The East Carolinian, February 23, 1993






mum �� "
Sports
Homerun!
Pirates score five runs
in the eighth inning for
a come-from-behind
8-4 victory over UNC.
See page 9 for story.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 12
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday , February 23, 1993
10 Pages
Former DUbttc Safety Disability-for-a-day increases awareness
director brought to trial
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
The wiretapping scandal opens with
yet another chapter as former director of
Public Safety James
DePuy received an
indictment on Jan.
27 to appear in a
civil suit filed
against him by
Patricia Hair Bul-
lock, a secretary in
the ECU Depart-
ment of Public
Safety.
The lawsuit
claims that
Bullock's telephone
line was tapped un-
der the orders of
DePuy in or about
July of 1990. The
lawsuit states that
DePuy "intention-
ally procured an-
other person to use
or endeavor to use
an electronic, me-
chanical or other
device to intercept
wire or oral com-
munications
ThesuitaJso states that DePuy "acted
maliciously, willfully and with knowl-
edge that his acts were in violation of
law This falls under the realm of viola-
tions of the Omnibus Crime Control and
Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended by
theElectronicCommunication Actof 1986.
The Safe Streets Act states that "any
person who willfully intercepts any
wire or oral communication" is punish-
James DePuy
able by fine or imprisonment. The suit
was filed in the U.S. District Court, under
jurisdiction given to all district courts to
handle all civil actions.
Special deputy to the Attorney Gen-
eral Tom Zeiko will represent DePuy as
defense attorney.
Zeiko refused to
comment on the
case, but did say
that the Attorney
General's office
was representing
DePuy because the
alleged actions
were committed
during DePuy's
tenure as a state
employee.
"DePuy's
alleged acts oc-
curred in the scope
of his employ-
ment Zeiko said.
Herman
Gaskins, Bullock's
attorney, said the
suitwasfiled a little
less than two
weeks ago, and that
Zeiko had asked
for an extension to
file an answer for pleading.
"Zeiko asked for an extra 20 days
to file an answer Gaskins said. The 20-
day extension will run out on March 2,
1993. Zeiko added that he had not yet
filed this answer for pleading.
The suit has asked that DePuy pay
$100,000 in compensatory damages,
$250,000 in punitive damages and an
a wa rd of attorney's fees and other costs of
litigation.
By Joe Horst
Last week, People United to Support
the Handicapped (P.U.S.H.) sponsored
Disability Awareness Week. Events ranged
from information for better awareness of
disabilities and an obstacle course. The
week culminated in a day where various
faculty and students took on a disability
for a day to increase their own individual
awareness.
The biggest obstacle that these indi-
viduals faced was the inaccessibility of
some buildings to wheelchair-bound indi-
viduals.
Linda Loud, program director at the
Center for Health Services R&D, said that
the wheelchair helped her become more
aware of the situation.
"The disability certainly increased
my awareness of the difficulties of handi-
capped individuals Loud said.
Other individuals who participated
in the program agreed that taking on a
disability increased their awareness of
problems that handicapped individuals
face every day.
Christy Green, an assistant coordi-
nator in Clement Residence Hall, said that
her disability (loss of her dominant arm)
served as a frustrating experience.
"I couldn't wash my hair, so I
cheated Green said. "I had to be in Belk,
and I drive a stick, so I cheated. 1 was
frustrated
Susan Askew, who worksat Howard
House, said that she had to change her
disability from a wheelchair to ear plugs
because of the inaccessibility of her office.
"The building where 1 work is not
wheelchairaccessible Askew said. "Our
offices serve as an information center, that
led me to wonder what people with a
mobility disability would do
Currently, over half of the buildings
on campus are either partially accessible
P.U.S.H.
hopes for
increased
awareness
about
disabilities
byaskins
for
student
and
faculty
partidpation.
Photo by Biff Ransom
Anobaciecourse served as oneoftheactfvities students and faculty could participate
in during Disability Awareness-Week. �
or tota lly i naccessible to wheelchair bound
individuals. Classes that would normally
be held on the second floor are moved to
the first floor if a wheelchair bound person
is enrolled in them.
The university plans to further adapt
campus restrooms, ins tall more rampsand
curb cuts, install more elevators and elec-
tric doors and provide more van-acces-
sible parking spots.
One dominant issue that occurred in
the discussion was the desire that people
treat handicapped persons just like any
other person they would meet.
see PUSH page 4
Right on cue
- . . . . , Photo by Biff Ransom
Relaxing in the basement of Mendenhall, many students choose to play pool to relieve mid-
semester stress.
Students ignore consequences,
punishments of plagiarism
Enforcement of policies begins with faculty
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
Plagiarism is punishable
by lower grades, probation and
even suspension, but still stu-
dents ignore those conse-
quences.
The National Association
of Student Personnel Adminis-
trators, Inc. said that dealing
with academic integrity is a se-
rious issue on college campuses.
The NASPA pamphlet
states: "At the same time, it is a
problem which is receiving little
attention. These factors, taken
in combination, create a situa-
tion in which the message to
students is clear: "What's the
big deal?"
Polls indicate that there
may be as many as three-fourths
of the students on campuses to-
day have cheated in some way
during their academic careers.
"It is important to know
that our academic integrity
polio really begins with the fac-
ulty, or really before that if a
student observes somebody
cheating said Ronald Speier,
dean of students.
ECU interprets plagiarism
as "copying the language, struc-
ture, ideas andor thoughts of
another and adopting them as
one's original work" (SGA 26).
According to the ECU Stu-
dent Handbook, the faculty
member hasoriginal jurisdiction
in all suspected violations.
"If you write a term paper
and hand it in and a faculty
member reads it and suspects
that you have plagiarized that
work or that it is not your work
the faculty member has origi-
nal jurisdiction Speier said.
"We just had a case where
the teacher gives out two test
versions and the student's an-
swers were the same as the
student's next to him, but he
had a different test format
Speier said.
"The teacher called him to
see PLAGIARISM page 4
SGA officially opposes tuition increase after several delays
By Jennifer Wardrep
Staff Writer
After three weeks of debate and two
revisions, the SGA passed a resolution in
opposition of a proposed tuition increase
for state schools, including ECU.
Troy Dreyfus, SG A chief of staff and
chair of the Student Welfare Committee,
originally proposed an anti-tuition hike
resolution at the Feb. 8 and Feb. 15 meet-
ings. The legislature voted to table the
resolution pending further research.
"I'm glad it was tabled and dis-
cussed because it has evolved into
this Dreyfussaid. "I feel it makesa bold
statement and stands for the majority
opinion of the students
The SGA passed the resolution Mon-
day despite controversy over a proposed
amendment regarding graduate students'
tuition.
The resolution states, "If an increase
does occur, it could force many students
out of the college market; and the stu-
dents of (ECU) feel the current tuition is
acceptable
The SGA proposed the resol u tion in
response to the North Carolina General
Assembly's consideration of a tuition in-
crease after the release of Government
Performance Audit Committee report.
The SGA resolution also states that
the General Assembly "has failed to pro-
vide sufficient funding for capital
projects" despite past tuition increases. It
also recommends that the Assembly "pass
the North Carolina Systems Capital Im-
provement Bond before entertaining any students up
proposed tuition increase Hadley also said he believes the
Mike Hadley, SGA member and resolution's reference to capital projects

graduate class presi-
dent, proposed an
amendment to the reso-
lution opposing a tu-
ition difference for un-
dergraduates and
graduate students. The
amendment was not
passed and Hadley ab-
stained from the vote on
the resolution.
"I think it really
misses thebont he said.
"Because in effect, what the Performance
(like Joyner library
funding) was too "wa-
tered down" and he
wasdisappointed with
the results in general.
"After three
weeks, I would have
hoped that we had a
better resolution he
said. "I don't think
(Dreyfus) incorporated
as many points of view
as possible. We should
try to include as many voices as we can,
If an increase does
occur, it could force
many students out
of the college mar-
ket; and the stu-
dents of (ECU) feel
the current tuition
is acceptable
Audit Committee has attempted to do is especially with something that affects so
divide the graduate and undergraduate many students
Dreyfus said he was not necessarily
against the amendment proposed by
Hadley and emphasized student concern.
"I compromised a great deal if you
look at the first version of the resolution
he said.
"I thought what we had without the
amendment was a quality resolution and
I was happy with it the way it was
Dreyfus said that although it may
not affect him personally, it could ad-
versely affect a lot of people. "It has my
name on it, but it's a student resolution
he said.
Hadley said he may bring up an-
other resolution for graduate students'
tuition, but he is wary. "I think a lot of
members just feel like we've dealt with it
and it's time to move on
J
. a





2 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 23, 1993
Grads develop more skin cancer
As if getting a college degree is not hard enough, now there is
evidence thatitsbenefits could be lethal. Malecollege graduates are2.6
times more likely to develop a type of deadly skin cancer known as
malignant melanoma than a male who never graduated high school,
according to a study by Dr. Peter Lee and Dr. Mark Silverman, both
formerly of the New York University School of Medicine. According
to the study, the more education received, the more melanoma they
suffered. Silverman noted that college-educated people with high
incomes tend to workindoors in offices and are not regularly exposed
to the sun, except on weekends. Intermittent sun exposure to un-
tanned skin can result in severe sunburn, which is a major risk factor
for melanoma.
Old Miss fraternity suspended
A University of Mississippi fraternity was suspended and its
members ordered to perform community service after a brawl in a
Virginia bar in which some fraternity members yelled racial slurs,
officials said.The Kappa Sigma members were in Charlottesville,Va
for an annual retreat when they got involved in a fight in a bar, Ole
Miss officials said. "Initial reports indicated that the violence which
occurred had been instigated by racial motivations on the part of Ole
MissStudentsauniversitystaternentsaidIhe90-rnember fraternity
is suspended until Aug. 1,1993, and the suspension includes banning
all group activities on or off campus. They must also present to Ole
Miss a program of fraternal education on multiculturalism, human
relations, personal development and values and scholarship.
Three more students die in gunfire
The president of Bethune-Cookman College called for stricter
gun control at a memorial service for three students who were shot to
death near campus, bringing to six the number of college men who
have been killed in violent encounters in the past year. Four men were
arrested in the killings of David Thomas, 23, of Daytona Beach,
Kenneth M. White, 19, of Oarkstan, Ga. and Henry Eaddy, 19, of
Sanford, Fla. A fourth student, Bernard Smith, of Daytona Beach, was
srwtmtheleg.Thomasattended Daytona Beach Community College
and planned to attend BCC, officials said. College administrators
want to close a busy street that fronts the school in an attempt to keep
trafficoutof the area. ADaytona Beach PoliceDepartmentspokesman
said four suspects have been charged with first-degree murder and
attempted first-degree murder. The four, who have admitted to the
shootings, told police they had mistaken the men for some others they
had been fighting with shortly before the shooting Feb. 12.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Cooperative Education aids
in student job searches
By Sharon Anderson
Staff Writer
Cooperative education is a
program designed to provide ca-
reer related jobs for students who
have a 2.0 grade point average.
Director Mary Cauley said,
"This program helps students get
experience that can extend out-
side of the classroom
The Cooperative Education
office is assigning jobs for the
summer and fall semesters now,
because they work one semester
ahead.
"The hardest thing Cauley
said, "is there are so many new
students and faculty coming and
going that it is-hard to let people
know that we are here She said
most students do not even know
what co-op is.
The co-op students now are
able to benefit from a new com-
puterized Job Opportunities
Bank System (JOBS). Any student
registered with co-op can receive
up-to-the-minute information on
job location, pay rate, specific
fields and minimum GPA re-
quirements.
Students interested in us-
ing the JOBS database will need
to obtain access privileges to find
out the proper user ID and pass-
word. They should requesta CMS
Usercode Application form at the
InputOutput window in the
main lobby of the Austin Build-
ing.
Once a student has identi-
fied the position, and has regis-
tered with the co-op office, a co-
ordinator provides the student
with job counseling and other in-
formation about the job.
The students are assigned a
co-op coordinator according to
your major. The coordinator aids
the transition between students
and perspective employers.
There are three types of co-
op work experiences. The alter-
nating plan the students work
full time during alternating se-
mesters. The student can also
use the parallel plan to work
local jobs while they are attend-
ing school. The third type is jobs
during the summer months.
The JOBS program is much
faster than the previous system.
The students used to receive
typewritten, hand distributed,
hard copies of job announce-
ment.
The present system also al-
lows immediate updating of all
computerized JOBS data, and
therefore, updates all co-op co-
ordinators' files at once.
These co-op positions may
be located locally, nationally, or
sometimes internationally. They
may be in the private or public
sector, including federal level
opportunities. The system can
also focus on individual areas.
Such as a students hometown or
dream location.
Students who are inter-
ested should attend one of the
two Co-op seminars given Mon-
day and Thursday each week.
CA4 -a 0a
Other students
interested with
Cooperative
Education may
contact the Co-op
office in suite 2300 of
the General
Classroom Building or
at 757-6979 for
further information.
The sood, the bad and the
ugly. They're all here at The
East Carolinian.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
The Lee Building 757-0003 Monday - Friday
Greenville NC 8:30-3:30
ngmgggmgmxg
STUDENT
APPRECIATION
DAY
TUESDAYS IN FEBRUARY at
SEAFOOD
626 S. Memorial Drive
Present your 1993 Student ID
Card and get:
YOUR CHOICE OF
ANY DINNER FOR ONLY
$029
Excluding platters & family packs.
Not valid with any other discounts.
Beverages and desserts not included.
innirirTTITTTMiTTTtmr
ifa
"fit
Friday
February 26
a 'Celebration of fun' for all
students, faculty, and staff.
Win authentic New Orleans Mardi Gras prizes when you get a
piece of the King Cafe or par-
Mardi Gras Minute
ticipate in FREE open recreation.
Get a souvenir Mardi Gras cup
with FREE Cajun Refreshments
throughout the night provided
by ARA ECU Campus Dining.
Dance, socialize, and mingle
along the Mardi Gras Parade route through campus. Enter the
Mardi Party at MSC "Bourbon Street" and let the fun begin!
A Bit ofN'awlins History
Mardi Gras is the last day of the carnival season and a traditional French cel-
ebration before Lent begins. There are several important Mardi Gras traditions
which include:
The King Cake - a breadlike, circular cake with a small plastic baby placed inside.
Whoever finds the baby will have good luck for a year.
Costumes - anything from a box of crayons to enormous headdresses of feathers.
Participants and human floats in the parade throw beads and doubloons at
onlookers.
Masquerade Ball - King, Queen, and court are presented and costumes judged.
All these traditions are a part of the "ECU Style" celebration!
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Steve Riley and The Mamou Playboys have
performed in the New Orleans Jazz, Heritage
Festival and many Cajun and Creole festivals. In
1991 they received five awards from the Cajun
French Music Association.
7:00-8:15 p.m.
College Hill
8:30 p.m.
College Hill
9:00 p.m.
9.00-12:00 mid.
MSC Recreation
9:00-10:30 p.m
MSC Multi-Purpose
9:00-12:00 mid.
MSC 244
9:30-11:00 p.m.
MSC Underground
10:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
10:30-11:00 p.m.
MSC Multi-Purpose
11:00-1:00 a.m.
MSC Multi-Purpose
1:00 a.m.
Human Float Judging
Crowning of Mardi Gras King & Queen
Parade Formation
Parade through campus to Mendenhall Student Center
Accompanied by The Will Bridges Band
Parade arrives at MSC "Bourbon Street and
Mardi Gras begins.
FREE open and challenge bowling.
FREE billiards and table tennis
Dance to ECU'S Panama Steel Drum Band
Karaoke contest - Sing and strut your stuff
for prizes
Listen to the music of Spiral.
FREE movie - "Birth of the Blues
starring Bing Crosby
Costume contest judging and awards
Mardi Gras Ball Dance to one of New Orleans'
finest bands - Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys
FESTIVITIES END
:
Masks required and available at the door. NO ONE UNDER THE INFLUENCE
WILL BE ADMITTED. Admission by valid ECU ID. One guest per person.





FEBRUARY 23, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
StateNews
Bank robber suspects tied to "White Power" group
(AP) � The head of a North
Carolina white supremacist group
saysone of the two men charged in
a Wilson bank holdup is a group
member, but he says the organiza-
tion wasn't involved.
Kurt Eugene Latimer, 27, the
Wendell resident charged with
robbing the bank, isadues-paying
member of the Confederate
Knights of America, said David
Mehus, the organization's North
Carolina grand dragon.
Investigators from five fed-
eral, state and local agencies spent
the week looking into the Feb. 9
incident, which led to a car chase
and a shootout in which two law
enforcement officers were injured
and civilians were caught in the
cross fire. A 71-year-old man was
kidnapped during the attempt and
forced to drive to Virginia after
the failed robbery attempt.
Mehus, grand dragon of the
CKA, said his group was not in-
volved in the robbery attempt.
"If they're looking for a con-
spiracy, they're not going to find
one said Mehus, 28, of
Fayetteville.
"As best as I can determine,
it was the action of two desperate
men
Last fall, Latimer and his
family appeared on an edition of
the Sally Jessy Raphael talk show
titled "I'm Discriminated Against
Because I'm in the Klan
Police found an assault rifle,
two grenade pins, ammunition
and stacks of white supremacist
materials in the car of Linwood
Paul Pittman, 20, a Zebulon man
who police say was the getaway
driver.
Latimer and Pittman each
have been charged with one count
of robbery with a dangerous
weapon and are being held in lieu
of $1 million bond in the Wilson
County Jail, The News & Observer
of Raleigh reported Sunday.
The National Socialist Front,
a white supremacist group based
in Fayetteville, offered support to
Latimer and Pittman on its White
Power Hotline last week. "This
message is dedicated to Kurt and
Paul the recording began.
In a solemn voice, the speaker
continued: "The actions of our com-
rades in Wilson were not part of a
conspiracy nor an organizational
undertaking They were the acts of
despera te men who had al 1 aven ues
closed off to them because of their
political beliefs. They had loved
ones, children, families. But they
found that if they let their hearts
guide them, their conscience move
them, they were marked
The National Socialist Front
is a youth recruiting arm of the
Confederate Knights of America,
a Ku Klux Klan sect that report-
edly practices military-style
survivalist training, said J.T. Roy
of KIanwatch,an Alabama organi-
zation that monitors hate groups.
Mehus said he organized the
National Socialist Front to intro-
duce newcomers to the white-
power philosophy. "It's an educa-
tional group he said, taking re-
sponsibility for making the record-
ing.
TheCKA, based justnorth of
Charlotte, claims to have units in a
half dozen states. It isclosely affili-
ated with the SS of America, a
skinhead organization whose
young members embrace neo-Nazi
ideas, wear closely cropped hair
and often provide security at white
supremacist functions, Roy said.
Relatives and co-workers
. have no idea how Pittman met
Latimer, but Mehus, the CKA
grand dragon, specula ted thatthey
metatsomesortofwhitesuprema-
cist function � probably at one of
the many covered-dish suppers
organized by the Klan.
Latimer faithfully attended
CKA functions, Mehus said, and
Pittman was well known to people
in the movement, attendinga vari-
ety of white power events.
Sharing the same beliefs, they
would naturally seek each other
out, Mehus said. "When you're a
white-power activist, other people
don't understand
Episcopal Student Fellowship
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
401 E. 4th St.
(across 5th St. in front of Garrett Hall; walk down Holly St. to 4th St.)
You Are There!
LENTEN SCHEDULE
FEBRUARY 24: ASH WEDNESDAY
HOLY EUCHARIST & IMPOSITION OF ASHES
7:00 AM 10 AM 5:30 PM
Supper for college students and program follow 5:30 service each Wednesday
Sundays:
Wednesdays:
7:30 AM � 9:00 AM � 11:00 AM Holy Eucharist
5:30 PM Holy Eucharist
5:30 PM Students supper
7:00 PM Lenten program "Questions of Faith" continued
Campus Minister: Marty Gartman � 752-3482

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4 The East Carolinian
PLAGIARISM
FEBRUARY 23, 1993
her office and she decided to
givehim a zero on the test. Which
in effect had some impact on his
final grade
'The most a faculty mem-
ber can do is give the student a
failing grade in the course
Speier said the dean of stu-
dents keeps a record of plagia-
rism incidents in order to have a
reference base if a student is ever
PUSH
charged again with the crime.
Transcripts are considered
academic records and are sepa-
rate from the disciplinary
records in which a plagiarism
record is kept, he said. Students
must give written permission for
either record to be released.
"We just had a big case last
fall where eight or nine or 10
MBA students were accused of
Continued from page 1
Continued from page 1
cheating.
The faculty member called
them in, and then afterward dis-
missed the charges on some of
them because they really didn't
do it Speier said.
"So the faculty can dismiss
the charges or find it supported
on the bases of the evidence
given
When a student has previ-
ously committed plagiarism or
when the student and faculty
member cannot reach an agree-
ment the case may be taken to
the Academic Integrity Board.
If the evidence is sufficient
to support the charge, the board
may sustain the decision of the
faculty member, impose proba-
tion for a period not to exceed
one year, impose suspension or
expulsion from the university or
require a period of counseling.
Students also have an op-
portunity to appeal a charge if
they believe they have been un-
justly accused.
S ucce ss
Starts with a
Professional Resume.
Stop in today and see what we
can do for you.
Ill IIS MORGAN
���� � PRUMTERSTInc.
3001 S. Evans St
Greenville. NC 355-5588
"I wasencouraged by the fact
that people were anxious to help
me Loud said. "It's a lot easier to
deal with closed doors than it is to
deal with closed minds
The common sentiment was
that when persons encounter a
handicapped individual, they
should treat them as normal hu-
man beings, not special cases.
ALFREDO'S
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One student stressed that a
disability may occur to anybody
and mat awareness can help plan
for a future eventuality.
"It's nice to use the front door
and notgoaround the back, through
the kitchen, up the freight eleva-
tor he said. "How do you treat a
person with a disability? Like a
person
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Sun,Mon, Tues
RESIDENTNIGHT MANAGER
The Ronald McDonald House of Eastern North Carolina, located in Greenville
� fffklng a V1" in vital for thr position of ResidentNight Manager. This person
wUI live on the premises (2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment) and will have admiaistrative
responsibiliues as well as being responsible for night operations. This individual will work
from 5-8pm datly (be available by beeper from 8pm to Sam) as weU as two weekends per
month. The position will be opening mid-May.
Candidates should be excellent in dealing with people; be tactful and compas-
SKnate, yet able to be firm and take charge when necessary. Computer skills a plus
d a. J�?t?'ple"? Send ren,me mt leaa rf iDtere,0: ��" McDonald House
KffiiSa�&� ���� ��NC 27m D-dB M-93-NO
'Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub'
Adult
Entertainment
jf Center
MONDAYS
Football Sports Night
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
. , ki. WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE W Lm
THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS TTeOZH0l,
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
J
with this coupon
HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
-
�lto Birthdays, Bachelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Fatties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night � tZ coupm I
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
CehhJIs Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
I
i
L
Dlckln�on Ay.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N. C. I. D. Required
I fajl �
rVflBll
WHO COULDN'T
USE SOME
U.S. GRADE A WAMPLER L0NCACRE
Split
Chicken Breast
3
lb
99
C
RED RIPE
Florida
Strawberries
C OF THE SEASON
$ m99
quart
f
'IN THE DAIRY CASE CHILLED
Kroger
Orange Juice
$ m99
Gal.
f
PartyPizza
Original Crisp Crust
BttlKIkSKiiS
ASSORTED VARIETIES, FROZEN
Totino's
Party Pizza
.10.2-10.8 Oz.
99
C
"IN THE DELI-PASTRY SH0PPECUSTOMER CHOICE" RUSSER VA BBAlun
HAM, WAMPLER L0NCACRE TURKEY BREAST OR '
Doughties Deli
Roast Beef
$999
2
100 s
OF CASSETTES
s3.98-7.98
Enjoy
Coke
Trjrfemartt�
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE, DIET COKE, SPRITE OR
Coca Cola
Classic
smo9
2 Liter
f
1109 CHARLES ST.
OPEN TIL 11:00
SUNTHURS
OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
758-4251
�2RA?r,HL1993-THE KROGER CO.
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD SUNDAY FEB
21 THROUGH SATURDAY, FEB. 27. 1993 IN
GREENVILLE. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT
DEALERS QUANT,TIES- N0NE SOLD TO
WESTERN. MONEY
UNION! TRANSFER
The fastest way to
send money.
AVAILABLE AT ALL
KROGER STORES
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY- Each of these
advertised items is required to be readily avail-
able for sale in each Kroger Store, except as
specifically noted in this ad. If we do run out of
an advertised item, we will offer you your
choice of a comparable item, when available,
reflecting the same savings or a raincheck
which will entitle you to purchase the adver-
tised item at the advertised price within 30
days. Only one vendor coupon will be accept-
ed per item purchased.





February 23, 1993
�TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5

mmw-m ftoommBteVanted
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS.l and
2 bedroom apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchenappliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer hook-
ups. Call 752-8915.
STUDENTS: Don't wait for next se-
mester, do it now We have now over
a hundred apartments that will be avail-
able for May, June, July, and August.
Call 752-1375 Homelocators today for
your selection.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 2608 Tryon
Drive; 3 bedroom 1 bath; $550.00 p
m.404S.EastemStreet;3 bedroom 2
bath;$680.00pm. No pets. Lease and
Deposit Required. Duffus Realty, Inc.
Call 756-2675.
A 7TH STORY luxury suite hanging
over the whit sand and clear water of
South Florida's most beautiful beach.
Completely furnished, sleeps five in
unbelievable luxury; minutes from jai
Alai, airport, horses dogs, Ft. Lauder-
dale Beach, Miami Action. $800 for
Week36-313atHollywood Beach
Tower. Call (205) 948 - 7493.
APT. FOR RENT near ECU - Female
Roommate $140 1 2 util -Will accept
less rent, call (919) 779 - 6299 after 5 or
leave msg.
1BR APARTMENT on 13th St Great
for pets. esp. dogs. Available immedi-
ately. 3275 mo. Call 752-9197.
SUMMER SCHOOL APARTMENT
Cedar Ct. apts. May-July Fully fur-
nished 182.50mo. utilities 752-0085
FEMALEroommateneed May through
Aug to share 2 bdrm apt at Tar River.
$100.00 per mo 1 3 utilities. Call 752-
8000!
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.To
share 4 bdrm in Tar River. Bdrm pri-
vate w own fireplace $156.25 a mth
1 4 utilities. Call Lisa 758-4332
KINGS ARM APARTMENT for rent.
One bedroom. Available immediately.
No deposit required. $265mo. Call
collect (919) 269-7844. Ask for Yvonne.
RINGOLDTOWERS�srudioapart-
ment for rent. Available March 1. Rent
$295.00 Deposit $295.00 Call 830-1191
Please leave a message.
ROOMMATE NEEDEDSummerses-
sion furnished apartment Tobacco Rd.
321-1313 Leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed for 2
bedroom apartment in Wilson Acres.
No deposit required. 13 rent and utili-
ties 758606.
c�f
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY: 427 Wedgewood Arms
Apts. Tennis Court &c Swimming
Pool. Call Jaysen at (919) 321 -1760.
ROOMMATE NEEDED March 1st:
Must love animals, music and occa-
sional celebrating, male or female
$150 a month rent and 13 phone
and utilities. Call Stacy or Michele
752-3244.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED by
March 1st to share 3 bedroom apart-
ment in Wildwood Villas. 13 rent
and 1 3 utilities. Call Andy or Daren
at 752-8506.
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live con-
cert & studio recordings for sale. Over
lOOOnew titles available this week from
thefollowingartists: ROCK-U2,R�.M,
Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendrix, Black
Crowes,Springsteen,SRV,VanHalen,
Rush, Beatles, Doors, G-N-R, etc. AL-
TERNATrVE-Nirvana,PearlJam,Chili
Peppers, Cure, Depeche Mode, MORE
OTHERSINCLUDE-BobMarley,Ma-
donna, Prince,and more. Call 931-2573
to leave name, number, and requested
artist on message (all new CD's and
tapes in stock).
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,Trucks, Boats, 4-wheelers,
motorhomes,byFBI,IRS,DEA. Avail-
able your area now. Call 1-800-436-
4363ext.c-5999.
COMIC BOOKS for sale, various is-
suesof TheDeathandFuneralofSUPER-
MAN. Great Prices. 10-50 off cur-
rent price guides. All are first printings
and in mint condition. Call 758 - 5819
'or info Ask for Johnnie. Leave Mes-
sage.
20" TREK 820 mountain bike 200.00or
best offer 758 - 6639 ask for Nicole.
KITTY HAWK 100 watt ALL - TUBE
AMP: w Channel switching. Like
new, plays great $350 Marshall 4 x 12
1960 slanted cabinet. S350Peaveyl8"
Black Widow Bass Cabinet. Good con-
dition $125 Call Warren 321 - 2046.
FOR SALE: Soundesign stereo system
w rack. Hasopenclose storage cabi-
nets. Remote con trol. Ha s digi tal clock,
alarm timer, tape, equalizer, etc. Wood
finish. Great buy. $100.00 o.b.o. 830-
9442
FOR SALE: Loveseat and chair. Good
condition. $70758-8606
CAR STEREO FOR SALE: Pioneer
KEH-M7200 includes high security
detachable face, CD changer control,
RCA preamp outputs, supertuner QL
Will sell to best offer. For more infor-
mation call Oye at 321-0800 or 916-
2678.
tificate required! For International
Employment program, call the Inter-
national Employment Gioup:(206) 632-
1146ext.J5362.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Spa re full time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions, Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext.P-3712.
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hi ring enthusia stic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. North Beach Sailing, Inc. Box
8279,Duck,NC 27949.(919)261-6262.
WANTED TO BUY: Rolex and other
high grade watches. CASH PAID Cal
David at 756-9290 MonSat 10-6Leave
message after 6 p.m.
PARTY HOUSES - North Myrtle
Beach. Welcomegroupsof4-34people.
Group - Leader discounts. Call Byrtle
Beach Tours 9 - 4 pm (703) 250-2125.
FLORIDA SPRING BREAK: 7nights
beachfront$139-159Quad. Deadline
soon. Reserve rooms NOW! CallCMl
1-800-423-5264.
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS!
Party like Gods Panama City $139,
Key WestS269, Jamaica &Cancun from
$450. Quality accommodations, free
drink parties! Calljoe Endless Summer
1-800-234-7007.
6RAVES PR0FESSI0NJU. TYPING &
WOUPIOCESIIIGSEIVICE
'English Literature Major
'Editing & Tutoring Available
'Professionally Composed Resumes
'Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS RESEARCH
NEEDED. Looking for enthusiastic
people with strong cheering and in-
terpersonal skills to teach
cheerleading camps in NC & SC.
Great pay and flexible scheduling.
Up to 10 weeks possible! If you love
cheerleading, this is the summer job
for you! To apply, Call 1-800-280-
3223.
$429
$439
$159
SPRING BREAK '93!
LAST CHANCE TO SA VEU
JAMAICA
CANCUN
FLORIDA
V For The -owvst
) W Prices A 7 ft rfesf
F Trips. Call
SUN SPLASH TOURS
1-800-426-7710'
�pan this ad amp oer a ipfcui mmmmn

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all subjects
Order Catalog Today wilhAisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
In Call). (213) 477-8226
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11322 Idaho Ava. 1206-A, Los Angles CA 90025
SAVE on Spring Break '93! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas from S459 Florida
from !149! Organize group and travel
free! Contact Susan �931-7334 or call
Sun Splash Tour s today 1-800-426-
7710.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
- Make money teaching English
Abroad. Japan and Taiwan. Make
$2000 - S4000 per month. Many
provide room & board other benefits!
No previous training or teaching cer-
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home.
All Materials provided. SendSASEto
National Distributors PO Box 9643
Springfield, MO 65801. Immediate re-
sponse.
HATE YOUR BOSS? Hate working
weekend nights? Wanta change? Work
when you can and without someone
looking over your shoulder? Growing
mail co. is looking for a few self-moti-
vated reps, in this area. Will be able to
live and work anywhere this summer.
Call Cindy 752-6560.
SEEKING ACCOUNTING MAJOR
for part-time work in medical office,
primary responsibility will involve ac-
counts payable. 10 hours a week at
$5.00hour. For more information,
please call Vicky at 7584300.
ATTENTION FASHION MER-
CHANDISING MAJORSiCain valu-
able work experience in your field of
study.Brody'sisacceptingapplications
forSecretary to Buyer. Work with buy-
ers in tracking and replenishing inven-
tory levels. Computer experience
needed. Must be available 3 days by 12
p.m 15-20 hours per week. Apply
Brady's The Plaza, Monday - Wednes-
day, 1-4 p.m.
AQUATIC DIRECTORS & LIFE-
GUARDS Summer positions in
Greenville and Nags Head areas. Call
Bob, 756-1088.
THE CITY OF RALEIGH PARKS
AND RECREATION department is
seeking enthusiastic hardworking in-
dividuals for summer employment.
Positions include pool managers, life-
guard, park maintenance, camp coun-
selors, nature, athletic, arts and lake
personnel, and therapeutic programs.
EOE MFH Contact: 2401 Wade Av-
enue, Raleigh, NC 27602 Phone: (919)
831-6640.
TYPING SERVICES
Resumes. Term papers. Lettei
� Master Thesis or Presenta:ioa
Professionally printed on
"Laser Jet" Printer
Reasonable rates
� Same Day Service available
Call Jenette at 756-1341
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1,000
IN JUST ONE WEEKI
PLUS $1,000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
And a FREE
IGLOO COOLER
if you qualify. Call
1-800-932-0528, ext 65
FOUNO IN GENERAL CLASS-
ROOM BLDG. last November, ore
jacket. Call Dr. Ginn in the Psychology
Dej. t at 757-4101 and identify.
WAM AND LOVING FEMALE
wni ,ts to give health Caucasian baby a
cjse knit family and financial security.
Will help v th expenses. Call Collect
(804) 572 - 8403 or Write PO Box 655,
South Boston, V A 24592.
CARPOOLfrom andtoGoldsborofor
ECU classes on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days (8 a.m. to 2 p.m.) Phone 919-736-
9041 Dave.
HEY GRETCHEN, HEY SKIP, how
aboutanothergameofrummy?Cheers,
Beginner's Luck.
HCB Hey woman, this one is for yu!
I'm sorry about all the stuff going on
with me right now. Please bea: with
me. Thank you for all the advice and
support. Thank you for being my best
friend. I love ya. Spike.
REAGAN: Happy Birthday a little
early you ole codger! Cori
REAGAN: Just wanted to put my two
centsworth in too and say Happy Birth-
day! Mo
CONGRATULATIONS AnneHenry
on your engagement to Marc Wash-
ington! Love, your Delta Zeta sisters &
pledges.
PIKES: Congratulations on raising
5,500dollars for the Ronald McDonald
House on the Walk to Wilmington.
PI KAPPA ALPHA: Continue the
great success in Intramural Sports,
bring homeanotherChancellor'scup.
Pike's above all the rest.
THANK YOU SIGMA PI for a great
pre-downtown at The Fizz! We look
forward todoingsomethingwithyou
again soon! Love, Delta Zeta.
THANK YOU, all the strangers we
met on Valentine's weekend. The
stranger mixer was a great success &
an even better time! (Maybe we'll see
a few of you again) Love, Delta Zeta.
TO THE GENTLEMEN OF DELTA
CHLwehadablastatCorrigan'swith
you! Thank you for a great time! Love,
the sisters & pledges of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA wishes the best to our
pledges and their new big sisters! Look
forward to a semester of fun!
ALPHA OMICRONPI congratulates
all the sororities on a great basketball
ATTENTION ALL GREEKS and
friends who attended Cool Aid. Phi
Kappa Psi would like to thank you for
your support to help the community
shelters. It was a big success.
ALPHA O MICRON PI thanks Jen-
nifer Behr for a great job with Rush!
COME OUT TO MUG SHOTS Tues-
day, March 2 for Gamma Sigma
Sigma's first annual KaraokeContest!
Sing the night away starting at 10:00
pjTi Prizes awarded! Guaranteed fun
and laughter included! For more info
c all: Jenny 931-S279, or Michelle 758-
7546.
CONGRATULATIONS to the Alpha
Omicron Pi basketball team on their
undefeated season! Watch out play-
offs �here we come!
THESISTERSOFGAMMASIGMA
SIGMA would like to recognize the
new pledge s of the Delta pledge class:
Carter Lawrence-Pres Catherine
Hawley-V. Pres Stacy Sevio-Sec,
Joelle Sevio -Tres Jenna Fazio-Sister
Liason, Jackie Hinson-Historian, Su-
san Alford, Kimber Anthony , Julie
Brooks, Amanda Carver, Marcy Cole,
FrankieCollins,CarolineCowan,Kris
Gregory, Kim Hack, Misty Joyner,
Debbie Knittel, Marsha Mills, Mich-
elle Moore, Amanda Prescott, Chris-
tine Riffle, Courtney Smith, Becky
Tyson,Kara Webb.Bestof Luck Love,
The Sisters.
SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITY
Did you save any money last summer?
Earn $4,000-$5,000 this Summer!
3 Credit Hours
Contact VARSITY INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
1 -800-215-4000 Ext. 1576
Announcements
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
SHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study God's
word, be involved in social and ser-
vice projects? Need j refuge from
time to time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship -i.ybevvhat) larelooking
for. Ourweekl) Tieetingareat7p.m.
Wednesdays at out Campus House
located at200E. 8th St Directly across
Cotanche St. from Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Everyone is welcome.
For more inf orma tion, ca 11 Tim Turner,
Campus Minister, at 752- 7199.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS FOR FEBRUARY 16 - 22.
1993
Tues Feb. 16 � James
Weaver, harpsichord, Guest Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm, Free).
ThurFebl8�Nathan Williams,cla ri-
net,and guest artists Audrey Andrist,
piano and James Stern, violin (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 pm, Free). Fri Feb.
19 � Donny F. AH, Jr. horn, Senior
Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm
Free). Mon Feb. 22 � Brad Foley,
saxophone, A. Loiuse Toppin, so-
prano, and Paul Tardif, piano (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 pm. Free).
ECU CAMPUS MINISTRY
ASSOCIATION
A pancake supper to begin
the pre - Easter season of Lent. Lent is
a time of sacrifice and reflection to
prepare for Easter. All students are
invited to participate in a simple meal
andactof worship. February 23, Meth-
odistStudentCenter,501E.5thSt.5:15
pm A free - will offering is to be taken
up for the support of the Homeless
Shelter.
ASH WEDNESDAY SERVICES
The NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER wishes to an-
nounce special Ash Wednesday
Masses with the distribution of ashes:
12 noon in the Great Room of Men-
denhall Student Center and 5:30 p.m.
at the Newman Center, 953 E. 10th
Street at the foot of College Hill.
FCU FENCING CLUB
ECU Fencing Club will hold
orientation on Feb. 23 and Mar. 2 Tues
at 6:30 p.m. in Christenbury Cym.
Fencers at all levels are welcome or
contact 752-3052.
ENGLISH DEFTECU
Susan V. Smith, a graduate
Student in the English Department
who was working to complete her
thesis,died recently. A memorial fund
has been set up in her name. Anyone
wishing to contribute to the memorial
fund for Susan Smith may contact St.
Peter's Catholic Church (757 - 3259).
STUDYABROAD
Now is the time to apply for
the National or International Student
Exchange or for one of many study
abroad opportunities! If you are inter-
ested in paying ECU tuition and at-
tending one of 107 other universities
around the United States or one of
over40English speaking foreign loca-
tions, investigate the many opportu-
nities available to you through the
ECU exchange programs. The next
information session will beheld Tues
Feb. 23 at 3:30 p.m. in the International
Progra ms Off ice on 9th St. Check your
ECU Student Activity calendar for fu-
ture information sessions or call Ms.
Stephanie Evancho, 757-6769, for an
appointment. Pick up a brochure and
application form now!
NATIVE AMERICAN ORGANI-
ZATION
The East Carolina Native
AmericanOrganiza tion will have their
next meeting on Tues Feb. 23 from 7-
8 p.m. The meeting will be held in rm.
14 of Mendenhall Student Center.
SOCIAL WORKCRIMINAL
JUSTICE
Applicants fortheS.W.&C.J.
majors are reminded to attend an Ad-
missions group meeting in Ragsdale
218 on Mon Mar. 1 or Tues Mar. 2 at
5 p.m. Applicants must attend one of
these meetings!
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention Gamma Beta Phi
Members! There will be a general
meeting on Tuesday, Feb 23. at 5:00
pm in 244 Mendenhall. We look for-
ward to seeing you there!
Gamma Beta Phi National
Honor Society will be holding a gen-
eral information meeting for all those
interested in joining with a 3.0 GP A or
better. The meeting will be held on
Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 5:00 pm in 244
Mendenhall. If you have any ques-
tions or are unable to attend please
contact Ruthann Bass at 931 - 9274 or
Lisa King (after 5) at 756 - 7587.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
ASSOCIATION
Filing for executive elections be-
gins Thurs Feb. 25,1993. Must have
48 semester hou rs, 2 semesters a t ECU,
a 2.0 overall G.P.A and be in good
standing. Contact SGA office at 757-
4726for more info. Positionsavailable
include president,vice-president, trea-
surer, secretary. 510.00 filing fee.
1.EARNTOSW1M
The children's Lea m to S wim pro-
gram in the Water Safety Instructor's
Class will start Mar. 15th. For further
information, contact Melrose Moore,
Minges Coliseum 757-4632 or 4633.
PUSHTHROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work towards
reducing the architectural, as well as
the artitudinal barriers that student
with special needs are faced with ev-
ery day, then come to the next meeting
ofP.U.S.H.(PeopleUnitedtoSupport
the Handicapped). Meeting will be 5-
6 p.m. on Mondays in Cotten Hall
Announcements
Lobby. Come join the fun!
RFCREATIONA1. SERVICES
Climb on us! Rec. Services climb
tower will re-open on February 24th
forregulardrop-inhours. If youhave
climbing experience or have taken a
climbing workshop-come on out! For
more information, -all Brian at 757-
6387.
RFrRFATTONAT SERVICES
If you want moneyWe want an
audition! Rec. Services needs Mimes,
Clowns, Jugglers, Magicians, etc. fora
Mardi Gras Parade on Friday, Febru-
ary 26th. Follow the parade from
College Hill through Central Campus
to Mendenhall. -FREE prizes will be
thrown out to followers. For more
information call 757-6387.

25 wads or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each addit ional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Any organization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and evens open to the publ ic two
times freeof charge. Duetothelimited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may be
cancelled before 10 a.m. the day
prior to publication however, no
refunds will be given.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
1





la -���2K5J
77?e East Carolinian
February 23. 1993
TuesdayOpinion
Campus buildings
need greater
accessibility
Over half of buildings arc totally or
partially inaccessible to persons
confined to whc Hchairs
Disability awareness on the ECL campi is should press
on a lot more minds than it does now.
More than half of the buildings on cmpus are either
partially accessible to wheelchabound individuals or
completely inaccessible. Jarvisand i hming residence halls,
along with the entire College Hill, h e yet to open theii
doors to physically challer r persons. Though the list of
partially accessible building is greater than the totally
inaccessible, the administration should make this a prime
concern when talking of c?m; : ij provements.
Currently, roughly 15 buildings are partially acces-
sible to wheelchairs. These biiklinjs include Austin, Rawl,
Ragsdale, Whichard, Spi Ima � �, Flanagan, the Infirmary and
Minges Coliseum. The definition of partially accessible
means that the person will probably only be able to get to
the ground floor. Classes or appointments on the second,
third or higher floors will just have to be held elsewhere,
sorry.
Recently, People
United to Support
the Handicapped
(P.U.S.H.) held Dis-
ability Awareness
Week. This week
was designed to in-
form students and
faculty alike of the
problems that physi-
cally challenged
people face on a
daily basis. What
members of this group
ask for is not a person's pity or sympathy, but the respect
that one should have for every person, no matter what their
condition.
People tend to treat handicapped individuals as a
separate class of human beings, moaning that they can't
understand or believe how a person can live the way they
do. People with a disability, whether it be a wheelchair,
blindness or any other ailment, are exactly that � people.
They feel the same things that other people feel, live life the
same way other people do � don't make the mistake of
underestimating what a person can do with his or her m ind
if his or her body is impaired in some fashion.
Don't stare or turn your eyes away when you see a
handicapped individual. If you're that curious, go up to
them and talk them. But don't act like their life has been
taken away from them because they're physically im-
paired. "My God! What happened to you?" is nor the way
to go about handling the situation. Treat them as you
would anybody else. Just understand that they may have
additional needs and concerns.
All of this comes back to the accessibility of wheel-
chairs on this campus. Being confined to a wheelchair may
not be the only d isabili ty, but it does serve as a good starting
point to greater awareness. Next time you're out on cam-
pus, take a look at whether or not a person in a wheelchair
could be where you are. You may complain about having
to climb three flights of stairs to get to your class, but is it
really that big of an inconvenience? If so, then think again.
ECU needs to step up its improvements to accommo-
date the needs of physically challenged individuals. Small
steps have been taken, but it's just not enough. If people
took the time to become more aware of the people around
them, then maybe this campus can start to better the
equality of life inside its halls.
Opinion
Page 6
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, JV�w Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Billiard, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren S limner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Cop Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manage:
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. layout Manage
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed. Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reect letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Kditor. The East Carolinvw.
Publications Bldg j:d Greenville. NT , 27858-4353. For more infom.a
lion, call (919) 757-3G6
Printed on
TO
100 recycled
paper
By Amy E. Wirtz
Animal testing considered brutal, unnecessary
Animal rights activists are
having a tough time getting sup-
port these days and most people
opposed to the fuss simply aren't
being informed to the horrors that
lie behind what the media wants
you to know.
Millions of laboratory ani-
mals � mice, rats, dogs, cats,
monkeys�sacrifice their health,
and often their lives, in the name
of "science testing everything
from cleaners to cosmetics to
children's toys. Before it reaches
your supermarket shelves, most
"new" or "improved" products
go through a battery of tests to
make sure they are safe for hu-
mans. In the process, some 14
million animals die each year.
Over 50 million more are put
through some kind of testing, pos-
sibly resulting in the animals'
painful disfigurement.
Some tests are brutal. Cos-
metics companies are the worst.
Some unnecessary, cruel and un-
reli.il� ' tests used by cosmetics
companies include:
� Lethal Dose 50: a test
group of rodents is force-fed a
test substance until at least half of
the group dies. This test is now
being replaced by the supposedly
more humane Limited Dose Re-
sponse Test.
� Limited Dose Response
Test: toxicologists determine the
biggest dose a human is ever
likely to encounter. That single,
fixed dose is then administered
to rabbits and their responses are
monitored.
� The Draize Eye Irritancy
Test: conscious rabbits are re-
strained and the test substance is
dripped into their eyes. The dam-
age is measured over a period of
days. Apart from the extreme cru-
elty involved, this test is demon-
strably unreliable.
� Skin Irritation and Sensi-
tization Test: animals, usually
guinea pigs or rabbits, have fur
shaved or ripped off their backs,
a test substance is applied and
area is bandaged tightly Reac-
tions can include bleeding, in-
flammation and ulceration of the
skin.
There are effective, safe al-
ternatives to these tests. Many
companies against animal test-
ing choose ingredients with a long
history of safe human use and
raw materials that are microbio-
logically tested and subjected to
the latest analytical techniques in
research labs. The Neutral Red
Release Test is used for irritancy
and "Testskin" is human skin ac-
tually grown in the test tube. In
place of the Draize Test, laborato-
ries are using Eytex � a natural
protein culture test which can
predict eye irritation in humans.
So I challenge anyone who
believes that animal testing is hu-
mane and necessary. Even the
Food and Drug Administration,
who has ju risd iction over cosmet-
ics, has no set policy about ani-
mal testing in the cosmetics in-
dustry. In fact, what they do say
is often contradictory, allowing
both sides of the issue to claim
that the FDA is on their side. The
FDA has no authority to require
any animal testing, but instead
urges cosmetic manufacturers to
conduct appropriate safety tests.
"Urges" won't cut it.
More than 300 companies
currently make products that are
not tested on animals, according
to People for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals. Sorting larough
the hundreds of companies is
made easier with PETA's publi-
cation, Shopping Guide for Caring
Consumers. The publication in-
cludes lists of companies that
don't test on animals, what types
of products they carry,and where
the products are available. To or-
der, write to PETA, P.O. Box
42516, Washington, DC. 20015.
Maybe someday people will
wise up to what's happening right
under their noses. Jeremy
Bentham, an 18th Century phi-
losopher, was a man before his
time. He wrote: "The question is
not, can they reason? Nor, can
they talk? But, can they suffer?"
Food for thought, everyone.
QuotcofthcDay:
It is the mark of the cultured man that
he is aware of the fact that equality is an
ethical and not a biological principle.
Ashley Montague
Letters to the Editor
Racism considered 'allergy' to different people
To the Editor:
A white student said to
me just the other day, "Blacks
dotoomuch talkingaboutrac-
ism. That only breeds more
racism I can't even begin to
count the number of time I have
heard students of all ethnic
backgrounds say, "Race rela-
tions are improving. Why are
blacks always stirring up the
issue? Why are they always
bringing it up?"
Well, 1 have written to
say that racism is alive and
kicking, as evidenced by the
article "Student forced to leave
dorm room by Resident Edu-
cation which appeared in the
Feb. 11 issue of the newspaper.
Oh, yes. Racism is still
around. It just has more covert
and creative forms.
Marenda Taylor cited her
reason for not wanting to live
with Stacey Staton as being
"allergic to the chemicals in
black people's hair Does Tay-
lor believe that there is some
giant hole in the ground filled
with goo that is the base of all
"chemicals" used in the hairof
all blacks? How can anyone in
their right mind believe this
nonsense?
To think East Carolina is
cutting back on multicultural
education. With sick attitudes
like those of Taylor here on
campus, we need mandatory
multicultural curriculums in
all majors.
I was greatly angered by
the way thedepartment of resi-
dent education handled the
situation.
Taylor was allowed to
buy Staton out of the room.
As an African-American
woman, I was greatly of-
fended by this whole incident.
It makes no sense that "edu-
cated" people would accom-
modate Taylor's racially mo-
tivated, although original,
scheme to insure that she will
never have to share a room
with a black student.
I believe that Taylor is
"allergic" to people who are
different from her. Ideally, a
university would betheclinic
for her to learn to tolerate, if
not overcome, these "aller-
gies It is all quite sad.
Aslongasignorancelike
Taylor's is accommodated, a
change is going to be a long
time coming.
K. E. Jones
Sophomore
English
TEC congratulated for safer sex campaign
To the Editor:
Congratulations on your
recent four-part series on HIV
AIDS and safer sex. Your cover-
ageraised a few eyebrows. I hope
it raised a few questions for stu-
dents as well as faculty and sup-
port staff.
As a follow-up, I want to
suggest a few resources for any
of your readers who may have
additional questions.
Our Student Health Ser-
icesCenteroncampusprovides
twoexcellentbi vxrhureson HIV
AIDS. Both are candid on the
most common means of HIV
AIDS transmission in the United
States unprotected anal, oral
or vaginal sexual intercourse.
lite government's Gen-
tersfbrDistaseC Control operates
the national AIDS Hotline. It is
open 24 hours, is toll free and
provides education, information
and referrals. It is anonymous.
English language 1-800-342-
A1DS, Spanish 1-800-344-SIDA,
TTY-TDD1-800-243-7889.
TheCDC's National Sexu-
ally Transmitted Disease Hotline
isl-8(X)-227-8922.
Anyone can call these toll-
free numbers to receive written
info, to discuss exposure to HP
and to find test sites in their local
area Free, anonymous or confi-
dential HIV testing is available
through some counts' health de-
partments in North Carolina.
The CDC estimates that
over 1 million United Statesciti-
7ens are infected with HIV. A
person can be HIV infected an
average of eight to 11 years be-
fore they may develop AIDS.
According totheCDC,the
greatest increase of new AIDS
cases has been among women,
persons living in the South and
persons infected with HIV
through heterosexual contact.
Yourcoverageisaccurate.
Thisvirusdoesnotdiscriminate.
Persons can makechoicesabout
protecting themselves.
Persons who are infected
and test HIV positive can also
make choices about staying
healthier longer and not infect-
ing other persons.
Thanks, again, for raising
a few eyebrows and questions.
JeffDongvillo
Graduate
Social Work
A View from Above
By I Scott Batchelor
Greenville moves
onward, upward
on VIMP scale
Greenville is no doubt becoming a more
sophisticated city, as indicated by the increase in
VIMP, the Vice Index of Municipal Progress.
This index, created by my crack staff, measures
thechange in frequency of certain typesof activi-
ties considered by society to be criminal or just
plain in bad taste. The scores on the VIMP range
from 10 (Roper or Grifton) to 100 (New York or
Los Angeles).
Let's look at some of the indicators. Time
was, when a fellow (or lady) wanted to get a
tattoo, he or she had to drive all the way to
Jacksonville or Fayetteville to get one. Now
Greenville (how many "villes" are there in this
state?) hasits very own tattoo parlor. How do I
know this? It was advertised in a local paper
recently. The Emerald Citv moves up on the
VIMP scale.
Next, we have a category which includes
many different types of businesses and activi-
ties. Wecallitthet-factor,for"titiIlation When
I first heard from a few sexually frustrated friends
about the strip club just outside town, I couldn't
believethatanythinglikethiscouldhavestaving
poweraround Greenville. Thatwas twoorthree
years ago. Now, like the tattoo establishment,
the strip joint advertises in the newspaper. On-
ward and upward, eh?
Long before the issue of whether it was
legal (or proper) for women to dance virtually
naked in a bar and get paid for it, there was the
controversial question of pornographic video-
tapes. The question was, specifically, how close
to the television screen should one sit while
viewing Fleshdarwe or Driving Miss Daisy Crazy?
Serio' -sly, thequestion was whether these
X-rated movies should be legal to rent on video
tape. That question has been resolved in favor of
the video stores, and some of them (I have it on
good authority) have even started stocking X-
rated videos directed towards the homosexual
market.
Onward and upward.
Next among the VPMP categories is pros-
titution. Prostitution, for our purposes here, is
definedassexualacts performed inexchangefor
money and money alone. (Beer,liquor,dinnerat
Christinne's and rides in expensive sports cars
do not justify the money stipulation in our defi-
nition.) Unfortunately, my office staff (Fred and
Jeremy), has incompletedata, and hasinformed
me that more field research is needed. Addi-
tional information will be forthcoming.
The last VIMP category is truly a tragic
cTte.WecallittheApplerjee'ssyndrome,vvherein
a disgruntled individual enters a public place
(usually a business) and takes hostages, putting
innocent people in fear of their lives. Sometimes
this behavior involves bloodshed, other rimes
not. It always involves tenor for all concerned.
Greenvilleisn'taccustomedtohosringsuch
acts, so when they happen here, we are all the
more unsettled. Just last Friday, a gunman en-
tered a local drugstore and shot to death the
president of the chain, then killed himself.
The VIMP scale took a jump on that day,
bringing the figureuptoa whopping score of 40
using the Arbitrary Scale of Measurement for
Imaginative Columnists method. Greenville is
finally gaining respect as a viable munidpalitv.
Now all we need is legalized gambling
and a total mafioso to run it. Watch out, ega
here comes the Emerald City!
(Yiward and upward indeed.





-�
���- I.
�' �
The East Carolinian
February 23. 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
Pandean Players introduce
youth to chamber music
By John Patrus
Staff Writer
When most casual music listeners think
of chamber music, a long and restful sleep
comes to mind.
The Pandean Players, a five-instrument
ensemble, plan to change those feelings
through theirperformanceat Wright Audi-
torium Saturday at 2 p.m.
Based in Atlanta, Ga the ensemble has
been playing for 12 years. They consist of
flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn and
have presented more than 650 concerts on
the East Coast.
The Players have played die Lincoln
Center, the Beethoven Festival, Atlanta Arts
Festival, the '88 Governor's Awards in the
Arts, as well as many radio broadcasts. In
addition, they ha ve put on over 100 perfor-
mances in concert halls,community centers,
schools, parks and libraries throughout the
Southeast this season.
The Players' style gears upbeat music
toward children. As part of the Young Audi-
ence Performing Arts Series (YAPAS), the
Players will offer an alternative to typical
Saturday entertainment.
Because The Pandean Players gear their
show towards a younger audience, Lynn
Jobes of the University Unions Marketing
Department feels that this event is more for
non-traditional students and their children.
, � . Photo courtesy Stuart Secttor
The flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and horn entertain audiences everywhere when
The Pandean Players perform. They will be at Wright Auditorium Saturday.
"You can take your children to Aladdin
so many times, thisevent brings the familiar
classics into a fun-filled afternoon Jobes
said.
"We are aiming this concert at children
in the4thgrade and up Jobes said. "It's just
a fun, family-oriented event for parents and
grandparents to introduce their children to
the arts
Tickets are on sale now; $8 for ad ults, $6
for faculty and $5 for children and students.
Tickets at the door will be $8.
Famous voices make 'Homeward Bound' a classic
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Disney studios, known for its animated
nxaies,hascreatedawkierangeoflivection
fUmstimxighoutitsUlustrioushistory.Movies
like Million Dollar Duck, That Dam Cat and
Herbie the Love Bug are known for their corny
stories that appeal to children. There are also
those Disney films which appeal to the young
and old alike. They include films such as Old
Yeller and Mary Poppins.
Much to the delight of parents, Disney's
latest live-action film belongs in the latter cat-
egory. Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey
manages a broad appeal that any adult could
enjoy, with or without children.
Like Old Yeller, Homeward Bound is an
adaptationofabook. "Thelncredible Journey"
was written by Sheila Burnford. Many college
students remember this powerful tale from
their youth.
The story chronicles the exploits of three
pets who have been left at a ranch while their
family goesoutof town for several weeks. The
pets take it upon themselves to return to their
house to check if their family is in trouble.
The narrator of the film is Chance, an
English Bulldog, who has seen life from the
inside of a pound and knows how lucky he is
tohaveahome.Chanceeatsunder,vcar,shoes
and even a wedding cake. His narration, as
well as his antics, infuses the fil m with a warm
Photo courtesy Buena Visit Pictures
A remarkable adventure begins when three domesticated pets embark on a perilous
mission to find their masters in 'The Incredible Journey
humor that offsets the more sentimental por-
tions of the film.
JoiningChancecri his journey areShadow,
agolden retriever,andSassy,a Himalayancat.
Shadow is in his golden vears and serves
as the leader of the trio. He eventually teaches
the younger Chance about life as a dog.
Sassy isa feline whois used to thecomforts
iifhome.Complainingofbrokennailsandwet
fur, the journey is very bothersome to her.
The feline adds humor to the film by
bickering with Chance. The bantering usually
centers around the superiority of cats over
dogs. Sassy at one point is asked by Chance to
catch a fish�Chance has failed miserably in
his own attempts. Before agreeing to catch a
trout for the hapless canine. Sassy makes him
say that cats are better than dogs. "Cats rule
See CLASSIC page 8
Photo by Dietrich Maune
Brad Rice of Breed 13 will help carry the band all the way to the top. They performed
with Flat Sided Buffalo, The Essence, The Kill Kids, SLAM and Fountain of Youth.
Six bands benefit
REAL Crisis Center
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
On Thursday, Feb. 18, six bands and the
Atticpoured theirenergy and timetoasignifi-
cant cause. "Rock For REAL the annual
benefit for the REAL Crisis Center, offered
everything from door prizes to outstanding
musical variety for those who came out to
support the cause.
The REAL Crisis Center is a non-profit
organization that deals with crisis interven-
tion. The center helps through � hotline and
service to "walk-in" dients. The center deals
with such issuesassuicide,domestic violence,
personal problemsand drug abuse. Being the
only service of its kind in the state, the center
has served as a cornerstone in the Greenville
community for over 20 years. Perhaps the
most important asset of the center is that it
offers referrals to about 430 different agencies
such as Alcoholics Anonymous. Because the
center is a non-profit organization, the onlv
way to raise money is thmugh benefit shows
such as this tne.
This year's Attic benefit included perfor-
mances by Flat Sided Buffalo, The Essence,
The Kill Kids, Breed 13, Sex, Love & Money
and Fountain of Youth�all local bands. Thie
Atticopeneditsdoorsat7p.m. for the six-hour
eventin which thebandsperformed in respec-
tive order.
FlatSkiedBuffalocharged thestageabout
8 p.mand provided a good introduction to
thebenefitasmoreandmorepeoplefloatedin.
Flat Sided Buffalo is one of those bands that
would be perfect for a party because they
deliver nice pop hooks and seem to have a
great ti me trying tocatch and reel in thecrowdi
Their jingle-jangle sort of sound is"
complimented rjystrimgvrxalsandanoverall
not-so-serious funness.
The next band, The Essence
singlehandedly offered the best variety of the
night The Essence sound falls somewhere
between Rush, King Crimson and The Out-
laws. Their music was emotional and dy-
namic, making useof very neattransilionsand
crescendos. The band used their hour long set
to showcase all original material, engaging
i
See REAL page 8
' "3
Wwn Kcrficr
Welcome
back to
westerns:
Aggeler's
Confessions
portrays
the life of
Johnny
Ringo.
Confzteioni of Jjjnnmj Jinao
By Tammy Fedder
Staff Writer
Do you ever wonder where
all the good Westerns are hiding
�those with war, gunfights, out-
laws and gambling?
Maybe even a few women?
Look no further.
Confessions of Johnny Ringo,
by Geoff Aggeler, fits the descrip-
tion.
From San Antonio prior to
the Civil War to Arizona in the
IKHOs, the novel follows the ad-
ventures of John Ringold as he
becomes a wanted man on the
run.
John Ringold is an actual his-
torical figure that is shrouded in
mystery.
It is a known fact that he
rode with Greek and Roman clas-
sics in his saddle bags, was edu-
cated at William Jewell College in
Missouri, and was a school offi-
cial in Texas.
The most interesting is the
fact that he was a member of the
pOMC that drove Wyatt Earp out
By Geoff Aggeler
Published by E.P. Dutton
of Arizona.
Little else is known about
Johnny Ringo's life. He was
known by his friends as being
very loyal, recklessly courageous
and brutally savage when threat-
ened.
A man of contrasts, Johnny
Ringo was also known for his
chivalry towards women.
Confessions of Johnny Ringo is
not a biographical book, not a
factual account: it is a novel.
"Because everything about
Ringo is so mysterious, it may be
impossible to write a connected
biography wrote Aggeler in the
preface to the novel.
Confessions of Johnny Ringo
takes place in Ringo's memoirs
� he has secluded himself in the
mountamsof the ApacheCochise.
It is here that he writes down
his life of war and loss.
He contemplates his struggle
for knowledge and a just life
turned sour by fate. Ringo has
endured his father's suicide, un
requited love, the slaying of his
adopted father at the hands of
abolitionist ex-
tremists and his
own adventurous
struggles.
The novel cli-
maxes with a
showdown be-
tween Ringo and
Earp in the Ari-
zona Territory.
Aggeler has
written a fictional
account of
Ringo's life based on a small
amount of information.
Figures in the novel include
Quantrill and his Raiders (a Con-
federate guerilla group), the
Younger brothers and the infa-
mous Frank and Jesse James.
There is evidence that Ringo was
related to both the Youngers and
the lames Aggeler takes full ad-
vantage of this in Confessions of
lohnny Ringo.
In actual life Ringo was found
dead in 1KH2 with a gun in his
hand. Suicide was the apparent
cause of death � a single bullet in
his head.
Because everything
about Ringo is so
mysterious, it may be
impossible to to write a
connected biography
Geoff Aggeler
However, according to Josie
Marcus (Wyatt Earp's mistress),
Earp returned to Arizona for a
little payback.
Aggeler splendidly gives his
interpretation of this occurrence
by the novel's end.
If you like bang-bang, shoot-
em-up westerns and are looking
lor something besides the stan-
dard Louis L'amour, I recom-
mend GwirssioMs.
It is an adventurous story
about the outlaws of the Ameri-
can West of the late 1880s.
Confessions of lohnny Ringo is
worth the read.





:�'j !
8 The East Carolinian
CLASSIC
FEBRUARY 23. 1993
Continued from page 7
and dogs drix t Chance repeats.
The journey itself is incredible.
The three domesticated animals face
the wilds of the Sierra Mountains in
California to reach their home on the
other side. Along the way, they en-
counteraskunk,aporcupine,abear,a
mountain lion and a roaring waterfall.
They rescue a little girl,mountan
escapefroma pound and bravely cross
in front of trains at a multi-rail train
station.
One of the pleasant surprises of
the film is the filmmaker'sdeciskn to
endow the animals with famous
v( ta& The audience hears Chance's
voice as provided by Michael J. Fox.
Sally Field imbuesSassy with just
therightamount(rfam)gincetomake
her endearing without being obnox-
ious. Don Ameche lends his strong,
resonant and soothing voice to
Shadow.
The three actors provide the per-
fect complementtothequalities of the
animals. Fox usesall the energy hecan
muster to make Chance really seem
like hecan talk. Fox received help with
dog noises while Chance chews and
licks,givingChanceadistinctivelybra-
zen, yet heartwarming personality.
Homnmrd bound does have some
faults-Someoftheactionsequencesare
notasrealas they could be. The grizzly
bear scene sticks out as an example. As
the bear attacks die travelers, he rises
n hind legs and then does nothing
else. The animals run away and the
bear never seems menacing.
REAL
Homnmrd Bound should please
adults and children. This uplifting
tale of faith and perseverance plays
well toallages. The wealth ofhumor,
especially that of Fox, provides rea-
son enough to see the film.
Though Disney's cachet is with
animation, they haveproventhatthey
canstillmakequality live-action films.
Homeward Bound, destined to
becomea family dassic,isshowingat
Carolina East Tl teater on Greenville
Blvd.
Continued from page 7
bonussorigwritingartdthree-parthar-
mony.
Next up were Greenville super-
stars The Kill Kids. Members of the
local scene for quiteawhile,this band
issolid,aslongasattitudesdon'tgetin
thewayofttTeiramplifiers.Thecrowd
seemed to enjoy their set that was
comprised mainly erf songs off their
latest release, you know � the one
with the Diane Arbus cover.
Breed 13 then overpowered the
stage, performing shock therapy to a
crowd anxious to move. The grou p is
originally from Greensboro, and was
transplanted to Greenville to go to
school.Theband sounded and moved
like a roller coaster, nding through an
hour of "losiri your stomach Breed
13 is very tight and intense � they
obviously have been playing together
quite a while. They performed songs
from their latest tape, Saturated, that
was recorded at Reflection Studios
(the launching studio of REM). From
the Iroks of their performance, this
band is going nowhere but up. How
Brad (their lead singer) didn't lose a
body part is beyond me.
The next band in the series of
events was Sex, Love & Money, per-
haps the heaviest band in Greenville.
They share the intensity and influence
of bands such as Pantera. The best
quality of SLAM is their outstanding
musicianship. Eachmemberof theband
isa talented instrumentalistand plays
extremely tight together as a unit
The lieadliner erf the benefit was
Fountain of Youth. This band still re-
minds me of those big flower sticker
things that would keep you from fall-
ing down in the bathtub. Either you
know what I'm talking about or my
parents really did get way toofaroutin
the '70s. Anyway, the stickers are a
little different now, but the music is
almost thesame.Thisband provided
an hourof groove� preachingremi-
niscentof a '70sa.m. radiostatioa It's
toobadthatFatAlbertisnotontheair
anymore because FOY would make
theultimaternx)seband.lnthemiddle
of their set a new hip-hop group
called Brickhouse joined them
onstage to jam, providing more di-
versity.
In addition to hosting the
event, the Attic dona ted all proceeds
from the bar to the cause.
Hank's
Homemade Ice Cream
Specials
Sunday - Sundaes
10 OFF All Sundaes on Sundays
Tuesday - Two For One
Get Two Blend-Ins For The Price Of One
Wednesday - Waffles
Free Waffle Cone With Each Order
Specials are Good thru March
No Coupons Needed
NEED A HAND???
RENT-A-BROTHER
FEBRUARY
27th &. 28th
windows washed
yard raked
house painted
kids tutored
dog walked
car waxed
paper typed
room cleaned
etc, etc, etc
12 DAY � $20.00
ALL DAY � $30.00
For reservation andor information call 321-2577
Sponsored by PHI SIGMA PI National Honoi Fraternity
CUFF'S
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
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The East Carolinian
February 23, 1993
Sports
ECU comes back to beat Tar Heels 8-4
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
Frank Fedak delivered a two-out, two-
run singleinttedghth inning to breaka4-4 tie,
arelChrisWestfoUcrwedwimatwcvrunlxxner
to lift East Carolina (5-2) to an 84 win over
North Carolina (2-1) on Monday afternoon at
Harrington Field.
Fedak, who madean error in the top of the
eighth that led to two unearned UNC runs,
stroked a single just beyond the shortstop's
glove on a 3-2 pitch by UNC reliever Tom
Hawkins(0-1).
'It was a situation where I could really
make up for the two errors I had in the field
Fedak said. "That hit was big. It was really big
�for me, and for the team
West followed with his second home run
intwodays�adeepblastdown the rightfield
line to put the game away and finish the
scoring for the Pirates.
"He (Hawkins) came back with a curve
ball and just hung it inside, and I turned on it
West said. "I feltreallygood tonight. I justlove
the way the ball jumps out of here
ECU Head Coach Gary Overton said he
liked the intensity his team put forth tonight,
both when they had theleadand when they fell
behind in the eighth.
"Once we fell behind we were able to
come back and put a little charge into the bats
andscorewhenwehad toOvertonsaid. "We
could pretty much sense it in thed ugout that if

HP vs. ODU'� sisflill
ECU (60)
Min fgftrb
m-am-ao-tato tp
Lyons 31 6-111-21-101 16
Rjcharson 25 4-92-40-135 12
Hunter 15 1-40-01-4?0 3
Young 24 6-142-24-601 14
Peterson 25 3-90-00-201 7
Gill 23 2-60-01-510 4
Lewis 23 1-20-00-2?1 2
Copeland 34 1-50-01-721 2
Totals 20024-605-810-311010 60
- .400, Ft. 625,3 pt. Goals: 7-21
333, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots - 0,
Turnovers - 10, Steals - 5.
ODU(73)
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-tatotp 14
Sessoms304-92-20-313
Swann151-40-03-41n?
Larkin121-22-31-2?14
Harvey151-12-40-3104
Anderson283-72-20-13-8
Mullen346-93-42-51?16
Hodge314-92-22-90010
fff
-V
- " 4
Pirates
improve
record to
5-2 with
victory
over UNC

12-38 11 10 73
Totals 20026-5715-20
Percentages: FG - .456, Ft. 750,TjpTGoals: 6-16
�37d, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots - 6,
Turnovers - 10, Steals -3.
ECU
ODU
1st half
29
27
2nd half
31
46
OT
Final
60
73
wJP S
we went down, we were going down fight-
ing
TheTar Heelshad achancetowin itwhen
they scored two runs in the eighth off Chris
Madonna's two-out, bloop double for a 4-3
lead off ECU closer Stand! Morse. However,
Morse (1-0) did not allow another hit and
pitched one and one-third innings of relief for
thewin.
Pirate first baseman Lee Kushner went 2-
2 with a two-run homer in the third and
extended hishittingstreak to 14games,includ-
ing the last seven in 1992.
"We got behind in this game late, and
ECU defeated the
Tarheels of UNC-
Chapel Hill
Monday. The game
was originally
scheduled for
Friday but
cancelled due to
cold.
Fila Photo
instead of putting ourtail between our legs we
kicked it in a little bit and went right at 'em
Kushner said. "If we keep playing hard as a
team gcxxl things are going to happen to us
"Ihe Pirates will play their next game at
home on Friday against George Washington
at 3 p.m.
Hoopsters fall to Monarchs of ODU
By Billy Weaver
Staff Writer
When the Bud Light Daredevils per-
form at college basketball games, the home
team has won 95 percent of the games. EC U
fell into the five percent. In Minges Coli-
seum, Saturday, the Pirates fell to ODU 73-
60 in a hard fought battle. The final score
does not reflect thewaythegamewasplayed,
however. ECU came out playing solid de-
fense and matching up offensively with a
bigger and more physical ODU team.
Lester Lyons and freshman Kareem Ri-
chardson combined for 17 of ECU's 29 first
half points to lead the Monarchs 29-27 at
halftime. The Pirates came out of the locker
room after halftime and jumped out to a 36-
30 lead, ECU's biggest of the game.
However, the turning point of the game
camewirh8:37leftwhenODU'sKevin Larkin
was sent to the line to shoot a one-and-one.
Larkin'sfirstshotmissedand was rebounded
by teamate Keith Jackson who scored the
goal and was fouled to put ODU up 55-50.
ECU suddenly found themselves playing
catch-up basketball.
With 2:51 left, Ronnell Peterson sank a
three-pointer to pull the Pirates within three,
63-60. Unfortunately, that was the end of all
Pirate scoring. The Monarchs dominated
the offensive boards and scored 10 unan-
swered points to put the Pirates away 73-60.
ODU improves to an impressive 17-6
while the Pirates fall to a dismal 9-15. ECU
may see the Monarchs again in the first
round of the CAA tournament.
ECU lost to
the
Monarchs of
ODU in
Minges, 73-
60. The Bucs
may face
ODU in the
first round of
the CAA
championship.
Page 9

North Carolina
East Carolina
NORTH CAROLINA Holbrook, If'� r�ttM 4 0 0 1JpftJ.
Grunewald, M4 0 0 0
Schaalar, rf4 13 0
DaSllva, lb3 0 0 0
Cox. 2b4 2 11
Madonna, dh4 0 2 2'0 0
Jonas, c2 0 0 01 0
Boona, ph-o2 0 0 0
l awls, c0 0 0 00 1
Mamtt. d3 10 01 0
Hoch, 3b3 0 1 J0 0
Totals33 4 7 424 a
Batting � 2B:Hoch (1. off Sanbum): Ma.
donna (1, off Moraa) HR: Cox (1, off Sanbum) SH-
Hoch. SF: Holbrook.
Basarunnlng�CS: SehaafarM, second base
by CronanLayton; Taam LOB: 6.
CAST CAROLINAab r h blpo a
Boral, cf3 2 102 0
Fedak, ss4 112
Wast. 3b5 12 2
Kushnar, lb2 12 26 3
Pitt.dh2 0 0 00 0
Obholz, ph-dh2 0 0 00 0
Cronan, c4 2 10
Wallons, if3 12 01 0
Haad, If2 0 101 0
Clark, 2b4 0 0 02 7
Totals31 8 10 626 13
Batting � 2B: Cronan (1, off Maney) HR:
Kushner (1. off Maney); West (2. off Hawkins) SH:
Head
Baserunning � SB: Boral (4), Watkins (6)
CS: Watkins (1, second base by Maney). Boral (2.
second base by Maney). Team LOB: 10.
j?!jj�f�d�K 2. Cronan. DP: 1.
ACHING. lp h r ar'wTw
NORTH CAROUNAlIl
Maney 47-
Wissel o.7
Crismon t
MacMillanfL. 0-1) 07
Hawkins q 7
� 03
EAST CAROUNA lp
Sanbum 50
Layton 2.7
Morse (VV.jO)1.3
IBB: Kushnar HBPDaSiivaby Layton.CronanTy
MacMi'lan. ObhcJiby Hawkins WP: Maney Morse
Hawkins.
GAME DATA - T: 2S4. ft 2.534. Tamp: 71
UMPIRES-HP: WoodaB. IB: Stewart. 3B: Powell.
bb ao
0 5
Watkins helps
define student-
athlete image
By Dave Pond
Staff Writer
r?m jbsTi
l�.
,t
Pat Watkins
Photo by
Bill Ranson
Carrying a
powerful bat
and possess-
ing a cannon
for an arm,
junior right
fielder Pat
Watkins has
become a sig-
nificant piece
of the puzzle
known as the 1993 Pirate baseball
team. If all of the pieces fit together
correctly, the Pirates could easily be
rewarded with a CAA conference
championship and a berth in the
NCAA tournament. A three-year
starter, Watkins has found that with
hard work, excelling on the field is
as easy for him as is excelling in the
classroom.
Watkins was born in Raleigh,
N.C. to a highly athletic family. His
father, William, played college base-
ball at Louisburgand his sister Paige
is an excellent Softball player in high
school.
Par rame to East Carolina from
See WATKINS page 10
,
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
PIRATES CRUSH UNCC
WITH12-RUN OUTBURST
East Carolina sent nine batters
to the plate for a five-run first in-
ning, and johnny Beck struck out
nine batters in eight innings to lead
the Pirates (4-2) to a 12-2 win over
UNC-Charlotte (1-4) on Sunday,
Feb. 21, at Harrington Field.
Although Beck (2-1) gave up a
two-run homer to Kelly Skeens in
the top of the first, he managed to
settle down and allowed only four
more hits before being relieved by
Brandon Mohr to start the ninth.
"I thought Johnny Beck did a
fabulous job, especially after giving
up the two-run home run in the first
inning and then coming back and
pitching very smoothly the rest of
the way ECU Head Coach Gary
Overton said.
East Carolina answered
UNCC's home run with five runs of
their own in the bottom of the first,
as the Pirates singled four times and
Jason Head knocked a two-run
double before the '49ers recorded
their first out.
"For the guys to put up a five-
spot in the both m of the first for me,
that gave me a little more confi-
dence Beck said. "The onlv way I
was going to win the game was if 1 SPARTANS, 3-0 IN PIRATE WIN
showed them that I could stay in Lyle Hartgrovefaced the mini-
controlandthrowmygameandget mumnumberofbattersandalkwed
ahead with strikes only two hits as East Carolina de-
Jamie Borel led the Pirate of- feated UNC-Greensboro3-0on Sat-
fense with five hits and two steals, urday, Feb. 20, at Harrington Field
and third basemanChris West, who Hartgrove retired the first 12
did not start be
cause of an in-
jured ankle, hit a
pinch-hit, three-
run home run in
the seventh in-
ning to put the
game away.
Borel contin-
ues to spark the
Pirate offense
from the leadoff
spot with his run-
ning game as he
and Frank Fedak
pulled off an-
other successful hit-and-run play
against the '49ers.
"One of the keys to our offense
is Jamie getting on base Overton
said. "We've inserted hi mat the top
of the lineup (because) he's been
very productive in that role for us.
Herunsverywell,and Frank Fedak,
who hits behind him, can move the
ball around a little. (Jamie) is a cata-
lyst for our running game
HARTGROVE BLANKS
99
batters he
faced before a
leadoff single
by Tonka
Maynor to
start the fifth.
However,
Hartgrove
did not allow
a man to
reach second
base for
Greensboro
(2-1) as both
Maynor and
Da n
Schneider, who started the sixth
inning with a single, wereerased by
double-play ground balls.
The Pirates (3-2) also played
exceptional defense behind
Hartgrove that included a pair of
running grabs by left fielder Jason
Head and another by right fielder
Pat Watkins to help kept the Spar-
tans off the bases.
Today, we played exception-
ally well on defense ECU head
coach Gary C vert m said. "We vvoi
"One of the keys
to our offense is
Jamie (Borel)
getting on base
(Jamie) is a
catalyst for our
runninggame.
Coach Gary Overton
that game with pitching and de-
fense
Although the Pirates stranded
10 runners on base for the game,
they managed to score three times
in the 5th inning on a bases loaded
ground out by Lee Kushner and a
two-out, bloop single by Steven Pitt
that plated two more. That would
be all the runs Hartgrove needed.
"My slider was really helping
me Hartgrove said. "I had good
command of it ttxiay so it wasn't
like I had to kxrk in on my fastball. 1
was able to mix it up enough to
hopefully keep 'em a little off bal-
ance
The Pirates played their home
openerdespite early morningsnow
flurries that made for wet condi-
tions th rougho u t the ga me. The wet
field did not seem to bother the
ECU defense, which did not make
an error behind Hartgrove.
"The defense more or less won
this game for us today Hartgrove
said. "I didn't strike out but two
(batters) so the ball was being hit. It
was just being hit right at some-
body
EAST CAROLINA SUR-
VIVES SCARE AT CAMPBELL
BUIES CREEK, N.C. � Pat
Watkins homered twice, singled
and had three RBIs to propel East
games
Carolina to a 7-6 victory over
Campbell at Taylor Field on
Wednesday, Feb. 17.
At one point, the Pirates (2-2)
led 5-1, but the Camels (0-1) fought
back for three runs in the fourth and
two more in the eighth for a 6-6 tie.
Lee Kushner's infield hit off
Camel reliever Bob Wharton (0-1)
with two outs in the ninth brought
homejamie Borel with whatproved
to be the winning run.
Borel, who led off the inning
with a walk, moved to third on
successive ground outs by Frank
Fedak and Chad Triplert before
Kushner's dribbler by the pitcher.
Johnny Beck (1-1) worked one and
two-third innings off relief for the
win. Wi th one out in the ninth, Beck
picked off CU pinch-runner Ryan
Crandell � the potential tying run
� with a snap throw to first base.
Borel hi t two singles and scored
twice, and third baseman Chris
West, who left the game with an
injured ankle, had a pair of RBIs
with a second-inning single.
Pirate pitchers allowed 12
Camel hits but only three earned
runs as the defense committed five
errors on the day. "We made some
mistakes defensively today, but
we're happy to get out of here with
the win ECU Head Coach Gary
Overton said.
ECU (66)
Min
Feb. 18,1993
fg ft rb
m-am-a o-ta pf tp
Lyons 30 7-11 2-4 2-54 1 17
Richardson 30 3-62-2 0-33 1 8
Hunter 17 2-50-0 0-10 1 4
Young 23 3-73-5 2-51 1 9
Long 2 1-20-0 0-00 0 3
Peterson 18 4-60-0 0-23 1 9
Gill 18 1-10-0 0-10 1 3
Armstrong 12 0-01-2 0-000 1
Toliver 3 0-00-0 0-00 0 0
Lewis 19 2-31-1 1-32 0 5
Copeland 28 2-33-7 1-71 3 7
Totals 200 25-44 12-21 7-31 14 9 66
Percentages: FG - .568, Ft. 571, 3 pt GoaLs:
4-9 - .444, Team Rebounds - 4, Blocked
Shots - 6, Turnovers -15, Steals - 7.
Virginia Tech(49)
Minfgft rb
m-am-a o-ta pf tp
J.Jackson 23 2-80-0 2-40 4 5
C Jackson 26 5-81-2 2-41 2 12
Purcell 33 2-80-0 1-4 1 4
Good 16 2-30-0 1-22 2 4
Watlington222-60-0 1-21 3 5
Davis 3 1-10-0 0-10 0 3
Hall 12 2-50-0 0-21 0 5
Jackson 29 2-81-2 040 2 6
Corker 11 1-20-0 0-12 1 3
Smith 23 1-80-0 3-30 0 2
Zaracnek 2 0-00-0 1-11 1 0
Totals 200 20-57 2-4 13-3012 16 49
Percentages: FC - .351, Ft 500,3 pt Gods
7-22 - 31S, Team Rebounds - 2,Blocked
Shots - 3, Turnovers-13, Steals-8.
1st half2nd halfOT Fina
ECU 323466
Va. Tech 212849





"�
BMaax
10 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 23, 1993
WATKINS
Continued from page 9
Garner High, where he was
coached by Jabo Fulghum. He had
an exceptional high school ath-
letic career, lettering in baseball,
basketball and football. Pat was
named to the 1990 All-State base-
ball squad as an honorable men-
tion after compiling a 6-0 record,
0.93 earned run average, and a
.416 batting average his senior
year. He also showed his athletic
versatility by throwing for over
1200 career yards as Garner's
quarterback and averaging 10
points and five assists for the bas-
ketball team his senior season.
"In him, 1 saw natural ability
and raw talent (he was) a
diamond in the rough Head
Coach Gary Overton said.
Just as noteworthy was
Watkins' high school academic
career. He was an honor student,
AthleticAcademic Award win-
ner, and North Carolina Scholar,
all while participating in three
sports a year. These are some of
the attributes that attracted
Overton to him. Watkins has con-
tinued his hard work in the class-
room here at ECU as a physical
education major. He is a three-
time honor roll student and has a
grade point average near 3.0.
By focusing solely on base-
ball, instead of three sports, he
has become one of the most pro-
lific hitters and speedsters on the
Pirate squad. As a freshman, he
hit .314 with one homer and 13
runs batted in, playing 47 games
for the Pirates, with 40 starts. In
1992 Watkins hit .267, boosted his
HR total to six, doubled his RBI
total, and swiped 16 bases. This
season, Watkins is off to a torrid
start, hiuing over .350 with three
homers and three stolen bases in
the Pirates' first five games.
Pat has also matured as a
player, mentally and physically-
"He, himself, has refined his
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skills (since high school)
Overton said. "He has good
knowledge of the game his
work ethic is very good
Teammate Heath Clark said,
"Pat is the type of player that can
take the game into his own hands
at any time. He is an asset to the
team
Off the field, Pat Watkins is
described by Clark as the kind of
person who is "nice, thoughtful,
and laid-back the kind of guy
who would do anything for you
In his spare time Watkins en-
joys playing golf, watching TV
and hanging out with friends.
However, when on the field, Pat
Watkins brings an inner level of
intensity to the game.
"Pat plays and performs qui-
etly and gets the job done, letting
his ability do the talking Overton
said. "He is a leader by example.
He is a multi-dimensional player,
and Andy Van Slyke-type, except
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Watkins said the highlight of
his baseball career was receiving
an invitation to participate in the
upcoming June tryouts for Team
U.S.A.
This took place when he was
playing for U.S. Olympic coach
Lazar Collazo in a summer league
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THUR, FRI, & SAT, FEB 25, 26, & 27
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For More Info Call The
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in Virginia. Pat will be vying for a
spot on the team to represent Old
Glory this summer in the 1993
Goodwill Games.
In the future, Watkins said
that he wants to stay involved in
baseball, either playing profes-
sionally or coaching.
"Pat definitely has a pro fu-
�ipM�mffl�2M2M&M2M2Mmmti
rure ahead, but once he gets his
chance, the rest is up to him
Overton said.
"He is not only a pleasure to
know as a player but also as a
person. Pat is a genuine young
man. We are proud to have a
person of his nature in our pro-
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 23, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 23, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.925
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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