The East Carolinian, February 16, 1993






Sports
Batter up
i
The Pirate baseball
team won one and lost
two in their first series
of the season. See
story page 11.
Lifestyle
'Sniper9 misses
Tom Berenger's latest
film, 'Sniper' is a war
drama that is off-target.
See story page 7.
The East Carolinian
m. 68 No. n
Circulation 12.000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday , February' 16, 1993
Media Board enacts alcohol policy for WZMB
16 Pages
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
The Media Board recently
closed a year-long issue with
the enactment of an alcohol
policy governing actions be-
tween WZMB and local clubs.
In February of 1992, the
Media Board issued a memo-
rand urn halting any future ben-
efits that might be held at local
clubs. On advice from the uni-
versity attorneys' office, the
Board concluded that any such
event would hold the univer-
sity open to civil liability law-
suits.
Through various memo-
, randums and discussions, the
( Board came to the conclusion
mat a policy would have to be
enacted to use as a guideline
fok any future events. Media
Board chairperson Terri Avery
met with the university attor-
neys and together, they came
up with a new policy that was
accepted at the Feb. 11 meet-
ing.
The policy stated that staff
members of WZMB may con-
duct live-remotes from local
businesses that serve alcohol. It
limits thisabilityby placing vari-
ous restrictions on the time,
manner and frequency these
live-remotes may be held.
For example, before the
policy was enacted, local busi-
nesses could hold benefits for
WZMB. This constituted one of
the major problems when con-
cocting the new policy. When
previous benefits were held, the
station would recieve money
that would go directly back to
improving the qualitv of the sta-
tion. Now, tne policy specih-
cally states that benefits for
WZMB will only be allowed "in
locations where alcohol is not
being served
Kevin Brelsford, program
director of WZMB, was pleased
with the results of the policy,
with the exception of the benefit
stipulation.
"Overall, I'm happy that
the matter was finally resolved
Brelsford said. "I'm pleased with
the results.
"I wish the policy didn't
restrict the clubs from holding
benefits for WZMB, though.
These benefits helped the sta-
tion in the past, they raised a
lot of money for the station
General manager Tim
Johnson agreed with Brelsford
on the single bone of conten-
tion.
"The school is still torn
over who is responsible when a
tavern hold s a benefit Johnson
said. "So, they still won't let
clubs hold benefits for WZMB
because they think WZMB might
De name.
Other points of contention
that the policy made dealt with
the manner with which adver-
tisements would be done, mon-
etary gains from the events and
members' affiliation with
WZMB as a radio station.
The policy stated that ad-
vertisements would be limited
See WZMB page 4
Fil� photo
According to a new Media Board policy, local businesses will no longer be able to host any benefits for WZMB
if the establishment sells alcohol.
Men at work
Knoio oy am Hanson
Construction has begun on the new Todd Dining Hall to be located on College Hill
on the old Tvler Beach area.
COST calls for student action, involvement
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
In the second meeting of the Com-
mittee On Student Tuition (COST), the
group's organizer, Bill Gheen, reiter-
ated his fears concerning an increase in
tuition.
Explaining to new members the
purpose of COST, Gheen said, "We're
reacting to a report from the Govern-
ment Performance Audit Committee
that suggested the state legislature
should raise tuition across the state to
raise revenue
"We think that the legislature will
raise tuition anyway, but our goal is to
minimize that tuition increase. We want
to make it hard for them to raise it in
the future Gheen said.
Gheen repeated his message be-
fore the Inter-Fraternity Council on
Tuesday and again before the
Panhellenic Council on Thursday. The
44
IFC appeared to be receptive to the
COST plan and offered to fill a leader-
ship position within
the group.
Mike Had ley,
representing the
SGA, and Cheen
hold the other two
chairmanship posi-
tions in COST.
Though Gheen
wishes to get his
group organized as
quickly as possible
in order to coordi-
nate its activities, the
legislature is not
prepared to act on a
tuition raising bill at
the moment.
"No one has set a calender date
yet for any legislative action an assis-
tant to the director of the Government
Performance Audit said. "The state Sen-
We think that
the legislature
will raise tuition
anyway, but our
goal is to mini-
mize that tuition
increase. "
Bill Gheen,
group organizer
ate will form a Select Committee to
review all government audits, and the
House will run any
such bill through its
Appropriations Com-
mittee
Gheen stressed
the importance of be-
ing prepared to react
quickly to any legisla-
tive action and possi-
bly prevent a bill from
ever coming to a vote.
"We want stu-
dents to write to their
state legislator, write
to their local newspa-
per, and tell their
friends and family to
do the same in order to let the legisla-
tors know how they feel about a tuition
hike
See COST page 4
AMA Marketing Week lab eled a' success'
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
The ECU chapter of the
American Marketing
Association's Marketing Week is
considered "a success" by Brian
Kerns, president of the AMA.
"Many students gained
valuable experience by partici-
pating in our experiments. It's
been a really good success
Kerns said.
The week culminated with
a visit from a Vice President of
Carolina Telephone, Bruce
Branyan. With 23 years experi-
ence in the industry, Branyan is
responsible for the marketing
strategies for the company.
Speaking at ECU for the
third time, Branyan opened his
presenta tion wi th a joke and pro-
ceeded to tell the audience about
his career in the marketing pro-
fession.
"I began my career in engi-
neering at Ohio Bell, a division
of AT&T, but moved to market-
ing when the company began
facing increased competition
Branyan said. "During the
breakup of AT&T I moved to
government affairs. Lobbying is
essentially marketing, though
In 1989, AT&T offered
Branyan a position in New Jer-
When you leave ECU, that is not the end
of your education. Always take the con-
tinuous education approach to your job.
sey. "I declined, and landed at
Carolina Telephone Branyan
said. "They were not set up to
deal with competition either, so
they brought in outsiders like
me to help
Branyan then asked the au-
dience of marketing students for
their assistance with a problem.
"1 have a marketing problem or
as my boss would say, 'a market-
ing opportunity
He then explained that
Carolina Telephone is a subsid-
iary of United Telecommunica-
tions, which also owns Sprint.
The company is about to merge
with Centel and is searching for
a new name.
Many students offered sug-
gestions, and Branyan expressed
his appreciation for their partici-
pation.
"Drawing from his experi-
ence, Branyan imparted some
words of wisdom to his audi-
ence. "When you leave ECU, that
is not the end of your education.
Always take thecontinuousedu-
cation approach to your job.
"Find yourself a mentor
Bruce Branyan, vice presi-
dent of CarolinaTelephone .
within the company and always
stay close to your customers. Re-
member, the customer is the rea-
son you're in business Branyan
said.
The meeting adjourned
with the presentation of a certifi-
cate to Branyan, and the award-
ing of door prizes.
Gift certificates from
Chico's, Boli's, Professor
O'Cooles, The Final Score, and
AMF Bowl were given to win-
ners. Subway also contributed
three party subs to the event.
In another Marketing Week
activity, the AMA conducted a
survey for the ECU student pub-
lications. The information gath-
ered from the survey will be used
by the media for editorial and
advertising feedback.
"We will put the data in
next week and should have the
results in about a month Kerns
said. "The survey was a great
success and we gained real-
world experience by participat-
ing
Education Career Day to
benefit students seeking jobs
By Sharon Anderson
Staff Writer
The Career Services Of-
fice and the School of Educa-
tion is sponsoring an Educa-
tion Career Day for all edu-
cation majors and those who
are exploring education as a
career. The event will be held
in the Great Room of
Mendenhall Student Center
on February 16th from 9 a.m. to
12p.m.
Over 70 representatives
from North Carolina, South
Carolina andVirginia schools
will be holding one-on-one
meetings with prospective em-
ployees. All East Carolina Uni-
versityseniorsareasked tobring
copies of their resumes.
"A majority of graduates
said MargieSwartout, Assistant
Director of Career Services,
"make contacts for future
possible employment She
also said that one of the best
things about career day is the
cost efficiency for both the
students and the schools be-
cause they have everything
finished in one day.
The students are not
See CAREER page 4
Top students are candidates for Golden Key
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
The Golden Key National
Honor Society is currently con-
ducting a membership drive.
Students that have been in-
vited to join must have their reg-
istration fee submitted bv March
5.
A reception will be held on
March 19 foral I members and their
families.
"Thiscl ub gives students an
opportunity outside of college to
give something back to the com-
munity said Layne Kalbfleisch,
a member on the leadership coun-
cil. "And, it looks good on a
resume
Golden Key is a national
nonprofit organization with 180
collegiate chapters at major uni-
versities across thecountry. Lead-
er in higher education, business
and public service are members
of Golden Key and support the
society.
Scholarships are a wared an-
nually at each chapter to the out-
standing junior and senior ini-
tiates. Awards are also given on
the graduate level.
Students qualify on the ba-
sis of objective academic criteria.
No more than the top 15 percent
of the juniors and seniors enrolled
may be eligible.
Peter G. Hartigan of Duke
University has been chosen to
serve as national student repre-
sentative for the 1992-93 academic
year. He was elected at this year's
national convention in Scottsdale,
Arizona.
'�





2 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 16, 1993
aSft&�&i-iifi& v ij;
ground Other
'Mies,
StateNews
Officials warn against scholarship search services
Tired of history 101? Try porn 150.
Constance Penley admits she had twinges of embarrass-
ment when her film class first met in January. Her students at the
University of California-Santa Barbara probably felt the same
way, she said. But then again, those on both sides of the podium
had every right to be squeamish about the class subject: The fou r-
credit course is a study of pornography as a film genre. That's
right, the kind of films Mom and Dad told you never towatchare
being shown in "Film Studies 150, FG Special Topics in Film
Genre: Pornographic Film. Deep Throat and Suburban Dykes
aren't exactly The Sound of Music, but that's the point. "We're
trying to define it (pom) as a genre. Our film program tries to give
a comprehensive survey in American film, and this is one of the
largest that has gone unaddressed Penley said.
Talk show woos students
He may not be a David Letterman, but Dr. Shin Lin of Johns
Hopkins University and his hot, new talk show are attracting
students in droves. Lin, the associate dean of the School of Arts
and Sciences at the university, is teaching the wonders of bio-
medical research to his students in a talk show format every
Monday night. Lin, who plays host, finds "celebrity" doctorsand
scientists to chat about different topics every week ranging from
"Biomechanics of Living Tissues to "Chartinga National Course
for Research on Cardiovascular Diseases "The point of this
course is toallow undergraduateswith no background in science
to come and be educated in an entertaining way Lin said.
"There will be a minimum of graphs and charts. It's not all fun
and games, though. There will be serious science. While students
have to pass an exam at the end of the course, there are no
textbooks and no exams.
New stamp honors black scientist
A new 29-cent postage stamp honoring black scientist
Percy Julian was introduced at a ceremony at Roosevelt Univer-
sity in Chicago. The stamp, the 16th in the U.S. Postal Service's
Black Heritage Series, was released in honor of February's Black
History Month. Julian, who was the grandson of a slave, rose to
become a preeminent American scientist who held over 100
patents and published more than 2a) scientific articles. Accord-
ing to the U.S. Postal Service, "Percy Lavon Julian (1899-1975)
was a distinguished scientist and chemical researcher. His syn-
thesis of cortisone for arthritis, a drug for glaucoma and synthe-
sis of progesterone won acclaim. In 1990, Julian was inducted
into the prestigious National Investors Hall of Fame
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
CHARLOTTE, N.C.(AP)�
High school students who pay
$40 to $90 to companies for help
in finding scholarships may be
throwing away their money,
North Carolina college officials
say.
"If you work closely with
your financial aid office and use
resources in the library, you can
get the same information for
free said Gordon Peck,
Davidson College's associate
dean for financial aid.
"We continually ask stu-
dents to let us know if they get a
good match, and no one ever
has said Eleanor Morris, direc-
tor of the scholarship and finan-
cial aid office at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
"That leads me to believe they
leave something to be desired
It's not known how many
search franchises operate in
North Carolina. But since mid-
1990, one company, Educational
Services of America in
Northbrook, III has signed up
270 licensees in North Carolina.
Two national companies
couldn't provide names of any
North Carolina students who
have won money through their
services, The Charlotte Observer
reported Sunday.
Howard Maroz, president
of California-based Money For
College, said it's up to the
company's licensees to provide
their own testimonials. But own-
ers of three Mecklenburg County
scholarship search franchises, all
of whom are now out of busi-
ness, couldn't give any suc-
cess stories either.
Maroz said the busi-
nesses provide a convenient
service at a time when pay-
ing for college is growing in-
creasingly difficult.
"What we do is a step-
by-step strategy to help them
build their own financial
plan he said.
Typically, national compa-
nies sell licenses to anyone who
will pay their fee, usually less
than $500.Thelocal licensee then
recruits customers � students
and their parents.
A student provides aca-
demic history and personal in-
formation, such as hobbies.
The local service sends a
student's application to the par-
ent company, which uses its
computer to match the student
with schol
From there, it's up to the
student to apply for the awards.
For Lee Pettit, a Virginia
Tech freshman from Collinsville,
Va the list netted cash. Pettit
won an $800 National Elks Club
Foundation scholarship through
Educational Servicesof America.
The company, which provided
Perth's name to The Observer,
couldn't cite a single Caroiinas
customer who had won a schol-
arship.
But Paola Bernacchi, a UNC
freshman from Jamestown in
Guilford County who spent $40
for a list of sources from Educa-
tional Services of America,
found the effort "a waste of
"If you work closely with your
financial aid office and use re-
sources in the library, you can get
the same information for free'
Gordon Peck,
Davidson College's associate dean.
money
She sent in her application
in October of her senior year of
high school bu t d id n't receive the
list until January.
By then, many of the
awards' application deadlines
had passed.
Ms. Bernacchi mailed off
more than 20 requests for appli-
cations, some to addresses that
turned out to be erroneous.
Ms. Bernacchi ended up
winning six scholarships, includ-
ing a National Hispanic Scholars
Award, but gave little credit to
the service.
Company owners maintain
their search services do yield re-
sults, if students conscientiously
apply to the leads they provide.
Yes, students can do their
own research, using library
books, but they won't, Mark
Cohen said. Cohen founded the
now-defunct Academic Guidance
Services in Mount Laurel, N.J
then sold it in 1988.
"Using that same theory,
would you do your own taxes?
Why would they not say, 'Don't
go to H&R Block Why would
they not say, 'Don't go to a bar-
ber. You can cut your own hair
Many colleges offer free
scholarship database searches.
For three years, Furman
University in Greenville, S.C
has offered applicants free use
of two databases, but they've
generated few scholarships,
said Benny Walker, a Furman
vice president.
Lenoir-Rhyne College in
Hickory bought a database from
the same company that sells li-
censes through Educational Ser-
vices of America.
The college has done about
1,500 searches, charging stu-
dents $5 per search.
Ed Clark, dean of enroll-
ment management at Lenoir-
Rhyne, said he doesn't know of
any students who've won
money through the searches.
But many Lenoir-Rhyne stu-
dents get scholarships, and he's
confident some of those leads
came from the database.UNC
also recently purchased a new
database sold by the College
Board,a nonprofitorganization
that provides the Scholastic
Aptitude Test and other educa-
tional services. UNC's database
soon will be available for UNC
students and applicants.
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications
for Staff Writers, APPLY NO W!
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.&
FEBRUARY 16. 1993
The East Carolinian 3
National News
Men joining fight against violence aimed at women
The Bush's private life: low
profile and take out barbecue
HOUSTON(AP)�Lifeasa
private citizen has given George
Bush a chance to get out of the
limelight and do something else
impossible while living in the
White House � pick up his own
takeout lunch.
"He didn't give us a warn-
ing said Fannie Coleman, who
works at Otto's Barbecue. "We'd
been looking for him to come by
soon. We're always glad to see
him when he comes
When Bush showed up ear-
lier this month to pick up a "half
order of links, half beef, beans
and a Diet Coke he came with
only two other men, Ms. Coleman
said.
Bush has followed his plan
to keep a low profile, granting no
interviews and just one photo op-
portunity since coming to Texas
after President Clinton's inaugu-
ration Jan. 20.
Tourists cruise through his
new neighborhood eager for a
glimpse of the home he and wife,
Barbara, are renting while their
new house is built on an adjacent
lot.
"They're super people
said Robert Koster, a plumbing
Contractor working on their new
home. "I was so impressed by
diem, I couldn't even tell you what
they said. I was kind of in awe of
talking to them. But they were
very nice
Bush was seen at a recent
Houston Rockets-Chicago Bulls
basketball game with his son, Neil.
His staff arranged for pictures to
bfctaken during a visit by Turkish
resident Turgut Ozal.
i "I'mnotgivinginterviews
E&ish reminded reporters who
showed up for the photo session.
His spokesman, Andrew
Maner, fends off calls from the
media and others seeking the ex-
president'sattention, saying Bush
wants his privacy.
"He has basically been just
going over the mounds of mail
mat we've received Maner said.
"We've just received so many
speaking requests, appearances
at promotional things, charity
things�I think more than any of
usexpected�hundredsand hun-
dreds
Bush also has been spend-
ing time planning his presiden-
tial library to be built at Texas
A&M University in College Sta-
tion, about 100 miles northwest
of Houston. He normally is at his
office by 8 a.m. and stays until 6
p.m Maner said.
He declines to comment on
the Clinton administration or
other political matters.
Secret Service agents accom-
pany Bush in his silver Cadillac
the two blocks from home to his
officeattheParkLaureate,a nine-
story build ing where he occupies
the penthouse.
Because of street construc-
tion and the influx of tourists,
police have had to help direct
traffic in Bush's new neighbor-
hood.
"It's been a little busier than
it used to be, but things have
slowed down since they put a
stop sign up down the street
said a neighbor who lives a few
doors away from the Bushes.
Emily Young, 11, and her
friends recognized the sudden
traffic crunch as a business op-
portunity and set up a lemonade
stand. Most potential customers,
however, were looking for the
Bushes home, not a cold drink.
"They just asked directions
and they'd pay us for that she
said.
BOSTON (AP) � Ask Craig
Norberg-Bohm why he joined the
expanding ranks of men working
actively to end violence against
women, and he'll say it was just the
right thing to do.
Press him a little, and he'll
recount the day his former girlfriend
was raped.
His experience isn't uncom-
mon. More and more, the fathers,
brothers, husbands and male
friends of rape or assault victims
are taking their cue from women's
groups and venting their rage pro-
ductively � by organizing.
Across the country, men are
setting up counseling groups and
seminars to try to halt a growing
number of rapes, wife beatings and
domestic homicides.
Their goal: to help men un-
derstand the roots of their violence
so they will stop. Their method:
man-to-man talk that gets down to
basics.
"I can say, 'Listen guys let's
be honest sa id Jackson Katz, who
in 1988 formed an anti-violence
group in Boston called Real Men.
"That's something women can't
do
Norberg-Bohm,a41-year-old
software engineering consultant,
was in college when his girlfriend
was raped by another man. The
attack left her unable to be inti-
mate, and the couple's year-old re-
lationship was shattered.
"When somebody is raped,
all these trusts go away he re-
called.
About 15yearsago, he helped
start a counseling center for male
barterers in St. Louis called Rape
and Violence End Now, or RAVEN.
The clinic helps men understand
how society conditions them to be
violent, buttheemphasisison hold-
ing them accountable for their ac-
tions.
"The man who comes in
usually puts the responsibility
on others said Norberg-Bohm,
who now lives in Boston. "He
says, 'She put me in here We
want to change that
Often, men must first be per-
suaded there is a problem. Katz,
who speaks at schools and colleges
about violence, begins by drawing
a white line down the middle of a
blackboard.On one side of the line
he asks male students to list things
they do each day to avoid being
sexually assaulted.
"There'sgiggling, i f not blank
stares Katz said. "Then someone
says 'Nothing and I say, 'Thank
you"
On the other side of the line
he asks female students to list the
same thing, "and the list goes on
and on"�everything from having
a man's voice on the answering
machine to not using parking
garagesTheblackboard gets filled
up with things they do everyday to
be safe Katz said. "Seeing it up
there so starkly, it makes them see
how unfair it is
In Ca 1 ifornia, members of the
Oakland Men's Project have hold-
inganti-violenceworkshopsevery-
where from prisons to workplaces
since 1979. Along the way, they've
learned what works with men, and
what doesn't.
"The touchy-feely stuff
doesn't go over well said Allan
Shore, the executive director.
"Companies don't like women tell-
ing mem about this. The old boys'
network wants men to tell them
about this
Not everyone is interested.
Katz endures plenty of name-call-
ing from men when he hands out
leaflets on Super Bowl Sunday or at
concertsof comedian Andrew Dice
Clay, whose brand of humor has
offended women and minorities.
Michael David Gordon, of the
group New York Men AgainstSex-
ism, received a death threat on his
answering machine when he orga-
nized an anti-violence workshop at
Columbia University. Also, it's not
clear men talking to other men will
effectively reduce violence. The few
studies on such methodsare incon-
clusive.
VOZM W6LL6KS,
BE OH THE LOOKOUT f OR YOUR
LETTER IMTHE MAIL TELLING YOU
ABOUT OUR RENTALS FOR THE
NEXT SCHOOL YEAR 1993 199.
KINGSTON
WaW place
CALL 758-5393
COMPARE PRICES TMT Witt COMPETE WIT THE IfORMSl
EasLCacplina 1992993
Playhouse mm Seasc
lay
;ason
William Gibson's spellbinding sequel
to "The Miracle Worker
MMftfM
"The story of Helen Keller and
Annie Sullivan continues
February 11, 12, 13, 15 and 16 at 8:00 p.m.
February 14 at 2:00 p.m.
ECU Students: $4.50
Call � 757-6829
Solutions from your Apple Campus Reseller:
the perfect Macintosh system to fit your budget.
Tvvo inexpensive rombinafions
that will helpyou survive eaithe
most fueling semester.
Pepperoni and Mushroom.
The affordable, rmeple StyleWriter U and Apple Macintosh Color Classic.
Introducing the most aordable color Macintosh" sys-
tem ever. The new Macintosh Color Classic computer gives
you a sharp, bright Sony Trinitron display built-in audio, file
sharing, networking and more. And the new, compact Apple
StyleWritef II printer delivers stunning, laser-quality output
while still fitting within your budget. See this new system
today at your Apple Campus Reseller. Where you'll get spe-
cial student pricing, as well as service dining college! And
discover the power of Macintosh. The power more - -
college students choose. The power to be your best.
ijfn Student Stores
STORE HOURS: Monday-Thursday 8am - 8pm
Friday 8 am - 5 pm Saturday 11 am - 5 pm
PHONE: 757-6731
vnri-aiwLtbU ouh fn.m Apftit-4mpw fowflrn uhihurr ifpir uthtn:tJ-mKrPrrmJen &Wf ifplt�Qmifiuh hh til rtfty rrmd W V' U-i�h-t vWntrrnui tumrUibvumt fq�lf�falM4 Wli nuhv (M Qmm 0t&mfim,hmkmMmmm4toJ&kGtMfmm hh Mtlr I VflffUmtflliMrt$ (fegMMfeM





4 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 16. 1993
I
StateNews
for welfare, tax
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) �
Tax laws unfairly benefit rich people
and welfare breaks up families and
keeps poor people perpetually poor,
said leading scholars at a national
conference.
Karen Hill, director of a hous-
ing program in Yonkers, N.Y said
rich people get what amounts to a
government subsidy when they de-
duct mortgage interest off their in-
come taxes.
Meanwhile, 70 percent of poor
people in the United States don't get
any kind of subsidy to pay their rents.
And welfare policies prevent poor
people from saving money to buy a
house, she said.
Ms. Hill was one of the econo-
mists, civil-rights activists, lawyers
and social scientists from across the
country who met at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill over
the weekend to discuss how racism
and poverty continue to cripple in-
ner cities, The Winston-Salem Jour-
nal reported.
The conference marks the 25th
anniversary of the Kemer Commis-
sion report, which warned that
America was disintegratinginto two
unequal nations of black and white
people. The Kemer Commission was
appointed by President Lyndon
Johnson to study racial violence in
the wake of the Watts riots in Los
Angeles in 1965.
Speakers called for changes in
welfare and tax policies.
"The public welfare system in
the United States has three character-
istics � it doesn't work, it doesn't
work, it doesn't work said David
Stoesz, a lecturer at San Diego State
University.
Peter Leonard, an analyst with
COST
New member Mitchell
Bowen, from Pitt Community
College, presented his argument
against raising tuition in our
state. "A tuition hike of 20 will
price many lower and middle
income people out of college.
"With fewer people going
to college, North Carolina would
have a less-educated population.
A less-educated population nee-
CAREER
essarily leads to a less-educated
workforce Bowen said.
If indeed the General As-
sembly enacts the recommenda-
tions of the Audit Committee,
then the legislators will have to
change their current interpreta-
tion of the state Constitution.
One provision states, "higher
education, as far as practicable,
be extended to the people of the
scheduled for formal interviews,
but are allowed to ask any ques-
tions they feel are important. In
return, each representative will
ask interview-like questions to
become more familiar with a per-
spective employee.
The purpose of this program
is for students and recruiters to
share information about their
school systems and the projected
hiring needs.
Each senior interested in
education as a career should reg-
ister with career services. These
students will be sent a newslet-
ter and attend an orientation pro-
gram.
the Center on Budget and Policy Pri-
orities, a nonprofit think tank in
Washington, said there should be an
income cap on that tax deduction.
"Rich people who buy man-
sions are always going to buy man-
sions he said.
Leonard also advocates rais-
ing the minimum wage and increas-
ingtheeamed-income taxcreditthat
poor families can now claim on their
taxes.
Several scholars recommended
thatuniversities,privatefoundations
and corporations help solve theprob-
lems surrounding poverty.
Peter Dreier, a professor at
Occidental College in Los Angeles,
said polls show most Americans are
willing to pay more in taxes to help
fight poverty, butonly if they feel the
programs work.
'Teople are willing to spend
money and cut the defense budget if
they think the money will be well-
spent he said.
Asked what budget changes
they would suggest to President
Clinton, the scholars recommended:
� Establishing universal-
health care coverage. About 22 per-
cent of black Americans can't get
private or government insurance,
said Sidney Watson, a professor at
Mercer University Law School.
� Increasing the amount of
money earmarked for Head Start, a
preschool program.
� Setting aside money to for-
give the educational loans taken out
by doctors and nurses who practice
in public clinics.
� Increasing welfare money
for job training or schooling.
� Starring a Peace-Corps-like
program for U.S. students.
Continued from page 1
State free of expense
The Committee further rec-
ommends, the General Assem-
bly should "establish UNC un-
dergraduate resident tuition at
16 to 19 percent of cost of educa-
tion Another recommendation
states, "Increase undergraduates
nonresident tuition to as much
as 100 percent of cost of educa-
tion
The Audit Committee re-
ports that undergraduate resi-
dent students currently pay 10.9
percent of the cost of education.
The cost of education is esti-
mated to be $7502.
COST will hold its next
meeting Thursday at 4 p.m. in
Mendenhali. For more informa-
tion contact Steve Benzkofer at
830-9239.
Continued from page 1
Any student who needs help
with their resumes and inter-
viewing skills may attend one of
the workshops conducted by the
Career Services staff.
The schools that will be
present on Education Career Day
are invited by East Carolina Uni-
versity to attend. Request to ap-
pear are usually recognized.
"The reason most of the schools
are regional" Swartout said, "is
most likely because the economy
is down
Three schools that have been
scheduledcannot attend on Tues-
day, but have sched uled appear-
ances in the spring.
WZMB
Continued from page 1
to "on-air announcements of
time, location and an explana-
tion of event coverage The
policy went on to ensure that
sponsorship would not be de-
noted to the radio station,
whether itbeobviousor implied,
by eliminating the use of the
station's call letters in any shape
or form.
The policy also stipulated
that WZMB staff members
should in no way "receive any
monetary gains from a function,
i.e. live-remote These gains in-
cluded door proceeds, payment
or gifts from the owner and free
admission into the club. The only
exception to the free admission
policy was when WZMB staff
members are covering the event
as members of the media and
that the free admission be for
that event only.
Brelsford commented on
the importance of this policy,
saying that WZMB's public im-
age is crucial to the sta tion's suc-
cess.
"Being able to represent
WZMB in public is a great pro-
motion for the station Brelsford
said.
"Being at these events and
being associated with them is
good promotion not only for the
station, but for the university as
well
m
HUNGRY PIRATE
THE BIGGEST BURRITO YOU'VE EVER SEEN!
Stuffed with beef, rice, lettuce, beans, tomato bits,
sour cream, and covered with enchilada sauce
Gup-anteed to fill you up!
$3.45
521 Cotanche St. � 757-1666
Served
2-5
Weekdays
11-5
Weekends
m
PHPa
HOTTEST
SPOT
IN
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COME EARLY -
DOORS OPEN
AT 9:00 pm
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fEDNESDA
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FOR LADIES
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UNDAYi
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$1.00 MIXED DRINK SPECIALS
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OPEN
UNDAYl
$1.00
DRINKS
$1.00
OVEI
2
DANCE
'LOOR,
THURSDAY. FEB 18
COOL-AID
BARi
featuring plutopia (Reggae)
WELCOME
PHI KAPPA PSI BENEFIT
FRIDAY. FEB 19
MK. POTATO KEAp
ALL
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iATURDAY FEB 20
PUNKY FUNKY ROCKU
REGGAE GROOVE
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PRIVATE CLUB FOR MEMBERS & GUESTSAWIjlAd
MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE

FREE FREE FREE FREE
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CAJUN REFRESHMENTS
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
MARDI GRAS PRIZES
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FREE FREE FREE FREE
FOR ALL ECU STUDENTS
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Friday
February 26,1993
7:00-8:15 p.m.
Collar Hill
8:30 p.m.
College Hill
9:00 p.m.
9:(K)- 12:(X)mid.
MSC Recreation
9:00- 10:30 p.m
MSC Multi-Purpose
9:00 -12:00 mid.
MSC 244
9:30- 11:00 p.m.
MSC Underground
10:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre
10:30-11:00 p.m.
MSC Multi-Purpose
Human Float Judging
Crowning of Mardi Gras King & Queen
Parade Formation
Parade through campus to Mendenhali Student Center
Accompanied by The Will Bridges Band
Parade arrives at MSC "Bourbon Street and
Mardi Gras begins.
FREE open and challenge bowling.
FREE billiards and table tennis
Dance to ECU's Panama Steel Drum Band
Karaoke contest - Sing and strut your stuff
for prizes
Listen to the music of Spiral.
FREE movie - "Birth of the Blues
starring Bing Crosby
Costume contest judging and awards
11 :(X) -1:00 a.m. Mardi Gras Ball Dance to one of New Orleans'
MSC Multi-Purpose finest bands - Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys
1:00 a.m.
FESTIVITIES END
Masks required and available at the door. NO ONE UNDER THE INFLUENCE WILL BF ADMITTED
Admission by valid ECU ID. One guest per person.
M





i i� ii ir
February 16, 1993
TheEastCarolinian
Classifieds
Page 5
c
lwvwyM9w
For
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS :1
and 2 bedroom apartments. Energy-
efficient, several locations in town. Car-
peted, kitchen appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washerdryer hook-
ups. Call 752-8915.
STUDENTS: Don't wait for next se-
- mester,doitnow We have now over
a hundred apartments that will be
available for May, June, July, and Au-
gust. Call 752-1375 Homelocators to-
day for your selection.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 2608 Tryon
Drive; 3 bedroom1 bath; $550.00 p
m. 404 S. Eastern Street; 3 bedroom
2 bath; 5680.00pm. No pets. Lease
and Deposit Required. Duff us Realty,
nc. Call 756-2675.
t
TIRED OF YOURpresent living situ-
ation? Room available in nice house 4
blocks from campus. Call TODD OR
f3RK at 830 - 3882 or 830-1371.
�7TH STORY luxury suite hanging
Over the whit sand and clear water of
outh Florida's most beautiful beach.
Smpletely furnished, sleeps five in
tjabelievable luxury; minutes from jai
Alai, airport, horses dogs, Ft. Lauder-
ijale Beach, Miami Action. $800 for
Week36-313atHollywood Beach
tower. Call (205) 948-7493.

APT. FOR RENT near ECU - Female
Roommate 5140 12 util - Will ac-
cept less rent. Call (919 779 - 6299
after 5 or leave msg.
Condominium for rent -
T&filloughby Park, 2 bedroom, 2 bath,
fireplace, pool, tennis, NOPETS, avail-
able March 1st, $525,756 - 9420.
Ir
lBR APARTMENT on 13th St Great
for pets, esp. dogs. Availableimmedi-
ately. $275 mo. Call 752 - 9197.
Ranted roommate: Ringgoid
"powers, Male, $187.50, Plus 12 ex-
penses. Call 757-0369 or (919) 291-
RDOMMATE NEEDED to share3 bd
house, $150 plus 13 utilities. Please
call 757 -2730 close to campus.
ROOMMATE NEEDED IMMEDI-
ATELY: 427 Wedgewood Arms Apts.
xennis Court & Swimming Pool. Call
Jaysenat(919)321-1760.
FEMALEROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 - bedroom apt. at Carriage
House. 5160 month rent 12 elec-
tric. NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED.
Roommate is needed immediately.
Please Call Christie for info, at 756 -
9261.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Wesley Village E Third St 3 bed-
room duplex, own room, firtplace, all
appliances, washer dryer, gas grill,
neat, serious, non - smoking student.
Must see to appreciate. Call at 830 -
4030.
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live concert
& studio recordings for sale. Over 1000
new titles available mis week from the
following artists: ROCK- U2, R.E.M
Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendrix, Black
Crowes, Springsteen, SRV, Van Halen,
Rush, Beatles, Doors, G-N-R, etc. AL-
TERNATIVE- Nirvana,Pearl Jam, Chili
Peppers, Cure, Depeche Mode, MORE
OTHERS INCLUDE- Bob Marley, Ma-
donna, Prince, and more. Call 931-2573
to leave name, number, and requested
artist onmessagefallnewCD'sand tapes
in stock).
DAY BED, white, iron and brass w2
twinsizeOrthopedicmattressesand roll-
out pop-up trundle. Never used, in box.
Cost $700. S310cash (919) 637-4421 after
6:30 pm.
BRASS BED, queen size w frame and
deluxe Orthopedic mattress set in fac-
tory box. Can't use. Cost $750, sacrifice
$285 cash (919) 67-4421 after630 pm.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,Trucks, Boats, 4-wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA. Avail-
able your area now. Call 1-800436-4363
ext.c-5999.
MOVING MUST SELL! 5 piece cherry
or oak bedroom set- $42500 Call (919)
946-9653.
SAMSUNG 8180 computer w514
floppy disk drive. Monochrome moni-
tor. AlsoCitizenl20-Ddotmatrix printer.
Fjccellentcondition! 4:0.00call 756 0125.
GEORGEOUSPUPnEStogoodhome.
Willbe ready for Valentine's Day. (Give
yoursweethearttheperfectgift.) Austra-
lian shepherd mix. Info: 758-2733.
FOR SALE: Fisher CD Component
Great Value at $65.00 Call-Leave mes-
sage for Kat 931 - 9667.
1987 KX125 new parts & Answer pipe.
Extra rear tire. This bike will Scream.
1050. Call Todd 752-2616.
COMICBOOKS for sale, various issues
ofThe Death and Funeral of SUPERMAN.
Great Prices. 10 - 50 off current price
guides. Allarefirstprintingsandinmint
condition. Call 758-5819 for Info Ask for
Johnnie. Leave Message.
SAVE on Spring Break '93! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas from 5459 Florida
from !149! Organize group and travel
free! Contact Susan �931 -7334 or call
Sun Splash Tour s today 1 -300-426-7710.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLYMENT -
Make money teaching English Abroad.
JapanandTaiwan. Make$2000- $4000
permonth. Manyprovideroom& board
other benefits! No previous training
or teaching certificate required! For In-
ternational Employment program, call
the International Emplayment Group:
(206)632-1146ext.J5362.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED:
Great club, great money, unbelievable
tips. Work Thursday, Friday,Saturday,
9 pm-2 am. Call Sid 919-735-7713 or
Paul919-736-0716. MothersPlayhouse
inGoldsboro.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(Gr)1821HilandaleRd.lB-295 Durham,
NC 27705
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions, Great benefits. Call 1-800-
4364365 ext.P-3712.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to distrib-
ute "Student Rate" subscription cards
at this campus. Good income. For
application write to Collegiate Ma rket-
ing Services PO Box 1436 Mooresville
NC 28115.
BRODY'SANDBRODY'SFORMEN
are acceptting applications for part -
time sales associates. Flexible schedule
salary clothing discount. Apply
Brady's The plaza Mon - wed. 1-4 pm.
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hiring enthusiastic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. Norm Beach Sailing, Inc. Box8279,
Duck, NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
FULL TIME MONEY, PART TIME
WORK: Weneed a few energetic, posi-
tive, part - time reps for nat'l Co. ex-
panding in NC work flexible hours, ex-
cellent income, opportunity for travel
and have fun. Call Cindy 752-6560.
CHEERLEADING INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED. Looking for enthusiatic
people with strong cheering and inter-
personal skilils to teach cheerleading
camps in NC & SC. Great pay and
flexible scheduling. Up to 10 weeks
possible! If you love cheerleading, this
is the summer job for you! To apply,
Call 1-800-280-3223.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Earn ex-
tra cash stuffing envelopes at home. All
Materials provided. Send SASE to Na-
tional Distributors POBox9643 Spring-
field, MO 65801. Immediate response.
���AWESOMESPRING BREAKTRIPS!
Bahamas Cruise 6 Days Includes 10 Meals,
Great Beaches & Nightlife! $279! Panama
QryBeachfrontRooms WifhKitchens$l 19,
Key West Oceanfront Hotel $249, Daytona
Beachfront Rooms With Kitchens $149,
Cancun$459, Jamaica $479! Springbreak! 1 -
8006786386
�AWESOMESPKINGBREAKBAHA-
MAS CRUISE $279! Includes 6 days in
Bahamas,10meals!SailfromFlorida!Beau-
tiful Beaches, Grea t Nightlife! Drinking age
18! Springbreak 1006786386
BEST TANNING PRICES in town at
Scissorsmith Hair Designs and Tanning
Center! One month unlimited only $30.00,
other packages too! 107 ETstbrook Drive
758-7570.
PARTY HOUSES - North Myrtle Beach
Welcome groups of 4-34 people Group-
RESEARCH INFORMATION!
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with visaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in Calif. (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. 1206-A. Los Angles. CA 90025
SPRING BREAK'93!
LAST CHANCE TO SAVE
JAMAICA - $429
CANCUN - $439
FLORIDA - $159
V For Th0 Lomit xk
-?- Prices & Tha Boat Kg
F Trip, Call
SUN SPLASH TOURS
1-800-426-7710'
mtmonrmsAOAMoetT�Ktuu.Bfooutm
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in iust a few days!
Plus a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself!
No cost. No obligation.
1-800-932-0528, ext. 65
RTTBTOON SPRING BREAKERS
PARTY LIKE GODS!
Panama City $139, Key
West $269, Jamaica &
Cancun from $450. Quality
Accomodations, Free Drink
Parties! Call Joe!
ENDLESS SUMMER
TOURS
1-800-234-7007
W&LNESS
Program
Opportunities
Pitt County Memorial Hospital is
accepting applicationsresumes
for the following positions in our
Wellness Program:
PROGRAM ASSISTANT
(part-time vacancy)
Requires a 4-year degree in
Nursing, Health Education.
Nutrition or related with 1-2
years of experience in teaching
health-related classes andor
preparing health promotion cam-
paigns.
WELLNESS ASSISTANTS
1-2 years of experience in teach-
ing aerobic classes required.
ompeiitive salaries offered. For
consideration, send resume to:
Employment Office, Pitt g
Ciiuni Memorial Hospital,
P. O. Box 6028, Greenville.
NC 27835-6028; 551-4556. �
EOEIAA
Pitt County
Memorial Hospital �
a constituent of
University Medical Cefftep H
Of Eastern Carotina-Pitt County �
Leaderdiscourts. CaUByrtteBeadYTours9
-4 pm (703) 250-2125.
SPRING BREAK' 931 Travel to Jamaica,
Cancun and Honda for guaranteed lowest
prices! Call Stu at 757-0313 immediately to
ensure a space!
WANTED: Men and Women to share in
furv sun - filled weeks in Jamaica, Cancun
andFlorida forSpringBreakj. Reserveyour
space by callingStu at 757-0313.
DONTBELEFTOUT! Limited spacestill
available to Jamaica, Cancun and Floridia
for Spring Break. Contact Stu at 757-0313
before it's sold out!
WIN TO LOSE Tired of yo - yo diets,hate
mealsubstitute9,noterKighttimetoexercise
but desperately want to bse weight? Give
me a call at 746 - 4583. (Leave name and
number on recorder).
FLORIDA SPRING BREAK 7 nights
beadi front $139 -159 Quad Deadline
soom. Reserve rooms NOW! CallCMIl -
800-423-5264.
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOW! USED CDS
JfJ �asv Soiling SWt Oiornvs
tit- Saiamae �r tie- Kt
Sk
EJ tit. DaxoMSt �r � flius L5
. mitr tkipar-tu tuns tr.ds
i ettudtit wit.1 far self
ththoddc ttttf
-800-780
-4001
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to the girls in
apartment 7. Debbie, Laurie, Lisa,
Sherry, and Kris. Best Wishes on your
Birthdays and we hope your party is a
great Success C&M
RACHEAL HAPPY 21ST BIRTH-
DAY. All My Love Jimmy.
WARMANDLOVINGfemalewants
to give health Caucasian baby a close
knit family and financial security. Will
help with expenses. Call Collect (804)
572-8403 or Write PO Box 655, South
Boston, VA 24592.
SHERRY: Rush is finally over. You did
agreatjob. Thanks forbeingawonderful
BIG SIS! 2 LAM Sandra.
LESLIE: Can't wait for tonight! Hope
you have as much fun as I am going to.
Thanks fortakingcareofme. ZetaLove,
Sandra.
LEIGH: today's the day! Can't wait for
tonight. Thanks for taking care of me.
ZetaLove, Sandra.
ZETATAU ALPHA: The Brothers and
Pledges of Kappa Delta Rho hope your
Spring Rush was a great success.
THE SISTERS OF GAMMA SIGMA
SIGMA would like to recognize thenevv
Pledgesof the Delta PledgeClass: Carter
Lawrence -PresCatherineHawley-V.
Pres.StacySevic-SecJoelleSevior,Tres.
-Jenna Fazio-SisterLiasonJackieHinson
- Historian, Susan Alford, Kimber An-
thony, Julie Brooks, Amanda Carver,
Marcy Cole, Frankie Collins, Caroline
Covuan, Kris Gregory, Kim rack, Misty
Joyner, Debbie Knittel, Marsha Mills,
Michelle Moore, Amanda Prescott, Chris-
tine Riffle, CourtneySmith, Becky Tyson,
Kara Webb. Best of Luck Love, The
Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONSTOTHENEW
SISTERS OF CHI OMEGA Michelle
BaritelLBeau Beauchemin,Tricia Crotts,
Carmen Elles, Julie Fields, Courtney
Fincher, Lucy Goodwin, Tiffany Hacke,
Lisa Hines, Dee Huskey, Joy Newman,
Martha Peacock, Beth Powell, Carlotte
Rakowski, Amy Sadler, Kathy Sare,
MamiSchlifkirvCaroleSharpless, Mkh-
elleSteiner.TuBeThooson.andSteDhanie
Withrow. We Love You!
COORS: Congratulations on the new
changes of the East Carolinian! They
look great even though they are a real
pain in the a to lay out but other
factors work into that! Well not much
else to say except that I am trying to
take up some space left by New York!
See ya later, Your Roomie!
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVES
Karen Bilyj
Lindsay Fernandez
Matt Hege
Aime'e Lewis
Brandon Perry
CALL
919-757-6366
for more advertising
information.
:
It
f
Announcements
NEW GARDEN OF EDEN. INC
We are proud to announce the
incorporation of a new non - profit
organization located in the city of
Greenville, Pitt County, NC Our
organization supports the preserva-
tion of animals and plants who's ge-
netic pools are in danger of extinc-
tion. As stated above, new Garden of
Eden, Inc. innon-profitand survives
solely through donation, grant and
memberships. For more information
please send a SASE and $1.00 to New
Garden of Eden, Inc. C o Mr. Hollis
Bracy Lilley, III 100 Duran St. Green-
ville NC 27858 or call 355 - 0981 for
info.
REMOVING INCOMPLETES IN
MATH 0001
Students who received a grade
on Incomplete (T) in Math Lab (Math
0001) Fall Semester, 1993 must be
sure to remove the incomplete by 3:00
pm, Friday March 19, . The
math Lab will be open from 2:00 pm
until 5:00 pm on Mondays through
Thursdays, to allow students need-
ing to remove and incomplete time to
study, receive any necessary help,
and complete the remaining tests, a
student with an incomplete from the
Fall, 1992 semester, who fails to com-
plete the required work March 19th
will receive a grade of "f" and will be
required to register for and repeat
(from the beginning) Math 0001.
(Note: Students entering the Math
Lab to work on removing an incom-
plete must have with them a picture
ID).
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOW-
SHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social and
service projects? Need a refuge from
time to time? Campus Christian Fel-
lowship may be what you are looking
for. Our weekly meetings are at 7 pm
Wednesdays at our Campus House
located at 200 E. 8th St directly across
Cotanche St. from MendenhaJl Stu-
dent Center. Everyone is welcome.
For more information, Call Tim
Turner, Campus Minister, at 752 -
7199.
CAREER SERVICES RESUME
WRITING WORKSHOP
The Career Services office an-
nounces workshops on resume writ-
ing to be held on Wednesday, Febru-
ary 17 and Tue. Feb. 23 at 4:00 pm in
the Bloxton house. Participants will
learn about format, content and pro-
duction of a professional resume.
Handouts will be available. This
workshop is especially designed for
prospective graduates, but is open to
anyone.
INTERVIEW SKILLS WORK-
SHOP
Seniors,graduatestudentsand
cooperative education students who
need help in developing or refining
their interview skills are invited to a
workshop sponsored by Career Ser-
vices. Come and learn special tech-
niques that will help you prepare for
the job search! The interview work-
shops will be held on Thursday, Feb-
ruary 18 at 3:00 pm and Thursday,
February 25 at 4:00 pm in the Bloxton
House.
REC SERVICES EXPOSE YOUR-
SELF!
Show off your roundball tal-
ents at the Slam Dunk Contest spon-
sored by Recreational Service and
Greenville Grand Slam. A informa-
tion meeting will be held on Wednes-
day, February 17 at 5:00 pm in Biol-
ogy 103. Men's and women's divi-
sions are open for 8" and 9" and 10"
tall baskets. Great prizes for the best
Slammers! for more information call
757-8367.
REC SERVICES HUNT DEAD
ROACHES!?!
Yes! And maybe possible
a male chest hair, a mattress or even
theChancellorssignature. Sound like
fun If so, Recreational Services will
be sponsoring a Scavenger Hunt on
Tuesday, February 16 form 4:00 - 6:00
for West and Central Campus. Come
out and enjoy this wild and wacky
hunt! For more information Call 757
-6387.
PARENTS WITHOUT PARTNERS
TheGreenvilleChapter of Par-
ents Without Partners will hold a
monthly meeting on Tuesday, Febru-
ary 16, 1993. Orientation will begin at
7 pm. followed by a guest speaker at
7:30 pm. The regular planning meet-
ing will begin at 8:30 pm. The meet-
ing will take place at the First Presby-
terian Church located in the corner of
14th and Elm Streets.
MSA
Muslim Student Association
meets weekly. For further informa-
tion contact Adib Farhadi at 355-6707.
POETRY FORUM
The Poetry Forum will meet
on Thursday, February 18. The meet-
ing will be held in Mendenhall, room
248, at 8 pm. If you would like feed-
back on your poetry, please bring
copies for those attending.
BLACK HISTORY MONTH
TheGreenviileMuseum of Art
located on 802 S. Evans Street will be
celebrating Black History Month
through an evening of poetry. It will
beheld Tuesday,February 16at7pm.
There will be a special encore presen-
tation Thursday, February 18 at 8 am.
For more information contact Billy
Walls at 8304260.
AED PREMEDICAL HONOR
SOCIETY
Attention AED members and
pledges. AED will meet at the ECU
School of Medicine, Brody Medical
Sciences Building in the Gold Audi-
torium on February 16,1993 at 7 pm.
Dr. Ann Jobe will discuss medical
school and give us a tour. Remember,
the Gold Aud. in Brody 1st floor at 7
pm. No pledge meeting.
Announcements

25 words or less:
Students $2.00
Non-Students $3.00
Each additional word $0.05
�All ads must be pre-paid�
Any orsanization may use the Announce-
ments Section of The East Carolinian to list
activities and events open to the public two
times freeofchar3e. tjetothelimitedamount
of space, The East Carolinian cannot guaran-
tee the publication of announcements.
Deadlines
Map To
THE EAST CAROL NAN
2nd Floor of the Student
Pubs Buildme
JOYNER
LIBRARY
MENDENHALL
STUDENT
CENTER
Displayed
$5.50 per inch:
Displayed advertisements may oe
cancelled before 10a.m. thedayprior
to publication; however, no refunds
will be given.
Friday 4 p.m. for Tuesday's edition.
Tuesday 4 p.m. for Thursday's Edition
For more
information call
757-6366.

.
mmmmmmmmm





mt"s�Hammrm
The East Carolinian
February 16, 1993
TuesdayOpinion
Country must look
to unity to heal
racism rift
"It's all right to be ethnically
conscious, but not ethnically
controlled
This statement is the crux behind ECU's New Gen-
eration Campus Ministries program last week that pro-
moted unity through religion, as opposed to separatism.
NGCM's president, Bryan Evans said that it was
time for students and individuals "to look to ourselves as
leaders. This program presents a strategy to go beyond
the past and to look forward to the future
Evans also said that "people need to hear a fresh
perspective He commented that the majority of people
are following doctrines based on separatism.
"We need to be at peace with one another instead of
at war Evans said. "We are one
As the jury is currently being selected in the civil suit
against the officers accused of beating Rodney King, the
country waits breathlessly to see if another installment of
the Los Angeles riots looms on the horizon. Police chiefs
in major (and minor) cities around the nation anxiously
await the outcome that will determine whether this coun-
try will be subjected to another three days, if not more, of
terror and fear.
The L.A. riots showed us just how separated this
country has become. Mass lootings and burnings oc-
curred in the city, not discriminating between black and
white store owners. Videotape footage showed brutal
beatings of both blacks and whites; police were lost as to
how to combat the overwhelming flood of looters and
pillagers.
A drive through the riot area today shows a person
the slow comeback that business owners are trying to
make. Burnt-out shells of stores and supermarkets
still mark
three-day
shook this
to its knees,
pable air of
still resides
people walking as if they're
m
t h e
riot that
country
A pal-
tension
air, with
waiting for the other shoe
to drop or to be kicked once again like a stray dog
This tension shows no signs of decreasing in the near
future, either. This country must look long and hard at its
stance on racism and discrimination before any light of
hope can be seen at the end of this dark tunnel. Imagining
that the problem has gone away just because people can't
see the symptoms anymore will just make it all the more
horrifying when these same symptoms reappear in a
much more dramatic form.
To paraphrase the quote above, ethnicity should not
control a person's life, but rather make a person more
aware of his or her heritage. African-Americans have
been degraded and debased in the past, but steps are
being taken to remedy those past faults. Would having a
separate black nation be the answer to all these problems?
Absolutely not. Unity is the key here, not separatism.
Only by working together�both blacks and whites
� can this nation hope to repair the rift and wound that
racism and segregation has created. Further segregation
would only increase this rift to the point that it very well
could rival the one seen in Civil War days. The "Union"
and the "Confederacy" are two names that just may see a
resurgence, but with vastly different ideas behind them.
Rodney King's statement of "Can't we all just get
along?" has taken a lot of ribbing and kidding in the
media lately. Trite as it may sound, this saying epitomizes
the basic need of this country today and in the future.
When people can recognize that skin color is not that big
a difference, some progress can be made in America.
Opinion
Page 6
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
John Bullard, Aur. Lifestyle Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
Jody Jones, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Asst. Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and
Thursday. The masthead editorial in each edilion is the opinion of the
Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters, limited to 250
words, which may be edited for decency or brevity.
The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for
publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian.
Publications Bldg ECU, Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more informa-
tion, call (919) 757-6366.
Printed on
100 recycled
paper
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
ByT. Scott Batchelor
IRS tax forms: study in sadism, bureaucracy
The friendly folks at the U.S.
Department of the Treasury sent
me my tax forms the other day.
They call the form 1040 EZ, with a
play on the word "easy (Boy, what
a bunch of wacky punsters those
guys are!) I read over the booklet
that comes with this form as soon
as I received it. I mustadmit that in
several years of filing taxes, this is
the first time I've sat down and
really read the information.
There's one section which
addresses some questions people
frequently ask, called "Answers to
frequently Asked Questions" (page
five of the booklet for those of you
playing along at home). One ques-
tion asks, "Do I have to file a re-
turn?" The reader is directed to
page nine where, in true govern-
ment style, a whole page is used to
basically answer, "Yes, you do ha ve
to file
Another item in the booklet
reads, "Gift to reduce the public
debt Apparently, there are people
out there who forgot to take their
medication and they call the IRS
and ask i f they can send even more
money than thegovemmentwants.
Theitemcontinuesasfollows: "You
may make a gift to reduce the pub-
lic debt. If you wish to do so, en-
close a separate check with your
income tax return. Make itpayable
to 'Bureau of the Public Debt
Reading this, one overwhelming
question came to my mind: Are
Jim and Tammy Bakker writing
the tax booklets now?
The last page of the booklet
has some enlightening information.
It reads, "In fiscal year 1991 fed-
eral income was $1,054.3 billion
and outlays were $1,323 billion,
leaving a deficit of $268.7 billion
To put this into perspective for the
college student, this is like writing
a $50check for the keg when you've
only got $35 in your checking ac-
count. The federal government calls
this a budget defici t; the police call
it check kiting. Both are crimes and
should be punished as such.
Filling out theactual tax form
itself is the most fun. As the saying
goes, if you put an infinite number
of monkeys in a room with an infi-
nite number of typewriters, they'll
eventually produce an IRS tax form.
One of the first items on the
form reads'Presidential Election
Campaign : Do you want $1 to go
to this fund?" and you check yes or
no in the appropriate block. I can
see a television commercial di-
rected towards people who check
yes or no in the appropriate block.
"My friend, did you check "yes" to
sending money to the Presidential
Election Campaign fund on your
tax form? If you did then come on
down to Crazy Jake's Auto Sales
where we've got a deal for you.
New 1992 Yugos for just $37,995;
recently acquired Russian�made
automobiles starting at $30,990; and
a special deal on used 1984 GM
pickup trucks
Then there are the instruc-
tions. "Subtract line 4 from line 3. If
line 4 is larger than line 3, enter 0. If
line 6 is larger than line 7, or you
were born in a month thatcon tains
an "r subtract line 7 from line 6,
unless you are currently with a
resident from G uadalupe, in which
case you divide line 7 by pi times
the square root of the IQ of the
sadist who produced this form
All this j ust so you can find ou t that
you owe the government more
money.
This brings up an interesting
question. Just where does all this
money go? On the last page of the
booklet there are two pie graphs,
one showing where federal gov-
ernment income came from in fis-
cal 1991, and the other showing
where the outlays went. Sixty-five
percent of what the government
took in came from personal income,
social security, Medicare, unem-
ployment, and other retirement
taxes.
The biggest receivers of
money were social security, Medi-
care and other retirement, defense,
veterans and foreign affairs and �
the saddest revenue sapper of all
� net interest on the debt. This is
how our money is spent.
In her note to the Taxpayer,
on page three in the 1040 EZ book-
let, Internal Revenue Commis-
sionerShirleyD.Peterson refersto
us as "customers" of the Internal
Revenue Service. This is a bit odd.
When was the last time you were
forced to buy a stereo or micro-
wave, or were ordered to choose a
certain dish ata restaurant? No, we
are certainly not "customers If
we are, then we're being forced to
do business with the company
store.
So happy tax filing. I certainly
hope you don't have to pay any-
thing. Maybe you'll actually get
some money back. And remem-
ber, if you get the urge to write a
check to the Bureau of Public Debt
asagift to reduce thedeficit,justsit
down and wait for it to pass.
fatfW. Vfe�Wfft�M MR,M&Cmf&fttm cafe
QuotcoftheDay:
To like an individual because he's black is
just as insulting to dislike him because he
isn't white.
e. e. cummines
Letters to the Editor
Students chided for behavior at Chomsky talk
To the Editor:
I attended the afternoon
lecture given by Noam
Chomsky on February 9. This
letter is addressed to the
people (the thoughtless ones)
who either attended or di-
rected their students to attend.
Several students at-
tended the lecture without
having the slightest idea of
who Noam Chomsky is or
what he does. The February 4
edition of The East Carolinian
carried an excellent letter by
professor Hal Daniel, who
listed some articles to read.
As I left the lecture, I
overheard several young fe-
males remark that they "don't
see what he has to do with
psychology Again, a lack of
preparedness on their part.
Also, psychology is not all
clinical.
Some instructors obvi-
ously assigned this lecture as
extra credit or as a require-
ment without briefing their
students about Chomsky's
work.
Lastly, to the students
who giggled, chatted, gos-
siped, jingled keys and were
otherwise bothersome; you
and your actions were rude. If
you cannot act as adults,
please don't attend the lec-
ture.
P.S. George
Graduate Student
Psychology
� LOVELOOKtN
ficr-m i4ue an
MY &'
VTH WHAT
HAMB ON , THAT
By Amy E. Wirtz
SI swimsuit issue
not worthy of
pornography label
TheSporfsIusrraferfswimsuitissueisdue
out this week. With it comes the same old
controversy: cries of soft- core pornography
and degradation of women. But to attack SI and
call it "pornographic" is unfounded. Undoubt-
edly, many feminists would have me locked
away for my views on this, but it is something
they (above all others) need to hear.
The American culture hasa problem with
sexuality. It has not and probably never will be
completely embraced, since people tend to be
scared of their own, and other's, sexuality.
Camille Paglia, a humanities instructor at The
University of the Arts in Philadelphia and au-
thor of the book Sexual Persotwe, states that:
"profanation and violation are part of the per-
versity of sex, which never will conform to
liberal theories of benevolence We've been
brainwashed to believe that the only way to be
good is to abstain from sex.
Paglia also believes that the knowledge of
"fantasies is expanded by pornography, which
is why pornography should be tolerated, though
itspublicdisplaymayreasonably be restricted
This isn't to say that it should be accessible to
everyone. Certainly children do not need to
view a Playboy or Penthouse asparlof their sexual
education. But we aren't discussing Playboy.
What we're discussing is Sports Illustrated.
Now come on, take a real look at the
swimsuitissue. Those models are there because
they want to be there. Posing that way is, very
simply, part of the job. The real issue is that
nudity, or partial-nudity, intimidates people.
People don't want to believe that the human
body is a beautiful thing. Over the years it has
been made in to something vulgar, to be hidden
away and a vessel of sin.
Many argue that women should not be
rated by how they look. Unfortunately, that is
uheprimarywayfhatweidentifyeachother.Anti-
pornography supporters twist thatand use it to
their advantage. What they're saying is that it's
O.K. to size someone up visually at first meet-
ing but to feature a woman's body in a maga-
zine is degrading. This is a blatant double-
standard.
Another argument, which is somewhat
founded, is that female athletes should be fea-
tured instead of the swimsuit issue; females are
not getting as much coverage as their male
counterparts. What if the female athletes were in
bathing suits? Would that be acceptable? I'm
sure it wouldn't, because then thev would be
featured as sex objects. I hate to say this, but we
areall objects ofsex.Weare sexual beings. Until
we realize this, there will be disa rd among all.
I'm sure the religiously pious are fainting
right about now, since sexuality is not part of
any religion'sdogma. Until we start identifying
and coming to terms with this part of ourselves,
we will be perpetuating an age-old issue.
The swimsuit issueisnot changing Ameri-
can society and hurtling it towards inevitable
destruction. In fact, ignoring this facet of our-
selves is probably destroying us more than a
mere magazine.
So please, if you don't like to look at
beautiful women in bathing suits, don't open
the magazine. Millions of others in touch with
their sexuality will.
� . '
M






� �amun
The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 16, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
Conversing with Noam Chomsky
�ditor's Note: The following
is a conversation between staff
writers Franco Sacchi and
Nathanial Meade with Noam Chomsky, which
will be printed in two parts. Lookjbr the second
installtnent in the Thursday, Feb. 18, edition.
On Feb. 9, Noam Chomsky came to
ECU and spoke at Mendenhall Theater. In
his usual bold and incisive style, Chomsky
discussed contemporary subjects ranging
from the political philosophies of David
Hume and Adam Smith, to global informa-
tion control, to the subtle influence of Ameri-
can sports.
For those unfamiliar with Chomsky, he
is presently one of the most famous linguists
in the world and has had books published
worldwide. Amonghismostrecentpolitical
works, Deterring Democracy has received
much a Mention. Now 65 years old, Chomsky
has taught since 1955 at the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, where he became a
full professor at age 32. He is widely known
for his dedicated probing into the dark side
of American foreign policy, as well as his in-
depth study of information control in Ameri-
can society.
Much of what Professor Chomsky has
to say seems offensive and outlandish, yet
this is mainly because the topics themselves
are of such intense significance for our soci-
ety. For this reason, most of his work has
been published in the "alternative press"
and has remained largely hidden from the
lay public. At the same time, the mainstream
media continues to marginalize Chomsky's
work.
Chomsky is not a pol i tician but a scholar.
Every detail, every accusation, is substanti-
ated by hisrigoroususeof primary research�
from archives and other forms of official
documentation. For this reason, his adver-
saries have repeatedly relied on a single
weapon: silence.
The following interview only skims the
surface of Chomsky's sweeping thought,
which is extremely difficult to compress in a
single article. We hope the following inter-
view will give those not present Tuesday
night at least a taste of this fascinating mind.
Here, surely, is one of the great free-thinkers
of our society. During the interview, Profes-
sor Chomsky was wearing sneakers and
had a distinct bounce in his step.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN: George
Bush's behavior during his term as presi-
dent often seemed to have traces of
Messianism. Do you think Bush ever had a
bigger plan in the geopolitical arena, a hid-
den agenda for a truly
new world order un-
der his leadership?
From this point of
view,howis President
Clinton's positiondif-
ferent?
NOAM
CHOMSKY: I don't
accept your premise.
I think George Bush is
a minor bureaucrat
who was following
orders all his life.Take
a look at his history.
He came into national
prominence as U .N. ambassador in 1971. He
was then head of CIA, then in the House of
Representatives, then vice president and
president. He was a loyal servant of the law.
I don't think he had any grand mission �
Noam Chomsky
you know, big-plan thoughts in his head.
When any president, or any leader, of any
country tries to mobilize the population for
a dangerousand violent action, they always
invent a messianic purpose.
Ican'tthinkofahis-
torical exception to that.
He couldn't think of
anything, so he came up
with New World Order.
What did the words
mean? Zero. He didn't
know wha t they meant,
and nobody else knew
what they meant. It's
just tha t he had to mobi-
lize the population for
the Gulf War. The New
World Order was just a
joke. He had no concep-
tion of anything except
serving the interests of
American wealth. Clinton, as far as I know,
is about the same.
TEC: Given the complexity of modern
society and political system, very few people
seem to know where the center of power is.
From this perspective, can the president of
the United States have any real control of the
situation? Can President Clinton promote
the necessary, large scale changes mis coun-
try needs?
NG Clinton won't try to promote big
change. If you look at the day after the
election, his campaign promises and ambi-
tions quickly disappeared. That's not sur-
prising. I can't imagine why anyone would
be surprised. The day after the election, the
front pages were telling us that Clinton's
advisors said theambitious social programs
they's been talking about would have to be
dumped, but that there would be a little-
discussed tax that would benefit investors.
Big surprise. Then take his position on Haiti.
Yes, he had something to say about that,
though it was contrary to what he had said
during the campaign. Now he was going to
intensify the same Bush policy he had op-
posed. And so on down the line.
If you're sophisticated, all of this is well
See CHOMSKY page 10
Ray dispels Hollywood-hype image
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
She's a down-home country
girl who went to the Big City and
became a star.
That's one way you might de-
scribe the life of television star and
ECU graduate Connie Ray. But,
don't ever think for a minute that
Ray has bought into that glitzy and
glamorous image that people see
of actors and actresses.
Ray said at a recent luncheon
that people need to realize that
actors are human, too.
"You turn from Connie Ray,
the person, to Connie Ray, the
thing Ray said. "Connie Ray, the
thing, is not me. Connie Ray, the
thing, is a product and it's some-
thing that I sell. The real me is over
here.
"If you start buying the hype,
you get really weird. You start be-
lievingall rhatstuff. Youhear about
people acting bad and throwing
fits, it's because they bought the
hype. They believe they are the
thing, the product. That's not what
we are. When you get so big, you
either completely become the prod-
uct or you stay a real person
Ray grew up in White Cross,
N.C, and this Southern upbring-
ing shows up in her plays, like
Smoke on the Mountain, and when
she talks about how it's influenced
her life.
"There's something to be said
for growing up in the South, with
that good Southern heritage Ray
said. "I was taught as a kid that
Southern work ethic�you work
and you do as good a job as you can
no matter what that job is.
"I am a good Southern girl
who is hard-headed to the nth de-
gree, and I will not give up. My
image for myself you ever had a
'Sniper' hits ifs
target, barely
By Ike Shibley
little puppy? And you play with
him with those rag toys? And they
clomp down on it and they won't
let go? And you can sling them
around in the air and they just
don't let go? That's the way I look
at what I want to do. I'm a very
goal-oriented person
Ray also commented on the
stereotypical image that Southern-
ers have around the country and
how she combats it with her work.
"I'm really proud of being a
Southerner Ray said. "When I
went up North, I can't tell you how
many people said, 'What's your
name, Daisy Mae?' You watch tele-
vision, and everybody's laying on
hay, telling jokes�three teeth and
overalls.
Connie Ray
"That's not the people I know
from North Carolina. The people
that I know from North Carolina
are good, sturdy people with in-
tegrity and a morality that I would
not trade for anything
Through her playwriting, as
seen in Smoke on the Mountain, Ray
wants to portray Southern people
as they really are, not the popular
hick image.
"My writing preserves the
Southern way of life I knew �
Southern people have more than
three teeth and they do wear shoes.
I will go to my death championing
a good Southern character
After growing up in North
Carolina, Ray came to ECU and
earned a degree in dance. But she
Photo courtesy ECU Theatre Department
used that work ethic that was so
instilled in her to get people to look
at her in the theatre.
"I had to use my wits to figure
out a way to get casted in a play
Ray said. "Don Biehn an ECU the-
atre professor was directing Who's
Happy Now and we had to read
from the script and to sing a coun-
try western song. I decided the best
way to get myself noticed above
everyone else, was to write my
own country western song. Which
I did, and it went over great, and I
got the role
Ray also said that she looked
upon her liberal arts education in
college as one of the most impor-
See RAY page 10
Staff Writer
Sniper, a new film that pre-
sents a different look at the hor-
rors of a different kind of war,
unfolds in the jungles of Panama.
Tom Berenger plays Gun-
nery Sergeant Thomas Beckett,
a marine whose profession is
assassinating people.
Beckett is a sniper whose
spotter gets shot as the film
opens. A civilian named Rich-
ard Miller, played by Billy Zane,
is sent to replace the slain man
and aide Beckett on his next as-
signment. That assignment is
executing a Panamanian gen-
eral who threatens to disrupt
the free election slated to be held
in that country.
Miller has never killed any-
one before and Beckett senses
this. Beckett feels that Miller will
be a liability unless he can be
counted on to pull the trigger in
a moment of crisis.
Sniper chronicles the mis-
sion of Beckett and Miller
through the forest to their final
destination at a seaside haci-
enda.
Films like Sniper usually in-
trigue the audience for the
simple reason that a person who
can kill without compassion
poses an enigma. The very fiber
of a person's soul cries out
against the slaying of another
human being.
Only in the military struc-
ture is killing another human
being not considered a crime.
The military complex actually
fosters an indifference in its re-
cruits towards killing.
The entire military structure
rests on the proposition that the
killing of a person becomes ac-
ceptable if the government sanc-
tions such an act. War films, at
least the better ones, explore
some facet of this philosophical
stance.
In Sniper, Thomas Beckett
interests the viewer because of
the detached manner in which
he views his job. He kills on
command and without compas-
sion. He kills for neither anger
nor fun. He kills because he can.
He's good at it.
Had Sniper probed Beckett's
mind, his past and future, then
the film may ha ve been on firmer
ground as an interesting study
of man. Instead the film's mak-
ers concentrated on the assassi-
nation.
The story they tell never re-
ally drags, much to the film's
credit. For almost two hours
nothing fills the screen but
Beckett and Miller surrepti-
tiously edging closer to their
bounty. The tension builds, but
the crescendo is dampened by
insipid, cliched dialogue.
Miller asks Beckett about his
dreams and Beckett talks about
fishing in Montana. Beckett
makes melodramatic statements
like: "If I wasn't prepared to die,
I wouldn't be out here
A silly facet of the story in-
volves Miller's assertion that he
is in charge of the mission be-
cause he was sent by Washing-
See SNIPER page 9
Attic Society revisited
Michael Preston
Staff Writer
The "Attic Society Revisited ECU
Student Union Foru m Commi ttee's on-
going roundtable debate series, is pre-
senting their latest topic.
The debate, titled
"The Future of Eastern
North Carolina; Devel-
opment, at what Cost?"
takes place tonight at 8
in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Great room.
The heated topic,
which has made or bro-
ken political careers,
takes a look at the im-
portance of both eco-
nomic development as
well as environmental
preservation. Six panel-
ists from throughout
Eastern North Carolina will tackle this
touchy subject.
The panelists represent various po-
litical views and invested interests.
Representing theeconomic community
is Steve Byran of the new Kinston Re-
gional Jetport and Mark Finlayson of
Weyerhauser.
The environmental team includes
Vince Bellis of the biology department
and Davia McNor of the PamlicoTar
River Foundation. To make things in-
teresting, Phil
Dickerson, a county
engineer will be caught
in the political middle.
"The Forum Com-
mittee feels strongly
aboutthisdebate'said
David Belch, a Forum
Committee member.
"There are not many
places where you will
find theTarRiver Foun-
dation and
Weyerhauser taking
each other on outside
the political arena
The Attic Society is a rebirth of an
Oxford debate club.
Being a roundtable discussion, the
members are spurred on by a modera-
tor who plays Devil's advocate.
�� There are not
many places
where you will
find th� Tar River
Foundation and
Weyerhauser
taking each other
on outside the
political arena
David Belch
Nonfiction writer to speak on campus
Eddy Harris will read from his latest novel
By Chandra Speight
Staff Writer
Nonfiction writer Eddy Harris will read
from his latest novel in Mendenhall's Great
Room Feb. 17 at 8 pm The novel, relating
Harris's motorcycle trip through the southern
partof the United States, will bepublished this
Spring.
Ha ms,aSt Louisnative,attended Stanford
University in California. He worked as a jour-
nalist for several years, but now devotes his
time to writing novels. A world traveler, Hir-
ris has lived in numerous countries including
England, France and Africa. Currently, Harris
resides in Harlem.
ThR)ughvvriting,Harriscorrelateshi5 trav-
els to his personal growth "M ississippi Sok
his first novel, concerns his solo canoe trip
down the Mississippi River.
Harris's second novel, "NativeStninger
br ught him much success. Harris traveled ti i
Africa in order to better understand his rela
tionship with the country.
He tells of his ex-
periences in the novel.
Originally published
only in the United
States,Penguin Books
is now producing an
edition that will be
published internation-
ally.
The Student
Union Minority Arts
and Forum Commit-
tees, in conjunction
with the Department
of English and the
graduate colloquium,
combined forces to
bring Harris to ECU.
"Harris possesses
an innatesenseof curi-
osity and intuition that
compels him to travel
to a variety of places in (rder to better under-
stand himself and others Professor Julie Fay
Eddy Harris
of the ECU English De-
partment said. "He will
appeal toadiverseaudi-
ence
"Our main pro-
gram goal is to work in
conjunctionwiththeaca-
demic departments to
bringinquality,thought-
provoking speakers
said J. Marshall,
Mendenhall Student
Center's assistant direc-
tor of student activities.
"A more specific goal is
to educate the univer-
sity and community au-
diences in different cul-
tures in conjunction with
African American
Awareness Month
Marshall also ex-
pressed his gratitude to the ECU English
Department for their efforts.
4?
1





� � - II �
8 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 16, 1993
The Orb displays inorganic sensuality
By Thomas Croft
Staff Writer
It's cybernetic cosmo-zwhirl,
humming and fading and pump-
ing quaalude post-rave rigor mor-
tis. It'svirtuaJsensuality,aural plas-
ticity for the faceless e-ball genera-
tion.
The Orb's second album,
UF.Orb(BigLifeMercury),sounds
mysteriously like their first, The
Orb's Adventure in the Underworld.
Both have recieved critical acclaim,
probably due to The Orb's epic es-
capism, both on record and as an
artistic, musicial outfit.
The Orb is the synthetic off-
spring of techno celestia 1-head s Dr.
Alex Patterson and Thrash.
It sounds like hyperspace
techtonics with rave-hall house
beats. Butitbeatsthegenericmael-
strom of daydream nation generia
that manifests rave culture and the
hype.
There'sa sick musicality about
The Orb, and about U.F.Orb. The
CD (74 minutes) comes complete
with an extra, bonus CD (66 min-
utes). When The Orb records its
inorganic unsensuality it delivers
� not skimping out on quantity
here.
In terms of quality, however,
TheOrbwavesabitflaky. Aestheti-
Photo courtesy Mercury Records
Tlie Orb
cally, U.F.Orb is excellent to study,
read, garden, cook, relax, sleep,
write or dance to. Though tremen-
douslyfunctional asanatmospheric
link to alien lifeforms and a
smokescreen tobackground silence,
The Orb crosses over enough gen-
erative sound associations to
oftentimes evade anv musicality at
all.
It is crystals and incense and
trippy and throbbing. It's micro-
chip masturbation.
U.F.Orb contains seven tracks,
though you'd never know it. The
bonus CD contains four tracks,
though you'd never know it. The
album is a great investment if you
want to create a "mood" at a din-
ner party, drug sit-in or romantic
engagement. The record also con-
tributes utility to anyone's need of
changing a given mood or elimi-
nating any uncool vibes or bogus
atmosphere.
Elephant breathing, Japanese
flutes and Radio Moscow are only
some of the gems that pepper The
Orb'saural feast of crazy whacked
body grind candy samples.
There's something disturbing
about The Orb, not musically but
inprinciple. One person; one com-
puter. The Orb.
The formula can be as spooky
�if long-time pondered�asarti-
ficial intelligence orauto-pilot cars
on L.A. freeways.
It is the antithesis of 1960s
psychedelia. It is faceless, voice-
less; it has no plasma. Celestial
information-age commando
futurismo overload cyberpunk
hemmorage brain-lobe antiseptic
asphaltcream. Liqui-pulsatepush-
button chugg plastic hippo revolu-
tion emotion vacuum slippy
striped strobe green Doc Martin
mega-hatted plaid puke in the af-
ternoon nipple-pierced relax.
Mary's Danish sets
new, unique standards
By Chandra Speight
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aff Writer
Mary's Danish is one of those
bands that can't be compared to
any other band. Maybe we want
to say they sound like the B-52's
and The Bangles mixed with Kiss
or something crazy, but no, the
truth is Mary's Danish sounds
like Mary's Danish. Then again,
on some of the slower numbers,
thevocals sort of sound like Rindy
Ross of QuaterFlash. Well heck,
throw Alannah Myles in too. But
those are slight similarities.
American Stamford,theband's
third album, features a cover with
a sloppy cheeseburger perched
on Uncle Sam's hat. I like fun
album covers, and this one is fun.
The press release says the cheese-
burger is really a veggie burger
� which is still swell � -rid it
symbolizes that "Americans are
fed up with the country and its
politics being reduced to fast-
food, artifice and seven second
sound-bite ideologies Well,
well, well. I like it.
The music is sometimes fast
and furious, sometimes eclectic,
but always good.
I especially like one of the
mellower tracks, "O Lonely Sou I,
It's a Hard Road
It's a moving number about
being alone, and the vocals,
smooth and syrupy, are every-
where.
Here's "Killjoy the first
track: "You'rea killjoySuffocate
the rising sunJoy � you always
take it backTo the place where
pride and vice are one If that's
not a killjoy, what is? "Killjoy" is
swell, but I'm more moved by
"Porcupine a shakin'short little
number about not getting along:
"ain't got time to work it outSo
why not sit at homeAnd sing a
little song about ha ting everyone
you know
Other tracks on the album
include "God Said a little ditty
about televangelism; "Leave it
alone another little number
ah ut not getting along; and
"Weeping Tree a great rockin'
song about how music, like po-
etry, revealsemotion. There's lots
of references to guns and stuff
everywhere too.
American Standard is for
people who stay away from too
much mainstream music.
But then again, it's music for
everybody, especially fun people.
On the ol' one to ten, I give Ameri-
can Standard an eight.
WHO COULDN'T
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Location:
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Texts:
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K.





FEBRUARY 16, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
Jatit nun r
T2Lj UJ& !By JiJiarJ. Czanuum
Competition is hell
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
DOWNTOWN
218 E. 5th St752-0022
Exercise is important, and I try
to get some now and then. I was
playingsome rowdy racquetball the
other day with this groovy guy, and
he was about four points down. It
was his serve and he bounced the
ball, jumped in the air and hit it
between his legs. He lost his serve
because the ball went straight t to the
floor, but it killed me the way it did
mat. It was a good game, lots of
laughs.
Anyway,that'sswell,butIdon't
want to talk about him, I like him. I
want to talk about people I don't
like � those ultra-competitive
people who take the fun out of ev-
erything.
Have you ever done anything
with these people? If you haven't,
you are one of these people: stop
reading now or you're going to get
your feelings hurt. But probably
not, you're insensitive.
Those people, let's call them
"turds are everywhere. You can't
play basketball,racquetball, volley-
ball, Trivial Pursuit or make salsa
without some turd telling you or
showingyou how itshould be done.
And if they should happen to lose or
bewrong! World coming toan end!
That's when the ailments and aches
come climbing out of their large
mouths like maggots from a dead
raccoon that swells u p and bursts in
the sun: "my arm is still sore from
curling 1,000 pounds
Look,has this ever happened to
you? You cook something�potato
salad, for instance�and you bring
some with you to school or workfor
for lunch, and you're eating it and
the local turd says, "what are vou
eating?"
Potato salad.
"Did you make it?"
Yes.
"What did you put in your's?"
And as soon as you say pota-
toes, onions, blah, blah, blah, what
do you get?
"Well this is howdo it
Oh goody thank you little turd
ofa super-cook for letting me know
that my humble littlebowlof potato
salad doesn't make the grade. Oh,
well. But that's nothing. Let mesha re
this with you. As you may know, I
no longer have a car since the little
accident with the pipe bomb, so I
rely on others for transportation.
OK, so I'm playing racquetbal 1 with
this turd. Now, I already knew he
wasa turd; I've played disc golf and
volleyball with him (Heaven help
you if serve into the net when you're
on his team!)
HedroveusuptoMingessowe
could play. In all honesty, the only
way to get to these people i s to make
them lose in a big way; it eats at
them likeacid,oryou could laughat
them: they're usually so intent of
putting up this facade of conde-
scending superiority that they're
easy to put down in front of every-
body. Anyway, I had toputasideall
my goofiness and stuff 'cause this
was going to be a serious match.
I thrashed him soundly.
Now, I'm sure his fragile ego
wasn'tbruised,afterall, I laterfound
out that he had aggravated an old
arm injury and he had been sick. But
that's not the point. The point is, he
made me walk home; he couldn't
give me a ride, he said. The nerve of
this turd. Maybe I should have let
him win once, maybe. So, we don't
play racquetball anymore because
he can't stand to lose, and I made
sure he never won again.
OK, OK, OK. My point is that
nobody likes you if you're that way,
except your mother. If you're going
togoaround informing everyone of
your superiority, then be a good
sport about it when you lose and be
in good humor when everybody
picks on you because they hate
you.Sohavefun,forcryingoutloud!
You'll end uplike thebully in Back to
the Future if you don't, or you'll die
of high blood pressure.
One last thing: Peel and slice
potatoes, boil til tender. Add sliced
onions and green peppers, salt and
lots of pepper. Throw in some rel-
ish, a chopped boiled egg, some
Miracle Whip, mustard, and a little
sour cream.
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HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
SNIPER
Continued from page 7
ton, D.C The sequence in D.C
which only occupies five minutes
of screen time early in the film,
plays as trivial � like actors trying
to muster enough energy to sound
ominous. The scene leaves the
viewer feeling uninvolved. As the
scene ends, one can practically vi-
sualize the actors walking off the
set at the end of the take.
The basic storyline itself plays
as cheap melodrama � an aged
veteran has to handle a young hot
shot, the young hot shot rebels but
eventually matures and ends up
saving the aging veteran's life in
the final reel.
Sniper is one of those films that
your dad might enjoy.
Sniper manages to maintain a
tense atmosphere with adequate
direction from Luis Llosa and an
eerie soundtrack that underscores
the tension evident on the screen.
The locations � Sniper was filmed
entirely on location in Panama and
Australia � add to the gritty real-
ism for which the film strives. The
use of camouflage and the art of
sniping provide an interesting side-
light to the ma in story. Even enough
plottwistsare included to keep the
film from becoming trite.
If you enjoy war films then
Sniper should keep your interest. It
chronicles war in a manner suit-
able for the types of conflicts hap-
pening in the '90s.
Sniper possesses most of the
admirable qualities of a war movie.
Unfortunately, war movies have
not as a rule, gained the distinction
of being an admirable genre like
Westerns and crime stories have.
Still, Sniper provides enough
entertainment to warrant a recom-
mendation no matter to whatgenre
it belongs.
Lifestyle Writers � I have some new stories! Stop by
and pick up an assignment or two. Thanks . . . Dana
STUDENT
APPRECIATION
DAY
TUESDAYS IN FEBRUARY at
SEAFOOD
626 S. Memorial Drive
Present your 1993 Student ID
Card and get:
YOUR CHOICE OF
ANY DINNER FOR ONLY
$029
Excluding platters & family packs
Not valid with any other discounts
Beverages and desserts not included
ATTIC �; The
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Wednesday, February 17
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HI





10 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 16, 1993
RAY
tant things she ever had.
"The more you know about
� everything, the better off you're
gonna be in the real world Ray
said. "Knowledge is a very power-
ful tool.
"I grew u p here in a lot of ways.
I made enormous mistakes here,
butl learned from them. I was given
enormous opportunities, just from
hard-headedness and a certain
CHOMSKY
amount of talent. I look back on
going to college as a great gift
When asked whether she could
give any advice to students who
were graduating, Ray said that ev-
erybody will find their own way to
succeed.
"Who am 1 to come here and
go, 'Yes, I'm a big success and I'm
gonna tell you how to do it? Ray
said. "That's such baloney. You're
gonna have to figure out your own
way. Everybody has their own
unique way of finding their way,
and finding their way to success.
"The way I looked at it � and
I betcha the way you'll look at it,
too�well, somebody's gotta make
it. They say only a tiny, tiny little
percentage of people ever make it
in acting � only a tiny, tiny little
percentage of people ever make it
Continued from page 7
Continued from page 7
in what-not. Well, I want to be part
of that tiny, tiny little percentage. If
everybody falls over and gives up,
nobody'll ever make it
When asked about the enter-
tainment business as a whole, Ray
said that it is a "look" business that
is especially hard on women.
"Show business is really type-
oriented Ray said. "You're the
blond bimbo, you're the plump
mother, you're the studly guy. You
can either grab on to it tight, which
makes it easier for them to cubby-
hole you, or you become a leading
lady, or a leading man.
"There are 70,000 professional
actors in L.A. Last year, there were
50,00 jobs. 16,00 of those were for
women. What does that tell you?
It's really hard for women
Lee Norris, Ray's co-star in the
new sitcom Almost Home (which airs
Saturdays on NBC at 8 p.m.),
summed up Connie Ray�the per-
son and Connie Ray � the actor in
few short sentences.
"She's a great person Norris
said. "She's fun to be around, to
work with. When's it's really tight
on the set she's always there, and
happy and smiling.
"Sne's really good
understood. Remember when Bush
raised the taxes, and everyone was
screaming at him?
There was an Op-Ed in the Bos-
ton Globe, written by some respected
academic, saying, "Look these criti-
cisms of Bush are completely unfair.
We have to understand that
there'sa difference between running
for election and governing. The pur-
poseof runningforelection is to win.
The purpose of governing is to do
what's best for the country, which
may be the opposite of what you
promised
Okay, well there's a little faker
here too, because it's not the country
you're doing the best for. But what
you're saying is that election prom-
ises are made to be broken. They're
just part of the technique of getting
someone into office. No one should
take them seriously.
Now the cynicism towards de-
mocracy � this editor is a bonafide
Kennedy liberal and an academic�
I is unimaginable. To them the situa-
! tion isjusta nuisance. Sure, we have
tohavedemocraticreforms,butwe're
not going to let them truly function.
If Clinton really did try to do
something�I mean, let's just say by
! some miracle Clintondid try tocarry
out reform programs�it wouL 't
! amount to anything.
Say I was elected president and
i wanted tocarry outreformprograms,
I wouldn't be able to do it. In a state
capitalist society, especially an inter-
national state capitalist system, it's
the people who control me resources
who run everything.
They set theconditions in which
decisions are made. If theydon'tlike
what'shappening, they disinvest and
46
.The purpose of running for election
is to win. The purpose of governing is
to do what's best for the country,
which may be the opposite of what
you promised.
the decisions can't be made.
TEC: How do you think the
powerbrokers of the West view the
situation of instability- in Eistern
Europe, the war in Bosnia?
NC: I don't think the West likes
the situation. They just don't know
what todoabout it. The West would
much prefer to have Eastern Europe
go back tobeinga well-behaved sec-
tion of the Third World, as in the old
days.
TEG But this would be more an
advantage for Germany than for the
United States.
NG Sure,andifyou'venoticed,
Germany hasbeen in theadvance on
this situation. The United States has
dragged its feet all throughout the
'80s about the liberation of Eastern
Europe.
The United States tried to bar
Ost-Politik a West-German term.
They didn't like the increase of East-
West trade. Just a week before
Ukraine declared independence,
Bush made a big speech saying they
shouldn't declare independence. In
fact, all the way through the United
Noam Chomsky
Stateshasnot wanted independence
for Eastern Europe for thevery simple
reason you just mentioned: Ger-
many is much better placed than the
United States is to take advantage of
the new Third World.
In fact, if you look at Germany
policy, it has a lot to do with what's
happeningin Yugosiavia.Germany,
unilaterally (because there big guys
too, the- do what they feel like) and
against everyone's objections, has
said it would recognize Croatia and
Slovenia. No one wanted them to do
it.
Slovenia, therichestpart,ispretty
mucha partof Germany. So Slovenia
isn'tabigthreatandnomingtoworry
about; and they're integrating back
into the West.
If the situation in Croatia gets
settled, it will become part of the
German control system. Serbia I
wouldn't worry too much about.
It's poor. They would be happy to
see the thing settled, because it's
dangerous.
If the Serbs go into Kowsovo,
and the Turks become involved, it
could get really ugly, and nobody
wants that.
(The second part of this interview
will be printed Jan. 18.)
ml
VISIT CAPTAIN WILLIAMS AT THE STUDENT STORES LOBBY
FROM 10:00-2:00 P.M. ON FEBRUARY 22, 1993 OR CALL
1-800-722-6715 FOR MORE INFORMATION
I





i-iii ii i iiiii
The East Carolinian
February 16. 1993
Sports
Page 11
Pirate baseball begins season by dropping two of three
By Michael Albuquerque
Staff Writer
STATESBORO, Ga. � East
Carolina opened its 1993 baseball
season on Friday, Feb. 12, with a
three-game weekend series against
Georgia Southern, losing the
opener 4-2 and splitting the final
two games with an 8-4 win on Sat-
urday and a 4-1 loss on Sunday.
Pirate head coach Gary
Overton sentstaff ace Johnny Beck
to the mound for the opener, and
although he lost, Beck pitched ef-
fectively for ECU, recording five
strike outs and allowing only four
earned runs.
"Johnny Beck threw very
well Overton said. "I thought that
it was one of his best outings.
Johnny did a remarkable job against
whatwe feel likeisoneof the better
hitting clubs we'll see all year
GSU center fielder Todd
Greene, a pre-season All-America
selection by Baseball America and
Collegiate Baseball, broke a score-
less tie in the fourth inning with a
PITCHING:WLERA. G GSGGSHOsvIPHRERBBSOHRE
Beck, Johnny013.8610007.07432520
Blackwell, Richie000.0000001.01000100
Hartgrove, Lyle104.1510008.71 1441710
Layton, Billy000.0000002.71001300
Mills, Jason000.0000001.01000100
Morsa, Stancll000.0000000.32000100
Sanburn, Mike018.3110004.38442100
File Photo
Pirate baseball started over the weekend. The Bucs took one of
three without the help of All-CAA outfielder Dave Leisten.
solo home run to left field which
gave the Eagles a 1-0 lead.
'Todd Greene is one heck of a
college hitter and readily deserves
to be one of the best in the nation
Overton said. "He's a very tough
out. He's an excellent hitter, and I
think that just truly sums him up
Georgia Southern added three
more runs in the fifth inning, in-
cludingan opposite field homer by
freshman Mark Hamlin which Pi-
See BASEBALL Page 14
Spiders bite Pirates,
ladies lose momentum
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU women's basketball team is
discovering firsthand how difficult it is to
sustain momentum. The Lady Pirates, after
winning a barnburner against James Madi-
son Friday night, fell 61-60 to Richmond on
Sunday.
The Pirates, stagnated by terrible shoot-
ing, hit just 22 of 58 attempts at the goal and
were able to score no three-pointers in the
contest The Pirate backcourt connected for
32 points, but was unable to counteract the
lack of productivity on the inside. Pirate
center RhondaSmithonly managed toscore
four points as she was virtually shut down
by the strict Richmond defense. Smith went
two-for-six from the field, and with the ex-
ception of her rebounding, was notas much
of a factor as in previous games.
ThePiratescouldnotreturntheSpiders'
favor, however, as Richmond battered the
Pirates from the inside. The Spider forwards
combined for 36 points including the career-
high scoring performance of Diana Poulsen.
Poulsen connected for 19 points, eight re-
bounds and two assists and frustrated the
Pirate defense by scoring bom from the in-
sideand the perimeter. Foul troubleplagued
PiratedefensivestandoutToina Coley asshe
was charged with three first half violations
and eventually fouled out of the game.
The Pirates never fell any farther than
five points behind the Spiders, and led by
that margin early in the second half, but
could not overcome their lack of inside scor-
ing. Despite an exciting comeback attempt
in the final minute, the day was to belong to
the Richmond forwards.
The Lady Pirates' record now stands at
4-5 in the CAA, 10-9 overall.
ECU (60)
Minftrb
m-am-ao-tapfP
Coley 294-61-22-3259
Cagle 00-12-30-0212
O'Donnell403-84-70-414210
Thurman 224-65-72-51413
Rodgerson 20-00-00-0000
Smith 302-60-03-7034
Baker 121-22-20-1014
Samuels 302-12W)1-1034
Blackmon 26692-85-100314
Totals 20022-5816-29 16-35 19 22 60
Percentages: FG - .999, Ft. 655, 3 pt. Goals: 10-28 -
.357, Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots - 9,
Turnovers - 15, Steals - 7.
Richmond(61)
Minftrb
m-am-ao-tapf�P
Barnes353-112-20-1398
Barnes,L. 60-00-00-0110
Sipple408-121-22-60217
Poulson378-103-53-82319
Loos311-50-12-3343
Winn50-10-10-0120
McClure 40-02-20-101t
Bartuska 222-62-42-8146
Babb112-22-31-1026
Noise10-00-00-0010
Nicosia50-0O-O0-0000
Totals200 24-4712-2012-32112261
TOTALS12 3.963 301025.031121 161930
WILD PITCHES:
SANBURN1
HITTING:AVG.GABRH2B3BHRRBISBcsBBso0BP.SLG.TBSHSFE
Borel, Jamie.3003102300010131.462.3003000
Clark, Heath.111390110000012.200.2222011
Cronan, Phil.600251300110021.7141.2006000
Edwards, Lamont.000130000000002.000.0000010
Fedak, Frank.3083132400000011.357.3084000
Harman, Grant.000110000000000.000.0000000
Head, Jason.000280000000002.000.0000000
Kushner, Lee.3333122410020012.385.4175000
Peters, Mike.000250000000013.167.0000002
Pitt, Steven.3083131410010005.308.385s000
Obholz, Kevin.000100000000001.000.0000000
Triplett, Chad.000100000000000.000.0000000
Watkins, Pat.300310I300141021.417.6006001
West, Chris.2313131320010012.286.38550 00 21
TOTALS.24331031125s0210111223.322.350365
HIT BY PITCH:SACRIFICEFLIES:
Head 1, Clark 1Watkins1
Thompson's team holds off Dukes, 69-67
By Billy Weaver
Percentages: FG - .510, Ft. 600, 3 pt. Goals: 1-5 -
700, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots - 0,
Turnovers - 22, Steals -14.
1st half2nd half OTFinal
ECU283260
Richmond313061
Staff Writer
Coming off a four-game road
stint, the Lady Pirates edged out fa-
vored James Madison 69-67 in a thrill-
ing game in Minges Coliseum Friday
night.
ECU went into Minges seeking
revenge after a 60-53 loss to the Lady
Dukes on Jan. 12. ECU leads the series
18-16 and is 8-5 against JMU at home.
The Lady Dukes went into Friday
nights game second in the CAA with
a 5-2 conference record. With a 3-4
record, ECU issteadily climbing back
into the running in the conference.
ECU came out playing hard. The
Lady Pirates took the early lead and
never looked back.
The Lady Pirates led by as much
as eight points in the first half but
could not finish off JMU who came
back to cut the lead to three to make
the score 35-32 at halftime.
The Lady Pirates came out after
the half with the same intensity until
11:54 left when JMU's Gail Shelly
halted an ECU drive with a steal that
led to the Lady Dukes' first lead of the
game 46-44.
In the second half, the lead would
change hands several times but nei-
ther team would give an inch.
The Lady Dukes ran tough until
36 seconds left to play when ECU's
Tomekia Blackmon scored under-
neath to put the Lady Pirates up 67-
62. It seemed as though ECU would
coast to an easy victory but JMU re-
Senior divers lead ECU into CAA contention
By Brent St. Pierre
Staff Writer
Go back into your library of sporting
knowledge and fry to find the one sport
that evokes terror when you see it and a
sense of amazement when it is pulled off.
I must remind you though, Super Dave
Osborne is not considered an athlete;
moreover, neither is Dale Earnhardt or
Dick Trickle.
So, what one sport gives the spectator
that tingly sensation in the pit of their
stomach? What one sport makes you ask;
"How the hell did he do that?" Here is a
hint: this sport is offered at ECU.
No, it's not football, though I realize
the same feelings and questions areasked
and no, it's not basketball either which
gives you an all together different tingly
sensation;I think it iscalled nausea. What
is this sport that comprises Michael
Jordanesque talents you ask? Diving.
Granted, diving probably was not
the sport to come to mind; but, go back to
the Olympics and try to recall the diving
events. They were spectacu la r; the divers
were doing things that seemed almost
inhuman. And when their mortality was
questioned, our perverted love for other
people's pain would be answered with a
thunderous "slap" as some poor German
guy would screw up and do a belly-flop
from six stories up. ECU has such ath-
letes.
ECU's diving team is headed by John
Rose and manned by what he termed as,
"the greatest ECU diving team from top
to bottom that has ever been put together
in the 12 years that I have been at the
helm Rose said.
ECU is led by three outstanding se-
niors. Tara Rohland, Matt Lawerence and
George Garbe. Together they ha ve the abil-
ity to be the catalyst needed to earn ECU
the CAA Swimming and Diving Champi-
onships held in Wilmington next week.
Individuallyeach of these threeaerial-
acrobats are special, special in their ac-
complishments, but more importantly,
special in the heart of Head Coach John
Rose.
The men are led by Matt Lawerence
and George Garbe. Rose is confident that
both will be finalists at the Conference
Championships. Rose's confidence is not
unfounded. "Matt Lawerence is the best
diver that 1 have ever coached in my
twelve years at ECU. He has finished first
or second in every meet for fou r yea rs and
is one of the greatest kids that I have ever
been fortunate enough to coach Rose
said.
As for Garbe, Rose has no lack of
Lady Pirates come home after
four road games
fused to die.
With 15 secondsleft, Gail Shelly hit
a dramatic three-point shot that knot-
ted the game at 67. The only thing JMU
had to do now was to hold ECU's of-
fense from scoring for the remaining 14
seconds which would send the game
intoovertime.But,JMU'sChristinaLee
made a critical mistake. She was called
for her fifth foul which sent LaShonda
Baker to the free-throw line. Baker
showed poise at the line and sank both
free throws to send the Lady Dukes
back to Harrisonburg with a 5-3 record.
The Lady Du kes, who are ranked no. 4
in the NCAA in field goal percentage
(52.8 percent), finished Friday's game
with a low 38.5 percent average.
For the fourth straight week,
Gaynor O' Donnell has led the na-
tion in assists average. O'Donnell
managed to reel off nine assists add-
ing to her impressive school record
of 707. Rhonda Smith who was seven
for eight from the field led the Lady
Pirates in scoring with 16 points.
The Lady Pirates improved to 4-
4 in the conference and look for-
ward to seeing JMU again in tour-
nament play.
iff- 'iMifflr 1
vs. RiGlffifSfil
Mingftrb
m-am-ao-taPfP
Cagle 102-30-00-1224
0'Donnell391-13-51-4935
Thurman 274-72-41-40410
Rodgerson 40-02-20-0002
Sutton 30-01-20-0011
Smith 267-82-40-61416
Baker 363-73-40-2129
Samuels 326-102-21-34215
Blackmon 233-61-30-5127
Totals 20026-4216-26 3-27 18 20 69
Percentages: FG - .619, Ft. 615, 3 pt Goals: 1-3 -
333, Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots -2,
Turnovers - 22, Steals -11.
James Madison(67)
Minif.ftrb
m-am-ao-taPf
Lee 254-126-93-745
Powell 201-53-53-414
Hopkins 325-103-32-402
Shelly 394-13(M)3-633
Algeo 364-120-03-643
Ratliff 152-60-01-204
Woodson 335-73-44-813
dLek zOa
The CAA tournament
win be held at Old
Dominion University
March 11-13.
p I
14
5
13
9
9
4
13
Totals 20025-6515-21 22-41 13 24 67
Percentages: PG - 385, Ft. 714,3 pt Goals: 2-6 -
333, Team Rebounds - 4, Blocked Shots - 0,
Turnovers -17, Steals - 9.
ECU
JMU
1st half
35
32
2nd half OT
34
35
Final
69
67
praise either. "Since transferring from
Radford, George has established himself
as the most self-motivated and hardest
working diver I have ever had. Last year
he didn't even go to the Conference Cham-
pionships due to injuries this year he is in
position to become a finalist on both
boards with Lawerence Rose said.
The women are led by Tara Rohland.
RohJand,afinalistlastyear on both boards,
is prepared for a return visit. Rose is
confident in Rohland's chances to return
to the Conference promised land. "She is
the second-best female diver that I have
ever coached and perhaps the most dedi-
cated, consistent hard workingdiver that
I have ever had. She has finished first or
second in every meet and will easily re-
turn to the finalsat the Conference Cham-
pionships Rose said.
If it sounds as if Rose has a parental
tone in his praise of the three seniors, it is
true. There is a sense of compassion and
love in the praise he gives Rohland,
Lawerence and Garbe, and it is apparent
thathe believes they will be successful this
weekend in Wilmington. What should be
a three-way dog race to the Championship
crown may very well be settled on the
boards. If confidence counts for anything
then Roses' divers are well prepared to
bringthe championship back toGreenville.
Tara Rohland
(left) is the
hardest working
and most
dedicated diver
Coach Johnny
Rose said he has
ever had. This
years' diving
team has
enjoyed more
success than
most of ECU's
other athletic
teams.

'
t
Photo by Dail Read





� ��
-72 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 16, 1993
Charlotte's Bogues plays David to NBA's goliaths
That's the
CHARLOTTE (AP)�The cyn-
ics may still laugh at Muggsy Bogues,
butthey should know better after five
years.
Instead oflingeringasa 12th man
with very little playing time because
he's5-fcot-3,Boguesisstartingforthe
Charlotte Hornets after a frustrating
rookieyearwiththeWashingtonBul-
lets.Hehasmaintained aplaoeamong
the statistical lead-
ersintheNBA,and
Bogues also is
provingthathehas Ultimate, knowing
that you can be
among the top
guards in the
league and you 're
starting and you're
being respected as
a starter
Muggsy Bogues
dominated by big-
ger men.
"Ihafsthe ul-
timate, knowing
that you can be
among the top
guards in the
Bague and you're
Jlartingand you're
being respected as
a starter Bogues
says. "If ssomething that I've always
believed, that I am a starter
The former Wake Forest star is
working on leading the Hornets into
the playoffs in their fifth year. It's a
ldfty goal for a player whose hoop
heroes as a youngster were not in the
pios.
"WhenIwasgrowingup,Ididn't
wjatch the NBA that much Bogues
s$ys. "I watched college some. I was
mainly involved in my own sports,
gOysaround theneighborhoocLIhad
nfighborhood heroes. I didn't have
NBA heroes because I couldn't really
relate to them
The NBA did have small guards
then, but by Bogues' standards Nate
'Tiny" Archibald was a monster of a
guard at 6-foot-l. There was Calvin
Murphy and Charlie Crist, also of the
era where being a point guard didn't
necessarily require the build of a
frontcourt player.
IfBogueshad an idol,itwassome-
body he could look in the eye � al-
most
"A guy named
Dwayne Woods. He
went to Dunbar High
School says Bogues,
who led the school's
1983 team to an un-
beatenseason. "Hewas
only 5-5 I wasn't pat-
terning my game be-
hind him, butl learned
sornetiungsfromhirn'
With his neigh-
bors tel ling him to for-
getproball,Boguesput
his athletic life in per-
spective and made college his next
challenge. He took the wisdom he
gained from Woods to Winston-Sa-
lem, where he became an all-Atlantic
Coast Conference performer and less
of a novelty.
But Wake Forest ta ughthim more
than basketball, he says, adding that
the school was the best thing that ever
happened to him.
"It was a challenge for me to go
there asa student-athlete he says. "It
was tough, but I fought my way
through it"
The fight was just beginning.
Bogues was a first-round pick of
the Bullets in the 1987 draft and the
12th selection overall. He played in 79
gamesand handed out404assists while
scoring a modest 5 points per game.
But Bogues watched thecoaching
staff change the offense around him to
a more deliberate style. It took him
away from histypeof gameand caused
Bogues tovvonder if thecoacheswould
stick with him.
"I think the coaching staff was
more ca ught up in what was happen-
ing aioundtheleague,andIthink they
started second-guessing themselves
aboutthedetisionthattheymadehe
says. 'They got caught up in listening
to other people
It was nice to be near his home of
Baltimore, Bogues said, but the situa-
tion was "uncomfortable
"I was unhappy, I wasn't playing
like I though 11 should have been play-
ing he says. "It wasn't a good situa-
tion
Bogues feels he didn'tget the shot
he deserved.
"They just gave up on me too
quick he says. "For them to give up
on a number one pick that early, it was
kind of unusual
When time came for Charlotte to
pick from theexpansion pool, the team
took a chance on Bogues. Still, in his
firstyear with his new team, he had to
prove he belonged.
T had another coach who didn't
believe in me,butl wasdoing so many
positive things out on the floor that
there was no way he could stop play-
ingmehesaysIwasthatimportant
to the team mat he had to play me
DickHarterwasthecoach.Aftera
season and a half he was gone. Bogues
went from a bit player to a key per-
former, raising his assists from 620 to
867 from his first year in Charlotte to
his second, which was under Gene
Littles.
Last season Bogues was fourth in
theNBAin assists and eighth in steals.
He put on his best basketball toward
theclose of 1991-92, when theHomets
were flirting with a playoff spot
Thisyear,Charlotteisexpected to
close the deal on a playoff berth. With
Larry Johnson,KendallGill and Alonzo
Mourning, the Hornets were picked
before the season started to be among
the eight teams in the Eastern Confer-
ence to fight for the crown.
His peers are convinced Bogues
can do the job.
Tfsa good thing he's that short
Seattle guard and former North Caro-
lina State star Nate McMillan says. "I
can't imagine how good he'd be at 6
foot But his shortness makes him so
hard to guard and also makes him
seem even faster
Milwaukee guard Eric Murdock
got 14 points on Bogues in a recent
meeting, but he developed a healthy
respect for his opponent
"By far he's the toughest
Murdock said when asked who was.
the toughest guard to bring up the ball.
against "You know he's soquick. But
just when you get by him and think
you're free, he's coming again to get
you. He's easily the toughest
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TUESDAYS
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�KHih1
Is your love-life a frustration??
Find out how to improve it
8 PM Thursday, Feb. 18
Mendenhall Room 244
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ and Athletes in Action.
m
-��
d
STUDENT UNION
HAPPENINGS
MOVIES I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
PACINO LEMMON BALDWIN
HARRIS ARKIN

GLENGARRY
GLEN ROSS
BASED ON THE PULITZER PRIZE WINNER
GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS
WED.& SUN, FEB 17 & 21 PASSENGER 57
THUR, FRI, & SAT, FEB 1 8, 19, & 20
. FORUM I THE FUTURE OF
i��- EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
CS ?J�w DEVELOPMENT AT WHAT COST?
�2�M1X1 THE ATTIC SOCIETY REVISITED
TUES, FEB 16,8 PM
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
MINORITY ARTS I AUTHOR, AUTHOR
& FORUM
CO-SPONSORED WITH
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH &
GRADUATE ENGLISH
COLLOQUIUM
an evening with
EDDY HARRIS
WED, FEB 17, 8 PM
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
Books will be available for sale through ECU Student Stores
VISUAL ARTS ILLUMINA '93
STUDENT ART COMPETITION
CALL FOR ENTRIES
FRI, FEB 19 1-8 PM
MENDENHALL ROOM 244
ENTRY FORMS AT MSC INFO DESK
CALL 757-47 5 FOR MORE INFO
For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
When is it too
late to say "NO"
to sex?
What is it
to be T"
masculine?
How do you deal with
feelings of jealousy in a
relationship?
What is it
V to be
feminine?
Healthy Relationship Week 1993
"PURPLE & GOLD PASSIONS"
What personal
qualities are you
looking for in a
date?
What personal
qualities are you
looking for in a
relationships?
"PURPLE AND GOLD PASSIONS" will give the
ECU campus community the opportunity to
express opinions about dating and
relationships - the frustrations and rewards!
Tell all your passions on "The Wall" at the ECU
Student Store on FEBRUARY 15TH AND 16TH from
10:00 until 2:00. Also stop by the "LOVE SHACK"
sponsored by the ECU Peer Health Educators
and obtain information on sexually transmitted
diseases and contraceptive options.
THEN ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16TH AT
7:00pm, Mendenhall Student Center, Room
244
Have you ever wanted to participate in a
talk show like Oprah or Donahue?
Now is your chance to attend The Joe
Boehman Show in which a panel of
experts will discuss
PURPLE AND GOLD PASSION: How ECU
students feel about sex, lies, and disease
in the 1990s.
ALL STUDENTS ARE WELCOME AND
ADMISSION IS FREE.
i





February 16, 1993
The East Carolinian
Fab five still wet behind ears
13
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP)
� There's a long way to go in the
Big Ten season and no one has
conceded the conference titie to
Indiana. On the other hand,
Michigan's run at the league
championship is just about over.
"We're probably not going to
win the Big Ten title. It would
take a major miracle Michigan
coach Steve Fisher said Sunday as
his team fell three games out with
seven to play after losing 93-92 to
top-ranked Indiana, the team in
first place.
The loss may have hurt the
fifth-ranked Wolverines' record,
but it didn't dampen their confi-
dence as the NCAA tournament
still looms on next month's hori-
zon.
"PmnotbelittlingtheBigTen
ring at all, but I think all of us
knows which ring is more impor-
tant Michigan's Chris Webber
said.
Indiana (22-2,11-0) has to be
one of the favorites for both pieces
of championship jewelry. The win
was the 11 th in a row for the Hoo-
siersand it was their 27th straight
at home, the longest such streak
in the nation.
Both streaks remained intact
because the Hoosiers wereable to
overcome a 13-point deficit in the
first half and one of nine points in
the second half.
"Last year, the year before,
we would have just given up on a
game like this said Indiana's
Calbert Cheaney, who had 20
points and 9 rebounds. "Today,
we dug in and told each other
'Let's go'and we did it
Indiana's tough defense held
Michigan (19-4, 8-3) without a
field for 6 12 minutes. Michigan
took its final lead at 78-76 on two
free throws by Jalen Rose with
6:01 left. Indiana scored the next
13pointsand a last-minute3-point
barrage by Webber made it seem
a lot closer than it was.
"When we took the lead, I
thought our defense was pretty
good Indiana coach Bob Knight
said. He thought the crucial point
came quite a bit earlier.
"The first point 1 want to
make, and it is possibly the most
important point of all, was that
we were able to leave the floor at
halftime just down two points
he said. "It nearly got away from
us again, but we did a really good
job of hanging in there and our
guys off the bench really contrib-
uted
The lead contributor off the
bench was freshman Brian Evans,
who finished with a season-high
17 points including a 3-for-6 ef-
fort from 3-point range where he
had only made eight shots all sea-
son.
Matt Nover had 20 points for
Indiana and his 8 rebounds were
a big part of the Hoosiers' 38-30
advantage, 20-10 on the offensive
end.
Webber finished with 23
points, 11 rebounds and 6 assists,
but was just 4 for 11 from the foul
line. He had three 3-pointers in
the final 54 seconds as the Wol-
verines, who shot 58 percent from
the field, finished 12 for 22 from
long range.
In other games Sunday, No. 3
North Carolina beat Georgia
Teach 77-66 and Louisville de-
feated No. 15 UNLV 90-86.
U. of Iowa still recovering
IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) �
Nearly all theteammatesChrisStreet
left behind came to this comer of
basketball heaven for the same rea-
sons he did and from the same kind
of small Midwestern towns that he
did. Maybe that's what made it so
strange to go on without him.
Four weeks ago today, Street
was killed in an auto accident after
leaving a team d inner and trying to
ease hiscar onto Highway 1. He was
heading back to campus for a night
class. He was 20 years old.
In some ways, the story that
began unfolding here three weeks
ago is similar to the emotional run
that Loyola Marymount made in
the 1990 NCAA tournament after
thedeathofstarforward Hank Gath-
ers.
Davis notes many of the same
things that happened then happen-
ing to his kids now. They focus bet-
ter at some times, but wander at
others; they need little motivation,
but they get wound up too easily;
they never fail to lay a body on every
body that rumbles down the lane,
but sometime the play is just plain
ragged.
In the week that followed
Street's death, school officials post-
poned two games toallow a proper
mourning period. Something unex-
pectedlv sweet happened: The
Hawkeyes climbed three spots in
the poll, ending it at No. 11.
The next week proved even
sweeter. First, Street's teammates
madt'upal7-pointdeficitin the last
530 to beat Michigan State on the
road. Then they closed out at No.
9 after beating powerful Michi-
gan at home and presenting the
game ball to Street's parents at
courtside.
An hour after their loss to In-
diana, Davis lingered in the hall-
way of Carver-Hawkeye Arena to
talk about what would come next.
"I really don't have any idea
he said, "but I don't have any
doubts we'll get through it fine.
There's no schedule for this. I've
let the players guide me through
it so far and they've been terrific
The ECU Student Union Visual Arts Committee
Presents
ILLUMINA '93
February 22-March 5
Reception Wednesday, Febbruary 24, 7:00-8:00 p m
Mendenhall Student Center Art Gallery
Call for Entries Friday, February 19
1:00 - 8:00 p.m. MSC Room 244
Entry Forms Available at the MSC Information Desk
For more information call 757-4715
Cash Prizes Totalling $700 Will Be Awarded
Top twenty-Five
The Top Twenty Five teams
in The Associated Press'college
basketball poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records
through Feb. 14, total points
based on 25 points for a first-
place vote through one point for
a 25th-place vote and previous
ranking (ACC teams in bold):
Record Pts Pvs
1. Indiana (59) 22-2 1,521 1
2. Kentucky 18-2 1,351 2
3. N.Carolina 20-3 1,348 6
4. Arizona (1) 17-2 1305 5
5. Michigan 191 1,281 4
6. Kansas 20-3 1,275 7
7. Duke 19-4
8. Cincinnati 19-2
9. Florida St 19-6
10. Wake Forest 16-4
11. Vanderbilt 19-4
12. Utah 19-3
13. Arkansas 16-5
14. Purdue 15-5
15. UNLV 16-3
16. Seton Hall 18-6
17. Pittsburgh 15-5
18. Tulane 17-4
19. UMass 17-4
20. Iowa 14-6
21. New Orleans 18-2
22. Louisville 14-6
23. Virginia 15-5
1,132
1,114
1,064
1,029
929
724
695
565
558
538
529
467
455
396
278
226
197
3
8
10
9
11
16
14
18
12
19
17
20
22
13
25
24
24. Marquette
25. St. John's
17-4
14-6
178 15
172 �
Other receiving votes:
Brigham Young 86, Oklahoma
64, Xavier, Ohio 52, Illinois 47,
Memphis St. 47, Oklahoma St
29, Nebraska 25, Boston Col-
lege 22, Georgia Tech 20, New
Mexico St. 19, Michigan St. 17,
Minnesota 10, New Mexico 9,
Syracuse 9, Southern Meth. 8,
George Washington 7, LSU 6,
W. Kentucky 6, Miami, Ohio 3,
Rice 3, Wisconsin 3, Kansas St.
2, Alabama 1, Manhattan 1, NE
Louisiana 1, Washington St. 1.
Jason Tremblay has been named sports writer of the week. Hooray for the
"Endowed Cine" (he's a wonderful writer). Writer's meeting @ 4:30, Thursc
INTERVARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Every Wednesday Night at 7:00 RM
in 244 Mendenhall
Enjoy the tun with shits.
music and guest speahers!
EVERYONE IS WELCOME
WHERE WILL YOU
BE IN 93?
Will you be doing the same old thing, or do you
want a new challenge?
If so, you're looking in the right place!
The U.S. Coast Guard, the nation's smallest
armed service, can offer you:
Law Enforcement
Search & Rescue
Engineering
Accounting
Computer Science Health Care
Management Aviation
Environmental Protection
Ship & Boat Handling
Positions are available in these and other specialties, at
various levels in the organization, for individuals between the
ages of 17-27 with a High School Diploma or College Degree.
Our excellent benefit package includes:
�30 Days Paid Vacation
�Full Medical & Dental CAre
�Undergraduate & Postgraduate
Training Opportunities
Will You Take The Challenge?
If you are interested in taking the OAR Exam (Officer Aptitude
Rating Exam) to see if you qualify to become an officer in the
United States Coast Guard, Contact your local recmiting office at:
U.S. COAST GUARD
RECRUITING OFFICE
3480 SUNSET AVENUE
ROCKY MOUNT, NC 27804
(919) 443-7476 CALL COLLECT
The Coast Guard is committed to equal opportunity.
Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.





14 The East Carolinian
February 16, 1993
baseball Slamf est to be held Wednesday at Grand Slam
Continued from page 12
rate right fielder Pat Watkins al-
most pulled down with a leaping
effort.
ECU had difficulty getting to
GSU starter Jim Carragher, a left-
handed finesse pitcher,until late in
the game when the Eagles had a 4-
Olead.
After manufacturing a run in
the sixth, the Pirates had their best
opportunity to mount a comeback
in the eighth inning with succes-
sive two-out doublesby Chris West
and Lee Kushner,cutting the Eagles
lead to 4-2. However, GSU left
fielder threw out Kushman at the
plate as he tried to score on Steven
Pitt's single to left.
"Theonly thing in the matter is
that it's a game that could have
been won Overton said. "It'scer-
tainly not a game that should have
been won but one that could have
been won
On Saturday, Feb. 13, ECU
starter Lyle Hartgrove pitched a
strong eight and two-third innings,
and the Pirateshad no trouble with
Eagle left)' Ron Buffington, a pre-
season All-SouthemConference se-
lection who was 8-1 last year.
Steven Pitt led off the second
inning with a double to right field,
and one out later Pat Watkins hit a
two-run blast to right-center field
to give ECU an early 2-0 lead.
The Pirates struck again in the
fifth inning with five singles and a
sacrifice fly to produce three more
runs, and Jamie Borel scored an-
other run in the sixth to give ECU a
6-0 lead.
Both innings were keyed by
beautifully executed hit-and-run
plays by Borel on the bases and
second baseman Frank Fedak with
the bat.
Phil Cronan, who filled in for
injured catcher Mike Peters, led off
the seventh with a home run to
right field, and Watkins scored an-
other run to give the Pirates a com-
manding 8-0 lead.
Greene finally put the Eagles
on the board with a two-run double
in the eight and a two-run homer to
deep center field in the ninth before
Pirate closer Stand 1 Morsecameon
to get the final out in the ninth.
The final game of the series on
Sunday, Feb. 14, looked like a re-
peat of game one as another Eagle
lefthander, sophomore pitcher
Clint Fair, blanked the Pirate hit-
ters with an outstanding perfor-
mance until he left after seven in-
nings with a two-hitter and seven
strikeouts.
The Pirates mounted a two-
out rally in the ninth inning with
consecutivesinglesbyKushnerand
Pitt before Eagle head coach Jack
Stallings brought in closer Paul
Thorton, a senior transfer from
Florida Community College who
was 9-2 with 12 saves and a 2.01
ERA last year.
However, Thorton, who hits
92 mphon theradargun,struggled
with his control and walked the
first two batters he faced before
Jason Head flied out to deep left
field to end the game.
The Pirates next game will be
at2 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 17,at
Campbell followed by the home
openerat Bunting Field at3 p.m. on
Friday, Feb. 19, against UNC.
By Thad Peoples
Recreational Services
Asa prelude to All-Star Week
end, ECU will show of it's own
great athletes in Slamfest.
The Recreational Services De-
partment of Intramural Sports will
be holding a Basketball Slam
Dunk Contest Wednesday, Feb.
17, at Grand Slam USA, located at
100E.14thStreet. There willbean
eight-foot rim division for all fe-
male participants and male par-
ticipants that are 5 feet 9 i nches or
under, a nine-foot rim division
will be held for participants un-
der 6 feet 2 inches and a 10-foot
rim division will be open for all
players.
An information meeting will
be held at 5 p.m. on the afternoon
of the event in Biology Building
Room 103 for anyone interested
in participating. Contestants may
register for the event at Grand
Slam 15 minutes before the start
of your division. The eight and
nine-foot divisions will be held
from 7:45 to 8:45 p.m. and the 10-
foot division will be from u to 10
p.m.
Rules of the NBA Slam Dunk
competition will be in effect. Each
participant will attempt two
dunks in the first and second
rounds and three in the third
round. The lowest third round
score will be dropped. Contes-
tants will beallowed tosubstitute
one missed dunk in each round.
There will be a score of 1.0 to 10.0
given toeach mii cessfuldunk.The
dunks will be judged on style,
creativity, and displayed athletic
ability. Each round is scored sepa-
rately.
The four participants with the
highest scores after each round
will advance. If there isa tie, there
willbeaSuddenDunkwhereeach
participant will get an additional
dunk to break the tie. No props
will be permitted in any round.
However, more than one basket-
ball may be used.
Your reputation is on the line.
The opportunitv to soar through
theairand pound the ball into the
rim should get you off of your
couch and into Grand Slam on
Wednesdaynight.lfnot to partici-
pate, merely just to see the show.
This is your opportunity to show
evervone what you are made of.
When you
finish your
copy of
The East
Carolinian,
be sure to
recycle it,
and then
tell a friend
to recycle
their copy
as well.
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Guardian
by Jeff Grubbs
7U� FREE 2LONE-
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PROSPERITY, anO
S�LFI5M PBggLg;
I CAN'T BELIEVE SI
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world a me to i thought
THE RACE WAR WAS HAD
Hi: � if .Tit'
AS A MEMBER (If THE SPECIAL
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mitti TO attain PttCB DtSt
EK H9 1VIL WAR. I SAW
THE HATRED CM tnri sides.
NCW PEOPLE DON'T CARE
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ARE YOU READY FOR
YOUR LIFESTYLE CONDOM?
The disease of AIDS has reo bed epidemic proportions; researchers
and experts state that within the. generation every person in the country
will know at least one person who has AIDS. The implications of this
prediction are staggering; AIDS is not fust something a person can
disregard. Tins disease has brought the issue of safer sex to the forefront
of our society, forcing people to think about subjects that otherwise they
would drop as uncomfortable.
The purpose of this four-part safer sex campaign is simply put � to
save lives. The East Carolinian wt in any way promoting sex; what we
are promoting is even' student's knowledge of their choice between
abstinence and safer sex. Only through information, knowledge and
common sense t an a person make this choice, one of the most important
decisions heshe will make in hisher life.
The last part of this "safer sex campaign" ties all three previous parts
into one neat bundle�how to choose a condom. Hopefully, a couple now
knows all the facts and risks that are being taken when they decide to
engage in intercourse. AIDS has made it a necessity to use a condom
whenever engaging in sex. Knowing how to buy condoms, how to use them
and how to communicate with a partner about condoms are three
essentials parts of the sexual experience. Safety is paramount here �
being assured that you are at the least risk possible will eliminate a lot of
fear and confusion.
The Past Carolinian thanks the students who modeled for this
campaign.
llfeSfyle (llf-stID n 1. a way of life or style of living that reflects
the attitudes and values of an individual or group.
Communication is an integral part of the process of
sexual intercourse. Intercourse is not just confined to the
physical act alone; it encompasses the act, the foreplay and
the discussion before and after the act between mutually
consenting partners. A person may know all the facts and
figures behind AIDS and STDs, but if heshe does not feel
comfortable enough discussing them with a partner, they
lose their purpose. Agree on how to use andor purchase a
condom before having sex. The risk, lethal as it is, is just too
great not to take the time beforehand to discuss all the issues.
Most people feel uncomfortable when talking about sex
or discussing the possibilities of sexually transmitted dis-
eases. Concerns range from feelings of inadequacy to feelings
of confusion, All of these problems and fears are valid;
however, one must overcome them to protect hisher health
and life.
The first step in improving communication on sex and
condoms is to know all the facts. The more you know, the
easier it will be to discuss it out in the open. The more you
know, the more determined you'll be to engage in safer sex.
Next, plan what you want to say. Know all the questions you
have and try to anticipate all the questions your partner may
have. Decide when to bring the subject up; a quiet time may
be better than before having sex.
There are many and various reasons a partner can come
up with if heshe does not want to use a condom. Knowing
exactly how you feel about sex will help to alleviate some
confusion; these situations may help with any additional
problems.
? "I'm a virgin � "I'm not. This way we'll both be
protected
T "You carry a condom around with you? You were
planning to seduce me � "I always carry one with me
because I care about myself. I have one with me tonight
because I care about us both
? "It destroys the romantic atmosphere � "It doesn't
have to be that way
? "I'll lose my erection by the time I stop and put it on
� "I'll help you put it on, that'll help you keep it
These examples are, by no means, all of the scenarios a
person might find hisherself in. If a person does not care
enough about hisher partner to take the time to communi-
cate, a problem exists. Sexual intercourse is between two
consenting adul
s � only when all parts o! this exist can
safety be totally ensured.
Buying condoms can be one of the most important
choices a person can make after deciding to have sex. The size
of a condom, the proper way to put a condom on and the
proper way to take the condom off are all essential to know
before using a condom. Some do's and don'ts follow:
On buying, condoms:
? Do check expiration date on outer package.
? Do check name of lubricant. Nonoxynol-9 is the most
recommended and provides a chemical barrier against sexu-
ally transmitted diseases.
? Do use a water-based lubricant.
? Do store in a cool dry place.
? Do carry a condom with you at all times, either FDA-
approved American or Japanese.
? Don't buy condoms made of any material other than
latex, which prevents passage of harmful germs.
T Don't buy outdated condoms.
? Don't store condoms in hot areas, like a glove compart-
ment, as heat can damage a condom.
? Don't carry a condom in a hip wallet for long periods
of time � this shortens the life of a condom.
Condoms can be bought in various sizes. Condom manu-
facturers usually indicate larger sized condoms by names
such as "Beyond Seven "Mentor" or "Magnum Smaller
sized condoms may be labelled under the phrase "a snugger
tit All sizes aside, this does not mean a man must have a
larger penis to satisfy his sexual partner.
On putting a condom on:
? Do roll condom down on penis as soon as it is erect,
before any contact with genitalia occurs.
T Do leave 14-12 inch extra space at the tip of a condom
if the condom has no nipple.
? Don't unroll condom before putting it on; roll it on all
the way toward the base of the penis.
? Don't twist, bite, or prick a condom with a pin � this
will damage the condom and may allow fluid to leak out,
which may infect a partner.
On taking off a condom:
? Do remove condom soon after ejaculation,
? Don't let the penis go soft inside partner. This could
allow the condom to drop off, with fluids being leaked out.
? Don't tug to pull a condom off � this may cause the
condom to tear.
Mutual consent between sexual partners is a necessary
ingredient before any of these factors can be considered.
Communication is a must in any relationship in order to
ensure the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.
ARE YOU READY TO
Ml
ARE YOU READY TO BECOME A
TATISTIC?
ARE YOU READY TO
DISCRIMINATE?
ARE YOU READY F
REDEEM THIS COUPON FOR A
QlkA LifeStyles CONDOM?
: iXs? FREE PACKET OF LifeStyles CONDOMS
CAROLINIAN
I
I
I
I
I
I
Today only, between 10am and 2pm at The East Carolinian booth located outside of the Student Stores. !
� 'Limited quantities available While condoms redut e the risl oj onta, ting HIV and oth, - S TDs, the risks arc not entirely minuted. Abstinence is the only 100 effect � ; i m vent
mmmwmmmwmwmwmwmwmmmmtWBZMwm
m HIV and s 1 Di





Title
The East Carolinian, February 16, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 16, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.923
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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