The East Carolinian, February 9, 1993






�f
Sport
Ay Carramba!
ECU women's soccer
team takes Fiesta
Indoor Tournament. See
story page 11.
The East Carolinian
miiBJfe.9
124
JmsdMf , February 9. 1993
14
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AMA sponsors marketing
week survey, guest lecture
By Jason Williams
Suff Writer
The ECU chapter of the
American Marketing Association
will hold its annual AMA Market-
ing Week February 7-13. The AMA
will hold several activities d uring
the week for members and indi-
viduals wishing to join.
Highlighting the week's
events will be guest speaker Bruce
Branyan, vice president of Caro-
lina Telephone. Branyan has been
with the company for 23 years
and is responsible for directing
the development and implemen-
tation of marketing and new busi-
ness strategies.
"Branyan is a dynamic indi-
vidual who is the chief marketing
executive of one of our region's
top communication and technol-
ogy firms Dr. Edward Wheatley,
chairperson of the ECU market-
ing department said.
"We are fortunate tohavehim
as a leader in our regional busi-
ness community
and speaking to
our students at
ECU
The AMA
will also conduct
a survey for the
ECUstudentpub-
lications during
the week.
The informa-
tion gathered from thesurvey will
be used by each of the media for
editorial and advertising feed-
back.
The AMA will set up booths
in the lobbies of Mendenhall, the
Student Store, and Belk and Scott
Residence Halls.
Banyan will speak on Thurs-
day at 4 p.m. in room 1032 of the
General Classroom Building.
After the meeting a raffle will
be held in which prizes donated
by area businesses sponsoringthe
week will be given away.
Gift certificates from Boli's,
Chico's Mexican Restaura ;it, Pro-
"Marketing week allows our
organization to give the students
the opportunity to gain profes-
sional experience through con-
ducting the survey and meeting
one of the region's top business
leaders
Brian Kerns,
AMA president
fessor O'Cool's, The Final Score
and AMF East Carolina Bowl will
be among the pnzes.
Brian Kerns, President of the
ECU chapter of the AMA spoke
about the purpose of the week.
"Marketing week allows our or-
ganization to give the students the
opportunity to gain professional
experience through conducting
the survey and meeting one of the
region's top business leaders.
"Students should take the
opportunity now to start building
their professional resume Kerns
said.
Photo by Dail R�d
Some students enjoy the chilly weather, taking a few minutes to relax in the sun before heading to their
next class.
Doctor defends the use of animals for medical research
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
The history of animal research has
become increasingly interesting in recent
years with the growing controversy in
animal rights issues.
Susan E. Lederer of the Milton S.
Hershey Medical Center at Pennsylvania
State University spoke at ECU yesterday.
The lecture, entitled "Before Ani-
mal Liberation:Opposition to Animal Ex-
perimentation in 20th Century America
was a history presentation in using ani-
mals in research.
Lederer is a medical historian who
has written extensively on the issue of
animals in medicine and also medical
experimentation with human subjects.
"I do support the responsible use of
animals in research Lederer said.
Lederer went on to discuss the issue
that stretches back to 19th century. In
1833, the American Anti-vivisectionist
Society was created .
Websters defines vivisection as the
cutting of, or operation on, a living ani-
mal. The American Anti-vivisectionists,
which are still in operation today, op-
posed this practice, Lederer said.
Newspaper tycoon William
Randolph Hearst supported the anti-
vivisectionist's movement.
Lederer highlighted how editorial
practices of a leading research journal
reflected politics of the time.
Lederer said "The Journal of Ex-
perimental Medicine" used such prac-
tices as refraining from using gender neu-
tral pronouns to refer to animals, keeping
numbersof animals low even if that means
using decimals or letters to make the num-
ber appear lower and not to use unsightly
photos of animal subjects.
She reported on the historical use of
orphans for research purposes. And, the
fact that Hitler's Nazi Germany and
Mussolini's Italy both outlawed the use
of animals in research.
"Using animals is a simple matter
of self-preservation according to some
Lederer said.
Lederer said that others use the
argument of "You would rather have
some rats or dogs die than your child.
That would make it understandable (us-
ing animals) but it wouldn't make it
right
Lederer traced the use of animals
for research, including legislative acts
and propaganda used in American over
the years both for and against animal use
in a slide presentation during her lec-
ture.
In the 1930s, rats became the lead-
ing research animal. By that time the use
of dogs had led to some significant medi-
cal advances. However, by that time over
8 million Americans owned dogs.
The di fference in the movements in
the animal activists of yesterday and to-
day lies in the purpose of the move-
ments. Many of the arguments used by
the anti-vivisectionists evolved around
the moral effects dealing that with live
animals would have on humans. Accord-
ing to them, it would deteriorate the
moral fabric of the human mind.
Today's movements focuses on the
rights of the animal involved.
t
Computers take program to cutting edge
For a good cause
Graduate students study shipwreck
for class project.
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy Maritime History
ECU graduate students take measurements of the Civil War ironclad
"C.S.S. Jackson" at the Confederate Naval Museum in Columbus, Ga.
lilfe.U�UII�IJIUBI1MP JUHJIUJUJUI � IUJ1I1 lUUIH-llllJHJII LUlJBlfr. Mill I1MII ULMI .
ECU's Maritime History
and Underwater Research pro-
gram has put itself on the cut-
ting edge of technology with two
new computers designed to as-
sist in siting and evaluating
shipwrecks.
Recently, $10,000 was
granted by an interested indi-
vidual to the program for the
purchase of two Gateway 2000
38633 computers, two GETCO
digitizing tablets and a high
speed Hewlett Packard Drum
plotter. The Autodesk company
also donated software called
AutoCAD Version II to go along
with the new computers.
"We got the computers
about a year ago, in March, and
just got it all set up last fall
said Gordon Watts, a professor
in the maritime history depart-
ment. "We're now putting the
first information that we're go-
ing to try and process from the
shipwreck survey we had been
doing with the Bermuda Mari-
time Museum
Students will also use the
new computers to input infor-
mation regarding the shipwreck,
"C.S.S. Jackson one of two sur-
viving Confederate ironclads.
The computers will then formu-
late a three-dimensional image
of the ironclad as it was during
the Civil War.
Watts has said that the up-
dated lab will provide student
with and edge in the field after
they graduate.
"The lab will give students
the necessary practical experi-
ence that will enhance their com-
petitive edge in a rapidly chang-
ing job market Watts said. "It
will also permit commercially
available programs to be
adopted for use in submerged
cultural resources research and
management
In 1981, the Maritime His-
tory program started at ECU.
According to Watts, the program
is a two-year program that fo-
cuses on both maritime history
and underwater archaeology.
"As far as what students
coming into the program could
expect, it's about 45 semester
hours Watts said. "It's a com-
bination both of history and the
elements that make up under-
water archaeology
The program also offers
two field programs where stu-
dents can go out and have
hands-on experience with infor-
mation that they have learned
in class.
"This summer, the field
school will be held in Jackson-
ville, Fla working on a vessel
called the 'Mapleleaf Watts
said. "We just finished working
on a 16th century Spanish ship
in Bermuda, and this year,
we'll be working on what ap-
pears to be an 18th century Brit-
ish ship
Plans for further semesters
include surveys in Mobile, Ala
on at least three Civil War ship-
wrecks, the "Monitor a cap-
See MARITIME Page 4
Photo by Dail Rood
Members of Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority and Sigma Pi fraternity held
a car wash last week to benefit American Missing Children.
UA Office of student life
iams eears of the Machine'
TUSCAL'OSA, Ala. (AP) �
For decades, the way into student
govemmentatthe Universityof Ala-
bama has been the Machine, a shad-
owy collection of white fraternities
and sororities highly effectiveat get-
ting its people elected.
Few people have been able to
overcome tnepowerof the Machine,
which has backed many student
leaders who later made thei r mark in
politics, including a number of con-
gressmen.
Even a leader-to-belikeGeorge
C. Wallace was no match for it
Wallace, the four-time governor and
presidential candidate, ran fora stu-
dent post in the 1930s without Ma-
chine backing and lost
But after a non-Machine can-
didate forstudent president reported
being beaten and slashed and a cross
was burned outside her house, ad-
ministrators shut down the student
government.
While school officials say
there's no proof the Machine is to
blame and leaders of the coalition
deny any role, administrators and
many students say it's time to start
over.
"When the contestsare marked
by violence, mat's just a clear indica-
tion that something has to happen
said Harry Knopke, vice president
for student affairs.
Minda Riley, a non-Machine
candidate for president of the Stu-
See MACHINE Page 4
"
I'





2 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 9, 1993
NationalNews
GM plans major announcement on safety
Census Bureau reports key to bigger paycheck
By 1990, one-fourth of American adults had earned a
degree beyond high school and were receiving bigger pay-
checks as a result, a Census Bureau report says. The report said
those who earn degrees beyond high school (25.2 percent) make
an average $2,231 monthly compared to $1,280 for those who
havesomecollegebut nodegree, $1,077 for thosewhohave only
a high school diploma, and $492 for those without a high school
diploma. The report said that most advanced degree holders
have either executive, administrative or managerial positions,
or work in professional specialities. Business degrees are the
most popular of all postsecondary degrees, and law, medical
and dental degrees account for 56 percent of all professional and
doctorate degrees.
Student objects to racial slurs
A University of Central Florida student dropped a class in
Judaic studies because she said the instructor make a comment
using the word "nigger" after she asked him a question, the
campus newspaper reported. Lynn Carswell said that she used
the term "Old Testament" when asking instructor Joseph
Gutmann a question, and he responded by telling her he found
the reference offensive because it implied that the Jewish reli-
gion is outdated. "How would you like to be called a nigger?"
he allegedly asked Carswell, who is African American. He then
asked another African American student the same question.
Gutmann, who is an adjunct professor, has apologized to the
student, according to the University of Central Florida Future, the
campus newspaper. The incident was being reviewed by the
administration, the paper said.
Aspiring attorneys to teach law
A group of aspiring lawyers from Ohio Northern
University's College of Law are teaching high school students
about the aspects of law that may directly affect them. Under the
Street Law program, 65 Ohio Northern University law students
are teaching 12-week mini-courses to senior and junior civics
and American history classes at five high schools in the area.
"The vast majority of high school students here have no contact
with a lawyer and know only what they see on TV said Sherry
Young, director of the Street Law program. "Unfortunately, a
number of the (high school) students will have contact with the
juvenile justice system. They are learning about how much
discussion should go on with a police officer without counsel,
that sort of thing
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS and other
campus newspapers.
DETROIT (AP) � General
Motors Corp. plans to battle back
against critics who say the nation's
biggest automaker manufactured
millions of unsafe pickup trucks
over a period of 14 years.
The Washington Post, quot-
ing unidentified company sources,
reported Sunday that GM will ac-
cuse the National
Broadcasting Co. and
several consumer
groups of rigging test
results to make it ap-
pear that the design
of the gasoline tanks
on full-size GM pick-
ups made from 1973-
1987 were unsafe.
The automaker
scheduled a news
conference for yester-
day afternoon at its
Detroit headquarters
that "I think (NBC)
might be interested in Bill
O'Neill, director of public affairs
for GM's North American Opera-
tions, said Sunday.
He denied the Post's conten-
tion that the announcement was
part of a major public relations
campaign. He said GM had previ-
ously been unable to respond to
allegations that its trucks were
unsafe because of a gag order in a
court case that ended Thursday
with a $105.2 million judgment
against the automaker.
A jury in Atlanta found GM
negligent over the "sidesaddle"
fuel tank design of its older pickup
truck models. The parents of Sh-
annon Moseley, 17, who was killed
in a fiery 1989 crash, were awarded
$101 million in punitive damages
and $42 million for the value of
his life.
The Moseleys contended
their son survived a crash with a
drunken driver but died because
the fuel tank in his 1985 GMC
pickup exploded. GM argued that
the teen-ager died quickly from
head injuries before the truck
caught fire.
GM has said it will appeal
the award.
Nearly 5 million of the trucks
are still on the road in the United
States and Canada.
Sources told the Post that the
automaker will try to show that
tests commis-
j.rm � sioned by NBC's
"This appears to "Datelin pro-
be an attempt by gram were rigged
General Motors to by the institute for
Safety Analysis to
divert attention
from this $100
million adverse
jury verdict and
possible recall
Tory Beilinson,
NBC News spokeswoman
Indiana-based testing company,
said he could not comment.
Critics contend that the
automaker knowingly endangered
lives by putting the gas tanks on
the outside of the truck frame
rather than inside, where the heavy
metal channels of the frame wou Id
serve as a protective steel barrier.
GM changed the design and
after 1987 put the tank inside the
frame. Industry analysts say a re-
call would cost from $500 million
to $1 billion.
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ensure that the
truck would burst
into flame on im-
pact.
NBC News
spokeswoman
Tory Beilinson said
Sunday that the
network stood by
its story, which
aired in November.
"This appears to be an at-
temptby General Motors to divert
attention from this $100 million
adverse jury verdict and possible
recall she said.
GM began legal action on Jan.
20 against the institute, seeking
access to the data compiled for the
Nov. 17 television report. The
automaker plans to announce a
similar lawsuit against NBC at the
news conference, the Detroit Free
Press reported today.
It said NBC acknowledged
Sunday that consultants installed
remote-control, electrical igniters
under both pickups it tested for
the report.
Beilinson told the newspa-
per that the tests were not rigged
because the fire did not start un-
derneath the truck where the ig-
niters were located.
She also said nothing was
done to the fuel tanks that would
have made them more prone to
leak or rupture during the tests.
Bruce E. Enz,an of ficer of the
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Books will be available for sale through ECU Student Stores
FORUM I THE FUTURE OF AnIIKIA
EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
r-ATT IC1 DEVELOPMENT AT WHAT COST?
lsacfeTY) THE ATTC SOCIETY REVISITED
FEB 16, 8 PM
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Books will be available for sale at the event
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� For More Info Call The
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��F-
FEBRUARY 9, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
Supreme court reverses death
penalty for six N.C inmates
GREENSBORO (AP) � Six
death row inmates have been
spared, while 10 others are facing
execution once again after a two-
yearwaveof new sentencing hear-
ings ordered by the U.S. Supreme
Court.
Since the 1990 court ruling
mat the sentencing guidelines used
in the state's capital murder cases
were unconstitutional, 41 inmates
have won new hearings and 16 of
them already have been resen-
tenced.
Joan Byers, a special deputy
attorney general who prosecutes
capital murder cases for the state,
said thenumber of death sentences
reaffirmed may be a vindication of
the state's position after the ruling
in the case of convicted killer Dock
McKoy.
State appellate defender
Malcolm "Tye" Hunter Jr. dis-
agreed.
"I really don't see it as a vin-
dication of anything said Hunter,
who argued before the state Su-
preme Court that those sentenced
under the unconstitutional proce-
dures must get life in prison.
"It just illustrates the arbi-
trariness of the system we have
he told the News & Record of
Greensboro. "One jury decides
death. One jury decides life
For the state's district attor-
neys, who must handle the resen-
tenting hearings, it has been frus-
trating.
In the McKoy case, the U.S.
Supreme Court ruled that state
judges had erred in telling jurors
that they must unanimously agree
on mitigating factors�those facts
that might lead them to recom-
mend life in prison instead of
death. Since that ruling, jurorshave
had to weigh those factors even if
they are not all in agreement.
In a re-sentencing hearing
last April in Alamance County,
District Attorney Steve Balog
watched a jury give convicted killer
El-Amin Ahmad Ali two life sen-
tences.
Ahmad had been sentenced
to die in 1988 for ambushing his
aunt and uncle in their Burlington
home and then shooting them to
death.
"We try these cases, we try
them by the rules as they were
handed down to us Balog said.
"And in the case of the
McKoy ruling, the courts send
them back to us because they de-
cide to change the rules. That's
pretty frustrating
The number of death sen-
tences reaffirmed so far is a "phe-
nomenal" victory for the state's
prosecutors, said Ms. Byers, who
argued before the N.C. Supreme
Courtagainst giving automatic life
sentences under McKoy.
In many cases, years have
passed since the original trials, she
said, and the state has much work-
ing against it � the emotion is
gone, the prosecutors sometimes
are new to the case, some witnesses
cannot be found. "We're talking
about stale cases Ms. Byers said.
But Hunter says he has seen
no change in the quality or quan-
tity of evidence and testimony in
the cases he has followed. The
resentencingshave caused anguish
for others, however.
Convicted killer Perrie
Simpson now has been sentenced
todeath three times. Thedaughter
of his victim, the Rev. Jean E.
Darter, hopes this time the sen-
tence is final.
On Aug. 28, 1984, Doris
Darter Faircloth found the beaten
body of her 92-year-old father in
the bedroom of his Reidsville
home.
In the eight years since the
murder, Mrs. Faircloth has had to
conjure up those horrorsagain and
again for police, for lawyers, for
juries.
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StateNews
Off-duty police officer kills family
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Four
members of a family heading
home from a birthday party died
Sunday when an off-duty Char-
lotte police officer crashed into
their car, police said.
The officer had been drink-
ing and was speeding, Charlotte
police said.
Five other family members
and the officer were injured.
The accident happened at
1:15 a.m. when a car driven by
off-duty Officer Jimena Davila,
22, crossed the center line and
crashed into a car filled with
members of a Monroe family,
police said. That car then strucka
third car, injuring one of its two
occupants, who were also family
members coming from the party.
The injured were all taken
to Carolinas Medical Center,
where one child was in serious
condition.
Dead at the scene were Jo
Neal Williams, 54, and her son
Roger, 28, of Los Angeles; Ashley
Coffey of Monroe, 6; and Jasmine
Thompson of Charlotte, 5.
Injured were Yashida
Torres of Monroe, 9, in serious
condition; Candice Torres of
Monroe, 6, in fair condition; and
Antwone Coffey of Monroe, 12,
in good condition; and Davila, in
good condition.
Treated and released were
Antonio Thompson, 12, and
Jennie Williams, 50. Robinson
was not injured.
Police say Davila was driv-
ing her personal car when the
accident occurred.
Davila was traveling 65
mph in a 45 mph zone and had
been drinking, according to po-
lice reports.
Investigators will turn their
findings over to the Mecklenburg
County district attorney, Capt.
Judy Dinkins said.
Private engineers may plan landfill
GREENSBORO (AP) � The
understaffed state Division of Solid
Waste Management is consider-
ing hiring private engineering
firms to review a heap of landfill
applications.
Officials at the division and
the Department of Environment,
Health and Natural Resources are
expected todecide within the next
two weeks whether to contract
with a handful of engineering
firms, said William Meyer, direc-
tor of the solid waste division.
"We have a backlog, and we
need some thing done relatively
quickly Meyer told The News &
Record of Greensboro.
The engineering firms would
be responsible for reviewing de-
sign and construction plans for as
many as 10 landfills. The division
has 35 applications pending.
State environmental watch-
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dog groups worry that hiring pri-
vate engineers to review applica-
tions submitted by their peers
could result in a less-than-thor-
ough scrutiny of landfill propos-
als.
"These things are so impor-
tant, they need to have some out-
side review said John Runkle, a
Chapel Hill attorney specializing
in environmental issues.
"I think at the very least a
firm that would be doing the re-
viewing should not have a pend-
ing application said Steve
Grathwohl, president of the Con-
servation Council of North Caro-
lina.
The waste d i vision is relying
on six reviewers and one supervi-
sor to handle a workload that is
growing every day, Meyer said.
Thecrush of landfill applica-
tions is due in large part to new
federal regulations that take effect
Oct. 9. Those regulations will in-
crease the cost and liability of clos-
inglandfills, so some counties want
to close their current landfills be-
fore October and open new facili-
ties that meet federal guidelines.
But there's no way the solid
wastedivisionstaffwould beable
to accommodate the 11 counties
that want to open new landfills by
October, Meyer said.
"We'd be able to do three or
four he said.
Hiring private engineers to
help handle the workload would
mean all 11 counties could possi-
bly meet their deadlines, some of
the division's backlog would be
cleared and the division maybe
could save money by forgoing the
hiring of more state workers,
Meyer said.
"We're looking primarily at
efficiency in state government
he said.
Costs for the firms' help
could range from $80,000 and
$120,000, Meyer said.
Although all qualified com-
panies would be eligible to submit
bids for the job, Meyer said the
companies would have to be fa-
miliar with North Carolina's land-
fill procedures. That means the
engineering firms would either
have to have submitted landfill
applications previously or have
applications pending.
But Meyer says the engineer-
ing firms' role will be very lim-
ited.
"We'll spell out a checklist
they'll have to check and certify
back to us he said. "They'll sub-
mit it back to the state and well
make the final decision on the ap-
plication
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? Critical Reasoning
� Problem Solving
(Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry)
� Data Sufficiency
Location:
ECU School of Business, BB&T Center for
Leadership
Development, General Classroom Building,
Suite 1200
Instructors:
Course taught by lull-time ECU faculty
Texts:
The Princeton Review:
Cracking the System: The GMAT
The Official Guide for GMAT Review
(includes actual GMAT questions wiih solutions)
Presented by
ECU School of Business ' Professional Programs
1200 General Classroom Building
(919) 7576377
FALL IN LVE WITH GREENVILLE TOYOTA SERVICE specials
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
WINTERIZATION SPECIAi; g)
�Drain cooling system and replace i V '
anti-freeze for protection to 20-30 ii
degrees below zero . l
�Check all fluid levels.
�Check battery and starter.
�Clean and inspect battery $f& C
terminalscables. ttTJ 9
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 2-27-93
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
MINOR TUNE-UP
I �Install Toyota-brand spark plugs.
I "Check air, fuel and emission filters.
I 'Inspect ignition wires, distributor cap
and rotor, belts, braces and PVC valve.
' -cylinder or 60,000-niile platinum ph.gs $( 0KE
slightly higher. a"7J
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Coupon expires 2-27-93
n
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
CHECK UP
i r
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Compihensive bumper to bumper
inspection of all major systems. X�5
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Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 2-27-93
i !
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
TIRE BALANCE
ROTATION $0 0
�Inspect tires for wear. iP Jr � ir P
�Balance all four wheels.
�Rotate tires.
�Check tire pressure.
1
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Please present coupon when repair order is written.
I
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l
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
LUBE, OIL & FILTER
�Includes up to 5 quarts Premium grade
Kendall Motor Oil and Genuine Toyota
double-filtering oil filter.
�Complete under-the-hood check
of all belts, hoses and fluid levels. I S�4S
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Coupon expires 2-27-93
r
GENUINE TOYOTA
OIL FILTER $
4.99
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Regular Price S6.13 Limit 2 plus tax.
Not valid with other coupons. Over the counter sales only.
Please present coupon at time of purchase.
Coupon expires 2-27-93
tyota" Greenville Toyota
Vj� � V I Service. Hours: Mondnv - FrirLnv 7-Onm - fnm Ratnrriav Qnm -
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3615 South Memorial Drive
Located Across From Carolina East Mall
321-3000
sar s ;S,iSS2
.CAN'S .
f Vintage Clothing, f
jeivelry, Collectibles,
Antiques, Furniture
SALE IN
PROGRESS
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown
752-1750
BUY � SELL � TRADE
fiL
M
�����
j






. 3
4 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 9, 1993
IntemationalNews
Ally of top Somali warlord
detained by U.S. soldiers
MARITIME
Continued from page 1
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP)
� U.S. troops detained a leading
ally of Somali warlord Mohamed
Farrah Aidid Monday and confis-
cated a rocket launcher and other
weapons.
Col. Omar Jess was one of 32
people in two vehicles stopped at
a roadblock north of Mogadishu
for a routine weapons search.
Marine Col. Fred Peck told
reporters. All 32 people were freed
after questioning, he said.
Clashes last month between
factions led by Jess and Mohamed
Said Hirsi, known as Gen. Mor-
gan, near the southern port of
Kismayu violated a cease-fire and
scuttled preliminary peace talks.
U.S. and Belgian forces in-
tervened to stop the fighting, de-
stroying several vehicles that Peck
and others said at the time be-
longed to Morgan.
But Jess said in an interview
gin, but added he would refuse to
meet with Morgan.
"Morgan is not one of the fac-
tions Jess told CNN. "What I'm
talkingaboutis organizations that
today that the destroyed armed ve- represent some of the population of
hides were his, not Morgan's
Peck said weapons seized from
Jess' vehicles today included five
AK-47 assault rifles, two machine
guns, a rocket launcher and five
rocket-propelled grenades.
Jess told Cable News Network
thatU.S. troops were preventinghis
forcesrromrrKJvingaboutwhilefail-
ing tocn.ckdownonMorgan,a son-
in-law of former dictator
Mohammed Siad Barre.
Jess said all factions should be
disarmed so peace talks could be-
Somalia
Morgancontinued tofightafter
his father-in-law fled into exile 10
months ago.
Siad Barre's buster from the
presidency in early 1991 was fol-
lowed by clan warfare and drought
mat claimed 350,000 lives last year.
More than 20,000 U.S. troops
are in Somalia with some 14,000
troops from 22 other countries. All
of these troops are trying to restore
order so food aid can be distributed
to needy people.
hired Confederate blockade run-
ner eventually called the
"Phillipi" and a Confederate
ironclad called "C.S.S. Gaines
Watts said that the new
computers will be used in these
future projects and serve as an
integral part of the program in
years to come.
"There probably will not
De any thing that we do from now
on that we won't use those com-
puters Watts said.
MACHINE
When asked about the
wealth of maritime information
in and around North Carolina,
Watts agreed that the state is a
good place for this program.
"Most people recognize
that coastal North Carolina is
the 'Graveyard of the Atlantic
Watts said.
"It is beneficial to have ac-
cess to the sort of sites that you
have in the vicinity of North
Carolina.
"It's a good base to operate
from. As far as work that we do
in the United States, it's sort of
midway between the Gulf of
Mexico and the Great Lakes �
we work in both of those places
Currently, ECU houses one
of the two maritime history pro-
grams available in the United
States.
Texas A&Malso has a simi-
lar program that deals with un-
derwater archaeology.
Continued from page 1
New government by election put on
hold tor hopeful Mozambique
uiPiiTn M7amhimiP fix the blame on a varietv of tar- onMozambiqi
MAPUTO, Mozambique
(AP) � Six weeks after the Secu-
rity Council approved it, the U.N.
Operation in Mozambique has
barely started its task of getting a
destitute, war-ravaged nation
ready for elections.
Fewer than 100 of the 7,500
people involved had arrived by
the end of January and the $332
million budget awaited approval
at U.N. headquarters in New York.
Unless everything speeds up
dramatically, it seems unlikely that
elections can be organized by Oc-
tober, as stipulated in the 1992
cease-fire agreement that ended
16 years of civil war.
Aldo Ajello, the U.N. special
representative, says the elections
almost certainly will be delayed
until April or May of 1994.
In mis decaying capital, sur-
rounded by the mud and reed
shanties of war refugees, people
fix the blame on a variety of tar-
gets, from U.N. bureaucratic wran-
gling to the destroyed infrastruc-
ture.
"We are very disappointed
said Manfredo di Camerana, the
Italian ambassador, who played a
leading role in peace talks. "It's
very difficult to know from the
United Nations when they are in
position to start
U.N. officials agree with lo-
cal leaders that events in Yugosla-
via, Angola, Cambodia and Soma-
lia have distracted U.N. attention
from Mozambique. But few seem
todoubt their ability tobringabout
Mozambique's first multiparty
elections and start the reconstruc-
tion process.
They say they will take what-
ever time is necessary to avoid the
failures of other U.N. efforts in
Yugoslavia and Angola.
"There is consensus to look
on Mozambique as a very impor-
tant operation said Eric Lubin,
chief adviser to Ajello. "It could be
the first operation that's success-
ful for a long time
Civil war in Mozambique
began after independence from
Portugal in 1975 and pit the Marx-
ist government against an anti-
communist rebel movement
known as Renamo.
Agreement by the govern-
ment to allow multiple political
parties and free elections led to the
cease-fire accord signed Oct 4 in
Rome by President Joaquim
Chissano and Afonso Dhlakama,
the Renamo leader.
The peace plan, negotiated
with the help of Italian diplomats,
the Roman Catholic church and
the United Nations, calls for creat-
ing a new army under joint control
and holding elections under U.N.
supervision, all within a year.
dent Government Association, re-
ported that a man entered her home
Sunday night, bruised her cheek,
busted her lip, cut her face with a
knife and toldhershewasalliedwith
the wrong people.
Two months earlier, a cross
was burned on the lawn of the white
student's off-campus house, and
threatening notes with the phrase
"machine rules" were put in her
mailbox and on her door.
This week, the university sus-
pended campuselectionsscheduled
for next week.
"Reform of student govern-
ment on this campus has my full
support school President Roger
bayers said Tuesday.
Knopke said that for several
months, a number of people have
madeallegationsof threats. Although
some blame the Machine, a coalition
of members of 27 fraternities and
sororities, Knopke stopped short of
mat.
But, he said, "There is an un-
dercurrent involving the so-called
Machine, and it will be discussed
The Machine-backed candi-
date for student president, Neil
Duthie, said he had no part in the
alleged attack and does not believe
the Machine wasresponsible. "I think
it's really horrible it happened he
said.
Miss Riley belongs to Phi Mu
sorority, one of 48 Greek organiza-
tions at Alabama and one those that
make up the Machine. But the Ma-
chine endorsed Duthie, a member of
Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
Marlon Trone, a member of a
non-Machine fraternity, said the ad-
ministration "should have investi-
gated the situation a long time ago,
who's in the SGA, the way if s been
run
Knopke said thatwhueadrnin-
istrators and students discuss the
makeup of the new student govern-
ment, all SGA functions will be di-
rected by the Office of Student Life,
with help from a council of student
organizations.
MissRitey'sbrother,Rob Riley,
the Machine-backed SGA president
m 1987, said he had no doubt that the
Machine or a candidate backed by it
was responsible for the attack.
Send your love
Show your sweetie just how much you care and send
your significant other a love line in the Feb. 11 issue
of The East Carolinian.
Drop by our office today on the second floor of the
Publications Building and show how much you care.
The cost is just $2 for the first 25 words, $3 for non-
students. Each additional word costs five cents.
25.99
4t 7�e Sqctane
Stuped 4tUml
t9.99
Smtl &U� Gouquet
Z.99
t1.99
10.99
tions
Roses
22.50
$19.99 dozen Ldown tboxwl
Punctate fttdmmttm tMuitt. J �oiuU muC teat. StamH 7SSS
Open Ail Day Sunday
We Deliver
Order Early
Inside Harris Supermarket
355-7673
ECU Students Get
10 Off
with valid l.D
MasterCard
We Accept





� �ft�
r
The East Carolinian
February 9, 1993
Classifieds
F( )R RENT1F )R SALE1F( )R SALE
Page 5
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
STUDENTS: Don't wait for next
semester, do it now We have
now over a hundred apartments
that willbeavailable for Mayjune,
July, and August. Call 752-1375
Homelocators today for your se-
lection.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 2608Tryon
Drive; 3 bedroom 1 bath; $550.00
pm. 404 S. Eastern Street; 3 bed-
room2 bath; $680.00 pm. No
pets. Lease and Deposit Required.
Duffus Realty, Inc. Call 756-2675.
2 - BEDROOM across from Men-
denhall, 205 E. 9th Street. 375.00
per month. Call 756.0151.
FOR RENT: 2 Bdr. duplex across
from Town Common. Need Lease
taken over in May. Call 752-7270.
Leave Message.
RC X )MMATE WANTED
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share apartment at Tar River.
13 rent and utilities. Call: 758-
8845. Leave message on answer-
ing machine.
LG. HOUSE near downtown &
campus $155mo pius 13 utili-
ties. Semi - responsible would be
about right. Jay 758-4375.
WANTED ROOMMATE:
Ringgold Towers, Male, $187.50,
Plus 12 expenses, call 757-0369
or (919) 291-2513.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
To share 2 bedroom Tar River apt.
Rent $115.00 mo. plus 14 utili-
ties. Call 757-1784 for more infor-
mation.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
To share two bedroom apartment.
ECU Bus route, furnished, NEAT;
Responsible, Non-smoder. $175
per month, 12 utilities NO DE-
POSIT. Please call 758-4135 ASAP.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Female.
As soon as possible. For more
information call 758-8606.
WANTED FEMALE ROOM-
MATE to share a 2 bedroom apt. at
Georgetowne Apts. 1st week in
March (Month to month lease)
Non-smokerpreffered. Laurie752-
9672.
WANTED ROOMMATEtudies
2 bedroom townhouse. $200 rent
and deposit plus utilities Tara 830-
9083.
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live
concert & stud io record ings for sale.
Over 1000 new titles available this
week from the following artists:
ROCK- U2, R.E.M, Clapton, Zep-
pelin, Hendrix, Black Crowes,
Springsteen, SR V, Van Halen, Rush,
Beatles, Doors, G-N-R. etc AL-
TERNATIVE- Nirvana, Pearl Jam,
Chili Pepers, Cure, Depeche Mode,
MORE OTHERS INCLUDE- Bob
Marley, Madonna, Prince, and
more. Call 931-2573 to leave name,
number, and requested artist on
message (all new CD's and tapes in
stock).
VALENTINES SPECIAL: Don't
forget to order early this year as
we run out every year. For just
29.95 you can get your lady 1 dozen
long stem red roses arranged and
boxed. 757-1007
DAY BED, white, iron and brass
w2 twin size Orthopedic mat-
tresses and roll-out pop-up
trundle. Never used, in box. Cost
$700. $310 cash. (919) 637-4421 af-
ter 6:30 pm.
BRASS BED, queen size w frame
and deluxe Orthopedic mattress
set in factory box. Can't use. Cost
$750, sacrifice $285 cash (919) 637-
4421 after 6:30 pm.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,Trucks, Boats, 4-wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 1-
800-436-4363 ext. c-5999.
MOBILEHOME. 1980Champion,
14x58. 2 bedrooms & bath. Refrig-
erator, washer, dryer & stove.
Curtains & blinds. Underpinned.
Good Condition. Winterville. 355-
8853.
KING SIZE WATERBED MAT-
TRESS and liner - NO LEAKS.
Heater, frame, rail pads, pedestal,
hardware, fill kit $100. 757-6688 or
355-6593 ask for Carl.
GIANTCRUISERBIKE,$70obo:
Cerwin Vega Speaker Enclosure,
$30; Custom Pool Cue w case, $40;
S-10SportRims,$75Ca!1758-5294.
FREE LITTER - TRAINED KIT-
TENS 752-6768 after 7 pm.
CHEST OF DRAWERS (5 draw-
ers) Darkwood. Good Condition
Please call 756-2286.
ART DECO FURNITURE, glass
ware, McCoy, Porcelain, Playboys
and Penthouse mags from the 70's
($20 a year) mint condition. Other
curious, strage and beautiful older
things for sale. Call 758-7993 to
come and take a look. (Ask for
Link).
FISHER SINGLE CD player.
Good condition. $95 or best offer.
Ask for Chris at 758-8461.
TWO CERWIN VEGA 380 SE
speakers, 405 Watts $375 Call Josh
830-6893.
55 GALLON fish tank and all
accessiories,$125;CobraPoolStick,
barely used - paid170 - sacrifice
for $100. Call Rod 321-1032.
FOR SALE - one almost new
Audiosource signal processor with
10 BAND GRAPHIC EQUAL-
IZER, Audio Video mixer (w
video detail and sharpness adjust-
ment and fader). Has 2 VCR and 3
auxilliary inpus outputs. Nifty
flashing lights, too. $300 (It's a
control unit for any system). Also,
for sale 2 subwoofer enclosures
with two ASI10" wooders in each
(four altogether). 90 wRMS, 130
max. Enclosures are custom with
plexiglass sides. $100 each or Ev-
erything above for $400-425. 931-
7021.
CANNONDALE Shimano 105 10
spd. New Rear Tire Cyclo com-
puter 11 2 yrs. old Sac. $350 Tony
931-8863.
1980 VW truck, Fi Cas, A ir (inop),
Cruise (inop.), AMFMCass, Bed
Rails, Clean, Runs Great, 107
Kmiles, New Tires, $1200.00 758-
5001 or758-8524 (leave Msg.) Gre-
enville.
MOVING MUST SELL! 5 piece
cherry or oak bed room set - $425.00
Call (919) 946-9653.
1969 Cadillac limo $1969.00,1969
Ibanez Stratocaster $196.90, 1969
Blackpearl ludwig drum kit
$519.69,1969 harmony 6 string
(copy of Gibson) mint condition
$119.69, 1969 Yamaho 6 string
$96.69, 1969 Leslie $619.69. Call
758-7993.
4 - SALE Trek Moutain Bike 22in
21 spd 3 mths. old. Extremely
good condition U-Bar lock in-
cluded $225 Neg. Call 830-9436.
SAMSUNG 8180 computer w
514 floppy disk drive. Mono-
chrome monitor. AlsoCitizen 120-
D dot matrix printer. Excellent
condition! 410.00 call 756-0125.
AVON - Buy the best in skincare,
cosmetic, and gifts. Call Rep at
758-5603.
HELP WANTED
SAVE on Spring Break '93! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas from $459 Horida
from $149! Organize group and travel
free! Contact Susan @ 931-7334 or call
SunSplashTourstodayl-800-426-7710.
INTERNATIONAL EMPLOYMENT
-Make money teaching English Abroad.
JapanandTaiwan. MakeS2000- S4000
per month. Many provide room &
board other benefits! No previous
trainingor tea cliingcertificate required!
For International Employment pro-
gram,call thelntema tional Emplayment
Group: (206) 632-1146 ext. J5362.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED:
Great club, great money, unbelievable
tips. Work Thursday,Friday,Saturday,
9 pm-2 am. Call Sid 919-735-7713 or
Paul919-7360716.MothersPlayhouse
in Goldsboro.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Setown hours!
RUSH stamped envelope: Publishers
(GI) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 part-time
youth soccer coaches for the spring in-
door soccer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the soccer
skills and have the ability and patience
to work with youth. Applicants must be
able to coach young people ages 5-18 in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are from 3
pm to 7 pm with some night and week-
end coaching. This program will run
from the first of March to the first of
May.SalaryratesstartatS4.25perhour.
For more information please call Ben
Ja mes or Michael Daly a 1830-4550.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions, Great benefits. Call 1-800-
436-4365 ext. P-3712.
EARN UP TO $10.00HR. Are you
looking for great hours? Great $5$ and
a Great experience? Don't look any
further. Market for Fortune 500 Com-
panies! CALL NOW 1-800-932-0528
ext. 17.
HELP WANTED - COMMISSION
S ALES-STARTIMMEDIATELY: Part-
time Full - time flexible hours � Inter-
rational Company with Local offices
needs you to sell product already in
high demand - requires minimal train-
ing - Great Summer Job - call 756-9231
for interview.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to distrib-
ute "Student Rate" subscription cards
at this campus. Good income. For
application writetoCollegiate Market-
ing Services PO Box 1436 Mooresville
NC28115.
HELP WANTED
BROD Y'S AND BRODY'S FOR MEN
areacceptingapplicationsforpart-time
sales associates. Flexible schedule
salary clothing discount. Apply
Brody's The Plaza Mon - wed. 1-4 pm.
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hiring enthusiastic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
tail. North BeachSailing,Inc. Box8279,
Duck, NC 27949. (919) 261-6262.
SERVICES OFFERED
"�AWESOME SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Bahamas Cruise 6 Days
Includes 10 Meals,Great Beaches &
Nightlife! $279! Panama City
Beachfront Rooms With Kitchens
$119, Key West Oceanfront Hotel
$249, Daytona Beachfront Rooms
With Kitchens $149, Cancun $459,
Jamaica $479! Springbreak! 1-800-
678-6386
�"AWESOME SPRING BREAK
BAHAMAS CRUISE $279! In-
cludes 6 days in Bahamas, lOmeals!
Sail from Florida! Beautiful Beaches,
Great Nightlife! Drinking age 18!
Springbreak 1-800-678-6386
���FREE DAYTONA SPRING
BREAK��Organizeonlyl8peop!e
and travel free! Stay at the Howard
Johnson's Beachfront from only
$149! CALL NOW! Take A Break
Vacations 1-800-328-SAVE
PARTY HOUSFS - North Myrtle
Beach. Welcome groups of 4 - 34
people. Group-Leader discounts.
Call Byrtle Beach Tours 9 - 4 pm
(703) 250-2125.
SPRING BREAK ' 93! Travel to
Jamaica, Cancun and Florida for
guaranteed lowest prices! Call Stu
at 757-0313 immediately to ensure
a space!
WANTED: Men and Women to
share in fun, sun - filled weeks in
Jamaica, Cancun and Florida for
Spring Break. Reserve your space
by calling Stu at 757-0313.
DONT BE LEFT OUT! Limited
space still available to Jamaica,
Cancun and Floridia for Spring
Break. Contact Stu at 757-0313 be-
fore it's sold out!
TODAY1
I DoVT WANT
70 Be STUCKIN
J109
68
SOUTH PADRE l$UND,T)(
5 ma 7 nights
DAYTONA BEACH, ft �
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
PANAMA CITY BEACH, ft � 81
5 AND 7 NIGHTS '
STEAMBOAT. CO ,J129
? SAND 7 NIGHTS
MUSTANG ISLAND, TX 132
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
HILTON HEADISLAND, SC 121
�i AND 7 NIGHTS
VAIL, BEAVER CREEK, CO $299
SAND 7 NIGHTS ' �.Z
PRICES FOR STAY- ff
NOT PER NIGHT!
T0U WEE INFORMATION RESERVATIONS
1-800 321-5911
SERVICES OFFERED
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Outer Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in Calll. (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave ig06-A. Los Angles CA 90025
SERVICES OFFERED
tosv Soiling Voidt Chorrers
9k
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS
PARTY LIKE GODS
Panama City $139, Key
West $269, Jamaica &
Cancun from $450. Quality
Accomodations, Free Drink
Parties! Call Joe!
ENDLESS SUMMER
TOURS
1 -800-234-7007
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in just a few days!
Plus a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself!
No cost. No obligation.
1-800-932-0528, ext. 65
SPRING BREAK '93!
LAST CHANCE TO SAVE
JAMAICA - $429
CANCUN - $439
FLORIDA - $159
V For The Lowest a
-Jr Prices & The Best Kg
r Trips, Call
SUN SPLASH TOURS
1-800-426-7710-
mmmwmMamMtTtmmmmmsm
BUUKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
liOjyi USED CD'S
PpD tkt Ba&amtit or (is KtfS 12
when CMMrfo nevtr mJs
llf food fit mtrtf
11-800-780
-400, jjjP
PERSONALS
THETA CHI: We enjoyed get-
ting together with you last night.
Let's do it again soon! love, Pi
Delta.
ALPHA OMICRON PI - CON-
GRATULATIONS on recieving
theSorority of Champions Award,
The Most Improved Academic
Award, and the Risk Magagement
Award. Also, congratulations to
Lisa Berting on recieiving the
Artemis Award and to lisa and
Jana Holland on receiving the
Greek Hall of Fame Award and to
Robin (Thelma) Lee, Bonnie
(Blackball) Hiser, and Stacy (Nice
Invitations) Carroll on receving
Academic Achievement Awards,
ditka!
ANGIE - Great job with RUSH so
far! We love you! The Sisters of
Epsilon Sigma Alpha.
THE SISTERS OF Epsilon Sigma
Alpha would like to invite those
interested in becoming part of an
exciting service organization to
join us for RUSH. For more info
call heather 758-9589 or angie 758-
8126.
CONGRATS Alpha Phi Water
Polo Betty's! Keep up the good
work!
DELTA CHI THOUGHT: "We
are all just contestants in the
gameshow of life; No Whamees!
No Whamees!
DELTA CHI would like to thakPi
Delta, Alpha Phi, and Chi Omega
for their help in making our RUSH
the best ever.
ADVENTURE PACKED
BREAK. Take this out - of - the
ordinary trip March 6 - 13. Enjoy
island camping, canoeing and sea
kayaking along the Edisto River.
$175 for students $185 for fs. Call
757-6387 for details.
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
Available March 1st Ideal location, close to
campus with ECU Bus transportation
provided. One and two bedrooms.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
EXCEPTIONAL VALUE FOR
SPACIOUS DUPLEXES
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
2 and 3 bedroom duplexes offering
lots of space and convenient locations
close to campus.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
m
I
m
it

Announcements
GREENVILLE- PITT COUNTY
SPECIAI.OIYMPtCS
There will be a Track and Field
Coaches Training School on Satur-
day February 13 from 9am -4pm for
all individuals interested in volun-
teering to coach in the following
sports: Swimming, Bowling, Gym-
nastics, Roller-ska ting, Powerlifting
and Volleyball. No experience is
necessary. For more information
call Greg Epperson at 830-455.
VOLUNTEERS FOR RFSFARCH
STUDY
The Section of Infectious Dis-
easesECU School of Medicine in
conjunction with the Student Health
Center is conducting a study on the
sexual spreadof herpes viruses. We
are looking for men and women 18
years and older who have never
had genital herpes. If you are inter-
ested in obtaining more informa-
tion, call Jean Askew, R.N. at 919-
551-2578.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN' FFT , OW.
SHIP
Looking for a fellowship of Chris-
tians, a place to pray, study God's
word, be involved in social and ser-
vice projects? Need a refuge from
time to time? Campus Christian
Fellowship may be what you are
looking for. Our weekly meeting
areat7pm WednesdaysatoutCam-
pus House located at 200 E. 8th St
directly across Cotanche St. from
Mendenhall Student Center. Ev-
eryone is welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Tim Turner, Campus
Minister, at 752-7199.
DEPARTMENT OF SPFFCH-
LANGUAGF. AND AUDITORY
PATHOLOGY AND MFDICAI
HUMANITIES
The School of Arts and Sciences
and The Vice Chancellor of Aca-
demic Affairs presents Professor
Noam Chomsky, Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology. Seminar:
Psycholinguistics. When: Tuesday,
February 9, 1993 at'3 pm. Where:
Room 244, Mendenhall Student
Center.
SIGMA GAMMA FPSII ON
Rock, mineral and jewellery sale
sponsored by the Geology Dept.
and Sigma Gamma Epsilon. Thurs-
day, Feb. 11,9am - 5pm and Friday,
Feb. 12, 9am-3pm. Graham build-
ing lobby. Large selection of quartz
crystals, geodes, jewelry and more.
Proceeds to support honor frater-
nity and Departmental scholar-
ships.
ECUSCHOOI OF ART
The ECU School of Art Metals
department is having their annual
Valentine's sale on Thursday, Feb-
ruary 11th and Friday, February
12th, from 8am until 5pm on the
ECU campus at the Jenkins Fine
Arts Center, on the second floor
foyer. Items available will be a va-
riety of earrings, and other jewelry
at reasonable prices. Comeoutand
purchase your sweetheart a unique,
handcrafted Valentines Day gift.
ECU SETA PRESENTS "ANI-
MALS'FILM"
ECU SETA will sponsor a show-
ing of ThnimAhlFilllL on Thurs-
day, Feb 11, at 7pm in GCB 1031.
The Animals'Film covers thp whole
range of animal liberation issues,
including experimentation, hunt-
ing, fur, animal agriculture, and
more. Admission is free and open
to the public.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
The International Student Asso-
ciation (ISA) will be meeting on
Thursday, February 11, at 5:00 pm
in MSC Rm. 248. International Stu-
dents as well as American students
are welcomed to attend. Also, the
ISA will have a social gathering on
Friday, February 12 at 6:30 pm in
the Underground, located in the
basement of MSC.
IOB SEARCH WORKSHOP
Career Services will sponsor a
workshop on strategies for break-
ing into the job market. Learn
proven techniques that will give you
an "edge This workshop is espe-
cially designed for graduation se-
niors or graduate students. It will
be held on Wednesday, Feb. 10 at
5:30 pm in the Bloxton House.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
The Recreational Services will be
offering a Climbing I workshop on
Tuesday, February 9 and also on
Thursday, February 18. These
workshops will begin at 3:00 pm at
the Climb Tower. A small fee is
required. For more information,
Call 757-6387.
NATIONAL RF.SIDFNCF HAT I
Honorary meeting Monday, Feb-
ruary 15,1993 5:15 pm, Room 14 of
Mendenhall.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Registration to play table tennis
on Tuesday, February 9 at 5 pm in
Biology 103. For more information
call 757-6387.
PHYSICAL FITNESS COMPE-
TENCY TEST
Held at Minges Coliseum on Feb.
12 at 1 pm. A passing score on this
test is required fordeclaringa physi-
cal education major. Any student
with a medical condition that would,
contrainicate participation in th�
testing should contact Mike
McCammon or Gay Israel at 757-
4688. To be exempted from any
portion of the test, you must have a
physician's excuse, which states the
items you are exempt from. Sum-
mary of the test available in Rm.
371, Sports Medicine Bldg.
wmm0 ��.�!�ki�i





� m
The East Carolinian
February 9, 1993
Opinion
Page 6
Safety should be prime concern at ECU
Safety technology has finally made a debut
on the ECU campus.
Currently, the Art Building is being used
as a test building for a new security system. All
outside doors have been updated with mag-
netic key card entries. Individuals must now
obtain a key card inside the building and use it
to get inside between the hours of 11 p.m. and 6
a.m.
The cards will be similar to credit cards, or
the debit cards currently being used for dining
services � a magnetic strip encoded with a
password will be on the back of the
card.
Students
would run their
card through a
small rectangular
scanner located next to the door. The computer
would then read the password and admit the
person if it had the password on file. Exiting
students would follow the same procedure.
Computers would also log on the time and
individual's name of the card being used.
This new feature should greatly reduce the
amount of people roaming the halls of the Art
Building at all hours of the night. Previously, the
building was accessible by anyone as long as
they could find a propped-open door. These
doors are still being found propped open, but
hopefully, the number will cbjrunish in time.
This new safety feature has been the by-
product of a much needed upgrade in the tele-
communications system here at ECU. In the
future, students may find that they can not only
feel safer in buildings on campus late at night,
but also telephone in their class registration and
their homework electronically.
If this new security system works out, plans
are for additional buildings tobe fitted with it as
well. Residence halls, other buildings where
students may need to work late, classroom build-
ings � all of these could very well be fitted with
these card scanners. In time, the whole campus
could be tied in to an up-to-date, technologi-
cally advanced system.
This system could very well solve
the majority of safety
problems on this
campus at night. The
accessibility of some
buildings on this
campus � at any hour, day or night � is scary
at best. Anyone can walk in at any time and
rummage through classrooms, offices or stu-
dios. The current telephone system located on
campus forces individuals to stand and wait for
a response. If a suspicious individual is follow-
ing you, the last thing you do is stop in a lone
area and wait for someone to answer your call
for help.
If this card scanning system fails in its test,
the university needs to take a long and hard look
at other options. The safety of students�at any
time�should be one of the prime concerns that
the administration has. Nobody wants to come
to a college where fear and terror run rampant
and unchecked.
GOOD LUCK
By Amy E. Wirtz
Family leave bill considered positive step
Clinton declared an end to
grid-lock government last week
with the passing of the family lea ve
bill. On Thursday, the Senate ap-
proved the bill, after decisively
rejecting Republican efforts to
amend it with a proviso barring
gays from U.S. military service.
This proviso certainly did not
come as a shock to many.
In a voice vote, the Senate
agreed to a six-month study by
the Pentagon and the Senate
Armed Services Committee of
Clinton's plan to lift the prohibi-
tion on gays in the military. This
lovely little proviso was tacked on
by conservatives supporting the
ban and by those hoping to defeat
the long-awaited family leave bill.
They failed.
If you remember correctly,
former president Bush twice ve-
toed similar family leave bills in
1990and againlastyear.lt became
a major campaign issue for Presi-
dent Clinton with women's
groups, organized labor and some
moderate Republicans, who said
it would help working mothers.
Undoubtedly, the focus on the bill
gained for Clinton an unwavering
amountof support from those frus-
trated with Bush's butt-dragging
in this and in most issues.
The bill requires companies
with more than 50 employees to
grant workers as much as 12 weeks
of unpaid leave to care for a new-
bom or newly adopted child or a
seriously ill family member.
Also included in this bill is
protection from instances that nor-
mally may have jeopardized a
workers job: if their own health
condition prevented them from
performing at their jobs, the com-
pany must now allow them time
off. This bill now insures workers
thatthey will have the same job or
an equivalent post upon their re-
turn. Itmaysound minor, but this
stipulation is very important. The
possibilities for workers getting
taken advantage of were enor-
mous.
Opponents argue that it
would raise business costs and
deprive workers of other benefits
they might prefer. What? How
could a bill that is so necessary
and so beneficial to all workers
possibly hinder the progress of a
company or its employees? Addi-
tional expenses, as history has
shown, will be minimal. Some
companies could even save money
on recruitment and training by
keeping experienced workers
rather than allowing them to quit
for family emergencies.
Now if we just sat down and
thought about the absolute sense
that this bill makes, we may pos-
sibly get somewhere asa nation. It
protects people that might other-
wise be treated unjustly; some-
thing that our fair government is
based on, or was, the last time I
checked.
Secondly, should an em-
ployee be punished for doing
something so noble as caring for a
sick family member of a newborn
baby? What's the point in having
businesses that thrive on the fam-
ily unit if there are no families
around to uphold their existence?
Family anything has been
dragged through the Big Govern-
ment mud for as long as I can
remember. Finally something is
happening that can have a posi-
tive effect on people in their life-
time. This bill is the cornerstone
for the future of families as we
know them and it can only help in
the ever-growing populace of
single-parent families. Some may
argue that this bill will lead to
paid leave in all situations. I don't
see that happening anytime soon.
If it took mis long to put a bill into
efLt,itwould takeeven longer to
pas. a bill with such weight as
that.
I applaud this bill. It came at
an opportune time and is an apt
reflection on our values as a na-
tion. Let's hope this is a sign of
things to come.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel,
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Matt MacDonald. Systems Manager
Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. TheEast Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Boar The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
orreject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, TheEast Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
THE Vg; 2O0. 1
W&L�0ie TO
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WWATCAN Z DO
FOR VA?
J WAS WONPERlNQ
ABOUT YOCR. Sfvlocy;
PRICES.
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batchelor
floor or that had both arm rests
intact.
There was a giant stain on
the screen, probably from a soda
tossed up thereby a conscientious
patron (see above), and the stain
Concession prices at movies empty wallet
Rude patrons, broken
seats, dirty screens and
bullets flying outside all
combine to force one
viewer to his VCR instead
of the big screen.
As part of an ongoing effort
to produce quality columns for
you readers out there, I decided to
take in t movie Friday night.
Loaded Weapon 1,1 think it was.
Maybe I'm getting old, but it
seems like movies and the movie-
going experience has changed a
lot in the past several years. I spent
many weekends of my childhood
inside those darkened auditori-
ums where monsters lurked
around every corner, great space
battles were fought and cowboys
rode off into the sunset. For me,
the motion picture theater was a
magical place; unfortunate
some of that magic has disap-
peared.
The decline started with the
patrons. There was a time when
people attending a movie ap-
proached the situation like they
were going to a library.
No, the idea that one should
be quiet in a movie theater was not
published in a manual or legis-
lated by Congress: it was simply
understood that the theater was
not your personal living room.
Now you'll be lucky if you can
hear most of the dialogue in the
movie.
Adding to the modern
movie-going experience is the gen-
eral state ofdisrepair of many the-
aters. I went to one last week and
had to try four different seats be-
fore I found one that either didn't
recline all the way parallel to the
There was a time
when people
attending a movie
approached the
situation like they
were going to a
library it was
simply understood
that the theater was
not your personal
living room.
was placed in such a way as to
make every actor in a close-up
look like Michael Gorbachev. Real
nice.
All of these iniquities
wouldn't be so bad, however, if
you didn't have to be CEO of
Disney to afford to take in a flick.
Five dollars for a movie ticket isn't
so bad. It's the extortionate price
of concession items mat saps your
funds.
I walked in Friday night af-
ter paying $10 admission for my
girlfriend and me and proceeded
to the snack bar to purchase my
requisite fountain drink and box,
er bag of popcorn. I looked at
the prices of the drinks: Small-
Si .50; Medium-$2.00;Large-$3.00;
and the super-jumbo Flick Flagon
for $4.50
Popcornpriceswereequally
shocking: a small bag was $150,
and if you wanted a large bag you
had to have a major credit card.
I stared at the menu a few
seconds in quiet disbelief, then
asked the clerk, "Are those prices
in U.S. currency?" Without a
second's delay he wittily replied,
"Huh?"
"Just give me two small
Sprites and a small bag of pop-
corn I said. The lad handed me
my order and said, "That'll be four
fifty Incredible. And some of
these places have the nerve to post
signs reading "No outside food
or drinks allowed inside Yeah,
right. -
Motion picture theaters used
to be havens, a place to escape
from reality in the cool darkness
and forget about the trying world
outside.
But a few months ago, while
a friend of mine was standing in
the parking lot of a local theater, a
fight broke ou t among some movie
patrons and a bullet found its way
through a fender of his car. Luck-
ily, he wasn't injured. Last sum-
mer, a movie theater in a nearby
city had its front plate-glass win-
dow shattered by patrons battling
ou tside after the showing of a con-
troversial film.
So allow me to sum up: rude
patrons, broken seats, dirty
screens, ridiculously inflated
snack prices and bullets flying
around outside the lobby. Over
the last decade, movie theater at-
tendance has declined, and is it
any wonder? Some of that won-
derful magic is still there, but it's
fading fast.
I'm going to go see what's
new at the video store.
A SPY Quiz
One out of every five voting Americans liked Ross Perot's ideas enough to think he
and Margot should be redecorating phe White House right now. Could it be that the
rest of us missed something he said? How many of the following do you recognize as
no-nonsense Perotisms?
� "The U.S. government is like a 450-pound woman in a size-7 dress or Bigfoot in a
size-5�hoe
� "Truth is, they all lie on TV and sell you a phony picture of what's going
on� Anyone who's truthful is called and looked at as crazy
� "There is no way you can know the taste of water unless you drink it or unless it
has rained on you or unless you jump in a river
� "I have a documented case of one boy traveling 35 days across Texas with a
chicken. Everyone wants to know why the boy came home? The chicken was worn out.
A chicken can only take so much travel
� "You have created the monster�My faith in me is stronger than all your armies,
governments, gas chambers or anything you want to do to me
� All are no-nonsense Perotisms.
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The East Carolinian
February 9. 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7

Monday After the Miracle
Helen Keller's saga continues
rr
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
The story of Helen Keller and
her fightto overcome herdisabilities
continues Thursday night with the
opening performance of William
Gibson's "Monday After the
Miracle
ECU Playhouse performances
will run from Feb. 11-16. Curtain
timesare at 8 p.m. for all night show-
ings and at 2 p.m. for the matinee on
Feb. 14.
The play resumes the story of
Helen Keller and her teachermen-
tor Annie Sullivan 17years after the
climax of "Miracle Worker Keller
is now in her mid-20s and world
famous for her success over the dark
and silent world she had lived in.
Writing articles and preparing
to graduate from Raddiffe College,
Keller shares her home with the al-
ways-present Sullivan, who is now
inher late '30s.Sullivanacts not only
as Keller's teacher, but also as her
foster parent and protector from the
outside world.
Into this peaceful and tranquil
setting steps the catalyst of the play,
John Macy. Macy is a Harvard
teacher and aspiring writer, who
starts out as Keller's literary collabo-
rator, but then goes on to marry
Sullivan.
"Whatdevelops isa unique love
triangle and an explosion of passion,
confession and recrimination that
gives relentless, angry force to the
conflicts of the play said Gary
Antenna, Kid Rock
bring the best
worst to young year
M. � , . � Photo courtesy ECU Playhouse
ie Bell and Jennifer Terrell will portray Annie Sullivan and Helen Keller, respectively, in the East Carolina
Playhouse's production of "Monday after the Miracle
Faircloth, ECU Playhouse general
manager.
"While 'Monday After the
Miracle' generates thepowerfulemo-
tions of its predecessor, itisdarkerin
mood, more mature in its theme and
more troubling in its conclusions
abouthumannature'said Faircloth.
Jennifer Terrell, a recent ECU
gradua te, will play the part of Helen
Keller. Terrell has acted in "The Cru-
cible" and other ECU theatre
mainstages and workshops, along
with "Brighton Beach Memoirs" in
Greenville, S.C.
Julie Bell will play the part of
Annie Sullivan Macy. Bell has ap-
peared in productions of "Equus
"The Crucible" and "The Skin of
Our Teeth" at ECU and is currently
studying meprofessionalactingtech-
nique here at ECU. Kevin Vamer
will play the part of John Macy.
Varner has also performed in
"Equus" and "TheCrucible along
with leading roles in "Damn Yan-
kees" and "The Rainmaker
Individual tickets will run$750
for the general public and $450 for
ECUstudentswitha valid I.D. Tick-
ets may be purchased at the box
office in Messick Theatre Arts Cen-
terorbyphoneat(919)757-6829.The
box office's hours are 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. on weekdays and until 8:15
p.m. on performance nights
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
With only a month out of
1993alreadygone,twobrand new
independent label releases prom-
ise toepitomizethete and a�rsf
music of this year.
Antenna's Hideout (Mam-
moth Records) is enigma pop,
tediously crafted with thought-
ful and meticulous artistry. On
the far-reaching other hand, Kid
Rock's debut LP The Polyfuze
Method (Continuum Records)
bleeds of cantankerous, trashy
white rap thoroughly raunched
down in mindless vulgaritiesand
is musically flimsy enough to be
deemed petty junk throwaway
snivel.
The seemingly unrelated con-
trast of Hideout and The Polyfuze
Method is stark enough to war-
rant an analogous discussion of
the polarity of pathetic versus
gen u ine a rt and i ts (tliei r) place(s)
in pop music, and perhaps more
pertinently, vice versa.
Antenna's three members,
bassistvocalist Jake Smith,
drummer Freda Love (formerly
of Blake Babies), and singer,
songwriter, guitarist John Strohm
(Lemonheads, Blake Babies),
think hard about the eclectic
catchies they write, record and
crank out live. Hideout, the
Bloomington, Indband'ssecond
LP, employs the clever, some-
times quirky, special sound ef-
fects and embellishments of
R.E.Ms Murmur (compare
Hideout's gurgly radio squelch
sampling, dawdlingpipe organs
and zappy feedback loops to
Murwur'selecrrified billiard balls,
backward-tracked piano and
endlessly layered vocals), yet re-
tainsa consistently starched and
organically poignant pop reso-
nance of, say Elvis Costello's My
Aim is True.
Antenna'sa rt seems to thrive
on a self-imposed minimalism,
in which beyond the four-string
bass,six-string-guitar, five-piece
drum set and one-voice singing
that seldom two-tracks or har-
monizes, that forces the creative
process to assume a rigorous, al-
most adamant, role in the
songcraftingand performanceof
Huieout's 12 tunes. Antenna's
musical limitations�much like
those of the great Thelonius
Monk, Jaco Pastorius, or even
Blake Babies trios�necessitate,
rather demand, the utmost en-
ergy each member can give, and
in turn forge a vicious artistic
whole perhapsfarsurpassingthat
which, with the same chords and
words,any more than threecould
create.
Switch gears; shut down the
powersupply;doseshop;squint
and puke. As the so-far worst of
See ANTENNA page 9
New York skyline
panorama on display
in Gray Gallery
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
Wellington B. Gray Gallery is host-
ing a solo exhibition of Phyllis
Rosenblatt's preparatory drawings and
paintings of complex, panoramic views
of New York City architecture.
Rosenbiatt's exhibition will be dis-
played in the gallery from Jan. 29 until
March 25,1993. A public lecture will be
held on Feb. 25, at 7 p.m to discuss and
explore her works in depth.
The interesting aspect of the exhibi-
tion is the opportunity to see the works-
in-progress side of the art. By having
both the drawings and the paintings,
viewers can compare the early stages of
the works to the final products.
"On theaverage, when an artist has
a showing, usually we see only the fin-
ished piece, therefore a viewer may not
realize ti e pages of studying that led up
to the finished product said Kim Tho-
mas, an ECU art student.
In comparing the prepara tory d raw-
ings and the finished paintings, novices
and expertsofartall agree thatthe works
of the New York City architecture are
uniquely intricate. The attention spent
on detail shows the many hours that it
took to bring the Big Apple to scale.
Rosenblatt's work has been nation-
allyexhibited in: America Art Today. The
City, curated by Dahlia Morgan, Art
Museum of Florida International Uni-
versity, Miami, Fl New York Observed,
Frank Bemarducci Gallery, New York;
Solo Exhibition, Hampshire College,
Amherst, Massachusetts; and TheCriss
CrossProject, Boulder ArtsCenter, Colo
rado.
Rosenblatt has taughtart at Parsons
School of Art, Tratt Institute, University
of Massachusetts, Hampshire College
and Minneapolis College of Art and
Design.
This program is free and open to the
public. Grav Gallery is located offof5th
and Jarvis St. in the Jenkins Fine Arts
buildingand isopen Monday-Saturday
from 10a.m. to5p.mand on Thursday
evenings until 8 p.m.
e&4.x0a
For more gallery
information, contact
Gallery Director Charles
Lovell at 757-6336.
Basketball cards coming on strong
By Cliff Coffey
Staff Writer
What's bigger than football cards, al-
most as big as baseball cards, and a lot
bigger than NASCAR cards?
Basketball cards � today they are a
big business.
Unlike most other industries, the sports
card industry has kept growing in the past
three years.
With players like Michael Jordan, Larry
Bird, and Clyde Drexler gaining more and
more popularity, and rookies like Derrick
Coleman, Larry Johnson and Shaquille
O'Neal coming into the fold, basketball
cards are at an all time high.
Michael Jordan's Fleer rookie card is
fetching a price of $700 and David
Robinson's Hoops rookie is already up to
S35, according to Clifton Rouse at Heroes
Are Here, Too in downtown Greenville.
At one time Julius "Dr. " Irving was
said to have saved the NBA. In recent
years, though, it had to be saved again and
Michael Jordan did so in a big wa v. Unlike
Irving, who only had help from the likes of
Larry Bird and Magic Johnson, Jordan has
had a lot of help promoting interest in the
NBA, and the card companies have taken
advantage of it
Front Row, Classic, Courtside, Fleer,
Topps, Skybox and Upper Deck all pro-
duce basketball cards. Three of these com-
panies produce premium as well as the
regular stock cards. With at least lOdiffer-
ent varieties of cards, what cards do you
chose? Not many people can afford to
collectall of them. Most chose eitheronear
With players like Dell
Curry and David
Robinson gaining
popularity, basketball
cards are at an all-
time high.
two companies or simply collect their fa-
vorite players. This year Upper Deck and
Fleer Ultra are the mostpopularcompanies
this year.
Fleer Ultra offers glossy images that
runoff theedges(noborders)and a smooth,
slick surface. Ihev also have a few of this
years rookie cards in their series, includ ing
Alonzo Mourning, Christian Laettner and
Todd Day. Upper Deck offers a nice, action
photo of the player with a small white
border around the card, but with a smooth
surface. Upper Deck's lirte includes many
David Robinson
rookies,over20,includingShaquilleONeal,
in their first series. These lines offer more
man justattractivecardsthough, they have
die hated sub-sets in their packs.
Sub-sets weredevised to make ihecon-
See BASKETBALL page 9
Bridges, Sutherland make 'Vanishing' a success
By Gregory Dickens Nancy Travis. However, hecannot let Diane He practices the motion of chloroform- Heawsetandraegedv 4m nhKriirr nfvn m nl itili f u
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
Imagine you and your girlboyfriend
have left ECU for the weekend. The two of
you have embarked on a hedonistic excur-
sion to the beach or up to Cat's Cradle. You
stop at a gas station and heshe gets out to
buy something. Promises to run right back,
plantsakissonyourcheekand runs into the
store.
And you never see them again. They
have simply disappeared. Poof. Vanished.
Whatdo you do?Howdoyou respond?
What does such an occurrence do to you?
This is the scenario posed by Twentieth
Century Fox's The Vanishing. Keifer
Sutherland plays Jeff Harriman, whose girl-
friend, Diane, disappears and he spends the
next three years searching for her. He even-
tually meetsup with and moves in with Rita,
a high schcxil acquaintance played well by
Nancy Trais. However, hecannot let Diane
go. He rents out a hotel rum as a bast- of
operations, he secretly writes a book on her
and he puts up posters of her every month.
Rita is unaware of hiscontinuingeffortsand
when she does, she forces him to choose
between a gh st and a life with her.
Jeff protests that even though he loves
Rita, he is haunted by Diane.
"If-not knowing he says " here are
times when I would rather six- be dead and
I find out everything that happened to her
But, Rita convinces him to give up and carry
on.
It at this point that the man who kid-
napped Diane makes hispresence known to
left Harriman. Jeff Bridges plays Barney
Cousin ,i chemistry teacher with wife and
chiklandafascirationtoexrjerimentlt'sno
mystery that Barney is the culprit. All
throughout The Vanishing we see him pre
part- tor the kidnapping.
He practices the motion of chloroform-
ingsccneone.Hemakeshisdaughterstream
tosee it the neigh borsom hear anything. He
practices the set-up of getting a victim into
his car so he can control his nervousness.
But, as yet, we don't know exactly how he
nabbed Diane or what he did with her.
Barnev tells left' that to learn what hap-
pened ti i her, he must experience what
she experienced you must go through the
same exact things Does ett go through
With it? I low badly does he need to know0
What did happen to Diane and will it hap-
pen to Jeff? And what is with Barney?
The Vanishing is not destined to K' a
roarmg success, I'm afraid. It doesn't otter
d�namic plot devices, camera anglesor spe-
cial effects. V hat it does present isa realistic
chain of events with honest characters and
no-frillsdialogue. The Vanishing isa wicked
tale not about left, hut Barney
Bridges I- fust plain weird in his role
Heavysetand ra
with a permanent
smirk and limp,
Barney isa freaky vil-
lain. He is unassum-
ing in appearance but
he'sawfully clever,ind
observant I Wven by
curiosity, he explains to Jeff that he wants to
know what the most evil thinghe iscapable
of. left assumes the worst
"So you killed Diane he asks.
"To me, killing isnot the worst tiling that
could happen is the suspfa bus response.
I here is a hint i t w hat fate awaited I Hane in
a remark Barney makes but you have to be
alert to make theconnection. In fact, vou need
tostayawaieofdetaibthroughoutvtoasftmg.
There isn'ta wasted lineot scriptor unneces-
sary scene here. I he more you notice, the
better ti e mo ie is
i hi; is I Ie irge Sluizei 's second i ffort
An absence of gore and violence
makes Vanishing rely on suspense.
It fits in between Silence of the
Lambs and Cape Fear in the thriller
genre without being outclassed.
w ith thisstory. Redirected the original 1 iuro-
peanproduction.whichlul a vastly different
ending. An absence ii gore and violence
makes Vanishing tery on suspense and it tits
nbetwemSdenttftheLambsandiCapeFearin
the thriller genre without being outclassed.
It may seem like I've told you the entire
story but all the above information can be
gleaned from die trailer and the movie gets
gritty following Barney'sconfrontation with
lett. More importantly, the mov ie keeps the
same level of coherence and intelligence
llopehillv.ther,7;iyu'on'tdisippeartoo
soon from theaters.





8 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 9, 1993
Relax your S1R�$$away
S7��Effects
Parlay International
Yourshouldersare tense, your back
hurts. You feel grouchy and know it's
all because of stress. What can you do?
The relaxation techniques described
below can help rel ieve both the physica 1
and emotional tension that often fol-
lows stressful situations.
RELAX YOUR BODY
The next time you feel the effects of
too much stress, try some of the follow-
ing ways to help you relax.
� Deep Breathing � While sitting,
lying down or standing, close your eyes
and breathe in slowly. Let the breath
out for a count of 5-10 seconds. Take 10
of these super-relaxers any time you
feel tense.
� Stretching � Practice simple
stretches such as the "neck stretch
stretch your neck by gently roll ing your
head in a half -circle, start inga tone side,
then dropping your chin to your chest,
then to the other side.
� Exercise � All kinds of physical
activity � hiking, running, bowling,
walking, etc. � help to reduce stress.
� Take a bath � Ask household
members to allow you at least 30 min-
utes of uninterrupted time.
� Get a massage � A massage is a
wonderful way to get rid of physical
tension. Professional massage therapists
generally take 30 minutes to an hour,
and will work on specific areas of ten-
sion, such as lower back or neck.
The American Massage Therapy As-
sociation runs a national referral service
of qualified massage therapists. Ameri-
can Massage Therapy Association, 1130
W. North Shore Avenue, Chicago, H.
60626-5670 (phone 312-761-2682).
� Eat Well � Reduce caffeine (in
coffee, black tea, chocolate) and alcohol
intake. Find out if your diet is well-
balanced and take steps to eat healthily
to help reduce stress.
RELAX YOUR EMOTIONS
Relaxing your emotions can be just
as important as relaxing your body in
relieving stress.
� Talk � Take the time to talk with
a friend or partner. Express feelingsyou
u
might have been holding in. Listen care-
fully to your partner. Walking in a quiet
neighborhood or park can limit distrac-
tions.
� Laugh � Go to a comedy club, see
a funny movie or spend time with a
funny friend.
� Cry � Crying can be as good a
release as laughing. If you haven't cried
in a long time, try listening to sad music,
watching a sad movie or writing about a
sad experience.
� Read � A good book is a great
escape. Reading a tear-jerker or comedy
can help release pent-up emotions.
� Do something you love � When
you enjoy yourself, whether it's garden-
ing, going to the beach or seeing friends,
you relax your emotions.
CREATE STRESS REDUCERS
These are just a few stress reducers
you can try.
You can create your own healthy
stress reducers (without alcohol or
drugs), or use those listed above.
You'll feel better and stay healthier
if you do.
Parlay International
Stress is the response of your body to all
demands made upon it. Understanding these
demandsand theireffectscanhelpyou learn to
recognize your own "stress response as well
aswaystocounteract distress toleadahealthier
life.
THE BASIC STRESS RESPONSE
Your body responds to all stress, both
positive or negative, by trying to get back to
normal. Deperdingon the stressor (whatever
causes the stress response), hormones, like
adrenafin,may surgeYcxirheartbeatandblood
pressure will probably increase. Your blood
sugar rises. These pttysical responses helped
prehistoric humansurvive by helping them
runaway faster or fight harder. By the time
they were done, their bodies had discharged
the tension of the moment and their stress
response was followed by relaxation.
PHYSICAL EFFECTS
Today, weexperiencestressors which are
very different from those early survival ones.
Yet positive stressors such as getting married,
or negative stressors such as family conflicts,
still cause the same physiological fightorflight
response.
Ifa stressful situation goes on for too long
without any relief, you might experience dis-
eases and disorders, such as colds, ulcers,
asthma, heart attack or stroke. You may feel
tired, irritable, depressed or anxious. You may
have trouble with sleeping, eating (either too
much or too little), drinking and smoking.
MINIMIZE THE EFFECTS
There are many ways to keep all the
negativeeffectsof different stressors toa mini-
mum, including:
� Taketimeforyourself to relax each day.
� Exercise regularly, after getting your
doctor's okay.
� Learn to "let go" of things which are
cwtsideyourcontrol.Learntoadapttochanges.
� Learn to takeaction when you am make
a difference.
� Avoid excessive alcohol, caffeine, fats
and sugar. Don't smoke.
� Go away for the weekend.
� Give your time to something or some-
one you believe in.
THEMIND-BODY CONNECTION
Yourmind and body areconnected. When
your mind is healthy, your body can resist
illness better. Whenyourbodyishealthy,your
feelings are more positive. During stressful
times, take care of both for maximum health
and satisfaction.
Get a job!
The East Carolinian
is now accepting applications for
Sports and News Staff Writers,
and, since we're a student
newspaper, no experience is
necessary. Applications are
available in our offices on the
second floor of the Publications
Building, which is located on
Central Campus across from
Joyner Library.
Love is in the air
Show your sweetie just how
much you care and send your
significant other a love line in
the Feb. 11 issue of
Tlie East Carolinian.
Drop by our office today on the
second floor of the Publications
Building to reserve your space.
It's just $2 for the first 25 words,
$3 for non students. Each
additional word costs five cents.
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WHAT IS
Enter your
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ECU
J�
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FREE PREGNANCY TEST
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750 Kamakazes � 75q 100 M.P.H.
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a I'm �nw
�w�





FEBRUARY 9, 1993
The East Carolinian 9
UPcomingEvents
Lectures
February 11
� Carol Shinn: Machine Stitching. A lecture by the artist of her works will be given at 7
pm. Shinn's work is unique in that she has created a technique which incorporates
tapestry and sewing machine stitching to canvases. Wellington B. Gray Gallery Jenkins
Fine Arts Center. ,
� Paul Bosland, Director, Chile breeding program, NMSU lectures on the Chile pep-
per in Chile Peppers�Some Uke 'em Hot at 730 pm. Brewster building, Room C103.
February 18
� FJoise Schoettler lectures on 20 years of the Women's Art Movement in Titen and
Now: An Overview of the Women's Art Movement 1972-1992. The lecture will begin at 7 p.m.
at the Francis Speight Auditorium, Jenkins Fine Arts Center.
BASKETBALL
Continued from page 7
sumer buy more cards than they
normally would in a chance that
they might get that one special holo-
gram, or gold card, or such. Retail-
ers like this gimmick, but the buy-
ingpublicisgettinga little tired of it.
Fleer Ultra offers a set of Scottie
Pippen cards, All NBA set, and an
Award Winner set in their packs,
only the chances of getting any of
the cards is 1:14,121, and 1:42 re-
spectively.
Upper Deck has many more
sub-sets, though. They offer a holo-
gram set, a Wilt Chamberlain Bas-
ketball Heroes set,an All Rookie set,
a Tec 1 MVP set, a Jerry West Se-
lects set, and a special print card of
Bird's and Magic Johnson's retire-
ment. The odds of getting any of
these cardsis, respectively, 1:12,1:8,
1:18,1:21, and 1:46. As you can see,
these cards are very limited, and
very sought after. To get all of the
cards of all of the subsets would
require a substantial bank account.
This is only one of the reasons
that many people have abandoned
the idea of collecting whole sets of
cards and turned to their favorite
players. The stumbling block with
this is that most of the "favorite"
players are the same for everybody.
Rouse said that Jordan, Magic, Bird,
Larry Johnson, Kendall Gill, and
Scottie Pippen are the most sought
after players. The rookies most
asked for are O'Neal, Mourning,
Laettner,TomGugliotta,and Hubert
Davis. Becausethesameplayersare
everybody's favorite, those players
cards quickly raise in their prices.
O'Neal's Upper Deck card isalready
$12, and Larry Johnson's Upper
Deck rookie is ten.
As basketball, and the number
of new card companies, gets bigger
with each passing year, basketball
cards will only get more and more
popular, maybe even eventually
eclipsing baseball cards.
ANTENNA
Continued from page 7
1993, Kid Rock's The PolyfiaeMethod
sounds terribly caged inside a four-
track world of drugs, copped-out
beats, K-Mart samples, slinky gui-
tarbass rock melodies and the most
weariest, whackedest rhymes inhip-
hop. His art�a loosely interpreted
label and corpora te moniker insisted
upon by the 2
Live Madonnas
on the Block in
the world�de-
fames, de-
nounces and de-
genera tesevery-
thing hip-hop
andraphasdone
in its near two-
decade evolu-
tion.
A blas-
phemer of the art of sampling, Kid
Rock unturns no stones lyrically or
musically in 16 songs, each amaz-
ingly sustaining a sorry level of stu-
pid raps sans dialect or intellect
about such things as: taking LSD
everyday ("My only goal in life is to
spend it all trippin from "The
Cramper"),beingomnipresent(Tm
here, I'm there, I'm everywhere
Antenna's 'Hide-
out' is enigma
pop,
tediously crafted
with thoughtful
and meticulous
artistry.
the chorus to "Prodigal Son"), and
lewd sex (lyrics unworthy of men-
tion or quoting though tragically
abundant on "Fuck U Blind "Balls
in Your Mouth "Blow Me and
"In So Deep").
Kid Rock shows potential in
songs such as "Trippin' with Dick
Vitale "Fred
and "Pancake
Breakfast but
ruins their comi-
cal and light-
hearted mes-
sages with beef-
hearted bonan-
zas about bolo-
gna bulges and
brainless mi-
sogyny.
Wheredrug
abuse permeatesThePolyfiize Method
and seems(unfortunately) to be Kid
Rock's impetus for living and rap-
ping, the topic rums up as well on
Hideout, albeit briefly and subtly.
"Wallpaper the record's second-
best tune after "Don't Be Late re-
flects on the ill-fortune of a ragged
heroin addict. "Here's your shot in
the armhere's your background
noisehere's you rups and downs
here's your rusty toywallpaper,
wallpapernever lies, high in the
sky
Strohm's voice sounds eerily
like Elvis Costello's on "Dreamy
"Easy Listening" and "Rust the
latter of which is a tribute to and
includes looped samples from John
Coltrane("ALove Supreme"). Sxvay,
Antenna's debut LP, wa s a disorga-
nized collage of frustrated (prob-
ably caused by Blake Babies'
breakup) and unfinished love and
hate tunes. Hideout, tremendously
fuller and overflowing with a co-
herent musicality for the subver-
sively catchy, will nodoubtwarrant
equal-to-better acclaim than Sway
(which garnered 4 stars from Rolling
Stone), and hopefully more fans to
boot.
On the other side of town, how-
ever, Kid Rock's LP earns wicked
anti-praise from this reviewer, and
hopefully elsewhere.
It's the stuff fertilizer is made of;
it's freedom of sleaze in action and
should be likewise shelved deep in
the reject septic tank of indie label
flops.

laLrzHrzs i Juau
SUNDAY FEB. 14th J
" DOZEN ROSES
$29.95
v Same low priee as last year!
Same fresh quality too
ry, BJLe I. S 205 E. 5th ST. Downtown, Greenville
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ORRENCE
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'N SALE NOW AT TRACKS,
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BUXD
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I;
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Valentine's Week is Feb. 8-14
: w�
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AND PLENTY OF
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CAROLINIAN
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919-757-6366
for more advertising
information.
i





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Captain Intent
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by Whiteley and Brown
De-Composition
rfT'S THE FiRST DAf of CLASS,
I ANt I'AA A LITTLE
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AS N TEACHER?
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?exsonalit will earn the
Respect" x'll Assert kvj
JWTH&Ri-n) OEsPrrt nj STATu�t�
4'1
CARTOONIST MEETING
We need this time together cartoonists, so please come. We have a lot to talk about
Those who are still trying to get ori the page are (expected to attend. See ya there!
Thursday
7:00pm.
East Carolinian Of ice
mmmm' .m
�k .





t.N
The East Carolinian
February 9, 1993
Sports
Page 11
ECU "D" thrones James Madison Dukes in Minges, 58-57
Piratee turn table on "Left and
Sampeon
By Billy Weaver
' Staff Writer
Statistically, JMU tops the CAA in
nearly all statistical categories and posted
an impressive 7-0 record in the confer-
ence. On the other hand, ECU was 1-6 in
CAA play coming into Saturday night's
game and appears at the bottom of most
CAA team categories.
Some expected a JMU blowout. Oth-
ers realized that statistics are just a pile
of numbers.
ECU exploded out of the gate play-
ing hard nosed defense against the fast
paced Dukes. "They're a running team
and keeping the score in the 50s was
what won the game Ronnell Peterson
said after his team held JMU to a mere 57
total points, 31 below their league lead-
ing average.
Defense was not the only thing that
contributed to the impressive Pirate vic-
tory. ECU also dominated the offensive
boards. Center Ike Copeland led the Pi-
rates with 5 offensive rebounds, which
matched JMU's total output. "Weneeded
Ralph's rebounding tonight JMU coach
"Lefty" Driesell said, referring to assis-
tant coach Ralph Sampson, a former
NBA and U.Va. standout.
After ECU shot just50 percent from
the free throw line in the first half, the
games critical moments came down to
just that- free throws. With 19 seconds
left, Kareem Richardson goes to the line
shooting a one and one. Richardson sinks
both shots to put the Pirates ahead 58-
54, which killed all hopes of a JMU
victory somewhat. On JMU'snext pos-
session, Darren McLinton hit a huge
three-pointer pulling JMU within one.
The clock winded down to :08 when
JMU sent Kareem Richardson to the
line once more. This time he missed.
The Dukes alertly call a time out with
just :03 on the clock. Regarding memo-
ries of the recent double overtime loss
to UNC Wilmington, ECU dug down
and found one last defensive stand.
Freshman Darren McLinton's shot
fell just short and assured the Pirates
their biggest victory under head coach
Eddie Payne. "We deserved to win. We
played harder and more intelligently in
the last three ball games than we have
all year Payne said after ECU's win
over JMU.
ECU improves to 2-6 in the CAA,
while JMU falls to 7-1.
Hip, hop,
hooray! Ho!
Hay! ECU
caught JMU
with their
dukes down
and played the
Riddick Bowe
on 'em.
ECU (58)
Min fg ft rb
m-a m-a o-t a pf tp
Lyons 21 5-9 0-0 1-1 1 4 12
Richardson 35 3-9 0-1 1-4 5 4 9
Hunter 23 2-7 0-0 o-l 0 1 4
Young 16 5-10 1-2 0-3 0 1 11
Peterson 25 2-6 1-2 0-112 7
GUI 27 2-3 5-5 2-3 14 9
Lewis 20 1-2 2-2 2-3 0 0 4
Copeland 33 1-5 0-5 5-14 2 3 2
Totals 200 21-5112-21 14-33 10 19 58
Percentages: FG - .411,Ft. 571, 3 pt. Goals: 4-12 -
333, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots - 0,
Turnovers - 13, Steals -7.
James Madison(57)
Minftftrb
m-am-ao-taPfP
Robinson 40-00-00-0000
McUnton 244-51-10-11011
Edwards 131-41-20-1054
Venson 50-10-00-0000
Culuko 282-55-50-12110
Davis 212-63-40-101V
Chambers 394-62-21-85310
Carter 334-80-02-7258
Ritter 333-61-41-4321
Totals 20020-4113-18 5-26 13 17 57
Percentages: FG - .487, Ft. 722,3 pt Goals: 4-11
363, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots - 3,
Turnovers - 15, Steals - 5.
!ho:o by Biff Ranson
1t.H�lf 2nd half OT
STAGINGS
Vten's standings as of Feb. 8
Team CAAOverall
James Madison 7-1.87515-5.750
Old Dorrunion 6-2.75014-5.737
Richmond 6-2.75010-7.588
UNC Wilmington 4-4.50012-6.667
American 4-4.5007-11.389
William & Mary 3-5.37511-9.550
East Carolina 2-6.2507-12.368
George Mason 0-8.0005-16.238
Women's standings asof Feb.
Team CAAOverall
Old Dominion 7-01.0011-6.647
James Madison 5-2.71412-6.667
American 5-2.71410-7.588
Richmond 4-3.5718-10.444
George Mason 3-4.42912-7.632
East Carolina 2-4.333M.500
William & Mary 1-6.1437-11.389
UNC Wilmington 0-6.0004-14.222
Pirates fall into Striders'
web, drop further in CAA
ECU
)MU
30
32
28
25
-Final
58
57
By Billy Weaver
Staff Writer
8
Coming off a huge win over first
place James Mad ison, the Pirates played
host to the Richmond Spiders last night
in Minges Coliseum. The Pirates played
hard but fell 72-63 in a disappointing
loss.
The game belonged to Richmond the
entire evening as ECU could not stay
with the Spiders de-
fensively. The Pirates
also only contested "Wfe THUSf CTeOte
seven of Richmond's a. �� -f
first-half shots "When d greater SCflSe Of
sacrifice on and
offthe court'
Eddie Payne,
Head coach
shooters, they're go-
ing to get a high per-
centage of shots
Coach Eddie Payne
said in reference to the
Spider's impressive 69
percent field goal shooting in the first
half.
Richmond's offensive scheme, com-
bined with poor Pirate free throw shoot-
ing (55 percent) were the deciding fac-
tors in the Spider's win.
Well aware of Richmond's shooting
in the first half, ECU came out after half-
time with a more up-tempo game. The
Spiders, who led by as much as 16 in the
first half, saw ECU cut that lead to 3 with
3:36 left and momentum swinging in
favor of the Pirates. "We tried to pick
them up full court and press more to
create turnovers and pick up the pace of
the game. It worked for a while. We cut
it close but we just couldn't win it in the
end Anton Gill said.
Richmond's
Michael Hodges then
took it upon himself to
score seven of the
Spider's nine unan-
swered points that de-
stroyed all hopes of a
Pirate comeback.
Consistency has
been a big factor for
ECU all season. "We
must create a greater
sense of sacrifice on and off the court
Coach Payne said. Payne feels that sacri-
fice and maturity will enable the Pirates
to win consi stently.The Pirates go on the
road to face CAA opponents American
and GMU before returning to Greenville
to host Va. Tech. on Feb. 18.
ECU
(63)
Min
Lyons 30
Richardson 33
Hunter 20
Young 14
Peterson 23
GUI 32
Armstrong 2
Lewis 14
Copeland 32
m-a
7-12
3-10
3-6
0-2
3-12
2-6
0-0
1-3
3-5
ft
m-a
1-2
5-5
2-3
1-4
1-2
5-8
0-0
0-3
0-0
rb
o-t
2-4
0-3
1-1
2-2
3-4
4-8
1-2
2-2
4-7
P
3
4
2
3
1
1
0
2
4
20
tP
15
11
9
1
9
10
0
2
6
63
Totals 200 22-5615-27 20-36
Percentages: FG - 392, Ft 556,3 pt Goals: 4-13 -
307, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots -1,
Turnovers - 14, Steals -7.
Richmond
Min
Jarmon 40
Johnson 10
Fleming 7
Weathers 13
Springer 16
Burroughs 40
Wood 40 5-11 3-4
Hodges 23 4-7 10-13
Metzger 11 0-2 OO
(72)
fc ft
m-a m-a
1-3 3-5
0-0 0-0
2-2 0-0
0-0 0-0
4-4 2-3
6-9 54
P
6
0
4
0
10
19
15
18
0
Totals 20022-38 23-31 4-26 15 21 72
Percentages: FG - 378, Ft. 742,3 pt Goals: 5-10 -
.500, Team Rebounds -1, Blocked Shots - 2,
Turnovers - 13, Steals -9.
rb
o-t
0-0
0-3
1-1
0-2
0-2
0-1
1-7
2-9
0-0
P�
1
5
1
3
5
0
2
2
2
1st half
ECU 31
Richmond 43
2nd half OT
32
29
Final
63
72
Women's soccer
team takes title
By Chip Little
Staff Writer
The ECU Women's Soccer
team won the third annual Fiesta
Indoor Tournamentin Jacksonville
last weekend. ECU was able to
field two teams for mis tourna-
ment due to their large member-
ship. The Gold team put forth a
strong showing, but the Purple
squad reigned victorious.
The eight-team tournament in-
cluded the two ECU squads, UNC-
Chapel Hill, The Chapel Hill Pio-
neers, Jacksonville Unidas, the
Winston Salem Wildcards, UNC-
Wilmington and a team from the
Marine Corps.
The Purple team opened their
Saturday competition with a 2-0
victory over UNC-W. Goals were
scored by Kiki Anderson and Toni
DeRose.Their next opponent, Win-
ston Salem, fell 5-0 to a potent Pi-
rate offensive showing. The Purple
squad fell 1-0 to the Chapel Hill
Pioneers, who were undefeated on
the first day of competition. After
tying their counterpart Gold squad,
a crushing 7-0 defeat of the Marine
ECU inks recruits for '93 football season
unit, a controversial loss to Jack-
sonville and a victory over Chapel
Hill, the Purple squad entered their
second day of competition seeded
second, and the Gold unit, despite
a strong defensive showing on the
first day of competition, ended Sat-
urday seeded fifth.
On Sunday the two teams en-
tered a process of single-elimina-
tion play where ECU Purple was
faced with itsclosestvictory against
Winston Salem. The Puple squad
and the Wildcards battled through
two overtimes until an ECU pen-
alty kick sealed a hard-fought vic-
tory. The Gold squad fell in its first
outing with Jacksonville Unidas.
The Purplesquad then moved
on to meet UNC-Chapel Hill in the
semifinals as goalkeeper Jaime
Pierce shut out Chapel Hill's of-
fense and the Purple squad went to
another 1-0 win.The squad was set
to meet the formidable Chapel Hill
Pioneers, who had allowed only
three goals in two days of play. An
Amy Warren score, combined with
intense defense, led ECU past the
Pioneers, and into their second
championship in two years.
Sports Information
Department
&uk 3 0�4 (& 3 04 C&4.
ECU opene its Indoor home eeaeon on Feb. 20
against UNC-Qwlotte.
GREENVILLE, N.C.� East
Carolina University hassigned 22
high school and junior col lege a th-
letes to national letters-of-intent,
to play football for the Pirates,
school officials announced Thu rs-
day.
Four North Carolinians are
among the list, which also incl udes
five junior college performers.
The in-state signees are de-
fensive back Columbus Grice, a
Greenville native and J.H. Rose
High School alumnus, who played
the last two seasons at Butler
County Community College in El
Dorado, Kan running back Jerris
McPha i 1, a transfer from Wa ke For-
est University who prepped at
Clinton High School, Dante
Randolph, a tight end from
Greenville's Rose High School,
and Spring Hope native Brian
Richardson, a defensive end from
Southern Nash High School.
Three junior college players
arecurrentlyenrolled atECU and
will participate in spring drills this
year. They include Bill Wilson, a
punter from Northeastern Okla-
homa A&M, Sean Turner, a de-
fensive lineman from Butler
County Community College in El
Dorado, Kan and Mike Sweat, a
linebacker from Dixie College in
St. George, Utah.
John Krawczyk, a defensive
lineman from Oglesby, 111 is the
fifth junior college signee.
Krawczyk (pronounced KRAY-
CHECK) spent the last two sea-
sons at Illinois Valley Community
College in Oglesby.
The Pirates also kept their ac-
cent on the passing game. The list
includes the South Carolina state
career pass completion record
holder in quarterback Perez
Mattison of Anderson, S.C.
Westside High School. Also, Dan
Gonzalez, a quarterback from
Neptune(N.J-) High School, linked
with the Pirates.
1993 1scu
NamePos.HLWt
Chris AivazoglouDL6-3270
Willie BrookinsDE6-2225 '
Marvin BurkeLB6-1235
Benny "B.J CraneLB6-1220
Linwood DeBrewWR5-10175
Andrew DuliokiOL66250
Dan GonzalezQB63205
Columbus GriceDB5-11175
Chad HolcombPK62160
John KrawczykDL63265
Perez MattisonQB61185
A Jerris McPhailRB5-11192
Shane McPhersonOL6-3265
Brian NagyOL66265
Jason NicholsWR5-10170
John PeacockLB60215
Dante RandolphTE64207
Brian RicliardsonDE64230
Mike SweatLB62235
Sean TurnerDL61255
Lorenzo WestLB63230
Bill WilsonP64215
Hometown
Eddystone, Pa. (Ridley HS Hargrove Military Academy)
West Palm Beach, Ha.(Suncoast HSNE Okla.
Jacksonville, Fla.(Raines HS)
College Park, Ga.(Lovett HS)
Newport News, Va .(Ferguson HS)
Orlando,Fla.(Winter Park HS)
Neptune,N.J. (Neptune HS)
GreenviUe,N.C(Rose HS Butler County CC)
Smyrna, Ga.(Campbell HS)
Oglesby, Dl.(St. Bede AcademyIll.Valley CC)
Anderson3C.(WestsideHS)
Clinton, N.C(Clinton HSWake Forest University)
Cartersville,Ga.(CartersvilleHS)
Orlando, Ha.(Winter Park HS)
Norcross,Ga.(MeadowcreekHS)
Venice, Ha.(Cardinal Mooney HS)
Greenville, N.C(Rose HS)
Spring Hope, N.C(S. Nash HS)
Kirkland,Wash.(LakeWashingtonHSDixie College)
Coffeyville, Kan.fParsons HSButler County CC)
Atlanta, Ga.(Decatur HS)
Sallisaw, Okla.(Sallisaw HSNE Okla. A&M)
?Enrolled at ECU during Spring 1993 semester. Will participate in Spring Drills.
Will be a junior during the 1993 football season. AWill be a sophomore during the 1993 football season.
p
ll
� ' � �
L � � I





12 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 9, 1993
Flying
high
in
Minges
The ECU men's
basketball team
gave the
cheerleaders
something to cheer
about. The Bucs
showed 360� of
power against the
James Madison
Dukes, Saturday in
Minges.
File Photo
Ashe tilted windmills of
another sort in U.S. society
(AP) � It was already well into
the night when he insisted on making
one more point.
With Arthur Ashe, there was al-
ways one more point. With him, it
was an obligation � even when fa-
tigueand the rasp thata connection of
a thousand miles could not hide
workedagainsthisbeingableto fulfill
it
The conversation took place in
mid-September. Ten days earlier,
Ashe had suffered a second heart
attack. The day before that, he had
been arrested outsidetheWhiteHouse
protesting against the Bush
administration's policy on Haitian
refugees.
But a couple of days hence, he
was setting off to tilt windmills of
another sort�thereasonfor his phone
call�andaswashis wont, Ashe took
great pains to make himself under-
stood.
"AIDSisdifferent. Lessdifferent
than i t was twoorthreeyearsago he
began, "but it still makes people very,
very uncomfortable. And the psy-
chology in some ways is more fright-
ening than the disease itself
Greaterawarenessofthedisease
that finally defeated Ashe late Satur-
day afternoon at the age of 49 was his
last crusade, but hardly the only one
for which he will be remembered.
like the battlesagainstAIDSand
for civil rights, some of those causes
searched him out; others, though, he
sought out on his own.
'It seemed that he could fight a
good,strongbattlewithoutaggravat-
ing people. That wasn't his style
tennis great Jack Kramer recalled.
"And because of it, he got things
done
Another of the tributes that re-
sounded through the weekend, this
onefromanother former tennisplayer
and sometimes business associate,
Donald Dell, made the same point
even more succinctly.
"He showed Dell said, "that
you don't have to be a jerk to be a
champion
Ashe showed us that countless
times. By refusing to be stopped at the
bottom of the tennis ladder because
he was not allowed to play on the
courts in the segregated Richmond,
Va park where his father worked.
And again much later, by not calling
a halt to the fight against that kind of
injustice after he'd reached the top of
the game himself.
Indeed, at almost every step of
the way in tennis � whether it in-
All you need is love
Show your sweetie just how much you care and send
your significant other a love line in the Feb. 11 issue of
The East Carolinian.
Drop by our office today on the second floor of the
Publications Building and show how much you care.
Crime may not pay, but we do.
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications for
the positions of News and Sports Staff Writer and
Editorial Columnist. Those interested can obtain
applications at our office on the second floor of the
Publications Building.
EasLCacplina 1992J993
Playhouse ,� Season
William Gibson's spellbinding sequel
to "The Miracle Worker'
MMftflEl
"The story of Helen Keller and
Annie Sullivan continues
February 11, 12, 13, 15 and 16 at 8:00 p.m.
February 14 at 2:00 p.m.
ECU Students: $4.50
Call � 757-6829
8
JV
jAFESj�,
February 17, 7:45-l0:00pm
Grand Slam USA
Register: February 17 at 5pm In Bio 103
8.9.10 foot rims
Men i women's Divisions
V tyutn SecneC ?� �xc&e$teHt! y
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sponsored by:
ECU Recreational Services
Grand Slam USA
Qll 757-6387 for more details.
GRAND
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U.S.A.
STUDENT
APPRECIATION
DAY
TUESDAYS IN FEBRUARY at
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volved organizing a players union or
demanding a visa to go play in South
Africa, when apartheid still exerted a
formidable chokehold on athletes�
Ashe risked profit and position to
make sure the people behind him
would have an easier dimb.
Earlier in that same September
telephone call, some si x months after
the threatofnewspaperstories forced
Ashe to reveala312-year battlewith
AIDS, he taiked about his plan to
launch a line of tennis clothes in the
coming days. It was a risky proposi-
tion, tryingto sell a product endorsed
by a celebrity known to have AIDS.
Butpartoftheproceedsfromthesales
were earmarked for the Arthur Ashe
Foundation to Defeat AIDS, and he
had no concerns about how the ven-
ture might be preceived.
"As far as taking an advocacy
position, I was going to do it any-
way Ashe said. "I just didn't want
other people telling me when to start.
Long before then, I was convinced
that morally, I had an obligation
And that was all heeverneeded.
sea kayaking
canoeing
island camping
$175 students
$185 facultystaff
Register by
March 1
204 Christenbury Gym
OFFERED BY
ECU REC SERVICES
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Here's what ECU
students are saying
about the hottest
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campus
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The Climbing Tower will offer
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following dates this spring:
February 9
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Climbing 1 Workshops are
designed for beginners. These
sessions teach basic techniques,
equipment fundamentals, voice
commands and give
participants the opportunity to
CLIMB ON USA
Drop-in Supervised climbing is
available for persons
successfully completing
Climbing 1 Workshops.
Participants may purchase a day
or semester pass and climb
Wednesday & Friday from
3:00-5:OOpm or Sunday from
l:00-4:00pm.
For more information regarding
The Hard ROC Tower contact
Brian Miller, ECU Recreational
Services at 757-6387
1

immmfmm





FEBRUARY 9, 1993
The East Carolinian
113
Dolphins' running back shot in leg by male companion
ALABASTER, Ala. (AP) � Miami
Dolphins running back Bobby
Humphrey, recently arrested in a Geor-
gia drug case, was shot in the leg Mon-
day after an apparent argument with a
man who was riding in his car.
Humphrey, a star player for Ala-
bama from 1985 to 1988, was released
from a hospital after being treated for a
wound just above theknee. He was shot
with a .38-caliber pistol, police said.
Police said they were questioning a
man but refused to release his name
because he had not been charged. Police
Chief Larry Rollan said it would be up to
Humphrey whether any charges will be
filed.
Humphrey'scar was impounded by
police until they could get a search war-
rant to check it out.
Humphrey's attorney, John
Swearingen of Columbus, Ga said the
running back attended a weekend trade
show in New Orleans with a former
Alabama teammate, Mark Petties.
Swearingen said Humphrey was re-
turning to Birmingham, his home town,
for a doctor's appointment later Mon-
day when the shooting occurred.
Rollan said officers were alerted to a
problem on Interstate 65 near the Ala-
baster exit about 7:10 a.m. by a woman
who called on a cellular phone and said,
"I think they are having a fight
When police arrived at the scene, he
said, Humphrey was lying on the side of
the road with a gunshot wound to the
leg.
Rollan said a U.S. marshal, who hap-
Lindros innocent in beer spitting incident
C6HAWA,Ontario(AP)�EricLindros
was found innocent today of charges he spit
beer on a woman.
Lindros, the 19-year-old who plays for
the Philadelphia Flyers,
shook hands with his
lawyerafterJusticeRhys
Morgan issued the ac-
quittal. The judge said
defense evidence raised
reasonable doubt.
"Being accused of
something you didn't
commitand gainingthat
much media attention, I
don't tliink it does any-
body much good Lindros said. "I know I
never did it and I had people to back me up.
It felt good
Morgan suggested Lindros drop coun-
tercharges against Lynn Nunney, a 24-year-
old factory worker, who alleged he spat and
poured beer on her last Nov. 29.
"The dispute could have been resolved
that night without
criminal charges Mor-
gan said. "Unfortu-
nately, the positions of
bothpartieshardened
Nunney said the
incident occurred after
she refused to make
room for the NHL
player on a packed
nigh tcl ub dance floor at
Koo Koo Bananas in
Whitby, about 36 miles east of Toronto.
Lindros said he wasn't going to try to
avoid similar situations.
"I'm a kid and I like to do the things that
"Being accused of
something you didn't
commit and gaining
that much media atten-
tion, I don't think it does
anybody much good
Eric Lindros,
Philadelphia Flyers
kids do he said.
Hyers spokesman Mark Piazza said in
Philadelphia that the team was relieved.
"We're happy that it's over and done
with and he can get back and concentrate on
playing hockey Piazza said.
In trial testimony ending Thursday, wit-
nessesoffered sharply conflicting versionsof
events. Nunney said Lindros repeatedly
pushed her toward the edge of the dance
floorand emptied a bottleof beer onherhead
and spat beer in her face when she tried to
stop him. Her testimony was corroborated
by her sister and a friend.
Lindros testified that Nunney started
the spat, pouring beer on his back without
provocation. He said he tried to retaliate by
"sprinkling" beer on her. Five defense wit-
nesses, including three who hadn't met
Lindros before, backed his story.
pened to be driving past, had stopped
and was holding a revolver when police
arrived.
Humphrey, who became Alabama's
all-time leading rusher during a career
that covered 1985-88, was arrested Jan.
31 in a Columbus, Ga hotel on charges
of cocaine possession, aggravated assault
and destruction of hotel property. He
also was charged with giving police a
false name.
The assault charge stemmed from a
fight with former Alabama teammate
Vantriese Davis of Phenix City, Ala.
Humphrey, who was released on
$12,500 bond, did not appear before au-
thorities as scheduled last week in Co-
lumbus.
The 26-year-old Humphrey was
acquired by the Dolphins in a 1992 trade
that sent running back Sammie Smith to
Denver.
Humphrey had 102 carries for 471
yards and a touchdown and caught 54
passes for 507 yards and a TD for the
AFC East champion Dolphins.
Basketball Hall of Fame adds
six to the list of elite players
(AP) �The Basketball Hall of Fame
has added Julius Erving, Bill Walton, Walt
"Bells" Bellamy, Dan Issel, Dick McGuire
and Calvin Murphy to its ranks.
In 1976, Erving, one of three players in
pro basketball history to score more than
30,000 career points, joined the Philadel-
phia 76ers. An 11-time NBA All-Star, he
was named the league's most valuable
player in 1981 and led the 76ers to the 1983
NBA championship.
Nagging injuries slowed Walton's ca-
reer. But in 1977, he helped the Trail Blaz-
ers win the NBA championship and was
named the league's most valuable player
in 1978.
Bellamy, a 1961 graduate of Indiana
and member of the 1960U.S. Olympic team,
scored 20,941 points and had 14,241 re-
bounds over a 14-year pro career with
Chicago, New York, Detroit, Atlanta and
New Orleans.
Issel, now coach of the Denver Nug-
gets, averaged more than 22.3 points per
game during a 15-year pro career that in-
cluded five years with the Kentucky Colo-
nels of the ABA and 10 years with the
Nuggets.
McGuire, one of the game's premiere
point guards, had 2,950 assists in an 11-
year pro career, including eight years with
the Knicks and three years with Detroit.
Murphy, at 5-foot-9, was one of
the first small men to make a big impact on
the modem game. He still holds the NBA
record for consecutive free throws at 78.
V-
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Friday, Feb. 12 9 am-3 pm
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February 9,1993
8PM
Hendrix Theatre
Presented By The STUDENT UNION FORUM COMMITTEE
For More Information Call The
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II WWII, ! I II 'Ml II Illl





ARE YOU READY TO
BECOME A STATISTIC?
The disease of AIDS has reached epidemic proportions; researchers
and experts state that within this generatit n even'person in the country
will know at least one person who has AIDS. The implications of this
prediction are staggering; AIDS is not just something a person can
disregard. This disease has brought the issue of safer sex to the forefront
of our society, forcing people to think about subjects that otherwise they
would drop as uncomfortable.
The purpose of this four-part safei sex campaign is simply put � to
save lives. TtieEast ('arolinian is not in any way promoting sex; what we
are promoting is even student's knowledge of their choice between
abstinence and safer sex. Only through information, knowledge and
common sense can a person make this choice, one of the most important
decisions heshe will make in his .
just how prevalent AIDS is in this country. Statistics show that this
ilisea.se is growing at an alarming rate � regardless of age, gender, race
or lifestyle. Statistics may impersonalize the issue, but cannot diminish
the truth behind it. Every day, more and more people are being diagnosed
with the HIV virus. Through information and education, a person can
insure that heshe will not become a victim � and another statistic � of
The second part of this four-part campaign is to enlighten people to this deadly disease.
THE AIDS STATISTIC:
U.S. Toti Cases 23
N.C. Total Cases 2,
Ci oLdiiSut. iioiz.?:
Statistics (sta-tis-tiks), n.r 1. numerical datum. 2. the analysis
of population characteristics by inference from sampling.
���0 ( ' r,it "cV� riiiig Ppirir"T� A Q
TOTAL NUMBER OF
INFECTIONS BY RACI
MALES
Black 56,081
White 119,909
Hispanic33,950
Asianl,378
American Indian346
FEMALES
Black 13,711
White 65,572
Hispanic5,419
Asian128
lerican Indians
Don't be a Statistic - look for the February 16th edition of The East Carolinian
ARE YOU READY FOR THIS?
In the United States, a close look at the statistics regarding the
AIDS disease reveal many startling and frightening facts. No longer
can this disease be considered a "gay" or "drug user" disease. All
trends of life are subject to AIDS � from men to women, from
blacks to whites, from children to adults.
Statistics of women who are infected with the HIV vims are on
the rise in the United States. Studies have shown that the risk of HIV
infection through heterosexual intercourse appears to be greater
for a woman with an HlV-infected partner than fora man with an
HlV-infected partner.Ihesestudies also postulate that women may
be more susceptible to infection because semen contains higher
concentrationsoftheHIVvirus. Also, womenhavemoreexpiised
areas of mucosal surface.
By the end of the decade, experts predict that as many w mei i
as men will be diagnosed with AIDS worldwide. By the year 199 .
over 15,(XX) women were reported to have contracted All S. AIDS
has been ranked as one of the five leading causes of death am mg
women ages 15-44 (CDC). Women with AIDS, oftenunawarethat
they are at risk or infected, die two times faster than men.
Though more female-related casesare being reported, this in no
way means that they are the only high-risk group. In the United
States, AIDS is the second leading cause of death among men 25-
44 years of age. Forty-six percent of Americans wi t h A1DS are people
of color. WHO (World Health Oiganization) reports that SO
percent of HIV transmission worldwide is heterosexual. Any andall
walks of life are at risk to this crippling disease.
Education is thekey to preventing further spreading oft he 1IIV
virus and AIDS. Half of all American teenagers have sex by the age
of 17. Pneumonia is the leading killer of pei ple with All )S � it is
10 times cheaper to prevent it than it is to treat it. Some other
statistics hit home on a wider perspective
T More Americans have died of AIDS than the number of
people whodied in the Gulf, Vietnam and Korean wars combined.
T Doctors diagnosed the first 100,000 cases of AIDS in the
United States during the first eight years of the epidemic. In less
than three years, the next 100,(XK) cases were diagnosed. Experts
expect the next 100,(XX) cases to be diagnosed in less than 12
months.
T By the year 2(XX), ten million cases of AIDS are expected to
be reported worldwide. In that same time, forty million men,
women and children will be infected with the HIV vims.
? More than I60,(XX people have died oi AIDS and over
2(X),(XX) Americans have now been dia
million Americans are believed to be infected with ti virus.
Ninety-eight percent of Americans have admitted that they
need more information on where togo if exposed to the HIV vims.
Information on this and other AIDS-related matters, like testing
and susceptibility, are available at health centers.
THOUGHTS Of A STJ�D�.NT
WAJTifNC FOfl THiE R&SU1TS
0 4.N HrTV AiiDS TEST
Editor's N te: The following l ttet was written by an anon) m
student whohadbeen testedforthe HIVxirus. Tiie student has given The
East ' 'arolinian permission to print this letter with the hope that other
students will realize the tremendous risk tliey may run by having
unprotected sex.
Please understand that there are may people who are HIV positive
and live meaningful and productive lives despite their diagnosis. How-
ever, if a person does need supt then are resources available on
campus as well as in tht Greenville community.
In just a few moments, I will know whether I am HIV
positive or negative. I do not know what to think or say.
I pray that I am HIV negative because I do not know what
I would do if I was HIV positive. It would almost seem like
my life would be over and in reality, it would be, because
there is no known cure.
I can't believe I was so stupid and careless with all of
my sexual partner(s). I should have known my partner(s)
better than I did. It is hard to believe that a person is
willing to give up their life for just a few moments.
Over the last month, I have thought long and hard
about what a relationship is supposed to be about. I think
now I finally realize that sex is nothing to mess around
with. One should love their parti ; .villing to carry
on a commitment for life. St ' stop to think
hapi me, today, it
could all comt
It
can't imat
n found !
think I � ntinue li
11 just
WHAT ABOUT TESTING?
In Pitt County, 81 cases of HIVAIDS.were reported as of
December 1992. People continue to be misinformed and lack
knowledge as to where toget tested and what the test result means.
A detailed breakdown oit lie disease and testing can help to alleviate
some of the fear surrounding this disease.
If a person has engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse,
shared needlesor syringes or been infected withasexuaUy transmit-
ted disease in the past,safet) dictates the need to be tested. Only if
one has nexvr shared needles, nevei had unprotected sex or nevei
done anything that could place himher at risk, can heshe be sure
that the test is not necessary.
The test for AIDS is actually a test tor the HIV antibodies. A
person may be infected with the HIV vims and not knowitbecause
having HIV and having AIDS are not the same thing. People
infected with the HIV vims may or may notget AIDS, but they will
remain infected for the rest i their lives.
Tests geared to detect t he HIV have been proven quite reliable.
The primary test used by most health centers is called ELBA or
enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. If the ELBA test returns
positive, a Western blot test is run to further verify the presence of
HIV antibodies.
The Western blot test, although more accurate than the ELBA
serves as a secondary test i f screening because of the high cost and
expertise needed. A trained and experienced technician is needed
to interpret the Western blot results, while ELBA results can be
determined by a physician.
Each health department in North Carolina offers thebloodtest
to determine HIV infection. Health departments offer free and
anonymous testing; also, counseling about the test and the mean-
of its results are available. At the time of testing, any questions
and concerns should be asked to ensure that the knowledge is
compl
Test results are usually available in two weeks. A person must
return to the health ent toreceive hisher results; he she
cam e phone. rhePitt County Health Depart-
ment oiteis HIV testing at their office located at 1825 West sixth
Street inGreenvilk 1141 for further information or an
S)





Title
The East Carolinian, February 9, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 09, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.921
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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