The East Carolinian, February 25, 1993






vr iir Vli
Sports
Victory!
ECU'S women's soccer team stomps
UNCC in 8-2 victory.
See page 11 for story.
Lifestyle
Poetic justice
Poet Kate Daniels
dispel Is the myths of
, motherhood and
uncovers the realities
See story page 7.
The East Carolinian
bl 68 No. 13
Circulation 12,000
Thursday, February 25, 1993
14 Pages
ECU wiretapping: another suit is filed
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
In the continuation of the wiretap-
ping saga at ECU, former Public Safety
Program John Burrus has requested a
third-party suit against Vice Chancellor
Richard Brown, former Director of Pub-
lic Safety Maurice James DePuy and
East Carolina University.
On Feb. 19, Burrus' lawyer filed a
request for a hearing on a third-party
suit.
Burrus is currently involved in a
civil action suit against plaintiff Patricia
Hair Bullock. Bullock contends that the
defendants Burrus and Teddy Roberson
Jr former director of telecommunications,
performed interception and recording
that are illegal under the Omnibus Crime
Control and Safe Streets Acts of 1968.
"Third-party plaintiff Burrus re-
quested that ECU represent him in said
civil action and ECU refused said a
said issued by Myron T. Hill Jr. and W.
Gregory Duke, attorneys for Burrus.
Bullock recently filed a civil suit
against DePuy that claims Bullock's
telephone line was tapped under the
orders of DePuy. ECU is representing
DePuy in the case with special deputy
to the Attorney General Tom Zeiko as
the defense attorney.
"I can't understand why East
Carolina would represent DePuv and
not represent Johnny or Teddy Hill
said.
According to the lawsuit, a tele-
phone tapping device was placed on
Bullock's phone by Roberson in July of
1990. Roberson was acting upon the
specific direction of agents of ECU.
Burrus and Roberson were acquit-
ted in Oct. 1992.
On July 22,1992, Burrus requested
representation from
ECU for the Federal
Court trial held in Oc-
tober and ECU denied
representation.
After the Oct.
1992 acquittal, Burrus
again requested repre-
sentation from ECU for
the civil action suit
filed by Bullock.
"The jury's ver-
dict in October acquit-
ting Mr. Burrus was tantamount to a
finding that Mr. Burrus was indeed
authorized by the university to engage
in the wiretapping said Hill in a letter
to University Attorney Ben Irons.
ECU again denied representation
to Burrus.
In the third-party suit, Burrus is
suing for damages
in four areas.
He is seeking
indemnification or
reimbursement in
the case that Bul-
lock proves him li-
able in the pend-
ing civil suit.
The second
claim is for inten-
tional infliction of
emotional dis-
tress. Burrus was
required to resign
or be terminated by Brown which
caused severe emotional distress to
Burrus.
I can't under-
stand why East
Carolina would
represent DePuy
and not represent
Johnny or Teddy
Myron T. Hill, Jr,
Attorney
"Burrus' professional reputation
and standing in the community were
damaged and the difficulties associated
there with caused the Burrus to seek
marital counseling and individual psy-
chotherapy according to Hill's report.
The third claim for relief is based
on negligent infliction of emotional dis-
tress.
In this, Burrus charges that ECU
should have trained him properly in fed-
eral and state wiretapping laws. Burrus
also said that ECU should have properly
investigate the situation prior to forcing
him to resign.
Burrus is also suing for wrongful
discharge under the defense that he was
acting under orders by agents of ECU.
For each of the four claims, Burrus
is asking for damages in excess of
$10,000.
Sunny thoughts
Program to capture
essence of black history
Photo composed by Dall Raad
Many ECU students are looking forward to lots of sun and fun as they stop to think about Spring Break that
is only seven days away.
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
ECU students and faculty will
be taking part in a program tonight
designed to celebrate Black His-
tory Month. The program written
by Reginald Watson, an English
departmentlecturer, will try to not
only capture the history of blacks,
but also forecast what their future
can and hopefully will be.
"The purpose of this program
is to pay homage to the importance
of blackhistory Watsonsaid. "The
program will be very informative
and entertaining as it traces the
major periods of black history
Will Bridges, saxophonist for
the local band Cold Sweat, will be
playing blues music to inform the
audience of the importance of jazz
music during the Harlem Renais-
sance and the early 20th century.
"A greatensembleof student
talent will be used to help portray
key black figures who best repre-
sent their time periods Watson
said.
Other key black figures that
will be discussed during the seven-
scene play are Mansa Musa, an
African ruler between 1200 A.D.
and 1500 A.D and Thurgood
Marshall, the Supreme Court Jus-
tice who helped overturn segrega-
tion in the school system. Both parts
will be played be Chris Haywood.
"Mansa Musa sets a great
example for the black race because
of his role as a king Haywood
said. "In this particular play, he
talks about the hardships his peop le
endured. I am hoping ECU stu-
dents will gain a knowledge of
black history as well as their own
history. This type of history we are
covering chronicles many centu-
ries
Gary Koonce and Wanda
Hall will sing spirituals that repre-
sent the pain and suffering of the
slaves. Hall will also read her own
poetry at the end of the program.
"We will have some music as
a backdrop to help capture the es-
sence of the time periods Watson
said. "Therewill be poetry reading
to show that black history and black
creativity are ongoing processes
Clayton Driver, ECU student
and football player, will portray
Frederick
Douglass, who successfully es-
caped slavery. Benjamin Banneker,
who helped build the White House,
will be portrayed by Michael
McPherson,anECU graduate stu-
dent. Takesha Wilson will play
Zora Neale Hurston, who wrote
Their Eyes Were Watching God.
Natasha Floyd, student, will play a
slave woman who talks about the
misfortune of slavery.
Other students who will par-
tici paring in the poetry reading are
Teresa Sanford and Sean Herring.
Staff member Vivian Bazemorewill
also be reading poetry by black
writers.
The program will be held at 8
p.m. tonight in room 244 in
Mendenhall. It should last about
an hour and a half.
Watson said, "This is only a
brief synopsis of what blacks have
done for not only this country, but
the world.
"The people involved in mis
program will try their best to cap-
ture the essence of the many char-
acters presented
Construction management students offered new scholarship
By Jenny Hamby
Staff Writer
The Triangle Chapter of the Profes-
sional Construction Estimators Associa-
tion (PCEA) of America has granted ECU's
School of Industry and Technology a
$16,800endowment.Theendowmentwill
provide annual scholarships to students
majoring in construction management.
"Over the past several years, the
PCEA has awarded $1,000 scholarships
to deserving construction management
studentsatECU Dr. Douglas Kruger, of
the Department of Construction Manage-
ment, said.
Kruger said that "previous faculty
members over the past few years as well
as current members' involvement in the
Triangle Chapter" helped ECU receive
the endowment from PCEA.
Since the department has received
the endowment, a permanent scholarship
fund will be set up to give to a construc-
tion management student each year.
The necessary qualifications for the
scholarship are to be a rising junior or
senior in the construction management
department. Furthermore, the students
must meet academic requirements, dem-
onstrate leadership capabilities and show
a financial need.
Kruger said that PCEA is "designed
to provide an organization for profes-
sional estimators so that they can get to-
gether and discuss areas in the construc-
tion management fields
The endowment is designed to "ac-
commodate for future costs. The amount
of the scholarship will increase as tuition
and fees rise Kruger said.
The scholarship is awarded by the
PCEA each April in Raleigh. The student
that receives the award will be able to use
it beginning in the fall semester.
Crawford Jobe, an industrial tech-
nology and construction management
major, said "the scholarship will attract
more students to look at industry and
technology and construction management
as a potential major
Arts council honors local students
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
The Pitt County Arts Council is
currently holding its second annual vi-
sual arts competition, and has awarded
over half of the prizes to ECU faculty
and students.
Judged by Jerald Melberg of the
Jerald Melberg Gallery in Charlotte, and
Tom Lopez from the North Carolina
Museum of Art, the entries will be shown
from Feb. 20-25. The gallery will be open
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Mel berg commented that the show
was comparable to other regional com-
petitions.
"It was certainly typical of that
type of exhibition, in that there was a
great variety of work Melberg said.
"It's what I would expect to find from
that type of regional exhibition
Doug Knots won best in show and
first place in the two-dimensional cat-
egory, with encausticoil paintings
titled "The Queen Escapes" and "The
King is Dead respectively.
First and third place in the sculp-
ture category went to Jerry Jackson.
"Cycle of Life, Saved at Childhood" won
first place in the competition, and "You
Can Call Me Bettie Now" placed third.
In the three-dimensional func-
tional category, first place went to ECU
student Djean Jan Runner. His "Parlor
Game" was constructed out of wood,
aluminum and Plexiglass. ECU faculty
Linda Darty and Terry Smith placed
second with "He Flew Away in the
Morning Darty and Smith composed
this artwork out of copper, enamel and
walnut.
In the video category, Susan
Luddeke placed fi rst with her 10-minute
entry.
The Pitt County Arts Council has
held this competition for the past two
years. Held in an abandoned elemen-
tary school in Ayden, board member
Andy McLawhorn said that the build-
ing can be used for many different pur-
poses.
See ARTS page 4
Whiz kid
This
man's
best
friend
takes a
break
with his
owner
during a
game of
frisbee
golf.
Photo by
Bitt Ranaon
I
J- �.





2 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 25, 1993
CRI
tENE
Feb.l
3 a.m.
A 23-year-old female was reported to have threatened to "fuck
up" a 19-year-old female and said, "this is how people get killed
in Fletcher Hall.
Feb. 3
11:42 p.m.
About $188 worth of materials were stolen after a suspect entered
an office in the Willis Building and took a television and a wallet
containing $78 in currency. About $110 worth of materials were
recovered.
Feb. 4
1:32 p.m.
Diving equipment, valued at over $200, was stolen from Minges
Pool equipment room.
9:30 p.m.
Jewelry, valued at $80, was stolen from a female's dorm room in
Tyler Hall.
Time unknown
University property on an intramural field was broken into with
a blunt object and almost $4,000 worth of climbing equipment
was stolen.
Feb. 5
4:50 p.m.
A male subject, 22, was undressed and entered a room in Greene
Hall. The suspect got into bed with a female resident. The suspect
was charged with misdemeanor breaking and entering, second
degree trespassing, delay, resist and obstruction of arrest.
Feb. 6
1:09 p.m.
A 34-year-old male was ticketed near Flanagan for having in his
possession, a Ruger 9mm handgun.
11:50 a.m.
A female victim, 21, was hit in the face by her boyfriend in Garrett
Hall.
Feb. 7
6:20 a.m.
The license plate of a red Ford Festi va was stolen from the parking
lot west of Mendenhall Student Center.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from ECU Public
Safety records.
StateNews
Hunt administration replaces zoo director
(AP)�Bob Fry, who was hired
byGov. Jim Hunt nearly 15yearsago
to head the N .C Zoo, has been forced
to resign by the new Hunt adminis-
tration.
Bob Fry was replaced tempo-
rarily by a former zoo curator who is
apolitical backer of Hunt. Fry, 60, said
he was summoned Thursday to Ra-
leigh and told to clean out his desk by
the next day.
Named as interim director was
Dwight Holland, who was chairman
of Hunt's campaign in Randolph
County last year and gave $1,200 to
Hunt's campaign.
Holland, who worked as the
zoo'sdesign curator from 1982 to 1990,
was one of the early supporters of the
park.
Jonathan Howes, secretary of
the Department of Environment,
Health and Natural Resources, which
oversees the zoo, said there would be
anationwide search foraprofessional
zoo manager to replace Fry perma-
nently.
Howes declined to discuss in
detail why Fry was forced out, say-
ing it was a personnel decision that
he could not talk about.
"He was actually hired in the
last Hunt administration Howes
said. "What I can tell you is, we had
good, sound personnel reasons for
doing it. It had nothing to do with
politics. It had everything todo with
the zoo needing new leadership go-
ing into this critical juncture
Rachel Perry, the governor's
press secretary, said there were prob-
lems with Fry's personal conduct.
"I want to point out there have
been serious allegations about Mr.
Fry's personal conduct and his man-
agement of employees and the zoo
operation Perry told The News &
Observer and The Charlotte Ob-
server. She declined to elaborate.
Fry denied angrily that any
personalaUegauonshadbeenlodged
against him.
"I do not know what she is
talking about Fry said of Perry.
"No such allegations have been pre-
sented to me. I would expect in an
appropriate forum that it be done.
Either make the accusations to me or
don't make them.
"At the time I was replaced, I
was given no reason other than the
zoo needed to go in new direction �
and to do that, they wanted new lead-
ership Fry said.
Like Hunt, Fry is a Democrat.
The zoo director is a political appoin-
tee. Fry, a retired Marine lieutenant
colonel, was hired to run the zoo in
September 1978 during Hunt's first
term as governor. In his nearly 15
years in charge, Fry was credited
with expanding and improving the
zoo.
"The N.C Zoological Park is
now recognized as a leader in natu-
ral habitat displays, instead of the
bars and cages of conventional
zoos said the release announcing
Fry's retirement
Fry said he has since learned
thatsomemembersoffheN.C. Zoo-
logical Society, a private fund-rais-
ing group, were unhappy with his
performance as director.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
THE BIGGEST BURRITO YOU'VE EVER SEEN!
Stuffed with beef, rice, lettuce, beans, tomato bits,
sour cream, and covered with enchilada sauce
Guaranteed to fill you up!
521 Cotanche St. � 757-1666
$3.45
Served
2-5
Weekdays
11-5
Weekends
Overtoil's
is Eastern North Carolina's
Swimsuit Headquarters
Styles by the Industries Leading Manufacturers
mmm?3& ;jcE�2d VENUS
DE LA MER
BEND1NGO
0mK
tX
DOLLAR
�$ 100. Domestics
'H M.4JB
$$l51ce TeisBahama MamasPit
mm
M &2 LADIMii ADiaSSION
Jlo Shots �75rkamtyga;
40
'
;�22
JAG
SOLAR
TAN-THRU
SPEEDO
CATALINA JRS
PORTA DO SOL
OP
ITAKE COVER
i& Many More
HE�-
Svft X
ambers $2.00 iwJ��K.5-�
Guest.$3,Mjfe
:�:� !���;�itwww;
lsmsiss&d
ONE RACK OF LADIES' SWIMSUITS REDUCED
UP TO 60 OFF OVERTONS PRICE
Overtoil's
HOURS
M-F 9 AM - 8 PM T m RED banks rd.
o� a a Ail -7 dm (Corner of Red Banks Rd. & Evans St.) I
Sat 9 AM-7 PM 355-5783
mm
FRENZY
ALLOO
DROP
$50.00 IN CASH will drop from the ceiling
every FRIDAY before Midnight
Enjoy Bogies
FREE BUFFET
FREE PIZZA for a limited time
FREE ADMISSION 8-10 pm
Take Advantage Of Our Great Drink Specials!
$2.50
754 Kamikazes D,c Teas PJ'S 504 Jello Shots
Bahama Mamas
Pitchers
Get There Early

'
a' ' i
iipw ����� �uwiiiiimiiii





Af '
FEBRUARY 25, 1993
NationalNews
Suspects arrested for shooting trooper
The East Carolinian 3
ALFREDO'S
DOWNTOWN
DALE CITY, Va. (AP)�Two
men were arrested Wednesday
and charged with murder in the
early morning shooting death of a
veteran Virginia state trooper along
Interstate 95 in Prince William
County.
State Police superintendent
Carl Baker identified the two as
Lonnie Weeks Jr 21, of
Fayetteville, N.C and Louis
Jefferson Dukes Jr 22, a resident
of the District of Columbia.
They were arrested after sev-
eral hours of questioning in the
death of Jose Cavazos, thefirststate
trooper killed in the line of duty in
four years.
Weeks and Dukes were
charged with capital murder. Pros-
ecutors said they will seek the death
penalty. They are scheduled to be
arraigned at 8:30 a.m. Thursday,
Commonwealth's Attorney Paul
Ebert said.
Both men charged with capital murder
Cavazos was found lying
near his cruiser on the 1-95 ramp to
the Potomac Mills Mall, police said.
Cavazos, 50 and a veteran of
the Persian Gulf War, was discov-
ered by a motorist and a state trans-
portation worker, who radioed for
help, police said.
Cavazos was declared dead
on arrival at the Washington Hos-
pital Center.
Police spokeswoman Lucy
Caldwell said Cavazos had been
shotjustabovehisbulletproofvest.
Four 9mm shell casings were found
at the scene, she said.
Baker said Cavazos had seen
a car speeding south on 1-95 and
had pulled it over on the ramp. A
scuffle followed, Baker said, dur-
ing which the trooper was shot
several times. Cavazos d id not pull
his gun.
Cavazos had not radioed that
he was making a traffic stop and
Baker would not say how that sce-
nario was arrived at.
He did say that several wit-
nesses had come forward.
About 20 minutes earlier,
Cavazos had spoken by radio with
the transportation worker, who had
asked him to investigate people
camping along northbound 1-95.
The campers were not thought to be
connected with the shooting.
Dogs from the Prince Wil 1 iam
County Police Department tracked
a scent to a nearby Days Inn motel,
where Weeksand Dukes were taken
into custody about an hour after
Cavazos was discovered.
Police also seized a stolen
Volkswagen Jetta with North Caro-
lina plates parked at a nearby Mobil
service station.
At one point, two detectives
opened the car's door. One looked
inside and was overheard saying,
"There it is. Bingo
State Police 1st Sgt. Norman
Pirkey said officers found a gun
sticking out from under the front
seat.
Ms. Caldwell said Cavazos,
who lived inNokesville,had served
in the G ulf War as an Army reserv-
ist. She said he was a staff sergeant
in military intelligence.
He is survived by his wife,
Linda, and two children � a 16-
year-old son and a 20-year-old
daughter who is a student at the
University of Virginia in
Charlottesville.
Pirkey described Cavazos as
"hard working" and said he "went
that extra step in making drug ar-
rests The last Virginia trooper
killed in the line of duty was Jerry
L. Hines, who was shot on Feb. 20,
1989, after stopping a vehicle on
Interstate 81 near Lexington, said
Claire Capel, a spokeswoman for
the state police in Richmond.
Ifefa
DAILY 5-8 PM
2 FOR 1 SPECIAL
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
ALFREDO'S ALFREDO'S '
JSileTop7g i$175 Pitcher
$6.99 Sun, Mon, Tues
with thisoupon until 10 pm doily with this coupon
HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
888 Sml
PRE-SPRING BREAK BLOW OUT!
Featuring LIVE Entertainment
THURSDAY
BRUCE FRYE
ladies in FREE!
FRIDAY HHHHHB
MOTHER NATURE
SATURDAYMHBHHl
RARE ESSENCE
Sunday lmmtmammm
DOLLAR NIGHT
Featuring s 7 Imports
The ONLY Place To Go On Sunday Nights!
Pwate Club For Members & Invited Guests
GREENVILLE
IMPORT SERVICE
DURAN
DURAN
CASSETTE CD
$7.98 �10.98
Established in 1976
We service all foreign cars: BMW, Mercedes, Toyota,
Honda, Nissan, Saab, VW, Porsche, Volvo, Subaru
Alfa Romero, Jaguar, and all others
i m EXPERT WORKMANSHIP
MB 756-9434
&m
V
��� 2204 Dickinson Ave.
VARIOUS CASSETTE
OVERSTOCK
$3.98 - f 7.98
TRADE HIR CASH
A m d T"Nintendo 1
WeNow Buy & Super Nintendo
Sell Used Sega Genesis
1109 Charles St
758-4251
Solutions from your Apple Campus Reseller:
a full Macintosh line for all your needs.
You're not the only
onewhokarryingalotof
units this semester
i i
Tie new Apple
Macintosh Color Classic,
� � i
"�x&mm
� � i
The new Apple
Macintosh Cmihis Gio.
- I III I Ill
He new Apple
Macintosh I.CIII.
fa.rfShIT � n,r Hit,aimpUS ReSe"er h:f "le m0St affofdabie new ,oreven moreP�w� the Mxintosh Centris 610 See these newcomnnters
Color Ckssc - a solid performer at a remark price. The Macintosh aswell steSkSSLSlSS
Student Stores STO�S: SSJSSVM; �am.5pm
W St SAmu�9 ottUWnnt Jl PHONE: 757-6731 H Y �m 5 pm
Is
fenw iumMrni (mm ffrdmtu SofBmni
m wl,
�lllrr lift Moaillitd) fen
!&rmlm,l �� . . ,�,�





w The East Carolinian
rain' n ,�
FEBRUARY 25. 1993
NationalNews
Mardi Gras revelry gives way to season of Lent
NEW ORLEANS (AP)�Two
million people � from wide-eyed
out-of-towners to transvestites in lin-
gerie � ate, drank and danced their
way through Mardi Gras in one last
fling before police cleared the streets
to usher in Lent Wednesday.
"If you want, it you can find it
on Bourbon Street at Mardi Gras
said John Summers, dressed as a
cancan dancer in ruffled skirt and net
stockings. "If you don't want it, you
can at least look at it. We have beau-
tiful men and beaunfulwomen ready
to let go of all their inhibitions
Revelers included clowns, doz-
ens of ersatz nuns and priests and
even a foppish quartet of heavily
rouged toy soldiers who extended a
limp wrist in a nod to President
Clinton's bid to lift the military's ban
on homosexuals.
With brilliant sunshine and
temperatures in the 60s, many revel-
ersdonnedtheskimpiestof costumes.
Others on French Quarter balconies
shed their clothes in response to
chants from the crowd and were re-
warded with trinkets.
"Thesearegreat Tom Conroy
of New York said of the strands of
beads he wore. "See these big green
ones? Women will do anything for
them.
Well, at least they'll show me
just about everything for them
ARTS
Police cleared Bourbon Street
of drunks at midnight as Fat Tues-
day gave way to Ash Wednesday,
the start of theaustere Lenten period
before Easter.
Police reported no serious
problems. Most arrests were for
pickpocketing,drunkennessand dis-
turbing the peace, Sgt. Bob Young
said.
Arrest figures weren't imme-
diately available.
Continued from page 1
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
"Three years ago, we found
out that the building was going
to be bulldozed McLawhorn
said. "We asked the county if we
could use it, if we cleaned it up.
There are lots of used buildings
like this around the county.
"There's plenty of potential
and possibility to use space here.
We hope to cooperate with East
Carolina to serve as a laboratory
for theater, music or dance. We've
already had some senior shows
performed here
Students from the ECU
Dance department performed at
the opening of the competition.
Faculty from the Dance and The-
atre departments also have
helped with dance and lighting
inside the old school.
The Arts and Recreation
Center also holds an 800-seatau-
ditorium. McLawhorn hopes that
in the future, this auditorium will
host dance performances, music
recitals and plays.
"I hope to see plays pro-
duced here or instructional vid-
eos shown in the future
McLawhorn said. "We want to
make a big effort to provide a
valuable service to Pitt County
The Recreation and Arts
Center is located in downtown
Ayden, off of Highway 11.
a888'
g
BANANAS
4lbsfor100
1534 E. 14,h St.
M-F 10-6:30pm
SAT 8-6:30pm
BROCCOLI
99 a bunch
757-3311
VV� s7G&2 �&gZ
jfV� ONLY
@$39
TWO MONTHS
FREE OFFER
�FREE Towing
�FREE Roadside Service
�FREE Battery Boost
�FREE Maps & Tour Books
�FREE Booking
�Guaranteed Lowest
Airfare and morel
Join us today and receive TWO extra months frff ann a
large, full-color, USA Wall Map suitable for framing.
AAA protects over 505,000 of your friends and neighbors in
North and South Carolina, and 33 million Americans nationwide
Most of our 82 benefits are FREE and others save you money.
For more information, call: Doneila Dzengeleski
919-443-7117 or 1-800-395-2623
FRIDAY
NIGHT (
DOLLAR (
NIGHT
ladies In FREE until 9:00 PM f
RfiMfiDfi INN )
Your favorite Irish & English
Beer on Tap at Special Prices
&& each Oysters
Steamed & Raw All Night feong
"Celebrate the Spirit
with Green Beer"
752-2450
Corner of 10th and Charles
Tues-Thurs 5:00-9:30
, Fn-Sai 4:00-10:00 Sun 12-9:30
Student
Government
Association
t WHAT:
I WHEN:
Filing for Spring Elections
� Executive President
� Executive Vice-President
� Executive Treasurer
� Executive Secretary
Thursday, February 25, 1993
until 5:00pm,
Thursday, March 4, 1993
t WHERE:
Room 255
Mendenhall Student Center
757-4726
t QUALIFICATIONS:
�Overall 2.0 G.P.A.
� Enrolled at least 2
Consecutive Semesters
at East Carolina University
� Good Standing
� Completed at least
48 Semester Hours
$10.00 Filing Fee
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING
Monday, March 15, 1993
WHERE WILL YOU
BE IN 93?
Will you be doing the same old thing, or do you
want a new challenge?
If so, you're looking in the right place!
The U.S. Coast Guard, the nations smallest
armed service, can offer you:
Law Enforcement Engineering
Search 5r Rescue Accounting
Computer Science Health Care
Management Aviation
Environmental Protection
Ship & Boat Handling
Positions are available in these and other specialties, at
various levels in the organization, for individuals between the
ages of 17-27 with a High School Diploma or College Degree.
Our excellent benefit package includes:
�30 Days Paid Vacation
�Full Medical 5r Dental CAre
� Undergraduate & Postgraduate
Training Opportunities
Will You Take The Challenge?
If you are interested in taking the OAR Exam (Officer Aptitude
Rating Exam) to see if you qualify to become an officer in the
United States Coast Guard, Contact your local recruiting office at:
Jmmm U.S. COAST GUARD
WffM RECRUITING OFFICE
(gljf 3480 SUNSET AVENUE
jg ROCKY MOUNT, NC 27804
m (919) 443-7476 CALL COLLECT
The Coast Guard is committed to equal opportunity.
Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.





4 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 25, 1993
National News
Mardi Gras revelry gives way to season of Lent
NEW ORLEANS (AP)�Two
million people � from wide-eyed
out-of-townerstotransvestitesin lin-
gerie � ate, drank and danced their
way through Mardi Gras in one last
fling before police cleared the streets
to usher in Lent Wednesday.
"If you want, it you can find it
on Bourbon Street at Mardi Gras
said John Summers, dressed as a
cancan dancer in ruffled skirt and net
stockings. 'If you don't want it, you
can at least look at it. We have beau-
tiful men and beau tifu 1 women ready
to let go of all their inhibitions
Revelers included clowns, doz-
ens of ersatz nuns and priests and
even a foppish quartet of heavily
rouged toy soldiers who extended a
limp wrist in a nod to President
Clinton's bid to lift the military's ban
on homosexuals.
With brilliant sunshine and
temperatures in the 60s, many revel-
ersdonned theskimpiestofcostumes.
Others on French Quarter balconies
shed their clothes in response to
chants from the crowd and were re-
warded with trinkets.
"These aregreatTomConroy
of New York said of the strands of
beads he wore. "See these big green
ones? Women will do anything for
them.
Well, at least they'll show me
just about everything for them
ARTS
Police cleared Bourbon Street
of drunks at midnight as Fat Tues-
day gave way to Ash Wednesday,
the start of the austere Lenten period
before Easter.
Police reported no serious
problems. Most arrests were for
pickpocketing,drunkennessand dis-
turbing the peace, Sgt. Bob Young
said.
Arrest figures weren't imme-
diately available.
Continued from page 1
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1-800-251-4000 Ext. 1576
"Three years ago, we found
out that the building was going
to be bulldozed McLawhorn
said. "We asked the county if we
could use it, if we cleaned it up.
There are lots of used buildings
like this around the county.
"There's plenty of potential
and possibility to use space here.
We hope to cooperate with East
Carolina to serve as a laboratory
for theater, music or dance. We've
already had some senior shows
performed here
Students from the ECU
Dance department performed at
the opening of the competition.
Faculty from the Dance and The-
atre departments also have
helped with dance and lighting
inside the old school.
The Arts and Recreation
Center also holds an 800-seat au-
ditorium. McLawhorn hopes that
inthefuture,thisauditoriumwill
host dance performances, music
recitals and plays.
"I hope to see plays pro-
duced here or instructional vid-
eos shown in the future
McLawhorn said. "We want to
make a big effort to provide a
valuable service to Pitt County
The Recreation and Arts
Center is located in downtown
Ayden, off of Highway 11.
BANANAS
4lbsfor100
1534 E. 14,hSt.
M-F 10-6:30pm
SAT 8-6:30pm
BROCCOLI
99
a bunch
757-3311
jfMk� ONLY
�$39
TWO MONTHS
FREE OFFER
�FREE Towing
�FREE Roadside Service
�FREE Battery Boost
�FREE Maps & Tour Books
�FREE Booking
�Guaranteed Lowest
Airfare and more!
Join us today and receive TWO EXTRA MONTHS frff ar,H a
large, full-color, USA Wall Map suitable tor framing.
AAA protects over 505,000 of your friends and neighbors in
North and South Carolina, and 33 million Americans nationwide
Most of our 82 benefits are FREE and others save you money.
For more information, call: Donella Dzengeleski
919-443-7117 or 1-800-395-2623
�F gjgjgggg? T5
ffiChmles
Your favorite Irish & English
Beer on Tap at Special Prices
&&JE each Oysters
Steamed & Raw All Night hong! f"
Celebrate the Spirit 4FJ(
FRIDAY
I NIGHT (
I DOLLAR I
NIGHT
ladies In FREE until 9:00 PM f
RfiMfiDfHNN I
with Green Beer'
752-2450
Corner of TOth and Charles
Tues-Thurs 5:00-9:30
Fri-Sai 4:00-10:00 Sun 12-9:30
KSBk'
w
WHEN:
Student
Government
Association
t WHAT: Filing for Spring Elections
r � Executive President
? � Executive Vice-President
� � Executive Treasurer
� Executive Secretary
Thursday, February 25, 1993
? until 5:00pm,
Thursday, March 4, 1993
I WHERE: Room 255
� Mendenhall Student Center
757-4726
E QUALIFICATIONS:
t �Overall 2.0 G.PA.
? � Enrolled at least 2
? Consecutive Semesters
� at East Carolina University
? � Good Standing
? � Completed at least
? 48 Semester Hours
? $10.00 Filing Fee
MANDATORY CANDIDATES MEETING
Monday, March 15, 1993
WHERE WILL YOU
BE IN '93?
Will you be doing the same old thing, or do you
want a new challenge?
If so, you're looking in the right place!
The U.S. Coast Guard, the nation's smallest
armed service, can offer you:
Law Enforcement Engineering
Search 5r Rescue Accounting
Computer Science Health Care
Management Aviation
Environmental Protection
Ship & Boat Handling
Positions are available in these and other specialties, at
various levels in the organization, for individuals between the
ages of 17-27 with a High School Diploma or College Degree.
Our excellent benefit package includes:
�30 Days Paid Vacation
�Full Medical & Dental CAre
� Undergraduate 5r Postgraduate
Training Opportunities
Will You Take The Challenge?
If you are interested in taking the OAR Exam (Officer Aptitude
Rating Exam) to see if you qualify to become an officer in the
United States Coast Guard, Contact your local recruiting office at:
Jmhj U.S. COAST GUARD
VW RECRUITING OFFICE
'�gm 3480 SUNSET AVENUE
�� ROCKY MOUNT, NC 27804
mm (919) 443-7476 CALL COLLECT
The Coast Guard is committed to equal opportunity.
Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.






Mammmimmimm
TheEastCarolinian
February 23, 1993
Classifieds
Page 3
tooffiffiftttied
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS :1 and
2 bedroom apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer hook-
ups. Call 752-8915.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 2608 Tryon
Drive; 3 bedroom 1 bath; $550.00 p
m. 404 S. Eastern Street; 3 bedroom 2
bath;S680.00pm. No pets. Leaseand
Deposit Required. Duffus Realty, Inc.
Call 756-2675.
A 7TH STORY luxury suite hanging
over the whit sand and clear water of
South Florida's most beautiful beach.
Completely furnished, sleeps five in
unbelievable luxury; minutes from Jai
Alai, airport, horses dogs, Ft. Lauder-
dale Beach, Miami Action. $800 for
Week36-313atHollywood Beach
Tower. Call (205) 948 - 7493.
1 BR APARTMENT on 13th St Great
forpets,esp.dogs. Available immedi-
ately. $275 mo. Call 752-9197.
SUMMER SCHOOL APARTMENT
Cedar Ct. apts. May-July Fully fur-
nished 182.50mo. -(utilities 752-0085
FEMALEroommateneed Ma v through
Aug to share 2 bdrm apt at far River.
$100.00 per mo 1 3 utilities. Call 752-
8000!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: To
share 4 bdrm in Tar River. Bdrm pri-
vate w own fireplace $156.25 a mth
1 4 utilities. Call Lisa 758-4332
KINGS ARM APARTMENTfor rent.
One bedroom. Available immediately.
No deposit required. S265mo. Call
collect(919) 269-7844. Ask for Yvonne
SUBLEASE: 2 bedroom apartment at
OakmontSquare. Rentis $380month.
Available March 1st through end of
May Call 355-5803.
1 BR APARTMENT across from cam-
pus call 752 - 2615.
SUBLEASE TAR RIVER APT. for
summer ASAP. 2 bedroom $460 a
month. Call 830-9421.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
SI 50.00 per month 13 utilities. Easy
going, non - smoker preferred. Please
call 757-1262.
CM
w
WMmwmwm
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live con-
cert & studio recordings for sale. Over
lOOOnewtitlesavailablethisweekfrom
thefollowingartists: ROCK-U2,R.E.M,
Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendrix, Black
Crowes, Springsteen, SRV, Van Halen,
Rush, Beatles, Doors, G-N-R, etc. AL-
TERNATTVE-Nirvana,PearlJarn,Chili
Peppers, Cure, Depeche Mode, MORE
OTHERSINCLUDE-Bob Marley, Ma-
donna, Prince, and more. Call 931-2573
to leave name, number, and requested
artist on message (all new CD's and
tapes in stock).
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boats, 4-wheelers,
motorhomes,byFBI,IRS,DEA. Avail-
able your area now Call 1-800436-
4363ext.c-5999.
COMIC BOOKS for sale, various is-
suesofTlieDeathmniFuneralofSUPER-
MAN. Greit Prices. 10 - 50 off cur-
rent pr reguides. All a re fi rst printings
and in mint condition. Call 758 - 5819
for Info Ask for Johnnie. Leave Mes-
sage.
KITTY HAWK 100 wart ALL - TUBE
AMP: w Channel switching. Like
new, plays great $350 Marshall 4 x 12
1960 slanted cabinet. $350 Peavey 18"
Black Widow BassCabinet. Good con-
dition $125 Call Warren 321 - 2046.
FOR SALE: Soundesign stereo system
w rack. Has openclose storage cabi-
nets. Remote control.Hasdigitalclock,
alarm timer, tape,equalizer, etc. Wood
finish. Great buy. $100.00 o.b.o. 830-
9442
CAR STEREO FOR SALE: Pioneer
KEH-M7200 includes high security
detachable face, CD changer control,
RCA preamp outputs, superruner HI.
Will sell to best offer. For more infor-
mation call Oye at 321-0800 or 916-
2678.
CHEAP! FBIUS SEIZED: 89 Mer-
cedes-$ 200,86 VW - $50, & Mercedes
-$100,65Mustang-$5. Choose form
thousandsstarting$50. FREE Informa-
tion 24 hour hotline 801 -379-2929 copy-
right NC 030610.
FOR SALE! Admiral Deluxe full -
sized refrigerator. Old but in very good
condition, 758-6998.
ROOMMATE NEEDED March 1st:
Must love animals, music and occa-
sional celebrating, ma le or fema le SI 50
a month rent and 1 3 phone and utili-
ties. Call Stacy or Michele 752 - 3244.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED by
March 1st to share 3 bedroom apart-
ment in Wildwood Villas. 1 3 rentand
13 utilities. Call Andy or Da renat752-
8506.
ROOMMATE NEEDEDSummerses-
sion furnished apartment Tobacco Rd.
321-1313 Leave message.
ROOMMATE FOR LG house near
downtown and campus. 1 3 utilities,
deposit, 5155 moth. Call Jay 758 -
4375.
national EmploymentGroup: (206) 632-
1146ext.J5362.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Setown hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions, Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext.P-3712.
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hiring enthusiastic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. North BeachSailing, Inc. Box 8279,
Duck, NC 27949. (919) 261 -6262.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED. Looking for enthusiastic
people with strong cheering and inter-
personal skills to teach cheerleading
camps in NC & SC. Great pay and
flexible scheduling. Up to 10 weeks
possible! If you love cheerleading, this
is the summer job for you! To apply,
Call 1 - 800 - 280- 3223.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All Materials provided. Send SASE to
National Distributors PO Box 9643
Springfield,MO65801. Immediatere-
sponse.
SEEKING ACCOUNTING MAJOR
for part-time work in medical office,
primary responsibility will involve ac-
counts payable. 10 hours a week at
$5.00hour. For more information,
please call Vicky at 758-4300.
ATTENTION FASHION MER-
CHANDISING MAJORS! Gain valu-
able work experience in your field of
study.Brody'sisacceptingapplications
forSecretary to Buyer. Work with buy-
ers in tracking and replenishing inven-
tory levels. Computer experience
needed Must be a va ilable 3 days by 12
p.m 15-20 hours per week. Apply
Brody's The Plaza, Monday- Wednes-
day, 1-4 p.m.
AQUATIC DIRECTORS & LIFE-
GUARDS Summer positions in Gre-
envilleand NagsHead areas. Call Bob,
756-1088.
THE CITY OF RALEIGH PARKS
AND RECREATION department is
seeking enthusiastic hardworking in-
dividuals for summer employment.
Positions include pool managers, life-
guard, park maintenance, camp coun-
selors, nature, athletic, arts and lake
personnel, and therapeutic programs.
EOE MFH Contact: 2401 Wade Av-
enue, Raleigh, NC 27602 Phone: (919)
831-6640.
NOSMOKING. Call 355-22187eve-
nings.
WILLING TO TRADE free horseback
riding in exchange for occasional stable
help. Private stable near WinterviUe.
Experienced riders only. Call 756 -
5784 after 6 pm.
MARKETING POSITION AVAIL-
ABLE at thriving family owned busi-
ness. Must have good basic phone
skills and pleasant voice. Must have
com mon sense, follow instructions ex-
actly; accept criticism, and be able to
handle rejection. Working hours are
6:00 pm to 8:30 pm, Monday - Thurs-
day w starting salary plus commis-
sion. We will train. Call 752 - 2756
between 8:00 to 11:00 pm and leave
yourname,address, phoneand your
favorite color.
simple to complex. Contact Taylor at
752-6219.
BUSY SCHEDULE; no time for typing.
Mary will do your typing for you at
$2.50 a page. Further Details call 752-
5228after6:00pm.
BRAVES PROFESSIONAL TYPIN6 4
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
'English Literature Major
�Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Composed Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in Calil. (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 Io: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave �206-A. Los Angles CA 90025
SAVE on Spring Break'93! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas from $459 Florida
from !149! Organize group and
travel free! Contact Susan @ 931-7334
or call Sun Splash Tours today 1-800-
426-7710.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
- Make money teaching English
Abroad. Japan and Taiwan. Make
S2000 - $4000 per month. Many
provide room &board other benefits!
No previous training or teaching cer-
tificate required! For International
Employment program, call the Inter-
EARN TOP DOLLAR! Old technique
coupled with new products equals ex-
tracash for you and your friends. It'sas
easy as a phone call'752-6560. Ask for
Tommy.
$20O-$5OOWEEKLY. Assemble prod-
uctsathome. Easy! No selling. You're
paid direct. Fully Guaranteed. Free
Information-24hourhotline. 801 -379
-2900. Copyright NC 030650.
IDEAL FOR STUDENT, Mother's
Helper, few hours in afternoons, School
agechild, lighthouse work, Mustdrive,
WANTEDusedCD's,NES, and Super
NES games. Call 756 - 3319 and leave
message.
WANTED TO BUY: Rolex-and other
high grade watches. CASH PAID
Call David at 756-9290 Mon-Sat 10-6
Leave Message after 6 pm.
PARTYHOUSES-NorthMyrtleBeach.
Welcomegroupsof4-34 people. Group
- Leader discounts. Call Myrtle Beach
Tours 9 - 4 pm (703) 250-2125.
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS!
Parry HkeGods Panama City $139,Key
WestS269,Jamaica & Cancun from $450.
Quality accommodations, free drink
parties!CalIJoeEndlessSummerl-800-
234-7007.
BESTTANNING PRICES IN TOWN
at Scissorsmith Hair Designs and Tan-
ningCenter! OneMonth unlimited Only
$30, Other packages too! 107Eastbrook
Drive 758 -7570.
DEVELOP A RECURRING INCOME
stream which can pay you without your
day - to - day involvement. Is college
preparingyoutobeanythingotherthan
an"employee"? Whatdo you think the
job market holds for the class of '93?
Build your won business part - time
with a dynamic young international
marketing company withoutinterrupt-
ing your academic career. Potential for
long term, passive income. We'reinter-
viewing for a few self - starting, moti-
vated individuals with high self - es-
teem. Some marketing and or eco-
nomic course work a plus. Call 1 - 800 -
497 - 5019 and leave your name and
number to make an appointment for a
personal interview.
LET'S PARTY experienced DJ from
Bogies available for all occasions: Fra-
ternity and Sorority socials, Weddings,
Birthdays. AlltypesofmusicfromClas-
sic Rock to Top 40 Dance. Highest
quality Best PricesCallRob@757-2658.
A GREAT OPPORTUNITY for stu-
dent group fund raising sell greeting
cards. Receivehalf profit. Call 919-758-
49016. Ask for Northern Lanier or see
Lisa Shibley.
EXPERIENCED DESIGNER wanted
to do T - shirts for organizations on
campus, (i.e. Greek or any other) From
the Bahamas or the Keys
MT4W MM
on your own private yatcht j
where the party never ends '
spend the week (or only
plus food & more!
1-900-780001
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
$NEED CASHS
TUDENT
WAP
WOP
BUYING
a SELLING
n
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
JewelryCgoodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
FOUND IN GENERAL CLASS-
ROOM BLDG. last November, one
jacket. Call Dr.Ginn in the Psychology
Dept. at 757-4101 and identify.
HCB: Hope Friday is the end of a
terrific week for you. Good luck on all
your test next week. Just think, after
that Sun and fun in beautiful Calif
You'll make it; low stress always. P. S.
We will have Abs of Steel by Spring
Break! Love, Spike.
TO THE LAX MEN: Thanks to all far
a great weekend. Your support is ap-
preciated. WARD: Thanks for the
house. GoodluckonSaturday'sgame!
Can't wait for next weekend! LADIES
LAX.
WRITER PHILOSOPHERmusician
and poetic soul seeks friendship and
correspondence from like - minded
lady Photos and letters to MV PO Box
8663, Greenville, NC 27835.
ALPHA DELTA PI: Thank you "ALL"
for joining us at the Pre Downtown Fri-
daynight. Wecan'twaittoseeyallatthe
Redneck Social! YeeHaw Sigma Pi.
DELTA ZETA: We predowntowned
the right way at Wrong Way's. It was a
great time. See you again soon. The
Brothers and Pledges of Delta Chi.
CONGRATULATIONSTOTHENEW
BEATSIGMAS'Sof Alpha OmicronPi:
Kerri Ellis, Paige Chirty, Trista Marsh,
Shelley Filar, Bridgett Newman, Lorie
Pettis, Karla Thompson, Allison
McFarland and Ashley Maples.
P1KAPPAPHI: Thanksforagreattime
last Friday. Let's do it again soon. Love,
Alpha OmicronPi.
THETACHI: What a night we all had.
Thestoplightthemewasthefad. Wehad
a great time with all of you. And by the
way, Thank you for the pretty pink roses
too! Love, The Alpha Phis
ALPHA PHI: It was a normal night
nobody knew, that we needed a date in
an hour or two. Kristine and Mandy
werereadytogo. Weall showed up and
put on a show. Before we knew it, we
danced the night away Anditwastime
to wake up for a new day.
PHI KAPPA TAU: Looking forward to
tonight. I'msurewellhaveablast! Love,
Delta Zeta.
PIONEERS! "that'sus Wehadagreat
timeatProvinceWeekend! Congratula-
tion to: Marie Hooper for her awards as
Outstanding Senior and Recording Sec-
retary, to Melanie Morris and her Golden
Crest Award, to our President, Christi
Radoll for her Outstanding Collegian
Award and to the whole chapter, run-
ner up for scrapbook, Rush Improve-
ment winner, Ways & Means Award,
Most Improved Chapter Award, and
Finally Thank you new Initiates for the
"x alls" to go up there and do our skit!
Delta Zeta.
ALPHA XI DELTA: Congratulations to
the new sisters Saturday roght was a
blast, looking forward to Champaign
brunch. Pikes.
CHI OMEGA: Remember Grandma
Rakowski's words of wisdom and fol-
low it. Friendshipsare worth more than
gold. The Bonding Sisters of Chi-O.
Announcements
Ecunisrr.mpnuff
2nd AnnualSpring AllCam-
pusTournamentSundayFeb28. Reg-
ister 10 -11:340 am mandatory player
meeting at 11:30 am 1st tee time at
12:00. Entry fee SI 2, with choice of t-
shirtordisc. 3 divisions - beginners,
amateurs, advanced with men and
women's brackets. For info call Chad
orToddat758-1085.
GOLDEN KFYfATIrNA
HONOR SOripTY
Golden Key wi 11 have a meet-
ing March 3rd in Speight 313. All
members are urged to attend. Ques-
tions? Please Call 756 - 5381.
G'VILLE BUSINFSS fc PRnFp�
SIONAI.WOMFNI'SHVff
SCHOLARSHIP! Deadline
March 15, 1993 criteria for selection:
Rising Junior have a 3.2 overall GPA,
meet before a scholarship committee
Forapplicationsand more info, CON-
TACT: Mrs Dot Seary, 503 Eleanor
St, Greenville, NC 27858, 746 - 6742.
GAMMA SIGMA r-MA
Gamma Sigma Sigma will be
holding its first annual Karaoke Cor-
testatMUGSHOTSon Tuesday March
2 starting at 10:00 pm. Sing the night
away with over 300 songs to choose
from! Prizesawarded! Don'tmissout
on this great event! For more details
contact Jenny931-8279or Michelle 758-
7546.
ECUSCHOOIOFMiisrr
EVENTS FOR February i�.?7
1993
Tues Feb. 16 � James
Weaver, harpsichord, Guest Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm, Free).
ThurFebl8�Nathan Williams, clari-
net,andguestartists Audrey Andrist,
piano and James Stern, violin (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 pm, Free) FriFeb
19 � Donny F. All, Jr. hom, Senior
Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm
Free). Mon Feb 22 � Brad Foley,
saxophone, A. Loiuse Toppin, so-
prano,and Paul Tardif,piano (Fletcher
Recital Hall, H.00 pm. Free).
ECL campus MINISTRY
A pancake supper to begin
the pre-Easter season of Lent Lent is
a time of sacrifice and reflection to
prepare for Easter All students are
invited to participate in a simple meal
andact of worship. February 23, Meth-
odist StudentCenter,501E.5thSt. 5:15
pm A free - will offering is to be taken
up for the support of the Homeless
Shelter.
ASH WEDNESDAY SFRVICFS
The NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER wishes to an-
nounce special Ash Wednesday
Masses with thedistributionof ashes:
12 noon in the Great Room of
Mendenhall Student Center and 5:30
p.m. at the Newman Center, 953 E
10th Street at the foot of College Hill.
ECU FENCING rili?
ECU Fencing Club will hold
onentationonFeb.23andMar.2Tues
at 6:30 p.m. in Christenburv Gym.
Fencers at all levels are welcome or
contact 752-3052.
STUDYABROAD
Now is the time to apply for
the National or International Student
Exchange or for one of many study
abroad opportunities! If you are inter-
ested m paying ECU tuition and at-
tending one of 107 other universities
around the United States or one of
over40Englishspeaking foreign loca-
tions, investigate the many opportu-
nities available to you through the
ECU exchange programs. The next
information session will be held Tues
Feb. 23at3.30 p.m. in the International
ProgramsOfficeon9thSt.Checkyour
ECU Student Activity calendar for fu-
ture information sessions or call Ms.
25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Stephanie Evancho, 757-6769, for an
appointment. Pick up a brochure and
application form now!
NATIVFAMFRICA
ORGANIZATION
The East Carolina Native
AmericanOrganization will have their
next meeting on Tues , Feb. 23 from 7-
8p.m. The meeting will beheld in rm.
Announcements
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The Fast Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeof charge. Diietothelimited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot gi jaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
14 of Mendenhall Student Center.
SOCIAL WORKCRIMINAl,
JUSIKE
Applicants for theS.W. &C.J.
majors are reminded to attend an Ad-
missions group meeting in Ragsdale
218onMonMar. 1 or Tues, Mar. 2 at
5 p.m. Applicants must attend one of
these meetings!
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication however, no
refunds will be given.
Deadlines
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
1





mmtmmmumtmmmammm
February 25, 1993
The East Carolinian
Opinion
Page 6
ThursdayOpinion
Student integrity
major problem in
classrooms
Cheating and plagiarism run
rampant and unchecked, often
because of faculty apathy
Consider this scenario.
The teacher walks into the classroom, carrying 50-
65 exams in his hand along with his briefcase. The room
is packed wall to wall with students, mostly because
the room was originally designed to hold only 35 people.
As the teacher passes out the exam, he warns the stu-
dents that they should look at their own paper and be
sure to do their own work. After distributing the ex-
ams, he stands at the podium in the front of the room
and opens the paper for his afternoon perusal.
Eyes move furtively to the side and bodies are
positioned for the maximum amount of vision. The
cheating has begun.
As much as this university espouses its honor
code, the reality of the situation is that you couldn't
throw a balled-up piece of paper in a crowded class-
room without hitting a person who's cheated at least
once in his or her lifetime. If somebody decides that
they're going to cheat on a test or copy somebody else's
paper, then they're going to find a way to do it. Cur-
rently, there is no effective deterrent to keep students
from cheating.
The above scenario only encourages the situation,
Riding the Mobius
By Jason Tremblay
Racial rift bridged by looking towards future
too. Even the most honest and
students are going to be
when confronted with an
obviously feels that he
things to do than
Only when the
realized and rec-
trustworthy of
tempted to cheat
instructor who
or she has better
proctor an exam.
problem is fully
ognized will any in-
roads be under-
taken.
AiKa The student
jflfSs? body goes under the
: unspoken understand-
ing that if you're careful
enough, you can get away
with cheating on an exam.
Some precautions are cur-
rently being undertaken to hinder
the chances of cheating, such as stu-
dents being asked to leave their bags at
the front of the classroom or take off any
ball caps they may have on. Are these pre-
cautions working, though? Only when students and
instructors alike seriously consider this event a prob-
lem will anyone be able to see any long-term effects.
It's hard to deter from cheating without sounding
like one is giving a sermon. Everyone's heard teachers
and professors expound on the issue, saying things like
"It's not your own work or "You don't really learn
anything when you cheat This age-old diatribe and
rhetoric only serves to bore students and stagnate the
problem at its current low level.
To climb the ladder of integrity, the first rung must
be the students. Only they can look at their own hon-
esty and place a value on it. If integrity is important to
a person, then they won't compromise it. But if a person
sees cheating as an easier way to get the same results,
chances are that he or she will continue to go on copy-
ing papers and exams.
Again, there is no current, effective deterrent that
this university offers to stop cheating. A more hard-
lined approach, with stiffer penalties for first-time of-
fenders, may be in order in the future. Unless someone
can come up with more liberal alternatives, there doesn't
seem to be much choice in the matter.
The East Carolinian
James R. Kniseiy, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hasseli, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Billiard,UK Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumnir. Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dicjtens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Ixiyout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed. Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. System Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday The masthead editorial in each edilion is the opinion of ihe
Editorial Board The Eastaroliman welcomes letters limited to 250
words, which may be edited of decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East ("aroliman.
Publications Bldg. ECU, Greenville. MX . 27858-45i;? lor more itilorma
tion. call (919) 757-f,V,f,
Printed :
With the month of February
fast coming to a close, and Black
History Month ending with it, it
only seems appropriate to discuss
the issue of racism, though the
topic has indeed been thoroughly
beaten into the ground this month
by an increasingly sensationalis-
ric media. While 1 personally do
not agree with the media's han-
dling of the event, I still think a
few things need to be said, all at-
tention-getting showmanship
aside.
Before 1 begin, the reader
should perhaps know a few things
about me personally; I'm about
6'1 medium build, blonde hair,
blue eyes, and in case those last
two didn't tip you off, European-
American. An exemplary "white
devil if you will.
Now, my physical appear-
ance is, quite frankly, something
I'm rather proud of. I'm pleased
with who I am, and I'm not
ashamed toadmit it by any means.
This is certainly not to say that 1
consider myself superior on any
level on the basis of my appear-
ance, it only means that I very
much enjoy looking into the mir-
ror and seeing a blonde English
major with artistic tendencies who
enjoys living.
Now, as most artists can tell
you, we enjoy simple pleasures as
well as those complicated ones
that so many people are con-
demned to. Oneof thesepleasures,
for me, is just walking by myself
on warm days and watching
things.
As luck would have it, about
three weeks ago, the bizarre
weather twists North Carolina is
famous for brought us a day so
beautiful that I had to make an
artistic pilgrimage to nowhere in
particular. The destination of my
travels unimportant, I hitched a
ride with my girlfriend to her place
of employment and began the four
mile walk back to my dorm.
On my trip, 1 saw many beau-
tiful things and delighted in each
one of them, though most people
(myself included, when I'm in a
funk) regard them as trivial and
pay them no notice during the
courses of their oh-so-busy lives. 1
was in harmony with nature it
seemed, doing all those hippie-
type things you can see in any '70s
acid movie or a Freedom Rock
commercial. Simply put, I was
minding my own business while
minding everything, and enjoy-
ing it.
About halfway through my
journey, I passed through a lower-
income neighborhood densely
populated with African Ameri-
cans. As I walked, I gazed about
me and took in the small, dilapi-
dated homes with an air of quiet
sobriety. I realized that I was in a
"bad "section of town, but it didn't
look bad to me. I saw the many
houses in need of a good coat of
paint, the garbage on the side of
the road, the smashed beer bottles
on the corner, but I saw much
more than that.
I saw two African-American
children playing in their front yard
with a rubber ball while their
grandmother sat on the porch wi th
a glass of lemonade and watched.
I saw a man hold the door for a
woman carrying her groceries up
the stairs, even though he had to
wait for her to get there. 1 saw
dozensof people going about their
lives in a happy, dignified fash-
ion, even though they lived in the
"bad" part of town.
I saw all these things and
was filled with respect, and even a
little jealousy. These were honest
people livinghonest lives, unclut-
tered by the excesses of the afflu-
ent. They seemed like good people,
and I was satisfied that they were
happy with their lives.
I continued on my wav and
eventually had to cross an inter-
section. Coming from the oppo-
site direction were three African-
Americans, one male, about my
age, though of lesser size, and two
fema les, one about 16 and the other
about 10. As we passed each other
in the intersection, the male glared
at me the whole time, and the el-
der female spoke to him. "Don't
even say anything she hissed at
him, and then we had passed.
When what I suppose
seemed a safe distance to them,
the elder girl turned and yelled
after me, "Get back to your own
neighborhood,crackerand then
all three ran off. I stood there for
a moment, not quite believing
what had just happened. I had
done them no harm, and in fact,
respected the people in their
neighborhood, and they had done
a decidedly racial thing to me
without provocation.
My mood ruined, I trudged
back to my dorm room, noticing
that a Black History Month dis-
play had been vandalized. I shook
my head in disgust, wondering
at the senselessness of it all.
My point, which I have
seemingly buried in all of this, is
that everyone needs to work to-
gether; cliche, but true. I am not a
"cracker" � if I were, I would
likelybesaturatedwithsoup.No
one is a "nigger" � it is a term
degrading and foul by any stan-
dards.
The racial rift in America
will never be closed if we, both
African and European Americans
alike, don't stop dwelling on a
sad history that can never be
changed. The time of ignorance is
past. The time for change is now.
Now stop reading, think
about it, go get a pizza and watch
some cartoons.
100, recycled
paper
QuoteoftheDay:
Adam was the only man who, when he said
a good thing, knew that nobody had said it
before him.
Mark Twain'
Letters to the Editor
Basketball fans considered 'fair weather untrue
To the Editor:
Are there any "true"
ECU fans left? As I sit here and
deliberate on what I should
say to the so called ECU fans
only three words come to
mind: You people suck!
ECU has the worst case
of "fair weather fans" ever re-
corded. For those of you who
don't know what a "fair
weather fan" is, it is fans who
on ly cheer or show u p to games
when we are winning. Even
N. C.State, who isgetting beat
badly almost every game,
packs the house every home
game. It pains me to say that
N. C. State fans are better than
ECU fans.
I will pause in the midst
of all this to say I was im-
pressed with the turnout of
fanstotheJMUand Richmond
games. But when you do show
up for the game, you leave
with as much as three minutes
or more left on the dock. Our
team iscapableof makingdra-
matic comebacks, which was
obvious at UNCW. I can only
imagine what our football and
basketball players are think-
ing as they look up into the
stands with time left on the
clock only to see a thimble full
of fans left.
To that thimble full of
fans that do stay, I say "you're
great Everyone should fol-
low yourexample. I do under-
stand that people have tests
and night classes, but out of
15,000 students, it seems like
you could fill up the coliseum.
It's not like you have to pay or
something. They are about to
make Minges bigger, and you
people don 'teven fill itupnow.
SAD!
When UNCW comes to
town on Feb. 27 they will bring
two times as many fans as
we've been having at our home
games. It's pretty embarrass-
ing for the other team to come
to our place and pack in more
fans than we do, especially
when we have over twice the
amount of students. It doesn't
make sense and I sincerely
hope the ECU fans see it as
their responsibility to do some-
thing about it.
So to all you "fair
weather" ECU fans, come out
of your holes and support the
Pirates! I challenge you not
only to come to the remaining
home game, but to remain
standing (like UNCW did to
us) and to cheer whether we
are winning or losing to the
last second. Show that you are
a real ECU fan and not some-
body who just attends class at
ECU.
Pack the place early to
greet our team as they come
on to the court. Who knows,
our fan support might even
give our team that extra shot
of energy it takes to pull out
these tight games.
Adam Terry
Junior
All letters to the editor must be signed, with a
working telephone number. Students, please in-
clude your major and year along with the letter.
By Gregory Dickens
America should
confront problems
on homef ront
The United States is once again close to
interceding in a foreign affair that has little
impact on our country's well-being.
Bosnia-Herzegovina, the tatters of one-
time Yugoslavia, is in the midst of Europe's
answer to the Middle East's ethnic and reli-
giousantagonism.TheCroatsand Muslims in
the area are at each other's throats for survival
and ethnic purity against Serbian domination
for political,geographicand militaryresources.
Once again, the United Nations looks to
America for financial or military support.
The United States, however, is undergo-
ing a change of leadership and priorities in
order to energize its weakened economy ver-
sus foreign competition and restructure its
health, education and welfare programs.
America has long been seen as the
world's constable since the administration of
Teddy Roosevelt. Except for a period of stem
isolationism in the '20s, America has sent our
men and our money "over there" for 90years.
Korea, Vietnam, Cuba, Latin America,
Grenada, Lebanon, Tana ma and The Persian
Gulf have all been the scenes of operations
undertaken because of lofty idealism or self-
interests and with our military leading the
way. Many of these conflicts have either been
the cause of social confrontations or have later
been proven to be unsuccessful, overdrawn
and unpopular.
Granted, America cannot pretend to ex-
ist in a vacuum when the United Nations
comes knocking at thedoor, butourparticipa-
tion in any affairs must be thought out first,
with the first criteria being "Do we ha vea right
to interfere?"
Bosnia-Herzegovina was inevitable. The
disintegration of the Iron Curtain freed not
only the citizens of the various countries, but
the numerous ethnic cultures mat were sup-
pressed by communist rule. Now that these
people are liberated and allowed elbow room,
they wanted to get away from each other for
the sake of cultural identity and socio-geo-
graphic pride.
Speaking as a country that can't claim to
have unbroachable race relations, what with
L.A. on the verge of another set of riots over
Rodney King, what sort of moral high ground
can America stand on to tell Europe how to
conduct their affairs? Who should we support
or oppose and on what grounds?
If humanitarian aid is necessary, the
United Nations was created and is empow-
ered to lend a hand. I do not deny that the
fighting has taken on inhuman acts and in-
tents. While it may lift our collective egos to
heal the world, it will drain our still-insuffi-
cient economy and divert initiative from where
it is needed
We must put America first and heal our
own ethnic tensions and sivial discrepancies.
If not, within ,i gei leratii in, we ma v he the ones
pleading with the United Nations to save us
from ourselves.
N
-
I





FEBRUARY 25, 1993
The East Carolinian
m
POET
Continued from page 7
book does not dwell on the actual
deathsofNiobe'schildren, but what
happened before and after the
deaths. InGreek tragedy, there was
a chorus to relate the inner feelings
of the characters to the audience.
Daniels has poems throughout her
book which serve this purpose.
Also, like Greek tragedy, the
book ends on a somewhat positive
note. Niobe goes on with her life
and a catharsis is reached.
Although based on myth,
Daniel's poetry is contemporary.
Her images are honest and her po-
etry is easy to understand.
"One of the remarkable aspects
of her poetry is the self sufficiency of
her imagery said Bill Hallbergof
the ECU English Department. "Her
subject matter is brave, uninhibited
and even upsetting
COUNSELING
Daniels is a Richmond, Va na-
tive. She studied English Literature
at the University of Virginia and
earned her M.F.A. in writing at Co-
lumbia University. She received the
Agnes Lynch Starrett Poetry Prize
for her first book of poems, The Whi te
Wave.
She iscurrently the poet in resi-
dence at the Duke Medical Center
and Wake Forest University.
Continued from page 7
ideal careers. At the end of the two-
hour program, the computer sug-
gests anywhere from two to five ca-
reers to investigate further.
The program also gives you in-
formationaboutthose careers. Ittells
you the preparation and training re-
quired, location, joboutlook,compe-
tition in the field,salary and whereto
find more information.
In addition to career counseling,
the center offers individual and group
counseling.
Individual counseling addresses
the student dealing with problems
or issues of a personal nature.
Groupcounselingcan assist vou
in liandling the pressures of college
and everyday life
The center offers manv work-
shops as well as therapy sessions.
Workshops titled Personal De-
vdopmentarKlCornmiinicatingto As-
sert Yourself allow opportunities to
assess your "life skills" and improve
self-esteem and assertiveness.
Support groups and therapy ses-
siemsconfrontissueslikeCiingWith
Loss, Survivors of Incestand Molesta-
tion, Eating Disorderstudents 25 and
Older and a Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual
group. The groupsprovideasafeenvi-
Rximenttooiceconcernsaboutthese
issues.
Other groups, such as Relation-
ships, Men's Issues and Women and
Self-Esteem, aid in helping you find
satisfaction in relationships with oth-
ers and yourself.
Ball explained that the workshops
and therapy sessions are "going well"
and thatstudentparticipation remains
high.
In the future, the center hopes to
add some additional staff members.
Tve been her since 1967 Ball said.
"Wehad five(staffmembers)thea
and we still have five. Our work has
gotten moredemanding, because there
are twice as many students
He also explains that although
many students admit not knowing
about the center, he finds that most
"find the service whenever they need
it"
TheStudentCounselingCenteris
located in 316 Wright Building. It is
open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
For more info, call 757-6661.
IN THE ARMY,
NURSES AREN'T JUST IN DEMAND.
THEY'RE IN COMMAND.
Any nurse who just wants a job can
find one But it you're a nur
ing student who wants to he in
command of your own career, conside
the Armv Nurse Corps You'll be treated as
a competent professional, given vour own
patients and responsibilities commensurate
with vour level of experience As
n Army officer, you'll command the
respet t vou deserve And with the added
benefits onlv the Armv can offer-a $5000
sinniny bonus, housing allowances and 4
weeks paid vacarion-vou'll be well in com-
mand of vour life Call 1800 USA ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
ATTIC
752-7303 I 209 E. 5th St
Every
Wednesday
The
CoMedY
2XNE
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
Live Music"
1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 � 1992
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
Thursday, February 25
BATTERSEA PARK &
GRAVITY'S PULL
Opened for Dillon Fence & Connells
99tf Highballs � 99tf 32 oz. Draft � 99l ADMISSION before 10:30pm � 99tf Memberships
Friday, February 26
Hootie & Tie Blowfish
$2.00 32 oz DRAFT
Saturday, February 27
INDECISION
$2.00 32 oz DRAFT
Appearing Wednesday, -March 17
THE WORLDS MOST POWERFUL HYPNOTIST
MIKEMESMER 'EYES'
St. Patrick's Day Comedy Concert
TICKETS ON SALE NOW
TICKFTS AVAILABLE AT ATTIC ONLY
T
GIFTI SHOP
m
Sunday, March 21
"I LOVE YOU PERIOD"
DAN BAIRD
Harris teeter
mm ioiv prices
SAVE $2.00 PER POUND
21-25 COUNT
JUMBO
SHRIMP
99
PERDUE FRESH
GRADE "A"
TURKEY
BREAST
RED OR WHITE
GRAPEFRUIT
DIET COKE OR
COCA-COLA
2 LITER
HARRIS TEETER LOW PRICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY
FROZEN mmwMMk
JENO'S TO
PIZZA7.6-8.10Z. W
HT SLICED AAA
cooked n99
HAMI60Z. Jk
6.5 OZ. SUN CHIPS OR am ff
FRITO LAY f 09
CHEETOS zoz I
FL0RIDAG01D REGULAR OR OLD FASHIONED m� m A
CARTON f39
ORANGE JUICE 64 oz I
REGISTER TO WIN IN
HARRIS TEETER'S
FLY WITH THE
HORNETS
SWEEPSTAKES
You Could Win One Of These Fabulous
Prizes. See Details And Register At The
Coke Display In Your Harris Teeter.
� One Of Ten Trips For Two To Orlando
Florida For The Game With Orlando
Magic, Includes Air Fare On U.S. Air
Accommodations And Game Tickets.
� One Of Ten Trips For Two To Charlotte,
N.C. For A Hornets Home Game. Includes
Game Tickets & Hotel Accommodations.
� One Month Of Free MCI Long Distance Air
Service. Call 1-800-274-7070 For More Details
On How To Win.
� One Pair Of Homers Tickets Will Be Given Away
In Each Harris Teeter For MarchApril Games.
Find Details And Register At The Coke
Display In Your Nearby Harris Teeter.
VALUABLE COUPON
WHEN PURCHASED WITH THIS COUPON j
Buy One 20 Oz. Box Of Kellogg s Just
Right Fruit & Nut And Get One 15.7 f
Oz. Box Of Just Right Nuggets For 1
3929
lust g RitjlH
lust a Ritfht

pon May Not Be Reproducers ur
Per Purchase With A10 00 Mn
This Co.
Coupon
Purchase Ottet Goo. I Fob)
March 2.1993
COUPON VALUf
S2 90
.r �if
imuin
Harris feeler
VALUABLE COUPON
WHEN PURCHASED WITH THIS COUPON
Buy One 1 Ct. Pkg. Of G.E. 3-Way
(50100-150 Watt) Soft White Light
Bulb And Get A Second Pkg. For K
5O-1OO-I50
50-100-150
2435
This Coupon May Not Be Reproduced Limit One
Coupon Pet Puichose With A10 00 Minimum
Purchase OHet Good February 24, thru
March 2.1 993
COUPON VALUE
$1 98
PIU 3004
NFS GROCERY
Harris feeler
VALUABLE COUPON
WHtN PURCHASED WITH THIS COUPON
Buy One 5 Oz. Bag Of Marie
Calender's Croutons And Get A
Second Bag For 1
This Coupon Mo Not Be Reproduced Limit One
Coupon Pei Pu'cnase With A $10 00 Minimum
Purchase OHet Good February 24 thru
Monh2 1993
COUPON VALUF
$1 9B
PLU 3005
PRODUCE
Harris feeler
Prices Effective Through March 2, 1993
Prices in The Ad Effective Wednesday, February 24 Through Tuesday, March 2, 1993. In Greenville Store Only.
We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.
I �
mmmmmmmmm





MNMI
� IM
Guardian
GARRISON'S -BASE OF
OPERATioisi:SoME�JHERE
IH THEQUAgANmEDad:
by Jeff Grubbs
Rich's Nuthouse
LOKP, WUOAMXt WKEW r lock mroA miredr. ALU X SeC l$AM gwfty a-ieu-L
M





The East Carolinian
February 25, 1993
Sports
Page 11
Beck 'born to play baseball'
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Few people are bom with the under-
standing of what they want todo with their
lives.
Unlike most of us, they haveno trouble
figuring out which path to take, or what
preparations they need to make for their
future. They seem to have the ability to
direct their existence, an enviable position
to anyone searching for the meaning of
their own lives.
Such is the case for Pirate pitching star
Johnny Beck. In his third season at East
Carolina,hewillstartforthesecond straight
year. In his freshman and sophomore sea-
sons, Beck exploded onto the Pirate team
earning the best record on the pitching
staff.
Beck is described in media notes as "a
hard-nosed player whocan withstand pres-
sure Beck, an extremely aggressive
pitcher, said that he believes some people
mistake his game personality with that of
his everyday life.
"I ju st want everyone to know that I'm
not as mean as I am on the mound Beck
said. "I'm reallv a nice guv. I have a great
sense of humor and I love to be around
people. I think people only see the guy on
themound sometimes,and I'mnot always
like that
A conversation with Beck makes it
apparent just how consumed he is with
baseball. The game seems to be more than
a sport to him. When talking about base-
ball, he smiles often and his eyes brighten.
Beck said he has harbored this obsession
with the game since an early age.
"I've known I wanted to play baseball
since I was big enough to hold up the glove
without it dragging the ground
Beck, wearing a cap embroidered with
the logo for Major League Baseball, said he
is excited about the prospects of a profes-
sional career,a career thatmay start as soon
as this season ends. Beck said he has al-
ready talked to his mother about him pos-
sibly leaving ECU to turn pro after this
year, and said she would support his deci-
sion.
"She's 100 percentbehindmehe said.
"She knows this is my dream
Beck said his late father, who passed
Women's soccer team
rolls past UNC-Charlotte
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Women's Soccer
teamcontinued theirwinning waysSun-
day at the Intercollegiate Soccer field by
trouncing UNC-C 6-0.
The Pirates started fast and strong
as freshman Kiki Anderson scored just 9
minutes into the game on an assist by
Amy Warren. Two minutes later, War-
ren assisted halfback Jennie Haines for a
2-0 lead. Then, with 25 minutes to go in
the first half, Anderson, a freshman,
scored again, with Warren assisting for
the third time. ECU continued to domi-
nate play, but was unable to put the ball
in the back of the net before halftime.
Just 3 minutes into the second half,
Jennie Haines scored her second goal of
the game off of an assist by Kerri Griffiths.
Griffiths assisted freshman, Jill Metzger
later for a 5-0 Pirate lead. With 30 min-
utes remaining, Griffiths scored, assisted
by Haines to finish the scoring for the
game. The 49ers never could get an
attack built due to stione defensive olav
by fullback Missy Cone, a sweeper Alison
Russell, in her first game at that position.
Forward Kristie Daly narrowly missed
a scoring opportunity as her shotended
up just wide of a diving UNC-C goal-
keeper.
The win came in the Pirate's first
outdoorgamefollowingtheir victory in
the Fiesta Indoor Tournament in Jack-
sonville. This Sunday, ECU will travel
to Chapel Hill to take on the Pioneers,
the team that ECU beat in the finals of
that indoor tournament. The Pirate's
season record stands at 8-2.
SPRING 1993 ECU WOMEN'S SOCCER
SCHEDULE
USX. Ea& Opponent
Hm� Place
Sat. Feb. 20 UNC-Chartotte 2:00 HOME
Sun. Feb. 28 Chapel Hill Pioneers 2:00 Away
SatSun. March 6-H SPRING BREAK
SatSun. March 20-21 Tournament
Raieish (To be played In the new Soccer
Dome)
Sat. March 27 UNC-W 2:00 Home
Sat. March 28 N.C. State 12:00 HOME
Sat. April 3 UNC-W 2:00 AWAY
Sun. April 4 Fayetteville 2:00 AWAY
SatSun. April 10-11 EASTER WEEKEND
Sun. April 18 Raieish Club 1:00 HOME
SatSun. April 24-25
LEAGUE TOURNAMENT
(Top 2 teams in each division play)
Spring training offers hope to
hopeless, chances for redemption
Flto Photo
Baseball is more than just a sport to ECU's left-handed pitching ace, Johnny Beck.
Baseball may, indeed, be in his blood.
away during spring break last year, would
have been proud of his baseball opportu-
nity, and believes that he still watches over
him while he plays.
"He's with me every time I step on the
mound
Beck lists Steve Carl ton, formerly of the
Philadelphia Phillies, as his favorite player
in the game, but in light of his potential
employment in any number of organiza-
tions, would not specify his favorite team.
Beck, shrewd in his use of diplomacy, said
"every team is my favorite team
If Beck remains at East Carolina for his
senior year, he is on the pace to be ECU's
career strikeout leader. Beck knows that
See BECK page 13
Laettner suspended
for missing practice
NEW YORK (AP)�Christian
Laettner, who didn't have permis-
sion to skip practice and attend an
awards dinner in North Carolina,
went anyway.
Minnesota coach Sidney Lowe,
whose chances of beating the New
York Knicks were especially slim
without his star rookie, suspended
him anyway.
Laettner is expected to be back
in uniform Wednesday night at
home against Seattle after sitting
out a 95-91 loss to the Knicks on
Tuesday night. He not only was
suspended without pay, but was
fined an undisclosed amount.
"Christian said he had an en-
gagement and I told him he wasn't
permitted to go Lowe said. "If I
hadn't suspended him, it would
have been an open invitation to any
player. It's a two-way street, and I
demand respect
Lowesaid thatLaettnerV'man-
agementteam" suggested he should
be in Norm Carolina rather than at
practice Monday in Morristown,
N.J.
At the time of the practice, he
was receiving the 1992 Carolinas'
college-amateur athlete award in
Charlotte. Last year, Laettner led
Duke to its second consecutive
NCAA championship.
"My advisors and agents told
me to go, so I did Laettner said.
"When I decided I couldn't make it.
I knew there would be some reper-
cussion, but I didn't expect a sus-
pension.
"I feel like I'm being treated
like a child, like I'm fill in high
school or college. I thought this was
the pros
Lowesaid thematterisoverfor
him.
"This is a dead issue now the
coach said.
"Hesuffered theconsequences
and now it's all over with. No
grudges are being held. He respects
what I did
The Timberwolves said
Laettner was at the team's
shootaround Tuesday morning at
Madison Square Garden, and he
was on the bench in street clothes
for the game against the Knicks.
Laettner averaged 17.8 points
and 8.2 rebounds while starting
Minnesota's first 47 games.
T,
op 25
Valvano honored in
Reynolds Coliseum
RALEIGH (AP) � Although
their rivalry heated up in the 1980s,
Dukecoach Mike Krzyzewski says
there was a part of his relation-
ship with North Carolina State's
Jim Valvano thatwas hidden from
fans and cameras.
"In intense competition, there
can still be just as intense a love or
respect for one another
Krzyzewski said. "We had that
while he was coaching, but it
wasn't seen and maybe we didn't
share it.
"Since he's been out of coach-
ing � not since he's been sick �
that's been able to be magnified
By beating the Wolfpack 91-
82 on Sunday, Krzyzewski was
able to even his record against the
Wolfpack at 15-15. Most of those
losses came at the hands of
Valvano.
Usually, Krzyzewski
wouldn't be on the cou rt prior to a
game. This time, with Valvano
back on his old home court for the
first time in three years, he had to
get a little look, at least to express
that once-hidden affection.
"Also, 1 didn't want to go up
to be a distraction, but I wanted to
see Jimmy behind the scenes
See VALVANO page 12
The Top 25 teams in The
Associated Press' college basket-
ball poll, with first-place votes in
parentheses, records through
Feb. 21, total points based on 25
points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-
place vote and previous rank-
ing:
Record Pts
Pvs
1. Indiana (63) 24-2
2. Kentucky (1)20-2
(AP) �Spring training is a special
time in baseball when there is hope for
all. It is a time to focus on the good
things that might happen in the future
and forget about what went wrong in
die past. For Tony Gwynn, whose
weight has been a topic at San Diego's
camp each spring, this is a time to talk
about other things.
"I don't usually say I am not going
to talk about something, but I am tell-
ing you guys now, it is the first day of
spring training and I'm not going to
talk about it the four-time NL batting
champion said Tuesday athisarrival in
Yuma, Ariz. "I have my reasons, and
they are personal reasons.
"Every year I come to camp, it's an
issue Gwynn said. "This weight issue
has really been getting on my nerves
My actions should speak for me. My job
is to play baseball and I am going to go
out and play baseball. That's it. Now get
off my back
Gwynn, planned as the Padres' lead-
off hitter this season, is listed at 215
pounds. He appears to have dropped
several pounds in the winter.
For Pittsburgh reliever Stan Belinda,
this is a time to drop memories from last
See TRAINING page 13
Clark underrated, does
not receive his due credit
Greenville native starring at home
3. UNC (1)
4. Arizona
5. Michigan
6. Horida St
7. Kansas
8. Vanderbilt
9. Duke
10. Cincinnati
11. Utah
22-3
19-2
21-4
21-6
21-4
21-4
20-5
20-3
21-3
1,620
1,509
1,457
1,423
1,401
1,240
1,222
12. Wake Forest 17-5
13. UNLV 17-3
14.SetonHall 20-6
15. Arkansas 17-6
16. Tulane 20-4
17. Purdue 15-6
18. Iowa 16-6
19.NewOrl. 20-2
20.Marquette 19-4
21. Mass 18-5
22. Virginia 16-6
23.Brig.Young21-5
24.Xavier,0. 18-3"
25. Pittsburgh 15-7
1,125 11
1,103
1,074
932
854
763
762
672
639
537
527
500
313
281
235
184
125
103
7
8
12
10
15
16
13
18
14
20
21
24
19
23
17
Others receiving votes:
Oklahoma St. 87, Illinois 83,
Georgia Tech 58, Oklahoma 55,
W. Kentucky 41, Louisville 28,
St. John's 20, Michigan St. 19,
Southern Meth. 19, Connecticut
18, UCLA 16, Boston College 14,
Memphis St. 13, Rhode Island
10, New Mexico 7, Nebraska 6,
George Washington 5, LSU 4,
Rice 4, Houston 3, New Mexico
St. 3, Ball St. 2, Iowa St. 2, Miami,
Ohio 2, Old Dominion 2, Syra-
cuse 2, NE Louisiana 1.
By Inglis Davis
Staff Writer
Heath Clark, a graduate of
Rose High School and a member
of the East Carolina baseball
team, is an athlete who some-
times may not get the credit he
deserves.
Heath possesses the quick-
ness and good hands that make
him a great defensive player, ac-
cording to Head Coach Gary
Over ton.
Overton said, "Heath is an
underrated hitter who comes
through in clutch situations
His teammate Pat Watkins
said he feels that Heath is a vocal
leader who tries to make sure the
team is motivated.
Growing up in Greenville
with two brothers and five dogs,
Clark enjoys hunting and a vari-
ety of other sports. However,
baseball has always been his fa-
vorite.
He started playing at the age
of five and eventually knew that
he wanted to come to East Caro-
lina and play baseball.
Because baseball is such a
big part of Clark's life, he has
many memories of the game.
Clark recalls his most em-
barrassing moment. "I was steal-
ing third, there were two outs
and a left handed batter up. I was
thrown out he said.
Clark felt he was safe and
told the umpire. To Clark's em-
barrassment the umpire told him
he may have been safe but it was
a stupid play.
Even though this was not a
good play, Clark usually makes
good decisions.
Although a professional
baseball career may be in his fu-
ture, Clark realizes the impor-
tance of a good , ,
Heath is an
or playing baseball he likes to go
out with friends and watch a few
education
He plans to
graduate next
year with a de-
gree in market-
ing and possibly
go on to get his
masters.
With an edu-
cation there are
many possibili-
ties for Clark.
Working in the
family's con-
tracting business seems likely.
When Clark is not studying
underrated
hitter who
comes through
in clutch
situations
Gary Overton,
Head coach
movies.
Clark said,
"My favorite
movie is Rambo,
becauseoftheat-
titude he
(Sylvester
Stallone) has
Clark has
not had prob-
lems maintain-
ing a tough
mental attitude
on the baseball
diamond, and
that has made
all the difference.
m
I
ECU second baseman Heath Clark is an underrated hitter packs a
punch in his bat and has hands soft enough to catch bullets in his glove.





12 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 25, 1993
VALVANO
continued from page 11
Krzyzewski said. "So I was able to most as if he was on one of his
In intense
competition,
there can still
be just as
intense a love
or respect for
one another, "
Mike Krzyzewski
talk to him and Pam.
"It makes you cry, not sad. I
hugged him he said. "I felt hon-
ored that the Duke game was the
game they did this
Krzyzewski also had to pit his
sentimental side against his coach-
ing instinct.
"I wanted to be here for the cer-
emony, but I didn't want them to
have that for their team he said.
"I've thought a lot about Jimmy
A lot of memories were re-
kindled and a lot
of feelings
touched Sunday
when N.C. State
celebrated the
10th anniversary
of its 1983 NCAA
basketball cham-
pionship. There
was the replay
over the public
address system of
the final 44 sec-
ondsofthebroad-
cast of the contest
with Houston.
There also
was the introduction of that 1983
team, as well as word that center
Cozell McQueen sent 83 roses from
overseas. But they were the warm-
up act.
Valvano came into a packed
Reynolds Coliseum; fans had arrived
well in advance of the tip-off of the
Duke-N.C. State contest. In his early
days, he would have had that swag-
gering style followed by a casual
stroll over to the opposing team's
bench. This Sunday, Valvano was
reduced to slow and short steps, a
result of the cancer which was dis-
covered last spring.
The disease has sapped him of
his strength and weight, although
Valvano showed the crowd that his
self-described tough hair has with-
stood his recent treatments. Heaiso
showed the crowd that neither his
enthusiasm nor his sense of hu-
mor have waned as he referred to
newspaper quotes that basically
described the Wolfpack's chances
of winning the 1983 title as slnn
"I remember my favorite quote
was that 'trees would tap dance,
elephants would drive in the In-
dianapolis 500 and Orson Welles
would skip breakfast, lunch and
dinner before N.C. State figured
out a way to win the NCAA tour-
nament Valvano said, his voice
sounding strong and belying the
advancing illness.
"This has taught me that
elephants are going to be driving
in the Indianapolis 500 he said.
"It's taught me there's hope
The longer he spoke, the stron-
ger his voice became. It was al-
motivational talks that he
worked around his basketball
duties in Raleigh. Adrenaline ap-
peared to have taken over, and
Valvano was working a crowd
trying to fight back the tears.
And at the center of it all was the
1983 title.
"They taught me what love
means, when you have a goal,
when you have a dream and
when you have a belief, and you
throw in that concept of never
stop believing and
loving each other
he said. "You can ac-
complish miracles
Then Valvano
talked about his can-
cer, how it's pre-
vented him from
walking well or
standing for long pe-
riods. It had also led
to rumors as to
whether he would be
able toattend the cel-
ebration. He not only
made the partv, but
he stayed and took
his seat alongside play-by-play
man Brent Musburger for the na-
tional telecast.
"I can't run over and veil at
the referee like I'd like to he
said. "I can't do the backflips I
like to do with our world-class
cheerleaders. I can't do those
things any more.
"What cancer cannot touch
is my mind, my heart and my
soul. Itcan't touch those things
Valvano said he has hope
that he can beat the cancer, faith
in God and his fellow man, and
love for the people who have
written to lend their support and
urge him not to give up.
As a spotlight shined on the
1983 national championship ban-
ner and 12,000 people remained
on their feet, Valvano was pre-
sented with a glass slipper, sym-
bolicofhisteam'sCinderella-type
march to the championship. Then
Valvano hummeo ihe Wolfpack
fight song for the second time,
awaiting the right moment to elicit
the crowd response of "Go State
"That's powerful he sa id. "I
missed that
Irish dismantled in Chapel Hill
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)
� Notre Dame has been dis-
mantled by the best teams in
college basketball this season.
Third-ranked North Caro-
lina took its turn rolling over
the Irish 85-56 on Tuesday
Tar Heels no longer leery of Notre Dame
night
Notre Dame coach John
MacLeod, whose team has also
lost to No. 1 Indiana, No.2 Ken-
tucky, No. 5 Michigan and No.
9 Duke, spent his brief post-
game talk with reportersshow-
ering accolades on the Tar
Heels.
"North Carolina isasgood
as any of those teams we have
played this year MacLeod
said. "They're right there �
they're in that group of six or
seven teams that have a chance
to win a national title.
"North Carolina is strong,
they're rangy, athletic and they dis-
rupt what you're trying to do
The Tar Heels (23-3) won their
sixth straight and avenged an 88-76
loss to the Irish last season at Madi-
son Square Garden. They
outrebounding Notre Dame 47-24.
"We were obviously leery of
them because last year they beat us
handily said North Carolina's
center Eric Montross, who scored
nine of his 19 points in the first 5:49
of the second half. "We were not
pleased with that so we wanted to
come out and play like Carolina
usually plays
Notre Dame(9-15)helditsown
formuchof the first half and trailed
by 13 at intermission.
But North Carolina outscored
the Irish 30-6 to start the second
period, holding Notre Dame with-
out a point for a span of 8:12.
"That's been a trademark of
thisteam thisyear MacLeod said.
Notre Dame, which had only
seven turnovers in the first half,
matched that total in the opening
six minutes of the second period,
helping North Carolina push the
!ead to 70-33 with 6:40 left.
"We didn't have to run much
of an offense because the ball was
getting inside on the f i rst or second
pass Montross said. "If it wasn't
there they could dribble right in
and score The fact of the matter
is that our offense didn't have to be
in top form butthatdoesn'tmean it
won't have to be the rest of the
season Brian Reese added 11
points, eight rebounds and four
assists for the Tar Heels, who placed
13 players in the scoring column.
Monty Williams led Notre
Dame, which shot 34.6 percent in
thesecondhalf,with20points. Ryan
Hoover added 12 points and broke
the Irish single-season mark for 3-
point attempts with 137.
. georges
hair designers
"Elegance in Hairstyling"
�-
SHJRT
SLOGAN
I
cK
georges hair designs
$5.00 OFF
I 10 Visit Tanning Package
L � � � � HP April15.1993 &
d " "geSqfes RaiTtlesigns � � H
$2.00 OFF
Men's Women's Haircuts
L. mm mm mm mf&U APril ,5- 1993
&o
THE PLAZA MALL
Greenville, Blvd.
Open Mon. - Sat. 9:30 am - 9pm
Sunday 1pm - 6pm
756-62W)
Autoclave Sterilization
New Needles Each Client
Fine & Bold Line
Custom Cover-ups
Sobriety Required
919-756-0600
STANTONSQUARE
On Stanionsburg Rd.
Open Mon. - Fit 10:00am - 8pm
Saturday 9pm - 6pm
757-0076
SP
Attention
Business Students!
Give us a T-shirt design & a slogan that will set us
apart from the rest of ECU. The ECU Student Store
will award a $100 gift certificate for the best
T-ShirtSweatshirt design. This contest is open
exclusively to you, the School of Business students.
For more details, come by the Professional Programs
office in Room 1200 of the General Classroom
Building. Deadline for entering is March 31,1993 so
don't delay!
lioT'ZrTT " Winning desiS" ,0 " 'OP fe fart.
i100 gift certificate from the ECU Student Store to firs, place winner.
� Winner will be featured in the next School of Business newsletter
' enToE'ln1 SSL '� � �' �
tf
CVUIU 1
-Jaiioo Skidt
Custom Jctttooing (kj a.viu
516A-Hwy264A
Greenville, NC
Trader Site's
Presents- Music To Play By
YOUR
SPRING
BREAK
HEADQUARTERS
THE PLAZA
355-6680
Nothing Is Beneath Us
LOWEST PRICES ON NAME BRAND CLOTHES
TGIF
Paddle Drums Available In 6 Si
lzes
NATURE RECORDINGS CDs &CWte.
Jot go,ng anywkcre for Spring Break?
- relaX �" t our Nature Recording take you away
R AINSTICKS ?nce smI hy the cyu-to���- �,
fe- Dl� K , n Ca" "Se " t0 "eate a S�" f�r '�"r �� sP-t
. Plaza Mall � Greenvilie. NC � 355-KATE
DOWNTOWN
210E. 5th Surei � 75.SS62
Open 10-6 Monday-Saturday
SPRING COMES EARLY AT TGIF
Super Savings on Select Spring Merchandise including:
�Save up to 50 on Men's & Women's Bathing Suits
�Linen Separates - 50 Off Our Price
�Select Group of Men's & Women's Shoes 30-50 Off
�Select Group of Men's & Women's Shorts 30 Off
SAVE 50 or More on Select Winter Merchandise





FEBRUARY 25, 1993
The East Carolinian
13
Hurley's No. 11 to
hang in rafters
,xr
gua
sej
,1
-
�tire
No.
i in
men
befi ire th
ome
plav
the Bruinon national telex ision,
The Herald-Sun of Durham re-
ported.
Hurie is second on
N A career assist list with 1,003
heading into tonight's game
against No. 6 Florida State in
Durham. He needs only 36 more
to break former N.C. State point
guard ChriC orchiani'srecord of
"he lersey City, N.J native
ha- led Duke to back-to-back
'C A A titles and holds the NCAA
lournament record with 129 as-
sists in IS garner
BECK
Congratulations to
sports writer Billy
Weaver for winning
third place in the
male strip contest
downtown.
Don't spend the
whole $25 in one
place.
Continued from page 11
wherever he may be plaving ball
next yeai
givethegaiTM I
when he finally leaves it.
"When m. . days are
over I -ti tvanttoh . mein
somecaparit) Becksaid I'dlove
to coach or manage or whatever,
but I -till want to be within base-
hall.
As I lead larj Overton
TRAINING
has barred theteam from thedown-
town area, beck and his peer- miss
an integral part of the E I experi-
ence, but the pitching -tar said he
doesn't mind that much. Beck -aid
h. mi�esdowntownecursions,but
understands his coach's thinking
and slid he feels the ban will help
the team's concentration.
hen beck talks about his fu-
ture a- a prote-sional he is quite
awareof his upbringingand his fam-
ily. Beck's brother, Larry, played at
Lenior Community College until a
knee injury ended his playing days,
and his sister plays soffball. Beck
said his late father is in the ASA fast-
pitch softball Hall of Fame and his
mother is also a fan of baseball, beck
slid that thi-environmentgiveshim
the right perspective on the game.
"It's within the blood Beck
-aid. "I was born to play baseball
Continued from page 11
Octo
fie; Hit, two
run -ingle to Franc cabn
the rinth inning that i illied At-
lanta pa-t the Pirate- in Came 7 oi
the NLplayoffs. Belinda's mailbox
did not bring a lot of encourage-
ment during the winter.
"I had a lot ii hate mail he
said. "But tin were judg-
ing mv whole C areer on one pitch.
They don't remember the situation
I was put in, the debatable calls.
There was a whole -leu of things
that went wrong that inning
"People say I must be awful to
give u p a hit to a guy off the bench
Belinda-aid at the Pirates'camp in
Bradenton. Fla -ortof felt like a
scapegoat all winter. But nobody
brought up the situation I came
into. I'm not a high-profile closer.
m not a miracle worker. But 1 tried
mv hardest I gave 100 percent
For Mark Davis, this is a time
to look ahead.
Davi-ha-onk -evensavesand
a 5.49 ERA since 19S9, when he
won the Cv Young Award with 44
-aves and a 1.85 ERA for the San
Diego Tad re
Davis, 32, is in camp with the
Atlanta Braves in West Talm Beach,
Fla He said he won't accept an
assignment to the minor leagues if
he can't make the roster.
"I'm coming out here toenjov
the situation he said. "Whatever
happens, happens. . 1 realize that
baseball i- going to end for me at
some point he said.
"I try to put all that out of my
mind, not think about it, because
when I do, I dwell on it inside he
said. "1 certainly don't apologize
for anything. It's not like I haven't
been going out there and trying
Will Clark also is looking
ahead, especially to playing with
newly acquired Barry Bonds. The
two stars were schedi. ed to work
out together for the first ti me today
at the San Francisco Giants' camp
in Scottsdale, Ariz.
"I've heard all winter how
Barry and I weren't going to get
along'Clarksaid I have nothing
against Barry. We will work to-
gether as well as anybody I've
worked with
If you have a room to
rent
wouldn't you like 12,000
people to know?
lake out an ad on the classifieds page of
The East Girolinian
HOM
(7IM
�75rrence
HEY RE BACK?
SALE NOW AT
TRACKS, RECORD
BAR ANP OTHER
PARTICIPATING
RECORD STORES IN
THECREENVILU
AND
RALEICH DURHAM
AREA.
BLOND
OY
MUSIC
CENTRAL
MW5
Greenville's Oldest Source for Books,
Magazines and Newspapers
Since 1969
3500 Maqazine Titles
(updated daily)
Bargain Books from
$2.98
Local & Out-of-Sate
Newspapers
Large Selection of
Trading Cards
Greeting Cards
1993 Calendars
Gift Certificates Available
ANY QUESTIONS?
CENTRAL BOOK & NEWS
Greenville Square Shopping Center
756-7W7
Mon-Sat 9:30am-9:30pm Sun 9am-9:30pm





i � - ir- il i a�
II ill" III I'll ill
111 1
a Celfcbrati
TridAy, February ZG
9:00 pm -1:00 am s
MendenhaU Student Center
if' for all
studeijt a, faculty, aijd staff.
Free Cajun Refreshments, Free mardhGras trinkets, Free Live N'awCins
Music, Free Movies, Free Biukards, BowCing, and Table Tennis, .
Tree Karaoke, Masquerade Batt, King Cake
The Official Mardi Gras Parade begins at 8:30 pm and includes:
Human Floats, clowns, jugglers, mimes, the Mardi Gras King & Queen in horse and carriage,
The Will Bridges Band, and more will travel through Central Campus to Mendenhall 'Bourbon Street7
FOLLOW THE PARADE TO MENDENHALL AS AUTHENTIC MARDI GRAS
MEMORABILIA WILL BE THROWN TO FOLLOWERS FROM PARADE PARTICIPANTS.
Masks required and available at the door. No One Under The Influence Wdl Be Admitted. Admission by valid ECU ID. One guest per person.
mmm-mmmm
i ii. �JB.iin.iP
PS





Title
The East Carolinian, February 25, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 25, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.926
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy