The East Carolinian, March 2, 1993






Lifestyle
The classics
World renowed
pianist Leon Bates
will play with the
North Carolina
Symphony.
See story page 7.
Today
High 54�

J Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 14
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Public safety enforces
bicycle safety policies
Tuesday, March 2,1993
12 Pages
By Shannon Anderson
Staff Writer
Students, faculty or employees
who ride bicycles may soon be ticketed
or have their bikes impounded by uni-
versity police if they are caught riding
too fast or carelessly on sidewalks.
Public Safety Lieutenant Keith
Knox said the student population has
grown, so thiscauses large increases in
cyclists and pedestrians.
"The university police have not
enforced this in the past, but the bi-
cycle population is so
heavyitcreatespossible Wr dott'f SPP anv
hazards Knox said. l UUn L btt unY
The students are
asked to follow the same
The faculty senate committee and
others have complained to the univer-
sity police because of some collisions
between cyclists and pedestrians, and
alsoaccidentsbetween cyclistsand au-
tomobiles. Knox said there have also
rules as automobiles on
campus. Including
riding the right direc-
tion on one-way streets.
Students should also
push their bicycles on
sidewalks that are
heavily populated by
pedestrians.
According to
Knox there are plans to
move some of the bicycle racks that are
in the problem areas. He said that they
might put a rack for each building, but
some of the larger ones will probably
stay in their current places.
Knox believes bicycle population
has grown because it is the fastest and
easiest mode of transportation. It also
has become more popular because it is
safer than cars for the environment.
problem with
riding on open
campus, but if it
creates potential
hazards we need
to do something
about it, 99
Keith Knox
been several near -misses involving bi-
cycles.
ECU Chief of Police Ken Avery
said the university police plans to be-
gin enforcing the policy on the first of
April. "We want to first educate the
publicsaid Knox, "then we will begin
enforcement
Some of the prob-
lems that bicycles are
causing on campus in-
clude the cyclists forc-
ing pedestrians off
sidewalks, Knox said.
This problem area is in
front of the student
store and general class-
room building.
Another problem
is cyclists going too
fast, Knox said. This is
dangerous because the
cyclist may not be able
to stop in case of a
problem, or the cyclist will be less vis-
ible to automobiles driving on campus.
Knox said the cyclists also create
problems on campus bv ridingon grass
areas, causing paths. This destroys the
beautification of the campus.
Lieutenant Knox said that the
campus police are mostly concerned
about cyclists riding in crowded areas.
T don't see any problem with
riding on open campus, but if it creates
potential hazards we need to do some-
thing about it Knox said.
Knox said this new policy will re-
enforce some policies already being rec-
ognized.
The university police will
strengthen its policy on students or
faculty who chain their bicycles to the
buildings on campus.
They will also require that all bi-
cycles be registered with the univer-
sity.
In the future theuniversity police
will have a unit of police officers on a
bicyc'e patrol, but right now there is no
funding for this project.
Photos by Jason Bosch
Public safety
will soon punish
cyclists caught
riding recklessly
on campus
sidewalks. The
relocation of
many bicycles
racks is also
under
consideration.
RHA victorious at state conference
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
The ECU Residence Hall As-
sociation received five honors in-
cluding state president, associate
finance director and NCARH'ssec-
retarynewsletter editor recently in
a state conference.
ECU's RHA hosted the North
Carolina Association of Residence
Hall's 1993 state conference on Feb.
19-21 at the Hilton Inn.
This year's conference was
entitled "NCARH Wants You
"The ECU students who
planned the conference deserve a
lot of praise for theirdedicationand
skill said RHA Advisor Linda
Sessoms.
ECU RHA members began
last February to prepare a bid for
the conference at a regional busi-
ness meeting. The bid was then ac-
cepted and the conference chairs
met several times over the summer
for "initial planning and brain-
storming stated Sessoms.
Two hundred and ten resi-
dence hall leadersand advisors from
across the sta te a ttended the confer-
ence. RHA Vice President Janna
McDonald was named 1993-94
NCARH state president. James
HnMO counssy buu hha
Linda Sessoms, Tammy Whitley and India Vaughn were all honored at
the N.C. RHA state conference.
Moretz was re-elected as the state
associate finance director. Ken
Wooten waselected NCARH'ssec-
retarynewslettereditor. Lisa Den-
ning was named RHA's president
and RHA's National Communica-
tionCoordinator India Vaughn won
a "Top Five"programaward. RHA
Advisor Linda Sessoms was
awarded "Ad visor of the Year"and
presented with a plague.
"The purpose of the confer-
ence was to bring residence hall
leaders together to attend educa-
tional workshops, share ideas, net-
work, socialize, to attend state busi-
ness meetingsand show theii school
spirit Sessoms said.
Other winners included Ap-
palachian State with the "Most Spir-
ited Large Delegation High Point
University with "Most Spirited
Small Delegation" and UNC-
Wilmington with "Best Roll Call
dean air policy still in experimental stage
University officials pleased with
smokers' cooperation.
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
In the summer of 1992, the
ECU Board of Trustees voted to
restrict smoking in all campus
buildings. The group voted 11-2
in favor of the act that prohibited
smoking in buildings that are
poorly ventilated or not venti-
lated at all.
Dr. John Moskop, presi-
dent of the Faculty Senate, said
that the university must come
up with a policy that includes
smokers' rights.
"The resolution directs the
chancellor to develop a clean air
policy which includes designat-
ing smoking areas in certain
buildings Moskop said.
Currently, there are only
threeareasthatare open to smok-
ers inside of campus buildings,
and these are in the experimen-
tal stage. According to Richard
Brown, vice chancellor for busi-
nessaffairs,thenumberof rooms
available to be set aside for smok-
ers are very few.
"We have a very little num-
ber of rooms available Brown
said. "The ones we currently have
are located in Joyner Librarv,
BiewsterBiiildingandRawl Build-
ing
These
nx:ms test out
ventilation sys-
tems called
"SmokeEaters
With three of
these in each
room, the
smoke is pulled
into the ma-
chine, run
through a vari-
ous set of filters
and forced back
out as clean air.
Brown also commented that
the university is facing very few
problems with smoking inside, but
does face problems outside.
"The policy has created far
The policy
has created
far fewer con-
flicts or prob-
lems than we
anticipated
Richard Brown,
Vice Chancellor for
Business Affairs
fewer conflicts or problems than
we anticipated Brown said.
'There is less clean-up needed
inside thebuildings,butoutside
wedohavea problem with ciga-
rette butts
The university is looking
into purchasing
ash urns that
would go outside
each exit door on
buildings. Brown
said that these
urns would cost
the university in
excess of $10,000.
Future
"SmokeEaters"
would also cost
the university
around $4,000 a
unit. Brown said
that most indi-
viduals are following the policy
with little to no problems.
"Smokers are voluntarily
being good citizens and smok-
ing outside Brown said.
American Lung Association benefits from food fair
By Shannon Anderson
Staff Writer
Thefourthannual Taste ofGreenville,
sponsored by the American Lung Absocia-
tionof.NorrhCaro!ina,willbeheldonMarch
6atthe Plaza inGreenville from 11:30a.m. to
2 p.m.
Severa I resta u ran fc, from Eastern Nfc rth
Carolina will set up individually decorated
booths for custi imers to st p by and sample
some of their fxd tohelp benefit the Ameri-
can Lung Association f r Eastern' an lina.
Tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for
children over five-years-old. For more infor-
mation call the American Lung Association
of North Carolina at 1-800-849-5949.
There will be entertainment bv the
Panama Steel Band, and Miss Greater
GreenvillePitt County, Jenny West, will be
featured.Thiseventalso includes free photo
identification and fingerprints for children.
"A taste of Greenville is also spon-
sored by IVpsi- oia Bottling Compan) of
enville said Sadie Daughtey, director
i f tin cistern region of the American Lung
Association of North Carolina The Pepsi-
C ola Bottling Company asked if they could
become involved in some kind of money-
raising project.
The idea for the festival was sparked
by other projects held in cities across the
country. A similar festival has been held in
Chicago for 14 vears.
The Taste of Greenville began in 199(1
when more than LO00 people attended. The
great turn-out made the assixriation decide
to find a building with more space than the
American Legk m Building. In l991,thefood
festival was held in the Plaza Mall with a
turn-out of 1,500 parti ipants
Proceed from ticket sales will go to
local funding of educational seminars on the
dangers of smoking, asthma, and lung can-
cer.
Daughtey said money from the ticket
sales will also go towards training clinic
leaders to give the educational seminars.
"Thisistheonly fund raiserwehave in
Pitt Count-each year Daughty said, "We
i inly hit people up for monev once a year
The Taste of Greenville began when
( asey Dobynes lost four members of his
family to lung cancel. I le approached the
association because he wanted tostarta fund
raiser tohelp research on lung cancer.
This buffet-style food festival has usu-
all) drawnlargecrowdsForsomereason
Daughtey said on rainy days we get more
people
The American Lung Association of
North Carolina-Eastern Carolina serves 22
Eastern North Carolina counties. Daughtey
has been involved with the association for
seven vears.
Some of the restaurants that will par-
tidp.ite are Annabelle's, The Beef Bam,
Chico's, Golden Corral, Omar's Express, Red
1 jobster, Shoney's, Subway and Trie Upper
C rust Bakery.





2 The East Carolinian
MARCH 2, 1993
Female rejected by The Citadel
Shannon Richey Faulkner was accepted, and then re-
jected by The Citadel after it was determined that her high
school transcripts had been altered to delete all references to
her gender. The Citadel, a state-run military school in Charles-
ton, S.C allows no women in its corps. In a press release. The
Citadel said provisional acceptance requires that several
conditions be met before full acceptance?"One of those crite-
ria involves a medical physical, which, in this case, would
have immediately disqualified the applicant it said. If
Faulkner sues, it will be the second gender-discrimination
suit filed against The Citadel within a year. Three female
veterans sued the school in June to be allowed to attend the
same day classes that male veterans attended along with The
Citadel's 2,000 cadets. Instead of allowing the women in, the
school closed its day-school program for the male veterans.
New SAT exam being planned
The Scholastic Aptitude Test may have a new name
when a redesigned form of the test is introduced in spring
1994. Critics say that the word "aptitude" misleads high
school students and their parents into believing the test is
analyzing something innate or immutable, said Robert Seaver,
spokesman for The College Board. Additionally, an aca-
demic study recommended a new name because the rede-
signed test won't include the antonyms section and will have
a longer reading section that requires students to come up
with conclusions. In the math section, the students will have
to generate their own answers instpd of picking an answer.
Students leave school after murder
Three students dropped out of the University of West
Florida after a junior was abducted from a campus parking lot,
raped and strangled. Additionally, six students who were tak-
ing night classes switched to day classes despite improved
lighting and a campus security phone system that has been
installed, reported the student newspaper, The Voyager. Susan
Leigh Morris, 21, a communication arts major who lived with
her parents in Pensacola, disappeared from a campus parking lot
on Jan. 12 while walking to her car after a night course. Her body was
found in a wooded area on campus the next day. She had been
beaten, raped and strangled, officials said. A suspect, Eric Scott
Branch, was charged with murder, sexual battery and grand theft.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
StateNews
Cleveland county residents fight increased meningitis
SHELBY, N.C. (AP) � In-
fectious meningococcal meningi-
tis struck two Cleveland County
residents � a Gardner-Webb
University student and a 3-year-
old boy � over the weekend.
Both were admitted to
Cleveland Memorial Hospital,
where they were diagnosed with
the potentially fatal infection, ac-
cording to a news release from
County Health Director Denese
Stallings.
It's the same illness that
killed Robert Allen, a 14-year-
old Shelby High School student,
two weeks ago. The two people
diagnosed this weekend appar-
ently had no contact with Allen,
Stallings said.
The 19-year-old college
freshman was in isolation and
listed in fair condition Monday,
and the toddler was in good con-
dition, said Dean Jenks, a hospi-
tal spokesman. Both were un-
dergoing treatment for menin-
gitis.
The bacteria that causes
meningococcal meningitis has a
10-day incubation period, so
health officials said that the dan-
ger period for further cases from
exposure to Allen expired last
weekend.
These two cases seem to be
unrelated to Allen and to each
other, Stallings t�aid, since the stu-
dent and the toddler lived in dif-
ferent parts of the county and
had no known contact with each
other.
The Cleveland County
Health Department is working
with area physicians and state
health officials to trace the
source of the bacteria, Stallings
said.
The main symptoms of
meningitis are high fever, head-
ache and pain or stiffness in the
back of the neck. Early symp-
toms may be similar to a cold.
Symptoms include aches, a low-
grade fever, mild headache and
nausea and vomiting.
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��� i
Student
Government
Association
I WHAT:
t
r
? WHEN:
?WHERE:
Filing for Spring Elections
� Executive President
� Executive Vice-President
� Executive Treasurer
� Executive Secretary
Thursday, February 25, 1993
until 5:00pm,
Thursday, March 4, 1993
Room 255
Mendenhall Student Center
757-4726
r
?
I
?
QUALIFICATIONS:
� Overall 2.0 G. P.A.
� Enrolled at least 2
Consecutive Semesters
at East Carolina University
� Good Standing
� Completed at least
48 Semester Hours
$10.00 Filing Fee
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING
Monday, March 15, 1993
25th ANNUAL SPRING
BIKINI CONTEST
Thursday, March 4th
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n�





MARCH 2, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
National News
Hundreds attend Virginia state trooper's funeral, state investigates shooting
U'ARRENTON, Va. (AP) �
More than 1,500 mourners said
goodbye to Virginia state Trooper
k ee M � Cavazos, who was gunned
down last week after he pulled
over a car.
Cavazos, a 10-year-veteran
of the police department, was shot
five times last Wednesday off an
Interstate 95 exit ramp near Dale
City. At 50, he was nearing retire-
ment. A North Carolina man has
been charged.
Law enforcement officers
from as far as California attended
funeral services for Cavazos at St.
James Episcopal Church in
Warrenton and the burial at
Fairview Cemetery in Culpeper.
"Ifitcouldbehim,itcouldbe
us said Patrolman Martin Brooks
of the Boston Police Department.
Brooksand rvvofellowofficerswho
came to the funeral mourned one
of their own last Wednesday. Bos-
ton police Officer Thomas F. Rose
was fatally
u
wounded Feb.
19 inside a po-
lice station.
State po-
lice Chaplain
Preston
Everhart said
Cavazos paid
the ultimate sac-
rifice.
Law enforcement of fleers are
getting tired of the killings, and
government officials should begin
taking action, he said. "We have
become sitting ducks Everhart
said.
Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, who
attended the funeral, said he heard
a call for handgun control. "We in
Virginiaare taking the lead Wilder
said. "And though
it wasn't in time to
prohibit theacrions
that took the life of
Trooper Cavazos,
hopefully it will be
in time to stop fu-
ture loss of life
The gover-
norhassaidhewill
sign a bill passed Thursday by the
General Assembly that will limit
handgun purchases to one a month
unless the buyer gets state police
permission for a multiple purchase.
Cavazos was still alive when
If it could be
him, it could
be us?
Patrolman Martin Brooks
he was found about 12:45 a.m.
Wednesday.
He was wearinga bulletproof
vest, but none of the shots fired
from a 9mm handgun struck the
protected area, police said. He was
killed by two shots that hit him
above the vest. He died at Wash-
ingtonHospital. Cavazoswasbom
in Edinburg, Texas. He moved to
Virginia in 1969 and joined state
police in 1983.
Younger troopers often asked
Cavazos for guidance because he
was older and wiser, 1st Sgt. Dou-
glas Hendley said. "I think almost
everyone called him Pop he said.
Two men have been arrested
in Cavazos' slaying.
Prosecutors have said they
will seek the death penalty against
Lonnie Weeks Jr of Fayetteville,
N.C who was implicated by his
uncle as the person who fired the
fatal shots.
Weeks, 20, and his uncle and
co-defendant, Louis Jefferson
Dukes,21, of Washington, D.C, are
charged with capital murder, use
of a firearm in the commission of a
felony and stealing the auto they
were driving.
Cavazos, of Nokesville, was
the first Virginia state trooper to
be killed in the line of duty since
1989.Cavazos is survived by his
wife, Linda, a 16-year-old son and
a 20-year-old daughter who at-
tends the University of Virginia.
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' .H
ATTENTION: STUDENT GROUPS
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
Annual Fund-Raising Planning
Are Scheduled For:
ions
Monday, March 15
Tuesday, March 16
Wednesday, March 17
Thursday, March 18
Monday, March 22
Tuesday, March 23
Wednesday, March 24
Thursday, March 25
Tuesday, April 6
Wednesday, April 7
Thursday, April 8
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4 The East Carolinian
MARCH 2, 1993
International News
Aid falling on Serb lines, missing Muslims
Word of the day:
ZYMURGY
FRANKFURT, Germany
(AP) � Air Force officials said
Monday that the first U.S. air-
drop of food and medicine into
Bosnia went well, but reports
from the ground indicated the
aid went to Serbs, not hungry
Muslims.
Flying high and at night to
avoid ground fire, three C-130
cargo planes dropped more than
20 tons of food and medical sup-
plies over the Muslim communi-
ties and returned safely to Frank-
furt before dawn.
It was the most direct
American involvement yet in the
nearly year-long war in Bosnia-
Herzegovina. Up to300,000Mus-
lims in eastern Bosnia have not
received U.N. relief supplies be-
cause of roadblocks set up by
Serb fighters.
U.S. officials have said they
also will drop food for Bosnia's
Serbs and Croats. All three war-
ring factions � Muslims, Croats
and Serbs�had representatives
in Germany to inspect the cargo
and ensure no weapons were
dropped.
U.N. officials said the aid
was dropped Monday on the
Muslim enclave of Cerska. But a
Serb commander indicated it fell
into the hands of Serb fighters
who U.N. officials said cut the
eastern town in two overnight.
Pilots said they encountered
no hostile fire.
Military officials, citing se-
curity concerns, would not say
where the relief pallets were
dropped or how high the planes
flew. The slow-moving turbo-
prop C-130s have few defenses.
"It went very well Brig.
Gen. Donald E. Loranger Jr com-
mander of the Air Force's 435th
Airlift Wing at Rhein-Main Air
Base outside Frankfurt, told re-
porters.
He said it was difficult to
determine where the food
landed, but said he was confi-
dent "we were very, very accu-
rate
Alemka Lisinski of the U.N.
High Commissioner for Refugees
in Zagreb, Croatia said the first
run targeted only Cerska.
Nenad Unukic, a radio op-
erator in Zagreb, said officials in
Cerska and two other encircled
Muslim towns � Gorazde and
Zepa � told him by radio that by
mid-morning no aid had been
found.
Warlord gets ultimatum, talks continue
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP)
� Supporters of rival warlords
stoned each other, and three Somalis
were shot to death Sunday in
Kismayu while the U .Sled coalition
stepped upeffortstocalm the south-
em port, officials said.
Thecoalition issued an ultima-
tum ordering warlord Col. Omar Jess
tomovehisforcesawayfromthecity
to an area 80milesnorth by midnight
Tuesday or face attack. Jess' rival,
Mohamed Said Hirsi, known asGen.
Morgan, complied with a similar ul-
timatum last week.
U.S. and Belgian troops also
conducted weapons sweeps in
Kismayu, 300 miles south of
Mogadishu, and captured a large
number of arms and ammunition,
said MarineCol. Fred Peck, U.S. mili-
tary spokesman in the capital.
Despite the recent surge in vio-
lence in Kismayu, representatives of
Somalia's 14 rival factions have
agreed on an agenda for a peace
conference Marchl5in Addis Ababa,
Ethiopia, U.N. officials said Sunday.
Somalia has been without a
government since dictator
Mohammed Siad Barre was ousted
in January 1991. U.Sled forces ar-
rived in December to try to stop clan
fighting and guard aid shipments in
the famine-wracked nation.
The agenda for the peace talks
includes working out terms for an
interim governmentand police force,
a transitional constitution, regional
autonomy and reconstruction. Also
to be discussed are human rights,
humanitarianassistanceand resettle-
ment of refugees.
Kismayu has remained tense
since Morgan'ssupportersdrove Jess
and 450 of his men out of the city on
Feb. 22.
The fighting forced U.S. offi-
cials to postpone sending home 1,000
GIs from the area and to send in
about 600 more. It also sparked anti-
foreigner rioting Wednesday in
Mogadishu by supporters of war-
lord Mohamed Farrah Aidid, an ally
of Jess.
An estimated two dozen
people died in the initial Kismayu
battle, and relief workers estimate
100 more have been killed since.
In Kismayu on Sunday, sup-
porters of Morgan and Jess staged
marches that met at a central arch,
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and the participants began pelting
each other with rocks, Peck said.
As the clash began to subside,
a Somali man threw a grenade at
nearby Belgian soldiers, who shot
and killed him. Twoother confronta-
tions between Somalis killed two
people, Peck said. No soldiers were
injured.
U.S. and Belgian troops have
conducted widespread searches for
weapons in Kismayu and have im-
posed a nighttime curfew since Fri-
day, officials said.
Arms seized overthe weekend
included 222 small arms,58 grenades,
567 mortar shells, 244 rocket-pro-
pelled grenades, 1,200 land mines
and 8,800 pounds of ammunition,
said Chief Warrant Officer Eric
Carlson,anotherUS.m!litaryspokes-
man. In other violence, a U.S. patrol
in Merca, 100 miles south of
Mogadishu, was fired on by Somalis.
The soldiers killed one Somali man
and captured three others, Peck said.
Australian troops on patrol in
Baidoa, 150 miles northwest of
Mogadishu, killed a Somali as he
aimed his gunatthem late Saturday,
Carlson said.
The University Media Board
Positions Vacancies
The Media Board wishes to increase the
number of applicants interested in serving
in the following positions for 1993-1994:
�Media Board Day Student Representative
�General Manager, WZMB-FM radio station
�Editor, The Rebel fine arts magazine
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Bldg.
Telephone: 757-6009
Applicants should have a grade
point average of at least 2.5
Application deadline:
5 p.m Wednesday, March 17
j

j
THE
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVES
Karen Bilyj
Lindsay Fernandez
Matt Hege
Aimee Lewis
Brandon Perry
CALL 919-757-6366
Today for
more advertising
information.
TT P I " " �" !TTTT
Tuesday
is
Student Appreciation
Day
SEAFOOD
626 S. Memorial Drive
Present your 1993 Student ID
Card and get:
YOUR CHOICE OF
ANY DINNER FOR ONLY
$029
Excluding platters & family packs.
Not valid with any other discounts
Beverages and desserts not included
Illl!llll!lll!lll!l!TTTT
DEADLINES
Deadlines for all advertising are:
Friday at 4 p.m. for Tuesday Editions
Tuesday at 4 p.m. for Thursday Editions
ADVERTISING RATES
Local Open Rate
$5.00 per column inch
Campus Organization Rate
$@.50 per column inch
CLASSIFIED
Students (25 words or less) $2.00
Non-Students (25 words or less) $3.00
Eash additional word over 25 $.05
Overtoil's
is Eastern North Carolina's
Swimsuit Headquarters
Styles by the Industries Leading Manufacturers
VENUS
DE LA MER
BENDINGO
JAG
SOLAR
TAN-THRU
SPEEDO
CATALINA JRS
PORTA DO SOL
OP
TAKE COVER
& Many More
ONE RACK OF LADIES' SWIMSUITS REDUCED
UP TO 60 OFF OVERTON S PRICE
Overtoil's
HOURS
M-F 9 AM - 8 PM
Sat 9 AM-7 PM
111
fatifl
RED BANKS RD.
(Comer of Red Banks Rd. & Evans St.)
355-5783
�HMMH
y





TheEastCarolinian
March 2, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS :1 and
2 bedroom apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdrver hook-
ups. Call 752-8915.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 2608 Tryon
Drive; 3 bedroom 1 bath; 5550.00 p
m. 404 S. Eastern Street; 3 bedroom2
bath;S680.00pm. No pets. Leaseand
Deposit Required. Duffus Realty, Inc.
Call 756-2675.
A 7TH STORY luxury suite hanging
over the whit sand and clear water of
South Florida's most beautiful beach.
Completely furnished, sleeps five in
unbelievable luxury; minutes from Jai
Alai, airport, horses dogs, Ft. Lauder-
dale Beach, Miami Action. $800 for
Week36-3 13 at Hollywood Beach
Tower. Call (205) 948 - 7493.
1 BR APARTMENT on 13th St Great
for pets, esp. dogs. Available immedi-
ately. $275 mo. Call 752-9197.
FEMALEroommate need May through
Aug to share 2 bdrm apt at Tar River.
SI00.00 per mo 1 3 utilities. Call 752-
8000
KINGS ARM APARTMENT for rent
One bed room. Available immediately.
No deposit required 5265mo. Call
Coflect(919)2fi9-7844 Ask for Yvonne
SUBLEASE: 2 bedroom apartment at
OakmontSquare. RentisS380 month.
Available March 1st through end of
May Call 355-5803.
IBRAPARTMENTacrossfrom cam-
pus call 752 -2615
SUBLEASE TAR RIVER APT. for
summer ASAP. 2 bedroom $460 a
month. Call 830-9421.
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live con-
cert&srudio recordings for sale. Over
lOOOnewritlesavailablethisweekfrom
thefollowingartists:ROCK-U2,R.E.M,
Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendrix, Black
Crowes, Springsteen, SRV, VanHalen,
Rush, Beatles, Doors, G-N-R, etc. AL-
TERNATIVE-Nir'ana,PearlJam,Chili
Peppers, Cure, Depeche Mode, MORE
OTHERS INCLUDE-Bob Marley, Ma-
donna, Prince, and more. Ca 11931 -2573
to leave name, number, and requested
artist on message (all new CD's and
tapes in stock).
CHEAP! FBIUSSEIZED: 89Mercedes
-200, 86 VW - $) �& Mercedes -
SI 00, 65 Mustang -55. Choose form
thousandsstartingS50.FREElnforma-
tion 24 hour hot I ine 801 -379-2929 copy-
nghtNC 030610.
FOR SALE! Admiral Delux full-sized
refrigerator. Old but in very good con-
dition, 758-6998.
HONDA 1988 Nx 125 J, 1127 miles,
SI ,200.756-1910.
MOUNTAIN BIKE Trek 820,1 year
old, good condition. 5175 OBOand its
yours! Call 752-9601.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE FOR LG house near
downtown and campus. 1 3 utilities,
deposit, $155moth, call Jay 758-4375'
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
S150.00permonth l3urilities. Easy
going, non-smoker preferred. Please
call 757-1262.
TWOGRAD STUDENTS insearchof
3rd roommate to live in 3 bdr. house.
$160moperson,S160depositrefund-
able end of August. Please inquire Ja-
son or Mandel 756-6614 or Jason 757-
6318.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures' Spa refull time.Setownhours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center iring enthusiastic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. NorthBeachSailing,Inc. Box 8279,
Duck, NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED. Looking for enthusiastic
people with strong cheering and inter-
personal skills to teach cheerleading
camps in NC & SC. Great pay and
flexible scheduling. Up to 10 weeks
possible! If you love cheerleading, this
is the summer job for you! To apply
Call 1-800-280-3223.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All Materials provided. SendSASEto
National Distributors PO Box 9643
Springfield, MO 65801. Immediate re-
sponse.
ATTENTION FASHION MER-
CHANDISING MAJORS! Gain valu-
able work experience in your field of
study.Brody'sisacceptingapplications
for Secretary to Buyer. Work with buy-
ers in tracking and replenishing inven-
tory levels. Computer experience
needed. Must be available 3 days by 12
p.m 15-20 hours per week. Apply
Brady's The Plaza, Monday - Wednes-
day, 1-4 pm.
AQUATIC DIRECTORS & LIFE-
GUARDS Summer positions in
Greenville and Nags Head areas. Call
Bob, 756-1088.
THE CITY OF RALEIGH PARKS
AND RECREATION department is
seeking enthusiastic hardworking in-
dividus for summer employment.
Position- include pool managers, life-
guard, park maintenance, camp coun-
selors, nature, athletic, arts and lake
personnel, and therapeutic programs.
EOE MFH Contact: 2401 Wade Av-
enue, Raleigh, NC 27602 Phone: (919)
831-6640.
200 - $500 WEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information-24hourhotline. 801-379
-2900 Copyright NC 030650.
WILLING TO TRADE free horseback
ridinginexchangeforoccasionalstable
help. Private stable near Winterville.
Experienced riders only. Call 756 -
5784 after 6 pm.
LOOKING FOR responsible Child-
hood Education or Nursing student
(preferably) who could watch my 4 vr.
old son in our home - 2 davs a week,
830 - 5:30. Transportation and refer-
ences necessary. Call Lori or Dennis
756-576S (leave message).
WANTEDusedCD's,NES, and Super
NES games. Call 756 - 3319 and leave
message.
WANTED TO BUY: Rolex-and other
high grade watches CASH PAID
Call David at 756-9290 Mon-Sat 10-6
Leave Message after 6 pm
PARTY HOUSES - North Myrtle
Beach. Welcomegroupsof4-34people.
Group-Leader discounts. Call Myrtle
Beach Tours 9 - 4 pm (703) 250-2125.
LET'S PARTY experienced DJ from
Bogies available for all occasions: Fra-
ternity and Sorority socials, Weddings,
Birthdays. All types of music from
Classic Rock to Top 40 Dance. Highest
quality Best Prices Call Rob @ 757 -
2658.
A GREAT OPPORTUNITY for stu-
dent group fund raising sell greeting
cards. Receive half profit. Call 919-
758-49016. Ask for Northern Lamer or
see Lisa Shibley.
BUSY SCHEDULE; no time for typ-
ing Mary will do your typing for you
atS2.50apage. FurtherDetailscall752-
5228 after 6:00pm.
SPRING ON THE OUTER BANKS
Sun Realty extends a special invitation
to students at ECU to vacation this
spring on the sunny Outer Banks of
NC through May 22nd. Certain restric-
tions apply. 5300 security deposit
requireed. Call for availabilities 1-800-
334-4745.
WORD PROCESSING AND PHO-
TOCOPYING SERVICES: We offer
typingandphotocopyingservices. We
also sell software and computer dis-
kettes. 24hours in and out. Guaranteed
typing on paper up to 20 hand written
pages.SDFProfessionalComputerSer-
vices, 106 East 5th Street (beside
Cubbie's) Greenville, NC 752-3694.
Typing Services
Resumes, Term Papers, Letters
Master Thesis or Presentations
Professionally printed on "LaserJet' printer
Reasonable Rates
Same Day Service available
C�ll J. Canon at 756-1341
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information in U.S.
all subjects
Older Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
in CaW. (213)4778226
?.r:JH?Jl $2 �� ,0: R���arch Information
11322 Idaho Ave. H206-A. Los Angles, CA 90025
TOLL FREE
HOTLINE
6MVES PROFESSIONAL TYPING &
WORD PR0CESSIN6 SERVICE
'English Litercuure Major
'Editing & Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resumes
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
Butbeing with you willmakeitthebest
time 1 could ever have. I love you,
forever, your mister man.
COORS: Congratulationsongoingto
Tennessee for the Billiards Nationals!
I'm sure you did an awesome job
HOTROD! By thewaydid the little red
headed girl come along and play with
you, I heard she might just for support
you know! See ya later and how about
Lifestyle? Mo
Brian, Cliff, Missy, Lisa, Sean, and
Jeremy: Thanks a lot for making this
semester a lot easier and one 111 never
forget! No matter where 111 be next
year, I'll always remember vou guys
and all the support you've given me!
Brian, watch out for the puck;Missy,
don't cut your hair;Cliff, don't forget
the study room;Lisa, feel it
burn,Sean,can 1 bum a smoke?and
Jeremy,Teli Prince I said Hi! I love you
guys! Your friend always, Lisa Marie.
To the Phi Kappa Tau brother who
enjoys being tied up and loves to wear
a tuxedo bikini: too bad you turned out
to be just a big Italian weenie. (Well, I
guess BIG is exaggerating it a bit!)
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVES
Karen Bilyj
Lindsay Fernandez
Matt Hege
Aime'e Lewis

Brandon Perry
CALL 919-757-6366
today for more
advertising information
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, exL 65
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,00C $5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NJ2WI USED CD'S
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
Available March 1st Ideal location, close to
campus with ECU Bus transportation
provided. One and two bedrooms.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
SUNSHINE, I want to thank you for a
wonderful four month anniversary to
be. I know New York City will be fun
and 1 cannot wait to see the Phantom.
EXCEPTIONAL VALUE FOR
. SPACIOUS DUPLEXES
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
2 and 3 bedroom duplexes offering
lots of space and convenient locations
close to campus.
Water and sewer is paid by us
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
THE �
EASTli J iII y J
CARPI Man fJJ'iJ,
The Advertising Deadline For March 16, 1993
Edition Will Be This Thursday, March 4th at 4 PM.
Thank you for your cooperation!
Announcements
COMMUTERS &RFTlipNIN-
ADULTSTI.jpFNTS
Need help? Have ques-
tions? complaints? suggestions?
Here's your opportunity to talk
with the experts in person on Wed
March 3 from 11:30 -1:00 and 5:00
- 6:30 plus Thurs March 4 from
11:30-1:00 on the first floor of GCB
outside room 1008.
NAIT
NAIT will be holding a
meeting Tues March 2nd at 5:00
pm inRawl 105. Todd Skinner, Vice
President with Industrial Construc-
tion for C. A. Lewis, Inc. will be the
guest speaker For more informa-
tion call PatrickCarrollat830-1765.
ENGLISH DFPT -Fi
Susan V. Smith, a gradu-
ate student in the English depart-
ment who was working to com-
plete her thesis, died recently. A
memorial fund has been set up in
her name. Anyone wishing to con-
tribute to the Memorial fund for
Susan Smith may contact St.Peter's
Catholic Church (757-3259).
CAMPUSrHRl�:TMN
FELLOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship
of Christians, a placeto pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects7 Need a ref-
uge from time to time? Campus
Christian Fellowship may be wh.it
you .ire looking for Our weekly
meetings are at 7pm Wednesdays
at our Campus House located at
200 E. Sth St directly across
CotancheSt. from Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. For more informa-
tion, Call Tim Turner, Campus
Minister, at 752-7199 .
EAST CARPI TNi A HoNoRC
ORGANIZATION
ECHO will have its next
meeting Wednesday, March 3, at
5:00 p.m. in GCB. Rm 2017. We will
be doing a personality evaluation.
All students with a 3.4 CPA are
welcome
ECUENVlROMMFiTM
HEALTH rillR
The next meeting will be
held on Wed March 3 at 5:00 in the
2nd floor student lounge of the
Allied Health Building Everyone
is invited to come!
RECSERVICFS
Spring Fling Get Away
Give Away! Free prizes will be
given away during all aerobics
classes on Wed March 3 And don't
forget to register for the Crand
Prize - A night's accommodation
for 2 and breakfast - compliments
of the Greenville Hilton Inn! For
more information call Kec.Services
at 757-6387
GOLDEN KFYNA,TfnM a,
HONOR SOCIFTV
Golden Key will have
meeting March 3rd in Speight 313.
all members are urged to attend.
Questions7 Please Call 756 - 5381.
GAMMASIC,MAqrrMA.
Gamma Sigma Sigma will
be holding its first annual Karaoke
Contest at MUGSHOTS on Tues-
day March 2 starting at 10:00 pm.
Sing the night away with over 300
songs to choose from! Prizes
awarded! Don't miss out on this
great event! For more details con-
tact jenny 931 -8279 or Michelle 758-
7546.
LEARN TO SWIM
The children's Learn to Swim
program in the Water Safety
Instructor's Class will start Mar.
15th. For further information, con-
tact Melrose Moore, Minges Coli-
seum 757-4632 or 4633.
STUDENT GOVFR'MFNT
ASSOCIATION
Filing for executive elections
begins Thurs , Feb. 25, 1993. Must
have 48 semester hours, 2 semes-
ters at ECU, a 2.0 overall G.P.A
and be in good standing. Contact
SCA office at 757-4726 for more
info Positions available include
president, vice-president, trea-
surer, secretary S10.00 filing fee
ECU FENCING PI lip
ECU Fencing Club will
hold orientation on February. 23 and
Mar 2 Tues . at 6:30 p.m in
Christenbury Gym. Fencers at all
levels are welcome or contact 752-
3052.
SOCIAI WORKrpilUirHAJ
JUSTICE
Applicants for the S.W. &
C.J. majors are reminded to attend
an Admissions group meeting in
Ragsdale 218 on Monday Mar. 1
or Tues Mar. 2 at 5 p.m. Appli-
cants must attend one of these meet-
ings!
ECU EQUESTRIAN CLLffi
ECU Equestrian Club will
be holding a meeting Thursday
March 4th at 5:30 in GC 1009. This
meeting is open for anyone inter-
ested in horses. Contact Angela at
931-8453 or Adrienne at 931-7722
for any questions.
PRE-OCCUPATIOMAI
THERAPY STUDENT
ADVISING
Early registration for sum-
mer and fall sessions will begin
March 29th. There will be an advis-
ing session Thursday night, March
18th from 4:00 - 7:00 in room 306 of
the Belk Building. If you are unable
to attend this meeting please call
the OT office for other advising
hours. Please see the video at the
Joyner Library before you come for
advising.
G'VILIFBUSINiFSSfc
PROFESSIONAI WOMFN"
CLUB
SCHOLARSHIP' Deadline
March 15, 1993 criteria for selec-
tion: Rising Junior have a 3.2 over-
all GPA, meet before a scholarship
committee. For applications and
more info, CONTACT: Mrs. Dot
Searv, 503 Eleanor St Greenville,
NC 27858, 746 - 6742.
ASH WEDNESDAY.SFRVIGFS
The NEWMAN CATHO-
LIC STUDENT CENTER wishes to
announce special Ash Wednesday
Masses with the distribution of
ashes: 12 noon in the Great Room
of Mendenhall StudentCenter and
5:30 p.m. at the Newman Center,
953 E. 10th Street at the foot of
College Hill.
REC. SERVICES
Softball registrationwill be
held Tuesday, March 16th at 5:00 pm
in Biology 103. There will be a mini-
mum oflOpeopleper team. Formore
information call 757-6387.
Classifieds Announcements Displayed
25 words or less
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times fteeof charge. Duetothelimited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publ ication of announcements.
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication however, no
refunds will be given.
Deadlines
EAST
CAROLINIAN
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
1
'���,mmm4mm.m�






The East Carolinian
March 2, 1993
TuesdayOpinion
Safer sex campaign
geared to save lives,
provide information
Students exposed to different
viewpoints as they mature, go
out into the real world
Recently, The East Carolinian ran a four-part safer sex
campaign designed to increase awareness to the AIDS prob-
lem that this country faces every day. Through what some
may have deemed controversial or even disgusting photo-
graphs, we tried to provoke some thoughts and questions to
a subject that is all too often swept under the carpet to lie in
darkness with the dust.
AIDS has been coined the "Black Plague" of the 1980s
and 1990s. More and more cases of HIV and AIDS are being
reported daily; the demographics of this disease know no
boundaries. Men, women, gays, heterosexuals,blacks, whites
� everyone is susceptible to this disease if they engage in
high-risk behavior.
Having sexual intercourse without using a condom and
other means of protection defines high-risk behavior. We at
The East Carolinian do not promote individuals having sex.
Rather, we promote that individuals who do have sex make
an informed and knowledgeable decision when they make
this potentially life-threatening choice.
Though abstinence is a viable choice for any person to
make, the reality of life today proves that more and more
people are engaging in sexual intercourse. Over half of the
young people in the United States who are asked say that
they have had sex by the time they turn 17. Though this
statementmay be likea splash of cold water in the face of some
people, turning away from it and ignoring it will not make it
go away or diminish its reality.
Some have argued that parents send their children to
college to get a better education so as to become productive
membersof society. They havesaid that this liberal viewpoint
towards sex only serves to demoralize the youth of toda y and
promote promiscuity and degeneracy.
One fact that remains hidden by this smoke screen of an
argument is that students at this university � and others
around the state � are adults and make their own decisions
as such. When a high school student graduates and goes to
college, especially a liberal-arts college such as ECU, the
prime motive behind his or her education is to have a well-
rounded experience so that he or she can go out into the real
world, knowing full well what to expect from it.
This well-rounded experience includes exposure to many
ideas that may be considered radical and new, some that
people may have never been faced with before � AIDS,
homosexuality, inter-racial relationships � just to name a
few. By turning a blind eye or condemning without ta king the
time to gain knowledge, people close their minds to the
variety that humanity has to offer.
As students, we seek knowledge. We seek this knowl-
edge not just on one particular subject, but knowledge on life
as we will experience it. The majority of students who gradu-
ate from ECU will move and take up jobs around this country.
They will be faced with day-to-day surprises and awakenings
that will test their inner resolve and fortitude.
If we do not see this world as it is, ever-changing and
forever moving, we will stagnate in the mire of ignorance and
narrow-mindedness. People must realize that this nation,
and this world, are made up of many varied lifestyles and
approaches. Different lifestyles are neither vulgar nor degen-
erate � they are what serves to promote the advancement
and progress of our society into the future.
The East Carolinian wholeheartedly agrees with the state-
ment that there is more to life than sex. But with this agree-
ment comes the necessary addend that there is more to life
than one view of the world. Students�and parents alike-
must realize that only through knowledge and information
can we ever hope to perpetuate our lives.
Opinion
Page 6
A View from Above
By T. Scott Batchelor
Weather dog to correct meteorologists' errors
Do you ever wonder if
broadcast meteorologists really
know what the heck they're talk-
ing about? Are they just winging
it, or is hit-and-miss forecasting
the best we can hope for in this
age of almost magical scientific
advancement?
Take this week's weather
occurrences for example. Living
in eastern North Carolina doesn't
afford one much opportunity to
build a respectable snowman. So
when the local weather shamans
predicted sizable amounts of
snowfall for Friday, 1 was excited.
See, I love snow.
I'm not sure where I got this
fascination with snow. Maybe it
comes from my younger days
when even the hint of frozen pre-
cipitation would send local school
administrators into a panic, at the
very least delaying school open-
ings, or cancelling classes alto-
gether.
Those days I stayed home, I
wou Id play in whatever snow had
accumulated until my feet and
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
hands were water-logged and
numb. When I got so cold I
couldn't stand it anymore, I
would retire to a nice spot on the
floor of our toasty living room,
right in front of the TV, and switch
the channel to � get ready for
this � PBS!
That's right, PBS. The Elec-
tric Company, Sesame Street and
Zoom kept me company on those
days off. (By the way, did you
know that the gifted actor Mor-
gan Freeman was one of the play-
ers on The Electric Company in
his earlier days?)
We were talking about last
week's blizzard.
On Thursday, a local news-
paper reported that an appre-
ciable amount of snow would fall
early Friday morning. Every lo-
ca 1 television station said the same
thing, with the usual qualifiers
like "probably" and "85 percent
chance
Have you ever noticed that
a 60 percent chance of rain means
it will definitely rain, whereas an
85 percent chance of snow means
it probably won't?
Well, as most of you who
were unfortunate enough to be in
this part of the state know, Friday
morning brought nothing but
bone-chilling rain and depressed
spirits. Yes, I was up late Thurs-
day night and saw a little precipi-
tation hit the ground,but it wasn't
enough to talk about. Maybe if
that much had fallen in say, mid-
August in Puerto Rico, we'd have
a story.
Perhaps I expect too much
from meteorologists. I mean,
they're only highly educated
people who ha ve completed a rig-
orous course of study involving
calculus, statistics, geology and
other demanding subjects. Why
should we hold these men and
women to any higher standards
of accuracy than we do to certain
national news networks whose
name contains the three lettersC,
N and B, or to certain heads of
state pushing fancy new "eco-
nomic stimulus" packages?
I guess what I'm trying to
say is, meteorologists are only
human, and like all the rest of us
they make mistakes sometimes.
My friend who is a meteorolo-
gist in the U.S. Air Force tells me
that two days is about the limit
on accurate weather forecasting,
and that these three-day fore-
casts are really unreliable. At
least he's honest.
1 was talking to a man re-
cently who sa id tha t the ci ty he i s
from doesn't even have a
weatherperson.
"How do you know what
the weather's going to be ?" I
asked.
"We have a local weather
dog he said.
"A weather dog?"
"Yeah, we send him out-
side, and if he comes back dry,
the weather's going to be clear. If
he comes back wet, it's going to
rain. If he doesn't come back at
all, it's going to be very windy
A weatherdog, huh? It defi-
nitely has potential.
Elizabeth Shitnmel, News Editor
Karen H assell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Billiard, Asst Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Utyout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Hasting, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, irrelir
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday ami
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor. Vie East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N C . 27858-4??. lor more inform
tion, call (919) 757-6366
Printed
100
5
I tuou&i-i t The: A�rATte:AAAH
SAC? THAT IT WA5 GOAtSTo &�"
QuoteoftheDay:
I advise you to go on living solely to enrage
those who are paying your annuities. It is the
only pleasure I have left.
Voltaire
Letters to the Editor
Alumni disgusted with safer-sex campaign
To the Editor:
My wife and I are 1963
and 1964 graduates of East
Carolina. I have always had
great appreciation for the edu-
cations we received and a
sense of pride about the uni-
versity in eastern N orth Caro-
lina that is sometimes ignored
and scornfully dubbed "The
Party School
That withstanding, I
want to express my utter dis-
gust regarding the full page
endorsement (Feb. 16) of pre-
marital sex, promiscuity and
degeneratehomosexual "sex"
that you, the "enlightened in-
tellectuals ram down the
throats (no pun intended) of
moral people while proclaim-
ing the "normality" of such
vulgar, degenerate and per-
verted behaviorally learned
"life-styles
Parents work hard to
pay tuition for their children
(and, you are children you
didn't know that, did you?)
and provide for them the op-
portunity toattend an institu-
tion of higher (sic) learning to
acquireskills and abilities that
will help them become a pro-
ductive and yes, normal per-
son that contributes to the
betterment of society. What
you are promoting by your
degenerate, liberal mindset,
under the guise of providing
"valuable" information, is
crap! Get your (institutional)
head out of your anal cavity,
discover again the smell of
roses instead of the pungent
odors associated with your
head placement and do some-
thing good for yourself, your
fellow students and society
� tell them to seek wisdom
(for your information, wis-
dom is not found in a
condom)! Yes, I have stressed
the moral side of this issue,
but what bothers me equally
as much is that you are en-
dorsing high risk behavior
which has devastating conse-
quences. I realize that you are
on a "mission from God to
save the world but for your
information, and maybe you
have never been told this,
there is more to life than sex,
whatever "style" you might
"embrace
The East Carolinian staff
needs professional help. Try
your Department of Psychol-
ogy if there is anyone there
who understands reality. If
not, then find help on your
knees. Maybe that is where
you should start, on your
knees!
Kenneth Webster
Alumni
By Amy E. Wirtz
Education rests on
parents' shoulders,
not on schools'
Are schools really to blame for the
country's millions of dropouts and the esti-
mated 20-40 million Americans who can
scarcely read street signs? Schools have al-
ways been the ones dumped on throughout
the years. A few people think it may be time
to point a finger someplace else. This time
it's at the parents.
Richard Haynes and Don Chalker, two
Western Carolina University professors who
studied educational systems in lOcountries,
found that U.S. standards were often among
the best in the world. Unlike counterparts in
Germany or Japan, parents in the United
States are slow to make students keep up
their end of the bargain. With this discovery,
they predict that establishing world-class
schools is not jome distant goal that will
require years of painful academic progress.
They believe that the American reform
movement of the past 10 years has over-
looked an extremely important fact � virtu-
ally every developed country in the world
went through significant school reforms in
the 1980s. The United States, on the other
hand, focused almost entirely on restructur-
ing schools. We haven't spent any time try-
ing to bring about world-class parents.
So there may be truth in what Haynes
and Chalker have reported. America's
schools do need serious help. Head Start is a
by-product of a failing educational system.
Started in 1965 as a pre-kindergarten pro-
gram for poverty-level children, it mandated
parent participation. Research showed that
a preschool in which parents were involved
could massively improve the social and cog-
nitive ability of children at risk.
Head Start began as a summer pro-
gram, which was almost immediately ex-
panded to a full-year program with 400,000
kids. The 1992-93 program enrolled 583,471
children and its budget is $2.2 billion. This
was the first major education reform that
took the heat off the schools. Schools weren't
to blame, parents who couldn't adequately
prepare their children for school were.
Yet, the federal government has never
provided funds to pay for the master teach-
ers called for in Head Start legislation. In-
stead, they have relied wholly on teachers
recruited from host communities. Most of
these community-based teachers have no
more than high school educations. Obvi-
ously, the Head Start program of today can-
not compare to the one in the '60s, so it is
under fire.
There is no definite evidence that Head
Start offers more than the most modest help
I to poor kids. Research supports both sides of
the question, but negative research is all but
ignored by educationists or child advocates.
Surely there should be some debo bout a
multibillion-dollar program that shows surh
r modest results, especially before more bil-
- - lions of dollars are invested in it.
Intellect is, to a large extent, a product
of experience, not inheritance. Clearly, poor
children do not have the same advantages as
wealthier children. Since 61 percent of chil-
- dren bom outof wedlock will live in poverty
at least seven of their first 10 years, America
has a serious problem on their hands. The
larger problem is the state of America's fami-
lies, though. Start fixing that and we may
actually get somewhere.
- 1
ltd
m
llllililllUN i!IW!i!





� The East Carolinian
March 2, 1993
Lifestyle
Spanish photographers 'Open Spain'
By Lisa Baumann
Staff Writer
EastCarolina University will present
Open Spain; Espana Abierta, an interna-
tional exhibition of 169 documentary
photographs, in the Wellington B. Gray
Gallery. It will be on display from Jan. 29
to March 25.
The exhibition was organized by the
Museum of Contemporary Photography
in Chicago. It will continue to travel to
other museums in the United States, Eu-
rope, and Latin America.
Open Spain; Espana Abierta features
the work of 16 contemporary Spanish
photographers. The photographs were
taken in documentary style and at least
half of them are in black and white.
Subjects in the display include im-
ages of Spanish sacred festivalsand rites,
religious and historical pageants, fiesta
and traditional events, countryside, ar-
chitecture, people and their gathering
places.
Charles Lovell, gallery director,
played a major role in getting the exhibit
to stop at East Carolina. "1 heard about
theSpanish display and knew right away
it would be rewarding to the university
since we (ECU) are trying hard to pro-
mote international studiesand increased
awareness of othercultu res said Lovell.
Lovell also said that normally the
university would not be able to afford to
bring such a display to Greenville. The
showing was made possible by the sup-
port of the SG A Fine ArtsFundingBoard,
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Dr. Marlene Springer, The Center for
International Studies and the Latin
American Resource Center.
Most of the photographs were ta ken
by photojournalists whose work has
never appeared before in the United
Photo courtesy Museum ol Contemporary Photography
'Unfitted, Madrid Area 1987 by Cristobal Mara
States. The artists and their subjects in-
clude Carmelo Alcala Ezquerro: a series
on Basque games, Carlos de Andes: con-
temporary punk culture, Clemente Ber-
nard: street photography, Jaume Blassi:
color landscapes,CarlosCanovas: indus-
trial landscapes of Catalonisjuan Manuel
Castro Prieto: working class portraits,
KoldoChamorro: festivalsand pageants,
Juan Manuel Diez Burgos: portraits of
Gypsies and circus performers, Cristina
Garcia Rodero: religious festivals,
Cristobal Hara: a bullfight, Manolo
Laguillo: building construction for the
1992 Olympics, Xurxo Lobato: color street
photographs, MartaPovo: Catalonianar-
chitecture,HumertoRivas: ethnographic
portraits, Manuel Sendon: color interiors
and Alejandro Sosa-Suarez: landscape-
panoramas. Lovell said that students, as
well as other visitors to the exhibit seem
to speak most highly ofCristina Rodero's
religious photographs.
"One of the unique things about this
art displav is that the photographs are
taken from different perspectives said
Lovell. "Rodero's religious photographs
are taken with a popular art perspective
that stands out
The collection of Spanish photo-
graphs seeks to illustrate the new open-
mindedness of Spanish culture and
lifestyle which has transformed during
the past 15 years of democracy.
Open Spain; Esptnfl Abierta was orga-
nized to coincide with the 500th anniver-
sary celebration of Columbus' voyage
from Spain to the Americas.
The exhibition is free and open to the
public. The Wellington Gray Gallery is
located off of 5th and Jarvis St. in the
Jenkins Fine Arts building and is open
Monday-Saturday from 10a.m. to5p.m
and on Thursday evenings until 8 p.m.
Pianist Richard Fields guides audience
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
"I'd liketo serve as your musical guide
tonight
With that statement, pianist Richard
Fieldsopened a performance Friday night
that showed his audience a side of classi-
cal music that many may have missed.
"All too often, classical concerts are
viewed as stuffy said Fields in a phone
interview. "With the pieces of music I
have selected, I want people to be able to
enjoy classical music
The selections that Fields played
ranged from the "Organ Prelude in G
Minor" by Johann Sebastian Bach to
"Honey" by R. Nathaniel Dett. Before each
piece began, Fields gave a little history
behind it to help explain why he had
chosen it.
One of the most memorable pieces
was WilliamGrantStiH's"Three Visions
Broken into three parts � "Dark Horse-
men "Summerland" and "Radiant Pin-
nacle" �Still's piece told a story of death,
heaven and rebirth.
"Dark Horsemen" evoked the image
of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.
Through the harsh, discordant rhythm,
the audience could picture the gallop of
the horses' hooves and the neighing of
their voices. "Summerland" played light
and breezy, envisioning a peaceful field
on a warm summer day. "Radiant Pin-
nacle" mixed the first two to create a pic-
ture of life and death with a positive end-
ing.
Field s played the piano as if it was an
extension of his body and hands. Not only
did his hands flow effortlessly across the
field of 88 black and white keys, but his
body also moved with his own internal
Page 7
Photo by Dail Reed
Mark Bryan of Hootie and the Blowfish posed the question "to dance or not to
dance?" during Friday's Attic show. Decision Makers opened the show.
Hootie blows the
minds of Attic crowd
Richard Fields
Hhoto Dy Uail Heed
rhythm. Constantly in sync with the music
he played, Fields provided more of a pic-
ture with his body language than with his
playing alone.
Fields has been playing concert piano
for 10-15years,alsoteaching pianotobach-
elor of music and doctor of music patronsat
the Cincinnati College Conservatory of
Music. He hasalsoreceived critical acclaim
for his performances with the San Francisco
Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic
and concerts in Europeand North America.
Fields hasalso won several awardsand
prizes throughout his pianist career. Some
include a Ford Foundation grant, a prize in
the Berkeley PianoClub Young Artist com-
petinonand the American prizeoftheViotti
International competition.
Fields oime to ECU through the Mi-
nority Presence Initiative Series. This en-
deavor brings in noted African-American
scholars and performers to provide an al-
ternative perspective, said Dr. Mar)' Ann
Rose.
"The program started a few years ago
geared tobring in minority scholarstocam-
pus Rose said. "We bring in role itii dels
to provide a different perspective to stu-
dents and faculty
Fields commented that his purpose
behind his performance at ECU was to
provide insight into the African-American
culture.
"1 want toshow part of African-America
that is not known to tix many people
Fields said.
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
Todanceor not todance. Friday night,
Hex itie and the Blowfish played toa packed
Attic crowd.
Flowever, it was the kind of night in
which I just couldn't getquitecomfortable.
Many people, including myself, couldn't
decide whether to be drawn into thedanc-
ing mob or stand back and watch the band
withourevesfixrused intobright lightsand
artistic minds.
The air was filled with fight sensa-
tional sound whilevocalsdanced through
the crowd with ease.
Hixitie and the Blowfish have brought
some of the lawsoffineart into their music.
To create a painting an artist considers
unifyand varietyasa means of expression.
Like most bands, Hootie creates unity with
constant svnehronized riffs, but the en-
semble also dabbles into the world of vari-
ety with tunesvaguely reminiscentof heavy
blues to a sporadic use of stop and go.
The combination and understanding
of unity and variety is an important ele-
ment in music and has taken these four
guys toa higher level with their sound.
Five years ago these guys came to-
gether at the University of South Carolina
and began playingwith theirmusical ideas.
The band iscomposed of DariusRucker
(vcvals), Mark Bryan (guitar), JimSonefield
(drums) and Dean Felber (bass).
The members all possess a variety of
talenton their respective instruments,and
amazingly, they all can sing.
It's difficult to find even one voice,
especially in the amateur scene, that is
technically good and clean � and they've
found four.
"I knew they would give a dynamite
show, they always do. Lots of times I go
see bands and I don't feel like 1 got my
money's worth, but after a show I ike this I
know it was money well spent said V i nee
Norris, an ECU graduate student.
Their EP Time released last year, con-
sists of four songs that really do not com-
pare with seeing the band live. "Drown-
ing and "Let Her Cry the last two songs
on the EP, sound decent, but their live
show gives their music life � complete
with a heartbeat and soul.
Mv biggestcomplaintsabout the night
were the opening band, Decision Makers,
and the band name Hootie and the Blow-
fish.
Without being distasteful, I would
suggest the Decision Makers rethink their
approach to music. Replicating Dillon
Fence and the Connells creates a cringing
sensation throughout my body and al-
most sends me back to the door where I
paid to come in.
And as for the name Hootie and the
Blowfish � well somehow it underminds
them as a group. I can't exactly pin the
problem down, but it's difficult to match
this sophisticated sound to such a silly
name.
However, once you see Hootie and
the Blowfish live, minor problems fade
behind thesoundsthat will haveyoudanc-
ingaway.
Leon Bates and the N.G Symphony will 'liff ECU
By Marjorie McKinstry
STarTWriter"
People are often shocked by
Leon Bates' physical appear-
ance. He's a young
("thirtysomethingish"), hand-
some and incredibly athletic man,
and much has been written about
his ability to bench press 300
pounds. Noneofthis soundstcx)
unusual, but it is not really his
appearance that shocks; it is his
profession. Batesisaconcertpia-
nist.
Unfortunately, many review-
ers overwhelmed by Bates'physi-
cal attributes fail to mention his
talent as -nusician. Hehasbeen
studying piano since the first cal and cas-
grade, and his powerful perfor- cades of notes
mances pulled from a lifetime of that all made
study garner him awards, praise m e 1 o d y . "
and chances toappear worldwide Hates at-
with some of the best sympho- tributes his
nies. range of tech-
His notes have intertwined nical skills
with thoseof the New York Phil- and strength
harmonic, the National Sym to his addic-
phony, the Strasbourg Symphony tion to physi-
in France, the Sinfonica dell cal fitness.
'Accademia Nazionale di Santa The emotion
Cecilia in Rome, and the Vienna heengenders,
Symphony. h o w e v e r ,
In Ireland, Hates' music was rises from a
acclaimed as a "power that was loveol music,
never hard, and always singing, and not tech-
firework that were always lyn nical prowess
Ia'oii Bates
"Sure tech-
nique is impor-
tant Bates
says, "But I
think you have
to transcend be-
yond that, rise
above it, and let
the music
speak. It's not
enough to just
negotiate the
notes
As .1 musi-
cal navigator,
Bates en joj s the
(lassk al v oi ks,
but he is more
"at home ith
American music He is enam-
ored with jazz and fusion, and
claims that Gershwin was the first
fusion composer. Batesalsocom-
pliments the more modern music
of Chick Corea and VVynton
Marsalis, and says he has "been
playing jazz piano since his teen
days, and still settles into jazz for
relaxation
Besides being an interpreter
nf music, a jazz fan and a fanati-
cal lifter, Hates also attempts to
bring pianomusic tochildren. He
relaxes his formal appearance for
them, and v ill strip down to a t-
shirt if his physique will help to
break the traditional geeky ste-
reot pe ol .m in ei t pianist. I le
also gives free concerts for chil-
dren, and will tutor young musi-
cians of exceptional ability.
Bates will play with the North
Carolina Symphony Thursday at
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Un-
der the direction of Gerhardt
Zimmermann, the symphony will
perform Prokofiev's Clatticnl
Symphony, Opus 25 (Symphony
No. 1), and Schumann's Sym-
phony No. 1 in B-flat major, Opus
38, Spring
Tickets for students and se-
nior citizens are $13, and tickets
for adults are $15 rickets maybe
ordered in advance from theen-
tral rickel Office (757-4788), or
Dun based ,M the dool.
I
�� ����





8 The East Carolinian
MARCH 2. 1993
That's pee-cans, not pa-cons

By Richard Cranium
Lifestyle Columnist
Some people prefer their
brownies without nuts. Me, I like
nuts�walnuts or pecans. By the
way, that's pee-cans, not pa-cons.
I don't eat brownies that often. I
try and stay away from that sort
of stuff. I hardly succeed. I avoid
brownies, not french fries, not
Krispy Kreme doughnuts, not
Skor bars, not Hfesaversor Baskin
Robbins peanut butterand choco-
late ice cream. What the hell, give
' me the syrup and the sprinkles�
1 love ya!
Anyway, I don't want to talk
about sweets; I want to talk about
those low-life under-agepartyani-
mals who swear by the quantity,
not quality rule. I hate 'em. You
know what I'm talking about.
Someone who goes to the liquor
store with five dollars and comes
out with a fifth of some rotten
Vodka made in Connecticut. Or
they want to have a good ol' time
so they take up a collection for
beer and come back with a case of
Milwaukee's Best�oops! I'mhip:
The Beast � or some rot-gut bot-
tom of the barrel brew like Mike's
Malt Likker.
Look here now, I'm not telling
people what todrink. I haven't got
to my beef yet. Here's my beef:
These cheap little drunkards are
always wantingtobragabout their
drinking and carrying on and stuff.
That's what kills me.
You see them everywhere. At
Food Lion, there'll always be one
guybuyingacoupleofsuitcasesof
Black Label or paint thinner or
whatever.
At the ABC store, Joe Blow
walks out with an armful of
BooBoo's Genuine Florida Whis-
key to a carfull of shiney-eyed
funsters gawking like they're
eyeballing their first dirty maga-
zine.
So they go back to their dorm
orapartmentor cardboard box and
start having a hoe-down. They put
on some Metallica or Michael Jack-
son or Marvin Gaye� ifchicksare
coming over�and start drinking.
So they all get drunk, one of them
cuts his hand, half of'em throw up
and one of them gets it on with
Myrtle Hogg. Life is good.
So the next day they're enter-
taining their classmates by telling
them how drunk they were and
howmanybeaststheydrank. I just
don't get it. Why brag about how
much you drank last night? And
really, why stress that you drank
rot-gut? That's what gets me. The
pride in drinking and that kind of
stuff.
But hey, drink whatever you
want. Just understand they don't
all taste the same, so why not buy
something that tastes good? This
dude tells me they all do the same.
I ask, "Wouldn't you rather it taste
good?"
"Who cares they say.
Maybe as they mature they'll
stop drinking for effect and drink
for taste. Hey, don't get me wrong.
If I'm putting 'em back during a
ga me or whatever, I'mdrinkingjim
Beam or George Dickel. But if I'm
havingmyeveningcocktaiU'msip-
ping back Wild Turkey or Old
Granddad. I guess I'm just a cul-
tured gentlemen.
Mississippi Mud Cake: Follow
directions for brownies, only add a
cup of pecans and a half cup of
chocolate chips to the batter. Just
before it's done sprinkle with min-
iature marshmallows, more pecans
and ch.xolate chips. Return pan to
oven. When it's finished spread
homemadechcxrolate frostingon top
while the stuff's still melted and
gooey. Yum!
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DC Comics resurrects man of
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I hi Lasturoliniun
9
Staff Writer
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dead 1 c has ri
tor hnm
be man tin
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vould remain
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Superman's back issues were a i
; It seemed likeSuperm
untrv.NowJourmonths
the hysteria has died down
I en I N will tir e en
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I
� � ��
The East Carolinian
March 2, 1993
Sports
Whitfield, Sanburn nearlv toss
Page 10
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
East Carolina (8-3) had two
outstanding pitching perfor-
mances as Howard Whitfield and
Mike Sanburn both nearly no-hit
Howard (1-11) in a doubleheader
sweep Sunday at Harrington
Field.
Whitfield (1-0) came within
one strike of a no-hitter with two
outs in the seventh and finished
with a one-hit shutout as the Pi-
rates defeated Howard 9-0 in
the second game of a double-
header.
"I knew it the whole game
Whitfield said of his no-hit bid.
"I was just trying to think about
pitching ahead, pitching smart
and not making a mistake.
"I had control over most all
my pitches early. I got my curve
ball over, and my change up was
working good. I kinda lost my
curveball in the middle innings
and found it late, and my change
.up was just working all day. It
Was kinda my go-to pitch
First game starter Sanburn
1-1) pitched almost as well in a
�-0 victory, throwing five and
.one-third innings of no-hit ball
before settling with a two-hit
shutout against the Bison.
"Both of them did everything
necessary to beoutstandingpitch-
ers on the day ECU Head Coach
Gary Overton said. "The keys to
both games were those two pitch-
ers. They did the job pretty much
themselves
Whitfield, who struck out
seven and walked one, had an 0-
2 count on Howard's Donnell
Brown with two outs in the sev-
enth before an infield single ended
the no-hit bid. Brown hit a chop-
ping ground ball over Whitfield's
head and shortstop Chad Puckett
could not make the play as the
speedy Brown ran down the first
baseline.
"If Puckett comes up with the
ball clean, he throws the guy out,
butitwasa tough play" Whitfield
said. "Hedid all he could. You've
got to come hard in that situation,
and that's what he did. He just
happened to bobble it that split
second, and thatguy (Brown) has
got good wheels. He got down
the line pretty good
In the first game, Sanburn did
not allow a hit until Marvin Spin-
ner knocked an infield single past
the diving third baseman Chris
Westand right to shortstop Frank
Fedak, who did not attempt a
throw. Sanburn finished with five
strikeouts and one walk to
GAME 1
GAME 2
EAST CAROLINA 4 EAST CARC JNA
HOWARD r
Howard000 000 0-0
E��t Carolina100 300 x -4
HOWARD
Spinner, cf
Hammond. It
Attaway. 1b
Webb,
Crawford, it
D. Brown. 3b
Hani, e
QOyard, 2b
Scott, ��
TotaS
ab I h hi
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
24 0 2
M �o
Howardooo 000
East Carolina013 212
HOWARTF ab r h
Baaarunntng�CS: Crawford (1, taoond bate
by CronanLayton; Taam LOB: 4.
Spinner cf
Hammond, If
Kenan, If
Crawford, rf
Attaway, c
D. Brown, 3b
Battle, 1b-2b
Green, ph
Duplessis, dhp
Gilyard, 2b
Webb, lb
Scott, as
Total.
3
2
1
2
3
3
2
1
2
2
0
2
23 0 t
EAST BaaMUaW
, �oto by Biff Ranaon
In the second game of a split double-header, the Bucs came within
an out of a no-hitter.
complement his two-hitter.
"Everything was working
pretty good Sanburn said. "They
were just hitting ground balls. I
was getting them to hit my
pitches
Sanburn has now pitched two
strong outings for ECU after a
shaky first start at Georgia South-
ern on Feb. 14, and he attributes
his success to a new found pitch.
"I've developed a slider, and
I've been using it a lot more he
said. "I think it has really helped
me keep the hitters off balance
Although the Pirates were able
to get their hits when they needed
them, they d id not seem to be com-
pletely in sync at the plate for most
of game one.
"Offensively, I'm disappointed
with the way we swung the bats in
the first eame Overton said. "We
seemed to be lethargic with the
bats. It seemed to be a carry over
from last night (a 3-0 loss to George
See HOWARD pageU
Bora), cf
Utes.ef
Fedak. ts
West, 3b
Kushnar, lb
Cronan, c
PKtdh
Wattdns, rf
Edwards, rf
Haad.lt
Clark, 2b
Puckett �b
totals
ab rbbl. Jah-ao
2
1
3
3
3
"3
3
1
1
1
1
1
31 8 10 6
Baaerunnmg � SB: Spinner. Taam LOB: 3.
Fielding � E: Hammond 2, Attaway.
EAST CAROLINA"
26 13
Batting � 28: Fadak (1, oft Smith). SF: Clark
Baaanmntng � SB: Boral (5) CS: Crawford
(second base by CronarVSanbum). Team LOB: 6
FlafoTng � E: Watt
Borel. cf
Fedak, ss
Puckett, ph-ss
West. 3b
Kushner, lb
Pitt, dh
Watkins, rf
Obholz, 2b
Clark. 2b
Head. If
Triplet pMf
Peters, c
ab
bl
"6"
o
o
o
1
2
2
1
0
0
1
0
29 9 12 7
2
3
4
3
4
4
2
0
2
2
2
bb
HOWARD
Totals
Baiting�2B: Obhota(2, oil Duplessis); Fedak
(2. oil Duplessis); Peters (1, oft Duplessis); Kushnar
(2, off Duplessis). HR: Watkins (5, off Duplessis).
Baserunnlng �SB: Watkins (7), Obholz (1)
Team LOB: 8.
Smith (L, 0-2)
EAST (ROLtNA"
tp h r ar bb ao
6�irm
HOWARD rp
Duplessis (L, 0-2) 6
h r ar bb so
12 B 6 6 1
Ip I
ar bb ac"
0 1 5
Sanburn (W, 1-1) 7 2 0
HBP: Boral and Head by MacMXan. WP: Smith 2
GAME DATA � T: 1:34. A: 108. Tamp: 44.
UMPIRES � HP: Satksrfiald 2B: Boyatta.
EAST CARODRI"
Sanbum(W, 1-0)
Tp IT
ar bb ao

Seahawks end season with win over Bucs
By Warren Sumner
'Assistant Sports Editor
; TneEQJnasn'srjasketballteamended
a season full of disappointment and heart-
ache Saturday night, with a 79-66 loss to
JJNC-Wilmington. The Pirates were out-
Shot, out-defensed and out-hustled in a
�ame that lowered their record to 4-10 in
conference play and broke their momen-
tum for this weekend's CAA tournament.
The Seahawks, who narrowly escaped
the Pirates in a double-overtime win in
Wilmington earlier this season,shota phe-
nomenal 63 percent in the second half to
bury the Pirates' chances forawinathome.
The Pirates, after playing an emotionally-
charged first half, seemed flat in the sec-
ond period and could not stop Seahawk
guard Chris Meighan, who blasted the
Pirates with a 20-point scoring perfor-
mance.
The Pirates, as in the majority of their
losses this season, started the game com-
petitively, as they traded the lead with the
Seahawks seven times in the first half.
Pirate guard Lester Lyons confounded the
Seahawks in the opening period with 14of
his 27 points and two steals. Despite the
Seahawks' better shooting margin, the Pi-
rates trailed by only one point with one
second remaining in the half. TheSeahawks
then completed a play that may have bro-
ken ECU's back with an inbounds score
under their own basket, giving them the
momentum and a three-point lead at the
half.
The Seahawks returned at halftime
and quickly built a six-point lead. The
Pirates were unable to defensively solve
the problems the Seahawk offense pro-
vided them and got no closer than four.
After the Seahawks eventually built a
double-digit lead, they were able to quell a
Pirate comeback at the free-throw line.
Pirate coach Eddie Payne said thathis
team has a lot of work to do in this week of
practice to have a chance in the tourna-
ment. "We have to try to salvage and
restructure attitude as far as what can
ECU (66)
Mingftrb
m-am-ao-tato�p
Lyons 359-195-62-23227
Richardson 311-43-30-1155
Hunter 60-10-00-1000
Young 182-60-02-4025
Long 10-00-00-0000
Peterson 285-140-01-31214
Gill 244-72-22-30110
Armstrong 70-00-21-2100
Toliver 10-00-00-0000
Lewis 110-00-40-2000
Copeland 382-41-77-11205
Totals 200 23-5511-2415-29 8 15 66
Percentages: PG - .418, Ft. 458, 3 pt Goals: 9-22
409, Team Rebounds - 0, Blocked Shots - 2,
Turnovers - 15, Steals -8.
UNCW (79)
Mingftrb
m-am-�o-tatotrt
Adkins 172-32-20-1037
Spann 121-11-10-1103
Jones 366-100-02-93315
Phillips 92-40-00-1124
Veney 332-87-100-66412
Petin 10-00-00-0000
Meighen 256-87-91-1�)020
Shaw 356-110-03-83112
Boykin 10-00-00-0000
Moore 312-32-23-6116
Totals 20027-48 19-24 10-35171479
Photo by Biff Ranaon
Lester Lyons (above) jams one home in ECU's last home game of the season. The
Pirates finshed the regular season 4-10 in the Colonial Athletic Association.
Percentages: PG - .563, Ft. 792, 3 pt. Goals: 6-11
.545, Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots - 0,
Turnovers - 15, Steals - 9.
happen in the tournament he said. "We
have to try to get a hunger for the tourna-
ment Payne also expressed his apprecia-
tion for the 5300 fans in attendance at
1st half 2nd half OT
Saturday's game.
'To have that many people there with
our record says a lot about East Carolina
fans
ECU
UNCW
32
35
34
44
Final
66
79
Bucs destroy Howard 14-0'lose to George Washington 3-0
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
Watkins, Hartgrove lead
Pirates over Howard 14-0
Pat Watkins went 3-3 with a double, a
home run and five RBIs to lead the Pirates
to a 14-0 win over the Howard Bison Satur-
day at Harrington Field. The victory came
in the first game of an unusual splitdouble-
header.
"We came out to play and did a very
fine job of putting the game away early
ECU head coach Gary Overton said.
The Pirates (6-2) sent 15 batters to the
plate for a 10-run first inning against
Howard (1-9) and scored four more runs in
the third before the game was called after
four and one-half innings.
Lyle Hartgrove (3-0), who retired 13
tf
straight at one point, allowed only two hits
and struck out six in five innings for his
second consecutive two-hit shutout.
"Lyle pitched a
great game for us to-
day Overton said.
Following a lead-
off walk to Jamie Borel,
Frank Fedak began the
Pirates scoring with a
two-run homer in the
first inning. Watkins
followed with a run-
scoring double, and
Steven Pitt added a two-run single to give
the Pirates a 5-0 lead before Howard re-
corded its first out.
Howard startingpitcherTerrill Hill (0-
1) had trouble finding the strike zone early
with five walks and two wild pitches in the
We came out to
play and did a
very fine job of
putting the game
away early, "
Gary Overton,
first inning in addition to six ECU hits.
ThePirates continued their scoringbar-
rage in the fourth. Watkins followed a
Howard fielding error
and a walk to Lee
Kushnerwitha three-run
homer for his fourth of
the year and a 13-0 ECU
lead. Kushner ended his
14-gameWttingstreakan
0-2 performance and a
couple walks.
head coach
George Wash-
ington blanks
Pirates 3-0
Three George Washington pitchers
braved below freezing weather and scat-
tered four Pirate hits as the Colonials (3-0)
shut out the Pirates (6-3) with a 2-0 win in
the second game of a split doubleheader
Saturday at Harrington Field.
GWU'sRichRosenberger (1-0) pitched
one and one-third innings in relief of in-
jured starter Bill Anderson for the win, and
Scott Under allowed three hits in five in-
nings to earn his first save of the year.
Johnny Beck (2-2) took the loss for ECU
despite allowing only one earned run and
striking out nine in five and one-third in-
nings.
"I thought we battled well ECU head
coach Gary Overton said. "Wejustweren't
able to put together many hits, and that's
certainly a credit to their pitching. Johnny
threw a very fine game We just couldn't
find the hits when we needed them
See BASEBALL page 12
WP: Duplessis.
GAME DATA � T: 1:55. A: 83. Temp: 46
UMPIRES � HP: Boyette. 2B: SatlerfiekJ
Ice'Kaieem
dreams of
bright future
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU basketball has its own force
of constant motion. Their freshman
guard, "Ice" Kareem Richardson has
brought his brand of hustle to the
courts of Greenville and, subse-
quently, has become a regular starter
for a struggling ECU basketball team.
Richardson, a native of Rantoul,
BL, has played in every game this
year as the Pirates' point guard.
Richardson has started in several of
those contests and has become East
Carolina's most deadly ball-handler.
His quick, penetrating style on the
court is quite the opposite of his cool
demeanor off of it.
Richardson said basketball has
always been a part of his life, and said
he had inherited the love of the game
from his family.
"Everyone in my family has
played basketball at one point and
time. I used to go to the gym with my
dad, so I grew up with the basketball
atmosphere around everything he
said. Richardson said he experienced
much of the game through watching
his dad play during his career in the
Air Force.
Richardson, a communications
major, carries the nickname of "Ice
a legacy of his playing days at Rantoul
High School.
"(The nickname) started in my
sophomore year in high school. I made
this shot in a game against
Bloomington, our rivals, at the last
secondthey just kinda caught on
with 'Ice KareemI like to think I'm
pretty cool under pressure, but its
just a nickname like everybody else
has
Richardson said he has adapted
well to the Pirates' game plan as well
as the pressure he has faced as a regu-
lar player for the Pirate roster.
Richardson has been the victim of
standard criticism of his inexperience
throughout much of the season, but
accepts this criticism as par-for-the-
course for any freshman athlete.
"That just comes with being a
freshman, they try to put that 'lack of
experience' label on youthat pretty
much just comes with the territory
Richardson said that he has fo-
cused much of his energy this year on
off-the-court success, the academic
success that eludes most athletes.
"I'm trying to keep my grades up
as high as I can, my goal is to make
honor role every semester, that's the
goal 1 want to try to keep for myself
Richardson said the strict aca-
demicenvironrnentthatECU athletes
face at school will make it easier to
See KAREEM page 12
1





MARCH 2, 1993
Lady Pirates overwhelmed by
undefeated ODU Monarchs
ii
By Billy Weaver
Staff Writer
Friday night, the Lady Pirates fell
71-59toOld Dominionu hopostedan
impressive 12-0CAA record and are
no strangers to the women's NCAA
championships.
The Lady Monarchs came out to
shake up the ECU offense with an
early full court press which resuJ ted in
22firsthalftumovers.AlthoughODU
only scored 13 points from the 22
turnovers, this proved to be the differ-
ence in the 32-23 ODU lead in the first
half and eventually became thediffer-
enceinthegame.
ODU continued todominate the
lyPiratesinthesecondhalf.Itw'asn't
until late in the game that Rhonda
Smith scored her only four points of
the game to cut the ODU lead to five,
5lM5.Themomentumand the crowd
seemed to be swinging in favor of the
Lady Pirates but with 757 left to plav,
Rhonda Smith committed her fifth
personal foul taking her out of the
game with a mere four total points.
The turning point of the game
came with 334 left as Toina Coley
fouled out on a steal attempt Toni
Thurman also followed suit fouling
out short after Colev.
With three of ECU's starters out
and three freshman in the game, the
Lad Monarchs reeled off 10 unan-
swered points tokill any ECU hopesof
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
ECU
(59)
Min fg
Coley 33
O Onnnell 36
Thurman 26
rWgrr�on 4
Jame 6
Si.tten 7
Smith 16
Baker 6
Samuels 37 6-lfi
Biackman 27 fVB
ft
m-a nva
1-7 0-0
3-9 4 5
4 6 3-J
112 II
0-0 O-i)
1-3
2-4
0-1
22
0-0
0-0
0-0
X4
rb
o-t
1-4
' 0-3
1-4
2-2
0-0
0-1
0-1
1-3
0-4
4-10
3
11
1
0
1
0
1
1
1

T
2
10
11
0
0
4
4
0
13
1?
Totals 200 23-5612-15 12-40 19 31 59
Percentages FC - 411, Ft -800, 3 Pt Goals 1-7-
142. Team Rebounds - 6. Blocked Shots - 2,
Turnovers - 31. Steals -10.
ODU (71)
Min fg
Greenville Toy
il v
CATCH OUR SERVICE SPECIALS
WHILE THEY LAST
nva m-a
0-1 0-0
5-7
2-6
1-3
1-2
2-2
Singletoa 2
Huntley 21
Deberry 9
Rnbinaon 11
Picache 13
Ma ton 1
Hill 29
Reynold! 36 4-10 8-13
v.n,iru. 37 2-10 2-5
Willyerd 10 0-1 0-0
Gilmorr 31 6-12 0-3
0-3 0-0
0-0 0-0
5-9 4-5
rb
o-t
0-0
1-1
1-2
1-4
0-0
0-0
1-9
3-7
1-4
1-1
5-6
to
0
3
0
0
1
0
3
5
0
1
24 20
�P
0
13
5
4
0
0
14
16
7
0
12
95
ToUU 20033-7019-29 11-49
Percentages FG - .471, Ft. . 655. 3 pt Goals: 10-28 -
357. Team Rebounds - 2. Blocked Shots - 0,
Turnovers - 15, Steals - 7
ECU
ODU
lit half
23
32
2nd half OT
36
39
Final
59
71
an upset.
Tc ina Cole'managed si x steals to
put her at the top of the Lady Pirate
career steals list. Coley is also third in
the nation with a 4.6 per game.
The Lady Monarchs improve to
16-7 (124) in the CAA).
The Lady Pirates fell to 12-11 (5-7
in the CAA)
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EAST
CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian is currently
accepting resumes for the
following positions:
ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES
This job entails prospecting new
clients, selling creative advertising
campaigns and supporting
advertising clients. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. No previous
sales experience is required but is
helpful. Open to all majors.
CREATIVE DIRECTOR
This job entails creating computer
designed advertisements using sound
design principles including; contrast
and focal point. Requirements:
Minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Working
knowledge of Macintosh
applications; PageMaker, Freehand
QuarkXPress, and image scanning.
Open to all majors.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN: ALWAYS LOOKING FOR PROFESSIONALS'
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Visa USA Inc 1993.





12
The East Carolinian
MARCH 2, 1993
Smith's 29 leads Bucs over Tribe KAREEM
Continued from page 10
Sports Information Department
GREENVILLE, N.C.�
Rhonda Smith scored a career-
high 29 points as East Carolina's
women's basketball teambrokea
two-game losing streak with an
81-73 win over William & Mary
Sunday in Greenville.
Smith, who scored 18 points
in the first half, was 12-18 from
the floor and 5-7 from the line.
She also led all rebounders with
13.
ECU scored first in the game
with a 10-foot jumper by Smith
and the Lady Tirates never looked
back.
The Lady Tribe tied the score
6-6 with a lay-up by Yolanda
Settles but that was as close as
they ever got. ECU's largest lead
in the first half was 35-23 at 3:08
after an eight foot shot by Smith.
The Lady Pirates shot 60.7
percent in the first half and led 41-
32 at intermission.
In the second half, William &
Mary cut the ECU lead 47-42 after
back-to-back three pointers but
ECU pulled away again and had
a 13 point lead with 12 minutes
remaining.
ECU had a season-high per-
formance from Gaynor O'Donnell
who scored 21 points. The nation's
assists leader, O'Donnell also had
Gaynor
O'Donnell
drives the
lane and
gets two
for herself.
The
Pirates
rebounded
well from
a loss to
ODU
earlier in
the week.
achieve this goal. Richardson said
that Pirate coach Eddie Payne
stresses class attendance over ev-
er) thing and does
hisbesttokeepthe ft , 1 n rV
team motivated. Lrll L IULI.
of
experience'
lab elpretty
much just
comes with
the
Photo by
Biff Hanson
13 assists.
For William & Mary, Ashleigh
Akens scored 21 points and had
10 rebounds. Settles had 17points
and had 11 rebounds.
The win improved ECU's
record to 13-11 and 6-7 in the Co-
lonial Athletic Association, while
the loss broke a two-game win
streak for William & Marv and
dropped its record to 9-15 and 3-
10 in the leaeue.
Richardson said
that he feels non-
athletes fail to re-
alize sometimes
just how hard he
and his peers ac-
tually work.
"I think they
sometimes think
that we only play
basketball one or
two nights a
weekI don't
think they see how
much time we do put in lifting
weights,goingtoclassand practic-
ing
Richardson also said that reli-
HOWARD
Washington). Yet, in the second
game we put together some timely
hits, and we swung the bats a
little bit better. We swung the bats
a little more with authority in the
second game
PatWatkinsled the Pirates in
hitting with two singles, a home
territory?
Karecm Richardson
gion is a big part of his c m and off-
the-court routine.
"You definitely gotta pray all
the time, you never
know what s going to
happen from day-to-
day.
You can never tell
if you're going to be
here for another day
Richardson said
he is proud of his per-
formance thus far, but
will not make plans to
lessen his intensity
anytime soon.
"I'mjusthappyto
be in college basket-
ball, its not an every-
day thing for most
kids, so you gotta be motivated
coming in or you'll look real bad
out there. I'm not planning on let-
ting up
BASEBALL
Continued from page 10
The Colonial pitchers allowed
only one Pirate runner to reach sec-
ond base �Jason Head witha lead-
off infield single and an error on the
play in the third inning. However,
Linder quickly ended the scoring
threat by striking out the next two
batters and retiring Frank Fedak
with a harmless grounder to the
shortstop.
GWU's Brian Urda put the
Colonials on the board with a lead-
off home run todeep left field in the
third inning, and Greg Patton, who
reached on a ca tcher's error on strike
three, scored on Scott Sharp's two-
out single to center in the fourth
inning.
"I'm not sure the cold weather
effected anybody Overton said.
"It's always tough to play in cold
weather. We thought the team that
scored early would have a distinct
advantage, and that proved to be
the case
Continued from page 10
run (No. 5 on the year), a stolen
base and two RBls.
Fedak had three hits, includ-
ing a pair of doubles, and an RBI
in the doubleheader, and Lee
Kushner added three hits and an
RBI on the day. Also, Kevin
Obholz went 2-2 with a double,
an RBI and a stolen base as the
starting second baseman in game
two.
East Carolina's next game will
be a doubleheader against Vir-
ginia State beginning at 2 p.m. on
Wednesday, March 3, at
Harrington Field.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
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MONDAYS
Football Sports Night
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11 pm-1 am
CASH PRIZE y. ,
�Conlaltmti netd to cull b rrgistrr in odxxma. Must mive !y 800. &tt'j1&El�Yt
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS TTIXWt&t
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
We do Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
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ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
alfs
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Ave.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid NC. I.D. Required
ALL VARIETIES, SERVE 'N' SAVE
Lunch
Meats
1 Lb. Pkg.

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SHTRT
SLOGAN
Attention
Business Students!
Give us a T-shirt design & a slogan that will set us
apart from the rest of ECU. The ECU Student Store
will award a $100 gift certificate for the best
T-ShirtSweatshirt design. This contest is open
exclusively to you, the School of Business students.
For more details, come by the Professional Programs
office in Room 1200 of the General Classroom
Building. Deadline for entering is March 31, 1993 so
don't delay!
�Free T-Shirts imprinted with the winning design lo the top five finalists.
� $100 gift certificate from the ECU Student Store to first place winner.
� Winner will be featured in the next S hool of Business newsletter.
� Contest is limited to only students accepted to the School of Business and currently
enrolled in courses.
T-shirt and Slogan Contest
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28 THROUGH SATURDAY, MAR. 6 1993 IN
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ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY- Each of these
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 2, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 02, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.927
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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