The East Carolinian, March 23, 1993






Pirates
Rammed!
Sports
Pirates fall from NCAA
Tournament in first game.
See story page 10.
Lucky 13
Breed 13 rocked O'Rock's
last Saturday night in
celebration of their album
release.
See story page 7.
Rjiny

� X
The East Carolinian
MA. 68 No. 18
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, March 23, 1993
12 Pages
SEX, DRUGS AND LOVEHANDLES
Health topics"
of cor.cern
with today's
college
students
STDs
Students voice concerns
about health issues
By Joe Horst
2087 2055 418 413
AIDS & Prescription & Need to loose How to use
other STDs illegal drugs 10-15 pounds a condom
200 calls Phone call statistics compiled from De Anza Community College
Staff Writer
Sex, drugs and those annoying love
handles.
Sound like a new alternative rock
band? Well, it's not. After a De Anza, Cal
survey, these three health topics rated as the
top three that students are concerned with
today.
Between August 1992 and January
1993, De Anza Community College spon-
sored a free, 24-hour recording offering in-
formation on drugs, alcohol and health is-
sues. The recording received an average of
2,500 anonymous calls a month from stu-
dents and community members.
The largest general category of calls
fell under the concern about "AIDS and
other STDs" with 2,087 calls. Running a
close second, "Dlicitand Prescription Drugs"
finished with 2,055 calls. Callers could then
choose more specific headings under these
and other general topics.
The most requested specific message
was various students' concerns about
weight. The survey registered 418 calls un-
der tiie "Need to lose 10-15 pounds The
question of "How to use a condom and
where to find them on campus" ran a sur-
prisingly diverse second with 413 calls.
The drug Ecstasy and concerns about
effects of drugs on a fetus rounded out the
list, receiving 316 calls and 256 calls, respec-
tively.
Ruth Foy, health educator for De Anza
Community College, said that the students'
picks came as no surprise.
"Look at the emphasis in our society
about being thin Foy said. "Look at the
pressure that's put on. These are things mat
people are thinking about
Jennifer Phillips, peer health educator
for ECU, agreed with Foy's comment, but
said that ECU students are more concerned
with STDs and pregnancy.
"In my opinion, the two most com-
mon calls into my office are concerning
STDs and pregnancy Phillips said. The
students call because they want to know
about testing, where they can get tested and
symptoms. "In the residence halls, program-
ming targetsSTD education. Students seem
to be most interested in this issue
Systems similar to the one in De Anza
are currently in operation in colleges such as
the University of Nevada-Las Vegas, the
University of New Mexico and the College
of Staten Island in New York.
Christine Whitten, spokeswoman for
the firm that markets the message system,
has said that some trends do exist as to
geographical placement.
"Systems on the West Coastarea little
more interested in the health issues�diet
and stress Whitten said. "Northeast sys-
temsaremore focused on self-help options
In the fall of 1993, ECU plans to con-
duct an assessment of total lifestyle and
health risks of incoming freshmen, accord-
ing to Dr. David Emmerling, dean of stu-
dent development.
Created by Woody Barnes
Trustees propose
changes, renovations
By Karen Hasseli
Assistant News Editor
The ECU Board of Trustees
proposed on Friday to lease a
piece of land in Ficklen Stadium
to an ECU organization for the
purpose of constructing needed
seating.
"Our athletic director Dave
Hart tells us we are going to lose
seats in putting chair backs on
the south side of the stadium
said board member William E.
Danseyjr. "It will create more leg
room but we will lose 735 seats
Dansey said that Hart did
not feel that ECU's Ficklen Sta-
dium could afford to lose seating
at this time and so he proposed a
creative idea.
ECU will lease the parcel of
land at the east end of Ficklen to
theEastCarolina University Edu-
cation Foundation for $. In re-
turn, seating will be constructed
whici. vill add 1,700 seats. The
total cost is to be funded by the
East Carolina Education Foun-
dation Inc.
The Board of Trustees
passed several other proposals to
repair and expand areas around
campus.
A motion was passed to al-
low theexpansion of Wright Soda
Shop. The expansion, at the cost
of around $997,700, will increase
the size of the soda shop about
2,000 square feet, Dansey said. The
asphalt is to be taken up in the
direction of the Rawl Classroom
Building and turned into a brick
walk. There will also be renova-
tions made in the existing space.
The Old Austin Cupola is to
be rebuilt. The dome-like struc-
ture will be placed in front of
Mendenhall Student Center and
the new student recreational cen-
ter.
Dealing with the deteriorat-
ing residence halls, Scott and
Aycock Halls are to be reroofed at
a cost of $331,500. The money will
come out of capital funding.
New dry wall is to be in-
stalled in White Residence Hall
See TRUSTEES page 4
Pirate Prayer
Photo by Biff Ransom
PeeDee prays for a Pirate victory during the NCAA battle
against UNC-CH. For more on the game, see p. 10.
ECU to be exposed
to potential majors
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
The Career Education
Committee will be hosting a
majorsminors fair tomorrow
starting at 12:30 p.m. Accord-
ing to Jim Pinkney, chair of the
committee, IHaBKa
tf
"The fair is an
opportunity
for students to
informally dis-
cuss potential
majors and mi-
nors
The fair is
an annual
event very
similar to a ca-
reer fair where
students have
the opportu-
nity to chat with various repre-
sentatives, Pinkney said. The fair
will be very informal so stu-
dents can either talk with repre-
sentatives or simply pick up
vritten materials regarding cer-
The fair is
most helpful
for students
trying to
decide on a
major, '
Jim Pinkney
tain majors and minors.
"The fair is most helpful
for students trying to decide on
a major Pinkney said.
Representatives from 40
departments across campus will
be present to give out informa-
tion on typical careers for their
mmmm.m majors, graduate
programs which
may be applicable
and any unusual
career opportuni-
ties students can
find in these de-
partments. The fair
will be held
Wednesday in the
Mendenhall Great
Room from 12:30
until 3 p.m and
free refreshments
will be provided.
Check it Out
Wednesday in the
Mendenhall Great Room
from 12:30 until 3 p.m.
Career Services offers
computerized career help
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
The Career Services office at ECU
is now offering two computerized ca-
reer-guidance systems that are avail-
able through the summer.
SIGI PLUS, developed by Educa-
tional Testing Service, gives students
access to a computer program that
helps them learn the decision-making
process involved in planning a career.
"In only an hour or so, students
identify which values are most impor-
tant in planning a career said Assis-
tant Director Margie Swartout. "Is
making money most important or do
they want to improve society? How
important is status in management7
"Another problem facing stu-
dents is selecting and studying fur a
career and finding out later that it's
not what thev thought Swartout s,i id.
"With SIGI PLUS, students can get
information on hundreds of vocations,
find out what skills are needed, ex-
plore chances for ad vancement, check
salary ranges, job security, employ-
ment and find out where they're go-
ing before they get there
DISCOVER, developed by
American College Testing, is a pro-
gram being piloted by the Career Ser-
vices office that also helps students in
making career and educational deci-
sions.
Users may select the parts of the
program that address their unique
combination of needs to give them
individualized and personalized ca-
reer counseling.
The program also includes mod-
ules for adults in transition to help
them in changing careers or re-enter-
See CAREER page 4
Students
are now
able to
start their
career
search on
campus
with a new
computer
guidance
service.
4 !
Photo by Dai! Reed





2 The East Carolinian
MARCH 23, 1993
High school students to prepare for technical careers
Student protesters burn state flag
More than 3lK) students from Atlanta-area universities
marched to the Capitol building and burned the state flag to
protest a symbol of the Confederacy emblazoned upon it. The
students assembled at Morris Brown College for the rally to
support Co Zell Miler, who is leading a movement to remove
the stars-and-crossed bars-symbol of the Confederacy from the
Georgia flag. Despite Miller's pleas not to burn the flag, the
students set it on fire. Amid chants of "burn, babv, burn" from
the crowd of mostly blacks, a few whites and members of the
media, the flag went u p in flames. More than 5(X) police officers,
helicopters and secret service agents were stationed around
and above the Capitol. One Atlanta police officer, who wished
to remain anonymous, said the strong police presence was
because they did not want a repeat of the riots that followed the
Rodney King verdict in Los Angeles last May.
Iowa students endorse gay rights
Iowa State University's student senate recently passed a
resolution recommending that partners of the same sex to be
allowed to live in married-student housing. But is wasn't until
after five hours of intense debate. "It started out very logical
and rational, then it became emotional. There was a lot of fear.
Some people just do not believe in recognizing gav or bisexual
people said Eric Hamilton, president of the Government of
the Student Body. Fair treatment of same-sex domestic partners
has been a hot issue on the campus since last fall when a
homosexual student requested housing with his partner, was
denied and appealed to President Martin Jischke.
The 'War of the Worlds round two
It wasn't Orson Welles' "War of the Worlds" that got
some radio listeners concerned this time, but a fictional broad-
cast of a major earthquake in southern California. Roger Takacs,
a senior at the University of California-Santa Cruz, created a
make-believe broadcast in late February from the school radio
station. The broadcast started with a bulletin that Los Angeles
had been hit with a major earthquake. Despite a disclaimer at
the beginning of the program and planned disclaimers that
were to air about ever' 15 minutes, numerous listeners be-
lieved there was a massive emergency and called the station.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Correction
The March 18 edition of The East Carolinian stated that the
Hospitality Management Carrer Day was to be held at the Human
Resources Building. It will be held at the Human Environmental
SciencesBuilding.Weregretany inconvenience this may havecaused.
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Through a new program
involving public schools and
community colleges, high school
students will be better prepared
to continue their education or
enter the workforce after gradu-
ation.
Though the State Board of
Community Colleges recently
endorsed the Tech PrepAsso-
ciate Degree program, some lo-
cal community o. ileges have
had the program in place for
more than three years.
Susan Q. Nobles, director
of marketing
and public rela-
tions at Pitt
Community
College ex-
plained thepur-
pose of the pro-
gram. "Tech
Prep is a cur-
riculum pro-
gram for county
school systems
designed to as-
sist students in
technical and
academic
courses in high
school to pre-
pare them for a hmb
technical career
"While high school coun-
selors work mainly with those
20 percent who go to a four year
university, Tech Prep is de-
signed for the 75 percent who do
not. Before this program these
students took mostly vocational
courses instead of the upper
level math and science courses
they needed at a community col-
lege or in their careers Nobles
said.
Dr. James W ingate, the vice
president of programs for the
Department of Community Col-
leges cited a lack of prerequisite
Tech Prep
shows the
students the
relevance of
subjects like
Geometry to
work they may
do in the
future
Gene Hembv
swit
dvo
MiLLiort toKfj of:
ie AHd&XjOQOtohfS
vhW od�S couid be
euitAAved eveRY YeAR.
Yoop -eves woNt Notice
YovJe. uohigs. fop.
yoReNAYs-teheLp
-tte eARtt, CALL
1-988-8887
courses as the ma in reason com-
munity colleges must teach re-
medial courses in the core cur-
riculum. Gene Hemby, Tech
Prep Coordinator at Pitt Com-
munity College, said that Pitt
had the same problem, espe-
cially in the areas of science and
math.
"This agreement paves the
way for community colleges to
minimize remedial instruction
and then use those same re-
sources to extend the technical
instruction in the associate de-
gree program Wingate said.
According to Hemby, Tech
Prep will benefit those high
school students
who decide to en-
ter the workforce
immediately as
well. "Tech Prep
shows the stu-
dents the rel-
evance of subjects
like Geometry to
work they may do
in the future
"To give an
example oi how
the needs are
changing, con-
sider electronic en-
gineering
Nobles said.
�hhhmbmm "Cor scs like calcu-
lus, physics and geometry are
necessary, and Tech Prep re-
quires these in high school
Hemby added that stu-
dents who complete the pro-
gram don't necessarily stop with
community college. "We refer
to it as a four plus two plus two
program. The door is not closed
with an associate degree
In fact, Nobles pointed out
that many students who com-
plete the program at Pitt go on
to ECU for a four year degree.
In addition, Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin serves on the Tech
Prep Steering Committee and
sings the praises of the program.
"It helps our young people pre-
pare themselves for work in the
world of technology. It also
helps our employers obtain a
trained workforce needed for
the 21st century Eakin said.
"The working relation-
ships between ECU, Pitt Com-
munity College, and Pitt county
Schools have really blossomed
with Tech Prep Nobles said.
"The ECU Administration sees
Tech Prep aiding the students
coming to ECU
The Department of Com-
munity Colleges states the goal
of the Tech Prep Associate De-
gree program is "to prepare at
least 85 percentofall high school
students through a Tech Prep or
College Prep course of study
According to Hemby, the
program seems to be working in
Pitt County. "We've seen SAT
scores increase, and the number
of students applying to college
increasedramatically. The drop-
out rate has also gone down over
the past two years
"It is an outstanding re-
source for our community. With
the Tech Prep program, we are
all winners Dr. Eakin said.
golden
corral
STEAKS, BUFFET & BAKERY
Golden Choice Buffet
with carved meats nightly
5.19
Weekend Buffet Breakfast
$4.49
present school I.D. and receive a
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504 SW Greenville Blvd.
FAMILY
HEALTH:
A CHALLENGE
FOR
OUR NATION
Dr. Mark
Ginsberg
MAJOR
Speeder
S-E-R-l-E-S
March 30,1993
8 PM
Great Room, MSC
Presented By The STUDENT UNION FORUM COMMITTEE
For More Information Call The Student Union Hotline
At 757-6004





I
wt
MARCH 23, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
State News
Burroughs Wellcome ready for AZT trial
DURHAM (AP)
Burroughs Wellcome officials are
confident the company can de-
fend its patent for the AIDS drug
AZT from challenges by drugcom-
panies in New York and Illinois.
Twogeneric-drug manufac-
turers say the U.S. government
should be named as co-inventor
of AZT, the leading drug treat-
ment for AIDS. The Research Tri-
angle Tark company rejects the
suggestion that anybody other
than Burroughs Wellcome should
have its name on AZT's patent,
which gives the company exclu-
sive rights to the drug's use for
AIDS.
"It was Burroughs Wellcome
scientists who conceived of the
use of the compound AZT for the
treatment of HIV infections
Kathy Bartlett, a company spokes-
woman, told The Herald-Sun of
Durham.
The two companies chal-
lenging Burroughs Wellcome are
Barr Laboratories of Pomona,
NY and Novopharm of
Schaumburg, 111. They contend
National Cancer Institute re-
searchers discovered that AZT
could be used to halt HIV's spread
by inhibiting the virus' ability to
reproduce itself.
If the government is named
asco-inventor, then it could grant
companies a license to manufac-
ture their own versions of AZT.
Right now, a generic copy can't be
made until after Burroughs
Wellcome's patent expires in 2005.
Novopharm and Barr filed
applications with the FDA for ge-
neric versions of AZT, triggering
Burroughs Wellcome patent-in-
fringement suit against the two
companies.
"This was done under our
resea rch program and this ap pears
to be an attempt to redefine, after
the fact, the relationship between
Burroughs Wellcome and the gov-
ernment Bartlett said. "We are
confident of our patent position
Both cases will be heard be-
ginning June 28 in U.S. District
Court in New Bern.
Burroughs Wellcome will
have a lot at stake in the court
cases.
A loss for the company
would clear the way for less-ex-
pensive generic versions of AZT
to hit the market years ahead of
time. That could seriously affect
Burroughs Wellcome's standing
in the stock market and drasti-
cally cut into its AZT sales, which
reached $388 million in 1992.
From AZT's introduction in
1987 through 1990, its sales jumped
more than tenfold, from $24 mil-
lion to $290 million. Company
profits for Burroughs Wellcome
rose 141 percent, from $145 mil-
lion in net profits in 1987 to $350
million in net profits in 1990.
In 1992, Burroughs
Wellcome had worldwide phar-
maceutical sales of $3.2 billion, of
which AZT accounted for $388
million or 12 percent.
Barr officials say the case is
important not only to their com-
pany, but also to AIDS patients.
"Our motive is not prima-
rily profit said Harold Cohen, a
Ba rr spokesman. "They have been
charging much too much in our
opinion, and we think we can help
a lot more people who maybe now
can't afford their medication
The NIH would receive roy-
alties from Barr's sales, and the
company has promised to sell its
version of AZT at half the current
cost, Cohen said. Selling AZT also
benefits the company.
"It is an opportunity for us
to get our name recognized, and
that'simportant said Paul Bisaro,
a New York attorney who serves
as Barr's general counsel.
3
One of Eastern North Carolina s
Finest Restaurants For Over 14 Years
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Controversial drug used for behavioral disorders
WILMINGTON (AP) � A
drug introduced more than 35
years ago to treat drug-induced
lethargy, narcolepsy and mild
depression is becoming more
popular for helping children di-
agnosed withattentiondeficitdis-
order.
Ritalin stimulates the brain
and in adults has the same effect
as speed, or amphetamine com-
pound s. But in children, it has the
opposite effect.
Parents and teachers say the
drug is becoming very popular,
partially because of educators'
enthusiasm for it.
"It's very controversial, the
issue if medicating children based
onbehaviorPhyllisBayzle,acoun-
selor at Gregory Elementary, told
The Morning Star of Wilmington.
Her first experience with
Ritalin wasaboutsixyears ago when
a child in her fou rth-grade class was
failing. Knowing his parents had
separated and thinking he was de-
pressed, she suggested he get coun-
seling.
"A couple of weeks later, the
child started working she said. His
grades improved. Ms. Bayzleleamed
the child was diagnosed with atten-
tion deficit disorder and was taking
Ritalin.
"You have to stop the impulse
not to want to do it for all kids with
these problems she said. "We in
education have to bevery careful not
to jump on the bandwagon
AngelaDavisknowsfirsthand
of the popularity of Ritalin, or its
generic equivalent,
methylphenidate. She received sev-
eral complaints from teachers about
the short attention spans of her chil-
dren, Matthew, 9, and Hannah, 8.
A pediatrigan prescribed the
drug after he and a child psycholo-
gist diagnosed the children with the
disorder, a label for a collection of
neurological behaviors that keeps
children from learning.
Matthew and Hannah's be-
havior improved drastically, but
not to the teachers' satisfaction.
"Some of the teachers,
they've asked me to get the doc-
tors to increase the dose Ms.
Davis said. "The doctors are very
firm. 'Tell the teachers this is not a
tranquilizer I've had to relay the
messages back and forth. That was
really a weird feeling, the teachers
wanting them to take more
Experts agree that Ritalin
should be used almost as a last
resort.
Often children who need
Ritalin have problems that require
counselingor tutoring,said pedia-
trician Angelina Knox.
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EVENT FORMAT:
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ECU's
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ECU's
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ECU's
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1





4 The East Carolinian
MARCH 23. 1993

National News
Sudaf ed tampering trial
rivals TV soap operas
SEATTLE (AP)�Who needs
"All My Children "Days of Our
Lives" or "The Young and the Rest-
less?"
The Sudafed tampering trial
of Joseph E. Meling in U.S. District
Court offers a real-life plot as com-
plex, characters as bizarre and cir-
cumstances as wildly unlikely as
any television soap opera.
Take Meling's marriage.
GaryLindbo,adecidedlystrict
Lutheran minister, moved to Brush
Prairie shortly after his 17-year-old
daughter, Jennifer, completed high
school in December 1979 in Kellogg,
Idaho.
The church secretary, Velma
Meling, called the lonely girl to ask if
she would go out with Meling's 18-
year-old son.
The teen-agers hit it off. Their
parents didn't.
"It was kind of a joke in the
family Jennifer Meling testified.
"He drove a fast car. He wore a
leather jacket Hedranka lotofPepsi.
That was not the kind of a person
you ought to be going with
In the fall of 1980, after she
enrolled at Pacific Lutheran Univer-
sity in Tacoma, Lindbo persuaded
her to break up with Meling.
Over the next several years,
she heard her old flame had bad-
mouthed her, had been married and
divorced,and still wanted toseeher.
After graduation, she found
work as a teacher at Tumwater
MiddleSchocJ.Hewasworkingasa
receiving clerk at the Vancouver
Columbian, nearly 100 miles away.
Despite the distance the flame
was rekindled. On four days notice,
they were married Nov. 22,1986, by
her father despite his strong misgiv-
ings. By 1989, the elder Melings and
Lindbos were at each others' throats
in a dispute over Velma's salary at
the church.
The younger couple also had
problems. Meling hurt his back lift-
ing a heavy table and earned little
but worker's compensation. Lilly
Lindbo,Jennifer'smother,lentthem
money, sometimes without telling
her husband.
Melingshowed early promise
as a Prudential insurance agent in
Olympiain 1990 and butsoon foun-
dered.His wife took more and more
extra work. They fought over sex
and his profligate spending habits.
After nearly dying of cyanide
poisoning on Feb. 2, 1991, she left
him and filed for divorce.
Then, after the FBI paid her air
farefora seven-week visittoa friend
in Hawaii, she went back to him.
But after repeatedly testifying
that she loves him and believes he is
innocent, she told reporters she
hadn't decided whether she would
stay with him when the trial is over.
Here are some of the support-
ing characters:
� Keith Jerome Meling, Joe's
uncle and the government's chief
informant, has a criminal history of
bigamy, forgery and bad checksand
wasdiagnosed inthel970sasapara-
noid schizophrenic.
He testified he couldn't re-
memberthenamesofall hissix wives,
how many times he had been mar-
ried, how often he had been in jail or
whether he once offered to sell his
unborn baby for $10,000.
�Gifford W. "Sonny"Meling,
Joe's father, tried to buy Portland
MeadowsracetrackinPortland,Ore
10 years ago. His application was
rejected partly for failure to mention
a grand larceny conviction that was
vacated after he made restitution.
He and Velma have yet to testify at
their son's trial.
� Kathleen Danneker of
Tacoma, one of the people who died
of cyanide poisoning, and her hus-
band had at least as stormy a mar-
riage as the Melings. Their son, Ken-
CAREER
Continued from page 1
ing school. DISCOVER's files
contain information on virtu-
ally all community colleges,
four-year institutions and
graduate schools in the United
States. Both SIGI PLUS and
DISCOVER are free to students
TRUSTEES
funded by the capital improve-
ments project at the cost of over
$270,000.
Attempting to confront the
asbestos problem in the resi-
dence halls, carpeting is to be
installed over the existing tiles.
When and if the tiles should
become broken and require re-
moval, the project may become
more serious.
The project has been
funded at $135,000 from Uni-
versity Housing Repairs.
At the meeting, the board
also discussed the negotiations
and require no prior knowledge
of computers.
A counselor will be avail-
able to assist, as well as to fol-
low up with counselling if
needed.
Students who wish to
schedule an appointment to
use these systems should call
Career Services at 757- 6050
between 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Monday- Thursday. SIGI
PLUS is also available in the
Counseling Center.
Continued from page 1
taking place to lease the old IBM
Building on First Street. If the ne-
gotiations go through, the build-
ing will be leased for a period of
ten years with the option to buy at
the end of 10 years at around
$800,000.Thebuildingwould pro-
vide 5,600 square feet of office
space in which to house Human
Resources.
During the meeting, Chair-
man Wayne Peterson presented
the board with the naming of vari-
ous rooms in the General Class-
room Building and the Joyner
Library addition. Among the
rooms named were two rooms
in the Joyner Library after 2
former U.S. senators. The Rob-
ert Morgan room is located on
the left side of the hallway and
the John East room is located
across the hall, on the right.
Chancellor Richard
Eakin announced the appoint-
ment of Phil Dixon to the Board
of Trustees and the resigna-
tion of Peterson who was re-
cently named to the Board of
Governors.
The next trustees meet-
ing will be held on April 30.
neth IV, testified one fight between
his parents was so bad he nearly
called the police.
After beingdivorcedforayear,
the Danekers had gotten remarried
the night before she died.
Her mother, Shirley Skinner,
testified that she lived with Kenneth
Daneker II and his children after her
daughter died, men was asked to
leave and told not to return for her
belongings after a falling-out.
�Paul A. Lindgren, who sold
a pound of sodium cyanide toa man
the government claims was Meling
in disguise, knew the defendant ca-
sually when the two were growing
up in the Vancouver area but had
not seen him in 20 years. Lindgren
said he recognized his old acquain-
tance only recently from newspaper
pictures.
� Several strippers � from
Kittens,NewPlayersClubandomer
Tacoma night spots frequented by
Meling while his marriage was at its
stormiest�werecalledtothestand.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is advertising account executives
currently accepting
resumes for the
following positions:
This job entails prospecting new clients, selling
creative advertising campaigns and
supporting advertising clients. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. No previous sales
experience is required but is heipful. Open to
all majors.
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed
advertisements using sound design principles
including; contrast and focal point. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of
Macintosh applications; PageMaker, Freehand,
QuarkXPress, and image scanning. Open to all
majors.
Same restrictions apply
JOSTENS
Existing tooling only
Date: MARCH 22-24 Time: 10:00-3:00
Deposit Required: s20.00
Place: ECU STUDENT STORE LOBBY
VISA
Jfi.
VALUABLE COUPON
SAVE $25.00
ON YOUR 14K CLASS RING
'AND REGISTER FOR A FREE GOLD RING TO BE GIVEN AWAY THIS WEEK!
NAME:
PHONE NO:
ORDER NO.
BRING THIS COUPON TO
THE ECU STUDENT STORE MARCH 22-24, 10:00-3:00 ,
UMfo
mmm
YOU HAVE ONE
HOT CAR
COME SHOW IT OFF
SATURDAY, MARCH 27
COME BE A PART OF THE
FIRST ANNUAL ECU STUDENT
CAR SHOW
$50 FIRST PRIZE
SPONSORED BY
AYCOCK HALL
CONTACT THE AYCOCK OFFICE FOR DETAILS
COME BY OR CALL 757-6935





TheEastCarolinian
March 23, 1993
Classifieds
Page S
WHY PAY $375 when you can pay
$315 for an apartment at the conve-
niently located Ringgold Towers.
Sub-lease a spacious 1 Bedroom for
1 or2 people for the summer months.
Park conveniently in front of build-
ing - no long walks! Call 758-4542.
SUMMER APARTMENT 2 Bed-
room 112 bath. Located in Cedar
Ct. To be sub-leased for summer.
365.00 Mo. Util. Ask for Brian or
Dave. 752-0085.
2 BEDROOM APT. HeatAC wa-
ter, sewer, cable included. 2 blocks
from campus. For rent NOW. Call
746-4169.
SINGLE ROOMS FOR RENT for
summer sessions. $250 per s.s. in-
cludes rent, utilities, and phone.
More info contact Marcus at (919)
758-3936.
2BDRDUPLEX, across from Town
Commons, close to campus and
downtown. Rent $325mo cats
neg. wdep Avail. 1 April. Sublet
til 1 Aug. new lease thereafter.
510-D East First St. Call 752-2400 or
752-8951.
APARTMENT TO SUBLEASE
this summer. One room efficiency
apartment at Ringgold Towers.
$260month. Call Dennis at 757-
0905.
TWOBEDROOMAPARTMENT
in Tar River. Available Mid-May!
Just in time for summer school! If
sign lease in April you get 1 2 OFF
JUNE AND JULY'S RENT! New
appliances and carpet. Normal rent
$460.00 Deposit required. If inter-
ested call 830-1791.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
UNIQUE SITUATION FOR FE-
MALE ROOMMATE. Full house
privileges, unfurnished room, ad-
joining bath, private entrance,
smoker o.k small peto.k. 1 3 utili-
ties, Wintervillearea. Callafter5pm
756-5467.
ROOMMATE wanted:Mustbe re-
sponsible and mature. 1 2 milefrom
campus, ECU bus. CALL: 752-1538,
leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE(S)
NEEDED to share 3 bedroomhouse
2 blocks from campus. House has
cable, washerdryer,and A?C.Call
Bonnie at 752-3472.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
May through Aug. to share 2 bdrm
Apt. at Tar River. $100.00 per mo.
13 utilities. Call 752-8000!
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
for May. Serious but fun, own bed-
room. $157.50 a month 12 utili-
ties. Call Penny at 830-3771, leave
message.
mm
CHEAP! FBI7 US SEIZED: 89
Mercedes -200, 86 VW - $50, 87
Mercedes - $100,65 Mustang - $5.
Choose form thousand s starting $50.
FREE Information 24 hour hotline
801-379-2929 copyright NC
030610.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 1-
800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
1981 YAMAHA "CHAPPY" Mo-
tor Scooter 49cc very good running
condition - great transportation for
around campus. Ride forever on a
gallon of gas. $400 931-7216.
YUMMY GIRL SCOUT COOK-
IES for sale! Call 7 to midnight931-
7959 before April 1st. Campus Girl
Scouts thank you!
KING SIZE WATERBED. Book-
shelfheadboard with mirror. Heater
and accessories included. Excellent
condition. $175. Call 752-3620.
ALVAREZ 12 String $200.00 Call
75d-7993.
USED - CDs, Gameboy NES and
SuperNES games, Nintendo, and
Gameboy. Call 756-3319 and leave
message.
1988 HONDA PRELUDE SI 4 ws
LOADED, CD player, amfm cas-
sette,RearWing,Sunroof,foglights,
power everything. High miles,
$6200,746-9196n, 830-7355d.
SNOWBOARD: Burton Elite 150
with Burton bindings and size910
Burton boots. Includes soft rack for
car and leash. $100.00 for all 931-
7392.
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
CimVi USED CD'S
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing
brochures! Sparefull time.Set own
hours! RUSH stamped envelope:
Publishers (GI) 1821 HillandaleRd.
1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
OUTER BANKS largest
watersports center hiring enthusi-
astic persons for sailing
windsurfinginstruction,powerboat
and equipmentrentals, retail. North
Beach Sailing, Inc. Box 8279, Duck,
NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
200 - $500 WEEKLY. Assemble
products at home. Easy! No selling
. You're paid direct. Fully Guaran-
teed. Free Information - 24 hour
hotline. 801 -379-2900. Copyright
NC 030650.
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many
positions.Greatbenefits.Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext P-3712.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT- fisheries. Earn $600week
in canneries or $4,000 month on
fishing boats. Free transportation!
Room & Board! Over 8,000 open-
ings. No experience necessary.
MALE or FEMALE. For employ-
ment program call 1-206-545-4155
ext. A5362.
PT CLERICAL POSITION - Af-
ternoons and evenings. Must have
accurate typing skills 65 wpm ().
Must be willing to perform a num-
ber of duties and work hard. Apply
in person at the Audit Bureau of
Greenville, 1206 S. Charles Blvd
Greenville, NC. No phone calls
please.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP -
SalesAdvertising begin imme-
diately part time. Have 4 weeks
summer vacation, good pay -
bring resume to Cooperative Edu-
cation Office General Classroom
Bldg. Will call for interview.
SUMMER JOB ON THE OUTER
BANKS: Kitty Hawk Pizza and
the New Tomato Parch Pizzaria
in Corolla are looking for sum-
mer help. Waitresses, cooks, and
dishwashers needed. Call Chris
locally at 931-7085 for an applica-
tion.
ATTENTION FASHION MER-
CHANDISING MAJORS! Gain
valuable work experience in your
field of study. Brody is accepting
applications for Secretary to
Buyer. Work with buyers in track-
ing and replenishing inventory
levels. Computer experience
needed. Must be available 3 days
by 12p.m 15-20 hours per week.
Apply Brody's, The Plaza, Mon-
day - Wednesday, 1-4 p.m.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
- Earn $2,000month world
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
ibbean, etc.) Holiday, Summer
and Career employment avail-
able. No experience necessary.
For employment call 1-206-634-
0468 ext. C5362.
LIFEGUARDS. Summer, NAGS
HEAD area, Country Club pool,
Call Bob, 756-1088.
RESPONSIBLE AND DEPEND-
ABLE BABYSITTER needed.
References and own transporta-
tion required. Flexible hours.
Ready to start now and or this
summer. Please call 355-7512.
WORD PROCESSING AND
PHOTOCOPYING SERVICES:
We offer typing and photocopy-
ing services. We also sell software
and computer diskettes. 24 hours
in and out. Guaranteed typing on
paper up to20hand written pages.
SDF Professional Computer Ser-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-
3694.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this
summer?Only $169 Jetthere any-
time for only $169 with
AIRHITCH! (Reported in Let'sGo!
& NY Times.) AIRHITCH @ 212-
864-2000.
NEED A FITNESS TRAINER to
get the look the guys want? Call
931 - 7866.
WHERE'S THE PARTY? Wher-
ever there's a Mobile Music Pro-
ductionsdisc jockey. Proven HOT-
TEST D.J. service in the area. Don't
wait too late to book. Call 758-
4644.
CARPET CLEANING $12 per
room 2 room minimum. Steamex
cleaning serving Greenville for 4
years. Call Marc at 758-1079.
LET'S PARTY! Experienced D.J.
from Bogies available for all occa-
sions: Fraternity and Sorority So-
cials, Weddings, Birthdays. All
types of music from Classic Rock
to Top 40 Dance. HIGHEST
QUALITY BEST PRICESCall Rob
' @ 757-2658.
Typing Services
Resumes, Term Papers. Letters
Master Thesis or Presentations
Professionally printed on "Laser Jet' printer
Reasonable Rates
Same Day Service available
Call J. Carson at 756-1341
RESEARCH INFORMATION!
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
InCaW. (213H77-B226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. �206-A, Los Angles, CA 90025
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
BRAVES PtOFBUONAL TYMN8 k
wounottssiMsaviCE
�Eng lish Literature Major
'Editing & Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resumes
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
JOE: I'm so glad you made it to San
Antonio- Spring break was truly a
week to remember! Next time we'll
actually see the ocean! Love, Jen.
LAW FIRM NEEDS TWO FJLLY
FURNISHED APARTMENTS
during thesummer. 1 bedroomMay
22 - June 27; 2 bedroom May 22 -
August 1. Contact BertSpeichor 355-
3030.
JIMMY- Hey! How's life after
anotherSundaynightatMugshots?
I'm sure all of us wish we had gone
home and not had that last shot! I
know I do! Poor Brandy had to
listen to me go a little nuts and you
thought your hand was made of
steel! Idiots! Later, Mo
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn S4,000-05,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
fact look on page 4 for an
SSoTKA excellent employment opportunity
4
Announcements
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Lookingforafellowshipof
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects? Need a refuge
form time to time? Campus Chrigf-
tian Fellowship may be what yoli
are looking for. Our weekly meefr
ings are at 7pm Wednesdays at our
CampusHouselocatedat200E.8th v
Stdirectly acrossCotancheSt. from
MendenhallStudentCenter. Every-
one is welcome. For more informa-
tion, call TimTumer,Campus Min-
ister, at 752-7199.
SPEECH-LANGUAGE &
AUDITORY PATHOLOGY
All General College stu-
dents who intend to major in
Speech-Language and Auditory
Pathology and have R. Muzzarelli
or M. Dowries as their ad visor are to
meet on Wednesday, March 24,5:00
p.m. in General Classroom 1028.
General advising for early registra-
tion will take place at that time.
Individual appointments can be
made following the general advis-
ing meeting. Pleasepreparea tenta-
tive class schedule before the meet-
ing.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next Gamma Beta Phi
meeting will be Tuesday, March 23
at 5:00 in Mendenhall 244. Please
bring 3 toiletry items to this meet-
ing for our next service project.
Donuts will also be distributed af-
ter the meeting. Hope to see you
there! Questions: call 931-9274.
.GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA .
"Jail House Rock" war-
rants for sell atStudentStore March
18,22,and23.Payonly$3.00tohave
someone arrested on April Fool's
Day! All proceeds go to needy fami
lies. Sponsored by Gamma Sigma
Sigma. �'
students, $15.00 faculty - staff- guest
For more information call 757-6387.
Tarticipants must register prior to
the pre-trip meeting.
TENNIS ANYONE?
TennisSinglesRegistration
will be held on Tuesday, March 23
a-�5:00 pm in Biology 103. For more
information call 757-6387.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
"CREATION'S TINY
MYSTERY" SCIENTIFIC MYS-
TERY UNRAVELED Dr. Rob-
ert V. Gentry, an internationally rec-
ognized authority on radiohalos will
be a guest speaker at ECU on March
23. He will present his work, which
chal lenges the evol u tioni sts'4.6 bil-
lion year age of the earth, in Hen-
drix Theatre at 7pm. You will be
amazed at his findings. Agree or
disagree, but come and hear what
many in the scientific community
want to keep quiet. Be prepared to
ask questions and challenge Dr.
Gentry's findings. No admission is
required, but donations will be ac-
cepted. If you have questions call
Tim Turner at 752-7199.
ENIOY A DAY OF CANOEING
Enjoy the Black River in
Sampson County where Cypress
trees and Spanish Mossdominated
the riverscape. A pre-trip meeting
will be held on Wednesday, March
24at5:00pminBrewsterD-l()l.The
actual trip will take place on Satur-
day March 27. Theost is $12.00
REC. SERVICES
Indoor soccer registration
will be held on Wednesday March
24 at 5:00 pm in Biology 103. For
more information call 757-6387.
? 25 OR OLDER?
Join us for brown bag
lunches on T esdays from noon to
130 pm. come for part or all of the
time. Trusgroupisan informal gath-
eringdesigned to be supportive and
help meet the needs of students
with family responsibilities. Infor-
mal discussions and presentations
are the format. Yes, there are many
students at ECU facing the same
corners as you. Let's leam from one
another. Every Tuesday, noon to
130 pmat theCounselingCenter in
313 Wright building. For more in-
formation, phoneGeorgeGressman
at 757-6661.
ATTENTION PRE - PHYSICAL
THERAPY STUDENTS
There will be a Pre - Physi-
ca I Therapy Cl ub meeting Wednes-
day, March 24 at 4:00 pm in the
Underground at Mendenhall.
Nominations for officers will be ac-
cepted at this meeting, all are wel-
come; please attend. If you have
questions, please call Dawn at 757-
0573.
PEER HEALTH EDUCATORS
The Peer Health Educators
are taking applications to join our
organization. If interested come by
our information meeting on March
25,4:00 pmStudent Health resource
room. All majors welcome.
WORKOUT FOR HOPE
Join the fun and fight
against AIDS at WORKOUT FOR
HOPE on Tues March 30 from
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm at Minges Coli-
seum. Proceeds benefit City of
Hope National Medical Center
AIDS research. For more informa-
tion contact ECU Recreational Ser-
vices at 757-6387.
FITNESS FANS
Come join Greenville's
finest fitness instructors and Mark
Brunetz (consultant to Jane Fonda
Video Productions and co-star of
body by VH-1) on Tuesday,
March 30 from 6:00 pm-8:00 pm
at Minges Coliseum on the East
Carolina University Campus in
the Fifth Annual WORKOUT FOR
HOPE. All ages and fitness levels
are welcome in this nationwide
event, held in 80-plus cities.
WORKOUT FOR HOPE will raise
more than $1 million for AIDS
research at the City of Hope Na-
tional Medical Center, a leader in
discovering ways to stop this fa-
tal disease. You can help WORK-
OUT a cure for AIDS. This event
is sponsored by ECU Recreational
Services. For more information
call 757-6387.
P.U.S.H. THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
towards reducing the architectural,
as well as the attitudinal barriers
that students with special needs are
faced with every day, then come to
thenextmeetingofP.U.S.H. (People
United to Support the Handi-
capped.) Meeting will be 5:00-6:00
on Thursday, March 25 in Cotten
Hall lobby. Come join the fun
RUSSIAN LITERATURE
It's Back! 20th century Rus-
sian Literature (taught in English),
RUSS 2221, will be offered Fall se-
mester, MWF 1:00 - 2:00pm. Sign
up at pre-registration. the begin-
ning Russian language course,
RUSS 1001 will be offered MWF
9:00-10:00pm.
Classifieds
25wordsorless:
Students $21)0
NrxrStudents $3jOO
Each additional word $005
�All ads must be pre-pakJ
Announcements Displayed
$5.50perinch:
AnyorgarizatkrimayuserheAnnounce-
merfcSertkriofTheEastCardritantofct
activitiesarxlevenrscpmtothepurJctwo
triTesfreeoftrHgatXjetotriekTitBdarnaunt
orspaceJheEastCat ufc s i carrot gjaran-
teethepiWcatkriofarTKLroaiHiti.
teplayedadvertisementsmaybe
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
priortopublication; however, no
refunds wil be given.
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. forTuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p. m. for Thursday's Edition
Formore
information call
757-6366.





March 23, 1993
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
TuesdayOpinion
Athletics produces
greater exposure on
national level
Football, basketball considered
high visibility sports; success
adds to school reputation
Who says good things don't come out of television?
Most recently, the East Carolina men's basketball
team upset the Colonial Athletic Association with its stun-
ning victories over teams such as James Madison and Old
Dominion in the CAA tournament. These victories put
ECU into the NCAA tournament, or "the Dance for the
first time in over 20 years.
The basketball team faced possibly the toughest oppo-
nent it could possibly come up against, the UNC Tar Heels.
Outsized and outmanned, EC U found itself facing a similar
situation that General Custer might have faced. The spread
had ECU losing by at least 25 points.
Faced with this much opposition, any other team
would havegivenup and thrown in the towel.
But not ECU. They hung in there, played
tough basketball and only lost by 20 (( , ' J points -
which is very good, considering the L, afore-
mentioned spread.
By not accepting defeat and
everyone's expectations, East Carolina
showed the state � and the country �
the type of student and athletic program
we have here. On national television, our
basketball team showed the pride that some
in this state have sneered at us for not hav-
ing. Hopefully, this pride will be evident in
later years by increased attendance at bas-
ketball games throughout the season,
whether they be home or away.
Football and basketball are the two
big money sports when it comes to be-
ing nationally televised. Our football
team put us on the map with their 1991
Peach Bowl upset over long-time rival
N.C. State. ESPN televised last year's game against South-
em Mississippi, and plans to televise next year's game
against Syracuse.
By just appearing in this year's NCAA tournament,
the basketball team has increased its chances for future
recruitment. Running against four of the biggest names in
college basketball � Duke, Wake Forest, UNC and N.C.
State � ECU is hard pressed to garner any big name
recruits. With this exposure, ECU can more realistically
compete for the remainder of in-state high school gradu-
ates and possibly garner some out-of-state recruits.
As much as some would vehemently deny the fact, a
college's reputation is more often than not built upon its
athletic program. If you don't have a decent football or
basketball team, chances are you'll remain in obscurity
until you do. Ever hear of Coppin State? Or Rider? How
about Coastal Carolina? No, not the TV show, the basket-
ball team. If you drew a blank on these names, then you
obviously haven't kept up with the NCAA tournament.
Everyone knows about Indiana, Kentucky or Duke � the
ones mentioned above only rise to fame once in a blue
moon.
Kudos to the basketball and football team for commit-
ting themselves to the high ideal that they have shown the
rest of the nation. Faced with what some termed insur-
mountable odds, both teams have shown a determination
and grit to persevere that will ensure their exposure in the
future. Through this exposure, our university will benefit.
Specifically, hats off to Ike Copeland, James Lewis and
Ronnell Peterson for being the most recent visible examples
of our university. They showed that ECU is not just a
second-rate college to be laughed at, but rather a institution
that produces first-rate graduates, in whatever field.
By Amy E. Wirtz
Jokes about Clinton becoming stale, old news
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hasseil, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Bullard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Siimner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asm lnyout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed. Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg . ECU, Greenville. N C, 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call CJ19) 757 6366
I'rinted on
w
100 recycled
paper
You know, I'm getting quite
sick of all the lame jokes that co-
medians (and people who think
they're funny) have been laying
out about Clinton. I'm sure you
know what I'm talking about: the
ones about his obsession with
McDonald's cuisine, his "folly"
concerning the building of a jog-
ging track in the backyard of the
White House, etc.
This upset me until I real-
ized that the cause of this out-
break is because of the fact that
Clinton and his team are actually
accomplishing things and work-
ing hard to change the future of
America (thank you very much).
My, can you remember a time
when a president worked so hard
that the media felt compelled to
write about his workaholic ten-
dencies and stress-related insom-
nia? Not I.
In the eight weeks since he
took office, Clinton, who is a gen-
eration younger than his two pre-
decessors in the White House, has
The Many
Faces of
Bill Clinton
maintained a pace few could
match. Clinton has stuck toa high-
energy schedule, shunned out-of-
town vacations and grabbed mo-
ments of relaxation when he could
�usua 1 ly by gathering family and
friends for an informal evening
watching sports or movies.
Since his inauguration Jan.
20, Clinton has crisscrossed the
country for a series of campaign-
style rallies. His one visit to Camp
David, the presidential retreat in
Maryland, was a working session
with Cabinet members. By com-
parison, Bush regularly fit in va-
cation time at his home in
Kennebunkport, Maine. The
Reagans frequently unwound at
their ranch outside Santa Barbara,
Calif. Clinton? He takes cat naps
between visits with prime minis-
ters and reporters. What a guy.
The other ways mat he un-
winds includes jogginga few miles
most days, which leads us to the
snide remarks about the jogging
track. On his morning runsaround
Washington's monuments,
Clinton is followed by a motor-
cade of Secret Service and media,
which creates traffic jams. Can't
we just let the man have his little
jogging track and leave him alone?
I'm sure there are more important
concerns that we upstanding citi-
zens can involve ourselves with
right?
Bill Clinton, after an admit-
tedly misspent transition and a
stumbling start in the White
House, has shown increasing con-
fidence in his job. He may, as some
associates contend, still be trying
to do too much himself, but his
energy and range impress every-
one who comes into contact with
him.
The majority in Congress is
as impressed by Clinton's style in
the early going but not driven by
the new administration's agenda.
They like the new guy, and were
pleasantly surprised when Clinton
took his economic plan on the road
last month and made it public.
They admire a guy who looks
like he knows what he's doing.
So far, that's how Clinton im-
presses a lot of these people.
In closing, an example of
the kind of clout Clinton has.
When conservative Democratic
senators at a White House bud-
get meeting pressed Clinton to
take bolder steps to reduce the
budget deficit, he replied that in
hisdiscussions with British Prime
Minister John Major, the Briton
had urged him not to "step too
hard on the brakes" and risk
aborting what looks like a prom-
ising economic recovery to the
United States.
Quoting Major and other
sources, Clinton told the sena-
tors that Western Europe might
have no real growth this year
and Japan very little, so the
United States must be the engine
to lead the industrial nations out
of the doldrums.
And this man isn't con-
cerned about foreign affairs
QuoteoftheDay
Sports � an order of chivalry, a code of
ethics and aesthetics, recruiting its
members from all classes and all peoples
Rene Maheu
Letters to the Editor
Fleming Residence Hall dies studious death
To the Editor:
Very few people will un-
derstand why I have written
this. Even fewer will be able to
relate, but here goes.
I have lived in Fleming
Residence Hall for the past three
years. I have watched people
come and go and all the ups
and downs that occur when
you put such a large group of
people under one roof. I saw
people come together to make
Reming the Residence Hall of
the Year. I was proud to say I
lived in Fleming, not only be-
cause of the awards, but also
because it wasn't just another
residence hall. I felt socomfort-
able walking up and down the
halls, joking and hanging out
with whomever happened to
be in the hall at the time. Every-
one got along to a certain ex-
tent, and we all seemed to look
out for each other. Each night,
people gathered in the lobby to
play cards, joke around and
watch an occasional game to
cheer on their favorite teams.
At times it was crowded and
loud, but isn't that what the
lobby is for? If people want to
study in silence, they can go to
their rooms or to the library.
That's what they built it for.
Over the years, Fleming
has become more strictly the
Honors residence hall,and with
that "24 hours of quiet" has
become more strictly enforced.
Maybe ECU needs a residence
hall for people who want to
live in silence and seclusion. I
only regret that Fleming had to
become ECU's live-in library.
There are restrictions at every
turn and the feeling of freedom
is gone. These are supposed to
be the best years of our lives.
Unfortunately, I think many of
Heming's residents are barely
living.
I'll be living in Fleming
for about five more weeks and
then I'll be moving out. When 1
walk down the halls and go to
the lobby, nothing is there.
There may be a few people
watchingTV or talking. It's not
the same. The bond, the chem-
istry and the excitement are
gone. With their loss, we may
have a more studious environ-
ment, but no classroom educa-
tion could give me the memo-
ries I gained from the atmo-
sphere which used to exude
from Heming.
Many Fleming residents,
namely the freshmen, can in no
way understand the point I am
trying to make. After all, you
can't miss what you've never
had. I believe most of thesopho-
mores understand where I'm
coming from. To the juniors,
what can I say? We've certainly
been through a lot and I'm sure
you all join in my feelings.
Many of us are moving
out this semester. After we're
gone, there will be nothing left
of the way things used to be. I
think that's why I felt I needed
to write this. In a way, I look at
this as an obituary for Fleming
Hall. Fleming is survived only
by our memories, and will be
put to rest at the end of this
semester. Fleming lived a long
and prosperous life. May he
rest in peace.
Ron Clark
Junior
History
Columnist praised for evaluation of society
To the Editor:
It is so easy to criticize.
Rare is the day when one
takes the time to pat some-
one on the back for a job well
done. Let me take the time to
pat Mr. Jim Shamlin on the
back for his superb editorial,
"Knowing cause, effects dis-
pels ignorance
Shamlin is as "right as
rain" in his evaluation of so-
ciety and its problems. Only
when society realizes the
true nature of government
and individual sovereignty
is again respected will this
country begin to solve its
many problems; if not, those
educated in the Freedom
Philosophy must undertake
another revolution and over-
throw the current govern-
ment.
It is refreshing to read
Shamlin's articles. Keep up
the good work!
R. Matthew Poteat
Senior
Public Historv
A View from Above
By T. Scott Batchelor
Hypocrisy flows
in government;
no end in sight
Hypocrisy, hypocrisy, hypocrisy.
Our topic of discussion for today is hy-
pocrisy. Last week, the Clinton
administration's Secretary of Education reaf-
firmed the validity of federally funded race-
based scholarships. The administration's po-
sition is mat blacks, Hispanics and American
Indians should be given special consideration
in the awarding of academic scholarships to
promote "equal opportunity" among college
candidates.
Two points here. First, does anyone re-
member the dream Martin Luther King, Jr.
once had that people would be judged by the
"content of their character" and not by the
"color of their skin?" Or have King's teachings
become passe in today's politically correct
climate?
Then there's the perversion of the con-
cept of equal opportunity in this instance.
Think about it. The goal is to win a scholarship
to go to college. Everyone, regardless of race
or ethnicity, should be free to compete for
those scholarships. That's equality of oppor-
tunity and should be legally protected. But
guaranteeing an individual a scholarship be-
cause he or she isblack, Hispanic or American
Indian is equality of outcome,not opportunity,
and the U.S. Department of Education ought
to be ashamed of itself for misrepresenting its
actions.
Now, our next topic of hypocrisy. The
Rev. Jesse Jackson came out several weeks ago
and led the drive to ban Marge Schott from
owning a major league baseball team. Jackson
did this because of some racial remarks Schott
allegedly maae.
Well, isn't that the pot calling the kettle
black? Remember when Jackson called New
York City "hymie town" in reference to the
substantial population of Jews living there?
Yet he cruises right along unfazed and has the
audacity to point his finger at those he calls
"racist The man obviously hasnoconscience.
Boston Globe columnist Derrick Z. Jack-
son chastised the news media for using the
word "Muslim" to describe the suspects ap-
prehended in connection with thebombingof
the World Trade Center. "The temptation for
the reader writes Jackson, "is to decide that
all Muslim 'fundamentalists' are death-deal-
ingaliens Jacksonpreferstheheadlinewhich
ran on page one of his own newspaper: "N.J.
engineer held in blast of N.Y. tower
However, using Jackson's "logic this
isn't proper either. Does the Globe mean to say
that residents of the Garden State are all
wackos? I hope not. So we should drop the
unnecessary reference to New Jersey and say,
"Engineer held in blast of N.Y. tower
Now my engineering friends are up in
arms (excuse the pun). "What are you say-
ing?" they indignantly ask. "That engineers
are a group of bomb-building tenorists? No,
of course not. So to play it safe, I guess the
headline should read, "Man held in blast of
N.Y. tower That unfairly targets males,
doesn't it? The only tiling I can think of to be
perfectly equitable would be the headline,
"Homo sapien held in blast of N.Y. tower
Theotherproblemwithjackson'sarticle
is the important but overlooked fact that, from
what we know at the moment, the bombing
had something todo with ad vancing the cau se
of Muslim fundamentalists engaged in a holy
war. It would be disingenuous to pretend
otherwise.
i�






The East Carolinian
March 23. 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
Breed 13 throws album release bash
By John Builard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
The line into The Breed 13
show, thrown for the release of
their new album, Saturated, at
CRock's lastSaturday night, was a
little longer than I thought it would
be. Then again, I didn't know that
theUltimaxtournamentwasgoing
tobe played in Greenville last week-
end. Throngs of students, from
schools such as Yale and Vermont,
came down South for frisbee and
fun.
Well, Saturday afternoon on
the intramural fields was frisbee
and lastSaturday night atO'Rock's
was fun.
Breed 13 and Lime Credo
played to a packed house of famil-
iar and not-so-familiar faces in an
atmosphere where anyone would
feel at home. The beer was free and
socializin' was done with that spe-
cialSauthemhospitality sofamous
at ECU.
Things were moving around
10:30 p.m. when Lime Credo took
tothestagt.Theydidn'tdisappoint
the crowd of Ultimate players and
Breed 13 fans. I hadn't been down-
town for ages and the music and
crowd at O'Rock's showed me that
I was missing a lot of great local
music and comradery.
Anticipation for the appear-
anceof Breed Dwaspretty high for
me and half the crowd � most of
us had heard good things about the
band, but hadn't had the chance to
try them on. With the beer flowin
I was ready to get my first taste of
the band I had been told so much
about.
With the appearance of the
Photo by Dail Head
Breed 13 celebrated the release of their latest, Saturated, at O'Rocks Saturday night. They teamed up with
the Ultimate tournament players to provide keg beer for all while it lasted.
association with other bands. Per- At the end of the show, 1 was
Breed 13, mynightcould'veswung
either way. 1 was having a good
time, but with a mediocre band, 1
would be in a cab and on the way to
my favorite pillow.
But my pillow had to wait.
Breed 13 provided the neces-
sary dose of energy to keep me
hyped from the very beginning of
their set. Head bouncing, I walked
around the crowd asking what
people thought. Many listeners
quicklysaid, 'Tmnotsure�they're
hot though and turned their at-
tentions back to the stage.
The band defies definition or
plexed, I walked over to Tim
Johnson, the band's manager, and
asked him totellmewho he thought
the band resembled.
"No he said. "Westeeraway
from that sort of thing
As the music kept the crowd in
high spirits, I began to realize that
Breed 13 defies definition because
they just plain do. The band's line -
up consists of four talented musi-
cians: Brad Rice sings; Jason Nunn
plays guitar; Lee Hylton thumps
the bass; and Clay Kent emphati-
cally beats on the drums.
thoroughly impressed with what
Greenvillenow offers forthedown-
town scene. I'msure all those frisbee
freaks will be going back to their
schools with much to say about
Greenville � and it'll have a lot to
do with the music.
Not wanting to offend the
band, I decided not to ask them
what they sounded like. You'll just
have to trust me. They sound like
Breed 13 and you're going to be
hearing more about them.
Next chance, you should check
them out. I will.
Puppets to perform
Wizard of Oz'
By Lisa Baumann
Photo by David Zeigvr
A scene from the Center for Puppetry Arts' production of 'The
Wizard of Oz to be shown in Wright Auditorium Saturday afternoon.
Staff Writer
The Center for Puppetry Arts
will present an adaptation of the
novel, "Wizard of Oz at ECU
Saturday at 2 p.m. The program is
part of ECU'S 199293 Young
Audiences Performing Arts Se-
ries and will be presented in
Wright Auditorium.
The hour-long presentation is
a dramatic adaptation from the
1900classictalebyL.FrankBaum
and is intended for enjoyment by
audiences of all ages.
Stuart Secttor, marketing di-
rector for EC U, wants the show to
be a family affair. "We encourage
people of all ages to come out and
see thisshow Secttor saidPup-
pets seem to bring out the kid in
us all
The performance takes view-
ers on a fast paced journey to the
Land of Oz and back to Kansas
with a determined and self-reli-
ant Dorothy leading the way.
The unique thing about this
puppet show ib the complicated
style of puppetry used. The Cen-
ter for Puppetry Arts' production
is fashioned after Japanese-style
Bunraku puppetry. This style in-
volves puppeteers, generally
dressed in black, who are visible
behind the puppets.
Traditionally, the rod pup-
pets are manipulated by more
than one puppeteer per puppet.
Onepuppeteercontrolsthearms,
while another puppeteer controls
the feet. This form of art requires
great skill and choreography.
Following the performance, the
techniques behind the craft will
be briefly demonstrated by the
'uppeteers.
The Center for Puppetry Arts
is a self-contained unit. They bring
their own set which consists pri-
marily of long, narrow
playboardsthatcontinuallymove
to instantly transfer the audience
from one scene to the other. The
puppeteers maneuver the
playboards in a kind of choreo-
graphed dance with the move-
See PUPPET page 9
Week at a Glance
Tuesday:
� Comedian
Mike Sweeney will
entertain students
for $1 and every-
one else for $2 in
Room 244 of
Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center at 8
p.m.
� Reception for
Gail Ritzer's exhibit
of pottery, quilts,
etc titled "Ameri-
can Heiroglyphics"
will be held in Mendenhall Student Center at 7
p.m.
Mike Sweeney
� Classical guitarist
Steve Aron will per-
form at 8 p.m. in
Fletcher Center Recital
Hall.
He will present two
selections from Abel
Carlevaro's "Preludios
Americanos the
Haydn Divertimento in
G, "Elegie" by Johann
Kaspar Mertz, "Five
Bagatellas" by Sir
William Walton,
"Three Preludes" by
Louis Richmond and
"The Prince's Toys
Suite" by Nikita
Koshkin.
Currently Aron heads the University of AKron
guitar department and is teacher and founder of
the classical guitar studies program at the Oberlin
Consrevatory of Music.
Thursday
� "The Social Challenges of Science a free
public lecture, will be presented by Thomas
Malone, former national president of Sigma Xi
honor society at 7:30 p.m. in Room 1031 of the
General Classroom Building.
Dr. Malone is among the nation's most promi-
nent ethicists of science. Currently a Distin-
guished University Scholar at N.C. State Univer-
sity, he has been foreign secretary of the National
Academy of Sciences and vice president of the
International Council of Scientific Unions.
� Suzanne Smioth Blancett, editor-in-chief of
two noted nursing publications, will talk of the
judgement calls and the dilemmas often faced by
editors in a speech to nurse researchers and other
nursing professionals at the spring banquet of
Sigma Theta Tau International, the nursing honor
society.
"Behind the Editor's Desk" begins at 7 p.m. at
the Greenville Hilton Inn.
Blancett, a Sigma Theta Tau Distinguished
Lecturer and member of its board of directors,
has authored numerous articles and a book which
won her the American Journal of Nursing Book of
the Year Award.
Mock political drama shown at Hendrix Theatre
)ust in case you didn't see or hear enough in November
By Lisa Baumann
Staff Writer
Mendenhall Student Union bhoweu
Tim Robbins'acclaimed political dmma
Bob Roberts as the Wednesday and Sun-
day movie in Hendrix Theatre. Bob Rob-
erts is a mock political documentary in
which Robbins stars as an arrogant,
pompous folk singer turned politician
who makes a run for the U.S. Senate.
Robbins, who makes his writing and
directingdebut with this project, shines.
His look and political smirk are very
convincing.
After impressive performances in
Bull Durham and Jacob's Ladder, Bob Rob-
erts only reaffirms Robbin's acting tal
ents. Unfortunately, Robbin'sactingabil
ity is not enough to salvage this political
mayhem of a movie
The plot unfolds as Roberts begins
his campaign caravan across Pennsyl-
vania. Like every gcx)d politician, he has
a gimmick. He plays the guitar, "the
instrument of the devil as one woman
put it With a sincere, politician-like
face, Roberts sings songs like "Drugs
Stink "Complainer" and "Pride He
isa politician with CDs and songs on the
Top 40. A little far fetched, huh?
Roberts runs on the Republican
ticket. Since he is a self-made million-
aire (worth around $40 million), he
doesn't ask for money.
Hecampaignson the sameold prom-
ises that most politicians make and ap-
peals to voters to vote for him because
they have pride in themselves rind
America.
Supporters are awed by this slick
talking, b.tfn-kissin, anti-drug, anti-
'60s politician who promises to take
Washington by storm. Sounds too fa-
miliar.
be full of the same old political cliches
that surround every campaign. Scandal,
sex, abuse of power, political mistrust,
misappropria-
Roberts
seems to have
the campaign
wrapped up
since his demo-
cratic opponent
was caught
with a teenage
campaign sup-
porter Trouble SCX, UbUSC OJ pOWCY, pOUtl-
ertsWwhenRt cal mistrust misappro-
S2SS�j: priation of funds
covers informa- �"�m��"�11�
This movie seems to be full
of the same old political
cliches that surround
every campaign. Scandal,
tion tving Roberts to the S & L scandal.
The rest of the movie seems to spira I
downhill after that. This movie seems to
tion of funds
It's all there. At
times, the
movie is hard to
understand �
several charac-
ters talk at once,
distracting the
viewer.
Thescriptis
full of political
jargon which no
one likes to
11 ' "���� hear.
The movie is full of Robert's cam-
paign songs, which were somewhat
funny at first, but became annoy.g in-
tervals in the plot. Senator Bob Roberts
is insincere, uncaring, superficial and,
sadly enough, is probably a good repre-
sentation of most politicians who just
want to win.
The movie contains special cameos
by some famous faces. Susan Sarandon
Robbins' real-life wife, appears as a TV
anchorwoman. Allan Richman,(thebad
guv in Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves),
plays Roberts' campaign manager and
is marginally funny. JamesSpader (White
Palace), Fred Ward (Remo Williams) and
John Cusack Say Anything) also make
appearances.
If you like politics, then Bah Roberts
is definitely your movie.
If you got enough politics this past
November, leave Bob Roberts on video
store shelf and spend your $3.75 on some-
thing else.





8 The East Carolinian
MARCH 23, 1993
At Wit's End
By Stephen Conrad
Staff Writer
Two weeks ago this fine institu-
tion of higher learning, otherwise
knownasaglorified high school, par-
ticipated in that almighty college tra-
dition, Spring Break. Throngs of stu-
dents flocked to the beaches, moun-
tains. Momand Dad, thisarticle prob-
ably does not pertain to you but read
it for future reference anyway!
What students did on Break is
always something of a mystery, es-
pecially to those who have never partici-
pated (and to some who have). These
experiences range from the mundane to
the absurd and beyond.
As a personal witness to this insane
tradition 1 must say the places that 1
have visited (and there have been a few)
are all weary of the "Spring Breaker
The locals are mostly fed up with
rude inconsiderate kids who feel as if
they have the right to be so. They de-
stroy, mutilate and generally disgust
the local populace of wherever they go
be it Vail, Key West, Cancun or Myrtle
Beach.
This is repulsive, you are suppos-
edly mature enough to handle yourself
responsibly without getting out of con-
trol.ThisI realizeishard for most ofyou
but consider where you are visiting.
Do you really think that they like having
you there for Spring Break?
Especially when you become an
immature high school student or worse
a drunk ass! The only thing that these
people like about you is your money,
even if it is soaked in beer and occasion-
ally bong water (not you, you say? Yeah,
right.).
That's OK though, you can always
return to Green-hell and that fine insti-
tution we all attend. 1 suppose that you
must release your tension somewhere
now that downtown is boring and re-
petitive so why not go trash someone
else's town after all they take all
your money, give you a hangover and
maybe a night in the slammer and then
they spend your money to fix the dam-
age that you did.
Maybe (just maybe) you, a college
student (or are you all in a high school?)
could be a little more responsible and
respectableor is that asking too much?
You might have better memories than
a headache, some strange STD or
handcuff scars from the cops.
Save the irresponsibility for
Green-hell after all, as our wondrous
radio station says, "what are you go-
ing to do in Greenville? Study?"
By the way, 1 am guilty of being
irresponsible during break but I also
wish we could all learn to act a little
more befitting of our place in society;
we are the future.
Stimulating biography paints Picasso's portrait
(AP) � Of the many books
written about Pablo Picasso, the
latest, "Picasso, Life and Art" by
Pierre Daix, is the most up-to-date,
comprehensive one-volume biog-
raphy of the great 20th-century art-
ist.
Although this is a translation
of the 1986 book published in
France, Daix writes that it "differs
considerably" from the original.
Several events that occurred
after the French publication made
the author drastically revise and
expand the book: two major Picasso
exhibits in Parisand New York; the
coming into the market of a signifi-
cant number of privately held
Picasso paintings; and a dramatic
increase in serious publications on
Picasso.
Daix is uniquely qualified as
Picasso's biographer.
He is not only an art critic and
novelist, buthewasPicasso'sfriend.
Armed with his personal and
professional knowledge of the art-
ist, he traceshislife from hisbirth in
1881 in Andal usia, Spain�a prov-
ince "scarcely touched by the En-
lightenment" � to his death as a
world celebrity in Mougins, France,
at the age of 91.
In the book, Picasso emerges as
alucky genius whowasrecognized
early and who spent his long, suc-
cessful career thrilling and scan-
dalizing the world, and enjoying it.
Dai x shows how he kept chang-
ing his technique and style as he
drew inspiration from various
women in various stages of his life.
The author concludes:
"Picasso, to the last day of his life,
was his art. Therein lies his great-
ness
Despite the sometimes awk-
ward English translation, Daix's
eruditionand insightshine through.
This isa highly stimulating and
thought-provoking book.
Check it out
Picasso, Life and Art
by Pierre Daix
HarperCollins
450 pages
$30
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�Deadbolt Locks Walk-in Closets
featuring
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I GREENVILLE'S FINEST APARTMENT COMMUNITY WITHIN
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THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
resumes for the following positions:
LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails creating computer aesigned layout for all
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0G.P.A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications;
PageMaker, Freehand, QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
ASSISTANT LAYOUT MANAGER
This job entails working with the Layout Manager creating
computer designed layout tor the Opinion and Classifieds
sections of the newspaper by incorporating up-to-date
design principles. Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P. A.
Working knowledge of Macintosh applications,
PageMaker, Freehand, QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
PHOTO EDITOR
This job requires working knowledge of 35mm camera and
darkroom operations ana will work with a staff of
photographers to supply the photo needs of various
meOia Requirements: Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Work well with
other staff members and meet deadlines. Open to all
majors
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
The chief duties are to create or oversee the creation of
artwork using both traditional and computer-generated
artwork to compliment the newspaper text ana
advertising. Also, supervise the comics section. Minimum
2,0 G.P.A. Knowledge of Macintosh applications,
illustration, design and cartooning. Open to all majors.
BUSINESS MANAGER
This position is responsible for aOministering the
newspapers funds available by controlling all requisitions
for purchases and analyzing financial data for the
Advertising Director and General Manager Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working knowledge of marketing,
management, finance ana economics and experience
using Excel. Open to all majors.
Apply at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor of the
Student Pubs building � 757-6366
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WAMPLERLONCACRE
Boneless
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ed per item purchased.






MARCH 23, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
New CD-Rom game provides hours of excitement
By John Bui lard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
Just last Thursday, I finally
got my Christmas present. My
brand-spanking-new Applecom-
puter with a CD-ROM drive at
last arrived at the student store.
For those unaware of what a
CD-ROM drive is, like myself un-
til last Thursday, it is like a regu-
lar audio Compact Disc player.
The only difference is that the
information on the CD is a com-
puter program.
The computer came with
some discs to mess around with,
but what 1 want to tell you about
is a CD game that's blown me
away.
The Journeyman Project, the
first-ever interactive,
photorealistic game for the
Macintosh, contains 400 Mega-
bytes (the Apples and PCs around
campus usually contain 40 to 80
MB hard drives) of information
that makes for an out-of-this-
world experience.
The game was written and
programmed by Presto Studios
out of San Diego, Ca and incor-
porates 3D animation, over 30
minutes of QuickTime video, an
original musical score, integrated
arcade action and a branching
storyline that plays like a detec-
tive story.
For the past couple days it's
been hard pulling myself away
from the game just to do trivial
things like relieving myself.
The premise of The Journey-
man Project centers around time
travel. You, the player, are a resi-
dent of the sky-city Caldoria in
the year 2318.
The world has finally gained
peace and tranquility only to be
jeopardized by theadventof time
travel. With time travel, the pos-
sibility of sabotaging history ex-
ists. As an employee of the Tem-
fFaritastic Sanis
the Original Family Haircutters,
South Park Shopping Center
115 Red Banks Road
355-9515
NEW HOURS
iOpen Sunday 1-6
poral Security Annex, it is your
job, Agent 5, to restore any time
rip that may occur.
At the beginning of the game,
you wake up and put on your
Biotech Interface, a device which
fits around the head of your char-
acter like sunglasses. The Inter-
face enables you to see the action
of the game much like the Termi-
nator sees things in the movies.
To players of the Journeyman
Project, the computer's screen
looks like an eye piece which dis-
plays information about your
health, possessions and status.
Once a time rip occurs, you
must go to the time machine, also
called Pegasus, and travel back
to the prehistoric times of dino-
saurs, where an information disk
is hidden that you must obtain.
With this done you speed back to
the Command Center and com-
pare the disk with unaltered his-
tory with that of the altered his-
tory disk.
TheCommand Center'scom-
puter then gives a set of dates
that are the most probable times
where the disruption of history
happened. You then must travel
to these times and figureouthow
best to "reset" history � and it
ain't easy!
Success
Starts with a
Professional Resume.
Stop in today and see what we
can do for you.
YV
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$22.95 suggd HAIR CUT
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I
The storyline is complicated
and tests the player's ability to
sort and figure clues to pinpoint
what happened to change his-
tory.
Everything is related to the
coming of aliens.
These aliens, the Cyrollans,
come in peace and someone, or
something, is trying to stop them
by changing events in history.
My first attempts at the game
were failures, ending in deaths
caused by such clumsy acts as
stepping off of cliffs. Once I got
the hang of it, I began moving
around with much more ease. So
now, my deaths are due to cap-
ture, su ffocation by seven-foot tall
robots, a poison dart and being at
a Mars mine when it explodes.
I still haven't resolved thedis-
ruption in history, but 1 plan on
skipping classes until I do.
The Journeyman Project re-
quires a Macintosh with at least
five megabytes of RAM, 256 color
capability, at least a 13" monitor
and System 6.07 or later.
Ordering information may be
obtained from Presto Studios,
Inc P.O. Box 262535, San Diego,
Ca. 92196-2535 or call (619) 689-
4895.
PUPPET
Continued from page 7
ments of the puppets themselves.
Some of the stunning effects in-
clude a dangerous cyclone, and .i
yellow brick road that moves as
Dorothy takes step after step to
Oz.
The music was composed for
the performance in a way a score
is made for a film or ballet. Ac-
tions of the characters are linked
with the music to create dramatic
scenes. Also, all voices and lyrics
are performed live by the fou.
puppeteers in the production. The
puppets, designed by Stephen
Kaskel, were fashioned after the
illustrations from the first edition
of the "Wizard of Oz
The Center for Puppetry Arts,
based in Atlanta, offers special
shows for adults, a family series
and a "Xperimental Puppetry The-
atre" which travels to theaters all
over America.
The concept of this produc-
tion is simple � to bring a kind-
hearted adaptation of the classic
tale to young audience members
in a way that sparks and chal-
lenges their imaginations.
Tickets for the performance
of the "Wizard of Oz" are $8 for
adults, $6 for faculty and students
and $5 for children. Tickets are on
sale at the ECU central ticket of-
fice in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter and can also be ordered by
phone (1 -800-ECU- ARTS).
5 MORGAN
� PRIIMTERSrinc.
3001 S. Evans St.
Greenville, NC
355-5588
Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream
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Sunday - Sundaes
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Dr. Robert V Gentry
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March 23
EAST CAROLINA I NIVERSITY
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Information: Contact Tim Turner at 732-7199
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quiet. Donations will be accepted.
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Performance at the Big Dancer
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Thursdays
Bloody Marys $2.25
Sundays
FREE Bar Snacks
During The Games �
Half price Appetizers
Sun. - Wed. After 9 P.M
Dine-In Only
� Mon. - Draft 95
12 Price Pitchers
of Beer
�Tues. - Sangria $1.25
�Wed. - Imports $1.25
521 Cotanche St.
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I





The Hast Carolinian
1arch 23, 1993
Sports
Page 10
ECU takes two of three in Witaington, sweeps doubleheader
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
TheE( L baseball team moved
closer to its anticipated show-
downs with Old Dominion and
George Mason for the C A A base-
ba 11 crc) wn by w i nn i ng two or" three
at UNC-Wilmington (11-10 J-2)
to improve to 5-1 in conference
play
The Pirate (19-7) swept a Sat-
urday doubleheader from the
Seahawks 10-2 and 6-1 before los-
ing on Sunday f-4. The loss broke
a season-high, eight-game win-
ning streak and marked ECU'sfirst
conference loss oi the year.
"Coming down here to
Wilmington and winning two out
of three is important ECU Head
Coach Gary- Overton said. "How-
ever, we would have liked to have
the last game after the double-
header sweep Saturday
In the first game on Saturda
Johnny Beck (4-2) pitched seven
strong innings, striking out nine
and allowing only one earned run
in the 10-2 win. Lee Kushner,
Steven Pitt and Jason Head each
led the team with three hits, one
double and a pair of RBls as the
Pirate bats overcame four error to
out-hit UNCW.
"1 thought we did a very fine
jobofsv ingii � the bats Overton
said. 'We allowed too many in-
field hits, kicked ,) couple ground
balls around and did not play with
defensive intensity, vet our ability
toswing the bats in thatfirstgame
overcame those saasssssssssssssssssssssssssi

flaws and al-
lowed us to win
the game
Game two
featured.) much
different tone as
the Pirates
trailed 1-0 for
most of the
game behind the
strong pitching
of Sea hawk
righthander
Brian Baucom
(2-3). However,
with two out1- mmmmmimm
and two men on
base in the ti ip oi the sixth, K ushner
hit a 1-2 pitch to deep center for his
sixth home run oi the season for a
3-1 ECU lead.
'I really wasn't thinking about
it (hitting the home run) to tell you
the truth Kushner said. "I was
lust thinking about hitting some-
thing hard and getting a run in
Thehomer marked Kushner's
sixth game-winning hit of the sea-
son and reinforced his ability to
come up with the clutch hit. "The
home run bv Kushner with two
strikes on him, wecan'tsavenough
about clutch hitting in that perfor-
mance Overton said.
mhhmi Pat Watkms
added a solo blast
to lead off the sev-
enth for his 11th
home run of the
season, and Frank
Fedak and Chris
West finished the
scoring for the Pi-
rates with two-out
RBIsinglesfora6-l
win.
L y I e
Hartgrove (4-1),
who struck out five
and walked two,
hihbbb overcame some
early difficulties
with the help of pitching coach
Roger Williams to pitch six solid
innings for the win.
"He struggled a little bit, but
he pitched out of a major jam and
ust did a tremendous job the rest of
the way Overton said of
Hartgrove's performance.
See BASEBALL page 11
GAME 1
EASTCAROUNA
UNC-WILMINGTON
GAME 2
GAME 3
EAST CAROLINA 6 II UNC-WILMINGTON 6
UNC-WILMINGTON 1 II EAST CAROLINA 4
Coming down
here to
Wilmington
and winning
two out
of three is
important,
Gary Overton,
ECU Head Coach
99
East Carolinan201 .02002C OOC032-000-10 2East Carolina UNC-Wilmlngton300 003 3 100 000 0-6 -1East CarolinaOOO 110 011 -4
UNC-WilmingtcUNC-Wilmington EAST CAROLINA Borei. cl140 0 ab r h 5 0 000 01X-6
EAST CAROLINA4rh 1bi.bb 0 2SO 1EAST CAROLINA Borei, cfJb 4thbi bbsob bb so
Borei. cf140 G00 0 2
Fedak, ss5101 01Fedak, ss4111 00Fedak. ss4 2 20 1 1
West. 3b4i10 10West, 3b3111 11West. 3b4 0 21 0 2
Kushner. lb4332 01Kushner. 1b2113 20Kushner, 1b4 0 01 0 0
Pin. dh3032 10Pitt, dh3000 0?Obholz, dh4 0 00 0 1
Obholz. pr-dh1100 00Watkins. rt3111 00Watkins, rt4 0 2o ;o o
Watkins. rtb101 00Obholz. 2b3010 01Head. It4 2 100 0
Head. Ifb132 00Clark. 2b0000 ;00Cronan, c4 0 100 0
Cronan,c410 11Head. If3110 01Clark, 2b3 0 11 i i
40Ul2 0Peters, c Cronan, c Totals1 20 n0 00 jo 0 01 1Totals3� 4 94 S 7
1C1310 b5
Batting � 2B: West, Cronan Baserunning � CS: Watkins (se BroomeSmtth). Team LOB: 7.
Batting � 2B Kushner BaserunningKush -SFner. � BnPitt,Head. Clark SF:28610 6 I 3 R: Kushner7 (6)ond base by
Batting � 2B:ObholzH
oft Broome'Penus,CS: DB: 93oreWest isecond baseWatkins (11 i. Basarunning �Team LOB5.Fielding �E: Clark UNC-WILMINGTON, Morse, Fed ab r hsk
by perrus Town Lbi bb so
Fielding � E:FedaK2iark. Head.so 0Fielding � E: 0 UNC-WILMINGTON D Esposito, cfbholz. Kjshner. hbi bbso 0D Esposito, cf Holley. 2b Broome, c5 1 3 5 2 2 5 0 21 o 0
UNCWILMINGTCHat Sr nh ibi. bb 0 0abr
Hooke 1!41?0 : 02 i 0 0
Holley. 2bsnl0 00Holley, 2b3010 01McBride. 1b4 0 100 0
Broome, c4000 02Broome, c4021 00Barnhardt. ss4 0 000 1
Barnhardt. ss?n?0 10Barnhardt, ss3010 01Altman, If-p3 2 101 1
Bans. 3b30n0 03McBnde. 1b2000 10Glasgow, dh4 1 200 1
Artman, ph0000 10Altman, If3000 00Hooker. It0 0 000 0
Cooper, 3b0000 00Robinson, rt2000 01Batts. 3b4 0 110 1
McBnde, lb41i0 01Glasgow, dh2010 10Holstad. rt4 0 010 1
Holstad, rt4 2 0i 0 02 0 00 0 0 1 0 11 1 0Tatum, 3b30 10 60 02Totals Batting � 2B:DEs Baserunning � SB-38 6 1261 5
Chapman, dhTotals261 25rosito, Broomi : McBride (1 38: Holley
Tatum, phBatting � 2B:Broome.D Esposito.SH:second base
D E sposrto, ct3001 01Robinsonon CronarVMillsl Team LOB: 9.
Robinson, ph1000 00Baserunning � Cronam Team LOB: Fielding � E: B EAST CAROLINA Hartgrove (W. 4 11 Morse- CS: D Esposrt 8 aucom.o (homebyFielding � E: Holley. Batts, Barnhardt
Totals34l� i10EAST CAROLINAip h rer bb so
Baserunning� C! iBec Bam�: Hooker. Barnhardt I t) Team LOB: e larrJt 2, McBridesee-Sanburn(L. 3-2) Mills Blackwell Morse6.3 11 5 0.7 0 0 03 1 t 0.7 0 05 0 4
ond base by CronaIPhrer bbso0 0 0
Fielding � E:5 16 0 h 00t 2 0 0b 01 1 1
EAST CAROLINA�ph 1ret bbso0 0 0
Beck 'W, 4-2)221 2 0 29 1UNC-WILMINGTON Baucom (L, 2-3) Cheek"P 6T 03r 6 0er bb 6 i 0 1so 6 1UNC-WILMINGTONip h rar bb so
laytonSmith W.0) Altman (S, 2)8 3 9 4 0.7 0 03 2 5
UNC WILMINGTON�phrer bbso
PettusfL. 3-111865 34HBP: Pin by BaucomHolley bv Hartarove.WP: Smith. BK: SanburrPB: Cronar.
Rogersr.tUF nATA � T fin A HR4GAME DATA �T: 2 34A: 469 Temp: 68
WP: iay1onUMPIRES �HP: Powell IBreecri.38: WoodallUMPIRES � HP: Creech. IB: Woodall 38: Powell
GAME DATA � T:250A: 3e4Temp: 61
UMPIRES �HP: Woodall IB: rwen3B: Creech.
Pirates fall to UNC in first NCAA appearance since '72
By Billy Weaver
Staff Writer
The Pirates went into the first
round of the NCAA tou ma mentfac-
ing, arguably, the best team in the
country, the Tarheels from North
Carolina. ECU ranked last out of the
fS4-team field and was a 25-point
underdog. Despite no tournament
experience and very limited televi-
sion appearances, the Pirates played
tough and earned respect in their 2( V-
point loss to the Tarheels.
The Tarheels came out scoring
early and often. UNC led by 14points
early in the first half, but the Pirates
settled down with afV-Orun to cut the
Tarheel lead to nine. Despite UNC's
early lead, ECU was out to show the
nation that their CAA champion-
ship was not a fluke
The Pirate gameplan going into
the tournament was to neutralize
seven-footer Eric Montross, which
proved to be easier said than done.
Montross scored 11 pointsinthefirst
half, leading all Tarheel scorers, and
George Lynch went five for five from
the field scoring 10 points
Surprisingly, with Lynch and
Montross both in double figures by
halftime, the Pirates wereonlvdown
by 11 points (45-34). Lester Lyons
seemed to be taking control of the
game as, at the half, he had hit three
Lyons
scores
27,
'Heels
win, 85-
65 in
Winston
Salem
IkeCopeland (left)
did his best against
Mount Montross,
while Curley
Young, a transfer
from Maryland
(right) returned to
ACC competition.
Photos by Bitt Ranson
o( four from the perimeter and led a II
scorers with 13 points.
In the second half, ECU came
outhangingontohopesofan upset.
Freshman Kareem Richardson
showed the poise of a prized veteran
and drove into the paint against a
much bigger Tarheel team and
showed range bv hitting two of four
ECU (65)
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-taPf�P
Young 285-130-04-41210
Cill 263-100-13-5126
Coptland320-21-22-7241
Lyons 378-116-60-24427
Rirhirrjrton274-90-00-13410
Peterson 182-50-01-2116
Lewis 221-32-42-5024
Hunter 100-31-20-1011
Totals 200 23-10-15 14-31 12 20 65
Percentages FG - 411, Ft - 667. 3 pt GoaLs: 9-21
429. Team Rebounds - 4, Blocked Shots - 1,
Turnovers - 11, Steals- 5.
UNC
(85)
Min
from three-point land.
UNC then went on a second
scoring rampage and led the Pirates
by 21 points by the H:40 mark.
"We were trying to play the
game in four minute intervals but I
thought we got off toa quicker pace
See NCAA page 12
Reese 26
Lynch 30
Montross 33
Williams 26
Rodl 25
Sullivan 14
Calabria 12
Salvador) 13
Phelps 14
Davis 1
Cherry 3
Stephenson 1
VVenstrom 2
g
m-a
3-7
7-0
6-9
3-9
3-5
0-0
0-1
2-4
3-6
1-1
1-1
0-0
0-1
ft
m-a
5-6
1-2
5-7
0-0
3-3
4-4
0-0
4-4
0-1
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
1-2
1-8
9
0-2
0-0
0-1
0-0
1-4
2-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-1
pf
1
0
2
0
2
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
T
11
15
17
9
10
4
0
8
6
3
2
0
0
Totals200 2� 5322271-34159H5
Percent�ges FG s47" im Reboundsft 5hi .ip Hocked SGoalsif-
313, Tehots-4.
Turnovers8, Steals -
HI halfInd halfOT1nal
1CL343165
UNC454085
Soccer club travels to Raleigh
for Indoor Soccer Tourney
By inglis Davis
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Women's Soccer
team traveled to Raleigh th is pa st weekend
to play in the Indtxir Soccer Tournament in
Raleigh's new Soccer Dome. With theclub
enjoying high interest and hoping for fu-
tu re a tm t a ffi I la tit in, EC U ta x k two teams,
Purple and Gold, to the tournament. The
uadseadn were sla ted toplaythree games
in the tournament.
�Tie Cold team, despite outstanding
df rt, was unable to achieve the semifinal
round, but their counterpart Purple team
made it ti i the championship round
Tie semifinal game on Sunday with
Charli itte went in the Pirate's i, ,r. While
there was noscore in the first half, the
Pir.it,m stn ng in the set ond
nv Warr n 54 l re1 twi l.
mthetir -��minute-harl tl -vered
iron . Kiki
An. let . n -1 llrllt li t' 111 t(redagaii linuteand
1, and ECU three
sec oi 1fi in the hampii mship
game Aii onRussell - ret makii
final i re 1 1iddii �'
iti
lh
i unda . i ��
in
IL was ready for the challenge. How-
ever, the Spartans stored the first 2 goals.
Amy Warreni ke) player throughout the
tournament for E L, scored with 6 min-
utes left in the first half. The score wasnow
2-1, Spartans.
Knowing that the Pirates needed to
score again, forward Alison Russell was
able to tie the game with 2 minutes left in the
first half
The Pirates were not able to keep the
Spartans from taking the lead. With ECU
only down by one at the half, they had
plenty of time to win the game.
Fhe second half did not go as well as
hail wanted, fhe Spartans stores 3
gi alsin a n �w and made the sc refV2. There
were st:ll 6 minutes left on the game and
ling could happen
Missybnescored with 4 minutes left,
a minute later the Spartansadded the
last goal i .1 the game he final score was 7-
I ms
Check it Out
Next Saturday ECU will
host UNCW In a 2
p.m. game.
Pirates do us proud
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Sometimes it is difficult to be fu-
eled by pride, to be armed with little
else than your determination in facing
the most insurmountable of odds and
goliath of opposition.
The few times this fuel carries you
to victory it is a momentous occasion.
To beat the odds and win as an under-
dog draws everyone's attention. For a
short time you are larger than life,
truly a phenomenon to behold Un-
likely victory builds status, gets you
headlines, makes you feel good.
It's when you give everything
you've got: your sweat, tears, your
very soul, and still come up short, that
defines your character. You are ton til
to accept defeat, an unthinkable propo
sition, but a necessary one You muM
walk a line, admitting the loss but
conceding nothing.
!he Fastarolina basketball pro
gram was faced with this proposition
when the pairings of theAA tour
nament pitted them against fhe pow
ertul North arolina larheels l"he
fell in a aliant effort, but maybe just
maybe earned the respect thev deserve
from the overpaid idiots that populate
sports TV broadcasting and the fans of
big-time college basketball.
The national sports media had a field
day when the tournament pairings were
announced, and it was discovered that
the Tarheels, the ' irling powerhouse of
college basketball, would diCf a 13-16
ECU squad who had scrapped their way
into the tournament by winning the CAA
championship.
I he Dick Vitalesand MikeFrancesas
all had plenty to laugh about. "ECU mav
as well had stay home" was their senti-
ment. How could these upstarts dare to
i ha lien ge the mighty I arheels, probably
the best team in the nation) virtual lock
tor the Final Four? Thev had no chance,
no wav.
I hey laughed and -idiculed the Pi-
rates in their interviews, as they dis-
i ussed the lynching the team would re-
ceive at the hands at the larheels rhey
snickered after running their tapes oi
our pre game pep rally, "applauding"
our enthusiasm while at the same time
making a fan e ol it I hese Pirates were
not foi real no matter whal then fans
said what their coach said, or what 11 it-
team itself said. We would fall and
fall hard and our fluke NCAA ap-
pearance would leave us crumpled
and beaten. We would be put in our
place as whipping boys and we
would soon be forgotten as yet an-
other first-round tournament victim.
These "professionals" even dis-
regarded the analysis of legendary
Tarheel coach Dean Smith who said
we were a ball club to be respected.
Smith's wealth o( experience, how-
ever, was lost on ESPN's Vita le, as he
donned an ECU hat sent to him bv
athletic director Dave Hart and
laughed his condescending laugh
and smiled hiscondescendingsmile
"ECU, Babeee you've got a date
with Carolina, welcome to the big
time. You're in the reai work! now
he slid.
And the sports world kept on
snickering
I he Pirates entered Lawrence
oel Coliseum on the night oi the
game, toi used on the impossible task
before them 1 he were faced with
the know ledge that the 'Heels were
See PIRATES page 12





r
MARCH 23. 1993
77ie East Carolinian
11
Cal and Kidd kill Duke myth
ROSEMONT, 111. (AP) � The
end of an era is always sad, yet
that's not why Mike Krzyzewski
was crying.
A last-minute NCAA tourna-
ment loss is tough, yet Coach K's
tears were not those of a man bitter
from defeat but those of a father
whose sons were about to leave
the nest.
Krzyzewski was unlikely to
get any sympathy from a college
basketball world his Duke Blue
Devils dominated for nearly a de-
cade. Which was OK with Coach
K. He didn't sound like a guy who
wanted sympathy, anyway.
"I wish you could all feel what
I feel Krzyzewski said Saturday
after Duke waseliminated by Cali-
fornia in the second round of the
Midwest Regional, 82-77. "College
sports are great. I've been the lucki-
est guy for four years to have spent
time with these youngsters
The two-time defending
champion Blue Devils fell behind
by 17 points midway through the
second half. California was hitting
almost every 3-pointer it hoisted,
and freshman star Jason Kidd was
weaving his way through Duke's
vaunted defense.
The Blue Devils looked beaten.
But they wouldn't accept defeat.
"I thought our team fought
valiantly Krzyzewski said. "We
gave a championship effort. We
just couldn't do it anymore
Duke actually rallied to take
the lead, 77-76, on Thomas Hill's
free throw with 2:21 to play. But
Cal won on Kidd's off-balance 3-
point play with 1:11 to go. Bobby
Hurley, the Ail-American point
guard who scored a career-high 32
points in his finale, missed three 3-
pointers in the closing minute.
"It's tough said Hurley, who
holds NCAA records for assists�
1,076 overall and 145 in tourney
play. "But I don't think there's
been a luckier kid
Hurley and Hill, the squad's
only seniors, were 18-2 in tourna-
ment play. Their only losses came
Saturday and to UNLV in the 1990
final. In between, there were 13
consecutive tourney victories and
the first back-to-back titles since
UCLA in the early 1970s.
"Losing a game, it doesn't
mean a damn thing Krzyzewski
said. "I won for a long time with
these guys and I'll win for the rest
of my life for my long association
with them.
"They've taken me to places
and experiences that no college
coach has had over the last 20 years.
It's only sad that I can't do it any
more with them. Bobby and Tho-
mas have been like sons to me
Duke's run is over. What a run
it was.
Under Krzyzewski, the Blue
Devils reached the tournament ev-
ery year since 1984. They advanced
to the Final Four in 1986, 1988,
1989, 1990, 1991 and 1992. They
won titles in 1991 and 1992. Since
1986, they were 33-6 in tourna-
ment play.
The nation's No. 10 team en-
tering the tourney, Duke has been
ranked in AP's poll since the fifth
week of the 1986-87 season�well
before the ratings were expanded
from the Top 20 to the Top 25.
"We got beat by a team that
deserved to win said
Krzyzewski, ever gracious. He
then looked at Hurley and Hill. "It
tears me up that we lost, only be-
cause I don't have an opportunity
to coach these two guys any more.
Every time they stepped on the
court, they gave their bodies,
minds and hearts
Cremins considering USC j ob
ATLANTA (AP) � Bobby
Cremins, who has steered Georgia
Tech to three Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence championships in 12 seasons,
said the appropriate time has ar-
rived for him to consider the coach-
ingvacancyathisalmamater,South
Carolina.
Rumorshavebeenrampantfor
weeks that Cremins was the No. 1
choice in Columbia, S.C to replace
Steve Newton, who announced he
was resigning at the end of the sea-
son
Cremins refused to discuss the
situation. He mentioned it to his
Tech team Saturday after it returned
home from an opening-round loss to
Southern UniversityintheNCAA tour-
nament.
"1 told them I had said I would
consideritattheappropriate time and
that this is the appropriate time
Cremins said Sunday night
"I told them I hope they would
respect that he said. "I told them this
has nothing to do with them or with
Georgia Tech-Ihavealot of feeling for
these kids. They never quit on me, but
this is something I must consider
One of his players, James Forrest,
said his coach was not leaving.
"Hetold ushe would not leave
this team" Forrest said during a
television interview on WSB-TV
Sunday night
Cremins denied making the
statement to Forrest.
Idcn'tknowwherejamesgot
that he said. "I didn't say it Noth-
ing I said could have been miscon-
strued like that"
Cremins has taken his last nine
teams to the NCAA tournament,
reaching the Final Four in 1990.
Cremins said he is under no
deadline pressure to make a deci-
sion and will take his time.
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BASEBALL
Continued from page 10
On Sunday, the Pirates were
plagued by some early defensive
lapses and never seemed to get on
track as UNCW led theentire game
after taking a 5-0 lead in the second
inning on somedefensive mistakes
by the ECU outfield.
"I have to go back to those first
two innings and they were by far
the worst innings we've played all
year Overton said. "Our outfield-
ers made not only physical mis-
takes but also mental mistakes as
well thatreallycost us and allowed
them to put that five spot on the
ooard
Mike Sanbum (3-2) pitched a
better game than his line suggests,
but the team fell too far behind
early in the game to make up the
deficit.
"I thought Mike did a great job
in the middle inningsof keeping us
in the game, giving us a chance to
come back and possibly win
Overton said.
Chris West led the team with
two hits, including a double and
one RBI, and Frank Fedak and Pat
Watkins also had two hits for the
Pirates.
Brian Smith (2-0) pitched eight
and one-third innings for the win,
and Heath Altman struck out the
final two batters for hissecond save
of the year. Sal D'Esposito led
UNCW with three hits from the
leadoffspotincludingadoubleand
one RBI. The Pirates next game is
scheduled for 4 p.m. against Vir-
ginia Commonwealth at the Dia-
mond in Richmond.
The East
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that's just a
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12
The East Carolinian
MARCH 23. 1993
PIRATES
looking for revenge for their
loss to Georgia Tech in the ACC
tou rna ment. Tha t Dean Smi th' s
club would love to send a mes-
sage, at ECU's expense, to the
rest of the country. The 'Heels
would be ready to play and
their fans were preparing for
an impending slaughter.
As the Pirates walked on
the floor they became aware of
exactly what they were about
to face. The size, the talent, the
very awesomeness of Carolina
basketball. This was a classic
case of David and Goliath, and
Goliath's last name was
Montross.
The seven-foot nearly three
hundred pound giant had
posed problems for every team
in the nation unfortunate
enough to have encountered the
Tarheels. Only three teams had
been able to overcome his mon-
strosity and they too were na-
tional powers. Surely the Caro-
lina center alone would be able
to slice through the Pirate de-
fense and humiliate these up-
starts from the East. Hell, if
Continued from page 10
Montross couldn't do it, they had
two other seven-footers who
could. This game would be no
problem.
As the two teams prepared
for the opening tip, the laughter
in the sports world was deafen-
ing.
That tip came and through-
out the first half, the Pirates ex-
ecuted a brilliant game plan con-
cocted by coach Eddie Payne and
hung tough with the Tarheels.
They handled the Carolina trap-
ping defense better than most
teams the Tarheels had faced and
kept Montross frustrated with a
persistent zone defense of their
own. With Lester Lyons dropping
three-pointers at every opportu-
nity and the Pirates handling the
Tarheels' size, sports fans all
scratched their heads at the inter-
mission. These were just the Pi-
rates after all. They weren't sup-
posed to still be in a game against
the Tarheels.
But they were. And as they
entered the locker room behind
by only 11 the ridiculing laughter
ceased.
I wish I could have written
this editorial cheering a Pirate vic-
tory, but as ECU fans well know
the Heels won the game. But the
fact that ECU played as hard as
they possibly could and gave the
Heels as much as they could
handle says much for ECU bas-
ketball and the men who partici-
pate in it. The 20-point defeat was
less than some teams in the ACC
had experienced and the Pirates
never gave up. In defeat, the pro-
gram gained respect. In defeat,
the program gained valuable ex-
posure. And in defeat, the pro-
gram gained character.
Next year, as the Pirates re-
turn their main scoring threat,
Lester Lyons, develop Kareem
Richardson into a premiere point
guard and add redshirt freshman
Don Douglas, a near seven-footer,
to their line up, no one should be
foolish enough to count them out
as contenders to repeat as CAA
champions. But given the igno-
rance of the sports media, they
would probably meet with more
underestimation.
Whether a berth next year will
become reality is probably a
moot point, but there is an un-
deniable fact that ECU will one
day enter big time basketball
despite the thoughts and
wishes of the rest of the nation,
and Thursday's game could
prove to be the launching point.
The game will fade in the
memory of sports fans around
the nation. The Pirates will join
the ranks of those defeated in
the first round of the tourna-
ment and this year's bid will
vanish into obscurity in the
mind's of many.
For Pirate fans, however, the
1993 Pirates may leave a legacy
for the next century. The names
of Lyons, Copeland and Rich-
ardson may be forever embed-
ded in the hearts and minds of
Pirate supporters as the team
that turned around ECU basket-
ball.
In the state of North Caro-
lina, thememoryof ECU'smatch-
up with UNC will last a long,
long time. In EastCarolina it will
last forever. Well done guys,
well done.
NCAA
Continued from page 10
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than we wanted and they got an
early nine point lead Head Coach
Eddie Payne said.
The Pirates playedallbuttwoof
Payne's four minute intervals very
well against UNC, which proved to
be the difference of the game.
The Tarheels
took note of Lester
Lyons' three-point
snooting ability in
the first half and held
Lyons in check early
in the second half,
but ECU's junior
guard kept the score
respectable by hit-
ting 15 of his game
high 27 points in the
lastsixrninutesofthe
game.
"He has good shooting poten-
tial and I think he exploited that to-
night Eric Montross said.
Despite the height differential,
which drastically favored the
Tarheels, ECUoutrebounded UNC
on the offensive boards. "Although
we out rebounded, it seemed like
theirs led to a lot of baskets Payne
said.
' I really do
respect their
quickness
and the job
Eddie Payne
has done. "
UNC coach Dean Smith
The Pirate road to the final four
took a quick exit in Winston-Salem
but not before turning a lot of heads.
In Hie press conference after the
game, well known sports authori-
ties, writers, and broadcasters gave
the Pirates high praise, including
one of basketballs
greatest coaches. "I
really dorespect their
quickness and the job
Eddie Payne has
done UNC Head
Coach Dean Smith
said.
Ironically, losing
to the Tarheels may
be a blessing in dis-
guise.
Many say that
this is the birth of
ECU basketball, and it may be. Pi-
rate fans are already looking for-
ward to next season. ECU will re-
turn four starters and hope that their
new found national recognition will
help in recruiting.
"The exposure is good for re-
cruiting out we've created a more
winning oriented atmosphere
Payne said.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 23, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 23, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.931
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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