The East Carolinian, February 18, 1993






Lifestyle
A chat with Chomsky
In an intimate intervew, Noam
Chomsky expresses his views on
world affairs.
See story page 7.
Today
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 12
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, February 18,1993
14 Pages
Fire services inadequate for dorms
City and campus officials must call for local help
By Karen Hassel
Assistant News Editor
ECU students should be
more concerned about fire safety,
especially in high-rise dorms.
"In some of our high-rise
dorms, if a student were trapped
on eighth or ninth floor, we
would contacta crane operator
said Herbert Oxendine, director
of Environmental Health and
Safety.
According to Oxendine, the
department has contacted a
crane operator in Greenville and
one in Kinston. The operator in
Greenville can respond in 20
minutes.
"The snorkel that we have
will only reach seven-story
dorms said Chief Raymond
Carney of the City of Greenville.
"But, the buildings referred to
are built of fire resistant mate-
rial and have what is known as
storm pipes so the likelihood of
ever having a problem is re-
mote
Photo by Dai! Rwd
The Greenville Fire Department is not equipped to fight fires in buildings
over seven stories tall, such as in this West Campus dormitory.
Carney explained that
Greenville is equipped with ma-
terials just like any major city.
The city of New York does not
have fire equipment that reaches
to the top of skyscrapers.
"What happens is that
firefighters put on a hose pack
and go into the building Carney
said.
At one time, the Depart-
ment of Environmental Health
and Safety was looking at roof
rescue with helicopter assistance
out of Cherry Point.
According to Oxendine, the
chance that a roof rescue would
be necessary is remote because
unless each stairwell was blocked
by smoke or flames, residents
would have a way out. A crane
operator would assist in getting
a student out if he or she were
trapped in a room.
"At least one stairwell in
each residence hall is built adja-
cent to a fire tower Oxendine
said. "That is a small room off to
the side of the stairwell that is
designed to pull smoke out of
the stairwell Each residence
hall should have fire escapes
marked and the routes should be
familiar to the occupants.
"I do know there is a lot of
apathy during fire drills
Oxendine said. "In my office, we
do fire drills in some of the aca-
demic buildings. Every once in a
while we run across a teacher
who doesn't want to let the class
"In my opinion, students
on the eighth or ninth floors are
at no greater risk than those on
the first floor he said.
State-of-the-art cancer
center opens at PCMH
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Cancer patients in the East-
ern North Carolina region now
have a first-class medical care
and treatment center close to
their home. The Leo W. Jenkins
Cancer Center, located in Pitt
County Memorial Hospital, has
recently expanded with another
floor and a new philosophy foi
treating patients.
The center, the only major
facility of its kind in the region,
has greatly profited from the
openingof ECU'smedical school
and has already begun to better
its quality of care with its "cen-
ter without walls" philosophy
of treatment.
Dr. Donald Lannin, an as-
sociate professor of surgery and
the director of the facility, said
this new philosophy of combin-
ing all of Greenville's research
and clinical facilities with the
center'swill enable the center to
give patients the same quality
of care they would expect from
larger facilities, such as those in
Durham or Chapel Hill.
"There is almost nothing
that thev can do there that we
can't do here Lannin said.
"Here it is a lot simpler for pa-
tients to get the care they need.
Our (center without walls) ap-
proach simply representsa lack
of bureaucracy found at these
larger centers. Lots of times we
hear patients complaining
about those centers because
they feel lost. Here they can
come in and get taken care of
easily
Lannin said that the suc-
cess of the center was largely
attributable to that of ECU's
medical school, as the relatively
youngschoolhasbroughtmany
research staff and publicity to
the area.
"ECU probably has the
See JENKINS page 4
Morality of transplants
discussed in lecture
By Stephanie Lassiter
Staff Writer
66
Moral issues related to organ trans-
plantation will be discussed in a lecture
today at 7:30 p.m. to be held at the Brody
Auditorium (ECU School of Medicine).
Leading the discussion will be Dr.
James Childress, former vice chairman of
the Task Force on Organ Transplantation
for the U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services.
"I would en-
courage anyone inter-
ested in this area to
attend. The talk is
designed for the en-
tire university com-
munity said John
Moskop, chair of uni-
versity faculty and
professor of medical
humanities.
Currently,
Childress is the
Edwin B. Kyle pro-
fessor of religious
studiesat the Univer-
sity of Virginia in
Charlottesville. He also is a professor of
medical education and the chair of the
school's religious studies department.
Childress has been recognized as out-
standing author in the medical and theol-
ogy fields.
He will be discussing issues related
to the transplantation of organs. Among
these topics will be organ procurement
and equitable organ distribution.
Organ procurement refers to the
enterprise of obtaining organs for trans-
plantation. A great number of the organs
obtained now come from people who
agree to be organ donors. Others come
from families who agree to donate their
deceased family members' organs.
Equitable organ distribution is the
process of deciding who would be the
best recipient for the organ. Key factors
involved in that decision are medical
needs, time waiting to receive the organ
and geographical location.
Surgeons prefer to transplant or-
gans into people in the same geographi-
cal location as the do-
nor.
I his makes people
feel like they .ire mak-
ing a bigger difference
because they can more
easily relate to the re-
cipient.
"Transplantation
is the best hope for re-
suming a normal life for
people wi thin-stage or-
qi(- gan failure Moskop
organ failure, saidit is the best hope
John Moskop, for survival for people
professor of medical humanities with heart or liver fail-
ure
The lecture is the second part of a
series of four entitled, "Ethics and the
Technological Revolution in Health Care
The series is supported by GTE
Foundation'sTechnology and Ethics Pro-
gram, and is co-sponsored by the ECU
School of Medicine, the ECU School of
Nursing and the Eastern Area Health
Education Center.
For more information on this pro-
gram or the remainder of the series, con-
tact the Department of Medical Humani-
ties at 551-2797.
Transplanta-
tion is the best
hope for resum-
ing a normal
life for people
with in-stage
Peer Health
gives students
sex education
By Elizabeth Shimmel
News Editor
Sex � whether tohave it and how to
mke it safer were the focus of this year's
Healthy Relationship Week at ECU.
"Our purpose was to promote posi-
tive lifestyle choices said Jennifer
Phillips, an ECU peer health educator.
eryone has to make their own choices
lor themselves
Some of the events sponsored by the
Peer Health Educators throughout the
week, which is also known as National
Condom Week, included a student sur-
vey, a panel discussion and a student
awareness day at the Student Stores.
Many students participated in the
student awareness day activities, which
included a question wall that allowed
students to answer questions on dating,
relationships and sex, a survey that asked
students when it was too late to say no to
sex, along with free condoms and a live
remote from WZMB.
"We want tocreate awareness about
sexually transmitted diseases, particularly
AIDS Phillips said. "It's great to pro-
mote the use of condoms and show stu-
dents how to use them, but whether stu-
dents actually use the condoms is the real
concern
Phillips said she is not promoting
sex, but wants student to consider absti-
nence as an alternative. "My personal
focus is to push abstinence as an option
Phillips said. "There are students who
choose to abstain and they deserve to be
recognized
Many students agreed that educa-
tion is the key to saving lives when it
comes to sexually transmitted diseases.
Photo by A.I. Ferguson
Over 600 condoms were given to ECU students in the Student Stores Tuesday to
promote Healthv Relationship Week.
SGA President Courtney Jones said, "I
think this is definitel) promoting some-
thing good, everyone needs to be re-
minded about being responsible if they
are going to be sexually active
Sophomore Scott Ostrander said
Healthy Relationship Week did not pro-
mote sex, but it did promote safer sex,
"You have to be ignorant or stuck in a
cave not to know what's going on
Ostrander said. "If you educate people,
then you're promoting safer sex, not just
sex
"I think students will benefit from
all of this by prompting them to think
about their behavior Phillips said.
Service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega
helped by handing out condoms to stu-
dents andI encouraging student participa-
tion during the student awareness day.
Fraternity member Marcy Krause said
many students were open and willing to
See HEALTHY page 4
Photo by A.L. F�rgu�on
Many students answered the questions
asked on "the wall
School of Business sponsors student design competition
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
ECU's Commerce Club is sponsoring
a T-shirt & slogan contest for business stu-
dents.
The Commerce Club is the Profes-
sional Scxriety for alumni and friends of the
ECU School of Business. The society aims to
establish and promote program that
strengthen the School of Business.
"Hopefully, it (the shirt & slogan
contest) is going to make students i
aware of the Commerce Club said Betl
Wilson, associate dean of business profes-
sional programs. "Hopefully it will build
some enthusiasm and pride for the School of
Business. We would like to be able to come
up with something that kind of sets us aside
from other schixils on campus
In September 1992, the ECU Alumni
Association gave the first Audrey Harris
Strickland Professional Society for Excel-
lence Award b i the Com tub.
1 he award was based i mi sen ice to the
L nr. i res school and it:
alumni populat
Ilu- luhwa ifnui pan I mp�d
Uhr in 1984. Since then, it has grown to
become the largest and most active alumni
society on campus.
"Obvk lusry we are an alumni group
Wilson said. "But inadditiantokeepingthe
tide strong between us and our alumni, we
are alsi i interested in giving benefits to our
current constituent
'If we i an do something for students
now and provide them with some benefit,
then fheyaregoing to remembertheS hool
�I the( !ommerce( lub "
! ntestrequiresthatstudentssub
nut a 1 -shirtanddesisin slogan for the& hool
of Business. The first place winner will re-
ceive a SKX) gift certificate donated by Mike
Q isb m ot the ECU Student Store.
Free T-shirts imprinted with the win-
ning design will go to the top five finalists.
The contest is open only to those students
accepted into the School of Business and
currently enrolled in courses. Deadline fat
(hecontest is March 31.
TheCorrunerceQubprovides students
with several bonuses. Forexample,on exam
u id pastries are provided
students.TheC lubhas
made it possible for the first time in the
historvof the School of Business forgraduat-
ing business students toenjoy a formal com-
mencement- t pe ceremony. The Commerce
Club also provides funding for an MBA
resume' booklet, a business etiquette pro-
gram and supplements to the student lab
facility.
WiKon slid the T-shirt contest came
into being in an effi rt get more in touch with
students and make them aware oi the part
flieclub plays in their education. "They may
l aware ol some of the activities we're
involved in, but thej may have no idea its
provided by the Commerce dub
:� '� �! � l"l





I
2 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 18, 1993
StateNews
Hunt proposes 2 percent raises for state workers
Paper stops naming rape victims
The student newspaper at Marshall University will not
print the names of rape victims this semester after triggering an
outcry last fall when it published a rape victim's name. The
Parthenon's new editor, Greg Collard, overruled the student
editorial board's January decision to print the name of a woman
who was raped during the winter term. In doing so, Collard
remanded the paper's policy to publish a victim's name in Sep-
tember 1992. The previous editor, Kevin Melrose, went along
with the seven-member board and printed the name of a rape
victim in September, and said he would not back down from
printing names in the future. Several campus groups condemned
the newspaper for violating the woman's right to privacy.
California Aggie Band probation ends
Officials at the University of California-Davis have lifted a
10-month probation imposed on the California Aggie Marching
Band after charges of sexual harassment surfaced last spring. The
probation was imposed after a former band member accused the
band director of sexual harassment. Some of the changes agreed
upon include implementing a formal grievance procedure, fully
defining the post of faculty band director, reviewing slogan
buttons and school cheers for appropriateness, and upgrading
dresscodes for band members. "The band will not tolerate sexual
harassment said Andrew McPherson, the newly appointed
band director.
Students charged in gambling ring
Three University of Texas sophomores were arrested and
charged with runninga $300,000-a-year gambling opera tionafter
police found gambling tally sheets in an apartment. Steve Waxberg,
20, Josh Paul, 19, and Justin Woolf, 19, were charged with
gambling promotion by Austin police in late January and re-
leased on personal bond. "Gambling is a serious problem. I'm
concerned when I hear that things like that are still going on Vice
President for Student Affairs James Vick told The Daily Texan.
Secretary charged in theft of funds
A former secretary at the University of Arkansas at Little
Rock has been charged with taking $8,100 from a checking ac-
count and petty cash fund. Betty L. Johnson, who used to work in
the school's art department, was charged with a second-class
felony after an audit revealed that $8,100 was missing, reported
the campus newspaper the UALR Forum.
Compiled by Karen Hasseli. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
RALEIGH (AP) � Gov. Jim
Hunt's proposed budget would
increase the number of state audi-
tors, triple the state abortion fund
and add four labor investigators
for workplacediscrimination com-
plaints.
The $8.8 billion budget plan
Hunt unveiled Tuesday alsowould
give state teachers and employees
a 2 percent pay raise.
"In short, this budget reflects
my campaign commitments he
said. "I consider ita promise kept
The plan contains about
$875.4 million in new spending over
the next two years on programs for
children, education, economic de-
velop ment,crimeand stateemploy-
ees.
It did not, however, contain
specifics about $100 million in cuts
each year that Hunt told legislators
he wants to make. He said those
recommendations will be given to
the General Assembly next week.
"I think we have a very good
chance of exceeding $100 million
(in cuts) Hunt said. This is
not the limit of what we can do. It's
just a start
The Government Perfor-
mance Audit being studied by the
Legislature con tains proposals that
would save an estimated $275 mil-
lion next year if all 400 recommen-
dations are adopted.
Hunt's salary proposals
would give state workers and
teachers a 2 percent raise next year.
In addition, 2 percent in salary
funds would be used for teacher
merit pay, and 1 percent would be
used for merit bonuses for state
workers.
Hunt also recommends tri-
pling the state abortion fund,
which pays for abortions for poor
women. The fund was cut from
$1.4 million in 1984 to less than
5500,000. Legislators rejected an-
nual attempts by the administra-
tion of Gov. Jim Martin to elimi-
nate the fund. Hunt proposes in-
creasing the fund by $1 million
next year.
The State Auditor's Office
would get five new workers for
performance audits and eight new
auditors for financial audits next
year under the plan.
The Labor Department would
get 11 new employees to help train
workers and employers about
workplace safety. It also would get
four additional workers to investi-
gate discrimination complaints.
He also would set aside $15
million for additional incentives to
attract industries to the state. He
said the special fund would be
handled by theDepartmentofCom-
merce with "complete oversight
and complete reporting" on what
incenesaregiven to spedficbusi-
nesses.
His proposals for the Univer-
sity of North Carolina system in-
clude a 3 percent tuition increase
next year and a 3.3 percent increase
the following year for in-state stu-
dents. Out-of-state students would
have a 5 percent tuition increase
each year.
He proposes no tuition in-
creases for community colleges.
His crime control spending
includes $5.6 million to expand a
boot-camp prison in Richmond
County to 180 beds and build an-
other 90-bed boot camp. Another
$10.8 million would be spent to
establish an inmate construction
program that would use prison
labor to build and maintain pris-
ons.
He also would add $2 mil-
lion for additional workers in
child protection programs. The
state Child Fatality Task Force
had sought more workers to deal
with abused children.
The Department of Environ-
ment, Health and Natural Re-
sources would get 14 additional
employees to work with industry
in reducing waste.
Hunt's proposals will be
considered by the General
Assembly's appropriations com-
mittees, which will prepare the
final budget.
Debate flairs over location
of UNC cultural center
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)�A
divisive question remains in the de-
bate over the black cultural center at
the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill � where to put it
The issue rose to the top this
week as members of a group formu-
lating a plan for the 48,000-square-
foot center met with members of the
center'sadvisoryboard.The advisory
board is made up primarily of black
students.
Students want the center built
between Wilson Library and Dey Hall,
a plot also being sought for a new
sciences building, The News & Ob-
server reported.
S
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
CAJUN REFRESHMENTS
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
MARDI GRAS PRIZES
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FOR ALL ECU STUDENTS
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
7:00 8:15 p.m.
College Hill
8:30 p.m.
College Hill
9:lX)p.m.
9:00- 12:(Xtmid.
MSC Recreation
9:00- 10:30 p.m
MSC Multi-Purpose
9:00- 12:00 mid.
MSC 244
9:30- 11:00 p.m.
MSC Underground
10:00 p.m.
Hcndrix Theatre
10:30- 11:00 p.m.
MSC Multi-Purpose
11:00- 1:00 am.
Human Float Judging
Crowning of Mardi Gras King & Queen
Parade Formation
Parade through campus to Mendenhall Student Center
Accompanied by The Will Bridges Band
Parade arrives at MSC "Bourbon-Street and
Mardi Gras begins.
FREE open and challenge bowling.
FREE billiards and table tennis
Dance to ECU's Panama Steel Drum Band
Karaoke contest - Sing and strut your stuff
for prizes
Listen to the music of Spiral.
FREE movie - "Birth of the Blues
starring Bing Crosby
Costume contest judging and awards
ii:Oo- i:00am. Mardi Gras Ball - Dance to one of New Orleans'
MSC Muiti Purpose finest bands Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys
1:00 a.m.
FESTIVITIES END
Masks required and available at the door. NO ONE UNDER THE INFLUENCE WIUL BE ADMITTED.
Admission by valid ECU ID. One guest per person.
NfembersofthewOTkJnggroup
that refused to commit to that site.
The working group supports a site
across the street between the Bell
Tower and Coker Hall.
A subcommittee of the work-
ing group plans to meet Friday to
make a site recommendation. Once
the working group, appointed by
Chancellor Paul Hardin, makes its
final recommendations, Hardin will
review it and send the plans to the
university buildings and grounds
committee, which will send itbackto
Hardin The final step will be to send
it to the University of North Carolina
Board of Trustees.
N.C. gonorrhea cases
on the rise this year
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
The number of cases of gonorrhea
more than doubled in North Carolina
during the first five weeks of 1993
compared tothe same period lastyear.
Dr. Inge Corless, an assistant
professor of nursing who specializes
in HTV diseases, said North Carolina
is now second in the country after
Texas in the number of gonorrhea
cases in 1993.North Carolina had re-
corded 2,531 cases as of Feb. 6, she
said. Last year, there had been 1,120
cases reported by early February.
"We have no idea why this is
happening here unless it is just better
reporting, but one thing is certain
Ms.Corlesssaid. "Toomany people
are engaging in unsafe sex. It is cer-
tainly worrisome
Untreated, gonorrhea can
spread to other parts of the body. In
nien,itcan inflame the prostate and
testicles and cause infertility. If the
diseasedamagestheFallopian tubes,
women also can become infertile.
Chief symptoms in men are
painful urination and agolden milky
urethral discharge. About six in 10
women have no symptoms, while
the rest experience symptoms simi-
lartomen.
The disease can be cured with
antibiotics.
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j






FEBRUARY 18, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
NationalNews
Economic plan hits turbulence
before formal introduction
WASHINGTON (AP) � Af-
ter days of preparing the nation
for higher taxes. President Clinton
is coming forward with a stern
economic package the White
House says will raise taxes on all
American households earning
more than $30,000. The plan al-
ready is off to a rocky start.
Even before Clinton formally
unveils his $500 billion deficit-re-
duction package, controversy over
its tax features sent the stock mar-
ket reeling, produced taunts from
Republicans and put the adminis-
tration on the defensive.
But Clinton said the plan �
designed to produce jobs, boost
the economy and trim the federal
budget deficit�will benefit most
Americans despite the pain of
higher taxes.
"Most middle-class Ameri-
cans (are) going to be much,
much better off he contended
Tuesday.
The president unveilshiseco-
nomic package in a nationally tele-
vised address toCongressat9 p.m.
EST tonight.
The program, according to
administration and congressional
sources, will contain a stiff new
energy tax based on heat content
of various fuels � a tax that will
hit the middle class the hardest.
Also going up: taxes on So-
cial Security benefits for retired
coupleseaming more than $32,000
and the top tax rates on wealthy
individuals and corporations.
A surcharge Clinton once
said he would impose on million-
aires is being expanded to fami-
lies earning more than $250,000 a
year. It will be roughly 3.5 per-
cent, said the sources, who spoke
on condition of anonymity.
The four-year plan will
match $250 billion in new taxes
with an equal amount in spend-
ing cuts. It also boasts a $31 billion
short-term stimulus package di-
vided between job-intensive pub-
lic works projects and tax breaks
for businesses.
Despite extensive advance
work, the plan is being launched
in atmosphere of confusion and
criticism.
The Dow Jones average of 30
industrial stocks tumbled nearly
83 pointson fears that higher taxes
would short-circuit the economic
recoveiy.
Clinton shrugged it off. But
it was the largest single-day fall in
the Dow in 15 months. "We don't
like taxes. Period said Peter J.
Canelo, chief investment strate-
gist at Natwest Securities Inc.
Republicans seized on the
tax increases to remind Ameri-
cans thatClinton had backtracked
ona campaign pledge fora middle-
income tax cut.
"Hold onto your wallets
said Senate Republican leader Bob
Dole.
And the administration
found itself trying to explain
Clinton's remarks in a televised
address Monday night that those
earning more than $100,000 ayear
would pay 70 percent of the nigher
taxes.
Did that mean individuals or
couples? First the administration
wasn't sure. Then White House
spokesman George
Stephanopoulos said it would in-
clude households � covering a
husband and wife each earning
$50,000, for example.
By day's end, the White
House was saying the figure was
arbitrary, and was generated by a
computer evaluation of the total
revenues in Clinton's tax propos-
als � including the energy tax �
measuredagainsthouseholdseam-
ing more than $100,000.
Actual tax rates wouldn't go
up until the threshold of about
$140,000 for individuals and
$180,000 for families was crossed,
said Clinton spokeswoman Dee
Dee Myers. Then the top tax rate
would be 36 percent, up from the
current 31 percent.
Families making less than
$30,000 will be protected from
higher taxes by an increase in the
earned income tax credit, which
enables the working poor to get
money back if their income falls
below the level at which taxes are
owed. White House aides said.
Clinton will declare that, ab-
sent any action, the deficit will be
$41 billion higher four years from
now than the gloomiest Bush ad-
ministration estimate, or $346 bil-
lion, according to a senior official.
Thisyear's deficit is pegged at $327
billion.
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4 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 18. 1993
Clinton supports special interest groups
WASHINGTON (AP)�Here
are the people that Senate Republi-
can leader Bob Dole describes as
everyday Americans: farmers,
nurses, factory workers, shopkeep-
ers, truck drivers and senior citi-
zens.
Who could argue that these
peopleare the backbone of the coun-
try? There are millions upon mil-
lions of them.
And guess what? They're all
represented in the capital by so-
called special interest groups.
In advance of his economic
address to Congress tonight, Presi-
dent Clinton has depicted average
Americans as the forces of light. "If
you're vigilant and vocal, we can do
what we have to do he said in his
Monday night pep talk to the na-
tion.
By contrast, the president
holds up shadowy "special inter-
ests" as obstructionist and greedy.
"Many have already lined the corri-
dors of power with high-priced lob-
byists he said.
HEALTHY
But, as Dole demonstrated
with his list, the line between the
people and the special interests is
not nearly as clea r as Cl in ton draws
it
One group with awesome
clout is the American Association of
Retired Per-
sons, 34 mil lion
strong. How
special is that
kind of an inter-
est? Is there
anyone in the
country whose
parents or
grandparents
don't belong?
There are unions for teachers,
truckers, government clerks�none
of them strangers, many of them
neighbors. There are farm groups
and business groups and profes-
sional groups and religious groups;
civil rights groups and women's
groupsand anti-tax groupsand law-
yers' groups.
"All interests are special su-
per-lobbyist Thomas Hale Boggs Jr.
argued in a New York Times essay
published Tuesday. "Is it unfair to
lobby for federal assistance to
Chrysler to save thousands of jobs?
Help defeat a constitutional
amendment on flag burning? Seek
legislation
ma king it easier
for homeless
people to
vote?"
That is
not the type of
cause or client
that normally
comes to mind
when one hears the phrase special
interest. "You might as well be talk-
ing about the antichrist said David
King, a special interest specialist at
Harvard's Kennedy School of Gov-
ernment. "It has a lot of emotive
quality about it. Nobody wants to
admit that their group has a special
interest
Michael Edwards, chief lob-
byist for theNational Education As-
If you're vigi-
lant and vocal,
we can do what
we have to do
Bill Clinton
soriation, calls his teacher union a
general interest. "When he uses the
term special interest, I honestly don't
think he's talking about us
Edwards said of Clinton. An oil in-
dustry lobbyist recently maintained
his group a Iso was too broad-based
to be special, King said. The reason-
ing: "Everybody uses gasoline. Ev-
erybody uses energy
Two senators demonstrated
the difficulty of defining a special
interest on CNN's morning news
show Tuesday. Sen. Jim Sasser, D-
Tenn chairman of the Senate Bud-
get Committee, called the super-
conducting supercollider "a $7 bil-
lion scientific pork barrel beingbuilt
in the state of Texas He said he'd
propose cutting it out of the budget
along with the space station, an-
other boon for Texas.
Sen. Phil Gramm, R-Texas, re-
torted that "Jim and the president
talk about investment in the future,
but they want tocut premier science
projects to invest not in the next
generation, but in thenevtelection
Continued from page 1
JENKINS
Continued from page 1
participate in all oi the day's ac-
tivities.
"The reaction has been great,
people are open to letting their
feelings out, and telling people
what they think Krause said.
In correlation with Healthy
Relationship Week, The East Caro-
linian ran a four-part, provocative
ad campaign promoting condom
use for heterosexual, interracial
and homosexual couples. The ads
culminated in the distribution of
three free condoms to students
who redeemed a coupon found in
the fourth advertisement.
"I think it's great that an-
other student organization took
interest in an issue that is really
important to college students
Phillips said. "I think the ads were
done in a tactful and educational
manner Phillips said the content
of the ads was tasteful and educa-
tional for students who took the
time to read them. "The pictures
were good at getting attention, yet
they weredone tasteflfclly Phillips
said. "I'm just hoping everyone
reads the educational information
that goes along with them
Several students agreed with
Phillips, with hopes that sexually
active students will learn the im-
portance of using condoms dur-
ing even' sexual experience.
"I think it's good that The
East Carolinian is doing this, they
got a lot of people to think about
safer sex, whether they want to
or not Jones said. "Promoting
safe homosexual activity is just as
important as safe heterosexual
sexual behavior
most successful young medical
school in the country, Around 20-
30 other schools started around the
same time, but none have matched
ECU's success
Lannin said that despite all
the center's strengths, there were
things that needed improvement,
especially thecenter's level of fund-
ing. Lannin said that due to the
nature of cancer, there was a great
need for hiring new specialists for
research.
"There is a misconception that
all cancer is treated in the same
way there are so many different
forms of cancer and all require dif-
ferent cancer specialists to provide
treatment. On some typesof cancer
we've made a lot of progress, but
the specialists are still needed
Dr. Albert Wiley, the former
director of the center, said that the
constant cost of keeping the most
up-to-date medical equipment
would also be troublesome to the
center.
"There is a constant cost in-
crease to keep up with technology
Wiley said. "The center needs a lot
of expensive new things to keep
up. We need a few million for
treatment and another few for re-
search we're trving to do the best
we can with limited resources, but
cancer is expensive to treat
Neither Wiley or Lannin
would comment on how they
thought theClinton administration
would change the conditions at the
center, but Wiley said he wasn't
exactly optimistic.
"I don't think things will get
any easier Wiley said. "Because
there seems to be a lot of interest in
cutting health care costs. But on the
other hand, I think the current ad-
ministration may show more sym-
pathy towards rural communities.
We'll just have to wait and see
Wiley said that the center can
currently treat "95 percent of all
cancer" and is optimistic about the
center's future ability to compete
with the facilities in Durham and
Chapel Hill.
Wiley also is hopeful about
the center's chances of receiving
multidisciplinary protocols, large
research studies funded by inter-
national corporations. "There is al-
ways a need for any kind of re-
search funding Wiley said.
The doctors said they expect
the center to grow, as they are re-
ceiving referrals from all over the
eastern part of the state, and as far
to the borders of Virginia and South
Carolina.
Lannin said that the center
has a backlog of patients that reach
into the thousands, and gains
around 1000 new patients annu-
ally. Lannin said he thinks the "cen-
ter without walls" philosophy may
have a lot to do with that.
"That is the difference be-
tween a cancer center and a doctor's
office Lannin said. "You get the
best of everything
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through Satunrty, Ftx 20, 1993
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RESIDENTNIGHT MANAGER
The Ronald McDonald House of Eastern North Carolina, located in Greenville,
is seeking a qualified individual for thr position of ResidentNight Manager. This person
will live on the premises (2 bedroom, 2 bath apartment) and will have administrative
responsibilities as well as being responsible for night operations. This individual will work
from 5-8pm daily (be available by beeper from 8pm to 8am) as well as two weekends per
month. The position will Se opening mid-May.
Candidates should be excellent in dealing with people; be tactful and compas-
sionate, yet able to be firm and take charge when necessary. Computer skills a plus.
To apply, please send resume and letter of interest to: Ronald McDonald House
Resident Night Manager, 549 Moye Blvd Greenville, NC 27834. Deadline: 3-1-93. NO
WALK INSPHONE CALLS, PLEASE.
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THEN
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WANTS YOU!
We are preparing for inductions and looking for qualified students.
If you are interested please attend our informational meeting Tuesday,
February 23 at 5:00pm in 244 Mendenhall. If you have any questions
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AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER
Estimates Given First
3140-H Mosely Drive
behind Parker's Barbecue on Greenville Blvd
752-5043





TheEastCarolinian
February 18, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS :1 and
2 bedroom apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer hook-
ups. Call 752-8915.
STUDENTS: Don't wait for next se-
mester, do it now We have now over
a hundred apartments that willbeavail-
able for May, June, July, and August.
Call 752-1375 Homelocators today for
your selection.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 2608 Tryon
Drive; 3 bedroom 1 bath; $550.00 p
m. 404 S. Eastern Street; 3 bedroom 2
bath;S680.00pm. Nopets.Leaseand
Deposit Required. Duffus Realty, Inc.
Call 756-2675.
A 7TH STORY luxury suite hanging
over the whit sand and clear water of
South Florida's most beautiful beach
Completely furnished, sleeps five in
unbelievable luxury; minutes from jai
Alai, airport, horses dogs, Ft. Lauder-
dale Beach, Miami Action. $800 for
We3k36-313atHollywood Beach
Tower. Call (205) 948 - 7493.
APT. FOR RENT near ECU - Female
Roommate SI 40 12 util - Will accept
less rent. Call (919) 779-6299 after 5 or
leave msg.
CONDOMINIUM FOR RENT -
Willoughby Park, 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
fireplace, pool, tennis, NOFETS, avail-
able March 1st, $525,756-9420.
1BR APARTMENT on 13th St Great
for pets, esp. dogs. Available immedi-
ately. $275mo. Call 752-9197.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY: 427 Wedgewood Arms Apts.
Tennis Court & Swimming Pool. Call
Jaysenat(919)321-1760.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
bedroom apartment. ASAP non -
smoker preferred. $157.00 a month
12 electric. 756-4666. Apartment is
like new with washer dryer.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED by
March 1st to share 3 bedroom apart-
mentinWildwood Villas. l3rentand
l3utilities. Call AndyorDarenat752
-8506.
ROOMMATE NEEDED March 1st:
Must love animals, music and occa-
sional celebrating, male or female $150
a month rent and 1 3 phone and utili-
ties. Call Stacy or Michele 752 -3244.
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live con-
cert & studio recordings for sale. Over
1 OOOnew titles available this week from
thefoUowingartists: ROCK-U2,R.E.M,
Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendrix, Black
Crowes,Springsteen,SRV,VanHalen,
Rush, Beatles, Doors, G-N-R, etc. AL-
TERNATrVE-Nirvana,PearlJam,Chili
Peppers, Cure, Depeche Mode, MORE
OTHERSINCLUDE- Bob Marley, Ma-
donna, Prince, and more. Call 931-2573
to leave name, number, and requested
artist on message (all new CD's and
tapes in stock).
DAY BED, white, iron and brass w2
twin size Orthopedic mattresses and
roll-out pop-up trundle. Never used,
in box. Cost $700. $310cash. (919) 637-
4421 after 6:30 pm.
BRASS BED,queen size wframe and
deluxe Orthopedic mattress set in fac-
tory box. Can't use. Cost $750, sacrifice
S285 cash (919) 637-4421 after 6:30pm.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boats, 4-wheelers,
motorhomes,byFBI,lRS,DEA. Avail-
able your area now. Call 1-800-436-
4363ext.c-5999.
MOVING MUST SELL! 5piececherry
or oak bedroom set-S425.00Call (919)
946-9653.
SAMSUNG 8180 computer w514
floppydiskdrive. Monochrome moni-
tor. Also Citizen 120-D dot matrix
printer. Excellent condition! 410.00
call 756-0125.
TWO CERWIN VEGA 380 SE speak-
ers. 405 watts S375.00. Call Josh 830 -
6893.
FOR SALE: Fisher CD Component.
Great Value at $65.00 Call - Leave
message for K2t 931 - 9667.
1987 KX125 new parts & Answer pipe.
Extra rear tire. This bike will scream.
$1050 Call Todd 752-2616.
COMIC BOOKS for sale, various is-
sues of The Dea th andFuneral ofS UPER-
MAN. Great Prices. 10 - 50 off cur-
rentpriceguides. Allarefirstprintings
and in mint condition. Cali 758 - 5819
for Info Ask for Johnnie. Leave Mes-
sage.
20" TREK 820 mountain bike 200.00or
best offer 758 - 6639 ask for Nicole.
GARAGE SALE: Saturday only Feb
201685 Scarborough Road -off of 14th
St. Furniture, dishes, microwave,
clothes, - Lots of good Stuff
KITTY HAWK 100 watt ALL - TUBE
AMP: w Channel switching. Like
new, plays great S350 Marshall 4x12
1960 slanted cabinet. $350Peaveyl8"
Black Widow Bass Cabinet. Good con-
dition 5125 Call Warren321 - 2046.
SAVE on Spring Break '93! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas from $459 Florida
from !149! Organize group and travel
free! Contact Susan� 931-7334 or call
Sun Splash Tours today 1-800-426-7710.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
-Make money teachingEnglish Abroad.
Japan and Taiwan. MakeS2000-S4000
permonth. Manyprovideroom&board
other benefits! No previous training
or teaching certificate required! For In-
ternational Employment program, call
the International Employment Group:
(206) 632-1146 ext.J5362.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED:
Great club, great money, unbelievable
tips. WorkThursday,Friday,Saturday,
9 pm-2 am. Call Sid 919-735-7713 or
Paul919-7360716. MothersPlayhouse
inGoldsboro.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(CD1821 HillandaleRd.lB-295 Durham,
NC 27705
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions, Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext.P-3712.
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hiring enthusiastic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. North Bench Sailing, Inc. Box8279,
Duck, NC 27949. (91�) 261-6262.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED. Looking for enthusiastic
people with strong cheering and inter-
personal skills to teach cheerleading
camps in NC & SC. Great pay and
flexible scheduling. Up to 10 weeks
possible! If you love cheerleading, this
is the summer job for you! To apply.
Call 1-800-280-3223.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffingenvelopes at home. All
Materials provided. Send SASE to Na-
tional Distributors POBox9643 Spring-
field, MO 65801. Immediate response.
i Wellness
i Program
1 Opportunities
1 Pin County Memorial Hospital is
accepting applicationsresumes
for the following positions in our
Wellness Program:
PROGRAM ASSISTANT
(part-time vacancy)
Requires a 4-year degree in
Nursing, Health Education.
Nutrition or related with 1-2
years of experience in teaching
health-related classes andor
preparing health promotion cam-
paigns.
WELLNESS ASSISTANTS
1-2 years of experience in teach-
ing aerobic classes required.
Competitive salaries offered. For
consideration, send resume to:
Employment Office, Pitt
County Memorial Hospital,
P. O. Vox 6028, Greenville,
flC 2785-6028; 5S1-4SS6.
EOEIAA
Pitt County
Memorial Hospital
a constituent oP.
University Medical Center
Of Eastern Carolina-Pitt County
PARTY HOUSES - North Myrtle
Beach. Welcomegroupsof4-34 people.
Group-Leaderdiscounts. Call Myrtle
Beach Tours 9 - 4 pm (703) 250-2125.
BESTTANNING PRICES IN TOWN
at ScissorsmithHair Designs and Tan-
ning Center! One month unlimited
only $30, other packages too! 107
Eastbrook Drive 758 - 7570.
DONTBE LEFT OUT! Limited space
still available to Jamaica, Cancun and
Florida for Spring Break. Contact Stu
at 757-0313 before it's sold out!
WIN TO LOSE Tired of yo - yo diets,
ha te meal substitutes, not enough time
to exercise butdesperatelywantto lose
weight? Give me a call at 746 - 4583.
(Leavenameand number on recorder).
FLORIDA SPRING BREAK: 7nights
beach front SI 39-159 Quad. Deadline
soon. Reserve rooms NOW! CallCMI
1-800-423-5264.
rdllNTUNI SPRING BUEAKEBSII
Party Like Gods
Panama City $139, Kay Wast $269,
Jamaca & Cancun from $450. Quality
Accomodations, Free Drink Parties!
Call Joe! ENDLESS SUMMER TOURS
1-800-234-7007
filAVES nOKSSMNUL TYPING t
'English Literature Major
�Editing & Tutoring Available
�Professionally Composed Resumes
�Competitive Rates
CALL 758-7218
SNEED CASHS
TUDENT
WAP
'HOP
BUYING
& SELLING
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Jewelry(goodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Perns
Jfj �osv Soiling Votctit Charteirs
tkt Bahamas at ttm Cm i
atuar owKfriwUuatcIU:
385
'fa-fuvm
800-780
-4001
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in just a few days!
Plus a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself I
No cost. No obligation.
1-800-932-0528, ext. 65
SPRING BREAK-93!
LAST CHANCE TO SA VEU
JAMAICA - $429
CANCUN - $439-
FLORIDA - $159
V For Th0 Lowest
?- Prices A The Boat Kg
F Trips, Call
SUN SPLASH TOURS
1-800-426-7710'
mnmonTnnADJumacTPtaiQfvoufm
TO MY PRINCE Thank you for an-
other chance. I love you now more
than ever. Your Princess.
WARM AND LOVING FEMALE
wants to give healthy Caucasian baby
a close knit family and financial secu-
rity. Will help with expenses. Call
Collect (804) 572 - 8403 or Write PO Box
655, South Boston, VA 24592.
GALE: I hope everything is going
okay for you now and the "situation"
has not taken its toll. You know you
always have a friend here if you ever
need to talk Of course you already
know that because it is nothing you
have not done for me. Mo
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA: Valentine's
came and Valentine's went. The social
at Tar River was time well spent. We
did drink and we did mingle. Cupid's
shot made some tingle. For the second
yearsrraight, it went great! Next year,
is just around the bend, I hope curtain
fishionisn'ta trend. Love the Brothers
and Pledges of Delta Chi.
DELTAZETA: Although we got off to
a slow start,Sigma Pi had tons of funat
thefizzlastThursdaynight. Hopefully
we will see you again soon.
IT WAS SATURDAYnightandcupid
was there. TheA-Phi'shadtheirdates
from everywhere. Red and white bal-
loons were full with messages inside.
Along with the music that never ever
died. Shelley and Jennice got wild and
crazy,theywereouttacontrolnotlook-
ing lazy. While drinks went flying all
over D, and Tim and Angie got down
and dirty. What a great night we will
always remember!
SIGMA TAU GAMMA: We had a
great time last Thursday night. Let's
gettogetheragainsoon. Love,Pi Delta.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW OMICRON PLEDGE CLASS
OFZETATAU ALPHA! SusanStroup,
Ashley Goad, Kristin Edwards,
Amanda Inscoe, Kimberlee Edgerton,
KristyDuke,PaigeAbbort,LeslieChan-
dler, Jennifer Reed, Amy Hargraves,
Suzi Nesbitt, Wendy Case, Amy
Willoughby, Jennifer Coxe, Christi
Athas, Shana Rishel, Amy Barber,
Courtney Hinson. We Love You All,
The Sisters.
PI KAPPA PHI: TheSistersand Pledges
of Zeta Tau Alpha want to thank you
for a great Pref. Party! You guys are
hell on TWO wheels! Hope we can get
together again soon!
TO THE BROTHER OF PHI SIGMA
PI from the pledge class Alpha Xi. Rub
-A-Dub- Dub, our sponges and our
tubs. Let us give your cars a rub that
they'll really love. A little soap, a little
water, give a dime, or give a quarter. At
the Pantry, at the Fuel Dec, Saturday,
8:30 to 4 o'clock Rain or shine, sleet or
snow. 8:00 am to the gas stations we'll
go. See you then Big Brothers, YourLil
Brothers.
EPSILON SIGMA ALPHA will be
sponsoring a Blood Drive in MSC on
MondayFeb22,1993froml2-6. Please
give a little of your time and give the
gift of life. Thanks for your suppoi
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEW SISTERS OF ALPHA XI
DELTA: Georgia Alexis, Chrissy
Boswell, Krista Britton, Kristen
Cockrell, Katie Craig, Kristen Gale,
April Harris Stacie Henning, Dana
King Sally Lackey, Stephanie Martin,
Dorothy Matheson, Jennifer Michno,
Jill Midrno, Karen Obermilller,Christa
Rutter, Kiersten Sadler, Liz Sweeney,
and Holle Vardermann! Welcome to
Sisterhood Hang in there Leslie,
Nancy, Misty, Mkhelle, Jenny, Holly,
Amy, Kelly, Courtney, Toni, Christy,
andTorie! Ve Love You! Your Alpha
Xi Delta Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
Pledges of Pi Kappa Alpha. The Rho
Class: Scott Browder, Ma tt Downs Pa t
Sutkowski, Chris Nunnand Matt Aus-
tin.
Announcements
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC EVENTS
FOR FEBRUARY 1ft- 7.im
Tues Feb. 16 � James
Weaver, harpsichord. Guest Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm, Free).
ThurFebl8�Nathan Wiiliams,clari-
net, and guest artists Audrey Andrist,
piano and James Stern, violin (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 8:00 pm, Free). FriFeb.
19 � Donny F. All, Jr. horn, Senior
Recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm
Free). Mon, Feb. 22 � Brad Foley,
saxophone, A. LoiseToppin, soprano,
and Paul Tardif, piano (Fletcher Re-
cital Hall, 8:00 pm. Free).
ECU CAMPUS MINISTRY
ASSOCIATION
A pancake supper to begin
the pre -Easter season of Lent. Lent is
a time of sacrifice and reflection to
prepare for Easter. All are invited to
participate in a simple meal and act of
worship. February 23, Methodist Stu-
dent Center, 501 E. 5th St. 5:15 pm A
free - will offering is to be taken up for
the support of the Homeless Shelter.
CATHOLICSTUnFNTNFWMAN
rjQjjJSE
The Newman Catholic Stu-
dent Center wishes to announce spe-
cial Ash Wednesday Masses with the
distribution of ashes: 12 noon in the
Great Room of Mendenhall Student
Center and 5:30 pm at the Newman
Center, 953 E. 10th Street a t the foot of
College Hill Drive.
Party all night at the
NewmnnCenterlock-in. All new and
old students are welcome to join in on
the food, games, movies,andfun. Fri-
day, February 19 at the Catholic Cen-
ter starting at 9:00 pm. See ya there!
ECU WOMEN'S SOCCER C! UB
ECU Women's Soccer club
meeting Friday, Feb. 19 in Room GCB
1001 at 4:00 pm. This is a MANDA-
TORY meeting for ALL members of
this club.
ENGLISH DEPT�FCII
Susan V. Smith, a graduate
Student in the English Department
who was working to complete her
thesis,died recently. A memorial fund
has been set up in her name. Anyone
wishing to contribute to the memorial
fund for Susan Smith may contact St.
Peter's Catholic Church (757 - 3259).
STUDENTS FrmrHRTc-r
Come and join us for an ex-
citing and very practical Bible discus-
sion in Mendenhall Student Center,
room242. Thisdiscussionwillstartat
7:00 pm on Thursdays. Everyone is
invited Topic: Which war are you
going to turn?
ECU EQUESTRIAN mm
Equestrian Club Meeting,
Thursday, Feb 18 at 5:30 pm in GC
1009. If you love horses and want to
find out about the club and team -
come to this meeting! Call Angela 931
- 8453 or Adrienne 931 - 7722 . For
details or come to our meeting and
meet other horse - crazy people!
PERFORMING ARTSFRIFS
The Dayton Contemporary
Da nee Company will perform on Sat-
urday, March 20 1993at8:00pm. This
Company produces choreography,
dance, music, and design at its most
dynamic. They will perform a variety
of dances from their repertoire which
includes worksbyAlvin Ailey, Donald
McKayle, Eleo Pomare, Alejandro
Cervera, and Talley Beatty, to name
but a few.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention Gamma Beta Phi
Members! There will be a general
meeting on Tuesday, Feb 23. at 5:00
pm in 244 Mendenhall. We look for-
ward to seeing you there!
Gamma Beta Phi National
Honor Society will be holding a gen-
eral information meeting for all those
interested in joining with a 3.0 GP A or
better. The meeting will be held on
Tuesday, Feb. 23 at 5:00 pm in 244
Mendenhall. If you have any ques-
tions or are unable to attend please
contact Ruthann Bass at 931 - 9274 or
Lisa King (after 5) at 756 - 7587.
METHODISTPRESRYTFRTAN
STUDENTCFNTFR
There will bea yard saleSat-
urday,February20at7am tilnoonat
theMPStudentCenter located at 501
E. 5th Street at Holly. ACOAwillbe
taking place Monday February 22 at
7:30 pm and the MethodistPresbyte-
rian Student Center.
CATHOLIC STUDENT NEWMAN
CENTER
Party all night at the
Newman Center lock-in. All new and
old students are welcome to join on
the food, games, movies, and fun.
Friday, February 19 at the Catholic
Center starting .it 9 pm. See ya there!
PUSH
If you would like to work
towards reducing the architectural,
as well as the attitudinal barriers,
that students with special needs are
faced with every day, then come to
the next mf eting of P.U.S.H. Meet-
ings will be held at 5 -6 pm on Mon-
days in Cotten Hall Lobby. Come
join the fun!
ECUSCHOOI OFMUSir
Wed Feb. 24 Bryant
Moore, piano, Junior recital (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7 pm). ThursFeb.25
� Koren Harrison, voice, Senior re-
cital and Susan Deyton, voice, Jun-
ior recital (Fletcher Recital Hall, 7
pm) and also, Derrick J. Askew, per-
cussion, Senior recital (Fletcher Re-
cital Hall). Fri Feb. 26 Black His-
tory Month Concert, Richa rd Field:
guest pianist (Fletcher Recita 1 Hall, 8
pm). SunFeb.28 � ECUSymphony
Orchestra, Robert Hause, conductor
with theConcerto Com petition Win-
ners (Wright Auditorium, 3 pm).
MonMar.l -ECU"CoastalWinds"
Faculty Quintet: Cynthia S. Decker,
flute: David Hawkins, oboe: Nathan
Williams, clarinet: Mary Burroughs,
horn: and Christopher Ulffers, bas-
soon (Fletcher Recital Hall, 8 pm).
All concerts and recitals are FREE!
For additional information call 757-
6851 or the 24 hour Hotline at 757-
4370.
SWIMMING PROGRAM
The Children's Learn to
Swim Program in the Water Safety
Instructors Class will start March
15th. For further information con-
tact Melrose Moore, Minges Coli-
seum 757-4632 or 757-4633.
ECU FENCING CM IB
The orientation meeting
will be held on Feb. 23 and Mar. 2 at
6:30pminChristenburyGym. Fenc-
ers at all levels are welcome. For
more information contact 752-3052.
Announcements

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�All ads must be pre-paid�
Any crsanization may use the -Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
rjmesfreeof charge. !jeto!helimited amount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Map To
THE EAST CAROL! MAIM
2nd Fiocr of the Student
Pubs Ek � re
JDYNER
LIBRARY
MENDENHALL
STUDENT
CENTER
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
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cancelled before 10a.m. thedayprior
to publication however, no refunds
will be given.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.
1
i I





The East Carolinian
February 18, 1993
Thursday-Opinion
Fire danger at ECU
largely overlooked
by students, city
Current firefighting equipment
inadequate to serve campus'
needs and concerns
Fire safety in Greenville needs to be vastly im-
proved before it's too late.
Currently, the Greenville Fire Department has snor-
kels, the elevating equipment fire trucks use, that reach
only as high as the seventh story of a building. This
forces residents on the eighth or ninth floors of some
residence halls to take their chances on a possibly smoke-
or fire-filled stairwell.
Administrators at ECU say that if circumstances
dictated that individuals were trapped on one of these
floors, a crane operator would be called to assist. The
catch with this scenario is that it would take the closest
crane operator 20 minutes to arrive on the scene.
Officials at the fire department also say that major
cities, suchas New York, do not ha ve fire equipment that
would reach to the top of skyscrapers. Firefighters would
go into the building with a hose pack to reach the upper
floors.
The problem with this is the time it would take a
firefighter to reach the eighth or ninth floor. Stairwells
may be choked off with rubble or fire and elevators are
normally not used because of their danger during a fire.
This adds to the time it would take
" to rescue a trapped individual, com-
f'J pounding the danger already
present in a fire situation.
ECU administrators have
WMn
A als� commented that the likeli-
jp hood of an individual being
(� trapped on one of the upper floors is
very slim. They say that precautions
are already in place that would make it a
rare instance where a crane operator or air
rescue team would be needed. Even the chance of
an event happening is worth a look into diminishing, if
not abolishing, that risk.
Fire safety in this city and on this campus has
become a joke. Students and instructors alike treat fire
drills as if they were a nuisance rather than a safety
precaution. Students who live in the dorms more often
than not ignore the clamoring bell they hear, passing it
off as "just another fire drill, forget it
Again, students' safety should be a prime concern
of the administration heret ECU. Basing a fire policy on
the belief that if you clap hard enough Tinkerbell won't
die is a potentially lethal mistake waiting to happen.
Sure, everybody would like to believe that the worst
won't happen in a crisis situation, but this city and
university should be prepared for any and all eventuali-
ties.
The administration or city leaders aren't the only
ones to blame, though. Apathy once again rears its head
in a campus-related issue. Students need to realize that
fire drills are not done by some har.d-rubbing, gloating
sadist who likes to see them stumble out of their rooms
at three in the morning. They are done by individuals
who are concerned that when there is a real fire, stu-
dents' safety is ensured.
Messing with the fire alarms is not funny, either.
This may be the prime reason why students don't take
the alarm seriously. They figure that some drunk person
pulled it because they thought it was funny, so why
bother? This laissez-faire attitude puts everyone at risk,
not just one lone individual. All it will take is one fire to
destroy these persons' belongings and then they will
appreciate the seriousness of further situations, but the
end result can never be justified by the means.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hasscli, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Bullard,Ujr. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori DanicLs, Layom Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Hasclrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12.000 copies every Tuesday ami
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edition is the opinion of the
Ldiional Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited 10 250
words, which may be ediled for decency or brevity
The East Carolinian reserves the riyht to
publication. Kellers should be addressed to The Ed
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville N ,27 58
boa, call (9191 757 6366.
edit or reject
lor.Ifc Easti
letters f.
Printed on
Opinion
Page 6
By Gregory Dickens
Attorney General issue dispels sexism in D.C
1 ��!1IJ- �. cJ .1 �
I pushed vehemently to get
Clinton elected and, regarding his
efforts so far in office, I am not
amused.
The only silver lining visible is
that the issues he has tackled so far
have led to extensive debate and
mminations.Sexuality,morality,eth-
icsand propriety have been bandied
about since he first announced he
was aiming for the Oval Office.
Clinton started off his transi-
tion to power by planning to make
the Cabinet an expanded, symbolic
chamber that "reflects America" in
diversity and concerns. Clinton had
decided to nominate a woman for
the office of Attorney General and
the responsibility tocleanupan inef-
ficient legal extension of thegovern-
ment. However, his nominees for
Attorney General have been made
politically invalid because of what
has been termed "Nannygate
Clinton's original nominee,
Zoe Baird, admitted to hiring an
undocumented foreigner (read: ille-
gal alien)foruomestichelpand baby-
sitting and then not paying Social
Security taxes for her employee. She
withdrew shortly after this was dis-
closed to the media.
The second nominee, US. Dis-
trictCourt Judge Kimba Wood, was
found to have essentially done the
same and withdrew before she was
even officially announced.
Clinton made it a hat trick by
nominating a third woman, Janet
Reno, who seems to be a safe bet,
being withoutchildrenthatneed sit-
ting and not hiring illegal aliens even
though she comes from Dade
County, Fla a region of the country
where undocumented aliens are
prevalent. Renoisscheduled to face
the Senate Judiciary Committee in
three weeks.
The debate concerns how
much of the "Nannygate" contro-
versy wasstirred up by the question
of gender.
A recent issue of Newsweek
suggests that there would not be as
extensivea background checkorsudi
disparagement leadingtoan unsuc-
cessful nomination if any of Clinton's
choices had been male.
The article stated that Wood's
hiring of an illegal alien wasn't ille-
gal until 1986aftertheemplo-ment,
and that she actually had paid her
employee's taxes. In short, she did
nothing wrong and was concerned
that any similarity to Baird's case
would hamper her cause and pub-
licly defame her � a realistic fear in
Washington.
Is the opposition to Baird and
Wood hoping to keep a "glass ceil-
ing" werworkingmotherstryingto
succeed in Washington?Such a view-
pointstrikesmeasparanoid. I would
imaginethatthedelugeofnewblood
into Congress would make such a
specific witch-huntdifficultand un-
popular. Ithasinnocapacityreached
the intensity of the debate concern-
ing homosexuals in the military.
Perhaps the more troubling
question would be why Clinton
choose the troubled legal extension
of the government to attempt an
idealisticprecedence?Anynominee
would have to be steel-spined to fix
the bureaucracy and over-manned
administration the Attorney Gen-
eral faces. Itseemsdetrimental to the
authority of the office to try to make
a nomination based with ideals over
ability. I can't help but wish a more-
recognized, more-commanding
nominee had been chosen, of either
sex. I do not denounce Clinton's
standards, but oppose his judge-
ments.
Clinton has run the risk of be-
littling the position after such media
derision. Our new Attorney General
will be seen as a third choice, and
possibly asa third-rate official. How
will her policies differ from those of
male candidate that may have ap-
peared on Clinton's list above
Reno's?
For that matter, did the presi-
dent risk nominating a woman who
may not have been as qualified be-
cause of whatboilsdown to political
idealism? Was there a male candi-
date equal to Baird's expertise who
waspassed upbecause he carries the
y chromosome? Would a male can-
didate have undergone such scru-
tiny for the position?
I believe the nomination was
fair in this regard. Since Clarence
Thomas was approved for the Su-
preme Court, nearly all political or
administrative individuals have re-
ceived renewed media attention in
regards to their past affairs, no pun
intended.
The double standard and ex-
cl usi veness of Washington concern-
ing gender is, with Hillary and the
newly-elected female members of
the legislativebranch of government,
slowly beingdiluted.Weare close to
seeingourfirstfemaleAttomey Gen-
eral. Clinton's goal of a socially di-
verse administration may be com-
ing true, bringing with it new ideas
into Washington. Unfortunately, his
only victory will be not be economic
or legislative, but philosophical.
fwk
LOCKINQ
MRS. QoODEAR
QuoteoftheDay
Science may have found the cure for most
evils; but it has found no remedy for the worst
of them all � the apathy of human beings.
Helen Kelk
Letters to the Editor
Slay residents angry at racism, bigots on campus
To the Editor
Concerning the article
written Thursday, Feb. 11,
1993, titles "Student Forced to
Leave Dorm Room by Resi-
dent Education" � we, the
concerned residents of Slay
Hall would like to make a cor-
rection.
First, we are not for nor
against either Staton nor Tay-
lor. We do not stand for rac-
ism, and we do not stand for
people such as Karen Hassle
(sic), assistant news editor,
who promote racism in order
to gain front page recognition.
We would, however like to
thank Hassle (sic) for invert-
ing thequality of housingcon-
ditions by turning it into a ra-
cial uproar. Because of Hassle
(sic), the racial tension of Slay
Dorm has increased from non-
existent to phenomenally high
levels.
Notes such as "Beware
� black people and white
people live here with no racial
allergies" and "Racial Bitch
(Go Home)" have appeared
mysteriously on resident
doors. We did not think this
was included with paymentof
our housing fees!
Raci sm has taken over the
campus. What is the purpose
of this university advertising
for lectures, marches,displays,
classes, etc. promoting racial
unity when the university em-
ploys and admits bigots? For
example, comments such as:
"My gut feeling is that it was a
racial issue, but the girl did
have a doctor's note" and "we
charged the white student for
a private room and the black
studenta vacant room as said
by Linda Sessoms and
Emanuelle Amaro respec-
tively, seemed to ignite feel-
ings of racial tension.
Wheredoesthisleaveus,
the non-racist students?
Sessoms, the Coordinator of
Slay Dorm, and Amaro, Assis-
tant Vice Chancellor and Di-
rector of Housing, were en-
titled to their beliefs and com-
ments under the First Amend-
ment of our Constitution, but
why is Sessoms defying confi-
dentiality and evoking art un-
derlying sense of mistrust1
Amaro also miscon-
strued this misunderstanding
out of proportion � thereby
surfacing the issue of racism.
A relatively peaceful dorm has
become tainted; racism has
now shown its ugly face, and
those who are non-racist are
trapped in its undertow.
In conclusion, we are all
here for the same reason: to
get an education and to better
ourselves for the future. As
long as there is racism, we will
continue to move backwards
in this "civilized nation We
are college students on the
brink of what America con-
siders adulthood. Take a look
around you, people! Do we
really want it to be like this?
Concerned Residents of
Slay Hall
(Editor's Note: Stories ap-
pear on the front page based on
their newsworthiness, and we
promote our beliefs only on the
Opinion page. We do not pro-
mote racism. Our intentionwas
to show how poor race relations
are at ECU. Hassell, like all our
writers, is an observer and is by
no means responsible for any re-
ported event.)
The East Carolinian openly requests and accepts all letters to the editor. Letters
should be no more than 250 words in length; persons should include their name,
year and major. Phone numbers are also requested for the sole purpose of contact
� they will not be printed. Interested individuals should drop letters off at the
Student Publications building, 2nd floor.
Editorial Notebook
By Joseph C Kinney
Industrialized
economics may
endanger society
The reason I write is to bring attention to
a potential problem facing our society. Of all
the problems that can be forseen to endanger
the existence of our society, they are few in
number. The most noteworthy danger of this
kind involves the possibility of nuclear war
someday breaking out on the planet.
There is another danger of this kind that
is seldom thought of. This danger involves the
long enduring mismanagement of industrial-
ized economies resulting, in time, in thedeple-
tion of life sustaining economic resources.
This is a danger worthy of inspection
given the fact that the world's financial mar-
kets are underpinned by financial futures
markets. The existence and use of financial
futures markets offers the possibility that a
financially well endowed organization could
gain secret manipulative control of world fi-
nancial markets.
Financial futures markets offer this pos-
sibility because of the financial leverage they
offer market participants in con trolling finan-
cial markets. This financial leverage combined
with presence of motive to manipulate finan-
cial markets makes the possibility of secretly
controlled financial markets a feasible one.
What about motive? Why would a finan-
cially well endowed organization ever have
sufficient motive to conspire to secretly con-
trol world financial markets? These are ques-
tions that reach to the heart of my warning tha t
something could be wrong yet unrecognized,
about our perceived economic condition.
If the United States or any other major
industrialized country were to pursue use of
fiscal policies leading it to experience bank-
ruptcy as an entire nation, it is possible that an
organization of men could become motivated
to disengage financial markets from underly-
ing economics. They could become motivated
to do so out of respect for a desire to avoid
experiencing an economic calamity resulting
from the bankruptcy of their nation.
Furthermore, if sufficiently powerful as
an organization, they might find it possible to
secretly tap central bank resources for use in
disengaging financial markets from underly-
ing economies. Use of central bank resources
combined with use of financial futures mar-
kets would allow such an organization capa-
bility to secretly disengage financial markets
from underlying economies for an indefinate
period of time.
1 hope there are people in the country
who take such a warning seriously. If what I
have just described should or has occurred,
our society could be quietly placed on an
extinction path of existence out of respect for
immoral,yet powerful, peoples' desire toavoid
experiencing an economic calamity in their
single lifetimes.
Hawed, bankrupt, yet highly industrial-
ized economies cannot be allowed to operate
indefinately without endangering their
society S long term ahilitv to survive. Such
economies use resources too abundantly and
tor too frivolous of purpose to support a
iK If
"�in i ,il interests.
sIMM -MWIi '1' �'�
. �





February 18, 1993
The East Carolinian
Lifestyle
Page 7
Phish � food for the offbeat
By Dana Danielson
Photo by Dai' Reed
Have you ever seen a musician make love to his instrument? Trey
Anastasio of the phenomenal Phish makes magic with his guitar.
Lifestyle Editor
Planet Phish.
Picture this: four men making
a melodic introduction a capella
with "Amazing Grace Then it
began.
Violet, turqouise, green lights
flashed with electric marine
synchronicity. People flowed
around and over everywhere,
spilling off the balcony into the
aisles�the music echoed, pierced,
fl i rted off the wa 11 s of UNC-Cha pel
Hill's Memorial Hall.
Monday's post-Valentine's
Day show summoned The Alter-
native Dead and psychedelia-in-
fused souls for a night jammed
with pure surrender.
The melody of Phish is ca-
pable of seducing every ear with
melody, cacophony. Some are en-
chanted, some frozen in drooling
ecstasy, some infected with the joy
ot boogieing; all are captivated.
Notes swirled against a backdrop
of neon vessels pumping with pure
intensity. 1 hail to sit down more
than once to sponge drops from
the River karma over nn
adrenalized bod.
Though somewhat hesitant at
first, every member of the audi-
ence was eventually swept away
ke
i .
inesstrawberry-scento d
�louds strobe magicor-
and another and ,tn-
therCousinItinTheEyesl r -
aring through an embracing
leshedcrowd with maniacal de-
Photo by Dail Reed
Phish (leftto right): Page McConnell, )on Tubbs" Fishma, Mike Gordan
and Trey Anastasio, during their "Amai- g Grace" intro.
in the Phish flood. The realizarj n
that all music must not be ori-
ented in the si me manner pulsed
in toeach's psyche with every strobe
that Hashed zebra radiance. Many
things can be learned from this
group �- they surprise ,nd fasci-
nate with unchallenged original-
ity and experimentality. Phish
swims upstream from the norm.
Kissing a vacuum cleaner
offbeat groove The Tire Song
dedication to their driver trippy
acid-washed moon balls me-
chanical guitar-playing robots
ation
n
ie
ikesonc
I ossomsdi ipping from thestage
. Schroeder tickling the ivorys
thesly -mile u orr. by every mem-
ber ' pit'T exhaustion.
Alwa -m-arching and search-
ing, reaching foranythingtomake
us feel whole � it's called the
perfect rhisli buzz.
Doolittie does
little with
new release
ByJohnBullard
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
In support of its new EP,
Doolittie will play CRock'sSat-
urday nigh t.Judgingfrom their
new release, the show should
be upbeat and perfect for the
downtown crowd. However, I
wouldn't go out and buy the
EP.
The Rocky Mount band's
self-titled release contains five
tracks. The tracks are musically
fun, but seriously lack in depth
and scope.
Doolittle's first track,
"Psycho Buds callsyou to join
in the fun. "SueyJusta littlebit
o' laughter Just a little bit in
your life are just about the
extent of the lyrics.
I couldn't help but join in
the fun and laugh, but I'm not
sure if it wasn't at the band's
i pense. The music to "Psycho
Buds" is simple and fun; it'll
remind vou of any southern al-
ternativesound - -from lOyears
See LITTLE page 9
Conversing with
Noam Chomsky
Editors Note: The follounng is the
second installment of a conversation be-
tween staff writers Franco Sacchi and
Nathaniel Meade with Noam Chomsky.
TEC: You'veoftensaid that a super-
power, in order to push its aggressive
foreign policy agenda, needs to find new
enemies. In this new global village, who
will be the next enemy of the United
States?
NC: The basic enemy is always the
same. The basic enemy is always the
Third World. Now, you've got to cover
that in various ways, and for a long time
Russia, which really was part of the Third
World, was a good candidate. But it's
not there anvmore. Right now it's most
likely to be Islamic fundamentalism.
That'sa joke. The United Stateshas noth-
ing against Islamic fundamentalism. In
fact the most fundamentalist state in the
world is the closest United States ally�
Saudi Arabia.They'remoreextremeand
fundamentalist than Iran. So the United
States really has nothing against Islamic
fundamentalism, but the point is what
they call Islamic fundamentalism is in-
dependent islamic movements. This is,
by analogy, the same kind of opposition
they had to t!ie Catholic Church in Cen-
tral America. The United States was fore-
warned that it was the Catholic Church
in Central America. But they went ahead
anyway, you know, murdering the a rch-
bishop, killing priests and nuns. The
United States called it the bitter war
against the church in Central America,
and they hated them for the same reason
they hate the so-called Islamic funda-
mentalists�they were independent. In
fact, any independent force in the Third
World is going to be an enemy.
Japan ard Germany pose a much
more comple case because, forone thing,
they're so integrated with the United
States. If you really look at the actual
capital, you can't make these distinc-
tionseasily. Oureconomies are too inte-
grated. It's a transnational world.
TEC: Vice president, Al Gore, is
actively addressing environmental prob-
lems and embracing a global vision of
stewardship. Some people have sug-
gested that, with efforts to curb pollu-
tion and conserve resources, the sover-
eignty of many Third World countries
will be compromised. Could the interna-
tional focuson the environment become
another version of the New World Or-
der, a kind of ecological imperialism?
N'c Yes, in a sense, fhe West is
beginning to he concerned about envi-
ronmental problems, lake the ozone
laver. As long as the ozone gap was
spreading over theSouth,and it was just
Chilean peasants being burned toai risp
nobody reallv cared. But as �
started appea ring over northen I
and rich white folk were beingburned to
a crisp, suddenly it became a big prob-
lem. So now they're interested in that.
If you look at the Wall Street Jour-
nal,�it's a nice index�for years they've
been pooh-poohing all this stuff. Now
they admit there's a problem with the
ozone because rich white folk are in dan-
ger. Bv the time the sea level rises to the
17th floor of whatever skyscraper they're
in, they'll recognize there's a greenhouse
effect. They'll admit there's a problem.
Then the next trick will be to figure how
private capital can make a profit out of
environmental issues, and there area lot
of ways of doing that. So that's what
they'll do. Then, at that point,you'll find
the big corporations interested in envi-
ronmental issues because they can profit
from it. So yes, they'll use that as a tech-
nique in intervention.
TEC: Let's talk about some of the
forms of totalitarianism we see in our
society. Given our present context, is
there a more contemporary del in it ion ot
totalitarianism?
NC: ITiese terms of political dis-
course are not verj precise, to put it
mildly, but if we want to keep some
�leaning to them, we don't have totali-
tarianism here in the United States. What
we have is a very free society in a totali-
tarian culture. I think we have a deeply
totalitarian culture, especially the intel-
lectual classes are deeply subservient
and obedient. It's just incredible. And
they don't have the excuse that their
counterparts in Russia have�those guys
have complete fea r, these guys have com-
plete cowardice. The totalitarian ele-
ments of the culture are pretty extreme,
even though we live in a society that is
uniquely free.
TEC: Since the end of communism,
do you agree with efforts to search for a
non-capitalistic model of development,
particularly in the Third World?
NC: First of all, capitalism doesn't
exist. The only place capitalism truly
exists is in the Third World, and basi-
cally this is because we force it on them.
If anybody hail anv lingering belief thai
capitalism was a viable system, it disap-
peared during the Ireat 1 tepressk m. So
what you have is various forms of state-
integrated capitalism. I think the col-
lapse o communism should actually flC-
vtht search forother forms of capi-
talism. It's like thedt feat of fasc ism. You
know, it eliminates a barrier to social-
ism I he Sovii t Uni n is me ban iei to
traditional socialist ideas. Whatever ele-
ments of sex ialism were in the Soviet
I nion were destroyed bv I eninbv about
1918, v itii t!iis barrier out of the way, it
i ,in then tree up opportunities that can
The Kill Kids (left)
will join Flat Sided
Buffalo, The
Essence, Breed 13,
Sex, Love &
Money and
Fountain of Youth
tonight at
y Rocks.
Photo by
Dietruch Maune
Rock for REAL to benefit crisis center
By John Bullard
Assistant I ifestyle Editor
Tonight, the REAL Crisis Center
hosts the third annual Rock for REAL
concert at the Attic.
The concert benefits the Center
and includesanall-starpacked lineup
of local bands.
This year, the bands who will
perform include Flat Sided Buffalo,
The Essence, The Kill Kids, Breed 13,
Sex Love & Money and Fountain of
Youth All the bands donate their time
and energy for free. This year's event is
sponsored by WZMB, Papa Oliver's and
The Attic.
" I he support of the bands and the
community is essential to our existence
said I racy S Ott, the benefit coordinator.
"Last vear's concert helped to raise over
$2,300, which helps to keep the center
going
The REAL Crisis Center, which pro-
vides the Pitt County area with free, con-
fidential, supportivecounseling, will sup-
port its 22 birthday in November.
"REAL receives an average of 450
contacts per month through the HELP-
line, the walk-incenterand off-site cri-
sis teams said Scott. "All operate on a
24-hour basis
The Rock Tor REAL benefit will
provide the local community with a
chance to give back to the center.
Thecoverchargeof$5willgocom-
pletely to the center and there will be a
door prize for a "night on the town
Doors will open at 7 p.m.
Jjnt Jmzllu Jhie.
jSu cuAaxd Cianium
IwasatBoli'sonenight with my woman
and some friends that 1 hate, and weordered
a pitcher oi Budweiser. 1 swear to you that
we got Natural Light. But I asked the wily
waitressaboutitand she let everybody at the
bar sample it and brought it back and said it
was Budweiser. She didn't even top it off!
Well, I stuck with bottles after that
1 think pizza and beer is an American
icon. 1 know people like to think of pizza as
Italian, but the pizza weeatisas American as
Ma's apple pie. Look it up � I have.
Anyway, I know beer goes with barbe-
cue chicken and steak and ice cream and
wha tever,butitreally goes with pizza.Speak-
ingof pizza, 1 like th Creek pizza at Mara-
thon better than the one at BoK's, but that's
me. So look, 1 like bacon, tomatoes and Feta
i heeset n my pizza. And olive oil, baby!
But 1 really don't want to talk about
pizza.
I want to talk about moochers. I hah'
'em. Ever have a cookout or party or some-
thing and vou say, "I lev, just bring what-
ever vou want to drink?" Then some kookv
clod shows up empt handed and starts
sponging drink; Sheesh! He's getting the
free! od,yi think hecouldhavebn
a si pack on
I had a
bnngasidedish �ver jmvc a cookout or party or something and
Jou want to y�u sa' "Hey imt bring whatever you want to
drink well drink"? Ihen some kooky clod shows up empty-
that should handed and starts sponging drinks.
have been easy �
( HOMSkA
'i
.
art) ortine wllfV 1h.u
irbet liesHitantsaid11
enough; even
the slackers who brought a loaf oi bread
brought theirown booze. But then came this
git 1 and boy and their friend, who we'll just
call Crapper, Shitter and Farter. So these
three miscreants come in with only one bottle
of wine between them. Not even a bag ii
generic chips! Now hey, that's cool if that's
all thev were going to have. But it wasn't.
So Shitter finishes both batches of Jell-O
shotsand heand Farternotonlydrinkall my
Hussong's tequila � it was a gift from a
good hombre � they fill it up with water!
Now look, that's mooching in the tirst de-
gree.
I didn't find out 'til Liter when 1 took the
tequila on a trip and was going to give a shot
to some other moochersand loand behold'
Tequila water! So unfortunately, I had to
refrain from invitingrappei and Shitter
o er again.
I speciallysincetheyahvaysdragl arter
around with them.
Bui we'vt all had e pi i ien i s w ith
cheap-ass moochers. And here's h
rid of them. There was this girl, Kelly, who
lived in my apartment building. She was
pretty, except tor her mustache. She was the
original Mrs. Empty-handed, the queen of
the moochers. I bullied her into buying me
d inner once to ma ke u p for a 11 the mooching
she did, but it didn't stop her.
Sothere'sthislaxativeJ forget the name,
butit'savailableatl larrisTeeter.lt comes in
a clear bottle, it's lime flavored and it'schea p.
So we were doing the cookout thing and
Kelly came over in her flashy mooching
style. I asked her if she wanted a daiquiri.
1 la! Just mix the shift with MinuteMaid
and ice in the blender with enough rum to
smell' She drank two bottles of the stuff! It
was a beautiful thing' She had the runs so
had she had to staj in that night! And the
next il
Ofcourse,Ionl say thisin fun. I would
never do such a thing and Idon'tencourage
it. But i an vou imagine?
Helpful hint: Leftover pizza makes a
delit i. his break last right out of the fridge





8 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 18, 1993
iMi4�ii
Murray saves 'Groundhog Day'
In 1862, English clergyman Charles I .
Dodgeson, better known as I ewis Carroll,
began inventing the story of "Alice in
Wonderland" for his friend, Alice
Pleasance I indell, during a boating trip.
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The ads read: "Bill is back
This is an appropriately powerful
phrase for the new film, Groundhog
Day.
The Bill in die ad is, of course,
Bill Murray. Once again Murray
proves to be one of the best comic
actors of the past three decades.
Though Groundhog Day isnot agreat
film, Bill Murray is a great come-
dian.
The gimmick in Groundhog Day
is simple; Murray's character, Phil
Connors, i s forced to relive the same
day over and over again until he
gets it right. The day he is forced to
relive is Feb. 2, Groundhog Day.
Phil works as a cynical vve.ith-
ermanatVTBH,Channel9inr s
burgh. Phil's cynicism reaches its
apex when he has to cover tht in-
nual Groundhog celebration in
Punxsutavvney, Penn home of the
famous (infamous?) groundf-iiv.
Punxsutavvney Phil.
Joining Phil the Weatherman
are Rita,a prod ucer played by Andie
MacDowell, and Larry, a camera-
man played by Chris Elliot. Al-
though not evidentearly in the film,
Phil is in love with Rita. He spends
a sizeable portion of hisenergy each
day trying to win her love.
In addition to tryingtoget Rita's
attention. Phi I manages to kill him-
self several times,by burning, crash-
ing and electrocuting his body,
krun ring that at 6 a.m. the next day
he v il be alive and awakened by
the mornti, deejays discussing
Groundh Day.
Grotmuttog Day was ably di-
rected by Harold Ramis, a comic
act r in hisown i ight Ramis knows
how r� accentuate Murray's talents;
he allows Murray enough room to
c;rry each scene by himself. R.inis
even makes a cameo as a
nei; wurgeon trying to determine
wh Phil Connors thinks he is Irv-
ing the si me day over and over.
A film like Groundhog Day pro-
vides copious opportunities for re-
curring gags. They are used exten-
sivelyrPhil meeting insurancesales-
man Ned Ryerson each morning,
Phil passing a beggar who asks for
money everyday, Phil waking up to
the same song on the radio every
morning ("I'veGot You, Babe")and
Phil walking into a huge puddle.
These are to name but a few.
Murray makes each of these
scenes vvatchable, even if the out-
come is predictable.
Groundhog Day is not without its
flaws. The story is flimsy. In most
films where something magical hap-
pens to a character some explana-
tion is usually attempted
Though some may applaud the
filmmakers for not feeling the need
to explain Thil's plight, this lack of
explanation leaves the magic unac-
counted for.
Another flaw is Phil's attraction
to Rita. Hie story never touches on
this attraction until Phil has already
WHO'S Ti
Attic
Thursday
Rock for REAL
featuring 6
local bands
Friday
Dillon Fence
Saturday
Sidewinder
lived three or four days repeat-
edly. His infa I uation is not believ-
able.
Another big problem lies with
Rita herself, or rather MacDowell.
Despi ted isagreement from agood
friend of mine, I see no craft in her
acting.
Life as a model could not be so
bad that MacDowell can't return to
the field. She may be a ttractive, but
even the ciean-cut, all-American
role, which should pose no real
challenge, seems to be hopelessly,
even haplessly, inept.
A final complaint results from
the film's length. A featherweight
comedy like Groundhog Day needs
to make its point in under 90 min-
utes. It drags for 110.
But lest you think I detested
Groundhog Day, I need to tell you
mat the film is funny. Bill Murrav
is in fine form. Despite the length,
the poor sup port and shoddy script,
Murray single-handedly makes
Groundhog Day a delight.
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FEBRUARY 18. 1993
The East Carolinian
9
LITTLE
Continued from page 7
ago. The onJy difference was the
"Row, row, row, your boat" repeti-
tion of the lyrics. A bit trying.
The tracks continue with much
of the same sound and lyricism in
"Helen Here's where the cliches
kick in. "Bye, bye baby good bye
sings the band. Again,likein"Psycho
Buds" the lyrics are cliche and repeti-
tive.
Doolirtle isn't without some re-
demption. The tracks "Elbows" and
"Listen to the Wind" seem to indi-
cate that the band has potential to
overcome some of the silly lyricism.
This was almost shattered by
CHOMSKY
be taken advantage of. Capital-
ism is wrong for the very reasons
Adam Smith pointed out, and 1
think we should overcome it.
That's the big task for the future.
TEC: Was tonight's lecture a
demonstration of democracy or
do we just live in
a system that can
tolerateanykind
of critic because
of the apathy of
the citizens?
the last track, "History Lies The
song is overdone with simple, lyric
attempts at an issue that deserves a
little moreIt'sno surpriseHistory
liesBaby diesAnd mother cries
Maybe the band should be playing
violins for this track.
Doolittle is composed of Roy
Clay (vocals, rythym guitar), Will-
iam Westcott (vocals, lead guitar),
Adam Seate (vocals, bass), Alan
Pendleton (keyboards) and Brian
Wordsworth (percussion). The band
possesses the ability to write
danceable music that is perfect for
the dub scene. A few beers, and I
don't think I would mind hearing
"Sueyand being treated likea farm
animal.
However,sittingaroundand lis-
tening to the EP leaves much to be
desired. Hell, I'll admit it I tapped
my fingers tothesongs. All the while,
though, I was strained by the shal-
low, repetitive lyrics.
As negative as this review may
seem, 1 do believe that Doolirtle will
put on a good show. Their music is
very danceableand meg' expertly
play their instruments. 1 he show this
Saturday at O'Rock's shouldn't
dissappoint.
Continued from page 7
.
NC: That's a
good question.
Certainly the
system can toler-
ate people like
me, you know,
the fringe ele-
ments. But no-
tice it can't toler-
ate us very
much. Take Boston where I live.
It's the most liberal city in the
country. The Boston Globe is prob-
ably the most liberal newspaper
in the country. It's considered
practically communist. People
around here will say it's a com-
munist journal. I have friends
who are editors in the Globe, and
I live within these circles. Not only
can they not review a book of
mine, they can't even list my books
under work by local authors. You
know, they have a listing every
week, but none of my work can be
listed. In fact the book review edi-
tor of the Boston Globe told Pub-
lishers Weekly, the big publish-
ing magazine�for publication,
they printed
this�that she
would never
permitanybook
publisher that I
had published
with to be re-
viewed. This is
the level of
fright we have,
over the fact that
one person in
the country is
talking about
these things.
They tolerate it
loan extent, but
in a very limited fashion. You
wouldn't believe the things that
happen. I'm privileged. What
happens to unprivileged people
is a thousand times worse. But
even people who are privileged,
like me, are extremely
marginalized.
Suppose we got to the point
where we weren't marginalized.
It's not clear what would happen.
Now they ad-
mit there's a
problem with
the ozone be-
cause rich
white folk are
in danger. 9
The United States has a violent
history, very violent and repres-
sive. It's a very free society, but
when there's been any threat to
ruling class domination, it gets
extremely violent. Take a look at
what's called McCarthyism,
which is not the right word, be-
cause it was started by liberal
democrats (McCarthy was just a
latecomer). That was very taut
business. They didn't kill a lot of
people, but they threw them out.
When the Black Panthers began
to organize in the ghettos, they
murdered them. Fred Hampton's
death should be famous assassi-
nation�it's much more impor-
tant than any of ffie others. He
was a very constructive Black
Panther organizer. They didn't
care about the criminals, so they
left them alone. But Fred Hamp-
ton was a typical example of a
very constructive Black Panther
organizer, so he was killed in a
Gestapo-style raid, set up by the
FBI. The United States also has a
very violent labor history. About
seven or eight hundred American
workers were killed instrikesdur-
ing a time when no one was being
killed in Europe. So state power is
there. Whether it would be used is
hard to predict. It depends on what
level of popular support there is.
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t





��Hl i i n "I � I 1MMaajM
Tlie East Carolinian
February 18. 1993
Sports
Page 11
Copeland rebounds
well from adversity
By Misha Zonn
Staff Writer
During Ike Copeland's four-
year career at ECU, he has success-
fully found a balancebetweenbeing
a productive on the basketball court
and beinganabove-average student
in the classroom. His playing daysas
a Pirate have taken him through a
surprising rookie campaign, a seri-
ous knee injury and at present, a
seriousdent in theECU recordbooks.
When Copeland first came to
ECU his main goal was to work as
hard as possible, he said. He said
had no idea his hard work would
pay off immediately.
"I didn't think that I was going
to pla y tha t much my freshman year,
and it ended up that I started
Copeland said. That year Copeland
made an immediate impact on the
team by averaging in double figures
in both scoring and rebounding.
Copeland found a niche for himself
under the boards.
Copeland said he found diffi-
culty in balancing basketball and
studying,butastirnewentby things
began to fall into place.
"In the beginning it was hard,
butit'slikehavinga job Copeland
said. "Afterawhileyougetadjusted
to a certain pattern and you do the
same thing every day
Dee has made it a habit of doing
the same thing every game by regu-
larly collecting nine or more re-
bounds per contest He feels that
even though there are taller and more
physical players in the conference,
heightand strength donotnecessar-
ily make a great rebounder.
"You don't have to be a great
leaper or bevery quick You box out
Photo by Biff Ranson
Copeland has been the backbone of the Pirate squad after being
surgically removed last year. He missed most of'92 with a knee injury.
a lot of times and the boards just
come your way Copeland said.
"Mostofthetirnermrxjxingoutthe
man that isleading the other team in
rebounding. If I box them out I get a
lot of rebounds
Despitea career-threateningin-
juiylastseason,Copeland hasplayed
See COPELAND page 13
The Colonial
Athletic
Association's
swimming
championships
begin today
in
Wilmington.
Photo by
Gary Patterson
Dukes to battle Seahawks for
swiniLming championship
JMU and American defend their
titles in 8th CAA championship
Wilmington, N.C. (SID�
James Madison University
and American University
will defend their respective
team titles as the 8 th annual
Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion Swimming and Diving
Championships will be held
Wednesday through Satur-
day (Feb. 17-20) at the
Seahawk Natatorium.
The complete schedule
of events starts Thursday,
with trials at 11 a.m. and fi-
nals each night at 7 p.m.
Saturday's finals will
start one hour earlier at 6 p.m.
James Madison won the
men's title in 1992 with 753.5
points over American at 557
points, while the Lady Eagles
of American claimed the
women's championship with
801.5 points over James
Madison's 759 points.
Three of this week's com-
petitors established meet
records in last year's champi-
onship.
UNC Wilmington's Burak
Erdem captured the 200-yard
backstroke (1:49.56),
American's Gabriella
Csepe took the 100-yard
butterfly (56.33), Jacque
Wisnauskas of American
swept the 200-yard butter-
fly (2:04.29) and James
Madison's Cindy Walker
set new marks in the 50-
yard freestyle (24.20) and
100-yard freestyle (52.16).
This yea r marks the fifth
time in its eight-year his-
tory that the championship
has been staged at UNC
Wilmington's Seahawk Na-
tatorium.
Pirates drop
in 10-point
loss against
Eagles in D.C
WASHINGTON (AP) � Brian
Gilgeous scored 21 points to lead the
American University Eagles (9-12,6-5)
over the East Carolina Pirates (8-14, 3-
8), 67-57 Monday night.
American holds a 14-6 advantage in
the series, winning the seventh straight
against the Pirates at Bender Arena.
Gilgeous nearly matched his sea-
son game average of 22.7.
Kareem Richardson and Lester
Lyons were the top scorers for the Pi-
rates with 15 points each.
East Carolina jumped out to an early
lead in the first half, leading by 5 at 11-
6 with 1350 on the clock. Gilgeous
scored 4 points on consecutive posses-
sions and Bryan Palmer pushed the lead
to American 12-11 with 11:40 left in the
half.
American wentona 10-5 run to lead
the Pirates 22-16 with 5:13 on the clock.
The Pirates narrowed the score to 26-24
at half time with strong man-to-man de-
fense and persistent drives to the bas-
ket.
The Eagles lost the lead early in the
second half with a Lyons 3-pointer
makeing the score 27-26 in favor of the
Richardson
and
Lyons
score
fifteen
each in
loss
In light of
recent roller
coaster rides,
the ECU men's
basketball
team is trying
to find some
consistency
before the
CAA
tournament in
Richmond.
Pirates.
Tim Fudd scored on a baseline
jumper to put American ahead 28-27.
The Pirates gained the lead once more
with to a 3-point edge at 37-34 with an
impressive Ike Copeland hook shot with left in the game.
Photo by Biff Ranaon
15:51 left in the half.
American answered with a Fudd
layup and successful free throw and a
Gilgeous score. The Eagles never looked
back leading by as much as 11 with 356
m vs. Am
ECU (57)
Min fg ft rb
m-a m-a o-t
Copeland 30 3-7 3-4 7-14
Lyons 22 6-9 1-1 0-2
Richardson 38 6-17 3-5 1-3
Young 25 1-5 1-2 0-0
Gill 23 4-7 0-0 2-6
James 1 0-1 0-0 0-0
Hunter 15 0-5 0-0 1-3
Peterson 22 2-8 0-0 0-2
Armstrongs 0-1 0-0 0-0
Lewis 16 1-2 0-0 0-2
Pf
3
P
9
515
315
23
48
00
20
05
30
42
Totals 200 23-62 8-12 12-38 6 26 57
Percentages: FG - .370, Ft. 666, 3 pt. Goals: 3-15 -
.200, Team Rebounds - 5, Blocked Shots - 3,
Turnovers - 15, Steals -8.
American (67)
Min fg ft rb
m-a m-a o-t a pf tp
Gilgeous 35 6-15 9-11 5-11 4 2 21
Sedmak 29 0-7 3-7 4-6 11 3
Fudd 32 5-9 6-8 4-9 0 2 16
Gilliam 24 1-4 0-0 2-2 112
Franklin 30 1-9 1-2 1-5 10 3
Lawrence 11 2-5 2-4 1-4 2 4 6
Palmer 10 1-2 3-4 1-3 115
BlackweU 4 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Robinson 9 2-2 0-0 1-4 13 5
Washington 10-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0
Krivokapic 15 2-5 1-2 0-3 0 3 6
Totals 20020-58 25-38 21-51 11 17 67
Percentages: FG - 344, Ft. 652,3 pt Goals: 2-10 -
700, Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots -6,
Turnovers -14, Steals - 9.
1st half 2nd half OT
Final
ECU
American
24
26
33
41
57
Mo' money required for Division 1-A playoff
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) � The No. 1
problemLncdlegeathtetkscouldleadtoariew
system of detenruTiing the No. 1 team in col-
lege football.
The problem is money. And one of the
possiblesolutionsisaDivisionl-A playoff that
could generate $60 million for financially
troubled athletic departments.
Althoughmostcoachesand collegepresi-
dents remain opposed to a playoff, NCAA
executive director Dick Schultz thinks there
will be one by the end of the decade. He said
Tuesday that economic pressures wiH'force
schools to seriously consider the idea.
"There are a lot of things outside the
control of coaches and presidents and athletic
directors that might take place that could have
some impact onvvhathappensin the late '90s
Schultz told NCAA College Football Forum.
At bst month's NCAA convention,
Schultz asked members to consider a one-
game playoff as a major source of new rev-
enue. While he concedes there hasn't been
much support for his proposal, Schultz thinks
that will change as more and more schools
struggle to fund theirathletic programs.
"We could do a lot with $60 million he
said.
Mostcoachesareagainsta playoff because
they believe it would destroy the bowl system.
But Schultz pointed out that the bowls are
already being hurt by the NFL's extended sea-
son, which has led to a glut of games on New
Year's Day and hard times for late December
bowls that must compete with the pros.
"Most of those non-New Year's games
have gone to syndication or cable Schultz
said. "And tlie postseason howl committee,
which had a plan to continue to raise the
payouts, has had to hold the line for the List
coupleofyearsorwewouldhavelostacouple
of bowls
While Division 1-A football and basketball
programs generally make money, almost all
other sports are in the red. And the financial
straincould get even worse as the NCAA tries
to achieve "gender equity by increasing op-
portunities for female athletes.
"Perhaps there does have to be some
paringofprograms,butIdon'ttliinkan'lxxly
wants to do anything tliat's going to damage
fcxTtballordamagebaskerballordamage men's
sports he said Instead, Schultz said, college
officials slxmld consider addingnewwomen's
sports Such as figure skating. "It's a beautiful
sport with tremendous interest in the Olym-
pics he sak I "N laybe we have to take a look
at some of these programs. Maybe we're not
searching in the right areas to determine what
the interests and abilities of women are
And how will schools pay for new or
expanded women's programs? In addition to
a football playoff, Schultz has suggested the
creationofanNCAAlicensingdivision similar
to those in the NBA, NFL and major league
baseball.
Schultz said collegiate licensing gener-
ated $60 million last year, but only $10 million
went to universities and $2 million to the
companies thathandled the licensing. The rest,
he said, went to makers of counterfeit and
pirated products.
"It has unbelievable potential if handled
rightSduiltzsaidWehavetoconstantlvhe
creative ri nd look at new means of developing
revenue
Rec services
basketball
rankings
Week 4
Fraternity Gold
1. Pi Kappa Alpha "A"
2. Kappa Alpha "A"
3. Alpha Phi Alpha
4. Sigma Phi Epsilon "A"
5. Theta Chi "A"
Fraternity Purple
1. Pi Kappa Alpha "B"
2 Sigma Phi Epsilon "B"
3.PiKappaTau"B"
4. Lambda Chi "B"
5. Theta Chi "B"
Men's Gold
1. United Nations
IBeefNBalls
3. To The Max
4. Total Package
5. Fugitives
Men's Purple
1. Ball Hogs
2. Da' Fat Katz
3. Take It As It Comes
4. Monarchs
5. Athletic World
Women
l.VB Heels
2. In Your Face
3. Thrown Together
4. LP Rejects
5. Bomb Squad
Sorority
1. Alpha Omicron Pi
2. Delta Zeta
3. Chi Omega
4. Alpha Phi
5. Pi Delta
L





12 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 18. 1993

Owners consider expanding playoffs
PHOENIX (AP) � Baseball
owners, no closer to hiring a com-
missioner, are considering dou-
bling the teams in the playoffs to
eight � although change may
have to wait until 1995.
John Harrington of the Bos-
ton Red Sox, chairman of the
schedule-format committee, said
early results of a fan survey
showed support for doubling the
size of the playoffs by adding a
third tier.
Owners still seemed stuck on
defining theduties of thecommis-
sioner, whose office has been va-
cant since Fay Vincent's forced res-
ignation on Sept. 7. But they
seemed tobe taking tentative steps
to the most fundamental change
in the game since 1969.
"There's a lot of strong feel-
ings in the game to make some
changes Harrington said.
Milwaukee Brewerspresident
Bud Selig, chairman of the ruling
executive council, said last month
tha t a survey of about 2,000 people
showed more support for change
among younger fansand less sup-
port among those who attended
ga mes more frequently. A second
groupofsurveyswassenttoabout
11,000 season-ticket holders, and
Harrington said those results are
still being tabulated.
"The two surveys were quite
close Harrington said. "A few
variations
Because schedules must be
provided to the Major League
Baseball Players Association by
July 1, Harrington said it was be-
coming harder to make
postseason change s for 1994.
"It's still possible, but the win-
dow isclosinghe said. "It's more
likely '95
The survey also asked ques-
tions about three divisions in each
league, interleague play and the
designated hitter. Harrington said
there may be a need for additional
surveys,and thatany changeswere
likely tobe gradual.
"I don't see us making a series
of changes all at once he said. "It
will be a progression of changes
Eddie Einhorn of the Chicago
White Sox, another advocate of
change, said owners understood
they needed to negotiate changes
with the union.
"All we can do is discuss it
and approve it from our stand-
point he said.
George W. Bush of the Texas
Rangers indicated there might be
some owners against change. So
far, that group has been silent.
"I'm a traditionalist he said.
Einhorn, a member of the tele-
vision committee, said it was un-
likely that starting times for
postseason night games would be
earlier this season. World Series
games were criticized last fall for
their 8:35 p.m. EDT starts, precipi-
tating late endings.
"Theyhave'60MinutesThey
have commi tmen ts that we've con-
templated when they made the
deal Einhorn said of CBS. "In a
new deal, we would like to work
that into it
CBS Sports president Neal
Pilson has said, however, that he
would consider earlier start times
if baseball allowed the network to
reduce its rights payments.
Members of the restructuring
committee and executive council
met Tuesday night and were set to
give an update to all owners dur-
ing today's major league meeting.
Although the committee was told
to redefine the commissioner'sjob
by Nov. 1, it has been unable to
come up with a final report and
some officials say there is a split.
wmmm
ThisWeek
BASEBALL
DETROIT TIGERS-
Agreed to terms with Mike'
Henneman and Mark Leiter,
pitchers, on one-year contracts.
MILWAUKEE BREW-
ERS�Agreed to terms with
Ricky Bones, pitcher, on a two-
year contract, and Carlos
Maldonado and Angel
Miranda, pitchers, on one-year
contracts.
OAKLAND ATHLET-
ICS�Agreed to terms with
Edwin Nunez, pitcher, on a
minor-league contract, and
Scott Baker, Mike Mohler, Kirt
Ojala, Curtis Shaw, Tanyon
Sturtze, and David Zancanaro,
pitchers; Izzy Molina, catcher,
and Scott Lydy, outfielder, on
one-year contracts.
TORONTO BLUE JAYS�
Agreed to terms with Duane
Ward, pitcher, on a three-year
contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Associa-
tion
DALLAS MAVERICKS�
Signed Morion Wiley, guard, toa
10-day contract.
DETROIT PISTONS�Acti-
vated Dennis Rodman, forward,
from theinjured list. Placed Isaiah
Morris, forward, on the injured
list.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
DALLAS COWBOYS�
Named John Blake defensive line
coach.
DENVER BRONCOS�
Named Bob Ferguson head of the
scouting department and direc-
tor of player personnel.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
BUFFALO SABRES�Re-
called Doug Macdonald, cen-
ter, from Rochester of the
American Hockey League.
LOS ANGELES KINGS�
Sent Jim Thomson, right wing,
to Phoenix of the International
Hockey League.
SAN JOSE SHARKS�Re-
called Dean Kolstad,
defenseman, and Michel
Picard, left wing, from Kansas
City of the International
Hockey League.
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Barry ripe for NBA after
being picked by Bucks
MILWAUKEE (AP) � Even
through he doesn't shoot free throws
underhanded, Jon Barry'sgame still
features many similarities to his Hall
of Fame father, Rick.
Like dad, Jon can shoot the 3-
pointer and he's not afraid to show
hisemotionsorcomplain toofficials.
"This was just one game, big
deal the Milwaukee rookie said
Monday night a fter scoring a career-
high 18 points in the Bucks' 128-122
victory over the Charlotte Hornets.
But for Barry, buried on the
Bucks bench since being acquired
from Boston in eirly December after
a longcontracthassle with theCeltics,
it was a start.
"I'd almost forgot what it was
like to play important minutes. It
had been since List March said
Barry, who scored 12 points in the
fourth quarter.
"I've got to find out if I belong
in the league and what I need to do
to improve. I hope theCelticssee the
highlights, but 1 don't want to stick
a dagger in their back
Barry's minutes increased from
an average of six to 17 on Monday
night for several reasons. Fellow
rookie Todd Day is out for four to
six weeks with a dislocated elbow
and Milwaukee coach Mike
Dunleavy wanted toresthisstarters
in the fourth quarter because the
Bucks play again tonight in New
Jersey.
"Jon held himself well. He got
an opportunity and did a job
Dunleavy said.
Barry got into a jawing contest
with Charlotte's Kendall Gill and
waved his arms after driving for a
layup around Alonzo Mourning
with 42 seconds togo. Healso made
two 3-pointers and then wrapped
upthevictory with three free throws
in the final 10 seconds.
Milwaukee led by nine after
three quarters and held the lead
behind the play of Barry and Fred
Roberts, who finishedwithl5 points.
"ltvvasa lot of fun Barry said.
"It was very frustrating sitting on
the bench. I had never done it.
Kendall just said, 'Come on rookie,
let's see what you gotMourning
had 29 points, 12 rebounds and six
blocks and Dell Curry scored 24 for
the Hornets, who had their four-
game road winning streaksnapped.
"Jon Barry wasa good playerin
collegeand he played well tonight
Charlotte coach Allan Bristowsaid.
"He tripled his career high in
points scored. Defensively, we let
them score at will. We were lucky
that our offense kept us in the
game
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will award a $100 gift certificate for the best
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For more details, come by the Professional Programs
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don't delay!
� Free T-Shirts imprinted with the winning design to the lop five finalists.
� $100 gift certificate from the ECU Student Store to first place winner.
� Winner will be teatured in the next School of Business newsletter.
� Contest is limited to only students accepted to the School of Business and currently
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T-Shtrl and Slogan Contest
Sponsored by the Commerce Club
mmmmmmm�r





FEBRUARY 18, 1993
The East Carolinian
13
Sura leads
Florida St
Seminoles
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) �
The Florida State Seminoles, trying
tokeep a share of the AtlanticCoast
Conference lead, will be without
their two top scorers tonight against
struggling North Carolina State.
Ninth-ranked FloridaState(19-
6, 9-2 in the ACC) will try to stay
abreast of conference co-leader
North Carolina without sophomore
Bobby Sura and senior Douglas
Edwards, both suspended for one
game for violating the school's class
attendance policy. The Seminoles
play the North Carolina State
Wolfpack at Raleigh.
"It's a very serious suspension
because we're looking at being in
the race for a regular season cham-
pionship coach Pat Kennedy said
Tuesday.
"You'realwaysupset when the
kids don't sustain their academic
responsibilities
The Seminoles would normally
be hefty favorites against the
Wolfpack, a team trying to avoid a
last-place finish in the Atlantic
Coast Conference in a year they've
been crippled by injuries and aca-
demic casualties. But the loss of
Sura ard Douglas hurts.
Sura, the ACC's third leading
scorer with a 20.8 average, and Dou-
glas Edwards,averagingl8.5 points
a game, are also the team's leading
rebounders.
North Carolina State (7-13,1-9)
has played much of its season with
only eight players, losing others to
injuries and academics.
"They may have a player or
two out, but it's still going to be a
big game for us and obviously a big
game for them said North Caro-
lina State coach Les Robinson.
"Those are very important players
for Florida State. They've got some
good players on the bench. I'msure
they've got some guys out there
battling
Kennedy was undecided about
his starting lineup for tonight's
game. He could use fifth-year se-
nior Lorenzo Hands and go with
the three-guard lineup oropen with
a big front line using freshman
Maurice Robinson and Byron
Wells,alsoafifth-yearsenior,along-
side starting center Rodney Dobard.
Starting guards Charlie Ward
and Sam Cassell are in the lineup,
but Ward is still recovering from a
shoulder injury that has limited his
play.
Edwards, who ranks among
the leaders in virtually every statis-
tical category in the ACC, also
missed Florida State's season-
opener for failing to take a final
exam last spring.
The Florida Board of Regents
established a rule several years ago
to suspend athletes from games if
they fail to take tests. It is known as
the "Deion Sanders rule named
for the former Florida State star
who failed to take any of his final
exams in his last semester �t the
school.
Junior point guard Charlie
Ward is still bothered by a shoul-
der injury and only at about 60 to 65
percentofhisabiuty,Kennedysaid.
Florida State earlier in the sea-
son lost 7-foot center Andre Reid
and guard Chuck Graham for the
year. Reid broke a finger and Gra-
ham suffered a knee injury in the
opening game. Freshman Derrick
Carroll suffered a broken foot last
week and is not expected back be-
fore the ACC tournament in mid-
March.
The East
Carolinian
is now accepting
applications for
the positions of
Staff Writer and
Editorial
Columnist.
Applications are
available at our
office on the sec-
ond floor of the
Publications
Building.
COPELAND
Continued from page 11
even more aggressively in the '9293
campaign.
He currently leads the CAA in
rebounding and shows no signs of
slowing down. Copeland said his
knee injury caused him to focus on
his senior year.
"I guess that you take things for
granted and then you have a major
injury like that hit you he said. "It
kind of puts things in perspective
The ECU basketball team
struggled in the first half of the sea-
son but have since pulled off an up-
set against James Madison and
played theotherC A A teams tougher
the second time around.
"We'll play a good game
Copeland said and then we'll have
a let down. We just have to get con-
sistent. If we get everyone playing
well on a given night then we can
beat anybody. We just have to get it
done
Copeland said that after he fin-
ishes his careerat ECU, it will be nice
to look backat his ind ividual accom-
plishments, but he puts a greater
emphasison winningand thepeople
he has met.
"I feel thatasa team, 1 wish that
wecould have won a lot more games
�overall 1 think that the friendships
I've made and the people I've met
are really going to be helpful
Copeland said.
"I'm happy about everything
except that I wish that wecould have
won a lot more games
Copeland is currently in third
place on ECU'sall-time rebounding
list. Copeland's hard work on the
floor will play a pivotal role if the
Pirates hope to make a run for the
CAA title in Richmond this March.
'Iike out an ad on
the classifieds
page in
The East Carolinian
If you have
something to sell
wouldn't you
like 12,000
people to
know?
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 18, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 18, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.924
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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