
COLLEGE HILL
WHO" ANY ECU STUDENT (FULL OR PART TIME) CAN ENTER. YOU
MAY BRING CARS FROM HOME AND YOU CAN ENTER AS MANY
CARS AS YOU LIKE.
COST: $3.00 ENTRY FEE UNTIL FRIDAY $5.00 DAY OF THE SHOW
all proceeds to benefit the local
ronald McDonald house
for more information
CALL 757-6935
3rd- SO-OO
BOGIES-752-4668SURFREPORT-355-6680
SPONSORED BY
AYCOCK HALL
sz
"5





Rich's Nuthouse
Thought for the unemployed:
Get a job,ya Bums
-an employed person
by Haselrig
Fred's Corner
By Sean Parnell
OU VEAU& T tAEP VoU
-r��v we- Ruins it
BY &&OWIN�-THR�.�
�AG.S OLP&Z IN
Pagliacci
by Mark Brett
Guardian
by Grubbs and Potts
WANG TV
by Ferguson and Manning
cou�t� swpgureveu
'cause me thdks
iu cmtegtooRK
De-Composition
by Angela Raper
CARTOONIST MEETING
The semesters closing up ,guys, and we've got some important stuff to get clear on.
No joke. The meeting should only take thirty minutes, but if you still can't come call me,
Thursday Today 7:00pm. East Carolinian Office
Special Comic Pages by David Jones





Warch 23, 1993
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
wsgw
JMWWHW
SUMMER STUDENTS! Get in spacious
AC 1 bedroom apartment for 1 or 2 at
Ringgold Towers. $315 gets you conve-
niently to downtown, campus. Lowest
priced B-unit subleased at Ringgold this
summer! Call 75S-4542.
SINGLE ROOMS FOR RENT for summer
-sessions. $250 per s.s. includes rent, utili-
-ties, and phone. More info contact Marcus
at (919) 758-3936.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE this sum-
mer. One room efficiency apartment at
Ringgold Towers. $260month. Call Den-
nis at 757-0905.
TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT in Tar
River. Available Mid-May! Just in time for
summer school! If sign lease in April you
get 12 OFF JUNE AND JULY'S RENT!
New appliances and carpet. Normal rent
$460.00 Deposit required. If interested call
830-1791.
SUBLEASE APRIL 1ST: 1 Br Apt Park
Village Apts. WaterSewer Incl. 5265mo.
thru 893 $175 Deposit. Excellent location.
Purple Busline. Call 836918 or 756-4481.
HOUSE - for sublease - this summer Op-
tion to renew lease for fall semester, three
bedrooms, screened in porch, walking dis-
tance to campus. Available in May. Call
258-6871.
SUBLEASE HOUSE 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
Washer-dryer, AC, partially fu.nished, 1
block from campus. $530 Mo. Call 752-
8526.
SUBLEASE a one bedroom apartment for
(Jie summer months (Approximately May
thru August.)CLEAN and EFFlClENT!Cal
752-9120 today.
2 BEDROOM APARTMENT for sublease
beginning May 1 thru end August with
Option to renew lease - Tar River. $460mo
call 830-0443.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
fgmgmm
ANYONE LOOKING for a fall semester
Roommate please call Holly - 931-8802.
ROOMMATE WANTED for 3 bdrm house
is Simpson. Call Brandy at 830-9230 for more
infromation.
GH
VNIQUE SITUATION FOR FEMALE
ROOMMATE. Full house privileges, un-
furnished room, adjoining bath, private
entrance, smoker o.k, small pet o.k. 13
utilities, Winterville area. Call after 5pm
756-5467.
SvOOMMATE wanted. Must be respon-
Isible and mature. 1 2 mile from campus,
ECU bus. CALL: 752-1538, leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED to
share 3 bedroom house 2 blocks from cam-
pus. House has cable, washerdryer, and
A'C Call Bonnie at 752-3472.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to share
Duplex located near ECU. Call 757-2636
6pm - 9pm or leave a message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
two bedroom Apt. Non-smoker, respon-
sible, and neat. $200mo. Rent and 1II util.
Needed the end of April. Call 830-0443, ask
for Heather.
M OR F ROOMMATE WANTED: Mov-
ing to New York City; looking for respon-
sible person to split rent and util Green-
wich Village area. Moving May 12 call 830-
8868.
WANTED: FEMALE ROOMMATE to
share two bedroom apartment $150.00 per
month 12 utilities furnished except bed-
CHEAP! FBIUSSEIZED: 89Mercedes-$
200, 86 VW - $50, 87 Mercedes - $100, 65
Mustang - $5 Choose form thousands
starting $50. FREE Information 24 hour
hotline801-379-2929 cop yrightNC 030610.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS, trucks,
boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes, by FBI, IRS,
DEA. Available your area now. Call 1-800-
436-4363 ext. C-5999.
YUMMY GIRL SCOUTCOOKIES forsale!
Call 7 to midnight 931 -7959 before April 1st.
Campus Girl Scouts thank you!
KING SIZE WATERBED. Bookshelf head-
board with mirror. Heater and accessories
included. Excellent condition. $175. Call
752-3620.
ALVAREZ 12 String $200.00 Call 758-7993.
USED-CDs, GameboyNES and SuperNES
games, Nintendo, and Gameboy. Call 756-
3319 and leave message.
SNOWBOARD: Burton Elite 150 with Bur-
ton bindings and size 910 Burton boots.
Includes soft rack for car and leash. $100.00
for all 931-7392.
FREE - 7 WEEK OLD FEMALE PUPPY -
Free to good home. Shep Lab. Call 757-
2636.
DEN FURNITURE for sale. One sofa, one
recliner, 3 endtables and 1 coffee table. Call
for details: 830-1978.
DODGE CHARGER 1986, $1500, Includes
AC, heat, AMFM radio, cruise control
and power steering. Call 752-0659.
MOTORCYCLE HELMET - Black full-
faced Fulmer helmet wair vents. Brand
new, only worn 4 times, x-large. paid $105
for it new 2 wks. ago, asking $75. 9J1-7216
and lv. message.
3 PIECE ANTIQUE Bedroom suite w
mattress and box spring. $450.00 neg. call
830-8868.
SCHWINN CROSSCUT. Hybrid - fast like
road bile - sturdy like mountain bike. Red,
men's 21" - all accessories included: seat
leash, toe clips, computer and more Paid
$500-will sacrificefor$250! Shimano400XL
components. Call me - 752-9618.
3 PIECE RATTAN den set plus three tables;
$225.00. Squire II Stratocaster guitar;
$220.00. Call 355-3636.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP - rilesAdver-
tising begin immediately part time. Have4
weeks summer vacation, good pay - bnng
resume to Cooperative Education Office
General Classroom Bldg. Will call for inter-
view.
ATTENTION FASHION MERCHAN-
DISING MAJORS! Gain valuable work
experience in your field of study. Brody is
accepting applications for Secretary to
Buyer. Work with buyers in tracking and
replenishing inventory levels. Computer
experience needed. Mustbeavailable3 days
by 12p.m 15-20 hours per week. Apply
Brody's, The Plaza, Monday - Wednesday,
1-4 p.m.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING - Earn
$2,000month world travel (Hawaii,
Mexico, the Caribbean, etc.) Holiday, Sum-
mer and Career employment available. No
experience necessary. For employment call
1-206-634-0468 ext. C5362.
LIFEGUARDS. Summer, NAGS HEAD
area, Country Club pool, Call Bob, 756-
1088.
PIONEER GIRL SCOUT COUNCIL is
now hiring seasonal staff for resident and
day camp. Positions include counselors,
lifeguard, day camp director and crafts di-
rector. If interested contact Jill Rhinehart at
1-800-627-6031.
WANTED - RIDE to New Jersey for the
Weekend of March 26th andor April 2nd.
Will help drive and pay for gas. PLEASE
CALL DEBBIE 931-8597.
;pflcv?c�
WWMW
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing brochures!
Sparefull time. Set own hours! RUSH
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
200-$500 WEEKLY. Assemble products at
home. Easy! No selling You'repaid direct.
Fully Guaranteed. Free Information - 24
hour hotline. 801 - 379 - 2900. Copyright
NC 030650.
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many positions.
Great benefits. Call 1-800-436-4365 ext. P-
3712.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOYMENT -
fisheries Earn $600 week in canneries or
$4,000 month on fishingboats. Free trans-
portation ! Room Sc Board! Over 8,000 open-
ings. No experience necessary. MALE or
FEMALE. For employment program call 1-
206-5454155 ex. A5362.
LAW FIRM NEEDS TWO FULLY FUR-
NISHED APARTMENT S during the sum-
mer. 1 bedroom May 22 - June 27; 2 bed-
room May 22 - August 1. Contact Bert
Speichor 355-3030.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHOTO-
COPYING SERVICES: We offer typing
and photocopying services. We also sell
software and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on paper
up to 20 hand written pages. SDF Profes-
sional Computer Services, 106 East 5th
Street (beside Cubbie's) Greenville, NC
752-3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this summer?
Only $169 Jet there anytime for only $169
with A1RHITCH! (Reported in Let'sGo!&
NY Times.) AIRHITCH 0 212-864-2000.
NEED A FITNESS TRAINER to get the
look the guys want? Call V31 - 7866.
WHERE'S THE PARTY? Wherever there's
a Mobile Music Productions disc jockey.
Proven HOTTEST D J. service in the area.
Don't wait too late to book. Call 758-4644.
CARPET CLEANING $12 per room 2
room minimum Steamex cleaning serv-
ing Greenville for 4 years. Call Marc at 758-
1079.
LET'S PARTY! Experienced D J. from Bo-
gies available for all occasions: Fraternity
and Sorority Socials, Weddings, Birthdays.
All types of music from Classic Rock to
Top 40 Dance. HIGHEST QUALITY BEST
PRICES Call Rob � 757-2658.
PAINTB ALL Come and play this Sunday
from 1pm - 6pm. Wear your camouflage
and take ad vantage of this Spring Weather.
Call rich at 752-2573 for more info!
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
inCalit. (213)477-8226
Or, rush S2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave �?06-A. Las Angles, CA 9002S
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
'Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Composed Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
$NEED CASH$
Student
wap
4HOP
x
FORMERLY ESTATE SHOP
COIN & RING MAN
BUYING & SELLING
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Jewelry(goodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
If you ore seltioy you must be 18
with a picture O (NCDL. ECU)
752-3866
Mon 10-12 1-5
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3
Sat 10-12
Park behind Globe Hardware
& use our new rear entrance
ALPHA SIG - We had a groovy time with
you! Hope to see you guys again! LOVE,
DELTA ZETA.
SIGMA PI - Sorry about all the confu-
sion! Well anyway, congratulations to
your basketball team! Way to go! LOVE,
DELTA ZETA.
THETA CHI - We had a blast around the
world with you guys! Hope to see you
soon! Delta Zeta.
ALPHA PHI - Forget-me-not formal of 93
was a night to remember for you and me!
The night started out with a zing while
Tamara and Sam were crowned King and
Queen. Rolls were the main dinner item-
Greg, 17 can you try and hide them! Dou-
glas and Andy were the pyro's how they
didn't bum down the table nobody knows.
Clifford's man was ready to play with his
impressions of She-Nay-Nay. Special
awards were given to Peyton, Martdy,
Alice and Angie who all never knew, a
dozen red roses were a surprise that Moss
couldn't try and hide. Tim, Chad and
Mandy were quite the hit. It gave more
life to the pool you have to admit. Kristine
was busy running around while Kim's
date could never be found. Formal was a
special night most of us can't remember!
SATURDAY night was wonderful. Thank
you for all your hard work, Kristine
Anderson and Pilar Depablo. Love, the
Alpha Phi's.
SIG EP- St Patrick's Day was a blast. Too
bad it went by so fast. It has been a great
tradition we have kept from the past.
Can't wait to do it again next year. Love,
the Alpha Phi's.
CONGRATULATIONS Laura Hampton
and Brandy Nixon on your induction to
Golden Key Honor Society. We are so
proud of you! Love, Your Sigma Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS AdamCiarlaon
winning Best LookingGuy! Your pennies
added up, actually your long hair is what
won it! Love, the Sigmas.
PHI KAPPA T AU - Karaoke is going to be
a blast! Start tuning up. We'll see you
tonight! Can't wait! Love, the Sigmas.
JENNY CLENDENIN - congratulations
on you lavalier and pinning. Eric is not
shy! We are very happy for you! Love,
you Sigma Sisters.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA - North Carolina
vs. ECU, we couldn't help but stare, not at
the game but at those that were there, the
game was hot but the ice was cold, the
shots were for only those that were bold.
The shots were blue that slid down the
ice, thanks for the social, it was really
nice. Let's do it again soon. Love, the
Sigmas.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Alpha
Omicron Pi basketball team for winning
the sorority championship two years in a
row Great job girls!
TO THE BETA SICMA'S OF ALPHA
OMICRON PI: Keep up the good job - it
won't be too much longer. Love, the sis-
ters.
ALPHA OMICRON PI wishes all frater-
nities and sororities a successful break
week Let's make it great
DELTA CHI: We really enjoyed meeting
you! Thanks for your support after the
pre-downtown! We hope to get together
with you again soon! ALPHA DELTA PI.
MS. WALK-A-THON '93: ALPHA
DELTA PI needs yoursupport! Help spon-
sor us in raising money for a very good
cause! Contact any member or the house
for details. Good luck Saturday, girls!
DR. SCHNEIDER: HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
We love you! thank you for all you do!
Love, the sisters of ALPHA DELTA PI.
KAPPA ALPHA: Friday, Friday - what a
night! the Mai-Tai social was out of sight!
Thanks for everything - we all had a blast!
the KAPPA ALPHA BOYS always show
lots of class! Love, ALPHA DELTA PI!
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Good luck to A and B
softball. Bring home a fourth champion-
ship. PIKES
PI KAPPA ALPHA. Looking forward to
Greek Goddess, at the Attic, Monday night
come join us! PIKES.
SUMMER CAMP STAFF: Counselors, Instructors,
Kitchen. Office. Grounds for western NC's finest Co-
� i�i t v khaah ed youth summer sports camp. Will train. Over 25
fyAMl I I.f. "(Hill activities including water skiing, heated pool, tennis,
artCool Mountain Climate, good pay and great fun! Non-smokers. For applica-
tionbrochure : 704-692-6239 or Camp Pinewood, Henderson ville, NC 28792.
WRITER PHILOSOPHERMUSICIAN
and poetic soul seeks friendship and cor-
respondence from like-mindd lady. Pho-
tos and letter to MV Pu Box 8663, Green-
ville, NC 27835.
SOME WOMEN to figure out are often
complex and n us men theyplace a hex.
A mystery they are as we all search for
clues to up our hand and kill our blues,
these women, to us they do bewitch and
by us, but not all are labeled a bitch. Is she
ARIES, TAURUS, GEMINI, SAGIT-
TARIUS, CANCER CAPRICORN, LIBRA
, AQUARIUS. Its in the sex and in the
mind, the two will cross and you will
find What you may seek is all of these,
she is complex, she is Ms.Pisces. She
wanyts you in and wants you out-inside
herself she does shout. She wants you
strong and to be weak. To be sly and to be
meek. She wants you dumb and to be
smart. She wants you wants to steal or
break your heart She wants you dirty
and to be clean. To be nice and slightly
mean. She wants you country and to be
city. To be charming and to be witty. She
wants you rich and to be poor. To be less
and sometimes more. Be right and be
wrong, be all of these, be complex be Mr.
Pisces. Jeff Jones.
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Exceptional Value
Available Immediately. One and two
bedroom apartments close to campus.
Water and sewer is FREE.
Laundry facility and ECU bus service.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4.000-$5.000 this Summer
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1 -800-251 -4000 Ext. 1576
EAST DO YOU WANT A CAREER IN ADVERTISING?
t' � Turn to page 12 for an excellent opportunity!
CAROLINIAN
Announcements
GRADUATF BUSINESS
ASSOCIATION
The Graduate Business As-
sociation will meet on Thursday,
March 25,1993 from 5:15 pm to 615
pm in GCB1023. The speaker will be
Walter Fitts of the North Carolina
Small Business and Technology De-
velopment Center. Refreshments will
be served
FIRST ANNUAL 3K WALK AND
GOSPEL SINGING CONTEST
Pepsi Cola, WOOW Radio
and the C n envillePolice Department
presents The First Annual 3K Walk
and GospelSingingContest to Benefit
the Homeless Saturday Ma rch27,1993
10:00 am TownCom mon (off First St.)
Greenville For more Information
Please call Roger Johnson, Event Co-
ordinator WOOW Radio 757-0365
FCU GOSPEL CHOIR
The 8th Annual EastCarolina
University Gospel Choir Anniversary
at AgnesFulIiloveCommunitySchcxil
Auditorium, comer of Halifax St and
. Watauga Ave.Greenville,N C.March
27,1993 6:00 pm. Donation: $2.
VOLLEYBALL CLUB
VOLLEYBALL MARA-
THON - Easter Seals will be sponsor-
inga volleyball marathon on April 3rd
and 4that MingesColiseum. For more
information about this event stop by
Recreation Services Office in
Chnstenbury or call 800-662-7119
A.RT IN THF MISSIONARY
POSITION
Mr. Tom Sokolowski, direc-
tor of the Grey Art Gallery and Study
Center at New York Uni versi ty, Inter-
national Juror and Lecturer, will be
presenting a lecture on ART IN THE
MISSIONARY POSITION at East
Carolina University on Friday April 2,
1993 at 11:00 am in Jenkins Audito-
rium, School of Art.
ALPHA KAPPA DELTA
Yard sale, in front of Brewster
building on East 10th Street, Saturday
March 27th at 7am books, clothes,
toys,furniture, wall hangings, kitchen
aids, jewelry, etc.
REGISTRATION FORGENERAL
COLLEGE STUDENTS
General College students
should contact their ad visors the week
of March 22-26 to make arrangements
for academic advising for summer
terms and Fall Semester 1993 Early
registration will begin March 29 and
end April 2.
THE SCIENCE FICTION AND
FANTASYQRGANIZATIQN
The SFFO will be having a
meeting Saturday,March 27 It will be
in the Mendenhall TV' Room at 5:00.
Star trek and Deep Space Nineafter the
meeting Anyone interested, please at-
tend - new members are welcome.
There will be a paperback swap and
please bring a list of those items you
wish to auction.
LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
OPEN HOUSE PROGRAMS
TheOfficeof Student Leader-
ship Development Programs has a
new location Formerly located in
Whicfwrd building, the office is now
open at 109 Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. An open house and reception will
be held on Thursday, March 25,1993,
3:30-5:30 p.m. come by and discover
Student Leadership Development
Program's new facility, the beginning
of the Leadership Library (The Vault),
the Conference and Training Room,
the Leadership Developmentstaff,and
the services we ha ve to offer to you a nd
toECUStudentOrganization. Refresh-
ments will be available. If you desire
additional information, please contact
Lisa Shibley or Jackie Jackson at 757-
47. Looking forward to seeing you
on Thursday.
WORKOUT FOR HOPE
Join the fun and fight against
AIDS at WORKOUT FOR HOPE on
Tuesday, March 30 from 6:00 pm - 8:00
pm at Minges Coliseum located at East
Carolina University. Proceeds benefit

25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional woid $0.05
All ads must be prepaid
City of Hope National Medical Center
AIDS research. For more information
contact ECU Recreational Services at
757-6387.
ITSQUT-A-HERE
The Home Run Derby Infor-
mation meeting will be held on Wed ,
march 31 at 5:00 pm in Biology 103. For
more info cal 757-6387 or stop by 204
Christenbury Gym.
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
tj mesfreeof charge. Due tothelimited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
UK ��HMMWMMHH
MM �� �-





wnrrrn if
The East Carolinian
March 25, 1993
Opinion
Page 6
ThursdayOpinion
By Gregory Dickens
f" f "i TZ "1 "7i Yeltsin, Khasbulatov face off for government
catalog revised I �ssspssess; ssessbsl ssssss: z�
Changes approved by
Chancellor unneeded, will only
harm future students
Hear ye, hear ye, the annual meeting for the ECU
Board of Unnecessary Changes in Student Policy has be-
gun.
The first item of business will be to go over the old
items of business. Though some may term this redundant
� as we talk about the same thing every time we meet �
they have yet to learn that redundancy is the cornerstone to
any bureaucracy. Let us give thanks for this essential
dogma to our sacred institution, or what is more commonly
known as covering our ass.
The following have proven this institution's ability to
ignore more pressing concerns, and make mountains out of
subjects that could barely be rated molehills:
� A massive tuition hike for out-of-state students,
guaranteeing in-state exclusivity for ECU.
� A dining hall being built not 100 yards away from a
currently existing one that services six separate residence
halls with no apparent problems.
Now that past business has been attended to (not that
we won't go over it again at the next meeting), we can
concentrate on upcoming business. A list of possible topics:
� Parking? Nah, who needs it, right?
� Greater accessibility for wheelchairs on campus?
Wheelchairs, what wheelchairs?
� Changes in a perfectly acceptable academic regula-
tion policy? Hey, more mindless bureaucracy and paper-
work than you can shake a stick at? Sure, let's devote our
full attention to this most pressing and disturbing problem.
On March 18, Chancellor Eakin approved the revised
section five of the undergraduate catalog, or as it's more
commonly known, academic regulations. This section deals
with dropadd procedures, registration, grading scales,
probation and suspension and access to records. Though
most of the original section remains intact, some very
important changes have been enacted.
Most importantly, the dropadd schedule has been
amended. The policy now states that undergraduate stu-
dents may only drop up to a total of four classes in their
tenure at this university. It further states that allowable
drops are prorated, meaning that if undergraduates have a
certainnumber of hours already, your allowable drops will
be cut determined by those hours.
This amendment reeks of ex post facto. An ex post facto
law rules that a person can be held liable for past conduct
that is now considered illegal. Future transfer students will
have to suffer, losing course drops because they were
foolish enough to attend another institution before ECU.
This limitation will only serve to add to the number of
failures that this school must report � students who have
used their drops may be forced to stay in classes that they
have no hope of passing.
Another unneeded deletion is the change of the reten-
tion policies from seven to two, forcing a higher GPA for
students at ECU. Though this amendment will improve
scholastic standards in the long run, right now it will only
force many students on academic probation. This proba-
tion only allows one semester for a student to improve
before being placed on suspension from the university.
Classes may be a lot smaller if this potential problem isn't
corrected.
Possibly the only beneficial change in this catalog is
the addend of an excused absence for the death of a family
member or participation in religious holidays. With this,
ECU shows that they recognize the cultural diversity on
this campus. A liberal arts college is based on this diversity;
recognizing it is another step in the walk to total equality.
This sole benefit cannot appease the problems that are
sure to be generated because of the other changes, though.
A bone is only as good for as long as the marrow lasts; after
that's gone, the hunger will return.
This meeting is adjourned.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmd, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Ufestyle Editor
John Billiard, Asst. Ufestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sunnier, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Stuff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Tliursday. The masthead editorial in each edinon m the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Kditor, Vie East Caroltnuin,
Publications Bldg , ECU, Gieenville, N.C 27858-4? For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6?66.
Printed o
100 recycled
paper
Russian President Boris "Im
age is Everything" Yeltsin is fed up
with the stubbornness of his
country's parliament, the Congress
of People's Deputies.
He hasdecreed a state of emer-
gency and declared that his word
overrules any decisions made by
the Russian legislators. This will
remain in effect until a national ref-
erendum isheld April 25which will
determine whether or not the people
want Yeltsin to lead and if a new
constitution should be created.
The parliament was in the
midst of try ingto curtail the powers
of the Russian presidency for two
reasons: 1) To slow down reforms
aimed at introducing a free-market
economy and 2) So Yeltsin couldn't
attempt such a decree in an effort to
boost his credibility and despera-
tion in the eyes of other world lead-
ers. The parliament is led by Chair-
man Ruslan Khasbulatov, Yeltsin's
main political adversary.
In retaliation for the decree,
the Parliament has asked the Con-
stitutional Court to decide if Yeltsin
can be impeached for his impetus,
which is of questionable legal ori-
gin. The Court decided Tuesday
that Yeltsin's decree is illegal.
Khasbulatov is now in preparation
to impeach the President, which will
requirea two-thirds majority by the
parliament.
If Yeltsin stays in power and
survives until the referendum, the
parliament would be denounced
by the public even further and the
majority of the legislators (80 per-
cent were once Communist hard-
liners) would hit the street. Yeltsin
would then be in the catbird seat to
influence a newly-elected parlia-
ment to pass his reforms.
If the Parliament boots Yeltsin,
his reforms and those of former Pre-
mierPresidentGorbachev, may be
erased. A still-existent support for
communism may push for a return
to the ways of the Soviet Union.
An NBC News poll reports
that 53 percent of Muscovites favor
Yeltsin with only 27 percent oppos-
ing him. An impeachment with a
subsequent unpopular Parliament
rule could result in heightened so-
cial tensions. Political theorists are
concerned that, in a worst-case sce-
nario,acivilwareither solely within
Russia or one embroiling the other
republics may occur and a new
Bosnia-Herzegovina may ensue.
Russia is seen as the touch-
stone for democracy to the other
republics and a political rewind
there may be mimicked in a
"domino effect" that has been de-
bated over for 40 years.
The Western world looks
again to the United States to deter-
mine the correct protocol. Remem-
ber the failed August coup in 1991?
The White House decided correctly
to wait and let the populace and
pi'Mic opinion choose who to put
faith in. This time, the rulingadmin-
istration may need to morally and
physically intercede. Asa source of
considerable economic support,
America may back Yeltsin and hint
(read: threaten) to stop sending
money if the president is ousted.
This would be more prudent
(egad!) than trying to influence
Yeltsin's successor, Ruslan
Khasbulatov, who mostassuredly
would vote to keep a Communist-
created constitution.
Yeltsin must be kept in power
in order for a more open Russia, as
well as the rest of the republics, to
exist. He has the support of the
people (more so than President
Clinton received upon hiselection)
and Yeltsin's continued adminis-
tration would utilize the Russians'
new-found voice in government.
To abandon him and the citizens
under him would greatly threaten
all democraticadvancementmade
in the former Soviet Union in the
last decade.
A bit of prevention now will
render unnecessary a substantial
political cure later.
The hallmark of our age is the tension
between related aspirations and sluggish
institutions.
Letters to the Editor
Students urged to vote in SGA elections Mar. 31
To the Editor:
If you are reading this,
then it is certain (or should be)
that you will bring your stu-
dent ID to campus March 31.
Simply by reading The East
Carolinian, you have shown
that care about what is going
on at East Carolina.
On March 31, there will
beSGAexecutiveelections! All
candidates are qualified and
have Student Government ex-
perience. They haveputa lot of
time and effort into what they
are doing. The only thing that
you have todo is produce your
valid ECU ID to one of the
many voting booths that will be
around campus.
Allow me to give other
incentives for you to vote. 1)
You're paying for it! That's right,
the ballots don't come from the
magic printing press in the sky.
The students sitting at the elec-
tion tables are all very nice and
caring people, but they too re-
ceive compensation. Nothing to
write home about, but a little
well-deserved thanks. 2) When
it's all said and done, you can
honestly say thatyou voted and
madea d ifference. 3) The people
at the table could get bored, so
it's u p to you to give them some-
thing to do.
There should be no ex-
cuses. Even if you don't know
any of the candidates or what
they stand for, vote anyway!
Just walk right up to the table
and check off a name or two.
Remember, it is a secret ballot,
so noone will critique whatyou
are doing.
It is just as easy and time
consuming to vote as it is to
walk around the voting booth.
Show you care and "Just do it
on March 31.
Rich Paravella
Junior
Finance
ECU first university to host Workout for Hope
To the Editor:
As college students, we
are faced with many problems;
the environment, the job mar-
ket, finances, crime and health
issues. Alcohol and drugabuse
is threatening the college
population, but more so sexu-
ally transmitted diseases and
AIDS are killing people every-
where � people from all walks
of life, people of every race,
people of every sexual orien-
tation. This iseveryone's prob-
lem. Everyone should be part
of the solution. Before you stop
readingandcometoyourown
conclusion that this is just an-
other piece about how terrible
AIDS is and how we all need
to be more careful, you might
want to see this all the way
through.
This is all about a solu-
tion. This is about how we can
all get involved in the fight
against AIDS. This isall about
the Workout for Hope.
The Workou t for Hope is
a celebration of health, fitness
and nutrition. It is a workout
party in support of AIDS re-
search. Participants raise
money by getting sponsors
(family, friends, coworkers,
etc.) to give money. Any
amount is welcome, small or
large. All proceeds go to the
City of Hope.
The City of Hope is a re-
search facility where research-
ers work to find a cure not only
for AIDS, but cancer, diabetes
and other health problems fac-
ing society.
This year, the Workout
for Hope will be held in over
80 cities nationwide. It is esti-
mated that over 65,000 people
will work out to help raise ap-
proximately $1.5 million dol-
lars.
On March 30 from 6-8
p.m East Carolina Universirv
will be the first university in
the country to sponsor this
event. It is going to be a night
to remember and because we
will be the first, it will be a
night that will godown in ECU
history, American history and
the history of AIDS research.
There will be circuit training,
cardio-funk, STEP demonstra-
tionsand low impact aerobics.
Mark Brunetz will be the
featured presenter. Brunetz,an
ECU alumni, is currently an
international fitness consult-
ant, can be seen in a number of
Jane Fonda productions, and
serves as national vice-chair-
person for Work"it for Hope.
So, Tuesday night from 6
until 8 p.m come out and be a
part of the solution.
For more information,
come by or call ECU Recre-
ational Services at 757-6387
Remember, withoutyou,
there is no hope!
Dionne Evans
Workout for Hope Vice-
Chairperson
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
Fun in the sun
without alcohol
achieved easily
As I walk around campus, I hear laugh-
ter coming from packs of students, as well as
some teachers, who feel the need to brag about
how drunk they got, and how they remember
verylirtleofwhatthey did for thatentire week.
While everyone has his or her own way
of enjoying themselves, I fail to see the amuse-
ment in this "drunken stupor" philosophy that
so many college students subscribe to.
Some of you gentle readers are likely
saying things such as: "Blasphemy! Bum the
infidel orperhapseven worse,dependingon
howimaginativeyouare.Ifyou are indeed one
of thosewhopractices the ancientartof "pound
till you hit the ground answer me this.
How much doyou rememberaboutyour
vacation? Was it fun? Perhaps most impor-
tantly; how much did your little trip to Pink
Elephantland set you back?
An interestingsetof questions, tobesure.
More than likely, many of you find yourselves
unable to answer them with conviction. It per-
plexes me, being a nond linker, to see so many
people spending literally hundreds of dollars
to go to some exotic beach full of flesh and
promise only to spend all that time toasted.
"Nond rinker? Ahhh, he's a prude, a
wimp, a feeb. Take out a loan and buy a clue,
pal Nope, sorry. Should any of you gentle
readers think this of me, methinks you should
reconsider. I'm screwed up enough already,
and Idon'tneed the influence of any substance
to be that way or to have fun. Nay, some of the
things I've done while sober would make you
giggle hysterically, blush profusely or justplain
wrinkle up your nose in disgust.
I've seen the effects of alcoholism up
close, and believe me, it ain't pretty. I just want
you to know where I'm coming from, and
pleasedon'tthinkl'muponmysoapboxpreach-
ing that all who consume the devil's firewater
will roast in hell. Far be it from me to tell
someone else how to live.
Allow me to share with you what I did
over Spring Break, sans alcohol. Being a poor
college student, my choices were somewhat
limited: 1) Go home to Pennsylvania and play
in the snow, 2) Try to fit into someone's suitcase
or 3) Take a page from the Greenville Bum
Handbook and wander around downtown
asking naivecollegestudents for change.Sinoe
my yoga skills are a little rusty and I simply
can't look wretched and pathetic enough toget
pity- money, I opted for the first choice.
While I was at home, I did the same
things I used to do in high school. I went out
with my Derelict Posse and got stupid with
them. I went out for coffee at Denny's at 1 a.m.
and discussed the secrets of the universe with
my friends. I built a snowman with my little
brother. I saw relatives 1 haven't seen in years.
I shot ptxii until thev kicked us out.
I d id loads of fun stuff while at home ami
remained sober. You know what? I remember
every detail, ever' nuance, and it didn't cost
me a cent.
My point, patient reader, is this: you
don'tneed alcohol tohavea good time. I've had
a good time this year at ECU, purportedly one
oftheworld'sfinestpartyschools,andIhaven't
touched a drop of firewater or even beer. I'm
living proof that a body doesn't need a blood-
alcohol ratio to enjoy itself. It'stimetowakeup
and smell the coffee without hoping that it
cures your hangover.
Now stop reading, think about it, go get
a pizza, and watch some cartcxins
i -





The East Carolinian
MARCH 25, 1993
Photo courtesy ECU Dance Theater
East Carolina Dance Theatre will begin the weekend performances
tonight, combining faculty and guest choreography.
Dance Theatre
opens tonight
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
The beauty of human mo-
tion, the p. �'try of music and the
wonderofthei .uman body. What
rnorecouldapersonaskforinone
night'sentertainment?
All of these expressions, and
more, will be displayed at
McGinnis Theatre tonight, when
East Carolina Playhouse's Dance
Theatre opens its 1993 run of per-
formances.
All pieces will be performed
by ECU dance students and cho-
reographed by dance faculty,with
the exception of guest artist Gin-
ger Farley.Eachnight'sshow will
start at 8 p.m with a matinee
perfbrrnanceonSunMar.28start-
ing at 2 p.m. The performances
will run until Tue Mar. 30.
Openingtheevening'sfesthi-
ties will be Dawn Clark's piece
entitled 'Virtual Reality Clark
has collaborated with the lighting
andcostumedesignerstoproduce
a work that blends reality with
illusion. The audience is asked to
consider the dimensions of the
dancers' space and how it is per-
ceived bvthedancer and audience
alike.
After "Virtual Reality
Patricia Pertalion graces the stage
with her piece, "Puzzle Based on
architectural shapes and forms,
Pertalion's dance uses real people
assyTnbobcpuzzlepieces.Coupled
See DANCE page 9
'Crying Game'
shall steal the
awards
By Gregory Dickens
StafFwriter
Thisisthetimeof year when justabout
everyone tries to show off.
Sports enthusiastsattempt topick the
winners of the NCAA Tournaments and
both the NHLand NBA Playoffs. Political watchdogs try
to predict the outcome of hapless budgets that are
run through Congress. And those of us with
insatiable appetites for Hollywood or
simply too much time on our hands pick
the Oscar winners on March 29th.
The Academy Awards are amazingly
affective seals of approval. They can make a
bomb into a hit, an unknown into a star and a no-talent
into the envy of the entertainment biz. Oscars are
potentandthat'swhyit'ssuchashamerhat
they are in the hands of the Academy of
Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.
The Academy is a 4,612-member
party of directors, actors, producers, etc.
who are constantly accused of being con-
servative, biased and terminally Caucasian.
Their nominations give credence to this
opinion. There are only two blacks nomi-
nated foracting(Washingtonand Davidson)
and the absences of Alfre Woodard (Passion
Fish) and Forest Whitiker (The Crying Game)
along with Rosie Perez (White Men Can't
jump), whose performance was just as
strong as Tomei's in My Cousin Vinny,
don't reveal a method to the Academy's
madness.
Politics enters into it also. Redgrave is
a surprise, considering her outspokenness.
Spike Lee's snub is not a surprise considering
his obstinance and social activism. The Acad-
emy flinches away from too much publicity
when choosing the worthy from the "great
unwashed"of the remainingfilmsof the past
year. The Crymg Game wouldn't have even
been considered if it was as successful
before the nominations as it is now but
since it is, the Academy may honor it to
saveface. Woody Allen'spublic war with
Mia Farrow probably killed his odds at
nominations for Husbands arid Wives.
Airman's The Player reflected Hollywood
politics at the Academy and thereby lost its
deserved awards.
But such debate is now moot. Now that the
nominations are out, all the conjecture may be
focused on the Oscars themselves.
See CRYING GAME page 8
By Ike Shibiey
Page 7
'Unforgiven' to beat
'The Crying Game
predicts one critic
Staff Writer
BEST PICTURE: Two films deserve
worthy consideration in this category:
Unforgiven and The Crying Game. Unforgiven
will win by a landslide because The Crying
Game, though almost as good as Unforgiven, is
not a Hollywood movie and so Hollywood
will not vote for it. Clint Eastwood's western
was simply the best picture of the year. The
story of William Munny, a retired gunfighter,
forced to return to murder in order to help his
stmgglingfamily, isa rxiwerfiilly com pel 1 ing d rama.
TheOscars rarely pick the most artistically inspired
film as their best picture, but this year they can and
will.
BEST ACTOR: Denzel Washington probably
turned in the best performance of the year as an
actor, but he has already won a statuette for Glory.
Stephen Rea turned in an equally impressive per-
formance in The Crying Game, but does not possess
an impressive resume. Al Pacino has never won an
Oscar and has an astonishing resume of work. Even
though the Academy Award issupposed to honor the
best performance of the year it often gives compensa-
tion for past losses. Pacinodeserved a supportingactor
award for his work in Glengarry Glen Ross and did not
get it. The Academy views his role in Scent of a Woman
as flashier and more deserving. Considering Pacino
didn't win anything for any of the three Godfather
films, the Academy will finally compensate and "make
him an offer he can't refuse
BEST ACTRESS: I hate to jump on the critical
bandwagon by complaining about the paucity of qual-
ity female roles this year, but the glaring differences
between the caliber of the actor and actress categories
is astonishing. Because she has won almost even,
major award this year, it seems that Emma
Thompson has the inside track for her per-
formance in Howard's End.
BESTSUPPORTING ACTOR: Since I've
already discussed the oddsof Pacino win-
ning the best actor award, he only other
choicehereisCneHackmanforLinorgroejJ. �
Hackman has been a Hollywood stalwart,
turning in top-notch performances in many
sub-par films. Once in awhile, he gets to
rum in a remarkable performance in a
superbfilm. If he wins he will have
waited longer than any other ac-
tor, 21 years between awards. He
last won, quite deservedly, for The
French Connection. He's even better
See UNFORGIVEN page 8
This Week at a Glance
Thursday
� "The Social Chalenges of Science a free public lecture, will be presented by
Thomas Matone, former national president of Sigma Xi honor society at 7:30 p.m. in
Room 1031 of the General Classroom Building
Dr. Malone is among the nation's most promii lent ethkists erf science. Currently
a Distinguished University Scholar at N.C State University, he has been foreign
secretary of the National Academy of Sdences and vice president of the International
CounrJ of Scientific Unions.
� Suzanne Smith Biancett, editor-in-chief of two noted nursing publications, will
tak of the judgement calls and the dilemmas often faced by editors in a speech to
nurse researchers and other nursing professionals at the spring banoyet of Sigma
Theta Tau International the nursing honor sodety.
"Behind the Editor's Desk" begins at 7 p.m. at the Greenville Hilton Inn.
Biancett, a Sigma Theta Tau Distinguished Lecturer and member of its board of
drectors, has authored numerous articles and a book which won her the American
Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award
� Patrick Dougherty, a nationaly recognized sculptor from Chapel HI, will
present a public lecture about environmental sculpture at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of
the ECU School of Art. Dougherty has just returned from a six-months National
Endowment for the Arts project in Japan where he studied contemporary Japanese
sculpture Contact Charles Lovel, ECU Gray gallery at 7575336 for more info.
� The East Carolina Dance Theatre spring performance opens at 8 p.m. in
McG'nnis Theatre. Performances run through March 30 For information call the
Playhouse Ticket Office at 757-6829.
Friday
� The ECU Opera Theatre wil perform scenes from famous operas at 8 p.m. on
Friday and Saturday evenings in the Recital Hal of the School of Musk. The program
s free and open to the public
Saturday
� The Center for Pup-
petry Arts will perform its
adaptation of "The Wizard of
Oz" at 2 p.m. in Wright
Audrtorium. The show s a
part of ECUs Young Audi-
ences Performing Arts Series.
Tickets are S8 or adults and
S5 for dVildren, and are
available through the ECU
Central Ticket Office in
MendenhaB Student Center
The toll-free number& 1 -800-
ECU-ARTS
"Star" shines with Belly-full
By John Buliard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
My inside line to new music came
into town a month ago.
The usual question was asked.
"What's worth listening to?"
"Belly he said.
"Belly?" I didn't quite know what to
think. Up to then, 1 had trusted his musi-
cal opinions. He had never led me astray
before� could his judgement beoff this
time?
Begging for some fresh tunes last
week, I went down to my favorite CD
store.
What the hell, I thought, when I saw
Belly's really cool art graphics on the
cover.
Broke and hungry, 1 went ahead and
spent the $14 and hoped that a band
named "Bellv" would be worth it.
After I gave ita try, I wondered what
took me so long to come around.
First off, I hadn't realized that the
band's leader, the very able Tanya
Donelly (an expatriate of the Throwing
Muses) was involved with Belly.
Everything I believed that was miss-
ing from the Throwing Muses, Donelly
has brought to Belly.
Star, the band'sdebut album, retains
all of those things which made the Muses
a good band along with a little dose of
the "Manchester-rave" stuff.
Think of Lush with a country twang
and you got Belly.
Donelly wrote all of the tunes, as
well as sings and plays guitar, on the
album.
Her voice will remind you of the
Muses and at times when she pushes it,
Sinead O'Connor.
Please don't let this scare you away
� Donelly appears to be stable enough.
Donelly is joined by Thomas
Gorman, who play s guitar along side.
The two pri k.1 uce unds and catches
that'll have your feet tappin' and head
boundn
The group rounds out with Fred
Abong(bass)andChrisGorman (drums).
The album contains 15 tracks that
range from strumming to swirling. The
album eases you in and out of itself with
two methodic bookends, "Someone To
Die For" and "Stay"
Star begins with "Someone To Die
For The song's lyrics are very conversa-
tional and invite you to stick around for
more.
The track "Gepetto" gives you a sense
of Donelry's' Vric abilities. She sings: "So
that kid from the bad home came over
mv house again decapitated all my
dolls and if you bore me you lose your
soul to me hey, Gepetto, where'd you
put it?"
Donelly pours her whole si nil into
Sfnrand it seems she wants listeners todo
the same.
Thealbum's single, "Feed theTree
is.i very catchy tune v, uh rwangy guitars
and a thumping bass line "So take your
hat off boy when you're talking to me
Star, the
band's
debut
album,
retains all
of those
things
which
made the
Muses a
good band
along with
a little dose
of the
'Tvlanchester-
rave" stuff.
and be there when I feed the tree sings
Donelly.
My favorite track, "Full Moon,Empty
Heart shows the capabilities and range
of Donelly's voice.
1 haven't had one person that hasn't
said that in parts she sounds like Sinead
(but better). Her voice'sdepth along with
the music is what separates Donelly from
Sinead.
Once you note the similarities the
comparisons end there.
Star finishes off with the very coun-
try sounding "Stay
A guest appearance from John
Douglass provides violin that eases the
ride down back to earth.
Star i, a fun and thought provoking
album. Just pop it in the car stereo the
next time you're heading out ol Ireen
villeand enjoy the rule
Sochalk another oneup for my friend
Bellv will not disappoint listeners and
should last me until the next time my
friend's back in town.





-8 The East Carolinian
MARCH 25. 1993
CRYING GAME
Continued from page 7
One last note is that the Acad-
emy has voted for sweeps the last two
years with Dances With Wolves and
"Silence of the Lambs and may do so
' "again.BestPicture:Mfl!a)m X.Okay,
okay, but I can wish, can't I? The
� Academy fell in love with Clint
Eastwood thisyear,afterrejectinghie
earlier efforts (Play Misty For Me and
Bird werestandouts)and Hollywood
thinksa sweep for Unforgiven isforth-
coming. I believe the bravura of The
Jurying Game may be too much to
overlook. My critical cohort picks
Unforgiven so I'll stand by Neil
Jordan's work-Howards End upholds
ttefinestardardscrfanlvcry-Jhabvala
production but may have been re-
leased too early for Oscar to remem-
ait Scent of A Woman simply wasn't
that good and the nomination ofA
Jew Good Men' was filler .Best Actor
,PenzelWashingtondeservesithands
;down for representing a recent con-
troversial historical figure and por-
traying him in a way that a varied
audience would appreciate while
� mergingthedichotomy of Malcolm's
philosophies. Downey, Jr. had the
same task and while he did a great
job, this is his first true effort as an
actor and Ibelieve Washington'spre-
�ious Oscar award will give him an
Sdge. If a sweep develops, look to
�Eastwood or Rea, depending on
which movie is taking the awards.
Pacinochewed-upthescriptconvinc-
inglyand the Academy likestohonor
characters with handkaps( remem-
ber Dustin Hoffman in RainMan and
Daniel Day-Lewis in My Left Foot?)
and he has ben waiting a while for his
Oscar. Best Actress: Anyone of these
actressesdeservesitThe Academy is
well-acquainted with Catherine
Deneuve'swork. SusanSarandonand
Michelle Pfeiffer have been nomi-
nated before and both went home
mpty-handed. Emma Thompson
and Mary McDonnell are the new-
comers here, relatively speaking. But,
Thompson's rolein Howards End may
be too much for the Academy to
overlook seeingashow they just love
actresses in period roles. Which
means Pfeiffer may have a shot here
for Love Field, which is set in the '60s.
It's going to be close.Supporting
Actor Anotherdoserace. Davidson's
nomination is a testament to great
casting, but his gimmick in The Cry-
ing Game is not
the depth of his
lence in a particular genre is one of
Unforgivm's strengths but it's been
done in graphic novels for the past
five years. Still, People's work is
strong. Allen's script is, as always,
insightful and funny.Lorenzo's Oil is
unlikely towinbuthasabetterchance
than Passion Fish. However, Neil
Jordan's screenplay is air-tight, sin-
cere and honest. The Crying Game
deserves to wiruAdapted Screen-
play: The competition here is tough.
Goldman's
"ErT script for Scent of
The Crying Game A Woman in
UNFORGIVEN
Continued from page 7
acting. Davidson � �
is tragically wouldn't have even been eluded an end-
Paymer's nomi- SUCCeSSful before the sugar-shock but
nation is a pleas- nominations OS it IS nOW if sa Hollywood
but since it is, the
Academy may honor it
to save face.
ant surprise and
points out what
the Academy
thought of the
rest of Mr. Satur- ��
day Night.Padno
and Nicholsongavetheirmovieszeal
and Hackman, a real class act, is in
good position to win if Unforgwen
indeed sweeps. Supporting Actress:
Judy Davis. Her performance out-
classed Farrow and Allen, which is
no mean feat in an Allen movie. Joan
Plowright has clout, being the wid-
owed Mrs. Lawrence Olivier. As I
said, Redgrave's nomination is note-
worthy.TomeimaywinbecauseOs-
carsusuallygotocomicperformances
in supporting roles. Whoopi
Goldberg and Joe Pesci won two
years ago and Mercedes Reuhl won
lastvear .Director If there'sa sweep,
Eastwood or, my favorite, Neil Jor-
dan.AltmandeservesitforTTiePilayer,
but since it garnered so few nomina-
tions, he isn't likely to win. Brest and
Ivory received nominations based
onpastefforts. Original Screenplay:
The underlying evaluation of vio-
endingsohey,he
could get a new
paperweight on
March29.l River
Runs Through It
�� lookstobethefa-
vorite with Howards End a close sec-
ond but the Academy may forgive
Tolkin for writing the script for The
Player and honorhis work. Enchanted
April will be
forgotten.Cinematography: The
Lover. This movie may have lacked
chemistry between the lovers and a
decent pace with which to tell the
tale, but it looked beautiful
trying.SongAWholeNewWorld
As much as an Oscar would cap a
banner year for Whitney Houston,
Disney owns this category and has
won two years straight. The ballad
will woo tine Academy but it would
be a scream to see Robin Williams
winning his first Oscar for singvig.
Let's hope, at least, that he sing it on
Monday.
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Greenville, NC
WE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails creating computer designed layout for all
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand, QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
ASSISTANT LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails working with the Layout Manager creating
computer designed layout for the Opinion and Classifieds
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand, QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
This job requires working knowledge of 35mm camera and
darkroom operations and will work with a staff of
photographers to supply the photo needs of various
media. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Work well with
other staff members and meet deadlines. Open to all
majors.
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
The chief duties are to create or oversee the creation of
artwork using both traditional and computer-generated
artwork to compliment the newspaper text and
advertising. Also, supervise the comics section. Minimum
2.0 G.P.A. Knowledge of Macintosh applications,
illustration, design and cartooning. Open to all majors.
BUSINESS MANAGER
This position is responsible for administering the
newspaper's funds available by controlling all requisitions
for purchases and analyzing financial data for the
Advertising Director and General Manager. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of marketing,
management, finance and economics and experience
using Excel. Open to all majors.
Apply at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the
Student Pubs building � 757-6366
in Unforgiven and should be part of
an Unforgiven landslide.
BEST SUPPORTING AC-
TRESS: Twoof the funniest perfor-
mances in cinema this year were
delivered by females: Judy Davis is
Husbands and Wives and Marisa
Tomei in My Cousin Vinny. Tomei
is honored just to have been nomi-
nated and Davis hopefully has
many other quality roles left in her
career. Neither woman will garner
many votes. Again, the award
should go to a person for a single
performance, but in this case the
Academy will recognize a year of
work from Miranda Richardson.
She played three different roles in
three different films, Enchanted
April,TheCryingGameand Damage.
Her nomination came in the latter
film, mostly for one explosively
powerful scene at the end of the
film, but she could have easily got-
ten a nod for The Crying Game as a
cold-hearted terrorist.
BEST DIRECTOR: Rob Reiner
wasupsetthathewassnubbed,but
it allowed the Academy to recog-
nize Robert Altman'svirtuoso work
on The Player. The exchange is un-
derstandable. Thetwobestpictures
for the year had the two best direc-
tors, Unforgiven and The Crying
Game. Because Nei l Jordan is a Hol-
lywood outsider, Clint Eastwood
will win for Unforgiven. An award
will rarely have been so obviously
deserved. Eastwood will be indi-
rectly honored for other superb di-
rectorial works such as Pale Rider
and Bird.
BEST ORIGINAL SCREEN-
PLAY: For all the praise heaped
upon Unforgiven, including the
quartet of great actors, the stun-
ning cinematography and
Eastwood's direction, the single
most impres-
the Unforgwen so, notch one more
for this magnificent film.
Unforgiven will win by
a landslide because
The Crying Game,
though almost as good
as Unforgiven, is not a
Hollywood movie and
so Hollywood will not
vote for it.
sive element of
the singularly
impressive
masterpiece is
David Webb
People's script.
The competi-
tion is fairly im-
pres s i v e :
Woody Allen,
Neiljordanand
John Sayles. If
Unforgiven �"��"
wins no other category, this nomi-
nation should be the one it wins.
(Butas I've said, it should win seven
out of its nine nominations.)
BEST ADAPTED SCREEN-
PLAY: This one is tougher than
most because of the quality of the
field of competition. I personally
would pick Richard Fiedenberg for
his ability to bring A River Runs
Through It so magnificently to the
screen. The actual winner will ei-
ther be Beau Goldman for Scent of a
Woman or Michael Tolkin for The
Player.Sincere Pfayerwassogood,
mainly because Robert Airman,
Goldman will probably get the
Oscar.
BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY:
Nofilmthisyear looked better than
BESTORIGI-
NAL SONG: The
Academy wants
to honor Aladdin
in some way, so
one of its two
songs will win.
(Hollywood
wants to forget
The Bodyguard, so
scratchoutitstwo
possibilities) I
would pick
"Friend LikeMe"
for its wit and joyful exuberance,
but the Academy prefers serious
ballads like "A Whole New
World Since the latter was on
top of the pop charts for a while,
look for it to easily win.
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MARCH 25, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
TONE DEF
By Thomas Croft
Staff Writer
There ain't no music revolution
going on; and if there was, it surely
ain't being televised.
Agrossmainstream,hyped green
out of its gourd about new, alternative,
Nineties' rock music, however, seems
to ooze like microwaved placenta ev-
ery time I muster the strength out of
boredom toradiatethedialtoChannel
26. MTV, you suck!
What seems to be going on, be-
sides chin-pierced leather doggies
posingwith Madonna, is mini-twerps
not allowed to ride Busch Gardens'
Python coaster making more money
than Dave Thomas with their dothes
on backward. The TV blitheringly
blares: "New is hype, old is wipe, we
got new, lef s take the world
Billy Ray Cyrus can suck my ribs
ascanthatnew teeny-bop greasemuf-
fin who sings, "My love can solve
anything" while skipping in sperm-
strangling Jordaches in creamy sea
surf with "Hey Kool Aid commer-
cial rejects drooling and whining over
his frosta-perm head mop and his
overbumed, fake-tanned pre-hunk
self. God save pop music.
I'vecompiled snippetjabsatnine
rektivdynewreleasesinthepop musk
world and considered them wholly as
artisticachkernents,hi-fiaesrhetefod-
derandofaiurseaslong-mileagedriv-
ing soul food. Take ye
and eat
Frank Black, Frank
Black 4ADElektra
"I had so many
problemsThat I got me a wifeI
really liked it a lot andThey'll walk
right in and they'll solve them Ah,
reitrealK'massaginganegalitarianist's
take on gender aJes, Frank Black takes
back-seatdrivenmisogynytoits eclec-
tic edge on "I Heard Ramona Sing
the second cutoff his debut, self-tirJed
LP. The harmless (1 suppose) though
rather un-PC lyric seems a propos,
given Black's recent split with right
hand woman and equal (if notanudge
superior)musicaltalentKirn Deal and
thedehinctPixies.Afterfivealburnsin
about the same years, the 'alterative'
god-head Pixies' media-appointed
captain, Black (really Black Francis,
but really Charles Thompson), has set
sail for solo seas. Unfortunately, he
wafts a bit rudderless.
Perhaps thequirky misgivings in
"1 Heard Ramona Sing" ring true to an
unhappy marriageamongFrank,bass-
ist Deal, drummer Jon Lovering and
guitarist Joey Santiago. The quartet
often seemed too good to be true (on
record especially). Crafted rafted ex-
plosively creative, yet refined and al-
most polishedSfarTrefcy, parts tomake
album after album of super groovie
rock jams.
Frank Black sees a gifted singer
mm
mm
NEW LOCATION
OPENING DOWNTOWN IN APRIL
georges
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ylo
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New Location
THE PLAZA MALL CHARLES BLVD. STANTON SQUARE
Greenville Blvd. SffPE StaiUonsburg Rd.
Mon. -Sal. 9:30 am-9pm ,� � � MonFri. 10:00am-8pm
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756-6200 757-0076
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OR
10 MINUTE PICK-UP
i&
songwriter guitarist still
doing what he did, but
sans three crucial pieces
of his musical puzzle.
Black's new band, Eric
Drew (bass, keyboards)
and Nick Vincent (drums), sounds
drab and sessiony compared to the
dicky chemistry amongFranas,Deal,
Lovering and Santiago.
The record's 15 tunes, all
grounded inBlack'strademarkmulti-
bar chord four-four strumming, egg-
shaped, half-step progressions and
weird off-beattempostops,lack fresh-
ness.
Hislyricsdon'twork;their stilted
goofiness rarely hintat insight or even
humor, which seems occasionally in-
tended. Exceptions include the rev
machine 'Ten Percenter the turbo
Mexicana of "Brackish Boy" and the
album's most-Pixiesqueditty, "Adda
Lee
But tunes such as "Los Angeles"
(pronounced as in the words "angle"
"ease")Tarrythe Wind High,Low"
and "Hang On to Your Ego" are see-
through pop wastes, too-thin efforts
by a man much more capable of finer
art. Beware hungry Pixie fans of in-
spire-less mediocrity,andacceptfm?rf:
Black as sad proof of the saying that i t's
better to have loved and lost than to
never have loved at all.
Living-room lounge music C
DANCE
Continued from page 7
6
To &c conr.nuec: ext
with an original score by School of
Music Pa)fessorOttoHenry,Pertalion
uses costumes significantly as exten-
sions of the dancers' bodies.
"This piece is about shape, form
and lines
Pertalionsaid "It's hh
about as abstract
asyou can getwith
rhehumanbody
Concluding
the first act will be
Alan Arnett's
"Couples Set to
an improvised
solopianoscoreby
Keith Jarrett,
"Couples" uses
four lyrical duets
to explore the be-
lief of inter-racial
relationships.
"Couples" evokes
the belief that any
two people who
love each other share universal feel-
ings and validity, no matter their race
or gender.
Opening the second act, Patricia
Weeks comui Jance, music and
theater in a story-like atmosphere in
'TromWhenceICameUsingmove-
ment and dialogue, the four dancers
show reactions to message from
parents and society that often contra-
dict each other. Eventually rebelling,
the dancers conclude with a mvth-
This piece is
about shape,
form and line.
It's about as
abstract as
you can get
with the
human body.
Patricia Pertalion
like Utopian society where everyone
is equal in all aspects. Audiences
should be warned that "From Whence
I Came" does contain some harsh lan-
guage.
Following
������� "From Whence I
Came guestartist
Ginger Farley has
choreographed a
piece called "The
Don Phenom-
enon Utilizing
movements de-
rived from dining
etiquette, Farley
shows how too
much structureina
person's life can be
absurd and comi-
cal. As Farley's fa-
ther, Don, used to
say, "Dinner is
mm more than just a
time toeat With a
child-like soloist leading the en-
semble, Farley proves this statement
admirably.
Concluding the evening's per-
formances, Joseph Carow presents a
ballet piece entitled "Variationen
99
Carow describes his piece as Neo-
classical ballet in the sense that there
is no story or plotThe piece isbasi-
cally the execution of the eight basic
ballet positions, and variations on
these forms Carow said. "These po
sitionsorienta dancer'sbody in space
and constitute the ABC's of the
dancer's body in space
Set to Brahm's "Variations the
11 female and three male dancers
take a basic theme of the eight posi-
tions and mirror Brahm's variations
throughout his piece. The dancers
perform the eight positions in their
formal order, varying them in the
orderthattheyareuniversally known.
Tickets for Dance Theatre are
$750 for the general publicand $450
for ECU students with a valid I.D.
Persons may purchase tickets at the
McGinnis Theatre box office Mon-
day through Friday, with a major
credit card (Visa or Mastercard) by
phone at 757-6829 or by mail ad-
dressed to East Carolina Playhouse,
ECU, Greenville, NC 27854353.
The box office is opfin Monday
through Friday from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m and until 8:15 p.m. on perfor-
mance nights.
1992J993
m Seasc
JOIN US FOR ALL THE
TOURNAMENT ACTION!
"Congratulations Pirates on your
Performance at the Big Dancer
Enjoy The Games Along
With These Specials:
Margaritas $2.50
Thursdays
Bloody Marys $2.25
Sundays
FREE Bar Snacks
During The Games �
Half price Appetizers
Sun. - Wed. After 9 P.M
Dine-In Only
� Mon. - Draft 95
12 Price Pitchers
of Beer
- Sangria $1.25
- Imports $1.25
521 Cotanche St.
757-1666
laynouse ,��,� season
EAST
CAROLINA
DANCE
THEATRE
�Tues
�Wed.
McCINNIS THEATRE
March 25, 26, 27, 29 and 30 at 8:00 p.m.
March 28 at 2:00 p.m.
Tickets: $4.50
THE FOLLOWNG RECREATIONAL
SERVICES POSITIONS ARE AVAILABLE
FOR FALL 1993.
HOURS
SUN THURS:
11:00 AM-1:30 AM
FRI-SAT:
11:00 AM-2:30 AM
$200-$500 WEEKLY
Assemble products at
home. Easy! No Selling.
You're paid direct. Fully
Guaranteed. FREE
Information-24 Hour
Hotline 801-379-2900
Marketing Assistants: (4 Positions)
Qualifications: Enthusiastic, creative, self-motivated,
independent worker.
Description: Promote programs and services to target
groups in West Campus, Central Campus, Sororities &
Campus Organizations.
Media Assistant: (1 Position)
Qualifications: Enthusiastic, creative, demonstrated
written communication skills, independent worker.
Description: Promote programs and services through
press releases, feature articles and various creative
promotional tasks. Macintosh computer skills
preferred
Self-Help and Work Study students encouraged to apply. Complete
an application today In 204 Christenbury Gymnasium.
GUMBY MADNESS
NCAA TOURNAMENT SPECIALS
BUZZER BEATER
14" pizza, one item,
two sodas
$6.26
THREE POINTER
Medium Pokey Stix,
two sodas
$6.19
GUMBY CHARGE
12" pizza, one item,
soda
$5.28
SLAM DUNK
20" unlimited item pizza
$13.49
TIME OUT
1 6" pizza, two items
$7.78

SWEET 16
large pizzas, one item,
16 slices
$10.00
PERSONAL FOUL
2-10" pizzas, one item,
$6.88
BOUNCE PASS
12" pizza, two items,
two sodas
$6.50
HALFTIME SNACK
1 6" pizza, one item,
two sodas
$7.36
DOUBLE DRIBBLE
2-14" pizzas, two items,
four sodas
$12.88
Prices Do Not
Include Sales Tax
IMOW OPEN
GREENVILLE
FUN PARK
COMING
:� i �' x
WE ACCEPT
CHECKS
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Without Notice
321-GUM-B
315 S.E. GREENVILLE BLVD.
Located next to Blockbuster Video
S3c�
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Burroughs Wellcome on 264
PARTIES & GROUPS
757-1800
�:�:�:�:�:�:�:�:��:�:�:�:





The liasl Carolinian
�larch 25, 1993
Borel blazing new
trails in Greenville
sslstj!
� rt�- I ditor
me college bast
Park,Kannauvetransf
: from Johnson (. ountv
tjun-
thestate & rel said hisformer
Kansas si rx �i surpasses Easl
and that!
� that regii r bit
i
brought hi
i.nt to a new level and
becom
u ir su
After setting Jamie Borel
n record at his school
� � � unding6
mmediatel) impacted on the 1
teamAccordingtoMarch22(
rt, the juni
out of 16 attempts and is second en ' �
I irate team in this category. Borel has a
contributed a solid batting performai
rutting
� junior i
prepared me I bei iorel s
thinl i ha.

-iKI' ,tt
iniversih �
- irel slid � �
i
aching st I
style of h �
u'd n i
� �


Sports
Page 10
BOREL page 12
Pirate Aoies-
�junior right fielder
Pat Watkins powered
East Carolina to a 5-1
week hitting for both
average and extra bases.
In six games, Watkins
had nine hits in 22 at
bats for a 409 average as
the Pirates improved to
19-7 overall and 5-1 in
the CAA Five of his nine
hits were for extra bases
as he recorded four
home runs, one double
and four singles for a
1.000 slugging percent-
age. He also had nine
RBI's and seven runs
scored. Watkins currently
leads the CAA in batting
average (433) and home
runs (11) and is second in
RBI (29)
�East Carolina's
baseball game with
Virginia Common-
wealth scheduled for
4 p.m. Wedne
the Diamond in
Richmond was
postponed because of
rain. Although a new
date has not been set, the
game will be rescheduled
for later this season.
The Pirates return to
action Friday against
Erskine College at 3 p m at
Harrington Field followed
by a doubleheader Satur-
day at 2 p.m.
�ECU quarterback
Michael Anderson will
continue to miss spring
4

Michael
Anderson
football drills
until he im-
proves his
academic
standing,
according to
Pirate Head
Coach Steve
Logan
"Pending
t on
his academics he will
continue to miss spring
drills Logan said. "We are
monitoring it on a daily
basis and he could return
by the end of the spring
Two redshirt freshmen,
Chris Hester and Marcus
Crandell, will work at QB
with the first offensive unit
Basketball cards hot items
'92 Draft creating price surge
ngiis Davis
Staff Writer
i

I
ourni
i
� � lollar
'
Ladies split
doubleheader
with Tarheels
Sports Information Dept.
East Carolina University
The Fast Carolina Softball
team travelled to Fetzer Field at
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill with a seven-game
winning streak ECU carried the
streak to eight games by winning
the first game on Tuesda) but
li ist in the se ond game if the
mbleheader.
These two games marked the
71 st and 72nd meetings between
the two schools; ECL currently
holdsa slight ad vantage 33-29 over
the Lady Tarheels.
In the first game, E( I right-
hander lennv Parsons, who
pitched v ith twobroken bones in
her left hand (suffered in the Lady
PirateC lassie),held UNC toonly
three hits tor a 1-0 victory, her
12th win of the season and her
eighth straight
's onh r11r. the
fourth inning when center fielder
Michelle Ward, who went into the
game bating 493 It d off the in-
ning v, ith a single LisaCorprevx 's
sacrifice bunt put Ward onset ond
base � � hwasf lli iwed b) Ki. 1
to-back singles b Cheryl I lobson
and (leorgianWilketoscoreW ard
lor the li me run.
In game two, the rarheels'bats
camealive, pounding out ten runs
on eleven hits, including a grand
slam in the fourth inning, lennv
File Photo
Pitcher Jenny Parsons pitched a shut out with two broken hones in
her left hand
Parsons started tl I the right for Tai I butbat-
Pirates, but failed to complete ting isou
work through the fourth i
droppin ord to 12-8 - ' not
I ead n the
Manahan and doctorssa itisall mound nahan said.
1993 EAST CAROLINA PIRATES (IS. 7. 5 1 in
AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB SBA BB SO HB 01 -
Watkins Pat29 39 4
Ku6hner. Lee� -
Borel. Jamie
Pitt. Steven
Fedak. Frank
West Chris
Edwards. Lemont
Head, Jason
Herman. Grant
Triplet! Chad
Obhol. Kevin
Clark. Heath
Cronan. Phil
Peters. Mike
Hines. Charlie
Wilhort. Kevin
Sanburn. Mike
Cau&ey. Jeff
Liles. Brandon
Puckett. Chad
TOTALS
OPP. TOTALS238 ;
PfTCHINl,W L ERA. G OS GG
rinvrs, Owen
Blai kwetl P
M ��
V;he
Bei k. Johnny
Morse Nthnet I
eld Hr.warrt

Hilly
runne
Mohi
-





MARCH 25. 1993
The East Carolinian
11
Ultimax tourney hosts 26 teams
By Steve Gibbons
Staff Writer "
This past weekend, the men's
and women's Ultimate Frisbee
Clubs, along with help from the In-
tramural Rec. Department, hosted
the 20th annual Ultimax Ultimate
Frisbee Tournament. This spring 15
men's teams and nine women's
teams participated in what proved
to be a successful tournament. Sat-
urday morning was beautiful and
sunny, about 55-60 degrees with a
slight breeze, perfect Ultimate
weather. The men's teams were
placed into three pools ranked ac-
cording to their known strength or
expected talent. The women'steams
plaved a round-robin tournament
90 everyone got the chance to play
each other.
The men's team, the Irate be-
gan the dav playing NC State win-
ning 154. thtT toy piayed the Lni-
ersit ot Vermont, beating them 15-
3. The last two games were against
theLniversitofirginia,asectional
rival who they beat 15-6 and they
also faced the University of Massa-
chusetts, winning that game 15-3.
The women's team won fou r games
on Saturday after some hard play.
Many horizontal blocks and layouts
were seen by all, lending to greater
excitement and inspiration for the
players. The "Spirit
oftheGame which �hmhm
is so important in
the self-refereed
game of Ultimate,
was kept quite high
on Saturday en-
abling enjoyable
play to be had by
all.
Sunday morn-
ing dawned bright
and warm, creating
another perfect day
for Ultimate. This
was the road to the
finals with teams
matched in a play-
off according to �"��
their rank after Saturdays play. The
Irates plaved Yale in their first game
ofthedav. Thelratesdorrunatedthe
game and came away with the win,
1154fc which moved themtothesemi-
finals against the X-Rates, former
Irates who have graduated or moved
on to the open division. The game
was verv intense and tempers flared
expectantlyasrhepupilsbattled their
teachers, the Irates again managed
to hold onto the lead and comeaway
with the win, 17-9. With that win, ries.
thelratesadvanced into the champi-
onship game to meet Fablo Ficasso,
the defending
Ultimax champi-
ons. A hard fought
first half ended
with the Irates tak-
ing a 9-7 advan-
tage as the sun be-
gan to set and the
lights came on.
The second half
saw the Irates pour
on precision of-
fense and hot de-
fensive layouts.
Thesupenorskills
and endurance of
the Irates enabled
them to pull out
�" withtheirseventh
straight win 19-13 in front of nearly
100 spectators.
Sunday w as a day of incredible
Ultimate and the players of all the
teams rose up to a better level of play.
Some excellent play was led by Irate
veterans, but the rookies were not far
behind. The Irates will ride this vic-
tory into this aiming weekend when
they travel to UNCW for the Colle-
giate EastemsToumament, the next
leg to the National Tournament se-
The "Spirit of
theGame
was kept quite
high on
Saturday
enabling
enjoyable play
to be had by
all
Jobe leaves decision to Cremins
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) �
Georgia Tech's Bobby Cremins was
told it was his decision to make when
he asked old friend Ben jobe if he
should take the vacant head coaching
job at South Carolina, the Southern
University coach said Tuesday.
"Itold Bobby thatthingsarenever
thesamcIobesaidHehastodecide
if he can live with the difference
Jobe said he and Cremins talked
after No. 13 seed Southern upset No. 4
seedCecrgiaTechinafirst-roundgarrie
last week in Tucson, Ariz.
Jobe said hegot the impression an
announcement from Cremins was
imminent
"I think he's made up his mind,
and he'll say something in a day or
two Jobe said.
Cremins played at South Caro-
lina in 1967-70 under the legendary
coach Frank McGuire, and Cremins
wasagraduateassistantforrheGame-
cockswhenjobewasanassistantthere
in 1973-74. Cremins also hired Jobe as
an assistant when he became head
coach at Tech in 1981.
"Bobby said that he's talked with
McGuireandorhers,andthatMcGuire
basically told him the same thing
Jobe said. "He has to be sure in his
mind thathecan make thingslike they
were again, or live with the difference.
"The politics of the game are dif-
ferent. The politics of the state are dif-
ferent,and there isadifferentadrninis-
tration. I told him what I would do, bu t
that's personal and between us
Asked if he advised Cremins to
stay at Georgia Tech, Jobe said "no"
emphatically.
"Ffehastodowhathisloyalty tells
him to do Jobe said. "Bobby is an
honorableman,and hehastogo where
his loyalty lies. If the Georgia Tech
peoplehavebeen good tohimand he's
happy there, he should stay
ATiTIC
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Wednesday Jhe �Best p)ace Jcf Hear
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S70NF 1987-1988 1989-1990 1991 � 1992
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
Thursday, March 25
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We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Glrdl Accept Federal Food Stamps.





MARCH 25, 1993
The East Carolinian
12
Sports world mourning loss of Crews and Olin
WINTER HAVEN, Fla.( AD-
United in grief, the Cleveland Indi-
ans mourned the loss of two team-
mates, while authorities tried tode-
termine if drinking contributed to
the fatal boating crash on a dark-
ened lake.
Investigators say it will be sev-
eral days before they can rule what
role alcohol may have played in the
Mtmdaynightaccidentthatleftpitch-
ers Steve Olin and Tim Crews dead
and pitcher Bob Ojeda seriously in-
jured.
However, several Florida tele-
vision stations reported Tuesday
night that one unidentified player
had a blood-alcohol level of. 17, above
the .10 considered legally drunk in
Florida for motorists and boaters.
The Associated Press could not
independently confirm the reports.
' 'We haven't released any of that
information at this time Cheryl
Strouse, duty officer for the Florida
Game and Fresh Water Fish Com-
mission, said Tuesday night. "If it
did get out, it was premature
Strouse said Olin'sautopsywas
performed Tuesday, with Crews'
scheduled for todav. She did not
know when blood-alcohol levels for
both players or Ojeda would be re-
leased.
Lt. Bruce Cociper of thecommis-
sion said investigators "found full
beer cans in an ice chest and a liter of
vod ka al most full" aboa rd the power
boat that crashed into a lake pier.
One emptv beer can also was found
on the 1 H-foot fiber-
glass craft.
Indians general
manager John Hart
said he had "abso-
lutely no idea"
whether the players
were drunk. But he
said he was assured
they weren't by
Fernando Montes, bbibmi
the team's strength
and conditioning coach. Fontes was
with the players and families before
the boat ride.
A memorial service for players
and families was scheduled for to
night.
01in,27,the Indians' top reliever,
was killed instantly. He struck the
pier when the boat, near full throttle,
raced underthedockbeforehittinga
post.
Crews, 31, the boat driver, died
a few hours later after being hospi-
talized with head and lung injuries.
It was the first time two major
league baseball players were killed
in the same accident.
Ojeda, 35, suffered cuts on his
head and was in serious condition
after surgery.
Wliatever
happens, God
has a purpose,
Carlos Baerga,
Clevland Indians
He is expected
to make a full
recover
The
Skeeter bass
boat had a 150-
horsepower
motor and a top
speed of 60
hbh mph. Viewed
by an AP re-
porter at the Lake County sheriffs
garage in Eustis, the gray and silver
boatappeared to have sustained just
scrapes and scratches.
But there was a significant
amount of blood on the carpeting
and seats, especially on the passen-
ger side. Blood was splattered over
the left side of the boat,covering pa rt
of the gas The speedometer had
BOREL
stopped at 39 mph.
Theaccident happened on Little
Lake Nellie,27miles north ofW inter
Haven, at theend of a day the players
spent picnicking w ith their families
on the team's only break during
spring training.
"Whatever happens, God has a
purpose said Carlos Baerga, the
only player willing to talk to report-
ers. "We just have to believe that
Thelndianscalled off txhibition
games scheduled for Tuesday and
today, but they will practice today at
Chain OT-akes Park.
Hart and Indians manager Mike
Hargrovemetwiththegrievingplay-
ers in the clubhouse early Tuesday.
The players talked of dedicating the
season to Olin and Crews, of black
armbands, of plaques in the bu 11 pen.
"We have to be strong for each
other Baerga said.
Hargrovesaid practicewillease
the players' grief.
"There are going to be enough
reminders that Steve and Tim are no
longer with us he said. "We don't
need to be reminded of that. So, with
that in mind, we are going to start to
work out
continued from page 10
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"Baseball is pretty much my life
Borel said. "After my playing ends,
I would really like to coach on the
college level
Borel said his primary goal for
the rest of the season is to continue
his streak of error-free play, a streak
that has run since the start of this
season.
Off the field Borel plans tospend
time with his family, especially his
two younger brothers. Borel said
plavingthepartofthe"older brother"
is important to him and he some-
times gets the chance to use his be-
loved game of baseball to relate to
them.
"One of my brothers is four-
teen, and just recently got cut from
his junior high team. I took him out
and worked with him a little on his
hitting. Now (his team) is all over
him
Borel adds that he has another
brother at home who is four and has
displayed as much interest for the
gameashisolderbrotherHe'sfour
and has more equipment than I do
CDs
Nintendo
We Now Buy & Super Nintendo
" Sell Used Sega Genesis
1109 Charles St
758-4251
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is advertising account executives
currently accepting
resumes for the
following positions:
This job entails prospecting new clients, selling
creative advertising campaigns and
supporting advertising clients. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. No previous sales
experience is required but is helpful. Open to
all majors.
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed
advertisements using sound design principles
including; contrast and focal point. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of
Macintosh applications; PageMaker, Freehand,
QuarkXPress, and image scanning. Open to all
majors.
FAMILY HEALTH
A CHALLENGE FOR
OUR NATION
. Mark
Ginsberg
MAJOR
S�ER'IES
Presented By The STUDENT UNION FORUM COMMITTEE
For More Information Call The Student Union Hotline At 757-6004





Title
The East Carolinian, March 25, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 25, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.932
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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