The East Carolinian, March 16, 1993






The Dance!
Pirates waltz
their way
into NCAA
Tournament.
See story page 11.
May flowers
B' . s first s
oum flourishes with
musical talent but
lacks strong Is.
story page 7.
Si
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h: 55
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, Riiiny
High: 62�




East Carolinian
ol.68No. I(
Circulation I2.IMM
(Ireenville, North Carolii
i;i
Tuesday, March 16, l�M
14 Pages
Tuition increase waits
in General Assembly
;�.
StaffWriter lina u
eneral Assem- shall beal ral
entto iii! p
and
- : n f t-lv 24 Sei ��
CAA Champs!
uttii ini
l

th.
phased in over four v� arstobe ompletedb
the W-?
ieral Assembl
findsthatthe tuition policv both for under-
graduates and graduates, and both for resi-
' i �
begin Martin ofluill
mendationsoftl
Audit Committee
that I students currenth pa
cent of the cost nfet1iic.il en, th
founder (it Ihe i mmittei i I ident lu-
ition i(61 , heid .1 pre;
dentsand nonresidents needstobereexam- March 4 to comment on the bill
terence on
ined.
"S B J94 is more acceptable than the
origin
tint now toa �) no in-
creases in tin tui lion rates in amendments
een said. "We an oking for assur-
ancesthat then hespenl forfii
"I ndergraduate resident students
should paj at least sixteen percent oi the
educational and general costs of the aver-
age cost of undergraduate education
Forgraduatestudents,thebill requires
the Board of Governors of the University of rial aid and capita 1 suchast
North Carolina to levelop higher tuition novations ensaid.
rates tor graduate and professional pro
Campus mail stolen
from delivery truck
Staff Writi
St(
� ' get to the mail thai w
" I lie mail was apparently sti
nevordersai
� : � known pi t of A - '� e thefl
sonstoli ffol a.i
a truck ; 11 - � nes Hall. Ihe
fra) marl ' s destined
for Tyli I was stolen berwei ' ted
' " ' ' ' ' � ed that person toe, t.lordai
e pel
had tohavi . 11 , 4
The 1993
CAA
Champion
ECU
Pirate
players
celehrate
the long-
awaited
final
54-49
victory
over
James
Madison
University.
Photo by
Bift Ransom
L
Spring Break
Photo by (Jan Reed
Man students opted nol to spend their Spring Break at the bea h. These students hose horsebai k
riding in Ashevilie, N.
National academic team
chooses ECU student
ECU expansion delayed by state legislature
-
Assistai
E(
I) i t
lu in pur, I.
-
Pitl
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
1t senior (lillian A- -
was recently sele ted for the All
liege cademi ream
This team is , omprised of stu-
dents from around the nation
chosen by the USA Today news-
paper foi their outstanding a ,1
demk and intellectual end
1 irs
I rom a field of nominees
numbering 1,342, L SA lodt
formed three teams te,
studentseach Ashley anEnglish
1 from i ayetteville, was se-
I to the publication's Third
I earn
� sure how it hap-
! but I f
Ashley said. " Io apply for the
team, you have to write about
. ement, so

Gillian Ashlev,
a senior
majoring in
English, was
nominated to
be on the All
USA College
Academic
Team.
��'
�� therfanl�

ard .1thev w� and Roslvn shle ot
"�hei fa

�.1


, �A( I1 1l .4





2 The East Carolinian
MARCH 16, 1993
State community colleges will see new changes
By Jason Williams
Condoms get rated at university
Northern Illinois University's health center distributed
35,000 condoms to be judged by students for "appearance,
sensualnesscomfort, smell, taste, lubrication and sense of secu-
rity butnot everyone was pleased by TheGreat Condom Rating
Contest. Health officials said the Feb. 22-26 event was supposed
to promote safe sex and AIDSawareness.Butcritics said itsimply
promoted behavior that spread disease and charged that the
contest literature may have misrepresented the condoms failure
rate among college-age users. "We copied the idea directly from
Stanford said contest coordinator Michael Haines of Health
Services. "The contest provides feedback so we can find out
student preferences, while we give them educational materials
discussing risks
Ban on hate speech dropped
The University of Connecticut has dropped a ban against
fighting words in its student code of conduct because of its
vagueness, officials said. The section on fighting words "created
a false sense of hope and expectations that regulations could be
used to keep people from behaving improperly, which isn't
true said university spokesman Richard Vielleux. "It was a
setup for failure because ittakesout the educational component,
saying that by inference, people could be using rulings to regu-
late behavior, and not education. Vielleux said there was no
controversy on campus about dropping the ban on fighting
words, which had been invoked five times in the past three years.
Four cases were upheld, and one case was denied.
Students unclog drains, change bulbs
How many students does it take to install a light bulb? It
depends on how well trained they are in American University's
dormitory maintenance program. A problem arose when stu-
dents living in campus housing complained that it took too long
to get simple work requests taken care of, such as fixing ceiling
tiles, changing light bulbs, unclogging stopped-up sinks and
applying touch-up paint. The Residence Hall Association and
administrators worked together to come with the idea of a
student maintenance crew, which started work Feb. 1. Currently
18 students work 20 hours a week doing minor jobs at the
residence halls in exchange for free housing in a double room and
tuition assistance.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Staff Writer
Following the recommenda-
tions of a recent report from the
Government Performance Audit
Committee (GPAC), North
Carolina's Community College sys-
tem will be undergoing some
changes in the near future.
In a meeting held February
11, the State Board of Community
Colleges imposed a moratoriumon
the establishmentof new campuses
or satellite centers for the Commu-
nity College system.
The Board, in combination
with community college presidents
and trustees, must now develop'
new guidelines for building new
colleges, and expanding existing
campuses.
According to Board Chair-
man William F. Simpson, the De-
partment of Community Colleges
will
'draft clear and firm guide-
lines which recognize the avail-
ability of technology and trans-
portation, locateany new facilities
to minimize theimpacton existing
colleges,campusesor centers, and
that apply regional program shar-
ing principles
In their December 1992 re-
port, GPAC expressed a concern
that community colleges were be-
ing established and opened with-
out any guiding criteria to govern
their proliferation.
Growing out of that same
GPAC report are two bills intro-
duced to the North Carolina State
Senate on February 19 concerning
tuition for community colleges.
S.B.270directs the State Board
of Community Colleges to develop
a tuition policy that "limits tuition
to less than one-fifth of the per
capita funding for community
collegesS.B. 272 requires that tu-
ition be set at "approximately
twenty percent or the cost of ed uca-
tion The bill also provides for tu-
ition "to be increased proportion-
ately when the cost of education
justifies an increase in tuition
GPAC found that although
students at community colleges
currently pay 19.2 of the cost of
education, the second lowest rate
in the nation, they still pay a larger
relative share of the cost of educa-
tion tan students at UNC system
universities.
As a result, the two Senate
bills will keep community college
tui tion at close to the current level
for now. As the cost of education
increases; however,tuition may go
up as well.
The Senate isnow consider-
ing another GPAC recommenda-
tion that would raise the tuition
rates of the 16-member UNC sys-
tem, including ECU. Since, on av-
erage, UNC system students cur-
rently pay 10.9 of the cost of
education, GPAC suggested in-
creasing that percentage to 16 to
19.
� StateNews
Smoking rules vary
in state buildings
RALEIGH (AP) � The execu-
tive director of the State Employees
Association of North Carolina says
hisofficehasnot received many com-
plaints about the lack of a consistent
smoking policy in state government.
"We are not getting the com-
plaints that weused togetaboutthese
restrictionsand prohibitionson smok-
ing Bob Beriam said. "1 think the
whole issue of passive smoking has
hit home with a lot of people, and I
think there's a realization mat this is
something that's happening all over
the place. So there hasn't been the
passion of the past
Beriam would like for all em-
ployees to be treated the same, how-
ever.
"We would love to have a con-
sistent policy, but I don't think we are
going to take it on as an issue
At least some smokers think it's
unfair thatthere'snostatewidesmok-
ingpoUcy,TheHerald-SunofDurham
&P"5ftpk
HOTTEST
SK7T
IN
iTCrWNM!
COME EARLY -
DOORS OPEN
AT 9:00 pm
'1.00 NIGH1
fEDNESDA'
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FOR LADIES
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:00 PM
m&m
LADIES
NIGHT
WEDNESDAY
LADIES
GET IN
FREEH
OPEN
iUNDAYi
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$1.00
IIGHTW
f$'l
NGHTCLUI
EVERY WEDNESDAY
USiC STE
LIVE BAND
Tots o' Green Stuff for the Irish at Hearth
$1.00 MIXED DRINK SPECIALS
)0 BOTTLE DOMESTICS & DRAFT $1.00
HURSDAY. MARCH 1
OPEN
tUNDAYi
$1.00
DRINKS
$1.00
70VEI
iATURDA
�irst Annual
lusical Sho
case
IVE BflND
Friday, march
TKE USUA
(Awesome Cover Band)
larch 17tl
Green Beer
for the Irisl
it Hearty
SATURDAY. MARCH 20
"MUG SHOTS FIRST MUSICAL SHOWCASE"
MONTH OF SUNDAYS,
HAT, � THE BETTIES
(alternativewinners of Music Stew)
$1.00 Night On Sunday�No Cover For Members
reported Sunday.
State Agriculture Commis-
sioner Jim Graham, for instance, can
light up one of his big cigars in his
office and puff away.
Bu t state employees who work
in the Labor Buildingnext door to the
Agriculture Building can't do the
samebecausetheirbuildingissmoke-
free. "IthinkifonebuiJdingdoesitJt
ought to be a standard thing said
Ernestine Hill, a Revenue Depart-
ment employee who was taking a
smoking break Friday outside that
building.
Hill would like designated
smoking areas inside state govern-
ment buildings, an approach that
Gov. Jim Hunt said he favors.
"The governor's view is that
there ought to be an indoor area set
aside for smokers, one that would
not intrude on the rights of non-
smokers Hunt spokeswoman
Rachel Perry said.
golden
corral'
STEAKS, BUFFET & BAKERY
Golden Choice Buffet
with carved meats nightly
$5.19
Weekend Buffet Breakfast
$4.49
present school I.D. and receive a
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504 SW Greenville Blvd.
25th ANNUAL SPRING
BIKINI CONTEST
Thursday, March 18th
Admission $2 Members $4 Quests
�����H PRIZES HHBH
1st Place $200 CfiSH
2nd Place $100 CfiSH
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�Mi DRINK SPECIfiLSHHH
$3.00 PITCHERS
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75 100 M.P.H. SHOTS
i'fit '�





MARCH 16, 1993
National News
The East Carolinian 3
Deaths reach 112 in the aftermath of nationwide blizzard
(AP) � Blizzard victims were
found dead in snowdrifts as the East
Coaststruggled todigoutand getto
work Monday. The death toll
reached at least 112, and dozens of
youngsters on a hiking trip were
missing in the wilderness.
Bitter cold hampered snow-
plow crews and motorists trying to
clear roads and free ice-encrusted
cars.
"As soon as the highways
open, I'moutof here. Idon'tcareif I
have to dig the whole parking lot
out said Chris McCade, a student
from Wayne State University in De-
troit who was stranded at a Charles-
ton, VV.Vahotel on his way tospring
break in Key West, Fla.
Thestorm hit Florida with tor-
nadoeson Friday and pushed up the
coast with hurricane-force winds
Saturday, wrecking seaside homes.
As much as 4 feet of snow fell, and
winds piled drifts 15 feet high.
"It looks like something ou t of
'Dr. Zhivago said Rooks Boynton
of Clarkston, Ga. "Nothing's mov-
ing out there
Rescuers used helicopters,
front-end loaders and four-wheel-
drive vehicles to reach scores of hik-
ers and travelers. About 100 hikers
hunkered down in sheltersand tents
in the mountains of East Tennessee,
where the rescue was suspended
until daybreak Monday, and dozens
of suburban Detroityoungsters were
missing in the North Carolina wil-
derness, a full day after the storm
passed through.
Ray Carson, a spokesman for
Cranbrook Kingswood UpperSchool
in Bloomfield Hills, Mich said park
� rangers had rescued abouthalfof the
122-person school group and had
maps showing the planned routes of
the others.
"We'd like to go in, but we're
still impassable here said Frank
Findley, an assistant ranger in the
Nantahala National Forest. "They're
justbarelyabletomove.Wejusthope
they stay put until we can get to
them
In Ala bama, an elderly woman
was found dead in the snow on a
neighbor's porch, and the body of a
69-year-old man was found a few
feet from his apartment door. A 77-
year-old man was found frozen to
death near Kittanning, Pa.
Dozensofpeoplesuffered heart
attacks while shoveling snow.
It was thedeadliest blizzard to
strike the United States since one in
January 1966 that killed 165 people.
After the snow let up, rain and
brutal cold turned it into rock-hard
ice. "It's not just carrying it away
New York City Sanitation Commis-
sioner Emily Lloyd said of the
cleanupNow it'schippingand ear-
ning it away
At New Jersey's Newark Air-
port, travelers frustrated by delays
jumped on ticket counters and
shouted obscentities Sunday.
Fistfights broke out. No immediate
arrests were made.
"I'm spending all my vacation
money in Newark, New Jersev
Linda Kyrzycki grumbled as she
awaited a flight to the Florida Keys.
Schools were closed across a
wide area Monday. Nearly 1 million
util ity customers had no power Sun-
day; many had no heat, either.
Interstate highways were be-
ing cleared, but many smaller roads
remained impassable. In Alabama,
where Birmingham got a record 13
inchesofsnow, highway official Mike
Mahaffey said the state had no more
than five snowplows.
Several hundred motorists
spent Saturday night in two tunnels
alongthe Virginia-West Virginia line.
Storm-related deaths were re-
ported in 17states, with 26 in Florida,
19 in Pennsylvania, 14 in New York,
eight in Tennessee and seven in Ala-
bama.
Three people died, four were
missingand three were rescued after
a Honduran freighter sank in stormy
seas off Florida.
In Cuba, at least three people
died and many homes were de-
stroyed, the Cuban news agency
Prensa La tina reported. Havana was
blacked out.
Fourstorm-relateddeathswere
reported in Canada as the storm
headed out to sea Sunday.
The storm also spun off a tor-
nado that destroyed more than 200
homes in Reynosa, near the Texas
border, the Mexican news agency
Notimex reported.
At least 18 homes were swept
out to sea on New York's Long Is-
land. Four were close to collapse on
Nan tucket in Massachusetts. About
200 homes along the North Carolina
coast were damaged.
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4 The East Carolinian
MARCH 16, 1993
National News
Feds shine bright lights on cult compound
WACO, Texas (AP) � Sta-
dium-style spotlights lit the for-
tified compound ea-ly Monday
where a religious cult has been
holed up for more than two
weeks, a new tactic by federal
agents trying to end the standoff.
Agents set up the lights Sun-
day, the same day cult members
unfurled a banner saying, "FBI
Broke Negotiations We Want
Press
Authorities would not com-
ment on the use of lights, but said
telephone talks with sect mem-
bers continued.
"We're still maintaining
contact with them FBI agent Al
Cruz said.
The lights illuminated the
movement of unarmed tanks
posted outside the Branch
Davidian sect's 77-acre com-
pound, which has been sur-
rounded since gun battles Feb.
28 that killed four federal agents
and at least two cult members.
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco
and Firearms wanted tc anest
cult leader David Koresh for d-
leged weapons violations and
search the compound for illegal
guns.

Four
adults and 21
children have
left the com-
pound. Eighty-
eight adults and
17 children re-
main inside.
Over the
weekend, at
least three cult
members asked
authorities
what charges they would face if
they surrendered, FBI agent Bob
Ricks said.
"It indicates a very favor-
able sign when people are talk-
ing about what types of charges
are going to be filed, 'Where will
I go, will I have an attorney ap-
We are constantly
doing things on a
daily basis that try
to impart to Mr.
Koresh the serious-
ness that we attach
to this process, "
Bob Ricks,
FBI Agent
pointed for me' and so forth
Ricks said.
But he said there was no
indication that an end to thesiege
was near.
Koresh, a
doomsday
prophet who has
multiple "wives"
among cult mem-
bers, has said he
is Jesus Christ.
Followers call
themselves.
"Koreshians
Early in the
siege, Koresh and
cult members
were able to speak
with reporters by telephone.
Later, phone use was limited to
incoming calls from authorities.
On the sixth day, electricity
was cut off, according to an at-
torney for one of the women who
left the compound. The bright
lights were the latest effort to put
pressure on the cult.
"We are constantly doing
things on a daily basis that try to
impart to Mr. Koresh the seri-
ousness that we attach to this
process Ricks said.
Last week, the cult put up a
sign seeking contact with news
reporters.
But authorities said isolat-
ing the sect was a key to ending
the standoff.
On the third day of the siege,
Koresh broke a promise to sur-
render after the FBI arranged for
a religious message he taped to
be broadcast on radio.
A woman who left the com-
pound Friday, Kathy Schroeder,
spent 30 minutes on the phone
Sunday telling those inside "the
only way to get the truth told is
for everyone to come out alive
said her attorney, Scott Peterson.
"She believes the FBI is sin-
cere in (its) efforts to reach a
peaceful end Peterson said.
ACADEMIC
Continued from page 1
returned to Scotland for a year in
college to study Medieval and Re-
naissance studies Ashley said.
Ashley is a University
Scholar, and a member of Sigma
Tau Delta, an honor society for
English majors.
She enjoys reading roman-
tic poetry, Victorian novels, and
contemporary fiction. In her spare
time she ta kes a pottery class. "I'm
not very good with the clay, but I
really enjoy it Ashley said.
Ashley will graduate in May,
and plans to attend graduate
schrol. "I would someday like to
teacn English at the university
level Ashley said.
This is the second time in
three years that an ECU student
was chosen for the USA Today
Academic Team. Chemistry ma-
jor Rebecca Denson of Grifton was
selected to the First Team in 1990.
MAIL
Continued from page 1
Public Safety offices to provide
further information.
"This information is neces-
sary for us to investigate the case
any further Knox said.
Knox asks that anyone who
was expecting any checks, credit
cards or money from home and
has yet to receive them to please
contact Lt. Jordan. He also asks
that any other individuals with
any information on the matter to
please contact either Public Safety
or Crimestoppers.
The number for ECU Public
Safetv is 757-6150; Crimestoppers
758-7777.
A reward may be paid to in-
formants if an arrest is made in the
matter.
Theft of mail constitutes a
federal offense, but Knox said that
Postal Master has allowed ECU
jurisdiction so far in the case.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
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Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
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Now Accepting Applications for the
Academic Year 1993-94.
The following positions are available:
SGA ATTORNEY GENERAL
SGA PUBLIC DEFENDER
HONOR & REVIEW BOARD
MEMBER
All applicants will be screened by the SGA Executive Council.
REQUIREMENTS:
2.0 Grade Point Average.
Good Standing with the University.
Applications Available At:
Dean of Students Office (209 Whichard)
Secretary's Office (255 Mendenhall Student Center)
Attorney General's Office (236 Mendenhall Student Center)
DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS:
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�TheEastCarolinian
March 16, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5

�f�
1BR APARTMENT on 13th St Great
for pets, esp. dogs. Available immedi-
ately. S275 mo. Call 752-9197.
SUBLEASE Efficiency Apartment,
Ringgold Towers, 260.00month. Call
752-9866,leave a message.
HOUSE CLOSE TO CAMPUS. Two
bedroom possibly three. Newly reno-
vated tiled kitchen, bathroom, painted,
wallpapered, refinished floors, air con-
ditioner. $330 pi us mon th deposi t. Ca 11
355-5150.
SUMMER APARTMENT2 Bedroom
112 bath. Located in Cedar Ct. To be
sub-leased for summer. 365.00 Mo.
Util. Ask for Brian or Dave. 752-0085.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed May
through Aug. to share 2 bdrm Apt. at
Tar River. $100.00 per mo 1 3 utili-
ties. Call 752-8000!
UNIQUESITUATIONFORFEMALE
ROOMMATE. Full house privileges,
unfurnished room, adjoining bath, pri-
vate entrance, smoker ok small pet
o.k. 1 3 utilities, Winterville area. Call
after 5pm 756-5467.
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live con-
cert & studio recordings for sale. Over
lOOOnew titlesavailable this week from
thefollowingartists. ROCK-U2,R.E.M,
Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendrix, Black
Crowes, Springsteen, SR V, VanHalen,
Rush, Beatles, Doors, G-N-R, etc. AL-
TERNATrVE-Nirvana,PearlJam,Chili
Peppers, Cure, Depeche Mode, MORE
OTHERSINCLUDE-BobMarley, Ma-
donna, Prince, and more. Call 931-2573
to leave name, number, and requested
artist on message (all new CD's and
tapes in stock).
CHEAP! FBIUSSEIZED: 89 Mercedes
-200, 86 VW - $) & Mercedes -
$100,65 Mustang - $5. Choose form
thousandsstarting$50. FREEInforma-
tion24 hour hotline 801 -379-2929 copy-
right NC 030610.
DRAFIX CAD for Windows Version
2.0. Never used, for IBMor compatible.
Changed majors and don't need. Ask-
ing $450.00, was S700.00 in store. Con-
tact Dana 931 -7825, leave message.
SPEAKERS FOR SALE: Great for any
home. Excellent cond i tion; 8" woofers.
$100.00 pair. Call 757-1331 or leave
message.
PASSPORT RADAR DETECTOR
only two months old. All accessories
and paperwork is included. Full
warrantee. Whypaylistpriceplusship-
ping? Only $100. Call Tommy 752-9620.
YAKOTA EL CAPITAN 19" MTN.
iIKE Excellent condition only 6 mths
old. Blue wwhite bans, switch blade
forks, Deone XT shifters, Shimano
Brakes and Gears, Araya wheels, $700
new - $525 or best offer.
MOVING-MUST SELLallmyfumi-
ture. 1 couch, 3 chairs, 1 desk, and
more.Pleasecallafter5:30p.m. or leave
a message at 752-2077.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
trucks, boats, 4 wheelers, motorhomes,
by FBI, IRS, DEA. Available your area
now. Call 1-800436363 ext. C-5999.
MEN'S HOGAN RADIAL IRONS
(LH) 3-SW plus Driver, 3 wood, putter,
bagwcover. 5250.00 Call 758-5001 or
758-8524 (LVMSC)
MOVING MUST SELL: 5 pc. Cherry
orOak Bedrooms Set $425.00 Call 946-
9653.
MAN'S CAP AND GOWN (Ph.D.),
black velvet Trim. Reasonable offer.
Call 752-5801.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own
hours! RUSH stamped envelope: Pub-
lishers (GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-
295 Durham, NC 27705
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hiring enthusia stic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. North Beach Sailing, Inc. Box
8279, Duck, NC 27949. (919) 261 -6262.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED. Looking for enthusiastic
people with strong cheering and in-
terpersonal skills to teach
cheerleading camps in NC & SC.
Great pay and flexible scheduling.
Up to 10 weeks possible! If you love
cheerleading, this is the summer job
for you! Toapply, Call 1-800-280-
3223.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All Materials provided. Send SASE
to National Distributors PO Box 9643
Springfield, MO 65801. Immediate
response.
ATTENTION FASHION MER-
CHANDISING MAJORS! Gain
valuable work experience in your field
of study. Brody's is accepting appli-
cations for Secretary to Buyer. Work
with buyers in tracking and replen-
ishing inventory levels. Computer ex-
perience needed. Must be available 3
days by 12p.m15-20 hours perweek.
Apply Brody's The Plaza, Monday -
Wednesday, 1-4 p.m.
200-$500 WEEKLY. Assembleprod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information - 24 hour hotline. 801 -
379 - 2900. Copyright NC 030650.
PROMOTIONAL MANAGER
NE EDED to Ma rket CD's of Various
Eas t Coast Bands. EARN UP TO $5.00
per CD. Send Resume to: Musicoma
Records, Box 1917 Salisbury, Md.
21802 or call: (410)749-0070.
POSTAL JOBS Available! Many po-
sitions. Greatbenefits. CalU-800-436-
4365 ext. P-3712.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble products a t home. Call toll
free 1-800-467-5566 ext. 5920.
ALASKA SUMMER EMPLOY-
MENT-fisheries. Earn $600week
in canneries or $4,000 month on
fishing' boats. Free transportation!
Room & Board! Over8,000openings.
No experience necessary. MALE or
FEMALE. For employment program
call 1-206-545-4155 ext. A5362.
HELP WANTED at Carpet Bargain
Center, Apply in Person 1009
Dickinson Ave.
WANTED Used CD's, NESand Super
NES games. Call 756-3319 and leave
message.
LET'S PARTY experienced DJ from
Bogies available for all occasions: Fra-
ternity and Sorority socials, Weddings,
Birthdays. All types of music from
Classic Rock to Top40 Dance. Highest
quality Best Prices Call Rob @ 757 -
2658.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typingand photocopyingservices. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24hours in and out.Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pages. SDFProfessionalComputer Ser-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
TUTORING available for MS-DOS
WORDPERFECTLOTUS. Contact
Barbara Curtisat321-1994.
HEADING FOR EUROPE this sum-
mer? Only $169 Jet there anytime for
only $169 with AIRH1TCH! (Reported
in Let's Go! & NY Times.) AIRHITCH
�212-864-2000.
HEY D.J Don't be fooled by false
"experience Mobile Music Produc-
tions is THE disc jockey service for
ECU Greeks. Most variety of any ser-
vice in the area. We play WHAT YOU
WANTTOHEARReadyto jam spring
formnls. Call 758-4644.
Typing Services
Resumes. Term Papers. Letters
Master Thesis or Presentations
Professionally printed on "LaserJet" printer
Reasonable Rales
Same Day Service available
Call J. Carson at 756-1341
GRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPINGS
WORD PROCESSING SaVICE
�English Literature Major
�Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Composed Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
HQJXi USED CD'S
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
Encyclopedia
America
Carpet maintenance
system floor care.
Low Price
Rebate also
available!
James 355-4524
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In ItM,
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VbaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in C�l�. (213)477-8226
11322 Idaho Ave. J206-A, Los Anglw.CA 90025
JIMMY- Happy's was a blast but hav-
ing to wait so long to leave was not the
highlight-Italian Pecker Wackers
seemed to be! You, Rob and Brandyare
outrageous-those things tasted like
shit! 7hatremindsrrieHowwastable
5? (Yeah-metoo!)Well,Ican'twaitto
see what happens the next time it's $1
nite at Mugs and Luigi is working!
Later gator! Mo
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-8QQ-251-4000 Ext. 1576
Announcements
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN pi �
LOWSHTP
Looking for a fellowship
ofChristians,a place topray,study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects? Need a ref-
uge from time to time? Campus
Christian Fellowship may be what
you are looking for. Our weekly
meetings are at 7pm Wednesdays
at our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
Cotanche St. from Mendenhall Stu-
dentCenter. Everyoneis welcome.
For more information, Call Tim
Turner, Campus Minister, at 752-
7199.
ECNAO
The East Carolina Native
American Organization will have
their next meeting March 16 from
7:15-9:15 pm in MSCRm. 221. The
guest speaker is Sandra Worth
Hughes.
ECUENVTRONMFNiTAT
HEALTH CLUB
The next meeting will be
Wednesday, March 17, at 5:00. the
next trash pick-up will be Friday,
March 19 at 3:00. Free food will be
provided after the pick-up for all
who participate.
SPRING 93 LECTURF SFRirs
� NEW WORLD MFFTS ni p
Rewriting History: Ameri-
can Indian Tribal Governments and
the International Sovereignty
Movement by Dick O. Winchell,
Dept. of Urban and Regional Plan-
ning, Eastern Washington Univ.
March 16,7:30pm, Room 1028 GCB
ECU campus. Cowboys of the
Americas by Richard Slatta, Dept.
of History, North Carolina State
Univ. March 24,7:30 pm, Brewster
Bldg Room C103, ECU campus.
GID-EE-UP!
A Beach Horseback Riding
Trip sponsored by Recreational Ser-
vices will beheld on Sunday, March
21. Spend up to three hours walk-
ing and racing down the white
sandy beachesof the Bamer Islands.
Transportation, riding fees, and
post ride meal included.The costis
$45 students, $50 stafffaculty. A
pre-trip meeting will be held on
Wed. March 17 at 5pm in Brewster
d-101. For more info call 757-6387.
PI DELTA
Pi Delta is sponsoring a 5k
run to benefit the Ronald
McDonald House on April 24th.
Applications will be available in
local businessesaround Greenville,
approximately 2-3 weeks before the
race.
PRE-OCCUPATTONIAT
THERAPY STUPFNTS
advising
Early registration for sum-
mer and fall sessions will begin
March 29th. There will be an advis-
ing session Thursday night, March
18th from 4:00 - 7:00 in room 306 of
theBelk Building. If you are unable
to attend this meeting please call
the OT office for other advising
hours. Please see the video at the
Joyner Library before you come
for advising.
REC. SERVICES
Softball Registration will
be held Tuesday, March 16 at 5:00
p.m. in Biology 103. Theremustbe
a minimum of 10 people per team
. For more information call 757-
6387. Men's women's, and co-ed
leagues available. This meeting is
mandatory for registration.
ATTENTION PR F-PHYSIC AI
THERAPY STITDFlMTt;
Registration advising for
summerfall semester, 1993, will
be held on March 22nd, 23rd,
24th(Monday, Tuesday, Wednes-
day) evening from 7:00 p.m. until
9:00 p.m. in the Physical Therapy
lab of the Belk Building. Please
enter by way of the front door of
the Belk Building. All pre-physical
therapy general college students
MUST a ttend one of these sessions
to have summerfall semester
sched ules approved and signed by
a physical therapy advisor.
REMOVING TNCOMPT FTPS
IN MATH 0001
Students who received a
grade of Incomplete (I) in Math
Lab (Math 0001) Fall Semester, 1993
must be sure to remove the incom-
plete by ;00 pm, Friday, March 19,
1993. The Math Lab will be open
from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm on Mon-
days through Thursdays, to allow
students needing to remove an in-
complete time tosrudy, receive any
necessary help, and complete the
remaining tests. A student with an
incomplete from the Fall, 1992 se-
mester, who fails to complete the
required work by March 19th will
be required to register for and re-
peat (from the beginning) Math
0001. (Note: Students entering the
Math Lab to work on removing an
incomplete must hav e with them a
picture ID.)
STUDENT SURVFYS
During the week of March
22-26, a survey of student opinion
of instruction will be conducted at
ECU. Questionnaires will be dis-
tributed inclasses with enrollments
greater than five. All students will
have the opportunity to express
opinions on the teaching effective-
ness of their instructors. The sur-
vey will be conducted during class
time and will take approximately
15 minutes to complete. Student
participation is voluntary and no
identities are requested. Instruc-
tors have been requested to leave
the classroom while the question-
naires are being completed. Re-
sults of the survey will be distrib-
uted to instructorsafterfinal grades
have been posted. The teaching
effectiveness questionnaire was
created by the Faculty SenateCom-
mittee for Teaching Effectiveness
and the Office of Planning and In-
stitutional Research. The resultsof
the su rvey, along wi th other in for-
mation and factors, are used for
administrative evaluation of the
instructor by the supervising ad-
ministrator within thedepartment
or division.
MAIORSMINORS FAIR'
Select a Major, Add a Mi-
nor, Talk with theFaculty, Wednes-
day March 24 12:30 - 3:30 p.m. at
Mendenhall Great Room: Free
Snacks!
SCHOOI OF NURSING
Departmental Meetings
for Advisement and Important An-
nouncements. Pre-Clinical Nurs-
ing Majors and General College
with Nursing as intended Major,
Tuesday, March 23 at 5:00 p.m. in
Room 101 Nursing Bldg. Nursing
Majors currently enrolled in Nurs-
ing24002700, Wednesday, March
24 at 5:00 p.m. in Room 101 Nurs-
ing Bldg. Nursing Majors entering
Senior level in Fall or completing
la stjuniorcoursesin Fall, Wednes-
day March 24 at 6:00 p.m. in Room
101 Nursing Bldg.
ALL TERRAIN BTKTNC;
Recreational Services All-
Terrain Biking Adventure will be
held on Saturday, March 20at 1030
am in Christenbury 117. Partici-
pants will learn proper equipment
Classifieds
25wordsorless:
Stuctents $2j00
Nan-Students $3j00
Each additional word $005
All ads must be pre-paid�
and safety techniques. Bring a hel-
met and be prepared to peddle!
Refreshments will bepro-ided. The
cost is $5.00 students, $8.00 fac-
ultystaff. Register Now! For more
info call 757-6387.
REGISTRATION FOR
GENERAL COT I FGF
STUDENTS
General College students
should contact their advisors the
week of March 22-26 to make ar-
rangements foracademicadvising
for summer terms and Fall Semes-
ter 1993. Early registration will be-
gin March 29 and end April 2.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FFI -
LOWSHIP
"CREATION'S TINY
MYSTERY" SCIENTIFIC MYS-
TERY UNRAVELED Dr. Rob-
ert V. Gentry, an internationally
recognized authority on
radiohalos will be a guest speaker
at ECU on March 23. He will
present his work, which chal-
lenges the evolutionists' 4.6 bil-
lion year age of the earth, in
Hendrix Theatre at 7pm. You will
be amazed at his findings. Agree
or disagree, but come and hear
what many in the scientific com-
munity wan t to keep quiet. Be pre-
pared to ask questions and chal-
lenge Dr. Gentry's findings. No
Announcements
AnycrganizatimrTiayusetheArinounce-
menteSecucnofTheEastCardhiantofet
artMtiesande�ntsQpentorJTerxibJctvw
trnesfreeofohargaOietotiiefcTTtedErrrafTt
rfspace,TheEastCardrtancannotgLiarari-
teettiepLiDlcationcifarricunoerrierTts.
admission is required, but dona-
tions will be accepted. If you have
questions call Tim Turner at 752-
7199.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The 1993 Greenville-Pitt
Co. Special Olympics Spring
Games will be held on April 20th
at E. B. Aycock Jr. High School in
Greenville (rain date: April 22).
Volunteers are needed to help
serve as buddieschaperones for
the Special Olympics. Volunteers
must be able tc work all day-from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. An orientation
meeting will beheld on April 15in
Ol d Joyner Library room 221 from
5-6:00p.m. (The first ones there
will be assigned a position.) Free
volunteer t-shirts will be provided
the day of the games to all volun-
teers who have attended the ori-
entation session. For more infor-
mation, contact Lisa Ihly at 830-
4551.
ASH WEDNESDAY SERVICFS
The NEWMAN CATHO-
LIC STUDENT CENTER wishes
to announce special Ash Wednes-
day Masses with the distribution
of ashes: 12 noon in the Great
Room of Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter and 5:30 p.m. at the Newman
Center, 953 E. 10th Street at the
foot of College Hill.
Dsplayed
$5.50perinch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication; however, no
refunds will be given.
I-
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
Formore
infonriationcall
757-6366.





r m 'ill' IT Tit
March 16, 1993
TuesdayOpinion
Tuition rates on rise,
affect out-of-state
students most
Current Senate bill better than
last, still needs improvement
before going into effect
Higher tuition rates loom on the horizon, with no
visible means of stopping the deluge from drowning the
average student in a sea of bills and debts.
Today's episode of All My Dollars focuses on a new
NorthCarolinaSenatebillthat,if passed, will begin in the
1994-95 academic year. Through the following four years,
the bill will phase its effects, concluding by the 1998-99
academic year. By the onset of the 21st century, students
in North Carolina will face an increase that may possibly
withhold higher education from some people.
The bill states that the North Carolina General As-
sembly has found that the current "tuition policy both
for undergraduates and graduates, and both for residents
and nonresidents, needs to be reexamined The bill
suggests that undergraduate residents should pay at
least 16 percent of educational costs, and leaves higher
tuition rates for graduates up to the Board of Governors
of the University of North Carolina.
Nonresident tuition will be raised even higher than
residents, effectively blocking out most, if not all, out-of-
state students from receiving an education at any UNC
institution. The bill proposes that nonresident tuition be
increased to "approximately 75-100 percent of the educa-
tional costs and general costs of education
The Government Performance Audit Committee
(GPAC) found that UNC students currently pay 10.9
percent of their cost of education. By raising the out-of-
state tuition rates to 75-100 percent, the
General Assembly is effectively adding
another zero to the $6,000 that non-
residents pay
at ECU now.
This addend
will eliminate
all out-of-state
students from UNC col-
leges, limiting the student
pool drastically and dropping
revenues into the1 danger zone.
Students on campus have complained that desper-
ately needed improvements on campus, such as financial
aid and Joyner Library renovations, are not receiving the
attention that they deserve. They want the revenue from
this current bill to be earmarked for these projects, above
everything else.
Opponents of the increase have stated that tuition is
high enough as it currently is and any increase will only
hurt existing and future students. But these are the same
people who bemoan the educational condition of our
university. What these people must realize is that money
constitutes the bottom line here � if you want better
facilities on this campus, then you'll have to pay the
piper.
Though the current Senate bill is more acceptable
than previous ones, it too must be revised and amended.
The current disparity between in-state and out-of-state
tuition rates is too large to ensure a semblance of equality
at this university. Granted, out-of-state students should
pay more to receive education in this state, but 75-100
percent is just too large a mouthful to swallow for stu-
dents.
Raise the tuition in order to improve the quality of
education at ECU. On the same note, make it equal in
respect to the amount that each person would pay. If not,
in five to six years, the UNC system may find itself with
a much bigger problem than lack of quality � lack of
students.
� The East Carolinian �
Opinion

Page 6
The East Carolinian
James R. Kniseiy, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmvl, News Editor
Karen Hasscll,U.H. News Editor
Dana Daniilson, Ufestxle Editor
John Milliard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. Layout Wimnyn
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Kecd, Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Syrians Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretaiy
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday ami
Thursday. "Die masthead editorial in each i-dilion is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomed Idlers Hated to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the ritht to edit or reject letters (or
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, 77w East Carolinian,
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville. N.C 27858-435?. For more informa-
tion, call (919)757-6366.
Freedom's Call
Printed on
Ob
100 recycled
paper
By Jim Shamlin
Knowing cause, effects dispels ignorance
Most discussions of oppres-
sion focus on cases in which one
groupoppressesanother.This, how-
ever, is not the only kind of oppres-
sion. A second type of oppression is
even more widespread � when a
groupofpeopleoppress themselves.
One wonders what sort of idiots
would oppress themselves � it
doesn't seem possible that anyone
could be so masochistic, but the
American publicfitsthisdescription
perfectly. Looking at the freakshow
we call "politics it's a wonder that
we've gotten this far.
In defense of our own lunacy,
it is only fair to state that Americans
are not idiots, but merely ignora-
muses. There is a difference: an id iot
will throw a brick into theairand try
tocatch it with hisforehead, whereas
an ignoramus will carelessly lob the
same brick, look up to see where it
will land and get hiton the head just
the same. Either way, the brick-lob-
bing pea-brain ends up with a con-
cussion.
True to the metaphor, we cast
our ballots about as carelessly as if
they were bricks, with packs of de-
mented lobbyists chucking
cinderblocks in all directions. After
more than 200 years of constant buf-
feting, we still haven't learned our
lesson.
For the most part, people sim-
ply don't realize the things they're
doing to themselves whenever they
make demands of government.
Manypeoplethirikof"gcrvemrnent"
as a mystic force, capable of doing
anything, of magically producing
whateveritsritizenswant.In reality,
government produces nothing. It
simply redistributes what's there,
usually wasting a good bit of it in the
process. In effect, it robs Peter to pay
Paul � it often robs Paul to pay Paul
� pocketing a commission on the
exchange.
Ignorance of this fact is the
sourceof widespread hypocrisy. We
demand better roads, but when the
government imposes a gasoline tax
to pay for those improvements, we
cry "injustice We stress the impor-
tance of AIDS research, but roar in
protest at the high cost of AZT, the
profits from which are invested in
the research we feel is necessary. In
both cases, we are objecting for hav-
ing to pay for something we de-
mand � we seem to expect pennies
from heaven, the mystical interven-
tion of the omnipotent god we call
"government
In their lust to get something
for nothing, many demand benefits
at the expense of others�tax them
to provide for us. Besides the fact
that this is extortion disguised as
legitimate politics,the people inques-
tion often end up taxing themselves
or people who are even less fortu-
nate. Typically, this brand of ignora-
mus wants to tax the mystic force he
calls "business"�often "big" busi-
ness, because he wants big money.
If one can justify the political
right of one to leech off others, this
seems almost rational�businesses
produce money.Of course,few para-
sites realize that "business" is not a
money tree � it gets its money by
selling something, whether a good
or service, to a consumership com-
posed of citizens. In effect, they are
taxing themselves all the same.
To explain this phenomenon
to those who couldn't stay awake
through Accounting I,businessesdo
not pay taxes. When a company sets
the price of its prcxiuct, it figures the
cost in materials, labor and other
expenses, i.e. "tax expense As a
result, a tax increase is an increased
expense, which creates higher cost,
which results in a higher price. It's
simplemathema tics: ABC When
distilled, it comes down to AC,
which means higher taxes equals
higher prices. Business is just a
middleman, passing its tax expense
on to the consumer. It loses nothing,
because we pay its tax increases in
the marketplace.
In some cases, the business
does not pass the entire tax along to
the consumer, but absorbs it. This
does not mear that the amount a
business absorbs magically disap-
pears. The money comes out of
someone's pocket, usually theowner,
or owners. Most owners are com-
mon citizens � young couples sav-
ing for their children's education,
workers saving for their retirement.
By demand ing tha tgovemment pro
vide for education and social secu-
rity, we are forcing them to take
money from people who need these
benefits anyway. While that seems
just,itisnot�we are forcing people,
incl uding ourselves, to dobusiness
with thegovemment, the most inef-
ficient and comipt bureaucracy in
existence.
This undermines the freedom
of choice. When we buy services
from the private sector, we are free
tochoose the bestamong options�
private firms must attract custom-
ers by offering quality service at a
reasonable cost. When we relegate
those services to the government,
we are no longer free to choose �
the IRS collects its fee at the point of
a gun and the government, holding
a monopoly on the service in ques-
tion, has no incentive to provide
any quality.
What we can do, however, is
stop demanding so much from the
government. The services do not
cease to exist, but are relegated to
the private sector, where they are
provided by those with an incen-
tive to provide good service at a fair
price.
In today's mixed economy,
we are both customers and share-
holders of the government. We
make demands and we pay the
price. Understanding the process
through which government redis-
tributes wealth will help to dispel
the widespread ignorance that has
resulted in risingprices, risingtaxes
and a collapsing economy. The
cause-and-effectconnectionsarenot
as cryptic as some would believe,
and knowing them is as essential as
knowing where a brick will land
beforewethrowit aboveourheads.
�XSJVf- 3ct9ti v'E'
"AHPNON 10ORWKTOWW60FrAYW)r40HMCPlAM
QuoteoftheDay
When a fellow says, "It ain't the money
but the principle of the thing' it's the
money.
Frank McKinney Hubbardl
Letters to the Editor
Fort Fisher hermit provides message to public
To the Editor:
I felt it is necessary to
respond to the article about
"the Fort Fisher hermit that
appeared in your Jan. 28 issue.
Not that I disagreed with it, or
more than in a very small way
found fault with it � but be-
cause you did not share with
your readers why thousands
ofpeoplevisitedhimeachyear.
Those who knew him and re-
member him, including thou-
sands from ECU who drove
the distance to see him, shared
his philosophy of "civil dis-
obedience" and "common
sense
His letters and many ar-
ticles about him are held in
your manuscript department
at the Joyner Library, and I
encourage you to get to know
him.
What also is important
are the other messages this
man spoke of � of love, un-
derstanding, tolerance and of
the necessity for questioning
authority, are evident in his
own letters. On the shore of
the Atlantic Ocean, he found
individual courage, strength,
pfcee and independence �
even though far beyond the
bounds of "normal" society!
I hope that when you
have the opportunity to visit
Carolina Beach or Kure Beach
during the upcoming Azalea
Festival,you win nave the time
to visit the tiny concrete build-
ing near the present-day Ft.
Fisher Aquarium, where he
lived for 17years, ina building
roughly the size of the cabin
Henry David Thoreau lived in
100 years before, when he got
back to nature. The hermit has
an important message for you
� if you can find it!
Michael Edwards
Alumni
Safer-sex campaign educated students to live
To the Editor:
In 13, the worst thing
unprotected sex could give you
was an unwanted pregnancv.
Than k vi u for your safer-
sex campaign. Your response
to AIDS reflects your aware-
We at East Carolina Uni-
versity are pursuing a higher
awarenessofourselvesand the
immense world outride of our-
selves. This awareness could
be called an education. Never-
theless, awareness does not
enter closed minds. Regardless
of our individual lifestyles, we
should all educate ourselves so
that we may live with each other
and so that we mav live.
Tracey Gay
Non-degree
Graduate
Joe of All Trades
By Joe Horst
Apathy serves as
easy way out to
life's problems
Apathy.
You're sirring around yourapartment, kill-
ing some time flipping between MacGyver on
USA and Tiny Toons on Fox. You go to answer
the door and find two or three of your friends
standing in your doorway with their hands in
theirpockets, wantingtoknow what'sgoingon.
They come in, grab a couple of beers,
situate themselves in your living room and ask
that inevitable question that most people dread
answering.
"So, what are we going to do tonight?"
If you've been on the opposite end, asking
the question, what's the worst � and usual �
answer that you get?
"I don't care
The scary thing about those three little
words is that most people make their life deci-
sions on such a laid-back attitude. So many
people walk around today not thinking�usu-
ally not caring � about what goes on around
them. They believe that if they don't mess with
anything, then it'll all work out in the end. They
expect thatgood things will just come their way,
with little or no effort being put behind them.
Wrong! The big X, the biggoose-egg, nada,
zip, nil, nothing. Thank you for playing, there
are some lovely parting gifts waiting for you at
the door. Don't let it hit you in the butt on the
way out. Get the picture? Hmrnm??
How can anyone expect anything good to
come out of lifeifyou don't putany effort intoit?
Do people think that if they just lift their eyes to
heaven that luckand prosperity will fall on them
like some soft cloud around their shoulders?
More likely than not, the truth will fall on them
� it'll just be a iron-cast safe on their head, that's
all. Hey, what'reyou gonna do, right?Justshrug
your shoulders, whistle a little tune and keep
walking down that lonely road.
Wake up! Hello, McFly! Get off your lazy
butt and put some work into your life. Cliches
only become cliches because they are truths that
have been overused. So when someone says tha t
good things only come when you work for
them, granted, it may be a little trite, but there's
got to be a kernel oi truth in there somewhere.
Why not look for it instead of sitting on your ass
and gathering moss?
People moan and complain about how
their lives are so bad and how nobody loves
them and how life is so rough. Wahhhh! Write
a letter if you've got a beef. Hell, you'll actually
bedoing something instead ofjustrubbingyour
eyes with your hands like a three-year-old whose
ice cream cone was taken away.
In short, put some effort into vour life. The
rewardsand benefits of hard work far outweigh
any risks that you might incur along the way.
Work at a job, a relationship, or whatever is
giving you some trouble. Don't let it stagnate
under the hope that it'll go away � more often
than not, it just gets worse.
V





I I�III
The East Carolinian
March 16, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
Dance company to
spend residency at ECU
Staff Reports
The East Carolinian
The Dayton Contemporary
DanceCompany,one of the nation's
leading African-American modem
dance ensembles, will be in resi-
dence at ECU March 18-20.
Theirvisit will include a Satur-
day, March 20, public performance
in Wright Auditorium, a March 19
lecture-demonstration on the im-
pact of African-American Danceon
modern American dance, and a
community reception at Agnes
Fullilove Community School.
The 16-member Dayton Con-
temporary Dance Company,
founded in 1968 by artistic director
Jeraldyne Blunden, performs an
eclectic repertoire from many note-
worthy choreographers, including
reconstructed African-American
dances as well as the classical and
avant garde.
For their performance in Wright
Auditorium, the company will
present "Rainbow 'Round My
Shoulder" by Donald McKayle,
"Love and the Weather" by Kevin
Ward (featuringa musical Motown
collage), "Gazelle" by George Faison
and "TheStackUp" byTalley Beatty.
The performance is part of
ECU'S 1992-93 University Unions
Performing Arts Series and will
begin at8 p.m. An open rehearsal is
scheduled during the afternoon.
The Friday, March 19, recep-
tion at Agnes Fu Hi love School (1615
Halifax St Greenvil le) will be high-
lighted by a multi-media lecture
demonstration on the influence on
native African dance on modem
American dance.
Other residency activities are
lecturedemonstration at North
Pitt, Ayden Griften and Farmville
Central High Schools throughout
the day on Friday and two Thurs-
Pholo courtesy Stuart Secttor
The Dayton Contemporary Dance Company
day, March 18, events on the ECU
campus: a 4 p.m. lecture demon-
stration in the Messick Theatre Arts
Center dance studio and a multi-
media lecture by three noted dance
scholars at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center.
The scholars lecture African-
American Perspectives in Modern
Dance willbegivenby threedance
scholars: Karen W. Hubbard, asso-
ciate professor of dance at UNC-
Charlotte; Joseph Nash, coordina-
tor of Black Dance History courses
for the Alvin Ailey American Dance
Theatre School; and Duke Univer-
sity professor Peter H. Wood, au-
thor of "Black Majority a book
about slavery in colonial South
Carolina.
Co-sponsors with ECU for the
Dayton Contemporary Dance Com-
pany residency are the National
Endowment for the Arts, the North
Carolina and PittGreenville Arts
Councils, the Pitt County Schools
and the West Greenville Commu-
nity Development Corporation.
The company's visit to ECU is
part of a March North Carolina tour
with engagements at Elon College,
theCarolina Theatre in Greensboro,
Pack Place in Asheville and the
Thalian Hall Center for the Per-
forming Arts in Wilmington.
Further information about the
Dayton Contemporary Dance
Company'slocal residency is avail-
able from Stuart Secttor at
Mendenhall Student Center (757-
4766) or Barbara Fenner, West
Greenville Community Develop-
ment Corporation (752-9277).
Tickets for their Wright Audi-
torium performance are available
at the ECU Central Ticket Office at
$15 for the general public, $10 for
ECU faculty and staff and $7 for
students and youth.
Ticket orders may be charged
to major credit cards by mail or by
phone (757-4788 or long distance
SOO-ECU-ARTS).
The ticket office is also issuing
passes to the open rehearsal on the
afternoon preceding the Saturday
performance.
Queen's Brian
May releases solo
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
Brian May, of
Queen fame, has re-
leased his first solo al-
bum. The guitar magi-
cian of Queen has spent
twenty years building
up for his first solo ef-
fort, Back To The Light.
May contributed
close to ha If of the songs
Queen recorded, and
wrote many of their hit
songs including, "We
Will Rock You "Keep
Yourself Alive "Flash Gor-
don "Tie Your Mother Down
and "Fat Bottomed Girls Since
his forte had always been the
more difficult songs that Queen
recorded, it only stands to rea-
son that most of the songs on
Light would be more rock than
pop, as have been the last three
Queen albums. You would be
correct to make this assump-
tion. Though some songs sound
like they could be Queen songs,
May doesn't stay in that mode
f . long. He varies the songs
tremendously, mixing ballads
("Too Much Love Will Kill You
"Just One Life"), rock anthems
("Resurrection "Love To-
ken"), and country influenced
songs ("Let Your Heart Rule
Your Head").
May shows quality
songwriting ability and no one
has ever argued about the qual-
ity of his guitar capabilities. The
one thing that was under ques-
tion was his vocal abilities. His
voice is strong. Is it as strong as
Fredd ie Mercury, the lead singer
of Queen? No. Nor did anyone
think it would be, but the corn-
Brian May
parison will be made. Not
many voca lists can mea sure up
to Mercury's vocal power or
range.
What May is able to do is
sing through the song with
emotion and a clear voice. The
range he uses is small, but he
uses it well. At times he sounds
like a subdued Lou Gramm,
but he doesn't move from op-
era to hard rock like Mercury
could do with ease (just one
listen to "Bohemian Rhapsody"
will show you Mercury's tal-
ents).
May admits, in the liner
notes, that it has taken five
years to complete Back To The
Light, and though it is dedi-
cated to Freddie Mercury there
is no soul searching done on
the album.
"Music is joy to me, and liv-
ing in it is sometimes the only
safe place to be. Much of what is
recorded here is for fun, escap-
ism, music for its own sake he
writes. That attitude isevident of
the songs.
See MAY page 10
w
At a Glance.
Break it Down
By Micheal Small
Carol Publisning Company
By Thomas Croft
Staff Writer
Did you know Public Enemy's Chuck D is 32? Do you know his real name?
Where he went to high school? How many children he has?
What about why Ice-Tand MC Lyte are vicious on stage and gentle at home?
Care what Queen Latifah cooks at home for dinner? Did you know Pete Nice's
major influences include James Joyce, James Baldwin, Arthur Rimbaud and
Cannonball Adderly? Did you know Hammer got his stage name when he was
a bat boy for the Oakland A's?
Well,thesetid-bitfactsand moreareall in Michael Small'snewestbook, Break
it Dowtv The Inside Story from the New Leaders of Rap (1992, Citadel Press, $16.95).
Smal 1,36, who writes for People magazine and who is working on a book about the
history of Sesame Sfreef, teamed up with free-lance photographer Al Pereira, 30, to
compile a glossy, 224-page compendium of old-school and new-school hip-hop
facts, faces and fetishes.
Break It Down is crucial in that raphip-hop cannot, and will not, be denied,
howeverdt lounceditcontinuestobe.Small'sintentseemstobetodocumentrap
artists wht have not only made names for themselves but who have also
committed hearty time and energy in promoting and promulgating the hip-hop
genre, its philosophies, culture and sounds that embody so much of today's pop
culture movement.
Sadly, Small's book seldom explores the true substance to the hip-hop
philosophical or political or
ideological canon and instead
takes the slick, easy route: that
is, using big fat photos of the
most popular and famous rap
artists, using enormous type
fontstoindicate such trivialities
such as stage artists' stage
names, real names, dates of
birth, marital status, home-
towns, education and other
little-known facts. The format
to the book gets too cutesy and
pop culturized ad naseum to
waft up to essential reference
book status.
Despite an aesthetically
pleasing layout that makes flip-
ping pages flippantly fun,
there's loadsof blank space that
See BOOKS page 10
Poetry reading tonight to feature Michael Mott
Poet and novelist Michael Mott will
be featured at the Poetry Reading tonight
on campus.
Mott, who was educated in England
and the United States, has written seven
collections of poetry, two novels, two
novels for young adults, a biography,
essays and reviews.
He received a B.A. Honors Degree
from London University and the
Courtauld and Warburg Institutes in the
history of European Art, specializing in
19th Century Art Criticism in France and
England.
Mott has taught as visiting professor
or writer in residence at Kenyon Col-
lege, Emory University, College of Wil-
liam and Mary and Bowling Green
State University (professor of English,
creative writing program).
In addition, he has wot vvards
including: Guggenheim, fellowship
(1979-80);Governer'sA- ard in the Fine
Arts, Georgia (1974); Honorary Doctor
of Letters, St. Mary's, Notre Dame
(1983); and the Christopher Award
(1984).
Tonight's Poetry Reading featur-
ing Mott will be held at 8 p.m. in Gen-
eral Classroom Building 1028.
Review
Jack Kirbys return split
between companies
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
The largest comic company in the
nation started with Jack Kirby and Stan
Lee.
After a brief hiatus from comics,
Kirby has returned to the world of com-
ics.
If you don't know the name, you'll
know some of Kirby's creations.
He's responsible for, in some form
or another, the comic characters Fantas-
tic Four, X-Men, Hulk, Avengers, Thor
and Captain America.
Kirby also worked for DC Comics
and created characters like the New
Gods, Forever People, Darkseid, Mr.
Miracle and the Demon.
He has inspired many writers and
artists working in the comic field today.
He's drawn more comics than any
other artist that has worked in comics.
His return to the medium is again
split between two different companies,
Topps Comics and Image Comics.
Topps Comics, a division of the
Topps Card Company, is new to the
comic market. 1�
Their first"
comic was an
adaptation of
Francis Ford
Coppola's film,
Bram Stoker's
Dracula.
Topps is
counting on the
popularity of
Kirby to trans-
late into sales
with an entire
line of comics "�
based on previously unseen Kirby cre-
ations. The Secret City Saga, Bombast, Cap-
tain Glory, Satan's Six and Night Glider
are all projected for an April release.
Topps has recruited many creators
from Kirby's time to work on the titles
including Dick Avers, Gerry Conway,
Roy Thomas, Steve Ditko and Don Heck.
Image is owned by and based around
comic creators, not a corporation.
Image Comics is
based around, and
owned by, comic
creators, not a
corporation.
'mage was created last year by Rob
Liefeld, Jim Lee, Todd McFarlane, Marc
Silvestriand Erik
Larsen.
They con-
tinually dedicate
their work to
Kirby and cite
him as their in-
spiration.
It is only fit-
ting that Kirby
work amongst
the Image crew.
Phantom
Force, also due in
����� April, will be
written and pencilled by jack Kirby and
inked bv Liefeld, Lee, McFarlane, Larsen
and Scott Williams.
Phantom Force is being marketed as
Kirby's last completely pencilled story.
With the company he's keeping, Jack
Kirby'sreturn to thecomic medium,even
with relatively new companies, should
be triumphant and enjoyable. Check out
his new work.
.�





Kmtmmmmmmm
8 The East Carolinian
MARCH 16, 1993
Waits' latest exhibits strong rhythm
By Andy Sugg
Staff Writer
There's a new anthem for all
those students on the five, six and
seven-year plans. It's: "I Don't
Want ToGrow Up by Tom Waits,
and it's on Bone Machine. This is a
song about how bad growing up
is, and he's right: it sucks. But any-
way
Tom Waitsis, well,Tom Waits.
After a 13-album career spanning
20 years, he's back with Bone Ma-
chine. Tom Waits is fun, and Bone
Machine, with its 206 sounds, is
fun. The jacket isn't really fun, but
that's life. The music on Machine
contains everything except a cat
(but there might be a cat hidden in
mere somewhere).
Waits has done some new
fringson Machine, and the album
fc dark. Waits was recently inter-
viewed by journalist Rip Rense.
Yeah, this was a darker view
Waits said. "A darker lens of
things
Consider "Dirt In theGround
"We're chained to the worldAnd
we all gotta pull And we're all
gonna be . . . Just Dirt In the
Ground Waits says death is the
only subject on Bone Machine . "In
theColiseum" isan infectious tune
with nothing happy in it, but I like
it: "A slowly-acting poison will
be given to the favorite one Yum.
Waits also says he has a lot of
"very strong rhythmic impulses
As the main percussionist on the
album, Waitsdemonstra teshisabil-
ity to play any object as a musical
instrument.
He even built a "conundrum"
to help. Waits hits anything and
everything: the percussion some-
times sounds like he's walking
around blindfolded,beating things
with a syncopated stick.
"If you don't like the sound of
drums, you hit the music stand, or
the wall Waits told Rense. This
philosophy dominates Bone Ma-
chine.
I don't know what he's beat-
ing on, but "Such A Scream" has a
James Brownesque quality to it.
"Such A Scream "pale face" and
the "eyeball kid" talk about a
"DonnieGal" and the swell noises
she makes. I like her. Try "Let Me
Get Up On It which has a JB title,
but is actually 53 seconds of rhyth-
mic chains, hinges, and squeaky
things.
"ThatFeel co-written by Waits
and Keith Richards, is a charming
song about the "feel and how it's
the only thing you can't lose, no
matter what. Dig it.
It's a good thing Bone Machine
comes with lyrics, because 1 really
can't understand Waits when he
screams, "The Earth died scream-
ing, while I lay dreaming, dream-
ing of you But that's part of the
charm. Bone Machine has murders,
suicides, broken hearts and run-
aways. It's not normal, everyday
music, but normal everyday music
will always be there. On the faithful
ol' one to 10, this crazy album that 1
love like a brother gets an 8.5.
Who's There on
St. Patty's Day
(That's Wed March 17, in case you forgot)
� �'Rockefeller's:
Fountain of Youth
� Attic: Comedy Zone
� Mugshots: Music Stew
� Corrigan's: Bruce Frye



Formerly The Rum Runner Dive Shop
Serving the area for over 15 years
Dive Center, Inc
2905 E. 5th Street. Greenville. Ph. 758-1444
� PRESESNT YOUR STUDENT ID CARD
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� SUPER SAVINGS ON MASKS & FINS
� SELECTED BCD's REDUCED DRAMATICALLY
Classes beginning April 6
Openwater II Class April
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Any nurse who just wants a job can
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Applicants see Kathy W. Harris, General Manager, on
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The University Media Board
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The Media Board wishes to increase the
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'
�-�,h
Tnrrfrr mi
Salad Bar dining:
MARCH 16, 1993
Parlay Internationa
Special to The East Carolinian
SALAD BAR DINING
Many restaurants now offer
salad bars asa low-calorie, health-
ful addition to their regular
menus.
Salad bars are also popping
up at many of the larger super-
market chains.
In addition to low-calorie,
nutritious foods, however, many
offer selections that may be high
in fats, sodium and calories.
So the next time you dine at a ; � ,�or)�
salad bar, use the following tips dressing, often found in the con-
andbesawy. diment section, or sliced lemon to
FOODS TO CHOOSE
In general, stick with raw veg-
etables, a good source of nutri-
ents. Legumes such as kidney
beans or chick peas, arealso good
choices since they are sources of
protein ad fiber.
Use lettuce, tomato, pepper
and onion. Some salad bars offer
broccoli or cauliflower, which are
high in nutrients and natural fi-
ber. Fresh peas and beans are also
available sometimes.
Choose a vinegar and oil
dressing, or a reduced calorie
avoid fatty dressings altogether.
FOODS TO LIMIT
Unfortunately, salad
bars can also be fat-
tening. It's easy to
bad up a plate '
and rack up the
calories. "�
In addi-
tion, people
may tend to-
ward salad bar .
foods that are
high in fat and so- y
dium. x fy
Macaroni, pasta and
potato salads should be avoided
because of their high fat content.
sawy,
The East Carolinian g
I
Bacon bits, processed cheeses
and croutons are high in sodium.
It's easy to overdo high
fat dressings, too.
HEALTHY
f SALAD BARS
A healthy
" salad barshould
"� bewellrefriger-
ated and should
carry a food
shield (also
2f called a sneeze
�C guard).
J, It should have no
flies and look clean and
fresh.
Check and see if food is fresh
and replaced frequently.
Marinated foods are gener-
ally considered to be safe because
of their high lemon and vinegar
content.
YOU'RE
WE'RE OPEN
DO!
� . ,vv� oi iu sec u iuuu is rresn
GENERAL GUIDELINES
Try to keep food choices to a
reasonable quantity.
A recent study at Mississippi
State University found that stu-
dents averaged about 1000 calo-
ries per tray when selected from a
salad bar, but less than 900 calo-
ries for a hot meal.
Salad bar meals averaged 43
percent of calories from fat while
hot meals averaged only 40 per-
Y
w J
cent of calories from fat.
Both meals were above the
American Heart Association ad-
vice that suggests less than 30
percent of calories should come
from fat.
SAVVY, NOT SORRY
Salad bars can be a fast, con-
venient, tasty alternative to the
usual restaurant fare, but you
should approach them with the
preceding tips in mind.
Select a variety of fresh fruits
and vegetables and avoid foods
with added fats (like oil or may-
onnaise) or prepared dressings.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
MOW OPEN
'TIL IVHDNITE
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& $2.00 OFF CDs M4.98 and higher
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for the following positions:
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LAYOUT DESIGN MANAGER
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-T-
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SLOGAN
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Business Students!
Give us a T-shirt design & a slogan that will set us
apart from the rest of ECU. The ECU Student Store
will award a $100 gift certificate for the best
T-ShirtSweatshirt design. This contest is open
exclusively to you, the School of Business students.
For more details, come by the Professional Programs
o�ficcin Room 1200 of the General Ck�mnm
DEADLINE EXTENSION
New Deadline Is APRIL 30 1993
linaliiti.
�Free f-shirts imprinted with the winning r ,
� iloo git cMfeM ton, ike Ecu Sluto, m M p� mJm
W,nm� w,l bo fcaiured In ,be nett School ol Siislna. nowiten.
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-
f-fS�
10 The East Carolinian
MARCH 16, 1993
Pharcyde plays with words, not controversy, on latest vinyl
By Thomas Croft
Staff Writer
Thequadcleveryounghip-hop
squad, The Pharcyde, beat-boxes for
Lou Rawls in red boxer drawers,
with hair on the tongue, a peg-leg
with a kick stand and an afro with a
ch in strap.
Averaging about 21-years-old,
The Pharcyde's gots the flyest rap
scootie out now on vinyl, on Deli-
cious Vinyl (see Brand New Heav-
ies). Take a Bizarre Ride to The
Pharcyde, the group's debut LP,
dishes twelve tunes (and four skits)
a h much fatter De La and a valiumed
down Q-Tip.
Theshit'sdope'n'lite, feel-good
rhymes on rruxxi organs, sly pianos,
slappy persussion and J i mi Hendrix,
Bob Marley, Quincy Jonesjames
Brownsamples which ya'wouldn't
catch a-one. "Ya'Mama "Passing
Me By "Oh Shit and "Soul
Flower" (originally on Brand New
Heavies' Heavy Rhyme Experience
Vol. I) a re The rha rcy d e's best tunes.
The group cuts tempos with
deft precision, undercutting the call
and response tag-team lyric fest each
rapper tosses around like Harlem
Globetrotters hot potato ball over
the shoulder like butter.
The downside to The
Pharcyde's ride is its tendency to
BOOKS
wear juvenile; serious substance and
controversial hype it's not. Clever
word play, pfun pun'n'roiling
tongue tripping with fresh
vocabuslang it's loaded on.
Thekidsaren'thard street;they
aren't soft silk; no gangsta mess; no
overdone blunt rollin' eight ballin'
40 tuggin' freaks allowed in this
house.
They'rekidsvvholovetohit the
shit on the mic, simple.
Continued from page 7
Most of the beats are phat
grooves but some rhythms get
whacked and sound almost tcx
spontane for vinyl, however deli-
cious.
Some loungy jazz drums fill a
couple of the skits, a la De La Dead
or Black Sheep.
It'sagood buy 'cuz, these feelin'
fellas are down. And like they rap
on "Pack the Pipe "The bud, not
the beer, thebud makes me wise
MAY
gives an overall impression not un-
like that of fake wood panelling on
the side of a 73 Chrysler Town &
Country family-sized station
wagon.
Tarry ho though mighty critic,
overlook ye not Small's valiant at-
tempt at stamping his firm nod to
old-school staplesand pioneers such
as KRS-One, Ice Cube, 3rd Bass,
Run D.M.C Kool Moe Dee and L.L.
Cool J, yet erstwhile stolidly main-
tainingadefiniteslanttoward newer
apd cutting-edgehip-hop kidssuch
as Q-Tip, Digital Underground,
Black Sheep, 2Pac, Naughty By Na-
ture and Tim Dog.
The book begins with Afrika
Bambaataa'ship-hopdictionary,the
Top Five rappers (including groups)
of 1992 and a profile of MTV's ef-
forts to sustain and promote rap
(including profiles of Yo! MTV Rnps'
very own Ed Lover and Doctor Dre).
Then Small and Perei ra embark on a
178-page journey � encyclopedia
style�through the lives, styles and
names of artists such as AMG,
Bytches With Problems, DJ Quik,
EPMD, The Juice Crew "dynasty
Marley Marl, Kid Frost, Monie Love,
Too Short, Yo Yo and even Vanilla
Ice. (By the way, Ice's real name is
Robert Van Winkle and during his
first tour he wore Femi Uomo after-
shave;heusedWellitecreambleach
toputthe streak in hishairand Vital
Care Superspritz to hold his hair-
cut).
Peppered throughout Break It
Down are (sometimes) interesting
sidebars titled "Hip Hop Topic
which usually amount to several
angled, cropped photos and a cool
quote by someone you've heard of.
Kind of fluffy stuff if you ask me.
Small ends the book with the
Top 10 rap albumsand videos of all
time(in which ATribeCalled Quest
rightfully makes it in twice): Afrika
Bambaataa's list of major moments
in hi p-hop history, another hi p-hop
dictionary, Gold and Platinum rap
albumsand singles, includingthose
by The Fat Boys, The 2 Live Crew,
Beastie Boys and Doug E. Fresh and
the Get Fresh Crew and finally four
"early rap singles that were not cer-
tified but probably sold a million or
more includingSugar Hill Gang's
"Rapper'sDelight"and Grandmas-
ter Flash's "The Message
"Rap music requires full atten-
tion. It isn't background music. The
words whiz by in a monotonous
blur until you listen carefully. Then
the variety of techniques becomes
clear. Some rappers focus on lan-
guage, finding fresh ways to reviv d
old boasts,whiIeothers make jokes,
tell true stories or tall tales wrote
Small in the book's introduction. "I
heard the Brand Nubian song'Slow
Down' a dozen times and never
realized, until I saw lyrics in print,
that it contains a stinging condem-
nation of drug addiction.
The track's rich languagedeliv-
ers a message reminiscent of Joni
Mitchell's'Cold BlueSteel and Sweet
Fire
lndeed,Small'sadef writer and
Pereira a fly photo man. But seven-
teen bucks is a few too many to shell
out on their book, however infor-
mative and entertaining it may be.
The bottom line is, if you know rap,
vou alreadv know this book.
U S.D.A. CHOICE GRAIN FED BEEF
T-BONE OR
Porterhouse
Steak
RED, WHITE OR THOMPSON
Seedless
Blue Crapes
FROZEN SELECTED VARIETIES
Banquet
Family Entrees
9
WITH PRICES LIKE THIS
WHY SHOP ANYWHERE ELSE?
CONDITIONER OR
White Rain
Hair Spray
7 0z.
SAVE
50
"IN THE DELI - PASTRY SHOPPE"
Chocolate
Fudge cake
S
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE,
DIET COKE, SPRITE OR
coca cola
Classic
8-Inch
36-Oz.
WESTERN
UNION
MONEY
TRANSFER
The fastest way to
send money.
AVAILABLE AT ALL
KROGER STORES
COPYRIGHT 1993-THE KROGER CO.
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD SUNDAY, MAR.
14 THROUGH SATURDAY, MAR. 20, 1993
IN GREENVILLE. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT
TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO
DEALERS.
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY- Each of these
advertised items is required to be readily ava
able for sale in each Kroger Store, except as
specifically noted in this ad. If we do run out of
an advertised item, we will offer you your
choice of a comparable item, when available,
reflecting the same savings or a raincheck
which will entitle you to purchase the adver-
tised item at the advertised price within 30
days. Only one vendor coupon will be accept-
ed per item purchased.
LOVE YOUR
MOTHER
RECYCLE!
Continued from page 7
May will be promoting Back
To The Light while he tours this
winter and spring as the opening
act for Guns 'N' Roses. Axl Rose
has always admitted to being a
big Queen fan.
May said, in the February 18,
1993 issue of Rolling Stone, "Axl
and Slash sent me a message say-
ing, 'Please do it I was thrilled
May also said the album
helped h i m recover from the death
of his father and Mercury as well
as the demise of his marriage. Back
To The Light isn't brilliant, it isn't
"Bohemian Rhapsody what it is
is a bunch of well performed, well
written songs about life.
Don't be left out
of the picture!
Sign up for on-campus housing next year
during the week of March 15.
Fa further information, please contact
University Housing at 757-6450.
ATTENTION
COMPLETE YOUR FOREIGN LANGUAGE
IN ONE SUMMER!
Department of Foreign Languages and Literature
will offer Accelerated Courses in
FRENCH and SPANISH
Summer 1993
FIRST SUMMER SESSION May 18 to June 22
French 1001 - 1002 & Spanish 1001 - 1002
SECOND SUMMER SESSION June 24 to July 3CJ
French 1003 - 1004 & Spanish 1003 - 1004
For more information call 757017
Charles
Your favorite Irish &. English
Beer on Tap at Special Prices
Jt&jt each Oysters
Steamed & Raw All Night hong!
"Celebrate the Spirit
with Green Beer"
752-2450
Corner of 10th and Charles
Tues-Thurs 5:00-9:30
Fri-Sat4:00-10:00 Sun 12-9:30
771 p 11 i 11 mm
Tuesday
is
Student Appreciation
Day
SEAFOOD
626 S. Memorial Drive
Present your 1993 Student ID
Card and get:
YOUR CHOICE OF
ANY DINNER FOR ONLY
$029
Excluding platters & family packs
Not valid with any other discounts
Beverages and desserts not included
llllll!ll"ll!IIIIIH

'�
�4








mmmtmmmmmllll)lllmmmmm
The East Carolinian
March 16, 1993
Sports
Page 11
Pirates reborn with trip to NCAA Tourney
By Billy Weaver
Staff Writer
Who would 've thunk it? The
Democrats take control, Elvis
sighted flipping burgers across
America, and the East Carolina
Pirates are going to the "Big
Dance
The only other time an ECU
basketball team has advanced to
theNCAAtoumamentwasin 1972
when the Pirates were involved in
a similar three-game sweep of the
Southern Conference tournament.
Ironically, JMU coach "Lefty"
Dreisell was the coach ofDavidson
College. East Carolina beat
Davidson to advance to the NCAA
tournament.
Twenty-one years later, the Pi-
rates pulled one of the biggest up-
sets in 1993 tournament play by
eliminating No. 2 Old Dominion
University, No. 6 UNC-
Wilmington, and "Lefty's" No. 1
James Madison University in the
CAA tournament in Richmond,
Va.
ECU was the first team to
make it to the NCAA tournament
with a losing record (13-16) since
Montana State did it back in 1986.
The Pirates will have to make it to
the Final Four to end their season
with a winning record but to the
Pirates and their fans, this a win-
ning season no matter what hap-
pens in the "Big Dance
The reward for nothing less
than an incredible performance in
the CAA tournament is an auto-
matic bid to the NCAA tourna-
ment and the right to play the
nation's No. 1 team Thursday in
Winston Salem � Dean Smith's
Norm Carolina Tarheels.
QUARTERFINALS: ECU 73
ODU 67
East Carolina stumbled into
the tournament with a 4-10 con-
ference record and the No. 7 seed,
ahead of only George Mason, and
was expected to lose to No. 2 seed
Old Dominion in the first round.
Someone forgot to tell that to Ike
Copeland. Realizing that a loss in
the first round would end his col-
EGUvs
ECU (54)
Mln fg ft
m-a r.i-a
Young 2S 7-11 1-2
CHI 24 4-6 2-2
Copeland 34 0-0 2-2
Ljron. 33 5,13 S-2
"irhjrrf�iii,24 4-8 0-0
llunlrr 12 1-4 0-0
Mini 22 0-5 0-0
Uwta 23 1-1 0-0
ECU
rb
o-t
1-5
1-7
1-5
0-1
1-3
0,2
0-1
1-0
(55)
Mln (g
ECU
fi
1
4
3
3
1
1
2
3
�P
15
10
2
14

2
0
2
m-a m-a
2-6 5-S
1-7 1-3
1-3 4-6
Totals 2(1022-48 7-8 5-32
13 18 54
I III! � Miami (I, FG - 4SH. Ft. 875. 3 Pt. Coal 3-9 -
.333. Tram Rebounds - D, Blocked Shorn - 4,
Turnover - 12. Steak - 3.
JMU (49)
Young 32
CHI 27
Copeland 36
Lyons 28 6-12 3-3
Rirh�rrfnnn32 2-4 1-4
lame 04- 0-0 0-0
Hunter 6 1-3 0-0
Pelerwn 22 2-5 3-6
Arfn4tmna,fl 0-0 0-0
Toliver Ot 0-0 1-2
Lewla 17 1-1 1-3
rb
o-l
0-4
3-10
4-11
1-1
1-3
0-0
1-2
2-5
0-0
0-0
1-1
73
Mln
Pf
0
3
1
4
1
1
0
2
0
0
1
P

3
6
IS
6
0
2
7
0
1
3
Young 25
CHI 35
Copeland 36
l.yona 32
Klrhjr.li.on30
Hunter 9
Petenon 17
l.ewla 16
fg
m-a
3-8
6-8
9-10
2-8
0-9
1-3
3-7
3-4
2-2
2-3
6-6
2-2
4-4
0-0
1-2
1-2
rb
o-t
3-4
1-2
3-11
1-2
1-6
1-1
0-1
2-4
Pf
1
1
2
3
1
2
2
3
�P
8
14
24

it!
2
8-
Mln fg ri
m-a m-a
Carter 21 1-3 2-2
Rilter 24 1-5 1-2
Chamber 38 2-6 0-0
Edwards 36 4-10 2-3
Davii 36 7-14 2-4
Robinson 4 0-0 0-0
McLinton 3 0-10-0
Vensnn 20 2-2 3-6
Culuko 18 M 2-6
rb
o-t
0-3
0-5
2-6
1-2
2-6
0-0
0-0
0-3
0-2
Pf
2
3
2
3
1
1
1
0
1
�P
4
3
4
11
6
o
7
4
Totals 20018-4412-23 6-28 7 w IT
IWcni.Bc lc- - .4W, k 3BZ J pt. TBshlSr
1�1, Team Rebound - 1, Blocked Shot - 3,
Turnover - 9, Steals - 3.
IVrrnl.ic PC . .TOO. p .5,3. 3 pi. Coals: 412 �
.333. Tcnm Ri-h.iun.lr. - 3, Blocked Shot - S,
Turnovers - 1R, Steal - 4.
UNCW (50)
Mln fg ft rb
m-a m-a o-t
Shaw 34 3-9 2-2 1-6
Moore 29 0-7 0-0 3-5
El S.r.�dHy22 2-5 1-2 1-5
)nne� 23 3-9 0-0 3-5
Veney 27 2-9 0-0 3-3
Adkins 13 5-9 3-3 1-1
Spann 12 1-1 2-2 0-2
Phillip 18 1-5 0-0 0-2
Peten 2 0-0 0-0 0-0
Melghan 18 1-3 0-0 0-0
Roykln 2 0-O0-0 0-2
Totals 20027-5718-21 14-33 14 15 71
Percentages: FG - .474, Ft. 857,3 pt. Conb: 1-5 .
200, Team Rebound - 2, Blocked Shot - 7,
Turnovers - 13, Steak - 8.
ODU (67)
Mln
Pf
3
3
4
2
2
4
5
5
1
0
0
P
a
0
5
7
5
16
4
2
0
3
0
fR �
m-a m-a
4-7 4-4
3-7 3-3
3-7 0-2
Sessoms 32
Mullen 37
Hodge 36
Anderson 32 4-9 4-4
lackson 35 8-13 0-0
Swann 8 0-0 0-0
Larkln 14 2-4 0-0
Harvey 6 2-2 0-0
rb
o-t
1-3
2-5
1-10
1-2
0-1
0-0
0-0
0-0
Pf
0
5
2
2
2
2
1
1
15
4l
fj
12
l1
�R
4
K

Totals 200 26-4911-13 5-23 8 15 t7
l-ercenlage: rC - 531, Ft. -Mb, 3 pt. Coals: 4-il) -
-401), Team Rebound - 2, Blocked Shots - 6,
Turnovers - 14, Steak - 9.
ECU
JMU
1st half 2nd half OT
Tnlab 20018-57 8-9 13-33 8 29 50
23
22
Final
31
27
54
49
rVrrcnlaRcs: PC - .116, Ft. 889,3 pt. Coals: 6-16 -
.375. Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots - 2,
Turnovers - 17, Steak - 11.
ECU
ODU
1st half 2nd half OT
30
31
43
36
Final
731
ECU
UNCW
� Unfit2nd half OT
27
17
28
33
Final
55
50
(1) James Madison
ECU found inspiration during the CAA tournament after a thankless
regular season. The Pirates will face North Carolina in the first round.
(8) George Mason
James Madison
lege career, the 6'9" Senior was like
a man possessed. Copeland shot
nine of 10 from the field, six of six
from the line, 11 rebounds, three
assists, two blocked shots and two
steals. "You don't play much better
than that Coach Eddie Payne said.
ECU led the Monarchs by 12
points early in the first half only to
have ODU reel off 11 unanswered
points to cut the Pirate lead to one
(22-21), ODU's only lead of the first
half came at the 3:00 mark but the
Pirates managed to take a one point
lead into the lockerroom (31-30)
Byhalftime it was evident that
center Ike Copeland was going to
have a big game. Copeland had
already chalked up 10 points, lead-
ing all scorers in the first half, and
he held the CAA's rookie of the
year Odell Hodge in check. Hodge
failed toscoreany points in the first
half.
The Monarchs came out after
the intermission to make a state-
ment. ODU's first field-goal was a
three-pointer and by the 12:40 mark.
ODU held their biggest lead of the
game, 52-44. Copeland and the Pi-
rates took note of the Monarch run
in the first half, and went on a 7-0
run of their own, cutting the ODU
lead to 52-51.
See CAA page 13
(4) American
(5) William & Mary
American
James Madison
On the road to
the
Dance
(7) East Carolina
(2) Old Dominion
East Carolina
(6) UNC-Wilmington
(3) Richmond
UNC-Wilmington
East Carolina
East Carolina
Women fare well, but fall short in semifinals vs. ODU
Dv D i IK � VAta. � f h-� t r.i i rnamon f -�� �-�� - 11; � R - (Ka ft � C 1 l ,L� ���. I r M�a
By Billy Weaver
Staff Writer
QUARTERFINALS ECU 72 GMU 50
TheCA A Women's Tournament was
held this weekend at the Old Dominion
University Fieldhouse in Norfolk, Va.
The East Carolina Lady Pirates entered
the tournament as the No. 5 seed and
had high hopes of duplicating the per-
formance by ECU in the Men's CAA
tournament. The Lady Pirates faced No.
4 seed George Mason in the first round of
the tournament.
ECU dominated the Lady Patriots
the entire game. The Lady Pirates led
GMU 41-23 at halftime and led by as
much as 24 points early in the second
period.
"The first half was totally uncharac-
teristic of our season GMU coach Jim
Lewis said. GMU found themselves in
foul trouble early.
Eventually, three Lady Patriots start-
ers would foul out. George Mason also
found it hard to convert easy layups
inside.
On the other side of the ball, the
Lady Pirates seemed to do everything
right. Rhonda Smith led all scorers with
22 points and Gaynor O'Donnell set a
tournament record with 13 assists.
Two other games followed the ECU
rout and both ended in similar upsets.
William and Mary, seeded seventh in
the tournament, came from 11 points
down to knock off No. 2 James Madison
60-58. American, No. 6 seed, overcame
an eight point deficit to beat No. 3 Rich-
mond on a last second shot by Karen
Jenkins 59-57.
No. 1 Old Dominion was the only
favored team to win in the tournament.
ODU topped No. 8 UNCW and would
host ECU in the semifinals.
SEMIFINALS ECU 67 ODU 85
ODU entered the CAA tournament
undefeated in conference play at 14-0
and had swept the Lady Pirates in the
regular season. ECU was looking for their
first win over the Lady Monarchs in five
meetings, including a loss in the CAA
tournament finals last year, but the depth
of scoring by Old Dominion over-
whelmed the Lady Pirates.
"I still have a scare (mentally) from
last year's final senior Gaynor
O'Donnell said.
CAA Player of the Year Celeste Hill
led the Lady Monarch stampede with 20
points and 12 rebounds. Deanna Vander
Plas scored a career high 18 points and
Pam Huntley added 17, eight of ODU's
first 10.
Both teams committed numerous
fouls and combined for a tournament
record 54 fouls, 29 of which were pro-
vided by the Lady Pirates, also a tourna-
ment record.
By the 8:51 mark in the second half,
five Lady Pirates were in foul trouble
with four personals each. Thurman,
Samuels, Coley and O'Donnell , all Se-
nior starters, would eventually foul out.
Without thedepth of opposingODU, the
Lady Pirates found themselves strug-
gling to stay in the game. "We have lived
and died by our five Seniors Coach
Rosie Thompson said.
Reboundfng was another key factor
in this semifinal game. The Lady Mon-
archs out-rebounded ECU by a huge 52-
26 margin, 26 of which were offensive,
matching ECU's total.
Gaynor O'Donnell played consis-
tently all year at 40 minutes per game,
but O'Donnell found herself in a rare
situation. Gaynor was on the bench in
foul trouble.
"When Gaynor O'Donnell is not run-
ning the Lady Pirate offense, we're in big
trouble Thompson said.
The Lady Monarchs went on to win
the CAA tou rnament in the finals against
upstart William and Mary and advance
to the NCAA Tournament.
Gaynor O'Donnell surpassed the
1,000 career point mark against ODU.
O'Donnell also clinched the NCAA's as-
sist title with 11 assists and was named
to the CAA all-tournament team. "We
went down fighting O'Donnell said.
The Lady Pirates end their season
with a 16-12 record.
ECU vs ODU
ECU vs GMU
ECU (67)ECU (72)
MinfgftrbMinfRftrb
m-am-ao-tapf�Pm-am-ao-taPf S�P
Thurman 275-97-82-30517Thurman 163-50-00-00
Samuels 368-140-01-4?l16
Samuels 335-101-20-01512Smith 298-106-71-10137?
Smith 355-81-20-100411Coley 383-54-51-957in
Coley 332-101-13-8255O'Donnell 403-103-50-61379
O'Donnell 366-94-81-311516Cagle 20-10-00-000n
Cagle 40-02-20-0002Rodgerson 40-20-20-0000
Rodgerson 30-00-004000James 60-03-40-001I
James 91-30-20-0022Sutton 232-22-21-405is
Sutton IS1-30-11-1022Baker 60-10-00-1n?0
Baker 50-1w0-0010
Totals 20025-5316-26
Percentages: FG - .472, Ft.
8-26 14 29 67
615, 3 pt Goals: 1-5-
.200, Team Rebounds - 1, Blocked Shots - 1,
Turnovers - 20, Steals -7.
Totals 20027-5018-25 5-35 21 21 fj.
Percentages: FG - .540, Ft. 720, 3 pt Goals: 0-4
-000, Team Rebounds -1, Blocked Shots - 1, r
Turnovers - 26, Steals -10.
ODU (85)
Min fg ft rb
m-a m-a o-t a pf
Hill 29 7-14 6-6 4-12 2 4
Reynolds 20 5-7 1-2 2-5 1 3
Gilmore 29 3-9 1-2 3-5 0 1
Huntley 28 5-10 5-6 2-3 4 2
V.Plas 25 6-9 6-7 2-2 2 3
Singleton 12 0-13-6 4-6 3 3
Deberry 8 0-10-0 2-3 0 1
Robinson 17 0-5 5-7 1-4 2 4
Rowley 2 0-0 0-0 0-1 0 0
Picache 17 0-4 0-1 2-2 2 2
Mason 5 1-1 0-0 1-10 1
Willyerd 8 1-4 0-1 3-5 0 1
P
20
11
7
17
18
3
0
5
0
0
2
2
GMU (50)
Min
Teter 22
Watson 25
Hilton 38
Chaconas 34
Harrison 33
Hinnerichs 1
Mattheus 23
Reynolds 6
Weems 4
Lacey 11
Boone 3
fg
m-a
0-3
3-5
6-13
2-8
4-12
0-1
2-7
1-1
0-4
0-4
1-1
ft
m-a
0-1
0-0
7-10
1-4
4-4
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
rb
o-t
2-2
0-2
4-12
1-4
1-1
1-1
1-6
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-0
pf
5
5
2
5
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
tp
0
6
19
5
12
0
4
2
0
0
2
Totals 200 28-6527-38 26-52 16 25 85
Percentages: FG - .431, Ft. 711, 3 pt. Goals: 2-4 -
.500,Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots - 3,
1st half 2nd half OT Final
ECU 35 32 - 67
Totals 20019-5912-19 16-39 12 20 50
Percentages: FG - .322, Ft. 632, 3 pt. Goals: 0-8 -
.000, Team Rebounds - 8, Blocked Shots -5,
Turnovers - 27, Steals -11.
Pirate baseball takes early lead
ODU
46
39
85
ECU
GMU
1st half
41
2nd half
31
OT
Final
72
23
27
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
East Carolina took the early
lead in the race for the 1993 CAA
basebaUcrownastheysweptathree-
game series from the visiting James
Madison Dukes on Saturday and
Sunday at Harrington field.
In the first game on Saturday,
ECU scored eight runs in the fourth
inning tokeya come-from-behind,
14-12 win over the Dukes.
The Pirates sent 12 men to the
plate in the fourth inning to chase
JMU starter RickCroushore(0-2)and
scored five runs before JMU recorded
its first out of the inning.
Chris West led the Pirates with
twohits,includinga homemn(No.3)
and fourRBIs,and Pat Watkins added
three singles, one RBI and a stolen
base. Jamie Borelhadapairofdoubles,
one RBI and a stolen base, and Kein
Obholz also knocked two hits, in-
dudingadoubleandoneRBI tospark
the Pirates.
Howard Whitfield (2-0)
pitched three and two-thirds in-
nings in relief of starter Lyle
Hartgrove to pick up the win for
the Pirates.
Kevin Nehring, Joe Higman
and Brad Edsell led the Dukes 16-
hit attack. Nehring had a single,
two home runs (Nos. 2 and 3) and
four RBIs, and Higman also hit a
See BASEBALL page 14
50
Fisher finds new home at ECU
By Dave Pond
Staff Writer
After PembrokeState University
dropped their tennis program for fi-
nancial reasons, their former No. 1
seeded player has transferred to East
Carolina. Sammy Fisher, who wason
a full scholarship at Pembroke, trans-
ferred with hopes of achieving the
same goals here as he achieved whi le
playing at PSU.
Fisher was born in Minot, North
Dakota to Samuel and Sandra Fisher.
He has two sisters and a brother, all of
which whoareyounger. Hemoved to
Gddsborobeforehiseighthgradeyear,
where he attended Eastern Wayne
High School.
In his eighth grade year Fisher
practiced with the high school squad,
then played varsity for the four years
that he attended Eastern Wayne. He
was the number two seed his fresh-
man, sophomore and junior seasons,
then took over the number one seed
his senior year.
Fisher received an athletic-
acedemic scholarship based on his
tennis skills combined with his 3.4
grade point average and 1100 SAT
score.
"Besides the scholarship, I chose
Pembrokebecausel wanted togetmy
feet in college tennis before transfer-
ring but I didn't know it would be
this soon said Fisher.
See TENNIS page 14
I
�I���- v Si
RMRMw.





t
12 The East Carolinian
MARCH 16, 1993
Roseboro sets two school
records in Boston meet
'By Rick Chann
.Staff Writer
Danita Roseboro set two school
records at the ECAC championship
meet on March 7th in Boston. Roseboro
�competed in the 55m dash and 200m
� dash at the meet. In the 55m dash, she
ran 7.08 seconds in the trials and ad-
i vanced to the semifinals. She ran a 7.02,
a- school record, in the semifinals but
missed the finals by one place. She
placed 7thinthe200mdash witha time
of 24.41 seconds. Her time set a new
school record and is faster than her
outdoor 200m record.
Susan Schram placed ninth in the
"sYiot put. Head Coach Charlie justice
felt Schram could have easily been top
six in the meet but she struggled on her
early throws. Her last throw of 44' 51
4" was enough for 9th but she missed
the finals by one place. Justice said
he was, "disappointed for her" be-
ca use it was her last collegiate meet.
Two freshman also competed
for ECU in the meet. Carla Powell
ran 7.50 seconds in the 55m dash.
Jennifer Kalanick ran in the 55m
hurdles, but hit the first hurdle and
failed to finish the race.
The men's track team competed
twice during spring break. Their
first meet was the IC4A champion-
ship meet in Boston on March 7th.
Charles Miles lead the tea m with his
first place finish in the 200m dash.
His time of 21.19 seconds was good
enough toqualifyhim for theNCAA
meet the following weekend.
Miles, competing at the NCAA
meet in his home town of India-
napolis, ran the 200m dash in 21.47
seconds. His time wasgood for third
in hisheatbutwasn'tfast enough
to reach the finals.
Danny Allette also ran in
the 200 and placed ninth with a
time of 22.0 sec. In the 55m dash,
Miles and Brent Gibson both
ran 637 seconds and tied for
fifth place. Corey Brooks placed
fifth in the 400m run in a ti me of
48.2 seconds. The Pirates fin-
ished the meet in 12th place out
of 43 teams competing.
This past weekend Brian
Irvan, former ECU track All-
American, competed in the
World Indoor Track and Field
Championshipsheld in Toronto,
Canada. Irvin was a member of
the 4x400 meter relay team that
placed first in the meet. Also on
the team was world record
holder Butch Reynolds.
Mackey holds onto lead in Iditarod
UN ALAKLEET, Alaska (AP)�
Rick Mackey was holding on to a
one minute lead as he left the
Unalakleet checkpoint Sunday
night, 862 miles into the 21st Iditarod
Trail Sled Dog Race.
Mackey, who won the race in
1983, left the checkpoint on the
Bering Sea Coast at 9:22 p.m one
minute before Jeff King.
The two are the only teams re-
ported out of Unalakleet, a city of
about 700 and the first checkpoint
on windy Norton Sound.
Dee Dee Jonrowe and Martin
Buser reached the checkpoint at
about6:30p.mbuthad not left four
hours later, race officials said.
As the leaders in the 1,100-mile
race to Nome began their final 270
miles, it appeared King and
Mackey's teams had established
dominant positions.
Jonrowe and King had been
trading the lead for the past two
days, with Buser's team beginning
to slow after setting the pace for the
race's first week.
Buser told Alaska Public Radio
Network late Saturday that his team
had caught a bug that has plagued
other mushers. As a result, he said,
his dogs needed more rest and
weren't in a position to keep up
with King and Jonrowe, who were
leading at that point.
"This mightbe the turningpoint
in the race Buser said. "At a given
point you can't do just your pro-
gram anymore. You have to react to
what other people are doing
Mackey, in third place at mid-
day, captured the lead by speeding
to Unalakleet from Kaltag. He ran
the 90 miles in 10 hours, about an
hour faster than King. Mackey still
had 19 dogs out of Unalakleet, the
iargest team in the race. Four-time
winnerSusan Butchersaid Mackey's
dogs looked like the strongest team.
Butcher was in fifth place Sun-
day, but with just 10 of the 18 dogs
she began the race with. She said she
was concerned about finishing and
appeared ready to concede any
hopes of winning this year.
Race rules require mushers to
finish with at least eight dogs.
"The thing that's in the back of
my mind, I'm thinking, can I even
finish this race?" she said.
At the current pace, the winner
should cross the finish line some-
time Wednesday after completing a
mandatory 12-hour layoveratWhite
Mountain, 77 miles from Nome.
More than $400,000 in prize
money will be awarded to the top
finishers mis year, with the winner
taking home $50,000.
Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream
Specials
Sunday - Sundaes
10 OFF All Sundaes on Sundays
TXiesday - Two For One
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Place
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No Coupons Needed


Wed. March 17th
ALL DAY LONG!
DRAWINGS &
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AND DRINK SPECIALS!
Located behind Quincy's on Greenville Blvd.
355-2946
WE HAVE
OPENINGS FOR STUDENT
RENTALS FOR
1993-94 SCHOOL YEAR
INTERESTED STUDENTS SHOULD
CALL 758-5393
BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR ECU STUDENTS
WE PROVIDE: FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENTS
ALL GLASSDISHESSILVERWARE
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WED & SUN, MARCH 17 & 21
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m SAT, MARCH 20, 7 PM
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TUE, MARCH 23, 8 PM
ROOM 244, MSC
$1 Admission with Student I.D.
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FORUM I LAST LECTURE SERIES
LAST DR. HAL DANIEL ecu's
ItudV LffiTBRE WED MARCH 24' 8 PM STUDENT
unVon7s SSriS ROOM 244, MSC union is
For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently
accepting resumes for the
following positions:
ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
This job entails prospecting new clients, selling
creative advertising campaigns and supporting
advertising clients. Reguirements: Minimum 2.0
G.P.A. No previous sales experience is reguired
but is helpful. Open to all majors.
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer de
signed advertisements using sound
design principles including; contrast
and focal point. Reguirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working
knowledge of Macintosh
applications; PageMaker, Freehand,
QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
This job entails managing all aspects of the
Advertising Department including hiring, train-
ing and managing the sales staff and Creative
Director. Reguirements:
Minimum 2.5 G.P.A. and at least one
semester as a print media Account
Executive. Open to all majors.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN: ALWAYS LOOKING FOR PROFESSIONALS'
������� i.i�����





; � a ��

MARCH 16. 1993
The East Carolinian
13
CAA
Continued from page 11
Thebackbrt. kerforODUcame
down the stretch when they were
down 67-65. A Monarch steal had
Petey Sessoms streaking down the
court for an easy dunk,
ummmlayupnodunk?
Evidently, Sessoms didn't
know what he wanted to do either.
The result, a missed easy basket
that would have tied the score.
With :23 seconds left, Home
Team Sport's player-of-the game
Ike Copeland finished off ODU
with a big rebound and two clutch
free throws. "AgreatwinforEast
Carolina basketball Payne said.
"Our guys really executed well
down the stretch The Pirates
pulled off the big shocker over ODU
73-67.
"We don't want to be content
with this win. We have more busi-
ness to do Coch Payne said. In-
deed the Pirates business was not
finished as ECU was headed for the
semi-finalsand thebackyard-brawl
with UNC-Wilmington.
SEMIFINALS:
ECU 55 UNC-W 50
After the Pirates shocked the
Monarchs and UNC-W stunned
No. 3 Richmond in the opening
rounds of the CAA tournament,
the two teams met in the semifi-
nals. After losing to the Seahawks
in double overtime earlier in the
season and losing again to the
Seahawks in the last game of the
regular season, the Pirates wereout
to settle the score.
UNC-W couldn't buy a basket
during the first half. The Seahawks
shot an atrocious 23 percent from
the field. ECU failed to put many
points on the board themselves.
With 3:55 left in a low-scoring first
half, there was only a 23-11 infavor
of theupstartPirates. ECU would
take a 10 point lead (27-17) at half-
time. "Itwasn'tanartisticgame by
any means UNC-W Coach Kevin
Eastman said.
In the second half, the Pirates
never led by less than five points
and the Seahawks continued to
shoot poorly. With theadditionof
a great Pirate defense, ECU man-
aged to pull out a win, shooting a
mere 39 percent from the field for
the game. Fortunately for the Pi-
rates, the Seahawk shooti ng was a
season-low 31 percent.
"We can't say a whole lot other
than we just didn't play well
Eastman said. "Hats off to Eddie
Payne and his crew talk about
fighting through adversity when
things weren't going well they
could have folded
Lester Lyons led all scorers
with 18 points. Ike Copeland and
AtonGillcombined for21 of ECU's
40 rebounds. For the second straight
game, the Pirates managed toout
rebound theiropponent.
For UNCW, Keith Adkins
scored 13 of his 16 team high points
within the last threeminutesof the
game. Despite a great last-minute
surgeby the Seahawks, the Pirates
proceeded tostunyetanotherCAA
opponent.
"We're just truly excited and
looking forward to the champion-
ship game Coach Payne said.
"There's no
pressure on ��
us we rego �� We dont want to be
content with this
and we're
going to play
hard
FINALS
ECU 54
JMU 49
The last
time ECU played James Madison it
was Feb. 6 in Greenville and JMU
was a t the top of the CAA with a 7-
0 conference record. On that full
moon Sa turday evening, the Pirates
handed James Madison their first
CAA lossof the season. Ironically,
in theCA A finals, thePirates would
face "Lefty" Driesell's No. 1 JMU
Dukes.
The Pirates came out playing
with the same fire and intensity
that propelled them to the finals.
ECU held the Dukes to their lowest
point total of the season, nearly 33
points below their average. "I don't
know what to say JMU's Driesell
said. "Last yearODU was fifth seed.
ECU was a No. 7 seed. Next year
I'm going to lose in the regular
season
JMUshot only 40 percent from
the field and failed to hit critical
free throws. JMU's Kent Culuko,
who shot 85.7 percent from the line
thisseason,missedfourofhisfive
free throw
attempts in
the second
half. "I'm
goingtoquit
coaching in
tourna-
ments
Driesell
said, after
losing in the
CAA tournament finals for thethird
time in four years.
The Pirates knew that this
would bea hard foughtbattle. "It's
like a heavyweight prize fight
Payne said. "We expected them to
put one between our eyes The
Piratesdid in fact suffer two hard
blows. The Dukes held ECU against
the ropes for 6:54 of the first half
without allowing a Pirate score.
The Pirates refused to go down.
Lester Lyons and Curley Young
stepped up to deliver 16 of ECU's
last 18 points.
win. We have more
business to do
Coach Payne
After a JMU turnover late in
the game, Lyons hit a big three-
pointer to put ECU ahead 46-42.
JMU then came back totiethe score
at 46 with 3:35 left to play.
With the game knotted up,
Curley Young turned his defense
up a notch and blocked William
Da vis'jumper. Young then hita big
15-foot jumper to give ECU the
lead for good at 48-46.
With time running out, JMU's
Kent Culuko was fouled in three-
point land by Lyons. Culuko had a
chance to cut the Pirate lead to one,
but he missed two of three shots
from the line. The Dukes still had
lifeasCuluko'sreboundwastipped
out of bounds by An ton Gill.
With 18 seconds remaining,
JMU trailed by three and main-
tained possession of the basketball.
On the inbounding play Bryan
Edward s was wide open from the
three-point line which would have
tied the game. It missed and Ike
Copeland came down with the
huge rebound. Copeland was then
fouled with 14.3 seconds to play.
Copeland, a 57 percent free-
throw shooter,converted bothends
of a one-and-one to give the Pirates
a five-point lead and the CAA
crown. "It's a supernatural experi-
ence Coach Payne said. "This is
what it's all about senior Ike Co-
peland said. "This is the way you
want to end your career
Fortunately for Copeland and
the Pirates, ECU will play at least
one more game this year in the
NCAA tournament. The Pirates
will face North Carolina in the first
round. "If weplay Indiana orCaro-
lina it doesn't matter. We're here to
play Lester Lyons said. Lyons was
named MVP of the CAA tourna-
ment and Ike Copeland wasnamed
to the CAA all-toumament team.
NOTE: Danny Sheridan's
odds for ECU vanning the NCAA
championship are 4 trillion to 1.
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1993 CAA All-
Tournament team:
William Davis -JMU
Jeff Chambers-JMU
Brian Edwards - JMU
Brian Gilgeous - AU
Ike Copeland - ECU
1993 CAA
Tournament Most
Valuable Player
Lester Lyons - ECU
Success
Starts with a
Professional Resume.
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�.w WOMWOW-





afca.
14 The East Carolinian
MARCH 16, 1993
BASEBALL
Continued from page 11
W.
pair of home runs (Nos. 1 and 2) and
added fourRBIs. Edsellalsohad three
hits for JMU, including a double and
one RBI.
Every starter on both teams had
at least one base hit despite wind
gusts up to60 mph and a severedrop
in temperature to below freezing as
the game progressed.
In a doubleheader on Sunday,
Johnny Beck and Mike Sanbum both
pitched complete game victories as
EastCarolina completed its weekend
sweep. The Pirates defeated JMU 2-1
in the first game and 1-0 in game two
to help avenge an 0-4 record to the
Dukes in 1992.
"Its great to get started off 3-0
with three conference wins behind
us ECU Head Coach Gary Overton
said. "A great deal of credit goes to
our pitchers today, and overall I was
pleased with our effort in every as-
pect of the games today
In the firstgameonSunday,Beck
(3-2) struck out six and scattered eight
hitsinseveninningstooutduelJMU's
Chris Slonaker (1-2) for the win. Beck
pitched out of some early jams and
did not allow a run until the sixth.
Lee Kushner put the Pirates on
the board early with a leadoff home
run (No. 5) to left field in the second
inning, and Kevin Obholz added an-
other am in the third with a two-out
single to right field to score Frank
Fedak from third.Game two featured
an even better pitching performance
as Sanbum (3-1) bested JMU's Greg
Whiteman (1-2) for his second shut-
out of the season. Only oneJMU run-
ner reached third base as Sanbum
allowed six hits, one walk and struck
out six in nine innings.
My curve was really working for
TENNIS
me today Sanbum said. "I was able
to throw itfor strikes every time. When
I found my change up later in the
game I was really able to keep their
hitters off balance
Whiteman pitched almostasweU
for the Dukes, tying a career high of
ninestrikeoutsand all owing only five
hits. However, in the third inning a
one-out double by Jamie Borel scored
Heath Clark from first with the only
run the Pirates would need.
The Pirates next game will be at
home on todavat3 p.m. against Hart-
ford.
Continued from page 11
Fisher said that after the Pem-
broke program was shut down, he
chose East Carolina beca use he knew
that it would be a challenge and he
could improve his game here. "They
were really good, and I had a lot of
respect for the coach
After talking to Head Coach Bill
Moore,FishertookplaceinPiratePride,
an early- morning conditioning pro-
gram for prospective tennis players,
which is the "make-it-or-break-it" for
the Pirate squad.
Fisher could possibly bringa lotto
the Pirate squad. "He has all the shots
in the game he can play excellent
tennis teammate Anders Ahl said.
"He can explode with amazingdown-
the-line shots
"Sam is an all-court player who
has an all-around game he is quick
and technically sound Moore said.
However Fisher knows that he
has a lot of work to do to win at ECU.
"I need to improve my consistency
he said. Mooreadded. "Sam definitely
needstovvork on the mental aspectsof
the game, and relax more when he is
Paying
"I wou Id li ke to model my mental
game and attitude after Jim Courier
Fisher said.
Heenjoysshootingpool,reading,
and listening to music. Fisher is a com-
munications major who aspires to ei-
ther rum professional, becomea televi-
sion sportscaster, or both.
Fisher is also avidly involved in
Campus Cnisade for Christ, a reli-
gious organization on campus whose
purpose is to share the gospel with
everyone who would like to learn.
"A lotofpeople in my shoes would
quit because I am not playing-yrt
Fisher said, "but I know, if I learn to be
faithful and trust in God now, when I
am playing and winning matches, I
will give Him all the glory
REWARD YOURSELF!
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Spring Break may be over but
you can still break away!
$12 is all you pay
along the Black River in a day!
Saturday March 21
Sampson County, NC is the destination for a
scenic canoe ride along the Black River.
Spanish moss and Cypress trees dominate the
riverscape. Register prior to the pre-trip
meeting held March 24 at 5:00 pm in BD101.
ONLY
$30 A
student!
Explore galore at Linville Gorge!
Friday, April 2-Sunday, April 4
With over 10,000 acres of wilderness, you'll
enjoy the spectacular scenery, hike Table
Rock, camp 2,000 feet above the Linville
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at 5:00pm in BD101.
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Climb the walls at Pitot Mountain!
Friday, April 16-Sunday, April 18
Experience the vertical world of top-rope
climbing. Climbs will be set at the popular
Ampitheater and Three Bears Wall. Relax under
the stars at night. Participants should complete a
Climbing I Workshop prior to registration.
For more details regarding Adventure Programs offered by Recreational
Services, drop in on the The R.O.C. in 117 Christenbury Gymnasium.
CREATION'S
TINY MYSTERY
Dr. Robert V Gentry
International Recognized Authority
On Radiohalos
SCIENCE'S UNSOLVED
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March 23
vr.kiO�
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Hendrix Theatre - 7:OQ PM
Information: Contact Tim Turner at 752-7199
Dr. Gentry will present his work challenging the scientific
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his findings. Agree or disagree, come and hear what many want to keep
quiet. Donations will be accepted.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 16, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 16, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.929
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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