The East Carolinian, March 18, 1993






Opinion
Give it up
The Great American Meat-
out is March 20, and students
are being asked to give up
meat for a day.
See story pg. 6
Getting Down
Movie sparks strong debate as
to public's likelihood to "Fall
Down" into violence.
See story page 7.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 17
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, March 18,1993
14 Pages
College Democrats chosen for local posts
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Several ECU College
Democrats recently won leader-
ship posts in the Democratic
Party's annual precinct meetings
held on March 4.
Local Democrats chose
ECU junior David Reid III to be-
come the next chairman of Green-
ville Precinct Seven. Reid will
replace outgoing chairman Pat
Dunn, who vacated her seat to
serve on the Pitt County Board
of Elections.
Although Precinct Seven
includes most of the ECU cam-
pus, Reid became the first stu-
dent to be elected to the chair
position.
In Greenville Precinct Five,
Democrats selected another ECU
student, Julie Robertson, to be-
come First Vice Chairman.
Robertson is the first student to
be elected to a vice chair position
in that precinct.
Both Reid and Robertson
will gain a vote on the Pitt County
Democratic Executive Commit-
tee, the ruling body of the local
party.
President of the ECU Col-
lege Democrats Thomas Blue
said that eight other students
were elected to positions within
the local Democratic Party. Blue
was elected Secretary in Green-
ville Precinct Seven.
"ECU students were elected
to leadership posts in over a third
of the precincts in Greenville
Blue said. "This is the most rep-
resentation our university has
ever had in local politics
A total of 17 students will
attend the county convention on
behalf of their local precincts on
April 17. ECU freshman Scarlette
Gardner will be a candidate for a
vice chair position in the county
party.
Bluesaid thatanotherseven
students were selected to repre-
sent Pitt County at the Third Dis-
trict Convention in May.
Mendenhall Student Center will
host the event, the first such con-
vention held on the ECU cam-
pus.
Also at the precinct meet-
ings, the College Democrats in-
troduced a resolution opposing
Senate Bill 394, the tuition in-
creasing bill currently being con-
sidered in the North Carolina
General Assembly. The resolu-
tion passed in four Greenville
precincts unanimously.
ECU students are now
represented more than
ever before in local politics
Julie Robertson (shown with Rep. Martin Lancaster) and David Reid were the first
students ever chosen to serve in the local positions they were recently elected to.
The resolution will now be
considered in the Pitt County
Convention by the entire county
party. If passed, it will then go
before the Third DistrictConven-
tion for a vote.Blue said that over
400 Democrats from eastern
North Carolina including many
state legislators will attend this
convention. "We hope this issue
does not come to a vote in the
General Assembly before we gain
the visible support of the higher
echelons of the Democratic
Party Blue said.
Steve Benzkofer, another
College Democrat elected to a lo-
cal post, and information coordi-
nator of the Committee On Stu-
dent Tuition (COST), spoke on
the meaning of the resolution. "It
will be a powerful tool if we can
get this resolution passed by the
District Convention before the
General Assembly votes on the
bill
Rainy days
.p . Ftl� Photo
This past week, the East Coast was slammed with what has been called the "Blizzard of the Century True to
form, Greenville only suffered from a deluge of rain and windy weather.
ECU geologist chosen
for national study
Career Day planned for hospitality students
By Sharon Anderson
Staff Writer
The hospitality department, along
with Career and Placement Services is hav-
ing a Career Day at the Human Resources
Building on March 23 from 10 a.m. to 12
p.m.
The event is open to students inter-
ested in hotel management, restaurant man-
agement, corpora teoffice management and
marketing are invited to attend.
Twelve representatives will have
booths to answer any questions students
mightfor futureemployment. Lisa Pittman,
an assistant manager at career services, said
that these representatives will give students
initial contact with corporations all over the
country.
These representatives will be mostly
from North Carolina, but there will also be
some from as far away as Florida or Kansas.
The hospitality career day gives stu-
dents opportunity to pick up information
on the companies and to give possible em-
ployers a chance to talk one-on-one with
students that are interested in management
careers.
Students, other than those majoring
in hotel, restaurant or corpora teoffice man-
agement, can also talktothe representatives
about other positions that the corporation
might need to fill.
Pittman said that these conglomer-
See CAREER page 4
Nursing lecture series features timely topics
By Sharon Anderson
Staff Writer
Sara Fry, PhD. RN, will give the
third lecture in a four-part lecture series
on ethical issues in high technology care
on March 18th in the Brody Auditorium
from 7:30 p.m. to 830 p.m
Fry teachesbio-ethicsatthe Univer-
sity of Maryland. Her lecture will be on
intensive care ethics. According to Marie
Pokorny of the nursing department, the
lecture will probably focus on the ethical
treatment of the critically ill.
The topics of Fry's lecture concern the
mental and physical treatmentof patients in
intensive care. She will teach techniques to
reduceproblemsthatarisebetween medical
staff and patientsor the medical staff and the
patients relatives. She will discuss the prob-
lems that occur in the decision making pro-
cess of what is best for the patient.
Porkorny said that Fry might touch
on topics such as conformed consent, liv-
ing wills, incompetent patients, end of life
decisionsandvvithholdingfacts.Thequal-
ity of life after treatments and family life
versus the rights of the patients will also
be examined.
Thislecture ispartof a series funded
by a $5,000 grant from GTE. The East
See NURSING page 4
By Karen Hassel!
Assistant News Editor
This summer an ocean study off the
coast of New Jersey, called Leg 150, will
attempt to discover how the sea level has
changed over the past 37 million years.
An ECU scientist, Dr. Scott W.
Snyder, has been invited to take part in a
study that is to depart from Lisbon, Por-
tugal, on May 30 and return to port in St.
John's, Newfoundland, on July 25.
"There is great interest now in this
subject said Snyder.
Leg 150, a scientific project for the
Ocean Drilling Program, is sponsored by
the National Science Foundation.
"What we are going to try to do on
this leg is carefully select the sites to get
the most detailed picture of global sea
level change during this critical interval
when modern glaciation is believed to
have begun said Snyder.
Snyder is an expert on marine ani-
mal fossils. He will spend two months
aboard a research vessel working in the
New Jersey Margin. The Margin lies along
the Continental Slope where the rela-
tively shallow bottom of the shelf begins
its descent into the deep reaches of the
ocean.
"We know sea level has risen and
fallen repeatedly he said. "We know it
is related to glacial changes-the melting
and freezing of polar ice. But we don't
know precisely when the whole cycle of
glacial activity started or the exact causes
of it
Snyder was invited to work on Leg
150 by Dr. Jack G. Baldauf, manager of
Science Operations for the program based
at Texas A&M University.
Dr. Kenneth Miller of Rutgers Uni-
versity in New Brunswick, N.J. and Dr.
Gregory Mountain of Lamont-Doherty
Geological Observatory in Palisades, N .Y.
will direct the project.
The JOIDES Resolution, one of the
world's best designed and equipped sci-
entific drilling vessels, will be used for
the stud y. The vessel and i ts d ril I ing tower
will allow the scientists to penetrate deep
into the sea floor to collect samples of
fossil-rich sediment.
The 470-foot research vessel uses a
computer-controlled positioning system,
featuring 12 powerful thrusters, to hold
the ship over a specific location. It can
suspend a drilling pipe in water 5 miles
deep and can drill into the sea floor an-
other 3,000 feet.
The vessel's drill rig will recover
long tubes of sediment from the sea bed
to serve as "yardsticks" on which tojudge
ocean changes over millions of years,
Snyder said. Analysis of the sediment
layers will focus on the time span from
the beginning of the Oligocene Epoch 37
million years ago through the more re-
cent Miocene Epoch ending about five
and a half million years ago. The Miocene
Epoch may include the start of the most
recent period of glacial activity when the
world was considered an "icehouse
"There is a lot of discussion now
over when glaciation began Snyder said.
"Some peop le don't believe it goes back a
far as the Oligocene Epoch
Snyder will comb through the sedi-
ment to find the fossil remains of micro-
scopic single-celled animalscalled "Fora-
minifera He said he will examine the
skeletons of the tiny fossils to interpret
the age of the different sediment layers.
The Leg 150 project is unusual be-
cause drill sites are in relatively shallow
water. The depth at some proposed sites
is only several hundred feet. Drilling in
shallow water is more risky for the ship
and its equipment, according to Snyder,
because the pipe that extends from the
ship to the ocean bottom is too short to
provide much flexibility at shallow
depths.
The overall planning for the pro-
gram is managed by The Joint Oceano-
graphic Institutions for Deep Earth Sam-
pling (JOIDES), an international group of
scientists.
The scientists represent research
institutions in the U.S Canada, Austra-
lia, England, France, Germany, Russia,
Japan and 12 other countries.
"Top scientists around the world
are invited to participate, so Scott's invi-
tation placeshimamonga select group of
world-class researchers he said.
Scientific offshore drilling began as
the Deep Sea Drilling Project in 1968. In
1983, the project was restructured as the
Ocean Drilling Project. Earlier studies
documented major geological events in-
cluding the evolution of the Atlantic and
other ocean basins.
i
-fo.





2 The East Carolinian
MARCH 18, 1993
CRIMES EN E
March 1
Mk20p.tn.
An unknown person stole a bicycle valued at $500 from the
bike rack north of Christenbury.
3:15 p.m.
A 31-year-old male is accused of stalking a 20-year-old fe-
male on the campus of ECU. The suspect is said to have followed
the victim in his vehicle.
March 2
236 a.m.
An unknown person broke out the back window of a 1990
Toyota Corolla and attempted to access the vehicle in the Ficklen
and Charles parking area.
March 7
1128 a.m.
An unknown person damaged state property when a win-
dow was broken out of the north side of Messick Theatre with a
blunt object.
1:58 a.m.
A 21-year-old female was arrested on DWI charges at the
comer of 9th and Charles St. The suspect also failed to stop at a stop
sign and carry a license.
March 12
535 p.m.
Two 15-year-olds were caught attempting to steal a bicycle
east of Green Dormitory.
March 16
7:37 p on.
Two bicycles and locks valued at $1,300 were stolen north-
west of Garrett Residence Hall. The bikes were locked together and
the suspects are unknown.
11:05 p.m.
Two males, both 19, attempted to lake and carry away a
bicycle and tire at the bicycle east of Scott Hall.
March 17
3:45 a.m.
An intoxicated 21-year-old male fell out of and damaged of
window in room 209 of the Jenkins Art Building.
Compiled by Karen Hasseil. Taken from ECU Public
Safety Records.
StateNews
Gay-bashing opponents push for government support
WILMINGTON (AP) �
Spurred by the beating of a
Wilmington man, an Alabama-
based activist group is urging
Secretary of Defense Les Aspin
to condemn anti-homosexual
violence.
The Southern Poverty Law
Center has sent a letter to Aspin
urging a ban on anti-homo-
sexual displays at military bases
and urging the military to insti-
tute training to "help eradicate
the widespread homophobia in
the military that leads to anti-
gay violence
The letter was released
Monday along with copies of a
lawsuit filed by Crae Pridgen Jr.
seeking damages from three
Camp Lejeune Marines.
Pridgen said he was beaten
Jan. 30 by three Marines who
shouted, "Clinton will pay! All
you faggots will die at Mickey
Ratz, a homosexual bar in down-
town Wilmington.
He suffered a fractured
skull, three stitches in his ear,
severe bruises, a black eye, a
nation Morris Dees, the
SPLC's chief attorney, said in a
prepared statement. "When in-
dividualsareatrisk
solely because of
their race, sex, eth-
nic background or
missing front tooth and an in-
jured leg.
Facing assault charges in
the case are
Lance Cpl. ,
Colin C. Hunt, WHetl
20; Lance Cpl.
Patrick G. individuals are sexual orientation,
Gardone, 23; . . . all of us are in dan-
and Lance Cpl. Ot TISK SOiely ger
Walter G. � f The letter to
Watkins, 26, all DtCaUSC Of Aspin, signed by
of Camp fpr YflCP C?V center legal direc-
Lejeune. WC" 'MCC, 3CA, tQr j Richarc
Pridgen's
suit seeks more
than $10,000 in
compensatory
damages plus
interest and
$10,000 in puni-
tive damages
from each of the
three defen-
dants, said Rita
B e c k h a m ,
deputy clerk of
civil court in
County
ethnic
Cohen, urges the
defense secreta ry to
background or set up a civilian
, hate crimes review
sexual
orientation,
all of us are in
danger. '
New Hanover
"Hate crimes plague our
board.
"The attack
against Mr. Pridgen
was not an isolated
incident Cohen
said in the letter.
"Over the past few
years, numerous ci-
vilians have suf-
fered similar fates solely because
of their sexual orientation
The center's letter includes
Morris Dees
a list of 12 hate crimes the group
says have occurred against ho-
mosexuals in the past two
years.
Among the attacks listed
were:
� March 9,1991, four sail-
ors stationed aboard the USS
Abraham Lincoln reportedly
beat, kicked and threatened to
kill a San Francisco motorcy-
clist whom they called a "fag
� July 1,1991, two sailors
assaulted three homosexual bar
patrons and a bartender with a
beer bottle, a brick and pool
sticks in San Diego. They also
attacked someone outside the
bar.
� Sept. 1,1991, a Marine
was charged with assaulting a
homosexual Washington resi-
dent.
� Feb. 1,1993, in Mobile,
Ala three sailors stationed
aboard the USS Jesse L. Brown
reportedly beat a bisexual
former shipmate who had been
honorably discharged from the
Navy.
Admitted murderer set for release from prison
HILLSBOROUGH, N.C.
(AP)�After more than six years
of facing first-degree murder
charges, admitted killer Robert
Lewis Gravette will go free.
Superior Court Judge
Knox Jenkins decided Tuesday
to dismiss two 1987 charges be-
cause of doctors' reports that
Gravette would never be fit to
stand trial because of irrevers-
ible brain damage, according to
The Herald-Sun of Durham.
The families of the victims
were stunned.
"I can't believe there's just
nothing we can do Dot Whicker,
mother of victim Curtis Ray
Whicker Jr 22, as she wiped tears
from her eyes after the short court
hearing.
Beverly Burch has traveled
to the Orange County Courthouse
almost every third month since
her son, William Melton, 23, was
killed. Gravette, Burch's ex-hus-
band, has had many competency
and custody hearings.
"They've got to make people
pay for what they've done Mrs.
Burch told the Raleigh News &
Observer.
Gravette was not in court
Tuesday. His attorney, Kirk
Osborn, said he had been unable
to contact him by phone Tuesday
afternoon.
Osborn said he was sure
Gravette would be relieved.
Over the years, judges have
placed Gravette under the super-
vision of relatives or Durham pro-
bation officers.
Osborn said he did not
know where Gravette would live
now.
Gravette was charged Feb.
1,1987, with the shooting deaths
ofhis stepson, Melton, and Curtis
Ray Whicker, a family friend.
He told authorities then
that the men had come to his
home to talk and drink liquor.
But Melton and Gravette began
arguing about a divorce settle-
ment between Mrs. Burch and
Gravette.
Both men were shot sev-
eral times and died instantly, au-
thorities have said.
w
SGA JUDICIAL BRANCH
Now Accepting Applications for the
Academic Year 1993-94.
The following positions are available:
SGA ATTORNEY GENERAL
SGA PUBLIC DEFENDER
HONOR & REVIEW BOARD
MEMBER
All applicants will be screened by the SGA Executive Council.
REQUIREMENTS:
2.0 Grade Point Average.
Good Standing with the University.
Applications Available At:
Dean of Students Office (209 Whichard)
Secretary's Office (255 Mendenhall Student Center)
Attorney General's Office (236 Mendenhall Student Center)
DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS:
FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 1993
5:00 PM
25th ANNUAL SPRING
BIKINI CONTEST
Thursday, March 18th
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MARCH 18, 1993
National News
Cost of cardiac revival up, patient survival down
The East Carolinian 3
ANAHEIM,CaIif.(AP)�The
routine hospital practice of reviving
patients whose hearts stop beating
costs more than $150,000 per survi-
vor, because most victims never re-
cover enough to go home, a study
found.
In fact, the research found that
most of those gi ven CPR in hospital
wards never regain the ability to
breathe on their own. Instead, they
spend their final days on respirators
in intensive care units, often running
up astronomical bills.
Doctors from Duke Univer-
sity watched what happened to 146
patients who were given CPR �
cardiopulmonary resuscitation �
after they suffered cardiac arrest in
the general medical and surgical
wards between 1988 and 1991.
Doctors and nurses were able
to revive 58 percent of the patients.
But only seven patients, or five per-
cent, got well enough to leave the
hospital.
The researchers added up the
costsof taking careof all these people
when they were pulled back from
deathandfoundittotaledabout$l.l
million, or more than $150,000 per
discharged patient.
Nationally, CPR is attempted
on about one-third of all patients
who die in hospitals. Many are eld-
erly and in the final stages of heart
failure, cancer and other diseases.
When they are revived, how-
ever, their medical bills shoot up
drama ticaIly,becausemostare trans-
ferred to intensive care and put on
highly expensive life-support sys-
tems.
"It'sa medical avalanche. You
trigger everything said Dr. Chris-
topher CConnor, one of the Duke
resarchers.
O'Connor and Dr. Mark Thel
presented the findings Tuesday at a
meeting of the American College of
Cardiology.
O'Connor said that CPR first
gained routine use during opera-
tions, when itciften worked well.But
it has since spread to all parts of the
hospital with little thought given to
the cost of interrupting death.
"We're not saying, Don't do
something. Juststandtherehe said.
Instead,OConnorurged doc-
tors to ask their patients how they
would like to be treated if theirhearts
stop beating. While hospitals are re-
quired to ask such questions, it is
usually done by clerks rather than
doctors. And when doctors bring up
the subject, he said, they shou Id keep
the price in mind.
"We feel that the cost of CPR
should be considered .vhen the doc-
tor counsels patients about whether
they should get it he said.
The researchers said doctors
should be reluctant to recommend
CPR to people who are gravely ill,
such as elderly patients suffering
from multiple diseases.
Typically, hospitals by to re-
vive all patients after cardiac arrest
unlessa sped fic"donot resuscitate"
�orDNR�order hasbeen posted.
The cost of caring for patients
in the last months of life has become
a matter of concern, especially as
health economists look for ways to
slow medical inflationWhen you
look at the way we treat patients at
the extremes of life, it's plain there is
no reason why we doctors can't al-
low people todiewithdignity'com-
mented Dr. Adolph Hutter of Mas-
sachusetts General Hospital in Bos-
ton.
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4 The East Carolinian
MARCH 18, 1993
StateNews
Wiretap tapes used in Sudafed trial
SEATTLE (AP) � Federal
prosecutors contend that secretly
taped conversations show relatives
of Sudafed-tampering defendant
Joseph Meling entereda "familycon-
spiracy" toprotecthimfromthelaw.
But the defense dismisses much of
what is on the tapes as hearsay.
Prosecutors have boiled down
about 90 days worth of conversa-
tions recorded through hidden mi-
crophones and wiretaps into four
hours of tapes. Selected conversa-
tions were made into a composite
tape for Meling's trial in U.S. District
Court.
Judge Barbara Rothstein sent
jurors home early on Tuesday after
defense lawyer Cyrus R. Vance Jr.
saidplayingl5orl6segmentswould
violate hearsay or other rules on ad-
mission of evidence. Legal argu-
ments on the issue must be resolved
before the jury begins hearing the
tape, Rothstein said.
Meling31,aformerTumwater
insurance agent, is charged with six
counts of product tampering, twoof
perjury and three of insurancefraud.
Product tampering carries a maxi-
mum penalty of life in prison.
Meling is accused of giving his
wife a cyanide capsule to collect
$700,000 in life insurance benefits
and placing other capsules in
Sudafed packages on store shelves
around Tacoma and Olympia to
make the tamperingappear random.
Jennifer Meling, 30, survived
cyanide poisoning Feb. 2,1991. Two
others died later that month after
taking poisoned capsules from
Sudafed packages.
Two tampered Sudafed pack-
ages were found in private homes
and one was recovered from a store
during a $17 million nationwide re-
call by Burroughs Wellcome Co. of
Research Triangle Park, N.C.
Sudafed eventually was reintro-
duced as a coated tablet.
Most of the conversations on
the composite tape are between
Meling and members of his family,
but about half a dozen involve rela-
tives and others talkingamong them-
selves, lawyers said after the jury
was excused in US. District Court
Tuesday.
"We have a tightly knit family
conspiracy where peopleare actively
talking about it on a day-to-day ba-
sis assistant US. attorney Joanne
Y. Maida said.
Before the trial, U S. Attorney
Mike McKay said the recordings
were the most important part of the
government's case, which lacks fin-
gerprints, fiber samples, traces of
sodium cyanide, eyewitness reports
of tampering or other direct evidence
against Meling.
FBI agent Ronald T. Stankye,
who supervised the electronic sur-
veillance, told the jury the telephone
of Meling's parents, Gifford W.
"Sonny" and Velma Meling, was
tapped from April 11 to June 10,
1991, and their home was bugged
from May 22 to June 22 that year.
During those periods, Meling
was living at his parents' home in
Vancouver, Wash and was sepa-
rated from his wife, who had filed
for divorce.
They were reconciled that
summer, and she has voiced her
support of him since then.
Under court orders allowing
surveillance, monitors listened and
NURSING
Continued from page 1
recorded all conversation relating to
theSudafed tampering investigation,
Stankye said.
The purpose was tolearn more
aboutthepoisoningsand any "tam-
pering with informants, obstruction
of criminal investigations,conspiracy
todosameandattemptstodosame
according to an affidavit filed by
Stankye before the trial.
"It quickly became apparent
that Sonny, as a target, was involv-
inghiswifeasaco-conspiratorinhis
attempts to obstruct the criminal in-
vestigation of their son Joseph the
affidavit said.
Investigators also learned
Sonny and Velma Meling wanted
"to see their son reconciled to Jenni-
fer, whom they intenselydisliked,as
a means of preventing his prosecu-
tion the affidavit said.
Vance said that in one conver-
sation hechallenged as inadmissible,
Joseph Meling's uncles Gordon Lee
Meling and Keith Jerome Meling
discussed comments by the
defendant s mother.
"You're getting into double
and triplehearsay'JudgeRothstein
observed.
The judge said she also was
concerned about playing "one sen-
tence from a whole day's conversa-
tion" or "a sentence a day from a
whole string of days.
Taken on their face, some of
them don't make any sense at all
she said.
Maida contended thedisputed
segments provided the context for
understanding other material on the
composite tape, including "the in-
criminating nature of thedefendant's
statements
Carolina School of Nursing collabo-
rated with the Allied Health Depart-
ment and the Philosophy Depart-
ment to develop a lecture seriescon-
cerninghealthcareand the technical
revolution.
The lectures are given every
third Thursday each month, the first
of which was on gene treatment.
The sponsors of the lecture were
disappointed with a low turn-out.
Life after transplants was the
focus of the second lecture. The final
part of the series will concern health
care delivery.
Porkomy said tha t this lecture
series is a "one-shot deal" that is not
an annual event. She said would be
nice if other events could be sup-
There will be a MANDATORY News Writers' meeting for all
writers today at 4:00 in the Student Publications Building. Anyone
interested in writing for The East Carolinian is invited to attend.
ported like GTE and Area Health
Education supported this series
The lecture is open to the pub-
lic.
Porkomy said the series might
be of special interest to nursing and
allied health majors, or anyone who
lsdealing with the treatment of criti-
cally ill friends or relatives.
Check it Out
Four-lecture series on
ethical issues in high
technology care on
March 18th in the
Brody Auditorium
from 7:30 to 8:30.
CAREER
Continued from page 1
ates might represent several busi-
nesses, such as PepperTree Resort.
Shealsosaid thatoneononecontact
is very important, and that juniors,
as well as seniors, should gain from
the first contact.
Students are advised to bring
resumesand any material that might
be needed to fill out employment
applications.
There will also be representa-
tives from several franchises. Any-
one who is interested in small busi-
ness management can get tips on
how to get started.
The Hospitality Department
Career Day sponsored by the Career
and Placement Service is an annual
event.
v�J
NOW OPEN
GREENVILLE
FUN PARK
COMING
IVIi
- � �i
Golf
GO-KART RIDES
& GAME ROOIVI
1-7 IVIon-Thur
1-Q Fri &. Sat
2-8 Sun
2 Miles South of
Burroughs Wellcome on 264
PARTIES & GROUPS
757-1800
SHKiM-SHK
ATTENTION: STUDENT GROUPS
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Annual Fund-Raising Planning
Are Scheduled For:
ions
Monday, March 1 5
Tuesday, March 16
Wednesday, March 17
Thursday, March 18
Monday, March 22
Tuesday, March 23
Wednesday, March 24
Thursday, March 25
Tuesday, April 6
Wednesday, April 7
Thursday, April 8
A Representative of Your
One Session In Order
Room 241
Room 242
Room 242
Room 247
Room 241
Room 242
Room 242
Room 247
Room 242
Room 242
Room 242
3-6 PM
4-7 PM
4-7 PM
4-7 PM
3-6 PM
4-7 PM
3-6 PM
5-8 PM
4-7 PM
4-7 PM
4-4:45 PM
Organization Must Be Present At
To Obtain 1993-1994 Funding
All Groups With SGA Funded Status Are Eligible
For Further Information Call:
Brynn Thomas 757-0157
Rich Paravella 757-3581
If You Are Unsure If You Are Eligible For Funding Please Call Millie Murphrey at 757-4726





�-�
TheEastCarolinian
March 18, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
1 BR APARTMENT on 13th St, Great
for pets,esp. dogs. Available immedi-
ately. 5275mo. Call 752-9197.
SUBLEASE Efficiency Apartment,
Ringgold Towers, 260.00month. Call
752-9866,leave a message.
HOUSE CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Two
bedroom possibly three. Newly reno-
vated tiled kitchen, bathroom, painted,
wallpapered, refinished floors, air con-
ditioner. $330 plus month deposit. Call
355-5150.
SUMMER APARTMENT 2 Bedroom
11 2 bath. Located in Cedar Ct. To be
sub-leased for summer. 365.00 Mo.
Util. Ask for Brian or Dave. 752-0085.
2 BEDROOM APT. HeatAC water,
sewer, cable included. 2 blocks from
campus. For rent NOW. Call 746-4169.
SINGLEROOMS FOR RENTforsum-
mersessions.$250pers.s. includes rent,
utilities, and phone. More info contact
Marcus at (919) 758-3936.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
UNIQUESITUATIONFORFEMALE
ROOMMATE. Full house privileges,
unfurnished room, adjoining bath, pri-
vate entrance, smoker o.k small pet
o.k. 13 utilities, Winterville area. Call
after 5pm 756-5467.
ROOMMATE wanted: Must be re-
sponsible and mature. 1 2 mile from
campus, ECU bus. CALL: 752-1538,
leave message.
FEMALEROOMMATE(S) NEEDED
to share 3 bedroom house 2 blocks
from campus. House has cable,
washerdryer,andA?C.CallBonnieat
752-3472.
SUMMERROOMMATES NEEDED
2 to 3 male or female roc mma tes needed
forsummer in NAGS HEAD. Low rent
plus utility allowance. If interested,
PLEASE CALL AS SOON AS POS-
SIBLE. Betsy-931-7844.
ROOMMATE wanted for May. Rent
is $157.50 a month 1 2 utilities. Call
Penny at 830-3771.
CHEAP! FBIUSSFJZED: 89Mercedes
- S 200, 86 VW - $) & Mercedes -
SI 00, 65 Mustang - S5. Choose form
thousands starting $50. FREE Informa-
tion 24 hour hotline 801 -379-2929 copy-
right NC 030610.
YAKOTA EL CAPITAN 19" MTN.
BIKE Excellent condition only 6 mths
old. Blue wwhite bans, switch blade
forks, Deone XT shifters, Shimano
Brakes and Gears, Araya wheels, $700
new - S525 or best offer. Call 752-1179.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DE A. Available your area
now. Call 1-800-436-4363 ext. C-5999.
MEN'S HOGAN RADIAL IRONS
(LH) 3-SW pi us Driver, 3 wood, pu tter,
bagwcover. $250.00 Call 758-5001 or
758-8524 (LVMSG)
MOVING MUST SELL: 5 pc. Cherry
orOak Bedrooms Set $425.00Call 946-
9653.
MAN'S CAP AND GOWN (Ph.D.),
black velvet Trim. Reasonable offer.
Call 752-5801.
MOTORCYCLE: 1988Honda NX 125J,
1127 miles $1,200, Stephanie 756-1910.
1981 YAMAHA "CHAPPY" Motor
Scooter 49cc very good running condi-
tion - great transportation 'or ground
campus. Ride forever an � gallon of
gas. $400931-7216.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time.Setown hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hiring enthusiastic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. North BeachSailing, Inc. Box8279,
Duck, NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED. Looking for enthusiastic
people with strong cheering and inter-
personal skills to teach cheerleading
camps in NC & SC. Great pay and
flexible scheduling. Up to 10 weeks
possible! If you love cheerleading, this
is the summer job for you! To apply,
Call 1-800-280-3223.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All Materials provided. Send SASE to
National Distributors PO Box 9643
Springfield, MO 65801. Immediate re-
sponse.
200-$500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information-24 hour hotline. 801 -379
-2900. Copyright NC 030650.
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many posi-
tions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-436-
4365ext.P-3712
ALASKA SUMM ER EMPLOYM ENT
- fisheries. Earn $600week in canner-
ies or $4,000 month on fishing boats.
Free transportation! Room & Board!
Over 8,000 openings. No experience
necessary. MALE or FEMALE. For
employment program call 1-206-545-
4155 ext. A5362.
HELP WANTED at Carpet Bargain
Center, Apply in Person 1009 Dickinson
Ave.
Vtl CLERICAL POSITION - After-
noons and evenings. Must have accu-
rate typing skills 65 wpm (). Must be
willing to perform a number of duties
and work hard. Apply in person at the
Audrt Bureau of Greenvilie, 1206 S.
Charles Blvd Greenville, NC. No
phone calls please.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP - Sales
Advertising begin immediately part
time. Have 4 weeks summer vacation,
good pay - bring resume to Coopera-
tive Education Office General Class-
room Bldg. Will call for interview.
SUMMER JOB ON THE OUTER
BANKS: Kitty Hawk Pizza and the
New Tomato Parch Pizzaria in Corolla
are looking for summer help. Wait-
resses, cooks, and d ishwa shers needed.
Call Chris locally at 931-7085 for an
application
WANTED - RIDE TO NEW JERSEY
for the weekend of March 26th and or
April 2nd. Will help drive and pay for
gas. PLEASE CALL DEBBIE 931 -8597.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typingand photocopyingservices. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pages.SDFProfessionalComputer Ser-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
TUTORING available for MS-DOS
WORDPERFECTLOTUS. Contact
Barbara Curtis at 321-1994.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer? Only $169 Jet there anytime for
only $169 with AIRH1TCH! (Reported
in Let's Go! & NY Times.) AIRHTTCH
�212-864-2000.
HEY D.J Don't be fooled by false
"experience Mobile Music Produc-
tions is THE disc jockey service for
ECU Greeks. Most variety of any ser-
vice in the area. We play WHAT YOU
WANTTOHEARfRead'y tojam spring
formals. Call 758-4644.
BEST TANNING PRICES IN TOWN
at Scissorsmith Hair Designs and Tan-
ning Center! One Month Unlimited
Only $30, Other packages Too! 107
Eastbrook Drive 758-7570.
NEEDAFrrNESSTRAINERtogetthe
look the guys want? Call 931 - 7866.
NEEDANEXTRAHAND?CallRENT-
A-BROTHER at 321-2577. For yards
cleaned, windows washed, house
cleaning, tutoring, painting, construct-
ing or more on March 20, 1993. For
reservation andor information call
321-2577 now: Sponsored by PHI
SIGMA PI National Honor Fraternity.
SMVES PROFESSIONAL TYPIN6 &
WDM PROCESSING SaVKE
'English Literature Major
'Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Composed Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
800-351-0222
In Calil. (213) 477-8226
?.riX!� ?2.��,0: R���areh Information
11322 Idaho Ave. J206-A. Los Angles. CA 90025
SNEED CASHS
TUDENT
VAP
HOP
HEY ROD AND G: Monday night
was fun hangin' with you guys. It was
a great cheer up session. I NEVER
Love, Lisa Marie.
MR. GREENJEANS: Thanks for be-
ing my margarita pal. Lots of love,
Hon.
HEY YOU ECU WHORES: Saggy
asses and K-Mart flops, the laughs just
seemed to never stop. Laying out na-
ked, we didn't care, the Sigma nerds
were EVERYWHERE! Designer
dumps form the seafood buffet, too
bad La boob's came up a different way!
Margaritavihe, Fat Tuesday, and
Rumrunners too, who will ever forget
Christy'sboobs? Second place,shewas
grea t, even Duff thought so-her lip lock-
ing mate. For six Wildwood girls, the
Keys were the best, with Big Dick and
!?! Piewill,youknowtherest. Spring
Break '93.
FORMERLY ESTATE SHOP
COIN & RING MAN
Encyclopedia
America
Carpet maintenance
system floor care.
Low Price
J Rebate also
KJ available!
James 355-4524
BUYING
& SELLING
F"
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Jewelry(goodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Hope everybody
had a good Spring Break. Looking for-
ward to the rest of the semester. PIKES.
ZETATAU ALPHA PLEDGES Hope
you're ready for Fridaynight!Wecan't
wait to be found by our new Littie
Sisters! Love, Your Big Sisters
TO ALL FRATERNITIES AND SO-
RORITIES: Hope everyone had a
memorable springbreak. Looking for-
ward to Greek Week! the Chi Omegas.
ALPHAPHLHopeeveryoneisgetting
psyched for formal this weekend!
ATTENTION ALL GREEKS: JFC
PanhellenicGreeklDsandGreekWeek
Stickers will be available Fri. 3:30-6:00
aridTues. 3:30-5:00 only inMendenhall
Student Center Multipurpose room.
Come early!
THE
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-05,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1 -800-251 -4000 Ext. 1576
EAST
CAROLINIAN
DO YOU WANT
Turn to page 1
Announcements
A CAREER IN ADVERTISING?
2 for an excellent opportunity!
ATTENTION PR BflggCM
THERAPY gmBEMIfi
Registration advising for
summerfall semester, 1993, will be
held on March 22nd, 23rd,
24th(Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday)
evening from 7:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m.
in the Physical Therapy lab of the Belk
Building. Please enter by way of the
frontdoorof the Belk Building. All pre-
physical therapy general college stu-
dents MUST attend one of these ses-
sions to have summerfall semester
schedules approved and signed by a
physical therapy advisor.
REMOVING INCOMPr FTFffIN
MATHWvl
Students who received a
grade of Incomplete (I) in Math Lab
(Math 0001) Fall Semester, 1993 must
be sure to remove the incomplete by
flQ pm, Friday, March 19,1993. The
Math Lab will beopen from 2:00 pm to
5:00 pm on Mondays through Thurs-
days, to allow students needing to re-
move an incomplete time to study, re-
ceive any necessary help, and com-
plete the remaining tests. A student
with an incomplete from the Fall, 1992
semester, who fails to complete the
required work by March 19th will be
required to register for and repeat (from
the beginning) Math 0001. (Note: Stu-
dents entering the Math Lab to work
onremovinganincompletemusthave
with them a picture ID.)
STUDrNTSURVPYfr
During the week of March
22-26, a survey of student opinion of
instruction will be conducted at ECU.
Questionnaires will be distributed in
classes with enrollments greater than
five. All students will have the oppor-
tunity toexpressopinionson the teach-
ing effectiveness of their instructors.
The survey will be conducted during
class time and will take approximately
15 minutes to complete. Student par-
ticipation is voluntary and no identi-
ties are requested. Instructors ha ve been
requested to leave theclassroom while
thequestionnairesarebeingcornpleted.
Results of the survey will be distrib-
uted to instructors after final grades
have been posted. The teaching effec-
tiveness questionnaire was created by
the Faculty Senate Committee for
Teaching Effectiveness and the Office
ofPlanningandlnstitutionalResearch.
The results of the survey, along with
otherinformationandfactors,areused
for administrative evaluation of the
instructor by the supervising adminis-
trator within the department or divi-
sion.
maiorsminor�;fair;
Select a Major, Add a Minor,
Talk with the Faculty, Wednesday
March2412:30-3:30p.m.atMendenhall
Great Room: Free Snacks!
SCHOOL OF mirsnCt
Departmental Meetings for
Advisementand Important Announce-
ments. Pre-Clinical Nursing Majors and
General College with Nursing as in-
tended Major, Tuesday, March 23 at
5:00 pm in Room 101 Nursing Bldg.
Nursing Majors currently enrolled in
Nursing 24002700, Wednesday,
March 24 at 500 p.m. in Room 101
Nursing Bldg. Nursing Majors enter-
ing Senior level in Fall or completing
last Junior courses in Fall, Wednesday
March 24 at 600 p.m. in Room 101
Nursing Bldg
All TERRAIN, BIIYr.
Recreational Services All-Ter-
rain Biking Adventure will be held on
Saturday, March 20 at 10:30 am in
Christenb'iry 117. Participants will
learn proper equipmentand safety tech-
niques. Bringa helmetand be prepared
to peddle! Refreshments will be pro-
vided . The cost is S5.00 students, 58.00
facultystaff. Register Now! For more
info call 757-6387.
SPEECH-1 ANntlAr.Fft
auditor ypathoioy
All GeneralCollege students
who intend to major in Speech-Lan-
guage and Auditory Pathology and
have R. Muzzarelli or M. Downes as
their advisor are to meet on Wednes-
day, March 24,5:00 p.m. in General
Classroom 1028. General advising for
early registration will takeplaceatthat
time. Individual appointments can be
made following the general advising
meeting. Please preparea ten tativeclass
schedule before the meeting.
GAMMA BFTA PHI
The next Gamma Beta Phi
meeting will be Tuesday, March 23 at
5:00 in Mendenhall 244 Please bring3
toiletry items to this meeting for our
next serviceproject.Donutswill also be
distributed after the meeting. Hope to
see you there! Questions: call 931-9274.
GAMMASICMASir.MA
"Jail House Rock" warrants
for sell at Student Store March 18, 22,
and 23 .Payonly 53.00 to havesomeone
arrested on April Fool's Day! All pro-
ceeds go to needy families. Sponsored
by Camma Sigma Sigma
CAMPUS CHRIST! A �
FELLOWSHIP
"CREATION'S TINY MYS-
TERY" SCIENTIFIC MYSTEKY UN-
RAVELED Dr. Robert V. Gentry,
an internatiopiilly recognized author-
it)'on Ccidiohalos will bea guest speaker
at ECU on March 23. He will present
his work, which challenges the evolu-
tionists'4.6 billion yearage of theearth,
inHendrix Theatreat7pm. You will be
amazed at his findings. Agree or dis-
agree, butcomeand hear whatmany in
the scientific community want to keep
quiet. Bepreparedtoaskquestionsand
challenge Dr. Gentry's findings. No
admission is required, but donations
will beaccepted. If you havequestions
call Tim Turner at 752-7199.
REGISTRATION FOR r.FNIFR, AJ,
COLLEGE STUDENT
General College students
should contact their advisors the week
of March 22-26 to make arrangements
for academic advising for summer
terms and Fall Semester 1993. Early
registration will begin March 29 and
end April 2.
SPECIAI.OIYMPirs
The 1993 Greenville - Pitt Co.
Special Olympics Spring Games will
be held on April 20thatE. B. Aycock Jr.
High School in Greenville (rain date:
April 22). Volunteers are needed to
help serve as buddieschaperones for
the Special Olympics.
Volunteers must be able to work all
day-from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. An orienta-
tion meeting will be Md on April 15 in
Old Joyner Library room 221 from 5-
6:00p.m. (The first ones there will be
assigned a position.) Free volunteer t-
shirts will be provided the day of the
games to all volunteers who have at-
tended theorientationsession.Formore
information, contact Lisa Ihly at 830-
4551.
ASH WEDNESDAY SFRVirFS
The NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER wishes to an-
nouncespecial Ash Wednesday Masses
with thedistributionofashes.lt will be
held at 12 noon in the Great Room of
Mendenhall Student Center and 5:30
p.m. attheNewmanCenter,953E. 10th
Street at the foot of College Hill. Come
and join.
XWi'mX-ZiiVti
Map to
The East Carolinian
2nd floor of the Student
Pubs Building
:wS �

Classifieds
25wordsorless:
Students $2XXJ
Nan-Students $3j00
Each additional word $005
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Announcements
ArrycyganizatJcrimayusetneAnnciunce-
menteSectkriofTheEastCardiniantofet
artrvAiesandeventscpentothepubfctvvci
tinesfreecfrJiaDuetotheiTitedr
ofspa7neEast(Iarrjinian cannot guaran-
tee thepubfcation of arnauncements.
Deadlines
Displayed
$5.50perinch:
Dispiayedadvertisements may be
cancelled before 10a.m. the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds wil be given.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p. m. for Thursday's Edition
Formore
information call
757-6366.
M





The East Carolinian
March 18, 1993
ThursdayOpinion
Convention center
will bring in funds
to better city
Benefits far outweigh the risks in
endeavor that will put Greenville
on statewide map
More money, more money, more money.
That's what the city of Greenville can expect if it
approves plans for the construction of a new conven-
tion center. Studies have shown that the convention
center would generate an average of $8.6 million annu-
ally for its first three years of operation.
Hotels and motels would experience the biggest
gains from this new building. Though the convention
center would promote an increase in the present occu-
pancy tax, managers around Greenville have voiced no
opposition to the increase. They have been quoted as
saying that if the new convention center goes through,
the added tax could be handled.
Along with motels and hotels, entertainment busi-
nesses such as restaurants or bars would also benefit
greatly from the center. Advertising, photography and
construction all rank up with these two leaders in the
potential revenues that would be accrued if the center
is opened. Benefits would be shown even as far down
as the common laborer, with the estimated 180 new
jobs that would be available � directly or indirectly �
from the center's operation.
Another benefit garnered from the convention
center would be the increase of trade shows and con-
ventions that would frequent the Greenville area. Ac-
cording to a study conducted by the Greenville-Pitt
County Con-
vention and
Visitors Bureau,
32 conventions
and trade
shows ex-
pressed an in-
terest in coming
to Greenville.
Lack of available space and accommodations deterred
these conventions from using Greenville as their base,
though.
The city of Greenville should make this conven-
tion center their top priority, if it is not already. Oppo-
nents who quibble about the high cost of land purchase
or development would do well to look at the benefits
that would come about. When you have more pros
than cons in a situation, go with the pros.
This convention center would put Greenville as
one of the top contenders in the North Carolina race for
tourism. Currently, only Charlotte has the top five-star
rating for a convention center, with Raliegh, Winston-
Salem and Greensboro running a close second. Green-
ville is now rated with two stars, and the new center
would boost the rating to four, putting the city in
viable contention with the rest of the state.
Arguments about the cost of land purchasing are
invalid, also. Currently, the city is looking at purchas-
ing the site of the abandoned Nichols discount store to
use for this center. This site would put the center in an
advantageous geographical position, virtually centered
between Carolina East Mall and The Plaza Mall on
Greenville Boulevard. All of the businesses on Green-
ville Boulevard � which houses the majority of busi-
nesses in Greenville � would benefit from this con-
struction and placement.
Twenty years have gone by, with hot air being
blown around enough to heat the center itself if it could
be harnessed. The time for action is now. More time
discussing possible concerns or benefits would only be
redundant � start building as soon as possible.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Billiard, Asst Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed. Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretan
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian
Publications Bldg, ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-4353 lor more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366
Printed on
w
100 recycled
paper
Opinion
Page 6
Freedom's Call
By Jim Shamlin
Majority of voters considered sleepwalkers
If government has become
oppressive, it is the people who
have made it that way, whether
through conscious or unconscious
support, sanction or tolerance. No
one can claim innocence.
In order to redeem ourselves
and to cease this oppression, we
must effect a revolution. It is not
yet time to resort to violent action
� history has proven violence to
be a radical cure, but it is only a
temporary solution. Since gov-
ernment derives its power from
the people and enforces the citi-
zens' demands, replacing one
body of rulers with another
changes nothing but the rulers'
names.
In other words: if the de-
mands of the people remain the
same, the "new" government will
enforce the same demands and
follow the same course as the pre-
vious one. In order for a revolu-
tion to hold, it is the people who
must change themselves � and
since government serves the
peoples' demands, government
will evolve in response to the de-
mands of its citizens. If govern-
ment fails to evolve with its
people, then it is time for vio-
lence, and only such violence as
is absolutely necessary to unseat
the public servants who, like ar-
rogant butlers, have forgotten
who signs their checks.
Effecting this change in the
citizenry is not as difficult as it
would seem. Oppression is by no
means a virtue in our society, and
few embrace it consciously �
many, however, embrace it un-
consciously. People wonderwhat
has happened to make the nation
run off-course when it is the
people, themselves, have fallen
asleep at the wheel. In order to
change the source of our nation,
to get it back on track, all we need
to do is sound an alarm to wake
the people. Once aware of what
they are doing, they will act to
correct their mistakes, to operate
the controls in such a way that
their actions will steer the nation
back on track.
The analogy fails, however,
by implying that it is within the
power of one person to take con-
trol. This country is not a bus in
which most of the people are pas-
sive riders � or it wouldn't be, if
the many "riders" would exer-
cise their right to vote � it is a
complex machine with a control
panel at each seat. It is not enough
to elect one man of vision and
expect him to do the job alone,
especially when that man is, at
best, half-blind; and the few of us
who are awake do not have the
combined strength needed to
steer the machine � but we do
have the power to wake the pas-
sengers and, at the same time,
remind them that they are the
crew, and that they are failing in
their duties.
This, however, is only half
the job�some of those who have
remained awake are frantically
pressing buttons and, more accu-
rately, pulling levers to steer this
country in the wrong direction.
Some of them have no idea what
they're doing � they will be the
easiest to recruit, because the des-
perately want to do something
effective. If given rational advice,
they will see the logic of it and act
accordingly.
Others, however, are far
more demented. They are half-
awake, like zombies, and al-
though they think they know how
to work the controls, they are
steering in the wrong direction,
toward the precipice that is rush-
ing toward us. These people think
they know the answers � they
act in accordance with false in-
structions such as Democratic or
Republican party propaganda,
the Communist Manifesto or,
worst of all, the Christian myth.
Each of these manuals is flawed
and inherently suicidal. All the
same, having a set of directives
that seems right at first glance
makes these people resolute in
steering the machine, and all of
us in it, toward certain death.
These citizens who are half-
awake are our greatest weakness.
They are casualties in the fight
for freedom, and not all of them
can be saved. Some of them are
firmly resolved to their perverse
and suicidal ideologies to con-
sider any alternative. We must
act to revive the ones we can and
accept our inability to affect the
ignorant and closed-minded.
Luckily, most of them are
salvageable. As for tne others,
the severely demented, there is
nothing we can do to stop them
from destroying themselves. Sui-
cide will always remain an in-
alienable right. However, we can,
and must, prevent them from
taking us along on their ride to
the slaughterhouse they call
"utopia to the butcher they call
"God
We, who know that free-
dom is the most important pos-
session; we, who are labeled
"revolutionaries" and "anar-
chists" in a country that has for-
saken its values; we, who remain
awake, have a duty to perform
for ourselves and for this fallen
nation. We must wake the sleep-
ing and bury the dead � our
only alternative is death.
IlWTC�lFlpP&r
jtiuft MEATS
, WHY gENvrW
QuoteofthcDay
Management by objectives works if you
know the objectives. Ninety percent of the
time you don't
Peter Druckerl
Letters to the Editor
Explore new diet in Great American Meat-Out
To the Editor:
Saturday, March 20, is
the eighth annual Great
American Meat-Out. On this
day, people are asked to " kick
the meat habit for a day and
to explore a less violent, more
wholesome diet The event
is coordinated nationally by
the Farm Animal Reform
Movement (FARM) with co-
chairs Doris Day, Casey
Kasem, Kevin Nealon and
River Phoenix.
ECU Students for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals
(SETA) will havean informa-
tion table in front of the Stu-
dent Stores on Thurs Mar.
18, and Fri Mar. 19, (from 9
until 3) to provide informa-
tion on the en vi ronmenta 1 de-
struction that animal agricul-
ture causes, the health haz-
ards of meat consumption
and the animal suffering in-
herent in meat production.
Here is a small sam-
pling:
� One acre of trees is
spared each year by each in-
dividual who switches to a
pure vegetarian diet.
� Up to 16 pounds of
grain must be fed to a cow to
make on pound of beef.
� 260 million acres of
forest have been cleared to
create cropland to produce
our meat-centered diet.
� 200 million pounds of
meat are imported annually
by the United States, from
Central America. Profits from
this are the primary incentive
for rainforest destruction.
� 55 percent of pesti-
cide residues in the U.S. diet
is supplied by meat.
� The risk of death from
heart attack for the average
American man is 50 percent,
while for the average Ameri-
can pure vegetarian man it is
four percent.
� Vegetarian diets eas-
ily provide all the nutrient s
necessary for optimum hu-
man health.
� After converting, most
vegetarians report having
more energy and greater re-
sistance to colds.
� Over five billion
warm-blooded animals are
killed annually in America
for meat.
� Today's "factory
farms" treat animals as meat-
producing machines rather
than sentient beings. Conse-
quently, the animals are
densely crowded and kept
under unnatural conditions
which frustrate many of their
instinctual drives.
To learn more, or to take
the "Meat-Out Pledge stop
by SETA's table.
Craig Spitz
ECU SETA
By Gregory Dickens
Scrap NASA to
pave way for new
space agency
If we want to cut the budget, we must
think big. Eliminate NASA and put our ener-
gies into an international scientific agency.
It's a step that, while bandied about, has
never been taken seriously by the majority.
Doing so will save the United States trillions of
dollars,orreduceour financial "sacrificeThe
only proposal onCapitol Hill concerning NASA
concerns downsizing the space station Free-
dom which has been in development since
1984. I'm not suggesting eliminating just the
station that will cost $101 billion over the next
30 years, but all of NASA.
Since 1986, with the Challenger explo-
sion, our space agency has been scrutinized as
being the largest money pit this side of the
Pentagon. Repeated reports of workers under
the influence of drugs while at work, the em-
barrassmentof unsuccessful rocket experiments
along with the Hubble Telescope snafu have
led to incremental restructuring.
We as a nation have lost our vigor about
space exploration. When Kennedy proposed
putting a man on the moon by the end of the
'60s, the United States went ballistic for the
idea of beating the Russians to our natural
satellite. Especiallyafter the Soviets had beaten
us with Sputnik. The Cold War was given a
new battleground that was politically popular,
considered valid by the military withoutbeing
inherently violent and socially popular from
sci-fi enthusiasts to the scientific community.
However, shuttle flights now seem to be
mundane and of concern only to communica-
tions companies. The information NASA seeks
can easily and less-expensively be gathered by
probes such as Voyager and Galileo without
risking human life. This modem manifest des-
tiny can be set aside by practical and ever-
increasing technology.
Such a move can fit the criteria Congress
uses to refine the budget.
Streamlining NASA will shaveoff money
that can be used to bail out an Savings and
Loan; whoever backs the move will be seen as
frugal and decisive. Intergrating existing tech-
nologies into a global effort that may incorpo-
rate environmental and agricultural interests
will no doubt be supported by the increas-
ingly-aware populace.
The military can adapt its efforts from
defense and utilize them in research programs.
The major contractors that have been sweating
about layoffs can save jobs without changing
their output; more-efficient engines, better fu-
els and stronger construction materials will be
the crux of further space research if we are to
keep putting humans outside our atmosphere.
An international agency would prevent
redundancies. In our efforts to have a grand
space station to represent America, we seem to
be unaware of the Soviet space station in use for
about a decade. If we were to work with the
developed nations that can adapt their defense
technologies as well, we may have the poten-
tial for a powerful scientific effort.
Far-fetched? I prefer far-reaching. Might
as well shoot for the moon.
r

-





The East Carolinian
I
March 18, 1993
;tyl(
Page 7
'Falling Down' reveals explosive city frustrations
By Gresory Dickens
Staff Writer
There comesadayin each of our
lives when we just can't take any-
more. Daily stress mingles with re-
curring frustrations in a way that
cripples the psyche and impairs
tamp le logic. Entropy and impotence
prevents any progress. In such situa-
tions, you just want to throw your
head back, scream, gnash your teeth,
pummel sorneonetodust or giveup.
Warner Brothers' Falling Down
begins with Michael Douglas giving
up. He's fed up with the atrophy in
the city, work and home to the point
where he abandons his car in Los
Angeles morning traffic to go home
for his daughter's birthday.
"dear a path. I'm going home
he warns to anyone in earshot
The story revolves around his
journeythroughthedtyonaswelter-
ing summer's day and his increas-
j inglyviotentreactionstoexamplesof
major urban aggravations.
Robert Duvall plays the police
detective who pieces together Dou-
g'identitywhiletryingtoguesshis
' destination. Barbara Hershey plays
Douglas' ex-wife terrified of her
. husbaVd'sintentionswitheachphone
call as he makes his way to her and
theirchild.
The theme behind Falling Down
is deterioration. The tide refers to a
descent both specific and far-reach-
ing. Man, the dry and the American
ideal are revealed to be in a vicious
�� cycle of decay and intolerance. The
white mkidledass which Douglas
representsispresentedasrheincreas-
inglyvokriessandpowenssminor-
ity in the melange of Los Angeles
social and ethnic levels His name is
withheld from theaudienoe until the
last 14 of the movie to add to the
generic aspect of his role.
As Douglas makes his way
i through the less-glamorous sections
of LA he grows more and more
incensed by what he sees as perver-
sions of the ideals he grew up with
Each obstruction gives him another
opportunityforvituperativetangents
of how things should be. High prices,
prejudiceand unnecessary diversions
from the normal routine takeiton the
chin as he strolls home.
EbbeRoeSmith'sscreenplayhas
its merits. Itbecomes obvious lateron
in the film that Douglas'anger stems
from his failed marriage and his vari-
ous ccrifrontations and are merely
examples of misdirected anger in the
faceof powerlessness. Hecaresforhis
family but his frustration in the rela-
tionshipisfooisedcritohissurround-
ings. It is a dever observation of hu-
mannaturethatwas last witnessed in
Do the Right Thing.
However, Spike Lee's movie al-
lowed us familiarity with the charac-
ters before they exploded in rage in
the dimax. Douglas is an Everyman
to the audience until his personal life
is revealed. As a result the shock erf
seeing a sympathetic character re-
duced to base reflex is lost. It would
havebeen much more affecting tobe
given theopportunitytosecond-guess
him before he "falls down
Smith's script dabbles in absur-
dity with the icon-like appearance of
conservative life that Douglas con-
veys. His short-sleeved button-up
shirt, horrid tie and H. Ross Perot
buzz cut is the semblance of the
archetypical nerd. And toseefhisstiff
marching through the streets toting
lucliaousry-accessible weaponry and
Wasting away phone booths is novel.
IrriagineyenircIadaUdressedforwork
and trying tobe the Terminator.
Douglas does a great job. Awk-
ward and polite even while hokiinga
burger-joint hostage, the audience
laughsathisnear-prim resolve while
flinching at his sudden and apathetic
violence. His seething resentment
shines behind his spectacles. His gri-
mace nears doser to the giggle of
Photo courtesy Warner Bros.
Michael Douglas stars as D-Fens, an ordinary man whose inability to cope with his anger leads him on a path of violence and self-destruction
in Warner Brother's latest compelling drama, "Falling Down
insanity. He carries the interest when
the story gets tedious. And the shift of
scenes between Duvall and Douglas
gets old fast As Falling Down contin-
ues, Douglas gees farther and farther
into unrestrained misanthropy and
becomes less liked as his acts of ag-
gression approach cruelty. This is
where the sporadic attention paid to
Iivaflbec�mesdexriiiwitashehunts
Douglas down to a chilling climax.
From all appearances and com-
ments, Falling Down soundsconcrete.
But it leaves room for strong debate.
Director Joel Schumacher does a fine
job, especially compared to his Lost
Boys and St. Ebno's Fire . Andrzej
Bartkcjwiak'scinematographyismes-
merizing. Conveying the heat and
burden of the dimate, the sharp cam-
era angle shots use strong design to
isolate Douglas' emotion while trap-
ping him in the momentum of the
story's inevitable outcome.
The tale of urban and familial
aggravation creates the question of
whether or not Douglas' actions are
the workof an extreme personality or
a more common persona in
punishingh-hardciiTXimstarKes.Ishe
nutstobewithorisheasymbolfor
anyofus?Theall-toc�-familiar story of
the shy, quiet neighbor who kept to
himself only to turn psychotic in the
blink of an eye raises concern. If it
couldn't happen to you, who might it
happen to? How far will they "fall
down?" Will they explode, gather re-
solve or give up? And who may be
hurtinthec3oss-fire?FaflffigDoaimay
be accused of exploiting dty fears but
it can easily be set in small towns
acrcthecountryandretainpotency.
Bewamed.Thisisnota movie to
wile away the hours. Falling Down
presents an extreme instance of com-
mon situations in a thought-provok-
ing fashion. It may seem imaginative
to us given our locale. But with ever-
present news of playground
shootings, restaurant massacres and
other senseless murders, perhaps
sorrewhohaveorthosewhohaveyet
to "fall down" do not have too far to
descend.
And then what?
Dashboard Saviors save
the Southern sound
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
TtemamthingseparatingtheDasrAxMid
Saviors from the rampaging hordes of coun-
try music stars seems to be that they're not
stupider than dirt
Unlikemost country acts, they don'tplay
an nostalgia (except with an air of ironic re-
gret), they don't sing about gettin' drunk and
havin' fun (without acknowledging the stu-
pidity inherent in such activity), and they
don'tmythologize life in the American South
(unless they make it into a sort of hell).
Another thing keeping this group from
the country ranks is its point of origin. The
Dashboard Savkrs hail from Athens, Ga
home toREM and the B-52's, and the spawn-
ing ground for a whole slew of boring "alter-
native" bands.
The Saviors,
fortunately, have
managed to shirk
the Athens stigma
and, on their new
album Kitty, forge
their own sound.
Oh, the aura of the
REM boys lurks
abouthereand there
(the album waspro-
duced by REM's
PeterBuck),butonry
as a backdrop to the
- Savior's own, intd-
ligentpointofview.
Which brings
us to "Consummation a soft and very wise
number about sexual congress and the pos-
siblejoysofloring.E)iscussionofaone-night
stand leads into philosophical thought on
questing for things as opposed to instant total
gratification. Wanting has a nice emotional
tingetoittheSavkxsetecide,auraquereeling
thaf s Jjost when desires are fulfilled. Or, as
i singer ToddMcBride puts it, "There's some-
thing said about a dream fulfilled Some-
thing sad about consummation Far from a
cry for abstinence, this song just urges us to
The Dashboard Saviors
last quarter century. The first moon walk is
remembered through Tang. The Watergate
hearings pre-empted cartoons and Mean's
soap operas. The death of John Lennon is
filtered through the teenage angst and regret
Thechc�rusisdeoeptivdyetegant,ascrtcrf
humorous refrain that works as a transition
between events: "but now spring is tumin'
into fall When I was a kid, G.I. Joe was 12
inches tall Time moves in this song and
things change. "G.I. Joe" is a powerful piece
thatmakesnostalgiaintoa tool for re-thinking
the past This is lacking only in a verse about
the present day to close the circle. But maybe
that's another song entirely.
'Town a piece of hate-mail to the mod-
em small-town South, follows the lives erf
three teenagers in some unnamed hell-hole
below the Mason-Dixon line. Alternately
bored, dissatisfied and
just plain lost, our he-
roes' spirits are crushed
by their envircciment
One erfthem sets firetoa
charity box with "a
Molotov Cocktail
made with a Boone's
Farm bottle, an
Aerosmith T-shirt and
some gas from his
daddy's car Another
fiixisherselfmthewrong
part of town and gets
raped in a parking lot.
Theyallenduptogether,
taking drags off a com-
munitydgaretteand sit-
fsS Schoof of Music
March 18: Brett Watson conducts the ECU Concert Choir in Wright
Auditorium at 8 p.m. The show is free to the public.
March 19: Heather Sundquist gives her senior piano recital at 7 p.m. in the
Fletcher Recital Hall. The show is free to the public. At 9 p.m Natalie Volk will give
her senior flute recital, which is also free and in the Fletcher Recital Hall.
March 21: Laura Gaither Costen gives a student recital on the organ at the
First Presbyterian Church (14th and Elm). The recital begins at 3 p.m. and is free.
March 22: The facultyguest trio of Paul Tardif (piano), Fritz Gearhart
(violin) and Brian Manker (guest cellist) will give a performance in the Fletcher
Recital Hall at 8 p.m. The show is free.
Just the Devil's Wa
ting in hopeless silence.
The"Wegottagetouttathisplace" theme
has been deme before, certainly, but 'Town"
updatesitforus-Theseareworking-classkicls,
stifled bytheeconomicand mental stagnation
thesmall-tDwnSouthrepresenrstothem.They
don't rebel. They can't They even can't get
angry about it. TheVre just numb. They're
trapped and there is nothing they can do.
The Dashboard Saviors paint a rather
bleak landscape with Kitty. Their South is full
of people made painfully aware erf their own
slowdownandenjoy thechaseforawhik.That language and powerlessness, who lead will-
same kind of wistful quality is involved in
"G.I. Joe a look back through songwriter
McBride's life. Historical benchmarks aie
linked with vivid physical sensations and a
child's half-understanding of the wuild
arourxi;thesecombinetopaintaportraitofrhe
fully self-destructive lives. Buttherearebright
spots. Kitty is not a depressing album, if s a
thoughtful one. No matter how sad many of
these songs appear, there's usually a softness
U� �he blow that keeps it from doing too much
damage.
By Richard Cranium
"All the world's a stage someone once
said,anditwasn'tthetruth.Ithinkitwas Elvis
in the timeless classic, "Are you Lonesome
Tonight?" Yes, so true. And then of course
there'sthepartaboutusbeingmerelyplayers,
I think Neil Peart added that in "Limelight"
Ifsamazing the thingsyou can learn fromrock
'n' roll. The point, however, is moot
Anyway, are you using your stamps of
The King? Hey look, here's a fun thing to do
with them. Paste them on the envdope and
draw a word balloon coming out of Hvis'
mouth. Then write in some lyrics form one of
hKSongs.Letrnetdlyou,itmakesgettingmail
so much more fun.
But don't talk to me about mail or Elvis. I
want to talk about those morons that always
seem to be in line in front of me. Whoa Nellie!
I was ewer at financial aid, and the gal in front
of rne had all those questionsabouthow to fill
a form out. So the patient receptionist had to
tell herthisand thatladeda, when all theding-
a-ling had to do was read the instructions! I
read mineilt'salwayssoniething.Iwas trying
topay my feesand I wasbehind a knudclehead
who was making the cashier explain the ab-
breviations for the buildings on her schedule!
Sheesh!
Iknow these people(someofrhem)aren't
trying to be idiots, but I have to think if s easy
to follow instructions sometimes. How about
thosefarty-marliesatclrive-throughsthathave
no idea what they want? How many items
does Wendy's have? I roll down the window
and holler, "Give 'ema bucket of oats
How about the post office? Is it necessary,
for thesedownstoaskhowtosend a letter first,
secxxd,third,fourthclass,e)vernight, certified
and express, when all they want to do is mail
it? Mail it you bimbo (or bimboon)! How
about this: "I want to buy a stamp Use the
machine.
I go to the bank and some dod wants to
deposit all the pennies he's saved since 1977,
unrolled. Grrr. They're everywhere, at the
phcrecompany,theutiUtiesaimmission, gro-
cery stores, and even restaurants: 1 uu � .ot
gonna charge me for the coffee are ya? The
coffee?"
Don't forget the DMV. I went there to
renew my tags the other day. Try todorhatin
an hour! You can't! Billy-Bob Bodeine will
stand at the counter for an hour trying to
convince the teller fhatitain'thisfaulthelet the
insurance on his Pacer lapse.
Maybe you haven't seen these people.
Maybe they lie in wait to jump in line in front
of me only. But maybe you have. They're
worse than car salesman. So let's band to-
gether. When you'rein lineand you see one of
these turds in line in frontofyou, too is all your
thoughts and energy on the back of his or her
head. Pretend you are boring into his or her
head. When you get there, repeat over and
over: "Die. Die. Die. Die
Helpful hint To remove mildew from a
showercurtain, pour somebleach into the tub
and runplenty of hot water. Let the curtain sit
for a while; scrub stubborn spots.





vj
��i i i m ��wmb
8 77ie Easf Carolinian
MARCH 18, 1993
'Amos and Andrew' leaves terrible aftertaste
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The next time anyone asks
why I don't want to become a film
critic when I grow up, I will cite
Amos and Andrew as the perfect
reason why I like keeping film
criticism as an avocation.
Amos and Andrew, a new film
starring Nicholas Cage and
Samue' L Jackson, left such a bit-
ter aftertaste in my mouth that it
may be a while before I volunteer
to review a marginal movie again.
I define a marginal film as
one that possesses no admirable
qualities in its credits. After being
around film for a long enough
time,one begins togetacquainted
with many of the artists respon-
sible for the film, mostly directors
and writers.
If neither the writer nor direc-
tor looks familiar, one can look at
the stars and sometimes a like-
able star can sell a film (Ground-
hogDay isan example.) Lastly, the
title may catch one's eye, perhaps
the film is a remake or maybe an
adaptation of a good novel. A
marginal film contains unremark-
able actors and no familiar artists
associated with it.
The last marginal film I re-
viewed was Hexed. If not for hav-
ing seen that piece of tripe I could
say that Amos and Andrew is the
worst film of the year. Since I have
seen both, that dubious distinc-
tion will have to be shared.
Amos and Andrew chronicles
the trials of a black professor
named Andrew Sterling (Samuel
L. Jackson)and a small time hood,
AmosO'Dell (Nicholas Cage.) The
story unfolds during one long
night on an exclusive island off
Massachusetts, which could not
have lasted any longer than the
fiH -eemed to.
during the evening Andrew
' -ling is mistaken for a thief. As
me islander (Michael Lemer) puts
it: "When you see a black man on
this island with his arms full of
stereo equipment, you know
damn good and well what he's
doing
The entire film tries to poke
fun at stereotypes yet the overall
result is a trivialization of racism
without any humor. The treat-
ment of the rich is no better. The
rich on the island all fall into the
snobbish, self-centered cliches.
One man says he won't give
Amos the keys to his car because
it was an anniversary present
from his wife. When Amos turns
to the wife to say he's sorry but
that he still needs the keys she
says, "Don't look at me, that car
was a present from his second
wife Lines like this fell sicken-
ingly flat. They sound pathetic
not witty. Rather than lampoon-
ing the stereotypes the fihn mak-
ers unwittingly accentuate them.
During the course of the
evening Amos and And rew (note
tnat even the title tries pitifully to
be creative to no avai 1) learn more
about each other and become un-
likely friends. One similarity,
which the writer and director E.
Max Frye, that they share is hay
fever. In one scene that is meant
to be touching Amos admits,
while Andrew is sneezing, that
he too suffers from the affliction,
especially fresh cut grass.
Later in the story, in an ap-
parent attempt to provide conti-
nuity, Amos falls on fresh cut
grass and begins a sneezing fit.
"See he says, "fresh cut grass
Like everything else that happens
in the film the viewer is left
scratching his head and wonder-
ing: What is the point?
Not only does the central
story fail but the minor stories are
even worse. Dabney Coleman's
police chief running for a govern-
ment office plays the bumbling
officer cum politician in a manner
reminiscent of the later Police
One more 'marginal' film for
the graveyard
ATTENTION
COMPLETE YOUR FOREIGN LANGUAGE
IN ONE SUMMER!
Department of Foreign Languages and Literature
will offer Accelerated Courses in
FRENCH and SPANISH
Summer 1993
FIRST SUMMER SESSION May 18 to June 22
French 1001 - 1002 & Spanish 1001 - 1002
SECOND SUMMER SESSION June 24 to July 30
French 1003 - 1004 & Spanish 1003 - 1004
For more information call 757-6017

-
l
Photo courtaiy Columbia Picture
Samuel Jackson and Nicholas Cage star in this social comedy flop about
a black playwright mistaken for a burglar in his own home.
Kingston
Place
Academy films. Coleman'sdeputy
(Brad Dourif) plays an even more
bumbling policeman and, if pos-
sible, is even less funny than
Coleman.
To say that 1 hated this film
weakens my feelings. I despised
everything about Amos and An-
drew.Thefilmis prime example of
the type of Hollywood mentality
exhibited in last year's The Player.
The typical producer figures
that if you combine enough trivial
elements from enough films (not
good films, mind you, just ones
that have made money) you will
produce a picture that sells. The
situation has worsened over the
years, leaving the audience to won-
der who is to blame: The produc-
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ers or the audience. The produc-
ers claim that they only make the
pictures that the audience wants
to see.
Have America's expectations
deteriorated so much that film
likeAmosandAndrewarewhatwe
expect? Perhaps sadly, it has.
Take a look at the films in
Greenville, rarely doyou see rore
than a couple films in the city
with any artistic aspirations. Most
simply are built on a trite idea so
that they have a gimmick that will
sell.
The next time a friend asks
why I do not write film reviews
for a living I will count to 10 and
try calmly to explain to themabout
Amos and Andrew.
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR
1993-94 SCHOOL YEAR
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE. FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
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GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
Thursday, March 18
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! I" 11.11
-






MARCH 18, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
Chorus Tonight
The concert choir of ECU will present a selec-
tion of contemporary choral music tonight,
March 18, in the Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall
Works in the program are: "The Garden of
the Seraglio" by Wilhelm Stenhammar;
"Five Flower Songs" by Benjamin Britten
(settings of poetry by such English poets as
Robert Herrick and George Crabbe); "Break,
Break, Break" by Ron Nelson; arrangements
of traditional American songs and spirituals by John Rutter and
L.L. Fleming; and a work by the Choir's conductor Brett Watson,
"Praise Ye the Lord
The 52-voice choir will be accompanied by pianist Carla Smith.
The ECU Concert Choir has performed in concerts and religious
services at schools, churches and cathedrals in 25 states, including
appearances in cities such as Washington, New York, Los Angeles
and San Francisco.
Dr. Watson has been twice selected for a group of 24 conductors to
conduct at the Sommerakademia-Johann Sebastian Bach in
Stuttgart, Germany.
He has also studied composition with IngolfDahl and Halsey
Stevens.
The current personnel of the ECU Concert Choir includes students
from the Carolinas, Virginia and New Jersey.
The concert will begin at 8 p.m. and is free and open
to the public.
CREATIONS
TINY MYSTEKf
Dr. Robert V. Gentry
International Recognized Authonty
OnRadiohabs
Science's Unsolved
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSE
Hendrix Threatre - 700 PM
Information: Contact Tim Turner at 752-7199
Dr. Gentry wilt present his work challenging the scientific "establishment's" view of the
theory of evolution You will be amazed at his findings. Agree or disagree, come and
hear what many want to keep quiet. Donations will be accepted.
JOIN US FOR ALL THE"
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521 Cotanche St.
757-1666
Student Academy Awards
now accepting entries
Beverly Hills, Calif. � Virgil
Grillo, chairman of the Film Stud-
ies Program at the University of
Colorado, will be the Region Four
coordinator for the Academy of
Morion Picture Arts and Sciences'
20th Annual Student Academy
Awards, which is now accepting
entries.
The competition divides the
country into seven regions; Re-
gion Four includes North Caro-
lina, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Arkansas, Georgia, Alabama,
Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana,
Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, New
Mexico, Utah and Arizona.
Students submitting films in
animation, documentary, experi-
mental or dramatic categories first
compete at the regional level.
Films winning those competitions
will be sent to the Academy as
national finalists. There they will
select the national winners.
To be eligible, films of 16mm
or larger must have been com-
pleted after April 1, 1992, in a
student-teacher relationship
within the curriculum of an ac-
credited school. All Region Four
entries must be received by Grillo
on or before5 p.m. (PST), April 1,
1993.
Finalists will be flown to Los
Angeles to participate in a week
of industry related activities and
social events.
The week culminates in the
Awards Presentation Ceremony
on June 13 at the Academy. Along
with their trophies, gold medal
winners in each of the four cat-
egories will receive $2,000, Silver
Medal winners will receive $1,500
and Bronze Medal recipients will
be awarded $1,000.
The Directors Guild of
America Student Film Award will
also be presented at the ceremony.
Students interested in enter-
ing the competition should con-
tact:
Mr. Virgil Grillo
Ms. Marci a Johnston
Film Studies Department
University of Colorado
Hunter 102
Boulder, Co. 80309-0316
(303) 492-1531
OR:
Academy of Motion Picture
Arts and Sciences
8949 Wilshire Boulevard
Beverly Hills, CA 90211
Attn: Rich Miller
(310) 247-3000
The Student Academy
Awards were established by the
Academy in 1972 to support and
encourage excellence in filmmak-
ing at the collegiate level.
Judge your success by what you
had to give up in order to get it.
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111
m
EAST
CAROLINIAN
NEW LOCATION
OPENING DOWNTOWN IN APRIL
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications
for the following positions for the
Summer and Fall of 1993:
OPINION EDITOR (Fall 1993)
LAYOUT DESIGN MANAGER
ASSISTANT LAYOUT DESIGN MANAGER
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR
PHOTO EDITOR
STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
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Applications Available At The East Carolinian
2nd Floor Student Pubs Building�757-6366
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THh PLAZA MALL CHARLES BLVD.
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Stantonsburg Rd.
MonFri. I0:00am-8pm
Saturday 9pm-6pm
757-0076





Freds Corner
UT VkEftt MTE
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By Sean Parnell
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Phoebe
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De-Composition
by Angela Paper WANG TV
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Adventures of The Wombat
By Chaisson
The World of Ghannon and Elvis
by Whiteley and Brown
TheWtafe
Acnmengte .atrretire Vaewst
xmentrd. iuv rth a 'juhi �-�
WOMBAT rybeniegBd to aambat aim
all over the Enwaid Qty or UoBwille
The WOMBAT nametake was chuser &.
the WOMBATs loyal partner ROBERT
because of the similarities between this
mar of mystery and thcee of a real
wombat ammng grace the ability to
hide m the nearest hole available ac
Robot
Tlie WOMBAT iruMtsd
mend Mways saaasi
MHMH rude ROBERT
doesn't really enter the
trry when thureidtigti!
In (aa he really doesn't
do a damn thing
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Weak nesses � i.fiwn
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read, with a snappv
retort immune t -
agarettesnxie
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An i rent master
prunaait in many arts
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Mutant power:
Beserker rage





.m - ,(�
The East Carolinian
March 18, 1993
Sports
Page 11;
Payne preparing for confrontation with North Carolina
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU basketball coach Eddie Payne is
preparing for what may be the most difficul t
game of his career. After leading the Pirates
to the CAA championship and earning a
coveted berth in the NCAA tournament,
Payne has been "rewarded" with facing the
top team in the country, the North Carolina
Tar Heels. The Tar Heels, always a national
power, are once again loaded with All-
American talent and a desire to hang an-
othernabonal championship banner in their
gym.
The Pirates have received tremendous
exposure from the sports media, as well as a
fair amountofcriticismforentering the tour-
nament with a 13-16 record. East Carolina, a
virtual unknown to national basketball com-
petition, is competing in "the Big Dance" for
the first time since 1972.
Payne said the media exposure ECU
basketball has received from ESPN and other
outlets will tremendously affect the market-
ability of the school, but facing North Caro-
lina in the first round may prove to be a little
daunting to his team.
'It's good for the program, but hard for
the team Payne said. "It's important to get
this kind of exrxsure,butit'sdifficultcri this
teamtoplaysuchagreatteam thematchups
for NorthCarolina are probably worse than
any other team, plus they have so much
depth
Payne said that facing UNC would be
difficult in many different aspects, espe-
cially penetrating their aggressive traps and
overplaying defense.
"Their style of play, the way they trap,
makes things very difficult he said. "It's
not just that they trap you, it's that they trap
you from so many different angles, most
people don't play that way North Caro-
lina traps you everywhere so it's a tough,
tough deal You gotta make plays against
athletic guys who are also big. How to attack
and handle their defense is the biggest con-
cern
Payne said he hopes his team's defen-
sive effort will be able to force UNC to shoot
from the outside, but even though he is
concerned with the Tarheels' inside game,
he is more concerned with their team phi-
losophy.
"The system, the things they do, that's
the focus. You can't really worry about one
person Payne said.
The Heels have been suspect from the
perimeter in past games and this has worked
against them. Payne's Pirates must attempt
to contain the inside production of Tar Heel
center EricMontrosswhilehoping Carolina's
guards are inconsistent from the perimeter.
"(Defensively)you havetogiveup some
things, you can't play mem straight up.
You're going to have to make some conces-
sions and hope that maybe they won't ex-
ecute as well or have a bad night shooting.
You gotta give up something
Payne said the incredible CAA victory
over James Madison toenter the tournament
has done wonders for the team's self-es-
teem, but doesnot believe thattheunderdog
statusprovidedtothembytheirlosingrecord
willgivethemanyadvantagesin Thursday's
game against the Tar Heels.
"We definitely don't mink of ourselves
as losers, we won the championship, so that
image is something that's been wiped out.
That's something we've been trying to do
with this program for quite some time. But I
can't see us having any kind of advantages
against North Carolina. What we've accom-
Eddie Payne, head
coach of the ECU
men's basketball
team, prepares his
troops for possibly
the toughest game
since the end of
the Duke-ECU
series.
plished does create some advantages and
some positive effects on us
Competing against Dean Smith, the
legendary coach of the Tar Heels, is not a
new experience for Payne. As a player at
Wake Forest University and an assistant
coach at South Carolina, Payne has com-
peted against Smith before, experiences that
have brought him a deep respect for the
coach. Payne said, despite this respect, he
will approach this game like he does any
other.
"It is an honor (to coach against Smith)
cause I have a great deal of respect for him,
but it'snot somethingyou really think about.
As a player people used to ask me what I
thought about playing against ('70s N.C.
State star) David Thompson, who in that era
was like Michael Jordan in this era, the best
player in the country. I remember telling
them 'If I sit there and wonder about how
great he is, how will that help me?' You
respect people but you don't hold them in
awe, otherwise you Tl get paralyzed and not
be able to do anything
Payne doesn't see this "Big Dance" ap-
pearanceasaone-shotdeal,andisoptimistic
about the future success of Pirate basketball.
Photo by Bift Ranson
Payne said he hopes this tournament ap-
pearance, regardless of the outcome, will
create new student excitement about the
program.
"I just hope that this is the beginning of
a process to create a terrific basketball atmo-
sphere here at East Carolina. Basketball
games and the atmosphere they create are a
lot of fun and the students have an awful lot
to do with that I'd just like to get this pro-
gramtobe an exciting event, and something
for everyone to really get involved in. If
students turn out, we'll be a lot better as a
team and a program
This play at
second
base was
much
closer than
the game.
Pitcher
Richie
Blackwell
shut down
the visitors
from
Hartford.
Photo by
Bift Ranson
! (Watkins drives in five runs
ECU whips Hartford, 10-2
j&y Michael Albuquerque
taff Writer
Pat Watkins went 4-4 with a
tjbuble, two home runs and five
I RBIs, and Richie Blackwell struck
� 6ut nine in seven and one-third
innings as East Carolina (15-6)
defeated Hartford (3-2) in college
baseball action Tuesday at Har-
rington Field.
The Pirates fell behind 1-0 in
the first inning when Blackwell
3r0) surrendered a two-out home
�Jjn to right-center by Steve
fatthews, bu t quickly countered
vsjjth two runs of their own in the
bottom of the first on a run-scor-
ing double by Lee Kushner and a
R51 single by Watkins.
I "I thought a very big point in
trfe game was the fact that after
wje fell behind 1-O,ourhittersdid
aigood job making run produc-
n and manufacturing runs by
getting runners in scoring posi-
tipn ECU Head Coach Gary
QVerton said.
I The Pirates added to their
fed in the third and fourth in-
gs with a manufactured run
Jamie Borel and an RBI triple
Heath Clark. Watkins fol-
ed with two home runs on
consecutive at bats as he knocked
a 4hree-run blast in the fifth to
chjase starter Brian Wood (0-1)
ard added a solo shot in the
eighth.
"I'm seeing the balI real well,
nd I was just trying to make
contact and hit it hard some-
where Watkins said. "The first
pitch was a curve ball, and the
second was a change up he said.
"I was a little out front on it. That's
why I got up under it a little bit.
Luckily, I hit it well enough to get
out
Two batters later, Chad
Triplett hit a two-run homer
down the left field line to end the
scoring for the Pirates.
The run support proved to be
more than enough for Blackwell,
who threw 118 pitches on the day.
After surrendering the first in-
ning homer he did not allow an-
other hit until a leadoff single in
the eighth.
"My curveball wasn't hitting
on too much so I went mainly
with my fastball and slider
Blackwell said.
"In the fifth and sixth inning
my arm felt pretty gcad, but I
knew once I reached my pitch
limit he (Overton) was going to
take me out
"At that time, we wl-p reluc-
tant tosend him back out because
he wasover the number of pitches
he had thrown throughout the
year Overton said. "Yet, he was
cruising along so we gave him
another inning. He started to tire
so we pretty much felt that we
had to get him out
The Pirates next game will be
today at 3 p.m. against Marist at
Harrington Field.
Due to inclement weather.
East Carolina's baseball game
with Marist scheduled for
Wednesday was postponed and
will be played today at 2 p.m.
Also, ECU's softball game
with Yaleon Wednesdayhas been
cancelled and a make-up date has
not yet been announced.
Hartford100OOO010-2
East Carolina.20113003x10
HARTFORDabrhblbb�o
Ruaaall. II300002
Qarvin, pMf100001
Laonard cf30000t
MaHnaws, 2b311100
Franeasconi, 300012
MM401001
Walaca, rf401001
Sravakis. aa400001
FiUpatrick. lb301000
Zatucki. pr010000
Ryan, 1b100001
Tobar.sb300002
Shanlay. 3b000000
Tola).32241113
Batting2BHilt. HR: Matthews (1)
Flaking E:Hit 2Matthaws.
Baaarunntng-Taiam LOB: 6.
EASTCAROUNAah r hhihh
Bona.cf4 2 2000
Hwd.ph-H1 0 1000
Fadek.sa4 1 1102
Wast. 3b4 1 0011
Kushnar. 1b4 0 2t00
Obhdt4 1 0001
Watkins. rf4 3 4500
Cronan, c3 1 0000
Patarj e0 0 0000
Triplatt. Il-if4 1 1201
Clark. 2b3 0 11a0
Total.35 10 1210is
Batting � 2B: Kushnar, Watkins 3B: Clark
HR: Watkins 2 (8.9). Triplatt (1). 8F: Fsdak.
Baaanmnmg�8B:Borsl2 (8.9) CS: Walton.
Taam LOB: 5
Raiding - E: Head
HARTFORO
Wood (L. 0-1)
Donahua
Polakowski
EAST CAROLiNA"
2.3
1
m bb ao
0 0 0
3 0 1
Black wail (W. 3-0)
leh
ac bb ao
7.3
1.7
HBP: Matthews and laonard by Blackwatl. Crorwn
and Clark by Polakowski PB: Hilt.
GAME DATA � T: 2 37 A: 131 Tamp: 58
UMPIRES � HP: Kannady 2B: Bamjrr,
Bloom surrounds himself
with success at East Carolina
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Charles Bloom, ECU's sports
information director, is a man who
likes to surround himself with suc-
cess. A glance at his office walls,
lined with service awards and
plaques, reveals a shrine con-
structed to remind
him of the value of
hard work and self-
motivation.
Bloom, in his
fifth year as sports
information direc-
tor, is the
university's liaison
to the media for
ECU's many ath-
letic programs. He
is in charge of set-
ting up media in-
terviews with play-
ers and coaches, keeping statisti-
cal data on Pirate games, and keep-
ing the media informed of ECU
athletic events. Given the size and
emphasis of East Carolina's ath-
letic department, Bloom's job is
no easy task.
Charles Bloom
His office's decor includes a
merit award for work at the 1984
Olympics in Los Angeles, a book-
case filled with the biographies of
successful business figures and
sports personalities,and textbooks
on the art of public relations and
media management. There is a
"Young Man of the Year" award
on one side of his
desk, balanced by
photographs of
Bloom standing next
to Robert Jones and
Tom Scott on the
other. Directly across
from his aesk, next
to his degree from the
University of South
Carolina, is a script
of Bear Bryant's
speech, "What It
Takes to be Number
One
Bloom entered his field while
in college at the University of Ne-
vadaat Las Vegas,wnere he served
as editor of his college newspa-
per. When a friend told him of an
opening in the sports information
department, Bloom began work
there as a student assistant. Bloom
participated through his sophorj
more year until he transferred to'
South Carolina and entered theiC,N,
department. i
When his superior at South I
Carolina moved to Louisiana State i
to head the sports information pro-
gram there, he drafted Bloom asj
his assistant. Bloom left LSU 18"
months later to become an associ- 1
ate sports information director a�a
Ole Miss, where he prepared for"
13 months to gain the head posi- j
tion at ECU.
Bloom's professional life is a
world of numbers and statistics.
In media conferences, when re-
porters need to know who played
second base on the 1973 all-star
team, Bloom is quick with a name,
and sometimes even a batting av
erage to go with it. Bloom smile
at this ability, to him it is all in a
day's work.
"I'm a historian Bloom said!
"My job says that I'm the histOr
rian. I look at my job as: I service
the press corps, whatever they
See BLOOM page 12
Hoosier may take the title once more
NCAA tournament might copy
preseason NIT
(AP) � Plenty of people will feel foolish after
spending three weeks filling in those too-small
NCAA tournament grids only to arrive at a result
that appeared in newspapers last Nov. 27.
That was when Indiana beat Seton Hall 78-74 in
New York to win the Preseason NIT champion-
ship. The Hoosiers will turn the trick again April 5
in New Orleans, this time to secure the postseason
national championship. The score might even be
the same. But present on the stage this time, al-
though well in the background, will be Georgia
Tech and North Carolina.
We're getting ahead of ourselves.
It was only Sunday that the NCAA tournament
selection committee, after much scratching of its
collective scalp, came up with the 64-team field.
Exactly what caused the members so much discom-
fort isn't clear, since 30 teams from various confer-
ences are automatic qualifiers and the committee
claims to have an 84-step process that enables it to
determine the 34 other worthies.
That sounds like 83 steps too many. Because
any time Bob Knight has one hand guiding a very
good basketball team and the other free to keep his
foot a good distance from his mouth, it can only
mean one thing: the man expects to hang another
championship banner at Assembly Hall. Meaning
this will be a year when whoever the NCAA invites
to fill out the backdrop doesn't much matter.
That's not to say it will be easy � even though
Knight himself should find the going much easier
than last year. Some people you worry about when
they get loud; with Knight you worry about when
he is quiet. And to get this team to play well, he
won't have to resort to bul 1 whips, cerebral reversal,
Anticipatory Muscular-Visual Conditioning, or any
of the other bizarre training regimens he rambled
on about needing to prepare last year's team. And
unless he plans to do the surgery on Alan
Henderson's knee, there isn't even much tinkering
left for Knight to do.
Much like the famous scene from the movie "El
Cid the Hoosiers will have to figure out a way to
prop up Henderson to make it look like he's ready
for battle. They will need at least the threat of his
defensive presence � mainly as a shot-blocking
threat � on a few occasions to get through the.
Midwest. But that's about it.
See TOURNAMENT page 13
?

v





12 The East Carolinian
BLOOM
MARCH 18, 1993
need, I find out for them. There's
some things that you look up so
many times that you memorize;
like how many yards )eif Blake
threw tor dur- "
mg his senior
year, I've typed
it st) manv
times; I think its
3,073, but I'm
not really posi-
tive about that
(Aglanceinthe
1992 Pirate
football media
guide proves
Bloom correct).
You just do it
so many times
it becomes old
hat
Bloom, a
sports enthusi-
ast since early
childhood,
finds this stat
.here at East
Carolina, we have to
do so much more for
our student athletes
than a Florida State
or a Miami we
have to make more
phone calls and send
more letters because
people just don't
know about us.
Charles Bloom
keeping the easy facet of his job,
but not the part he enjoys most.
Bloom said it is working with the
student-athletes at the university
that makes him happiest, despite
the difficulties he faces while ECU
strives for a higher profile in ath-
letic circles.
"We'vejustgot so many great
people in our organization in
terms of our student athletes. It's
such a pleasure to work for them.
When Robert
Jones was here,
his freshman
year was mv
first year here,
when it became
known that he
was going to be
pretty good I
worked with
him very
closely for four
years and Jeff
Blake; what a
super human
being. Success
reallydidn'tgo
to his head like
it would have
for a lot of
people. . . here
at East Caro-
lina, we have to do so much more
for our student athletes than a
Florida State or a Miami. . . we
have to make more phone calls
and send more letters because
people just don't know about us.
To me Jeff Blake was the best
plaver in college football his se-
nioryear.ltwasjustdifficulttoget
people to see that
Bloom said he feelsone aspect
of the work his office does with
ECU's student-athletes is just as
important to their careers as what
they do academically: teaching
them communication skills.
"When recruits come here, I
talk to them and tell them that
through my office you do one of
the most important things in your
life, and that's communicate. You
could be the best scientist, the best
writer, the best golfer; but if you
can't communicate with other
people you're going to fail
Bloom said he has faced frus-
tration over seeing ECU players
lose awards to other players solely
from their school's bigger football
reputations. He lists Robert Jones'
loss of the Lombardi award to a
Michigan player as a prime ex-
ample.
"It's real tough to break this
ss
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because you've got people out
there who have never heard of
East Carol ina. In my office we have
to do a hard sell, we have to send
all the personal letters and make
all the phone calls, that a Miami
may not have to. We have to do
anything we can. But it's getting a
little easier
Bloom lists possible confer-
ence affiliation as an important
development for ECU's national
publicity.
He feels that a future expan-
sion of the Big East may include
East Carolina, which would pro-
vide the football program with
schedulingsecuri ty, improved re-
cruiting and better opportunities
for bowl appearances.
Bloom said that basketball, the
other high-revenue sport at this
university, must pick up the pace
to keep track.
"We need the student body to
come toour home games, we need
Continued from page 11
alumni to follow us around to away
games. If people want a big-time
basketball program its going to
take a commitment from every-
body I think the commitments
already been made in football, but
basketball just needs to step it upa
notch (This interview was con-
ducted before the Pirates' CAA
championship and resulting
NCAA berth). 6
Bloom said the exciting na-
ture of ECU athletics makes sell-
ingtheuniversity'sathleticsmuch
easier, particularly the football
program. He said he believes this
dramatic tendency, combined with
the loyalty of local fans will push
ECU into a higher level of success.
"Last year we were 5-6 and we
still brokeattendance records. You
can always bring them in when
you win, but what are you going
to do when you stumble? It's easy
to follow a winner, it's easy to
stand in line to buy Peach Bowl
tickets, butwill people waitin line
to buy rickets to see a 5-6 football
team? I hope that our fans will
continue to answer the call
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v,
The East Carolinian
C A CT is currently accepting
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ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
This job entails prospecting new clients, selling cre-
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advertising clients. Reguirements: Minimum 2.0
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CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer designed adver-
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contrast and focal point. Requirements'
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working
knowledge of Macintosh
applications; PageMaker, Freehand,
QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
This job entails managing all aspects of
the Advertising Department including
hiring, training and managing the
sales staff and Creative Director.
Requirements:
Minimum 2.5 G.P.A. and at least one
semester as a print media Account
Executive Open to all majors.
Spring Break may be over but
you can still break away!
$12 is all you pay
along the Black River in a day!
Saturday, March 21
Sampson County, NC is the destination for a
scenic canoe ride along the Black River.
Spanish moss and Cypress trees dominate the
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meeting held March 24 at 5:00 pm in BD101
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Friday, April 2-Sunday, April 4
With over 10,000 acres of wilderness, you'll
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For more details regarding Adventure Programs offered by Recreational
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TOURNAMENT
MARCH 18, 1993
Continued from page 11
Indiana's strongest challenge
figures to come from two-time
defending champion Duke in the
regional finals at St. Louis. Given
Knight's considtrable history
with former disciple Mike
Krzyzewski, the game will fea-
ture two teams that are mirror-
images of one another � motion
offense and man-to-man defense
� and two coaches who could be
� if you used a funhouse mirror.
Knight will still like what he sees
when it's over. And from there,
it's just a short ride down the Mis-
sissippi River to New Orleans,
where Indiana will dispose of East
region winner North Ca rolina and
then Seton Hall.
But we're getting ahead of
ourselves again. To recap:
North Carolina will win the
anemic East and the only person
bruised will be Dean Smith. The
North Carolina coach will have
reached another Final Four only
to be turned awav again � and
this yea r not even on the ballot for
coach of the vear. Again.
In the VVest, all the hand-
wringing about making Michigan
the top seed in Arizona's back-
yard will turn out to have been
wasted energy. Late-charging
Georgia Tech will overtake what-
ever Michigan's collection of
young roosters is calling itself
these days, then crawl past
Vanderbilt.
No doubt, Seton Hall will
have the hardest road to the Final
Four. The Hall will have to muffle
AnferneeHardaway of Memphis
State and then sedate frenetic
Florida State, no easy duet. Then
comes Kentucky. Then goes Ken-
tucky. Then Georgia Tech.
Thescenario Knight is dream-
ing up, except for the trophv pre-
sentation at the end, might be very
different. No matter. He's appar-
ently been dreaming up a lot of
scenarios.
Ashis team left the floor Sun-
day after beating Wisconsin 87-80
in the final Big Ten Conference
game of the season, Knight
stopped to talk with Wisconsin
coach Stu Jackson.
"Coach Knight came over to
me and sa id he knew the NIT was
going to invite us Jackson re-
called, "so that's a reliable
source
At this time of year, there's
none better.
TEC would like to thank senior center Ike
Copeland, point guard Ronnell Peterson,
and forward James Lewis for their efforts at
ECU. Good luck against the Tarheels.
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Friday, March 19,1993
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 18, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 18, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.930
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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