The East Carolinian, March 4, 1993






Sports
Sign up!
With spring on the way, students are
encouraged to register their teams for the
intramural softball season.
See story page 9.
Lifestyle
Bonjoumo
Greenville's latest addition serves up
n authentic Italian cuisine along with great
W atmosphere and service.
See story page 7.
Today
N


Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 15
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, March 4,1993
10 Pages
Daytona offers students 'classic' Spring Break activities
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
What do a Playboy basket-
ball tournament, an international
beauty pageant and MTV have in
common? AH of them, along with
tens of thousands of college stu-
dents from around the nation, wi 11
be in Daytona Beach, Florida next
week during Spring Break.
Destination Daytona the
Convention and Visitors Bureau
and the Chamber of Commerce of
Daytona Beach have organized
about two months of activities
designed to lure college students
south to the sunshine state to party.
Spring break in Daytona be-
gan in mid-February with the ear-
liest visitors being Canadian stu-
dents. According to long-time
Daytona resident Marvin Moore,
"There was a whole pile of Cana-
dians that came down, about
20,000 of them, right after the race.
The local news said that they have
an early spring break
Many of of the city's largest
hotels began their Spring Break
activities on Feb. 15 and will con-
tinue through April 11. Events at
these locations include volleyball
tournaments, parasail rides and
live entertainment.
One of the more popular
annual events is the Miss Hawai-
ian Tropic International Beauty
Pageant to be held March 12 at the
Howard Johnson Hotel. Publicist
David C. Rizzo said, "Over con-
testants will compete for more than
$100,000 in cash and prizes
Celebrity judges for the Pag-
eant include Donald Tru mp, Robin
Leach, Jim Kelly and Wolfman
Jack. The festivities will be filmed
for a syndicated television special
to air later this year.
Rizzo reports that proceeds
from the pageant will benefit the
American Cancer Society and the
Mkomazi Game Reserve in Tan-
zania, Africa.
Another event to be held
during the upcoming week is the
Playboy Spring Break Basketball
Tournament. This annual event
features three person teamsof col-
lege students from universities
across the country.
MTV returns once again for
spring break at Daytona to broad-
cast live from what some consider
to be the world's most famous
beach. The network, which popu-
larized Daytona as a spring break
destination, will hold events at
the Bandshell March 10-17.
The Jackie Robinson
Ballpark will host a month long
College Basketball Jamboree fea-
turing teams from top conferences.
Florida, West Virginia and Illinois
are among the schools scheduled
to compete.
Later in the month leading
manufacturers of car stereos and
sound systems will exhibit their
latest technologies at the Spring
Break Nationals at the Ocean Cen-
ter. Rizzo describes the event as a
"hands-on format where partici-
pants can sit in their cars and ex-
perience the advancements
Those planning to go to
Daytona should plan to pack a
coat or jacket and other warm
clothing. Overcast skies and tem-
peratures in the low 50s greeted
unsuspecting tourists dressed for
warm weather last year.
"It's been cold down here so
far Moore said. "We've had
northeasters, and northwesters,
and all kinds of crazy winds. We've
only had about three pretty days
sincewe've been down this year
In addition to the large
crowds and mass entertainment
offered along "The Strip the
Daytona area hasa fewquietplaces
only a short drive away. Ormond
Beach to the north is a much more
secluded area, and Ponce Inlet to
the south has a quaint brick light-
house and a few good fishing spots
as well.
Photo courtasy Destination Daytona!
The Miss Hawaiian Tropic International Beauty Pageant is one of the many activities planned for Daytona
Beach during Spring Break 1993.
Michael Boswell, an ECU
junior who went to Daytona last
year, shared his thoughts about
the experience.
"It was colder than I thought
it would be, and there weren't as
many people there because it was
cold
"Also, the seafood wasn't as
good as North Carolina's. In fact,
one of my friends ate some bad
fish the last night we were there.
He was so sick the next day, he
must have used every bathroom
in Disney World Boswell said.
Alternative getaway found in Lake Placid
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
You hear the shussssh under your
feet as your body leans into the turn. You
can smell the pine and fir trees as you
speed past them, gathering momentum
with each passing second. The cold air
bites at your cheeks and nose, but it
doesn't detract from the grin planted
firmly on your face.
Sound like fun? Sound like some-
thing you'd want to do in the winter,
knowing that a warm fire awaits you at
the lodge below? Well, wax those skis,
pull on that parka and don those ski
goggles, because Spring Break in Lake
Placid, N.Y has begun.
Many students see Spring Break as
fun in the sun in Florida or some other
sun-drenched, beach-as-far-as-the-eye-
can-see state. What many fail to realize is
that more options are available than the
beach, and that some are considerably
cheaper than Daytona or Fort Lauder-
dale.
Lake Placid rests among the
Adirondack Mountains, roughly five
hours north of New York City. Lake
Placid's biggest offering to skiers is the
greatest vertical drop in the East (3,216
ft.), or more commonly known as White-
face Mountain. Skiers can choose from 65
trailson the mountain,28percentof which
are expert, 37 percent intermediate and 35
percent beginner. Students can get lift
passes and lessons starting at $46 for one
day and going as high up as $211 for five
days out of a week.
Skiing is not the only winter sport
that students can partakeofwhen at Lake
Placid.Visitorscantakearideinwhathas
been called the "Champagneof Thrills a
bobsled ride on America's only Olympic
bobsled run. Professional drivers and
brakemen carry participants on a ride
that only costs $25 per person.
Students can also strap on a helmet,
lie on their back and take a hair-raising
trip on the Olympic luge run in Lake
Placid. Piloting their own sled, people
will slide through the final five turns,
including the famous Omega turn. Rides
cost $10 per person.
Ice skating, dog bled rides, sleigh
ridesandsnowmobiling combine to make
up the rest of winter fun at Lake Placid.
Prices are as follows: dog sled � $5 per
person; snowmobiling � $30-40 per per-
son, an hour at some places; ice skating�
$5 adults, $3 children (rentals $3-6).
In Lake Placid and adjacent areas,
lodging abounds for the expensive and
inexpensive minded alike. �
Prices range from $40-180 fornightly
rates on weekends and holidays; $30-125
for nightly rates midweek. Bed and Break-
fasts are also available for people inter-
ested in a first-hand look at northern
lifestyles.
Bars stay open until 4 a.m. in Lake
Placid and the adjoining towns. For those
under 21, the Canadian border is a hop,
skip and a jump away at45 minutes north
ofLake Placid. The legal Canadian drink-
ing age is 18 years.
Lake Placid serves as a very viable
skiing alternative to Vail or Aspen. Defi-
nitely a tourist spot, the town still retains
enough of a rustic atmosphere to be com-
fortable for visitors. Dubbed the "1 re-
sort in North America for alternative ac-
tivities" by Snow County Magazine, Lake
Placid offers a little something for every-
body.
For further information, call the Lake
Placid Visitors Bureau at (518) 523-2445.
students in Cancun
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
Imagine lounging in a cool, blue
pool with nothing around you but palm
trees swaying in the warm, tropical
breeze. You are staring
at that gorgeous some-
one when your
thoughts are inter-
rupted by a waiter of-
fering you your choice
of various concoctions,
some alcoholic and
some not.
Cancun, Mexico,
sometimes referred to
as "The City of the
Sun offers all of these
things to college stu-
dents looking for a
Spring Break destination. The island of
Cancun is 12 miles long with a palm-
lined beach on one side and a clear blue
lagoon on the other. Dividing the is-
Not only is
Cancun much
nicer than
Florida, it is
a lot less
expensive
Irene Fortier,
ITG Travel Center
land are luxurious hotels and shops.
Surprisingly, Cancun is afford-
able. "Not only is Cancun much nicer
than Florida, it is a lot less expensive
said Irene Fortier, a consultant for ITG
Travel Center.
Fortier said that
ITG offers a deal start-
ing at $399 per person.
Included in the trip are
round-trip airfare to
Cancun, three nights
hotel accommoda-
tions,airport transfers,
room and interna-
tional taxes and health
fees.
ECU student
Bert Humphrey spent
his Christmas holiday
in Cancun in 1991 and
said, "It is really a good time down
there. I especially liked the Hard Rock
See CANCUN page 3
Myrtle Beach: close to home
By Jenny Hamby
Staff Writer
Myrtle Beach,S.C.wiU soon
be welcoming many college stu-
dents for Spring Break, 1993.
The Myrtle Beach Reserva-
tion Service, the official reserva-
tion service of the Myrtle Beach
Area Hospitalitv Association, has
information for students about
making reservations for Spring
Break.
"The Reservation Service re-
ceives information from 80 differ-
ent properties about the availabil-
ity for interested students" said
Maria Carter of the Myrtle Beach
Area Hospitality Association.
The Reservation Servicesup-
plies information about the prop-
erties that allow students under
age 25 to stay in Myrtle Beach.
The Reservation Service is
free of charge toanyone interested.
Betty Edwards, reservation ser-
vice manager said, "The service
offers personalized, friendly as-
sistance in finding clean, afford-
able accommodations (for stu-
dents) The toll free number for
the Reservation Service is 1-800-
626-7477.
"Students have been calling
in complaining they can't find a
place that allows students to stay
there Carter said. "However,
there are several properties avail-
able, but most require a security
deposit from the students
"Myrtle Beach is a very
popular place for students'Carter
said. Myrtle Beach offersa variety
of activities.
There are golf courses, ten-
nis courts and places to fish for
people interested in sports.
Other activities include
places to shop, amusement parks,
restaurants and plenty of bars.
Go Goofy next week at Disney World
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
Take a trip to Pleasure Is-
land this spring break, that is,
Pleasure Island, Walt Disney
World.
Disney World is offering a
special theme park ticket for col-
lege students visiting Florida dur-
ing spring break. The ticket is
priced at $24 plus tax. and an
additional $5 ticket is available
for the nighttime entertainment
center, Pleasure Island.
"Pleasure Island is an adult
entertainment park said
Michelle Lamey of special mar-
keting in publicity at Disney
World. "The park contains many
shops and restaurants, but the
main attraction will be the night
clubs
Only oneclub, Mannequins,
requires a minimum age of 21.
There are several different clubs,
each with its own theme within
the park.
Visitors must be over 21 to
drink in the park, but people of
any ageareallowed in. Eachnight
there is a countdown to midnight
beginning at quarter till, a stage
show and fireworks.Special
priced tickets are available for use
between March 1 and April 2,
1993. Students must present valid
college identification.
The ticket is good for one
day between March 1 and April 2,
1993 in one of the three Walt
Disney World theme parks: The
Magic Kingdom, Epcot Center or
The Di sney-MG M Stud ios Theme
Park.
Lamey said thot the new
Splash Mountain which opened
in October in The Magic King-
dom is a large attraction to col-
lege-age students along with new
parade Aladdin's Royal Caravrtn
inDisney-MGM.
The Magic
Kingdom,
Epcot
Center,
MGM
Studios
and
Pleasure
Island are
just some
of the
things
students
can see in
a Spring
Break trip
to
Orlando,
Fla.
-�
J





2 The East Carolinian
MARCH 4, 1993
crjmeSene
Feb. 18
9:10 a.m.
A male was caught using a clothes hanger to
remove snack items from vending machine. About
$5 worth of foodstuffs were stolen along with $1
worth of condoms in the Aycock Hall basement
canteen.
Feb. 19
4 a.m.
A 19-year-old male was caught in possession of
beer.
Feb. 20
2:35 a.m.
A male aged 21 was caught beinj
kicking light fixtures on E. 10th S
; intoxicated and
t.
Feb. 21
10:10 p.m.
One male aged 20 and two females aged 19 and 18
were caught smoking marijuana and using drug
paraphernalia in Jones Hall.
Feb. 23
1:30 p.m.
An unknown person stole a bicycle worth $492
and the attached U-Bolt worth $30 from the chain
post fence west of Jones Hall.
8:25 p.m.
Damage to state property was committed to a
dorm room when a waterballoon was launched by
a sling-type instrument on the southside of Aycock
Dorm.
An 18-year-old male was found in possession of
marijuana in Garrett Hall.
Feb. 25
12:31 a.m.
A canvas top valued at $40 was stolen out of a
1980 Jeep from the gravel parking lot north of
Jones Hail.
Feb. 27
12 p.m.
An unknown person stole a bicycle worLh $1000
and the attached U-Bolt worth about $30 from the
bicycle park at the west end of Jones Hall.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from ECU
Public Safety records.
Many students choose to spend their Spring Break
helping others. The following organizations can heipyou
enjoy your break without spending it on a beach.
� Break Away
Vanderbilt University
6026 Station B
Nashville, TN 37235
615343-0385
i Habitat for Humanity International
Collegiate Challenge '93
121 Habitat Street
Americus, GA 31709-3498
912924-6935
� Global Volunteers
375 E. Little Canada Road
St. Paul, MN 55117
800422-4828
� Volunteer Services
University of Miami
P.O. Box 249116
Coral Gables, FL 33124
305284-4483
� Christian Appalachian Project
235 Lexington St.
Lancaster, KY 40444
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
WHEN BODY REPAIR
ACCOSTS HAVE
SltiaPEDYOU
? ???
???4
TO
A-1 AUTO BODY
REPAIR SHOP
20 Discount For All
ECU Students & Faculty
�Free Estimates
�Painting
�Frame Slraigntening
�insurance Claims
?Fiberglass Woric
�Glass Work
2200 DICKINSON AVE 355-4611
ONLY
$39
TWO MONTHS
FREE OFFER
�FREE Towing
�FREE Roadside Service
�FREE Battery Boost
�FREE Maps & Tour Books
�FREE Booking
�Guaranteed Lowest
Airfare and morel
Join us today and receive TWO EXTRA MONTHS FREE and a
large, full-color, USA Wall Map suitable for framing.
AAA protects over 505,000 of your friends and neighbors in
North and South Carolina, and 33 million Americans nationwide.
Most of our 82 benefits are FREE and others save you money.
For more information, call: Donella Dzengeleski
919-443-7117 or 1 -800-395-2623
ALFREDO'S
DOWNTOWN
irrre
DAILY 5-8 PM
2 FOR 1 SPECIAL
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
DINNER MENU: 2 CALZONES, 2 STROMBOUS, 2 BEERS, 2 DUNKS
ALFREDO'S
2 Large Pizzas
with 1 Topping
j $6.99
i with this coupon until 10 pm daily
ALFREDO'S
1.75 Pitchers
Sun, Mon, Tues
wiih this coupon
HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
4
JuIaILU
YOUR FIRST STOP FOR
SPRING BREAK

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FRESH FRYER �
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y�lffWFjntil�Miir ii-mjieih





MARCH 4. 1993
The East Carolinian 3
Take a ride
on the
Panama
Express
US Air is offering a new
introductory special flight to
Panama City for anyone inter-
ested in an inexpensive Spring
Break getaway. From Char-
lotte, one way tickets are $99.
Whi le there a re no restrictions,
thenumberofseatsare limited
to about 39 passengers. Planes
leave daily from Charlotte at
11 a.m 4:40 p.m. and 9:30 p.m
except on Saturdays. Return
trips leave Panama City daily
at 8:50 a.m 1:30 p.m and 6
p.m with the same Saturday
restrictions as the flights from
Charlotte. Students interested
in this special should call 1-
800-868-2515.
Clinton unveils new college plan
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J.(AP)
�President Clinton unveiled Mon-
day a pilot version of his plan to
allow students to pay for college
with national service,sayingitwould
"make higher education available to
more people in return for the service
they give to their community"
Clinton discussed the broad
outlines of the program during a
tour of the New Brunswick Public
Schools Adult Learning Center in
New Jersey,before heading tonearby
Rutgers University for the formal
announcement.
Thepresidentsaid hisprogram
would allow students either to pay
off college loans with public service
or to do the service first and accrue
credits to attend college later. Bor-
rowers who did not want to do ser-
vice work would pay a percentage of
their income back into the loan fund.
By setting the repayment at a
percentage of income instead of a set
amount, Clinton said he hoped to
encourage graduates to take lower-
paying public service positions such
as in police and community health
work.
He linked die program to his
overall economic package, saying "an
economic investment is not justbuild-
ing an ai rport or a road or investing in
new technology, it isalsoinvesting in
people
Clinton's plan would get off to
a modest start thissummer with 1,000
or so summer community service
positions and then grow over the
next five years to more than 100,000
slots.
After the Rutgers speech,
Clinton planned to promote the pro-
gram in an interview for an MTV
special to air tonight Vice President
Al Gore, Tipper Gore and three
Clinton Cabinet members were stag-
ing events to promote the national
service plan, as well.
CANCUN
Continued from page 1
Cafe, they had great bands and a
huge crowd
Optional tours of Cancun are
also available to students. Suntour
Isla Mujeres is a popular half day
tour. For $47, students can cruise
to an island away from Cancun for
several hours of snorkeling, swim-
ming and fun. Humphrey added
that the price of this day cruise
includes the cost of drinks.
A full day tour called
Chichen Itza is available for $62.
The tour includes an archaeologi-
cal site, pyramids, a sacrificial well,
the temple of warriors and other
historical sites. A continental
breakfast, lunch and open bar are
included.
For students who choose not
to participate in these activities,
Cancun is still a fun place for stu-
dents to go for Spring Break.
Autoclave Sterilization
New Needles Each Client
Fine & Bold Line
Custom Cover-ups
Sobriety Required
919-756-0600
avuj 5.
Custom �tattooing Ly avuj
-Jaitoo ziiudi
LO
516A-Hwy264A
Greenville, NC
Don't be left out
of the picture!
Sign up for on-campus housing next year
during the week of March 15.
For further information, please contact
University Housing at 757-6450.
S S 2
SPRinutaK Special
Bring Your Spring Break
Photos To Us!
v
Dreamed
ZuUSCTlFPRWTS
with ECU Student I.D.
355-5050 THE PLAZA
�⁢ gW
like the
ECU'S Equestrian Club can
make your dreams come true.
InformationOrganizational Meetings have been
scheduled for the following dates:
Thursday, March 4 at 5:30 pm in GCB 1009
Thursday, March 18 at 5:30 pm in GCB 1009.
From beginner lo advanced level riders are welcome. Club
activities are held at Rock Springs Equestrian Center. For those
who are interested but cannot attend meeting, please call
Angela or Adrienne at 931-7722.
The Equestrian Club competes in the Intercollegiate Horse
Show Association circuit. The Club is associated with ECU
Recreational Services.
WALL-CRAWLING.
STILL WEB-SLINGING.
STILL SPIDEY AFTER ALL
THESE YEARS.
ISNT IT TIME YOU GOT
BACK INTO THE
SWING OF THINGS?
COMICS
GRAPHIC NOVELS
TRADE PAPERBACKS
ARE AVAILABLE MONTHLY AT:
OPEN
7 DAYS
A WEEK
THE COMIC BOOK STORE
919 Dickenson Ave.
Greenville, NC (111) 758-6909
Mon-Sat 9:30-6 MAMH
Sun 2:00-6 9RS
Ovcrton's
is Eastern North Carolina's
Swimsuit Headquarters
Styles by the Industries Leading Manufacturers
.
VENUS
DE LA MER
BENDINGO
JAG
SOLAR
TAN-THRU
SPEEDO !
CATALINA JRS
PORTA DO SOL
OP
TAKE COVER
& Many More
ONE RACK OF LADIES SWIMSUITS REDUCED
UP TO 60 OFF OVERTON S PRICE
Overtoil's
HOURS
M-F 9 AM - 8 PM
Sat 9 AM-7 PM
f 111 RED BANKS RD.
(Corner of Red Banks Rd. & Evans St.)
355-5783
Student
Stores
REMODELING
SALE
30-50 OFF
SELECTED CLOTHING APPAREL
20'OFF
I Regular Price
Shorts &. T-Shirts
With Coupon � Expires March 31, 1993
One Stop, Sfopftitfy at t6e evtt o� &v4tfuci
Wright Building � 757-6731
ECU Sludcnl Stoics: More than just books�your dollars support student scholars
inywuwWiiiK.mwmwi





WANG TV
by Ferguson and Manning
Comics:
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Fred's Corner
WANG TV
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Student
Government
Association
WHAT:
? WHEN:
i
WHERE:
Filing for Spring Elections
� Executive President
� Executive Vice-President
� Executive Treasurer
� Executive Secretary
Thursday, February 25, 1993
until 5:00pm,
Thursday, March 4, 1993
Room 255
Mendenhall Student Center
757-4726
QUALIFICATIONS:
�Overall 2.0 G.P.A.
� Enrolled at least 2
Consecutive Semesters
at East Carolina University
� Good Standing
� Completed at least
48 Semester Hours
$10.00 Filing Fee
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING
Monday, March 15, 1993
HEY
STUDENTS!
In honor of
Spring Break '93,
it's
Uncle Bubba's
Drink-o-rama
Beer
Bonanza!
��������a
For a limited time,
it's our foreign
beer special,
featuring:
Peruvian
Llama Spit
Beer
$19.95 per keg
only at
Uncle Bubba's Beet
Boutique
IIWY 43 SOUTH
1A i
25th ANNUAL SPRING
BIKINI CONTEST
Thursday, March 18th
Admission $2 Members $4 Guests
PRIZES
1st Place $200 CfiSH
2nd Place $100 CASH
3rd Place $50 CASH
DRINK SPECIfiLSl
$3.00 PITCHERS
$1.00 DOMESTICS
75C 100 M.P.H. SHOTS
� �





.
�riiiirf MIT i mii nil Minimum .
TheEastCarolinian
March 4, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS :1 and
2 bedroom apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchenappliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer hook-
ups. Call 752-8915.
1BR APARTMENT on 13th St Great
for pets, esp. dogs. Available immedi-
ately. $275mo. Call 752-9197.
KINGS ARM AP ARTMENTforrent
One bedroom. Available immediately.
No deposit required. $265mo. Call
collect (919) 269-7844 Ask for Yvonne
SUBLEASE: 2 bedroom apartment at
OakmontSquare. Rentis $380 month.
Available March 1st through end of
May Call 355-5803
1 BR APARTMENT across from cam-
pus call 752-2615.
SUBLEASE TAR RIVER APT. for
summer ASAP 2 bedroom $460 a
month Call 830 -9421.
SUBLEASE Efficiency Apartment,
Ringgold Towers, 260.00month. Call
752-9866,leave a message.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE FOR LG house near
downtown and campus 13 utilities,
deposit, $155 moth, call Jay 758-4375
ROOMMATES NEEDED: Two to
three female roommates needed for
summer in Nags Head. Cottage is a
must see to believe. WasherDryer,
dishwasher, AC and more. $250 per
person with utility allowance. If inter-
ested please cal AS SOON AS POS-
SIBLE. Betsy 931-7844.
NEEDED: Female Roommate for a 2
bedroom Apt. in Wilson Acres. 1 3
rent utilities. No deposit required.
Need now. Call 758-8606.
cC
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live con-
cert & studio recordings for sale. Over
1000 new titles available this week
from the following artists: ROCK-U2,
R EM, Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendnx,
Black Crowes, Springsteen, SRV, Van
Halen, Rush, Beatles, Doors, G-N-R,
etc. ALTERNATIVE-Nirvana, Pearl
Jam, Chili Peppers, Cure, Depeche
Mode, MORE OTHERS INCLUDE-
Bob Marley, Madonna, Prince, and
more. Call 931-2573 to leave name,
number, and requested artist on mes-
sage (all new CD's and tapes in stock).
CHEAP! FBI US SEIZED: 89
Mercedes -200, 86 VW - $) &
Mercedes - $100, 65 Mustang - S5.
Choose form thousands starting 550.
FREE Information24hourhotline 801-
379-2929 copyright 0 NC 030610.
YAMAHA 1982SecaC5025,000miles
$750 Call 830-8890.
DRAFIX CAD for Windows Version
2.0. Never used, for IBM or compat-
ible. Changed majors and don't need.
Asking $450.00, was $700.00 in store.
Contact Dana 931-7825, leavemessage.
SPEAK ERS FOR SALE: Grea t for any
home. Excellent condition; 8" woof-
ers $100.00pair.Call757-1331 or leave
message.
PASSPORT RADAR DETECTOR
only two months old. All accessories
and paperwork is included. Full
warrantee Why pay list price plus
shipping? Onlv $100. Call Tommy 752-
9620.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hiring enthusiastic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. NorthBeachSailinglnc Box8279,
Duck, NC 27949. (919) 261 -6262.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED. Looking for enthusiastic
people wi th strong cheering and inter-
personal skills to teach cheerleading
camps in NC & SC. Great pay and
flexible scheduling. Up to 10 weeks
possible! If you love cheerleading, this
is the summer job for you! To apply,
Call 1-800-280-3223.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All Materials provided. Send SASE to
National Distributors PO Box 9643
Springfield, MO 65801. Immediate re-
sponse.
ATTENTION FASHION MER-
CHANDISING MAJORS! Gain valu-
able work experience in your field of
study. Brody's isaccephng applications
for Secretary to Buyer. Work with buy-
ers in tracking and replenishing inven-
tory levels Computer experience
needed. Must be available 3 days by 12
p.m 15-20 hours ptr week Apply
Brody's The Plaza, Monday - Wednes-
day, 1-4 p.m.
THE CITY OF RALEIGH PARKS
AND RECREATION department is
seeking enthusiastic hardworking in-
dividuals for summer employment.
Positions include pool managers, life-
guard, park maintenance, camp coun-
selors, nature, athletic, arts and lake
personnel, and therapeutic programs.
EOE MFH Contact: 2401 Wade Av-
enue, Raleigh, NC 27602 Phone: (919)
831-6640.
200-$500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
ucts athome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed Free
Information-24hourhotline. 801 -379
-2900 Copyright NC 030650
LOOKING FOR responsible Child-
hood Education or Nursing student
(preferably) who could watch my 4 yr.
old son in our home - 2 days a week,
8:30 - 5.30. Transportation and refer-
ences necessary. Call Lori or Dennis
756-5768 (leave message).
PROMOTIONAL MANAGER
NEEDED to Market CDs of Various
East Coast Bands. EARN UP TO $5.00
per CD. Send Resume to: Musicoma
Records,Boxl917Salisbury,Md.21802
or call: (410)749-0070.
SUMMER JOB ON THE OUTER
BANKS: Kitty Hawk Pizza and the
New Tomato Patch Pizzaria in Corolla
are looking for summer l.elp. Wait-
resses, cooks, and dishwashers needed.
Stop by during Spring Break or call
Chris locally at931-7085 for an applica-
tion.
WANTED TO BUY: Rolex - and other
high grade watches. CASH PAID
Call David at 756-9290 Mon-Sat 10-6
Leave Message after 6 pm.
LET'S PARTY experienced DJ from
Bogies available for all occasions: Fra-
ternity and Sorority socials, Weddings,
Birthdays. All types of music from
Classic Rock to Top 40 Dance. Highest
quality Best Prices Call Rob @ 757 -
2658
SPRING ON THE OUTER BANKS
Sun Realty extends a special invitation
to students at ECU to vacation this
spring on the sunny Outer Banks of
NC through May 22nd Certain restric-
tions apply $300 security deposit
requireed. Call for availabilities 1-800-
334-4745.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typingand photocopying services We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24 hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pages SDFProfessiona'iComputerSer-
vices, 106 East 5�h Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
TUTORING available for MS-DOS
WORDPERFECTLOTUS Contact
Barbara Curtis at 321-1994
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today h VisaMC or COD
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
ouO-351-0222
in C�IH. (213)477-8226
Or. rush $2.00 to Research Information
11322 Iflahc Ae �?06-A. Los Angle CA 90025
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
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IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, exL 65
SNEED CASH
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
BUYING
& SELLING
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Jewelry(goodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
SEX! Now that I have your attention,
all SWF who desire interesting corre-
spondence and Friendship, write me
HAWK, P.O. Box 8663, Greenville
27835.
IN MEMORY of Chris Rogers, from
Dail, Ace, Dana.
HEY SCOTT: Don't forget to watch
Carrot Top on Jay Leno's show Mon-
day March 15th.
ANA, Good Luck on your exams I
know you will do well You have my
support and confidence always Love,
L.F.
ALPHA XI DELTA hopes everyone
has a safe Spring Break. Have fun!
JEAN MCALEESE Thanks for all of
your hard work! We wouldn't be
where we are if it weren't for you Xi
love -Your Alpha Xi Delta sisters
HEY PHI TAU HITMAN: You en-
joyed playing obscene games with me
on the phone, Don't you wish now
you didn't moan, When 1 heard you
yell my name, I never thought I'd use
it to put you to shame. Now that all's
ben said and done, it's my turn to have
some fun
ALPHA DELTA PI: Thanks for the
"Beautiful" turnout at the redneck so-
cial. Papa's Redneck regulars will
never be the same We hope this is the
beginning of killer "social" life to-
gether You guys are the best Love
Sigma Pi.
SATURDAY NIGHT - we were ready
to go - Snapperhead was waiting to put
onashow Thebuswasfull-aHANDY-
DANDY RIG. We flocked out to Papa's
for a roaring good GIG! It was a cool
little joint with the neon ABLAZE. We
found theSigmaPi'sthroughasmokey-
grey HAZE! Papa, Willie, and the regu-
larswere there - whenwefirstwalked in
we felt a little scare. Who was dressed
up-whowasn't?WHOKNEW?Butfhe
HONKEY-TONK locals just loved us
Y A-HOO! We shotpool 'til da wn - game
after game-weeven learned the camera
lady's name! The night flew by like an
18-wheeler without a care - so let's make
the Redneck social an ANNUAL AF-
FAIR! Thanks CRACKER, MATT - and
all yougod 'oleboys-Lovehesistersof
ALPHA DELTA PI PS. Matt are you
gonna eat that?
ALPHA OMICRON PI thanks so much
for Saturday! We really enjoyed and
appreciated it! Alpha Delta Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS DELTA
ZETA on an awesome basketball sea-
son! 5-1,let sseeifwecandoitnext time!
Thank you to all the girls who played
and all the others who cameouttoshow
your support!
THANK YOU COACH TODD for a
great basketball season! As the
mtramurals go by, Todd Mason will
always be, the favorite coach in the hearts
of Delta Zeta! Love, DELTA ZETA.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Friday night
was a blast! Next time maybe we'll let
vou win! Beta.
DELTA PLEDGE CLASS: You all are
doing a great job, so far! Keep up the
hard work! We love you! The sisters
of Gamma Sigma Sigma.
DELTA SIGMA PHI: Sorry so late,
but thanks for the "cook-in the food
was great! We had so much fun; we
hung out so late! The pool games
turned out to be very revealing, and
don't worry, we haven't lost "that
lovin' feelin
Gamma Sigma Sigma
ALPHA PHI SISTERS - It wa s Thurs-
day night and you knew where to go
- Predowntown at the Elbo. The mu-
sic was pumpin' and the beer was
chill. When we get together it's al-
ways a thrill. Let's get together again.
The Brothers and Pledges of Delta
Chi.
THE ZETA TAU ALPHA pledge car
wash was a COLD WET experience
Thanks for everyone who braved the
mud. Keep up the hard work.
ALPHA PHI OLD EXEC: Thanks for
everything you did. You did a great
job. We are very proud of you. Love,
the Alpha Phi's.
DELTA CHI'S: We had great time
on Thursday . Hope to do it again
sometime. You guys are awesome!
Love, the Alpha Phi's.
ALPHA PHI wishes everyone a safe
and fun Spring Break Love, the Al-
pha Phi's.
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-35,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
EXCEPTIONAL VALUE FOR
SPACIOUS DUPLEXES
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
2 and 3 bedroom duplexes offering
lots of space and convenient locations
close to campus.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
Available March l5t Ideal location, close to
campus with ECU Bus transportation
provided. One and two bedrooms.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.

i
EAST
Advertising Account Executive Gain valuable sales experience
Creative Director Create computer-generated designs for'publication i.187"
Submit Resume & Application at The East Carolinian, 2nd floor. Student Pub
757-6366
Announcements
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Gamma Sig Presents Jail
House Rock Coming Soon!
ATHEORYrOMOOUlllM
Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick
from Duke University will be lectur-
ing in the "Tales of the Avunculate:
The Importance of Being Earnest"
on Thursday, March 4, 1993 at 4:00
p.m. in CCB 1028
LEARN TO SWIM
The children's Learn to Swim
program in the Water Safety
Instructor'sClasswillstart Mar. 15th
For further information, contact
Melrose Moore, Minges Coliseum
757-4632 or 4633
STUDENTGOVFRNMFNT
ASSOCIATION
Filingforexecutiveelections be-
gins Thurs Feb. 25,1993 Must have
48 semester hours, 2 semesters at
ECU, a 2.0 overall C PA, and be in
good standing. Contact SGA office
at 757-4726 for more info. Positions
available include president, vice-
president, treasurer, secretary. $10.00
filing fee.
ECU EQUESTRIAN CIUB
ECU Equestrian Club will
be holding a meeting Thursday
March 4th at 530 in GC 1009. This
meeting is open for anyone inter-
ested in horses. Contact Angela at
931 -8453 or Adrienne a 1931 -7722 for
any questions.
�LD�LIA
Pi Delta is sponsoring a 5k
run to benefit the Ronald McDonald
House on April 24th. Applications
will be available in local businesses
around Greenville, approximately 2-
3 weeks before the race.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
"CREATION'S TINY MYS-
TERY" SCIENTIFIC MYSTERY UN-
RAVELED Dr. Robert V Gentry,
an internationally recognized au-
thority on radiohalos will be a guest
speaker at ECU on March 23 He will
present his work, which challenges
the evolutionists'4 6 billion year age
of the earth, in Hendrix Theatre at
7pm. You will be amazed athis find-
ings. Agree or disagree, but come
and hear what many in the scientific
community want to keep quiet. Be
prepared to ask questions and chal-
lenge Dr. Gentry's findings No ad-
mission is required, but donations
will be accepted. If you have ques-
tions call Tim Turner at 752-7199.
PRE-OCCUPATIONAI
THERAPYSTUDENTS
Early registration for sum-
mer and fall sessions will begin
March 29th. There will be an advis-
ing session Thursday night, March
18th from 4:00 - 7:00 in room 306 of
the Belk Building. If you are unable
to attend this meeting please call the
OT office for other advising hours
Please see the video at the Joyner
Library before you come for advis-
ing.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Softball Registration will be
held Tuesday, March 16 at 500 p.m
in Biology 103. There must be a
minimumof 10 people per team For
more information call 757-6387.
Men's women's, and co-ed leagues
available. This meeting is manda-
tory for registration.
G'VILLE BUSINESS &
PROFESSIONAL WOMEN'S
CLLIfi
SCHOLARSHIP! Deadline
March 15,1993 criteria for selection:
Rising Junior have a 3.2 overall Grade
Point Average, meet before a scholar-
shipcommittee Forapplicationsand
more info, CONTACT: Mrs Dot
Seary, 503 Eleanor St Greenville,
NC 27858, 746-6742.
ASHWEDNESDAYSERVICES
The NEWMAN CATHO-
LIC STUDENT CENTER wishes to
announce special Ash Wednesday
Masses with the distribution of ashes:
12 noon in the Great Room of
Mendenhall Student Center and 5:30
p.m. at the Newman Center, 953 E.
10th Street at the foot of College Hill
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Aquasports Co-Rec H20
Volleyball Registration will be held
on Wednesday, March 17 at 5:00 in
Biology!03. For more information
call 757-6387.


25 words or less:
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Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
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Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ment. Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge. Duetothelimitedarnount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication, however, tio
refunds will be given.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.





March 4, 1993
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
ThursdayOpinion
Wiretapping scandal
appears to have no
end in sight
Administration must take
hard-line stance before
irreparable damage is done
ECU cannot seem to get itsen' out from under the
black cloud of the wiretapping scandal. It doesn't
look like any silver lining will appear soon, either.
Former Director of Public Safety James DePuy
has recently been sued by both Patricia Hair Bullock,
the secretary whose line was tapped, and John Burrus,
who has requested a third-party suit against DePuy.
Burrus has also filed this suit against Richard Brown,
vice-chancellor of business affairs for ECU, and East
Carolina University itself.
This suit has long-reaching and potentially dam-
aging effects for this university and its image. If
Burrus is awarded this settlement, the repercussions
may reach as far and as high as the chancellor's office.
It must make one wonder as to how far knowledge of
this crime went; was it the act of just a few individu-
als or a combined effort of the top echelon of ECU's
administration?
A disturbing fact that has arisen in both of these
cases is the legal representation accorded to the two
separate parties. Special Deputy to the Attorney Gen-
i eral Tom Zeiko will be representing DePuy, while
Burrus is being represented by local attorneys Myron
1 T. Hill Jr. and W. Gregory Duke.
Thequestion wg that needs to be asked
h
is why the w state would
choose to - represent
DePuy and not Burrus and Teddy Roberson. Zeiko
has said that the Attorney General's office is repre-
senting DePuy because the alleged actions were com-
mitted during DePuy's tenure as a state employee.
Doesn't that apply to Burrus and Roberson also? All
three were employed by the university at the time, so
all three would have committed these acts "in the
scope of their employment as Zeiko has quoted.
This apparent double standard only serves to
add to the mass of confusion that plagues this inci-
dent. So much mud has been flung around since the
onset of the criminal trial that it takes two or three
people to make sense out of one piece of testimony.
Something needs to be done to clear up this fiasco so
that the university can clear its tarnished name.
The East Carolinian calls for Chancellor Eakin to
take the first step. Bring in a commission of outside
individuals to investigate this matter and discover
the whole truth, even if it reflects badly on some
members of the administration. Find out who was
responsible, what they did and how the university
can make amends. Settling out of court does not, and
will not, solve this problem; that back-pedaling only
goes in one direction � further down.
If this investigation brings to light that there
were any other administrators involved in the wire-
tapping, ask for their resignation. Clean out the dead
wood that plagues this university so that the tar-
nished image we now have can begin to be cleaned.
Open disclosure is the key to unlocking this weight
that drags down everyone's shoulders that is affili-
ated with ECU.
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blalr Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Massed, Asst News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Bullard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, CreatneDirector
Dail Reed. Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretan
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg . ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353 For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
Lifestyle has little impact on fighting ability
As President Clinton's poli-
cies regarding homosexuals in the
military continues to feed the flames
of controversy, the question of mo-
rality , for me, seems distant and
unimportant.
I hadn't really thought about
it until last week when the
dinnertime topic turned to gays in
the military, a difficult topic when a
body is trying to consume a hot dog.
The person I was speaking
with is someone very special to me
and has had a bad experience with
homosexuals, one that left him or
her feeling very insecure and con-
fused. Therefore, they havea learned
hatred of all homosexuals and an
understandable,althoughvery nar-
row, view of gays.
This person feels very strongly
that gays should never be allowed
to serve their country, and unless
I'm interpreting incorrectly, ostra-
cized from society altogether. Many
people in the military seem toagree
with this viewpoint, as well as le-
gions of civilians. The perplexing
question in all of this is "Why?"
I fail to see what the real prob-
lem is. Certainly there would be
problems to overcome, bu t very few
of these would likely be caused by
the homosexuals themselves. The
main problem facing the military is
not the quality of performance of a
gay soldier or how he or she wou Id
act around others, but how hetero-
sexual soldiers would cope with
having gays in their midst.
The point is well illustrated
by the courageous soldiers who
have publicly announced their ho-
mosexuality. These men have
served, in some cases, years with
exemplary records without their
fellow soldiers ever knowing their
sexual preferences, yet the mere
utterance condemns their service
records and threatens to end their
careers.
What of personal privacy and
basic human rights? These men and
women have made it very clear that
they are willing to serve and die for
their country. I would be willing to
wager that the vast majority of
people reading this column are not
in any military service and do not
ever intend to be, yet we all enjoy
our basicrights guaranteed tousby
the Constitution.
This is not the first public de-
bate concerning homosexuals to
ruffle political feathers. In 1991,
Craig Dean and Patrick Gill filed a
suit against the city of Washington,
D.C in the amount of $125 million
dollars because thecity denied them
a marriage license. The reasons for
gays wanting legal recognition of
homosexual marriages are numer-
ous; marriage improves tax situa-
tions,entailsmedicaland insurance
benefits, etc. After all, gay people
pay all the same taxes that hetero-
sexuals pay, they abide by the same
rules and regulations and are hu-
man beings just like any hetero-
sexual.
Back to the question at hand.
Many would argue that hav-
ing gays in combat would under-
mine morale and cause unneces-
sary tension among the soldiers.
There are also the staunch bigots
who view homosexuals as being
too weak and confused to be of any
use in battle, and should therefore
be eliminated. Up until recently,
these same views have been re-
peated about women in combat as
well. Now,after DesertStorm, these
views are all but totally outmoded.
If women can be accepted as
equal and productive members of
the armed forces, why not homo-
sexuals?Thisisnottoimplythatall
homosexuals are women or femi-
nine men,just to illustrate thatsome
underrated segments of the popu-
lation can be useful members of
any given fighting force.
When you come right down
to it, just how much strength or
machismo does it take to fight in a
war today? With all of our techni-
cal advances, war is almost as easy
asitispointless. Anyone can pulla
trigger or throw a grenade; what
happens behind closed tent flaps
after the fighting is over is his or
her own business.
Recently,Iwasrelievingmy-
self in a men's room on campus
and 1 happened to read somescrawl
on the stall. It read something to
the effect of "We salute those Ma-
rines that did their civic duty by
bashing those (expletive deleted)
faggots
To the author of this bit of
fascist wisdom, I hope you never
come to power, because I like my
hair and I hate swastikas.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza and watch
some cartoons
elrsfe
�:
YOURENOTONE
OF TMERCAPE OU
7
QuotesoftheDay
Laws are spider webs through which the big flies pass and
the little ones get caught. Honore de Balzac,
Nobody has a more sacred obligation to obey the law than
Sophoclesl
those who make the law.
Letters to the Editor
Safer-sex information valuable to students
To the Editor:
In response to Mr.
Webster's "disgusted" attitude
in Tuesday's paper, I fear that
Webster has totally missed the
point about the full-page en-
dorsements The East Carolinian
published throughout the safer-
sex campaign. These endorse-
ments were not "rammed"
down the throats of students
because we already know it's
out there and it's happening (in
regard to the sexual behaviors
you listed).
There is no need to refer to
ourtacticsofpromotingsafesex
as "degenerate, liberal mindset
The information provided is
valuable and useful to the stu-
dents on this campus. I'm sure
that the Peer Health Educators
and Student Health Services go
througha lot of trouble and time
toorganize such campaigns. The
East Carolinian did a great job in
their advertisements in grab-
bingtheattentionof all thatread
the paper (that is the point of
advertisement). These ads were
in noway "promoting high-risk
sexual behaviors" when these
behaviors arealready occurring.
These ads, and the campaign,
promote a way to help control
the devastating consequences
that can occur when one does
not take precautions, whether
hetero- or homosexual.
On a final note, perhaps it
isyou,Mr. Webster, who should
pull your head out of your anal
cavity and realize that this is
1993 and that sex is not some-
thing to be kept hidden in the
closet. Sex is more freely publi-
cized and sex education is be-
coming an important part of all
school curriculum. No, we are
not on a "mission from God to
save the world and yes, wedo
realize there is more to life than
sex. But, humans are sexual be-
ings and unfortunately, devas-
tating consequences can occur
from unprotected sex.
So please step back,
Webster, and let our university
lend a helping hand in educat-
ing our students about these
consequences and how to pre-
vent them. You are the one who
needs to face the reality of what
is going on in the world. Per-
haps you have reached a
"mindset" where you can no
longer relate to my generation.
Attending an institution of
higher learning requires more
than just book-sense, buta little
common sense, also.
Angie Stott
Senior
Health Education
TEC safer-sex campaign supported healthy life
To the Editor:
I felt strongly that I had
to respond to Mr. Kenneth
Webster's Mar. 2 letter to the
editor regarding safe sex. I
don't believe that The East Caro-
linian is advocating "degener-
ate behavior" (for the record, I
don't think that sex between
two mature human beings is
immoral). But more, they are
supporting a long and healthy
life for ourselves and our chil-
dren.
This rnan'seditorial sim-
ply makes my blood boil. This
disease is not God's punish-
ment to so-called sexual devi-
ants, but purely a tragedy that
touches the lives of thousands
of different races, genders, ages
and sexual preferences each
year.
I understand that
Websterisfromadifferentgen-
eration, but age is no excuse
for apathetic ignorance. AIDS
sufferersexperience a long and
dreadful death. Encouraging
college students to be consci-
entious about condoms can
spare a certain percentage of
the population the desolation
and misery of this disease.
We greatly appreciate
Webster's concern for our
damaged moral fiber, but to
the people I know, they'd
choose their lives over reli-
gious rigidity and moral dic-
tatorship.
Finally, I found his so-
called "no pun intended" to
be crass and downright tacky.
In the profound words
of condom advocates � "Be
Cool, Cover Your Tool
Christine Mehan
Social Work
Sophomore
By Gregory Dickens
National media
worsened Trade
Center explosion
This Friday, someone blew out the base-
ment of the World Trade Center. Five people
died, 1,042 people were injured and three
people are still missing. This act is a direct shot
to the national and foreign economic commu-
nity. While such an act is obviously disturb-
ing, the national media made the event worse
by exploiting its far-reaching technologies to
scare the American citizen.
No later than four hours after the explo-
sion, Phil Donahue and the news depart-
ments of ABC and CBS were suggesting that
the cause of the destruction was a bomb
planted by foreign terrorists. The FBI con-
firmed the next day that it too suspected this,
but did not attempt to guess the saboteurs'
identity. This did not stop the network news
agencies from brash supposition.
Since the significance of CNN was made
clear to the world after the Persian Gulf War,
the major networks have tried to not only be
as efficient as CNN, but also as sensationalis-
tic in the news. While such enthusiasm en-
ables the public to be more informed of cur-
rent events, it also encourages the agencies to
create news without full verification. They
also may air rumors in order to sound as
exciting as the competition. Such undisci-
plined vigor ranks as tabloid entertainment.
The reporting of the likelihood of a de-
liberate bombing swept over the majority of
local and national newscasts. It was thrilling
in an odd way; we could be the target of a
faceless terrorist organization whocould strike
anywhereand anytime with impunity. It was
like the enemies of James Bond and the Aveng-
ers leaping into reality.
However, the networks began running
reports of increased security in the rest of
New York City, Washington, DC, and even
numerous airports around the country. Such
wide-spread measures toguard against an as-
yet-unconfirmed antagonistappeared rushed
and paranoid. The coverage of these responses
hinted that such precautions were valid steps.
Were the networks hoping to make such
an incident (terrible in its own right) merely a
precursor to future events? Yes. An ABC re-
porter rommented that moreeventsare inevi-
table since America is the only superpower
left and that we make an obvious target not
only for specific retaliations, but also for blind
acts of aggression. Remarks like these bom-
barded the airwavesduringtheweekend and
served to raise tensions across the nation.
While I laud the determination of the
networks to scoop one another for the big
story, such excitement was ill-placed. It was a
bomb, but the FBI believes that the material
used in the bomb was too common to be
constructed by professional terrorists. They
also suggest that it may not have been the
work of a mad bomber because there was no
prior threat.
In other words, the bomb was placed in
a specific place for a specific reason. Whi le this
information does not diminish the tragedy of
those harmed, the evidence left by the explo-
sion does not give credibility to the networks'
concerns and reporting.
The public needs to be aware that while
the media may be omnipresent, it surely isn't
omnipotent.








The East Carolinian
March 4. 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
Comic convention
to be held Sunday
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
For the past 15 years, Charles Watts has been selling comic books to college students,
inhisstoretheBooktrader Nostalgia Bookstand.EveryonceinawhileWatteholdsacomic
book convention. The next one, celebrating his 15th anniversary, is March 7.
Hefirst opened hisstorebecausehe found thatit was
difficult for people to find the comics they wan ted on the
newsstands in stores. Watts would have to look all over
to wn to get the issues thathe read. There wasno central
place for comic books. He filled the need.
Though college students make up about50 percent
of his clientele, Watts says that he's not dependent on
them. Though He likes the diversity that the students
bring. DC Comics' Vertigo comics sell much better in a
college town, and Watts feels that some of the best
writing in comics is happening in the Vertigo line
(Sandman, Shade, Animal Man, Enigma).
Since 1970, the Pitt County native has been
anavid collector of comics and feels thatif people
like the Vertigo line of comics, then they'll most
likely enjoy independent comics from compa-
nies like Thundra, Fantagraphics and Kitchen
Sink.
Watts sees a new trend in comics, the
emergence of independent publishers as a
challenge to Marvel and DCs market share. He
mentiohed several up-and-coming publishers,
including Valiant, Image and Dark Horse. He
does see, though, mat the market is at a very
volatile state. "There'sa lotofexcessoutthere
now. To some degree, there is alsoa manipu-
lation of the collector said Watts.
The wholeindustry haschanged from
its beginnings. Now, an artist can sur-
vive off of working on one comic a
month, whereas lOyears ago an artist
would have to work on several comics
to get by. The importance of the artist has grown tremendously in the new market. A
convention is one of the places that promotes the creators of the comics, as well as giving
collectors a place to gather to talk about the current trends and happenings in comics.
The convention will be held at the Ramada Inn on Greenville Blvd on Sunday, March
7 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. There is no admission fee. Watts feels that a convention allows
collectors to find treasures from other dealers in the area. "There's so much new stuff
coming out that it'sbecome hard to keep everything in stock, and a convention allows the
collector a chance to find books they normally can't said Watts. Another bonus to the
convention is mat it exposes comics to the public and gets new people into comics.
Area artists Craig Gilmore (Black Leopard), Nathan Massengill (Fenry) and ECU
alumnus Jeff Parker (Vampirella) will be attending the convention, with the possibility of
a few more dropping in.
Paula
Abdul and
children
perform
"Zip-A-
Dee-Doo-
Dah
Photo courtesy
Walt Disney
Records
Disney CD sure to please young audience
Melissa Etheridge, Bobby McFerrin among famous voices
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
When The East Carolinian decided to
review the latest music release from
Disney records, they needed someone
who could relate to the record's target
audience, someone who could think on
the level of a four-to-10-year-old.
I was the obvious choice for the task
of reviewing For Our Children: The Con-
cert, Disney's newest offering. This re-
lease, the second album benefit for the
Pediatric AIDS Foundation, features
some of the top recording artists in the
music industry singing some of thegreat-
est children's songs of all time.
The album features such talents as
Melissa Etheridge and Bobby McFerrin,
as well as artists with more questionable
abilities, such as Faula Abdul and
Gerardo. This 16-song compilation, pro-
duced by jazz-great George Duke, show-
cases just how much fun thereis in mak-
ing good music for kids. Several of the
selections were recorded live at Los An-
geles' Universal Amphitheater in Sep-
tember.
The disc starts off with Paula Abdul's
live performance of "Zip-A-Dee-Doo-
Dah Abdul, backed by Duke's all-star
band gives what may be her best perfor-
mance todate. Of course, given thequal-
ity of Abdul's offerings in the past, that's
not saying much. But this disc is for
children, and Abdul's performance is
energetic and could be captivating for
kids.
The young rap duo Kriss Kross fol-
lows Abdul's lead with "The Krossed
Out version of a Nursery Rhyme These
two teenagers rap some of America's
oldest nursery rhymes, changing the
words to fit a more urban and '90s child
audier e. Their performance warmed the
audience for the entrance of Celine Dion
and Maurice Davis, performing the
theme from "Beauty and the Beast This
live version carries much of the emotion
of the recorded version and I will cer-
tainly admit: Dion can sing.
The disc continues with a studio ver-
sion of Woody Harrelson singing
"Happy to the Sun" based on a John
Drinkwater poem. Harrelson is backed
only by an acoustic guitar and his voice
leaves much to be desired. (Stick to
"Cheers" Woody.)
Live music reemerges on the next
track, as Michael Bolton performs "You
Are My Sunshine" with Duke's band.
Bolton is at his most saccharine here, but
delights the crowd of children, as well as
their mothers in attendance.
After a Motown-influenced rendi-
tion of "Mockingbi rd " by Shanice, one of
the record's better talents emerges with
an offering by Melissa Etheridge.
Etheridge performs a rendition of "The
Green Grass Grew All Around a song
testing the memorization skills of the
listener. I could sing the hell out of that
song when I was six, bu fctheridge's
See DISNEY page 8
New restaurant offers Italian feast
By Pam Revels
Staff Writer
Great Italian food and a warm,
comfortable atmosphere�just two
things Ragazzi's, An Italian Place,
offers.
Ragazzi's, located on Greenville
Boulevard beside the Mitsubishi
dealership, opened Monday, March
1. The restaurant, a mass of white
brick with greenand red trim, makes
its 14th appearance with the new
Greenville location. Other sites in-
dudeRaleghJacksonvilleandCary.
Manager Ed Schrage insists that
the service exceeds that of a typical
chain. "It's the kind of service you
would expect from a family-owned
restaurant, notachain'Schragesaid.
"We're very service oriented
Along with the great service
comes great"scratch-cooked Italian"
food; meaning that almost every-
thing cooked is from scratch�from
the bread to the lasagna. Nothing
comes out of a can here, folks.
The restaurant also
boasts four homemade
specialty sauces: white
clam, marinara,
pizzioli and
cacciatore. They offer
several signature
dishesaswell,one fTp)'
of which consists (J c? a
of a whopping or-
der of cheese sticks
cooking adds up to "great flavor
Of course, great food deserves
to be served in the right environ-
ment. Schrage describes the atmo-
sphere of Ragazzi's as "casual Ital-
ian Rightly so.
Subtle, low lighting
and warm colors of
green and dark red en-
hance the romantic
and serene setting.
7lCW And the Pres-
fp) encecfafull-ser-
I vice bar doesn't
hurt either.
And if you're in the mood for
pizza, you're really in luck. Ragazzi's
pizza oven cooks up a good one. The
red brick wood-burning oven bakes
your pizza on an open hearth. Ac-
cording to Schrage, this method of
It's the kind of place where
anyone feels comfortable. "Our ap-
peal is real broad Schrage said,
commenting that people from all
walks of life frequent the restaurant.
One reason for this broad ap-
peal centers around affordable and
economical prices. The most expen-
sive thing on the menu, a seafood
pasta dish, rings in at $12.95. Lunch
prices range from $3.95-6.95, and
dinner from $5.95-12.95. Forthatyou
geta heapinghelping of Italian-style
heaven � a helping usually too
hearty for most.
"I would say that 90 of the
people can't finish their dinner
Schrage says, joking about the num-
ber of Styrofoam boxes used for
doggie bags.
This emphasis on quality and
quantity may make Ragazzi's the
place to go. "I've worked for a lot of
restaurants Schrage explained.
"We (Ragazzi's) believe in what we
do
With their outstanding service
and most of their food cooked from
scratch, how could they not?
Milestone working
on ethnic comic
By Cliff Coffey
New group reaches past MTV commercialism
By John Patrus
Staff Writer
An entity that creates an atti-
tude of optimism towards the future
of progressive rock is a new band
called The Beyond.
Thegroup'sdebutalbum, Crawl,
represents a hopeful vision that sur-
passes many of the new, so-called,
progressivealternative bands that
rdy tremendously upon MTV's ap-
proval.
The Beyond have manipulated
many tastes and styles, from many
diflerentgrour,trathaveassimilated
into their own original format.
Neil Cooper, Andy Gatford, Jim
Kersey and John Whitby are all gifted
and rising musicians that may be
amongtheleadersofprogressiverock
someday, if MTV does not ruin them
"Sacred Garden the first track
off of Crawl, capitalizes on all of The
Beyond's talents and becomes an ad-
mirable opener.
Thebassguitarand complex per-
cussion bring the single into its skillful
existence, while the lead guitar tears
into place with innovative riffs.
Whitby's vocals fuel the song until a
speedy rhythm takes control.
The
melody ex-
plodes into a
thrash festival
that changes
the character
of the song
untilamellow
fade out ends
the piece.
The
fourthsongon
CrawlEvery-
body Wins
begins withan
excellent
rhythm that
cannot be compared with anything I
have ever heard.
The Beyond utilize an array of
dubbed voices that add even more
complexity to the pace of this track.
Thevocalsareslightlydistorted which
add to the imagery of the lyrics and
emotionally build the listener up to the
aggressiveending. Thefadeoutofthis
single uses more dubbed voices that
ultimately make this piece the high-
light of the
CD.
"Nafl
the fifth
song off of
the album
arises with
an elevated
lead guitar
riff that ad-
vances ef-
fortlessly
throughthe
chords.
The
meticulous
guitarwork
is followed by a series of complex
drumfiUswhicheventuaUystopdown
to a clean cut form.
As the chorus enters for its mo-
ment of glory, the flat and stripped
down rhythm accelerates until the
chorus is over then it declines back to
the smc x )th ?�rvle.
So far, song 11 of Crawl, "lead
The Blind is the only single that has
been released to the radio.
Thetrackcxxnmenceswithajazzy
entrance, similar to Rush tunes, that
progresses into an incredible guitar
riff.
The musical piece then leaps into
a faster pace that would make the
calmest person turn wild.
A smooth transition into a com-
pletely different riff, similar to Kirk
Hammett, takes place later on and
improves the song even more.
Eventually, the thrashing mas-
terpiece returns to the original jazzy
theme but soon after blasts into what
would be considered as a head-
banger's heaven that ends the song.
Despite a few rough edges, The
Beyond ha vealready reached a higher
plateau of talent than many of the
commercialized bands on MTV.
One can only hope that young
talented groups, such as The Beyond,
can have enough tolerance and pa-
tience not to take the easv path to
success, through commercialization.
Staff Writer
Milestone Comics will write a
new chapter in the history of comic
books. DenysCow-an,DerekDingle,
Michael Davis and Dwayne
McDuffiecollaborated in theinven-
tion of the sect of ethnic based com-
ics, which will be distributed
through DC Comics.
Cowan and McDuffie have
beenworldngtothecomkmedium
for many years and dreamed of
brtogfogtolifeanethnicbasedcomic
universe. They're previous work
included manyblackcharacters
dudingtheBlackPanther Deathlok,
and Luke Cage. They have spent
the past few years working on the
prindpleofMilestone;tryingtoget
it just right before they unveiled it.
The line is based on black charac-
ters, writtenbyblackwriters,drawn
by black artists.
The first title from Milestone is
called Hardware. Hardware is by
CowanardMcDuffie.TtenexttifJe,
Blood Syndicate, is by McDuffie and
Trevor Von Eeden. Icon is the third
comic from the Milestone line and
will be handled by McDuffie,Mark
Bright and Mike Gustovkh. The
final of the first four tides, Static, will
be done by McDuffie, Leon and
Mitchell. McDuffie, obviously, will
be the conductor of the initial line.
He also serves as the head editor for
Milestone, as well as the submis-
sions editor for those that wish to
enter the ranks of this new com-
pany.
Cowan stated that the main
reasonhe wanted tobeginanethnic
based company isbecausehedidn't
feel that black characters were
handled correctly in comics. He felt
that toe black characters were used
as stereotypes and weren't given a
realistic representation. They were
also used only as supporting char-
acters, with few exceptions. Those
that did get a lead role didn't have
longevity. Cowan wanted to por-
tray ethnic characters in their own
cultures, truthfully.
Once Cowan and McDuffie
began looking for ethnical comic,
creators they found there are many
black writers and artists interested
in working for Milestone. They ini-
tially decided on four comics, but
the surface will just be scratched
with Hardware, Blood Syndicate, Icon
and Static. Their motto is, "If you're
not there, you just won't get it"
K&h-Aon. w&j. . .

The Crying Game, the smash cinematic hit that has garnered six
Oscar nominations, is currently plaving at the Buccaneer
theater on Arlington Blvd. Students are encouraged to go and
catch it so we all can get more cool, artsy movies here in the
Emerald City.
The senior percussion recitals of Stacy Loggins, Nick
Holland and Scott Harris will take place at The Fletcher Recital
Hall at 7 p.m. oA A. Brown (trumpet) and John Lowe (trom-
bone) will give their senior recitals at 9 p.m.
H





8
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MARCH 4, 1993
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Tlie East Carolinian
March 4, 1993
Sports
Page 9
Peterson sets sails for professional ranks
By Warren Summner
Assistant Sports Writer
It's always tough when you can't
reach your expectations. There is a feel-
ing of lost opportunity that is hard to
deal with, especially if you know that
you may not have another chance to
achieve those goals.
Senior guard Ronnell Peterson,
along with his peers on the Pirate bas-
ketball team, is dealing with this sense
of disappointment, by chasing it with
hopes for success. Peterson is facing the
heartbreak of another losing season with
the therapeutic belief that his team is
poised to shake things up in this
weekend's CAA tournament.
"I feel like we have a good chance to
be tough in the tournament Peterson
said. "Wehavea real good attitude about
it. We're the underdog, so no one really
expects us to do much of anything. It
will be real important for us to get past
the first night, but I think if we can do
that we could make things interesting
Peterson said he feels one of the
major problems the team encountered
this season was inconsistency in their
performance levels from game-to-game.
"It seemed like we'd all have our
(good) games on different nights, one
night it would be Ike (Copeland), then it
would be Lester (Lyons), then me, then
Kareem (Richardson), it seemed we
could never get our game together on
the same night
Peterson is extremely supportive of
his coach, Eddie Payne and said that he
believes Payne can turn ECU's program
around in time.
"Coach Payne is a really good
coach Peterson said. "When I came
into ECU, I was recruited by (former
Pirate coach Mike) Steele. When coach
Payne came in no one was too sure what
Senior point guard Ronneli
Peterson has been one of the most
consistent players on the 1993 ECU
basketball team. His steady ball
handling and tough defense has
helped keep the Pirate ship above
water. Peterson (as shown) is an
adept dribbler who can go both
ways and penetrate.
he would be like. I wish we'd won a few
more games and everything but Coach
Payne really helped me. I wish I could
play for him for a couple more years
Peterson, while maintaining high
hopes for the Pirates' CAA appearance,
also hopes to continue his basketball ca-
reer after his college days end. Peterson
is realistic about the work he must do to
be able to play on the professional level.
"I would love to play basketball af-
ter school Peterson said. "I think I have
to work on my in-between game, I shoot
pretty well from the perimeter and I
have a good feel for the three-point line.
I'm also a real good defensive player. I
feel like if I work on my penetration
See RONNELL page 10
Pirate softball season off to late start
Sports Information Department
COLUMBIA, S.C.�The East
Carolina Lady Pirate Softball
Team opened their season a day
later than expected. After bad
Weather delayed the Lady Game-
cock Invitational one day, ECU
finished the first day with a win
and two losses. '
ECU played their first game
against Eastern Michigan, and the
Pirates scored two runs in the top
of the seventh to take a 4-2 victory,
jenny Parsons pitched all seven
jnnings, giving up only one earned
run to lead ECU to victory.
Georgeann Wilke and freshman
Mary Dunlap led the Lady Pirate
offense with two hits a piece.
Cheryl Hobson and Wilke both
had doubles, while Dunlap cap-
tured the lone ECU triple.
12 3 4 5 6 7 Total
ECU 0000112 4
EMU0 0 0 0 10 1 2
In the second game of the day,
againstNorth Carolina, the Pirates
dropped a close one 2-1. ECU
jumped out on top in the first in-
ning, but couldn't mount another
scoring attack. The Lady Tarheel's
scored the game-winning run in
the bottom of the sixth to take the
win over ECU. The Pirates could
only manage fourhitsoff of UNC's
Yvette Davis, who pitched all
seven innings to receive the win.
OneofECU'sfourhitswasa triple
by Sherri Allen. Jenny Parsons
pitched her second straight game.
giving up two runs on eight hits in
the losing effort. Parsons record
falls to 1-1 on the season.
12 3 4 5 6 7 Total
ECU 1000000 1
UNC 0010010 2
In the final game of the day
for the Pirates, the host team South
Carolina dominated the game win-
ning, 11-1.
USC jumped on the Pirates
early scoring five runs in the sec-
ond inning, one run in the third
and three runs in the fourth in-
ning to take an insurmountable
lead.
ECU could muster up only six
hitsagainst Lady Gamecockhurler
Kim Sheridan. Stephanie Hobson
had the only extra base hit for
ECU, with a double. Jenny Par-
sons started her third game of the
day, only pitching two innings
before being relieved by freshman
John Eckman.
All five runs scored against
Parsons in the second inning were
unearned.
The Pirate defense had three
errors in the game, giving USC an
early lead.
12 3 4 5 6 Total
ECU 0 0 10 0 0 1
USC 0 5 13 0 2 11
On Sunday morning, after
USC plays E. Michigan, the first
seed plays the fourth seed and
then No. 2 will take on No. 3 The
championship game will be
played at 5 p.m.
Rec Services ready for
softball, fitness registration
Women's soccer team sneaks
past Chapel Hill Pioneers, 1-0
i
I MM � � 'I
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Women's Soccer Team
triumphed over the Chapel Hill Pioneers 1-0
in a hotly contested battle Sunday in Chapel
Hill. The Pirate triumph was over one of their
fiercest rivals, making
the win especially
sweet.
Just five minutes
into the game, freshman
forward Kiki Anderson
was tripped in the pen-
alty area and awarded
a penalty kick. Her shot
rebounded off of the left
post, and ECU was de-
nied a prime scoring op-
portunity.
Two minutes later,
& Pioneer broke free into
3?CU territory and fired
a shot at goalkeeper
jaime Pierce. Fortu-
nately, it sailed just over
Ithe crossbar and the score remained 0-0.
20 minutes into the half, sophomore Jill
Metzger broke free and streaked down the
Adeline to get into scoring territory. As she
ilrew two defenders to her, she played a per-
fect pass to Alison Russell, who fired a left
footed shot over the outstretched arms of the
Thiswasavery
intense match,
against one of our
two toughest
opponents, and I
couldn't be more
pleased woth our
team's play today
Pioneer goalie for a 1-0 lead. After the game,
Coach Doug Silver stated, "It was by far the
prettiest goal that I have ever seen this team
score
After the half, ECU came out strong. Half-
back Sheryl Hawkins was denied a goal from
30 yards out only by a fantastic save from the
Pioneer keeper. The Pirates
continued to play strong soc-
cer, but the tide started to
shift Chapel Hill's way. As
the second half neared it's
midpoint, it looked as if the
solid ECU defense might
break. Chapel Hill's star
player, who played in Brit-
ain with the National Team,
tried every move in the book
to get around Mary Keenan
and Faith Burnett, but they
held tough. Fullbacks
Stephanie Aicher, Courtney
Bucka, Missy Cone and Joey
Chip Hudson, pierce held tough, and the
ECU coach game ended with a M Pirate
victory.
"This was a very intense match, against
one of our two toughest opponents, and I
couldn't be more pleased with our team's
play today said ECU Coach Chip Hudson.
East Carolina placed themselves in the
driver's seat to get to the league tournament
with this victory.
Hobson honored
by Omicron
Delta Kappa
honor society
GREENVILLE, N.C.�
Cheryl Hobson, who plays first
base on the East Carolina Lady
Pirate softball team, was one of
13 student leaders accepted into
the East Carolina Circle of Omi-
cron Delta Kappa. The honor so-
ciety is a national organization,
with members coming from over
220 colleges and universities
across the country. Hobson, in
the Fall semester of 1992, made
the Dean's list.
Omicron Delta Kappa rec-
ognizes and encourages supe-
rior scholarship, leadership and
exemplary character. It also rec-
ognizes achievement in scholar-
ship; athletics; and campus or
community service.
Hobson's first activity will
be on March 3, in a "Tapping
Breakfast" sponsored by Dr.
Eakin, ECU's chancellor, in the
Great Room of the ECU
Mendenhall Student Center.
Recreational Services
Spring is coming, and with
it, comes the beginning of an-
other intramural softball sea-
son. With the hype the upcom-
ing season is generating, indi-
viduals have been organizing
teams as early as the fall se-
mester.
There will be an informa-
tion meeting regarding the sea-
son on March 16 at 5 p.m. in
Biology 103. Any needed in-
formation about the season,
registration, rules, and playoff
format will be given at this
meeting. Registration will take
place on the following day. On
March 17, in Christenbury 111,
there will be team registration
from 10 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.
There will be nine sepa-
rate divisions offered during
the season. There are plans for
Men's Gold, Men's Purple,
Women's Gold, Women's
Purple, Fraternity, Sorority,
and Faculty Staff divisions.
The season will begin on
March 22. Games will be
played at the Ficklen intramu-
ral fields 1 through 6. Games
will be played from 4 to 11
p.m. on Monday through
Thursday and also Sunday.
Fields five and six will prob-
ably only be used during day-
light hours.
If you have any questions
regarding the information
meeting or registration, con-
tact Max Carter at 757-6387.
Fitness Registration
The beginning of second
session fitness classes is draw-
ing near. Registration begins
on March 2 and lasts until
March 16. Classes begin on
March 15. One fitness session
includes 12 classes and costs
only $10 for students and $20
for faculty, staff, and spouses.
There is a jump-start pro-
gram for those who are inter-
ested in entering an aerobics
program but have not been in-
volved in one or at least not
one recently. Classes will be-
gin at low intensity and will
increase throughout the six-
week session. These classes are
held from 3 to 4 p.m. on Mon-
day and Wednesday at
Christenbury Gymnasium
room 108. D.A. Higham is the
instructor.
There are a variety of
aerobics classes offered
throughout the week at both
Christenbury Gym and at the
Pipeline Pumphouse a t Garrett
Hall. These classes are de-
signed to strengthen your car-
diovascular system. There are
classes at Christenbury 108 on
Monday and Wednesday from
4:05 to 5:05 p.m on Tuesday
and Thursday from5:15to6:15
p.m on Friday from 4:05 to
5:05 p.m and on Sunday from
3 to 4 p.m. Classes are also
offered at Garrett on Monday
and Wednesday from 3 to 4
p.m. and 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. and
on Tuesday and Thursday from
3to4p.m.and4:05to5:05p.m.
Also in Christenbury 108,
there are low impact classes. In
low impact, one foot is touch-
ing the ground at all times.
These classes are offered on
Monday and Wednesday from
5:15 to 6:15 p.m. and on Tues-
day and Thursday from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m.
Hi-Lo classes are a combi-
nation of traditional aerobics
and low impact. There are
classes offered on Monday and
Wednesday from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m on Tuesday and Thurs-
day from 3 to 4 p.m and Sat-
urday from 12 to 1 p.m.
If you like funk, then
Christenbury has the class for
you. In Christenbury 108 on
Tuesday and Thursday from
See REC page 10





10 The East Carolinian
MARCH 4, 1993
REC
Continued from page 9
4:05 to5:05 p.m you can enjoy your
favorite dance music while getting
into shape. The class is led by Dionne
Evans.
If you want to tone up, Rec Ser-
vices has you covered. There are
Toning classes offered to increase
muscular strength on Monday and
Wednesday from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in
Christenbury 112 and from 4:05 to
5:05 p.m. at Garrett. There is also a
class offered on Tuesday and Thurs-
day from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in
Christenbury 112.
Focusing total interest in toning
those abdominals, Belly Busters
classes are offered at both
Christenbury and Garrett. There is a
class on Tuesday and Thursday from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. in Christenbury 112
instructed by Leslie Smalley, and on
Monday and Wednesday from 6:30
to 7 p.m. at Garrett instructed by
Kel ly Sapp. Belly Busters classes cost
only $5 for students and10 for fac-
ulty and staff members.
An aquaerobics class is offered
in the Christenbury Pool on Tues-
day and Thursday from 5:30 to 6:30
p.m. instructed by Kris Metzger. This
class is identical to an aerobic dance
class except water resistance en-
hances muscular strength.
Finally, Rec services offers an
Early Bird Special on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday from 6:30 to
7:30 am. This Hi-Lo fitness class is
held in Christenbury 108 and is in-
structed by Greg Strivland.
All classes are available on a
drop-in basis with the purchase of a
ticket. You may buy a ticket in
Christenbury 204 from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday through Friday.
It is a goal of Recreational Ser-
vices to meet all of your fitness needs.
To do this, they need your input.
If there is a class that you would
like offered at a specific time and
date, give your suggestions to Rec
Services by dropping by
Christenbury 204 or calling 757-
6387.
MYRTLE
BEACH
SPRING BREAK
Special
SIDEVIEW
RONNELL
Continued from page 9
game I'll have a good shot
According to Pirate coach
Eddie Payne,
Peterson has U Will be real
been one of the . . -
mostconsistent important for US tO
players on the get pOSt the first
Pirate roster nignt but 1 think if
and has dis- � '
played the tena- We CUTl do that We
ciousness on could make
defense the Pi- , . . ��
rates have things interesting "
needed to be Ronnell Peterson
successful.
"Ronnell is real steady Payne
said.
"He has had the ability to
do a lot of things for us defen-
sively. He is
strong enough to
guard the bigger
players we've
faced and usu-
ally defends our
opponent's scor-
ing guards
Payne said
Peterson also
possesses the
temperament to
keep a cool head
in games, as well as much-
needed leadership.
g- gjfigggg? r?
StCharles
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The University Media Board
Position Vacancies
The Media Board wishes to increase the
number of applicants interested in serving
in the following positions for 1993-1994:
�Media Board Day Student Representative
�General Manager, WZMB-FM radio station
�Editor, The Rebel fine arts magazine
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Bldg.
Telephone: 757-6009
Applicants should have a grade
point average of at least 2.5
Application deadline:
5 p.m Wednesday, March 17
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 4, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 04, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.928
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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