The East Carolinian, February 4, 1993






Sjjimttfc
ailtatak
Safe at home Don't get Hexed
Pirate baseball fans can
. prepare for the Spring
season which begins on
�ftV3i-
F rid ay Feb
page
12.
11
See story
Columbia
tares' recent
release casts
no spells. See
story page 8.
Mostly
Sunny

High: 55'
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 8
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, February 4, 1993
14 Pages
Group plans to fight proposed tuition hike
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
The cost of an education at a North
Carolina university mav soon be sub-
stantially higher, but a group of ECU
students plan to fight mv proposed in-
crease in tuition.
Reacting to published reports in a
recent edition of TheRaleigh News St
()bserver which indicated tli.it state leg-
islators mav � in increase in tu-
ition rates at i! � bei UN sys-
tem, ECl junior BillIheen is organiz-
group called C( 's i
student Tuiti �
"Th .
edly onsiderine raisins
orommittee
ors are report-
our tuition be-
cause oi a ret ommendation by an inde-
pendent consulting firm Gheen said.
"Their report stated that in order to raise
revenue and bring North Carolina in
line with 11 sister states, then the legisla-
ture could raise tuition
As a result of this report, Gheen
metwith several politically active friends
as well as the head ot various campus
organizations to begin organizingCOST.
The group held its first meeting Monday
afternoon.
FirTit at that meeting were repre-
sentatives from the RHA, WZMB, the
College I emocrats and Courtney Jones,
president tit the St A.
' We want everyone to join C( 6 1.
not just the campus organizations, be-
cause tin- is an issue that affects every-
one i .been said. "We also need the
other politically active group, the Col-
Republicans, to help us influent e
the legislature. This is a bipartisan i
and COST will he a bipartisan group
Steve Benzkofer, information cooi -
dinator lor COST, said, "If we can get the
people behind us, I think we can really
have an effect. We must have all the
students, though, and not just the
groups
i iheen said thatCOST will attempt
to revent a tuition hike bill from ever
coming to a vote in the General Assem-
ble
We'd like to target our activities
toward key committee members so that
they could kill it in committee he said.
'Since students don't have their own
lobby, we plan to arrange for our mem-
bers to visit their legislator to let them
express the student's point of view.
"We'll be asking our members and
anyone else concerned about this issue
to do a few simple things Gheen said.
"First, students can call their state l
lator or write them a hand-written letter
detailing how they feel about a tuition
hike. We plan to have a list of legislative
districts on hand in case anyone dotn't
know his or her legislator when they call
us.
Second, students can ask four rela-
tives to call or write their legislator also.
Ehud, students can write an editorial to
their hometown newspaper about the
issue
( Iheenalsi said that he hopes other
groups across the state join him in the
fight against a tuition increase.
' 1 have been in contact with orga-
nizations on other campuses, and plan to
send a letter to all the College Federation
organizations across the state
Chancellor Richard Eakin spoke
about the possibility of a tuition hike in
an address to the SGA on Monday.
" There is little doubt that the cur-
rent General Assembly will consider an
increase in tuition as a way to raise rev-
enue Eakin said.
See TUITION page 4
English graduate student
suffers fatal heart attack
By Laura Wiser
Staff Writer
dergrad uate
in so i !
n entei
Sltv :
will I
student d
ment pro
Smitl

tack .
dav, Fan.
Smith was described
as "upbeat and a
hard worker.
HOLD YOUR BREATH

handicap, strh mg to complete
her eii il ind continue
teachii . I tocommunity
collegi �
excited ab nt ah:� ngfin
ished said Dr. Richard Tay-
lor, Smith's M.A. thesis advi-
sor. "The news of her death was
like a lightning bolt
Smith completed her un-
ina Univer- English Master's Pro-
te pi gram gram. 1 (escribed by
outstanding Faylor as 'upbeat
commence- and a hard v - Smith was will award her M.A. degree post
tlay. Susan working on master's the humously to Smith's family, I
sh master's titled "Comparati - lextsofthe filling her dream.
Portrait of Mr. W. H. by Oscai In addition to her studies at
Wilde a complex and difficult ECU,Smith ta gli ,h
subjec t I��. i : lid. time at Pitt I mm
In addil to rev ising and College '
submittii - thesi Smith She enj l icting
wastotak tambe- with the students, Faylor said
�" : itii lay. and she wanh I ' continue
Fa) r. Charles tea rung n the community-col-
Sullivan I luate el I of the one
studies for the Ei lepartment, on-om � I ithherstui
areattemptine I contai tSmith'
.1 heart at-
n Fri-
matic
sreame her
sne v. as a ternhc pei
surviving r itives and retrieve layloi said.l leaddedthathe .
the documentations oi her the- I to se Smith rec
sis.Iftherevisionsaresemi-com- ognition, and called her death
plete, the English department "senseless" and "horrible
Photo by Dail Reed
'students tome in from the told in The General Classroom Building, which has been plagued with high
amounts of organic compounds and carbon dioxide.
Accreditation Board calls for
immediate library renovations
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
th
rsitv has
ears, but the
� s'd the uni-
lution to
d ib
nistrativi
he review pai i b I th
mine ui
tl
ind it- br.
h, Insufficient space, stwts and hook collections ar just some of the reasons ovner
nir Library needs immediate renovations.
Giant Pee Dees now
appearing on campus
Pv fas on Williams
Staff v ritei
in to him at the Student Store. Others
iround the ath-
letic departmi - ithers could
. i tted bun, ! � � n
"1 le" i- the ah
about life-liki
e in t.
The
hano Eakii rah illov
� report on the matl
" 1 In
i b r a i
; the 1 ibr, ctions a n
ng suit
I

bers and apital fi
forECUand
eth City, t
proi
ner.
ui i isl �.
: ppi
the library pi
reneged
tatel
tural

( 'WJK
to her own pirate, anti originally in-
spired the idea.
"Instead ol painting a pirate on
Somepeoplema havebumped the window which might look good
or might not we decided to create a
real one laguti s.iid.
i hildren that come in run
right to it. You can reall) ee their eyes
light up and the college kids seem to
enjoy it also
Malaguti said.
W h i 1 e
Malaguti did the
mold-making for
the pirate, Richard
Watt, a man with50
years' i xperience in
the business, actu-
als sculptedthe re-
ation. I be original
PeeDee took six
montl ilp't and make a mold
Malaguti ith that done, we
can make one in about two weeks. Of
ne i- still individually
hand laiiI an 1 Is ind painted
1 hi rsit recei es a per-
centage of royalties from the sale of the
pirates, ,nA must also approve where
;o "We want the pirate to por-
tray the best in ECU Malaguti said.
cueFiberglass,whi halsode-
anv oi the figures at local
miniature golf coursesaround thearea,
is currently working with the Univer-
md PeeDee 1 his
one w ould be made to be ant hored
iuld have toi hange the
support
sv. tJei
ie Fiberj
and w brain
child � the
� �, . -
� Malaguti.

to rep
; � �- enl t! ie uni i rsit.
thing that had ne ei been done
�tarted seeing
'We want the
pirate to
portray the
best in ECU
Frfye Malaguti
PeeDee Designer
i
it in the '
iik luding the
Studi in orderingpirates,
one to th
'
in tie-





2 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 4, 1993
STATENEWS
rings snow to Outer Banks
Fraternity to do community service
Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity members at the University
of Kentucky will have to perform 2,000 hours of commu-
nity service as part of their punishment for taking sports
memorabilia from two North Carolina universities, school
officials said. Kentucky officials confiscated several items
that Pi Kappa Alpha pledges took from Duke University
and the University of North Carolina during a retreat in
December. Among the items taken were the retired jerseys
of former Duke basketball players Christian Laettner, Danny
Ferry and Johnny Dawkins. Pictures and a lamp made out
of a North Carolina Tar Heel football helmet were among
the items taken from the Chapel Hill campus.
Professor asked to resign
A professor of Judaic studies at the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte resigned after it was discov-
ered that he was secretly holding two full-time teaching
positions at two different universities while receiving sala-
ries in the amount of $146,400. Tzvee Zahavy, a nationally
known Talmud scholar, was hired by UNCC last year as a
result of a two-year national search to fill the Isaac Swift
Distinguished Professorship in Judaic Studies. UNCC was
unaware that at the same time, the professor was still
holding his previous position at the University of Minne-
sota. The University of Minnesota has also requested the
professor's resignation.
Family sues school for $8 million
The family of a Florida State University student who
died after diving into a trapeze safety net used by the
school's Flying High Circus has accused the school of
negligence and is seeking $8 million in damages. Stacey
Lynne Stokes, 20, of Fort Myers, died Oct. 31, 1992 at a
Tallahassee hospital. According to police reports, Stokes,
who was not a member of the circus, scaled two fences
posted with no trespassing signs and climbed a platform
before jumping into the net, which collapsed. The family is
asking for $5 million in damages for Stokes' parents and $3
million for a younger sister "for emotiona 1 distress and loss
of her sister
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
(AP) � Outer Banks restau-
rant owner Bubba Schauer thought
he was seeing wind-driven ocean
foam blowing around Avon, while
Kith Hawk police Officer Terry
Winstead thought it wasashes from
burning trash.
It wasneither. They saw snow
on Tuesday morning.
"I couldn't believe it said
Schauer, who owns Bubba's Too in
Avon. "It got thicker, and thicker,
and it was really blowing thick
snow for a while
Snow blew across the Outer
Banks through the morning, mostly
from Cape Hatteras northwar 1.
It started falling, off and on,
about 7a.m and wascominge'own
steadily by 8 a.m Angela Cozza,
owner of Water's Edge Landscap-
ing in Avon, told The News & Ob-
server of Raleigh.
"It's coming down sideways,
because it's blowing so hard she
said. "There's just a light covering
on the ground
Although there were reports
that the snow was sticking to grassy
areas and a few other spots, no
accumulations were reported, said
Doug Hoehler, an intern in meteo-
rology at theCape Hatteras weather
station.
Hoehler said there was only a
traceattheweatheroffice,although
he had reports of as much as a
quarter- to a half-inch on grassy
areas from Avon to Manteo.
The last time most Outer
Banks residents saw snow was
when a half-inch fell Jan. 19,1992,
or when a trace fell on March 16,
Hoehler said.
Captain followed instincts
in saving drifting tanker
CHARLESTON, S.C (AP) �
Capt. Debbie Dempsey says she fol-
lowed her instincts when she was
lowered onto the deck of the drifting
freighter Lyra in 50-knot winds and
20-foot seas off the North Carolina
coast.
"The danger neverentered my
mind. All I thought of was every-
thing I had been trained for all my
life said Ms. Dempsey, a 16-year
veteran on the high seas.
The 634-foot unmanned vessel
broke loose from a tug boat Jan. 26
and began drifting toward Frying
Pan Shoals near Wilmington, N.C
An official of the New Orleans-
based Lykes Bros. Steamship Co
which owns the vessel, called Ms.
Dempsey at herhomein Virginia last
week after the ship broke loose.
A few hours later, Ms.
Dempsey and three other members
of the crew were flown by a Marine
rescuehelicopter to the ship and low-
ered onto the deck.
"I had been on this ship in bad
weather before so I was thinkingof
lowering the anchor she said in an
interview with The Post & Courier.
The crew tried to start the gen-
erators that would lower the anchors
and stop the ship.
"My main concern was to stop
a disaster from happening said
George Bradley, a crew engineer
Although the vessel was not
loaded as it was being towed to New
Orleans, it was carrying 397,000 gal-
lons of heavy fuel oil and there were
fears it could spill and contaminate
the North and South Carolina coasts.
The crew succeeded in lower-
ing the anchors la te Tuesday night of
last week. The vessel was anchored
in 108 feetof water 16miles northeast
of Frying Pan Shols.
It took three more days to pull
up the anchors and get the tow
hooked up so the ship could leave
the scene.
"1 never thought we couldn't
do it, but something like this doesn't
happen very often Ms. Dempsey
said. "It was a real team effort on
everybody's part, and we're all very
pleased we were so successful
Ms. Dempsey, 43, has been
master of the Lyra since 1989. She
sailed around the world, made six
trips to the Persian Gulf during Op-
eration Desert Shield and taken ships
safely through hurricanes.
She was the first woman to be
accepted to the Maine Maritime
Academy and the first woman to
graduate from any service academy
in the United States, The (Charles-
ton) Post & Courier reported Tues-
day.
� Bodysuits
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Sleepwear
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PRIVATE CLUB FOR MEMBERS & GUESTS
MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE
Summer Student
Leadership Opportunity
Available
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
ORIENTATION
STAFF
Applications Available in
Room 203 Erwin
Beginning January 25, 1993
Deadline For Completed Application
is February 19, 1993
At 4:00 PM





i mil HI n I ill
� ii � li I I 111 "II i
FEBRUARY 4, 1993
The East Carolinian 3
PEACE
wdom
Photo by Dail Reed
EC U students, Roy Ennis and Michael Coldren created this T-shirt design in an effort to promote peace.
An article in the March issue of Expressions magazine will describe the shirts in detail.
NATIONALNEWS
Officials urge for loan improvements
WASHINGTON (AP) � Sen-
ate Republicans decided Wednes-
day to force a symbolic vote on re-
taining the ban on homosexuals in
the military without the changes
PresidentClintonhasorderedtotake
effect over the next six months.
Even though some Democrats
were expected to join the effort, one
Republican acknowledged it would
likely fail given the Democrats' 5713
majoritv in the Senate.
The measure would ensure
preservation of the original ban for
the next six months, pending the
outcome of congressional hearings.
It also would prevent the president
from acting by executive order and
would give Congress a vote on any
changes.
Still uncertain was whether the
measure would bean amendment to
the family and medical leave bill or
free-standing legislation that would
face a certain presidential veto.
"Our position is we want an
up-or-down vote on the amend-
ment said Sen. Phil Gramm, R-
Texas.
Hepredicted thatabouta half-
dozen Democrats would back the
GOP measure. "I'm not that optimis-
tic that we'll get 51" votes, said Sen.
Don Nickles, R-Okla.
Earlier in the day, Sen. Sam
Nunn,D-Gachairman of the Armed
Services Committee, said both sides
should "hold off" for now because
Clinton already has retreated.
Nunn also said he will oppose
the GOP measure, despite his own
opposition to lifting the 50-year-old
ban.
"I spent last week trying to get
President Clinton � and 1 finally did
� to move toward not issuing any
kind of final directive or even anv
kind of interim directive that would
fundamentally change the polio
N'unn siid on NBC's "Tcxlay" show.
The armed services, mean-
while, began to implementQinton's
first steps to end the ban on homo-
sexuals in the militarv.
The Armv, a wand AirForce
ordered recruiters to stop askingap-
plicants their sexual orientation and
the commandant of the Marine
Corps, Gen. Carl F. Mundy, urged
his troops to "remain on watch
iiiiiiiiiniTinniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiin
m
WE
HAVE A
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DEAL
FOR YOU!
33
With any $5.00 purchases of
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at the East Carolina
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receive a FREE 4 oz. bag of
Hershey Kisses.
Available at the checkout
from February 1
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CO or while supplies last.
IBM
Student Stores
Wright Building � 757-6731
ECU Student Stores: More than just books�your dollars support student scholars I
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;1MB
4 77e fflA7 Carolinian
FEBRUARY 4, 1993
I
Test cargo plane crashes at Georgia base
TUITION
Continued from page 1
MARIETTA, Ga. (AP) � A
test plane crashed and burned at
Dobbins Air Force Base in subur-
ban Atlanta on Wednesday. At least
two of the seven people aboard
were killed, a base spokeswoman
said.
The C-130 plane hit a Navy
medicalclinicat the base, butcaused
minimal damage and no one in the
clinic was injured, said Lt. Pat
Blassie.
The fate of the other five
people on board was not immedi-
ately known. The others aboard
"are being searched for Blassie
said.
The C-130 was owned by
Lockheed, which has a plant next
to the base.
Smyrna police reported the
plane crashed about 1:45 p.m. near
the entrance to the base off U.S. 41.
The crash site was north of a run-
way.
The C-130 is a military troop
and cargo transport plane, but this
plane was a special version used by
Lockheed for testing, said Susan
Miles, spokeswoman for Lockheed
JOYNER
Aeronautical Systems Co.
"This one had a lot of equip-
ment most C-130s don't have she
said.
Reporters were barred from
entering the base.
The plane appeared to be try-
ing to land, a witness said.
"You could see it coming in,
and then all of a sudden it just went
nosedown'said Bill Morgan, who
works at a nearby car dealership.
"It seemed like it was kind of
off line he told Cable News Net-
work.
Continued from page 1
project is a serious concern for
ECU and for the Commission
on Colleges of the Southern As-
sociation of Colleges and
Schools Eakin said.
A new proposal is in the
works for the Legislature to con-
sider. This proposal would not
only include the UNC system,
but also the community colleges
and grades K-12.
Eakin said that he hopes this
new proposal will be put up for
early consideration by the Sen-
ate and House, so that voters
could vote on it and give the
project a definite starting date.
"I am more optimistic that
the bond referendum will be ap-
proved this year than last year
Eakin said.
"One of the strengths of
higher education in our state is
that tuition has been low in com-
parison to national figures. While
this is an enviable position, over
time, one should expect tuition to
increase in our state as in every
other Eakin said.
Several COST members
stressed the importance of a pro-
vision in the State Constitution
stating that education should be
"as close to free as practicable
Matt Stuart, a member of the
group, said, "This proposed tu-
ition hike will affect the middle
class, and may push poorer people
out of school Nevertheless, all
students will be affected.
Junior Laura Maready gave
her reason for joining COST. "I
have a brother that will be start-
ing college in four years, and my
parents are already struggling to
put me through school. Once the
legislature raises tuition once, I
think it will have a snowball ef-
fect, and they will raise it when-
ever they need money
For more information, or to
join COST, contact Steve
Benzkofer at 830-9239. "We're
meeting again next Tuesday at 4
p.m. in Mendenhall to elect the
leadership. 1 encourage everyone
who cares about this issue to come
out and help us Gheen said.
Don't forget
your
sweetheart
Feb. 14,
send them a
love line.
'INFORMAL spring rushk
Meet the sisters of
ZETATAU ALPHA
February 9 "WESTERN NIGHT" and House Tour
February 10 "FIFTIES" SKIT NIGHT
February 11 "PUTTING ON THE RITZ" (invitation only)
5 PM each night
Pref Party with Pi Kappa Phi
Zeta Tau Alpha
Social Sorority
508 West 5th St.
For rides and
information call Sherry:
757-0344 or 757-1811
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
invites applications tor the
Slimmer Pre-Graduate Research Experience
�10 week Summer Research Project with
UNC-CH Faculty Mentor
�Rising Senior Minority Undergraduates
�Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Physical
Sciences, Biomedical Sciences, and Public Health
including Environmental Sciences and Engineering
�Skill Enhancement Workshops Available
�Housing plus $1,000 Food Allowance and
$2,500 Stipend
�Application Deadline is February 26, 1993
�Period of Program: May 25, 1993 to July 30, 1993
UNC-CH Contact is:
Associate Dean, Dr. Henry T. Frierson, Jr.
The Graduate School
200 Bynum Hall CB 4010
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Telephone: 919-966-2611
For Application Forms and Additional Information Contact:
Dr. Brian Haynes
204 Whichard Building � 757-6495
Is Now Offering
UNLIMITED
TANNING VISITS
for only $30.00 a month
other packages available, too
WE HAVE GREENVILLE'S
LOWEST TANNING PRICES
we will beat any currently advertised price
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located just off Greenville Blvd behind Pizza Inn
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The East Carolinian
ftw
Februarys 1993
Classifieds
R )R RKNT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS :1 and
2 bed room apa rtments. Energy-efficient,
several locations in town. Carpeted,
kitchen appliances, some water and
sewerpaid,washerdryerhookups. Call
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STUDENTS: Don't wait for next se-
mester, do it now We have now over a
hundred apartments that will be avail-
able for May, June, July, and August.
Call 752-1375 Homelocators today for
your selection.
NEW 1 bedroom apartment $275. 757-
0476.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 2608 Tryon
Drive;3bedroom lbath;$550.00pm.
404 S. Eastern Street; 3 bedroom 2 bath;
$680.00 pm. No pets. Lease and
Deposit Required. Duffus Realty, Inc.
Call 756-2675.
2-BEDROOMacross fromMendenhall,
205 E. 9th Street. 375.00 per month. Call
756.0151.
FOR RENT: 2 Bdr. duplex across from
Town Common. Need Lease taken over
in May. Call 752-7270. Leave Message.
ROOYIMATIW
MALEROOMMATENEEDEDtoshare
apartment at Tar River. 13 rent and
utilities. Call: 758-8845. Leave message
on answering machine.
LG. HOUSE near downtown & campus
$155mo plus 13 utilities. Semi - re-
sponsible would be about right. Jay 758-
4375.
WANTED ROOMMATE: Ringgold
Towers, Male, $187.50, Phis 12 ex-
penses. Call 757-0369 or (919) 291-2513.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED: To
share 2 bedroom Tar River apt. Rent
$115.00 mo. plus 14utilities. Call 757-
1784 for more information.
MALE ROOMMATE NEFDED: To
share two bedroom apartment. ECU
Bus route, furnished, NEAT; Respon-
sible, Non-smoker. $175 per month, 1
2 utilities NO DEPOSIT. Please call 758-
4135 ASAP.
S l I
ALL NEW UNRELEASED live concert
& studio recordings for sale. Over 1000
new titles available this week from the
following artists: ROCK- U2, R.E.M,
Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendrix, Black
Crowes, Springsteen, SRV, Van Halen,
Rush, Beatles, Doors, G-N-R, etc. AL-
TERNATIVE- Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Chili
Peppers, Cure, Depeche Mode, MORE
OTHERS INCLUDE- Bob Marley, Ma-
donna, Prince, and more. Call 931-2573
to leave name, number, and requested
artist on message (all new CD's and
tapes in stock).
VALENTINES SPECIAL: Don't forget
to order early this year as we run out
every year. For just 29.95 you can get
your lady 1 dozen long stem red roses
arranged and boxed. 757-1007
DAY BED, white, iron and brass w2
twin size Orthopedic mattresses and
roll-out pop-up trundle. Never used, in
box. Cost $700. $310 cash. (919) 637-
4421 after 6:30 p.m.
BRASS BED, queen size w frame and
deluxe Orthopedic mattress set in fac-
tory box. Can't use. Cost $750, sacrifice
$285 cash (919) 637-4421 after 6:30 pjn.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED CARS,
Trucks, Boats, 4-wheelers, motor-
homes, by FBI, IRS, DEA. Available
your area now. Call 1-800-436-4363 ext.
c-5999.
COLOR TV ZENITH 19' color TV,non-
remote, older model with minimal use.
Excellent picture. Perfect for dorm or
apt $100.00. CallB30-9522.
MOBILE HOME. 1980 Champion,
14x58. 2 bedrooms & bath. Refrigera-
tor, washer, dryer & stove. Curtains &
blinds. Underpinned. Good Condi-
tion. Winterville. 355-8853.
KING SIZE WATERBED MATTRESS
and liner - NO LEAKS. Heater, frame,
rail pads, pedestal, hardware, fill kit
$100. 757-6688 or 355-6593 ask for Carl.
GIANT CRUSIER BIKE, $70 obo:
Cerwin Vega Speaker Enclosure, $30;
Custom Pool Cue wcase, $40; S-10
Sport Rims, $75 Call 758-5294.
FREE LITTER - TRAINED KITTENS
752-6768 after 7 p.m.
CHEST OF DRAWERS (5 drawers)
Darkwood. Good Condition Please call
756-2286.
ART DECO FURNITURE, glass ware,
McCoy, Porcelain, Playboys and Pent-
house mags from the 70 ($20 a year)
mint condition. Other curious, strange
and beautiful older things for s-�le. Call
758-7993 to come and take a look. (Ask
for Link).
FISHER SINGLE CD player. Good
condition. $95 or best offer. Ask for
Chris at 758-8461.
TWO CERWIN VEGA 380 SE speak-
FOR SALE
ers, 405 Watts $375 Call Josh 830-6893.
55 GALLON fish tank and all accesso-
ries, $125; Cobra Pool Stick, barely used
-paid $170-sacrificefor $100. Call Rod
321-1032.
FOR SALE - one almost new
Audiosource signal processor with 10
BAND GRAPHIC EQUALIZER, Au-
dio Video mixer (w video detail and
sharpness adjustment and fader). Has
2 VCRs and 3 auxiliary inputs out-
puts. Nifty flashing lights, to. $300 (It's
a control unit for any system). Also, for
sale 2 subwoofers enclosures with two
ASI 10" woofers in each (four alto-
gether). 90 w RMS, 130 max. Enclo-
sures are custom with plexiglass sides.
$100 each or Everything above for $400-
425. 931-7021.
CANNONDALE Shimano 105 10 spd.
New Rear Tire Cyclo computer 112
yrs. old Sac. $350 Tony 931-8863.
1980 VW truck, Fi Gas, Air (inop). Cruise
(inop.), AM FMCass, Bed Rails,Clean,
Runs Great, 107 Kmiles, New Tires,
$1200.00 758-5001 or 758-8524 (leave
Msg.) Greenville.
MOVING MUST SELL! 5 piece cherry
or oak bedroom set - $425.00 Call (919)
946-9653.
1969Cadillaclimo$1969.00,1969Ibanez
Stratocaster $196.90,1969 Black & pearl
Ludwigdrumkit$519.69,1969 harmony
6 string (copy of Gibson) mint condi-
tion $119.69, 1969 Yamaha 6 string
$96.69, 1969 Leslie $619.69. Call 758-
7993.
P WAN III)
SAVE on Spring Break '93! Jamaica,
Cartcun, Bahamas from $459 Florida from
!149! Organize group and travel free!
Contact Susan � 931-7334 or call Sun
Splash Tour s today 1-800-426-7710.
ORIGINAL ARTWORK WANTED!
Looking for art that would look good on
T-shirts. We will pay for the exclusive use
of your work Call for an appointment
752-6953.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED: Great
club, great money, unbelievable tips.
Work Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9 pm-
2 am. Call Sid 919-735-7713 or Paul 919-
736-0716. MothersPlayhouse in
Goldsboro.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull time. Set own hours!
RUSH stamped envelope Publishers (GI)
1821HillandaleRd. 1B-295 Durham, N.C
27705
SPEND A SUMMER in New Hamp-
shire. Outstanding boysgirls sports
camps located on New England's largest
lake are recruiting individuals for all staff
positions, including nurses. Applicants
must be able to assist in the instruction of
an activity. For more information, call
Kyle at (919) 847-4430.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
forwaitstaff at Professor OCools between
2-4 pjn. daily. No phone calls accepted.
Located behind Quincy's Steak House
on Greenville Blvd.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES: The
Greenville Recreation & Parks Depart-
ment is recruiting 12 to 16 pa rt-timeyouth
soccer coaches for the spring indoor soc-
cer program. Applicants must possess
some knowledge of the soccer skilLs and
have the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours are from 3 pm to 7
pm with some night and weekend coach-
ing. This program will run from the first
of March to the first of May. Salary rates
start at $4.25 per hour. For more informa-
tion please call Ben James or Michael
Daly at 830-4550.
NEED FULL OR PART-TIME non-
smoking caregiver in my home for 4
month old. Transportation and refer-
ences required. 830-9082
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-800-436-
4365 ext. P-3712.
DENNY'S will be accepting application
for immediate employment for all posi-
tions from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday -
Friday. Servers, Host, Line Cooks, Bus
Dishwashers. Apply in person only at
Denny's 808 S. Memorial Dr.
EARN UP TO $10.00HR. Are you look-
ing for great hours? Great $$$ ar.d a
Great experience? Don't look any fur-
ther. Market for Fortune 500 Companies!
CALL NOW 1-800-932-0528 ext. 17.
HELP WANTED - COMMISSION
SALES - START IMMEDIATELY: Part-
time Full - time flexible hours - Interna-
tional Company with Local offices needs
you to sell product already in high de-
mand - requires minimal training - Great
Summer Job - call 756-9231 for interview.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to distribute
"Student Rate" subscription cards at this
campus. Good income. For application
write to Collegiate Marketing Services
PO Box 1436 Mooresville N.C. 28115.
LOOKING for student or student orga-
nization that would like to earn S100.00
HELP WANTED
to $1000.00 promoting a spring break
packagetoDaytona Bench, FL. Call Man
- Wed 5-9 p.m. (904) 423-4809.
OUTER BANKS largest watersports
center hiring enthusiastic persons for
sailing windsurfing instruction,
powerboat and equipment rentals, re-
taiL North Beach Sailing, Inc. Box 8279,
Duck, N.C. 27949. (919) 261-6262.
SERVICES ()FFERED
���AWESOME SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Bahamas Cruise 6 Days Includes
10 Meals, Great Beaches & Nightlife! $279!
Panama City Beachfront Rooms With
Kitchens $119, Key West Oceanfront
Hotel $249, Daytona Beachfront Rooms
With Kitchens $149, Cancun $459, Ja-
maica $479! Springbreak! 1-800-678-
6386
���AWESOME SPRING BREAK BA-
HAMAS CRUISE $279! Includes 6 days
in Bahamas, 10 meals! Sail from Florida!
Beautiful Beaches, Great Nightlife! Drink-
ing age 18! Springbreak 1-800-678-6386
���FREE DAYTONA SPRING
BREAK Organize only 18 people and
travel free! Stay at the Howard Johnson's
Beachfront from only $149! CALL NOW!
Take A Break Vacations 1-800-328-SAVE
PARTY HOUSES - North Myrtle Beach.
Welcome groups of 4 - 34 people. Group
- Leader discounts. Call Byrtle Beach
Tours 9 - 4 pm (703) 250-2125.
SPRING BREAK '93! Travel to Jamaica,
Cancun and Florida for guaranteed low-
est prices! Call Stui at 757-0313 immedi-
ately to ensure a space!
WANTED: Men and Women to share
in fun, sun - filled weeks in Jamaica,
Cancun and Florida for Spring Break
Reserve your space by calling Stu at 757-
0313.
DONT BE LEFT OUT! Limited space
still available to Jamaica, Cancun and
Florida for Spring Break. Contact Stu at
757-0313 before it's sold out!
�THE BEST FUND-RAISER" It's it
and thafs that. Why ask Why, You never
forget your 1st, It doesn't get any better
than this, It's the right one now, Do the
right thing for your group Call us at 1-
800-932-0528 ext 64.
SNEED CASHS
TUDENT
WAP
hop
rIv-lEPLV ESTATE SHOP
: GIN & RING MAN
BUYING
& SELLING
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Jewelry(goodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
SERVICES ()FFERED
BREAKS
LAST CHANCE!
. VE GOT TO)
f call TODAY!
Ji don't mrr
TO BE STUCK IN
$109
68
81
s129
132
121
9299
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND, TX
5 ana 7 NICHTS
DAYTONA BEACH, FL
S AND 7 NIGHTS
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL
S AND 7 NIGHTS
STEAMBOAT CO
2 5 AND 7 NIGHTS
MUSTANG ISLAND, TX
HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
VAIL BEAVER CREEK, CO
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
PRICES FOR STAY-
NOT PER NIGHT'
T0U FREE INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS
1 BOO 321 5911
SPRING BREAK '93!
LAST CHANCE TO SA VE'J
JAMAICA - $429
CANCUN - $439
FLORIDA - $159
V For The Lowest jk
-r Prices & The Best &J?
F Trips, Call
SUN SPLASH TOURS
1-800-426-7710-
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in just a few days!
Plus a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself!
No cost. No obligation.
1-800-932-0528, ext. 65
Sw
rnif' v SoJmg Voutt Choners
�T tie. Baiamat � tie Ceut E
mwur ownfrimteuatcit
v vktet, tktptrtf itrtr itdr
T tptttitit VHJifrr nU
iSoDw,
1-800-780
4001
OTflmON MM HIKERS
PARTY LIKE GODS
Panama City $139, Key
West $269, Jamaica &
Cancun from $450. Quality
Accomodations, Free Drink
Parties! CallJoe!
ENDLESS SUMMER
TOURS
1 -800-234-7007
LOOKING FOR
PROFESSIONAL
GROWTH
T
As an Army Nurse,
you II be a part of
a highly profession-
al health care sys-
tem in which edu-
cational and career
advancement are
the rule. Find out
more about Army
Nursing opportuni-
ties. See your local
Army Nurse
Pecruiter today.
1-8006627473
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
K ALL YOU CAN RE.
12th Annual
Party!
BREAKS
PRICES FOR STAY-NOT PER NIGHT!
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
5 ana 7 NICHTS
DAYTONA BEACH
5 AND 7 NICHTS
PANAMA CITY BEACH
S AND 7 NICHTS
STEAMBOAT
2 5 AND 7 NICHTS
MUSTANG ISLAND I
PORTARANSAS
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
S AND 7 WONTS
FORTLAUDERDALE
VAILBEAVERCREEK
S AND 7 NIGHTS
TOLL FREE INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS
1-800-321-5911
PERS( )NALS
FREE ADMISSION TO THE HZZ FOR
NIKK1 BREWER'S 21ST BIRTHDAY!
COME CELEBRATE WITH SWEET
MEDICINE AND THEBILTMOREZOO
GANG. FULL MOON, PARTY
TREATS SEE YOU THERE! LOVE,
DANA.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE 1993
Executive officers of Alpha llii: Presi-
Page 5
PERSONALS
dent Kim Parker, Vice President Elizabeth
Clifford, Rush Lori Oates, Frat Ed. Velvet
Belk, Treasurer Lara Williams, Chapter pro-
motions Julie Breazeale, Panhellenic Monica
Sweet, Administrative Assist Betsy Smith, Cor-
responding Sec. Tammi Hakouz, Recording
SecJanetFunderburk,ScholarshipAngieTew,
Social Kristine Anderson, House Manager
Lauren McCutcheon, Philanthropy Kristen
Lott, Activities Shelly Daubenspeck,GAMMA
Jonni Wainwright Good Luck! We know
you 11 do an awesome job. Love, your Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE NEWLY
elected executive officers of ALPHA DELTA
PL President Debbie Garner, Vice President,
Rene Smallwood; Alpha Education, Lara
Baumgarten; Membership Education Vice
President, Kerri Martin; Recording Secretary,
Traci Perry; Treasurer, Susan Heddleston;
Panhellenic Delegate, Laurie Oliphant; Rush,
Margaret Johnston; Executive Officers; Vickie
Edmunds,AnnaZadeits,JelynnKaplin; House,
Pam Leffew; Guard, Amber Dillow; Corre-
sponding Secretary, Catherine Brown; Schol-
arship Dana Jackson; Standards, Connie
Hardee; Chaplain, Nikki lxxxtus; Historian,
Kathy Bedsole; Registrar, Sherry Lang; Social,
Ami Cotter; Spirit, Heather McLaughlin; Phi-
lanthropy, Amber Dillow; Activities, Patricia
Spove;Gins,KelrBakenReporter,AmyScBm;
Information Sheets, Lisa Pittard, Intramurals,
Amy Warren Alumnae, Christie EarL
DELTAZETA WELCOMES our new Pledges!
Stacey Homolka,Candee Blanton, Sarah Duie,
Katie Hassett, Kim Crowder, and Anna Tay-
lor; we are looking forward to you becoming
part of our family! We picked you because
you'respetiaLsogoodluck! Love,TheSisters.
DELTA ZETA proudly congratulates all of
December's new initiates, (now you're one of
us!) Kristen Allen, Jodi-Lyn Antonucci, An-
gela Austin,BrookeBatchelor,ChristieCarver.
Trisia Chappell, Cathy Crooks, Michelle
Draughn, Lori Femer, Amy Gilley, Susan
Gupton, Marshand Hager, Anne Henry, Tina
Hoke, Rebecca Holloman, Vanessa Jones,
Randi Jordan, LonJus-s,Linda Lambert, Bettie
Lupton, Colette Lambardo, Lori Martin,
Allison Misal, Brittany Olson, Anna Porter,
Heater Salter, Pamela Schwertz, Jennifer
Seaford, Laura Tillet, Sheila Townsend, Holly
Walter, Staoey Williams, Leigh Whitehurst,
and Kacey Young! (Whew).
CONGRATULATIONS to the new 1993
Panhellenic executive council: President- Anna
Harrington, Vice President-PheobeDicerson,
Assistant Vke!Jresident-Yetta Robinson, Rush
Director - Lisa Berting, Assistant Rush Direc-
tor - Deana Cale, Treasurer - Jill Auerbach,
Secretary - Niki Loomis, Rho Chi Director -
Louisa M;chael.
CONGRATULATIONS to the 1992
Panhellenic executive council on a job well
done! President - Jean McAleese, Vice Presi-
dent - Fay Jones, Assistant Vice President -
Kati Mulligan, Rush Director - Leigh-Ann
Stewart, Assistant Rush Director - Lori Oates,
Treasurer - Angela Sutton, Secretary - Marie
Hooper, Rho Chi Director - Aimee Otey, Phi-
lanthropy - jeana Judkins, Scholarship - Lisa
Berting, Intramurals - Melissa Toretch,
Gamma - Anna Harrington.
ALPHA OMTCRON PI, ALPHA PHI,
CHI OMEGA: Thanks for your help on
mis springs successful rush. Hope to do
more things this semester. Love Delta Sig.
CHI OMEGA: Had a great time Friday
night. You helped make Bid Night a great
rime. Let's get together again. LoveYa!
Delta Sig.
ZETA TAU ALPHA INFORMAL RUSH
is almost here! Feb. 9, 10,11. Call 757-
1811 or 757-0344 FOR MORE INFO.
PHI KAPPA TAU: Get your Pj's ready
for Friday night, well party down and
do it right! Love, Alpha Phi.
PI KAPPA PHI: We had a GREAT time
at the "No Siesta Phi - Esta Congrats
on your new pledges! Love, Alpha Phi.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: We had a gTeat
time watching the Super Bowl. Hope to
dosomethingagainsoon. Love,PiDelta.
THETA CHI: We enjoyed getting
together with you last night. Lef s do it
again soon! Love, Pi Delta.
ALL FRATERNITIES: Congratulation
on a great rush! Love, Pi Delta.
?SON"ALS
ALPHA DELTA PI: We appreciate your
help during Rush. We hope you en-
joyed the songs. Let's get together again,
soon! Brothers of Phi Kappa PsL
CHI OMEGA: Thank you for your sup-
port with Rush. You were a great help!
We look forward to seeing you again
soon! Phi Kappa Psi.
CHI OMEGA PLEDGES: our support
is there for you. Hang in there! Love.
The Sisters of Chi Omega.
TAU KAPPA EPSILON: Congratula-
tions on all your pledges! We had a
greattimecelebratingyourBid Day party
with you Love, Chi Omega.
CONGRATS to the Alpha Omicron Pi
basketball team on their victory over
Alpha Delta Pi and their perfect record!
Keep it up! Love, your Sisters.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Only 2 more
days! It will definitely be a Rose Ball to
remember!
ANN SELDON: THANKS for all you
have done! You are doing a great job!
Love - your Sigma Sisters.
CONGRATULATION to Georgia
Gloyd and Kelly Sapp on their initia-
tion. WE LOVE YOU! Your Sigma
Sisters.
KAPPA SIGMA: Thanks for the Bid
Night Party - it was a Blast! You are the
greatest pledges. Let's get together again
� soon! Love the Sigmas.
THANK YOU Phi Kappa Tau for a fun
pref party! Our new pledges had a blast;
we think you really impressed them!
(wink! wink!) Love, The Delta Zeta's.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: Congratulation
and Good Luck with your new Pledges!
We had a great time. Love, DEE ZEE.
LADIES - Who do you think is the best
- looking guy on this campus? The war
begins on Monday in front of the Student
Store. Bring your pennies!
SEX! Now that I have your attention, all
SWF who desire interesting correspon-
dence and friendship. Write me HAWK,
PO Box 8663, Greenville 27835.
WARM AND LOVING Female wants
to give healthy Caucasian baby a close
knit family and financial security. Will
help with expenses. Call collect (804)
572-8403 or write PO Box 655, South Bos-
ton, VA 24592.
GREENVILLE - PITT COUNTY
SPECIAL OLYMPICS: There will be a
Track and Field Coaches Training
School on Saturday February 13 from
9am - 4pm for all individuals interested
in volunteering to coach in the following
sports: Swimming, Bowling,
Gymnastics, Roller-skating,
Powerlifting and Volleyball. No
experience is necessary. For more
information call Greg Epperson at 830-
4551.
VOLUNTEERS FOR RESEARCH
STUDY: The Section of Infectious
DiseasesECU School of Medicine in
conjunction with the Student Health
Center is conducting a study on the
sexual spread of herpes viruses. We
are looking for men and women 18
years and older who have never had
genital herpes. If you are interested in
obtaining more information, call Jean
Askew, R.N. at 919-551-2578.
WATER SKI CLUB AND TEAM There
will be a meeting for spring of '93 on
Tuesday Feb 2 and Feb 9 at 9:00 pm in
room 14 at Mendenhall or call Thomas at
758-8215. Beginners welcomed.
GOLDEN KEY NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY Golden Key National Honor
Society will ha ve a meeting on Feb 4th at
3pm in 313 Speight. All members are
encouraged to attend. We will be
discussing the Regional Conference and
the Campus Awareness Campaign. Any
questions, call 756-5381.
HEYCOORS! Whatsgoingon? Nothing
much to say but you know how it goes at
the paper!
EXCEPTIONAL VALUE FOR
SPACIOUS DUPLEXES
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
2 and 3 bedroom duplexes offering
lots of space and convenient locations
close to campus.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
Available March 1st Ideal location, close to
campus with ECU Bus transportation
provided. One and two bedrooms.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
m
�����nnm ������





The East Carolinian
February 4, 1993
Opinion
Page 6
Book buyback policy needs updating
At each side of a semester, the beginning
and the end, students dread the one event that
most, if not all, cannot escape from.
The buying and selling back of textbooks.
Long lines and half the money one paid
for each book await students at the end of the
semester. Even longer lines and stores having
"that last book needed" out of stock for three
weeks is what's in store at the beginning �
bookends of misery and frustration.
Currently, prices for textbooks
are set in stone, no matter the
condition of the book. If 10
different people use the
same book, then it's sold
at the same price as a
book that has been
used by only per-
son. Used books are
sold at three-quarters
of the price if it was new,
and bought back at half price of the
new price.
Trying to buy books can be just as frus-
trating. Unbeknownst to most students, the
prime reason behind books being out of stock
and unavailable lay at the feet of their profes-
sors. The bookstores must wait until they get a
buyback list from each professor. The univer-
sity tries to get all the orders in three to four
months before the semester ends, but each new
semester begins with hundreds of orders inun-
dating the stores.
The stores must then order all the books,
THE BUCK STOPS HERE
forcing students to wait an additional three
weeks into the semester before they can buy
the required books. Communication between
the faculty and the bookstoresneeds to be im-
proved before any signs of life will be seen.
Make it part of a faculty member's job to
get that requisition form in on time. Currently,
faculty are subject to the periodic evaluations
all students fill out in the last third of each
semester. Tenure, salary, number of classes �
all of these are affected by stu-
dent evaluations.
Add availability
of books for the course
on these evaluation forms.
Let the students know
what professors are not
getting their lists in on
time. If you threaten
someone's pocket or wal-
let, chances are that they
will respond a lot quicker
than if you just mouth inef-
fective words to them.
Change the pricing system
given to used books here on campus. If a book
is used 10 times as compared to one, than that
book should be cheaper than the newer one.
Declining prices are necessary for fairness to
the student.
Take a hard-line approach to a problem
that has been plaguing this campus for years.
Make instructors and professors accountable
for delaying the cost and time of our education.
By Gregory Dickens
Juvenile violence on rise, TV seen as cause
By Mike Joseph
'Cultural elite' at war with 'family values'
Hollywood is all smiles. Af-
ter 12 years of Republican moral-
izingand oppression, unrehearsed
glee has suddenly swept across
some of America's most famous
faces. These famous faces (the
Hollywood-New York crowd of
writers, artists, producers and
stars) constitute part of what ex-
vice president Dan Quayle called
"the cultural elite and he railed
against their scorn of "our
country's enduring, basic social
values
Quayle and the "cultural
elite" areon opposite sides of wha t
many scholars see asa culture war
in America - - in education, art,
religion, politics, etc. This could
be interpreted as a war between
traditional morality and indi-
vidual autonomy.
Mary Ann Glendon, a pro-
fessor at Harvard Law School, as-
serts that the big names in Holly-
wood "are geographically mobile
technocrats who get their pres-
tige, power and satisfaction from
work. They tend to mistrust the
judgement of ordinary people
According to University of
Maryland political scientist Will-
iam Galston, "Traditional moral-
ity hasnoprimafacie authority (for
them) because it has to be tested
against the principle of individual
autonomy He adds that "at the
core of their world view is per-
sonalautonomyand self creation
With their daily and nightly
TV visits into America's living
rooms, the "cultural elite" has vast
opportunities to present their
points of view and values to any-
one who will listen.
Are they being heard? Ken-
neth L. Woodward, writing for
Nezvsweek, stated that "many par-
ents are appalled by the any thing-
goes sexuality and violence that
constitutes popularentertainment
in this country, even though they
may watch it themselves Au-
thor Robert Coles said that "the
working class families I've visited
over the last 20 years are for what
Quayle (called) family values,
even if the reality of their own
homes doesn't always live up to
those values
This disparity between the
attitudes of Hollywood and ordi-
nary people was reflected in a 1991
studybytheCenterforMediaand
Public Affairs. For example, the
study found that while 85 percent
of ordinary people polled believed
adultery is wrong, only 49 percent
of Hollywood celebrities believe
itis wrong. Only 4percentof ordi-
nary people have no religious af-
filiation's percent of Hollywood
celebrities have no religiousaffili-
ation. Only 20 percent of Holly-
wood polled believed homosexual
acts are wrong; 76 percent of ord i-
nary people believe homosexual
acts are wrong. Ninety-seven per-
cent of Hollywood is pro-choice
on the abortion issue; 59 percent
of ordinary peopleare pro-choice.
Hollywood is not respon-
sible for thedecline in Dan Quayle-
type "family values but Holly-
wood is smilingtodaybecause the
new administration favors
changes in social policy which are
more accommodating of
Hollywood's values. Will another
study four years from now by the
Center for Media and Public Af-
fairs show that the gap between
ordinary peoples' attitudes and
Hollywood's attitudes has nar-
rowed? If it has, can a social em-
phasison "individual autonomy"
provide the cohesion necessary for
America to retain a positive na-
tional identity?
We will see; in the process,
perhaps we will learn whetherlife
imitates art, or art imitates life.
Nearly 30 years ago, An-
thony Burgess and William
Golding wrote short stories in
which children and teenagers are,
by fateorsociological breakdown,
given free rein. In both "A Clock-
work Orange" and "Lord of the
Flies they devolve from well-
bred, intelligent students into hi-
erarchic, violent creatures with
little or no remorse. Such works
were accepted at the time as dis-
turbing fiction. However, these
works, like those of Jules Verne,
have correctly prophesied present
developments.
In Ypsilanti, Mich two
boys, ages 12 and 14, were ac-
cused of first-degree murder of a
44-year-old cab driver. They al-
legedly robbed and then stabbed
the victim. One's first reaction may
be to laugh involuntarily at the
absurdity of thesituation. Increas-
ingly, though,similarincidentsare
being reported across the nation.
Time magazine reports as
many as 100,000 handguns are
being taken into high schools by
students on a daily basis. Some
urban schools have banned beep-
ers because they areconsidered to
be the accessory of choice by those
who sell drugs in school.
The recent publicity of the
Pamela Smart and Amy Fischer
trials garnered notoriety not only
because the two adults involved
had sex with minors, but also be-
cause those minors later attempted
to kill the spouses of their adult
lovers.
An Oct. 1991 issue of Rolling
Stone reported on the increasing
number of cases filed at the
Children's Institute International
in Los Angeles involving sexual
abuse on children committed by
other children. Cases include a
10-year-old boy accused of mo-
lesting his four-year-old sister.
Two six-year-old twins commit-
ted oral sex on their 18-month-old
brother after having been forced
to do the same to their uncle. An
eight-year-old enlisted his friends
to hold down a classmate while he
attempted to rape her. A six-year-
old sodomized his younger
brother.
FBI statistics report the ar-
rest rate for rape by males under
12 rose 244 percent from 1965 to
1989. It should be assumed that
not all instances were reported nor
were all the cases an indirect re-
sult of sexual abuse upon the at-
t lcker. No matter what the cause,
such violent and extreme behav-
ior is, to say the least, unnatural.
We live in a world that obvi-
ously is much more explicit in its
communication and imagery than
before. Advertising pushes the
limits of network sensitivities
more and more daily. The Top 40
radiostationsareallowing increas-
ingly blatant messages to be re-
peated four times an hour. More
immediate is the effect of tabloid
TV. Hard Copy, A Current Affair
and inside Edition all endeavor to
present, as quickly and with little
editing as possible, the nadir of
human trivia, tragedy and trash
daily in the most graphic repre-
sentation or dramatization pos-
sible on late afternoon program-
ming.
However, these are not the
cause, they are the symptoms.
They are presented and are highly
successful because there is a de-
mand for more than what has been
allowed by censors before. Weask
for it and we are given it. Com-
puter usersare aware of the phrase,
"garbage in, garbage out Suc-
cinctly put, this is what is wrong
with our society.
There are self- or federally
imposed criteria slapped on ev-
erything these days, such as pa-
rental advisories on CDs, ratings
for motion pictures and age re-
strictions on alcohol, handguns
and "adultmaterialThe purpose
of these restrictions was to keep
children away from what may in-
fluence them in damaging ways
or "scar" them.
Theassumption thatbehind-
the-newsstand pomographyalone
creates an attitude of cruelty in
young minds is obsolete. As is the
idea that pom is limited toa purely
sexual context. In reality, pornog-
raphy may be used as a catch-all
phrase for anything that demeans
others, incites violence, encour-
ages emotional detachment from
others' desires and leads to apa-
thy toward others' sensitivities.
The images we see and hear ev-
eryday simply aren't that distant
from that definition.
I don't believe graphicness
is wrong as long as it isn't ex-
ploited to sell beer or some other
unrelated purpose. We are adults
here at ECU (well, most of us at
least act like it) and there is no
need for sugar-coating the media
or trying toimplementcultu rally-
obsolete sensitivities to what of-
ten is unavoidable in the media.
We are capable of interpreting it
and accepting it as responsible
individuals.
However, children are
swamped in flitting images of ran-
dom sex and violence, often with
no explanation given to them. It is
this blind flood of commercial data
that creates stereotypes and often
confuses the young mind with
blanket assumptions, possibly
leading to a macho need to carry
firearmsorassauit people in vary-
ing ways.
Admit it, how many of us
would be comfortable with the
idea of discussing the implications
of Basic Instinct or Amy Fischer
with our parents at age 13? And
how many of us First learned of
sex from Mad or Playboy maga-
zines snuck into junior high?
The instances mentioned
may at first invoke ideas that we
should protect children in today's
society from themselves and their
lack of full comprehension.
On the con t ra ry, we, the new
adults and for whom the media
now targets with its images, must
protect them from us and our lack
of full consideration.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Chomsky to lecture on anarchy, apathv
TotheFHitor- r� u. J
OPERATIOM INJUSTICE
The East Carolinian
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel,
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Secretary
To the Editor:
As a faculty member of the
Student Union Foru m, 1 ha ve been
asked to write informing your
readers of the upcoming Noam
Chomsky lectures.
His agreeing to lecture at
ECU is of particular significance
when one knows that hisonly aca-
demic lectures this year are for
ECU and the University of Cali-
fornia at Berkeley. He will be giv-
ing an afternoon and evening lec-
ture on Feb. 9.
For those wishing to know
more about his afternoon lecture
on "Psycholinguistics I suggest
reading the Nov. 15,1969, issue of
TheNew Yorker in which Chomsky
elegantly debunked the
Skinnerian model for language
learning.
Regarding his evening lec-
ture entitled "Anarchy or Apa-
thy I highly recommend the May
28, 1992, issue of Rolling Stone
which features Chomsky's ideas
on American intervention from
Vietnam to Iraq.
I hope our university will
presentitself admirably for Noam
Chomsky, a professor at MIT who
is considered by many as one of
our country's leading thinkers.
Not since Buckminster Fuller has
our university had such a distin-
guished scholar lecture here.
HalJ. Daniel, III
Professor
Speech Languageand Audi-
tory Pa thology
WZMB offers students chance to be heard
S STSS 522 5 EaSt Car0Hna C3mpUS COmmunity Since '925' information that affects
ureenvuie, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
To the Editor:
WZMB's Listen-Up news
programgivesstudentsavoice.In
today's society, opinions seem to
be the only thing we're not run-
ning out of, but how often do you
think youropinionsare heard? As
both a student and assistant news
director of WZMB (ECU's college
radio station), I also feel the frus-
tration of "not being listened to
With the help of two hosts
and a variety of special guests,
Listen-Up gives different view-
points on a variety of subjects that
affect our changing society. Stu-
dents can participate in the issue
and guest selection by contacting
WZMB and giving us your ideas
on issue you wish to be aired. Is-
sues from "tuition hikes" to "gays
in the military" � let us know
whatyou want to hear about. With
so many of us here at ECU, the
suggestions should be endless.
Contact WZMB directly on
our business line at (919) 757-4751
or drop us a line at: WZMB News
Department, Mendenhall Student
Center, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Many of my fellow class-
mates forget or choose to forget
that they some control over the
life they lead. By using the facili-
ties offered to you by the univer-
sity, such as the newspaper and
the radio station, you can express
yourviewsandchangewhatgoes
on around you. So Listen-Up every
Monday night at 7:30 p.m on
WZMB 913.
Andrew Wharton
Senior
Broadcasting
If

- . -
A'Ki r
r - .1






The East Carolinian
February 4. 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
'Smoke' heralds ECU alumna's return visit
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ECU'S 1992-93 Performing Arts Series
will host the return of that "old time religion"
Feb. 12 in Wright Auditorium, with the pro-
duction of graduateConnie Ray's "Smokeon
the Mountain
The story is a bluegrass-gospel musical
comedy centering on a church congregation
awaiting the arrival of the Sanctified Sanders
Family Singers. Set in the pickle capital of
North Carolina, Mount Pleasant, during the
end of the Great Depression, the play exposes
theaudiencetoafacet of thermal South when
organized religion was at its peak. Guitars,
harmonicas, washboardsand even an ou t-of-
tune piano help the actors celebrate in song,
witnessing and loads of laughter.
Originated by its director Alex Bailey,
Ray wrote "Smoke on the Mountain" in the
shortest time in which she has ever written.
"1 wrote like a banshee for three weeks
Ray said in a telephone inteniew. "Alex
called me up and asked me if I could write a
bluegrass musical comedy.
I'd never before written a musical with
a guaranteed production in i months. Usu-
ally, you go through rewrites, rehearsals and
more rewntes before it ever goes up. I ;e-
wrote j 'Smoke j in rehearsal, and then we
put it on
"Smoke on the Mountain" became an
off-Broadway hitwhen i t ran in New York for
14 months. Its 500 performances, starting in
Mayofl990,madeitthelongestrunningplay
in the history of Lamb's Theatre. "Smoke"
also currently runs in major dries like Chi-
cago, San Frandsco, Atlanta and Ridimond,
Va.
"Smoke" is definitely not the first play
Ray has ever written.
She started at age 10, winning county
and district 4H talent shows. More recently,
Connie Ray exposes a facet of the
South with religion at its peak
Photo courtesy S. Secttor
Ray's "Smoke on the Mountain" will be presented in Wright Auditorium Feb. 12-13. The
play became an off-Broadway hit when it ran in New York for 14 months.
Ray's talents a s a playwright shone when she
wrote, productd and starred in her one-
womanslxvBeteLo-esSrwipbeans After
that, Ray wrote other one-act plays, like "Cat-
fish Loves .Anna" (whidi has played in New
York and Hollywood, Ca.), and a full-length
play, "Vanilla Triplets which has played in
the DenverCenterand Playwright's Horizon
in New York.
When asked if her youth in White Cross,
N.Clmianyeffectonwriting"Smokeonthe
Mountain Ray responded with an enthusi-
astic "yes
"The play was sort of a valentine to my
parents and where I grew up Ray said. "I
wanted to portray Southern people like they
really are, not that they just lay on hay and tell
jokes
"Smoke on the Mountain" will be pro-
duced by the Arkansas Repertory Theatre in
association with Lamb's Theatre. Ticketsare
currently available at the ECU Central Ticket
Office at $20 for adults, $15 for ECU faculty
and staff and $12 for children and ECU stu-
dents. Aspedal matineewill be offered at230
p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 13 in Wright Audito-
rium.
Ticket prices for the matinee will be $15
for adults, $10 for ECU faculty and staffand
$750 for children and ECU students.
As director Alex Bailey puts it, "Smoke
on the Mountain" is a play that "makes us
lookfondlyattheheartachesand triumphsof
our own families
Swirlies, The Lyres
make weird noises
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
It's not that Boston's Swirlies are
entirely unoriginal; neitherare that same
town's Lyres. They don't regurgitate 10-
year-old R.E.M. riffs or don MTV-dic-
tated hippie retro-fashion. At least they
have that going for them. No, the prob-
lem with both acts, and with their latest
releases, is that they're simply boring.
Bland. Unexdting. Almost stultifying in
their unflinching loyalty to their indi-
vidual styles.
Noise is the style chosen by Swirlies.
They feed their guitars through what
sounds like a few dozen distortion ped-
alsandmixingboards,shapingthe buzz-
ing tones that escape into workable
rhythms. On What To Do About Them,
Swirlies create the same kind of sound
walls that Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr.
havemadetheircareerson.Swirliesaren't
necessarily derivative, mind you; they
liketohangtheirnoiseonpophooksabit
more than their influences (although their
malefemale tag-team vocalistsdobring
Sonic Youth strongly to mind).
Swirlies also like to grind their music
down to a tumbling halt every once in a
while, slowing down to a low rumble,
then swinging back up into a higher
groove. This down-shift method creates
a choppy maelstrom of sound thatcan be
quite engaging.
So what's the problem? That's all
they do. Swirlies is a talented band, with
a couple of neat tricks up its collective
sleeve.But they pull off those same tricks
on every song. It would be nice to say
that at least one tune on What To Do
About Than stands out above the rest,
maybe one of those with the neat names
like 'Tall Ships" or "Her Life of Artistic
Freedom But they don't. They sound
just like all the rest, with a cool noise
guitartwistand lyrics justmuddy enough
to be incomprehensible. When a band's
tricks can't even remain interesting over
the course of a seven -song EP, they need
to learn a few more.
The Lyres don't even have tricks to
keep their headsabovewater. Billed asa
1960s Garage-StylePunkband (note that
the phrase "1960s" and "punk" go to-
gether about as well as "oil" and "wa-
ter"), the Lyres' Nobody But Lyr.s EP is
merely a tired retread of some flacdd
1960s pop-rock. Images of the Rascals
and several other mediocre and easily
forgotten acts of the '60s come to mind
when listening to the Lyres. It's sort of
like watchingrerunsof "American Band-
stand except even more ridiculous.
Granted, the Lyres do have energy,
and a nice hard edge that many of today's
alternative bands lack. One look at any
M1V "alternative" broadcast wilt snow
you that. Butthatdoesn'tchange the fact
that they're digging into a musical style
that had its day and died a timely death.
Even the presence of now-dead Punk
legend Stiv Bators (in his last recording)
can't save this one. In fact, Bators' in-
volvement makes it a bit sadder. Stiv
should have gone out on something bet-
See SWIRLIES page 9
Old School brings new sound
"Matinee' combines feai;
comedy for good fun
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
Ifs October, 1962. Cuba is quarantined by the United States from
accepting offensive weapons from Soviet transport ships. The world is
virtually at the brink of World War III. Kennedy and Kruschev have
fingers on the buttons that could launch enough nudear weapons to
destroy everything on the planet Everyone is frozen in panic and aware
thatternsuchas"tomorrc'aixi "bier" are indangerof
As one man declares, "People are scared
Producer Lawrence Woolsey answers, "Exactly! And what better
time to open a new horror movie?"
Woolsey (John Goodman) is in Key West, R, to premiere "Man t a
low-budget monster movie about a half-man, half-ant created by radia-
tion.Afjisthestory'ofWc�lsey'sspiritedopeningamidthenenous-
ness of the Cuban Missile Crisis. Stan Fen ton is Gene, a 12-year-old who
loves monster movies, determined to see "Mant" and learn what he can
from Woolsey. His friend Stan (Omri Katz) is trying to get a date from
Sherrie (Kellie Martin of ABC's "Life Goes On") while avoiding her
jealous boyfriend who seems to be stuck between The Fonz and Jack
Kerouac
Matinee's focus is on the pre-teens growing up and trying to pay
attention to the important things in life (movies, sex, Lenny Bruce's
profanity), but becoming more and more aware of the world and how it
may affect them now. What makes Matinee so lively and far from dull is
"Mant" and Woolsey's showmanship and hype. Goodman is great as
Woolsey, a huckster out for money but who obviously loves to entertain
a crowd in a theater, which he sees as a shrine of vicarious experiences.
'They know we can't hurt 'em, but they're still scared to death he tells
the thea ter's employees. His "Mant" is not only a movie bu t an exercise
in the gimmicks producers actually used to get the audiences involved.
"Atomovision" and "Rumblerama" and electric shocks in the theatre's
seatsare joined with other tricks that would ruin the fun to mention them
here. "Mant" itself is a campy film similar to "The Bride of the Monster"
shown during the Lousy Movie Lock-In in November. The dialogue is
hilarious: "He'snota monster. He'sa shoesalesman "Would you let tliat
fityou ina pump?" Ageneral (Kevin McCarthy from theoriginal�z�SK�
ctteBodySratohers)screamsatagiantant, "Comedown off thatbuilding.
We've got sugar for you
Matinee is a great tribute to the '50s movies that came on Saturday
mornings on independent television stations. It also is a sly study of fear
and how the people of Key West escape that fear by getting scared at a
theater. Director Joe Dante (Gremlins I&II and HBCXs 'Tales From the
Crypt") is perfectly capable of mi;ang fear and comedy. It's obvious he
reveres the 50s sd-fi monster flicks that, as one detractor describes them,
make people think atomic energy is harmless. That it's all right for
mutations to rip the dothes off young women It's sick, cheap thrills for
hop-headed teenagers Which is why all the kids are seeing it. One kid
laughs, "Ifs neat people are gonna throw up
Matinee is engrossing and has a distinct point of view wi thou t being
preachy or stiffly noble. If you sat through the Lousy Movie Lcxk-In ai id
not just for the T-shirt, you'll like Matinee for its wit and sense of fun.
By Matt Mumma
Special to The East Carolinian
Old School is a pleasant mix
of ska, rap and hip-hop. The mix
they paint is lively, danceable
music somehow blended in a
mesh of loud, aggressive, alter-
native college music.
Old School will cure the faint
of heart. They are not like Dillon
Fence, Hootie and the Blowfish
or Mary on the Dash. (These
bands I consider to be unique to
our area.) They are new and, yes,
Ido put them over elaborate com-
pany. For a young band they are
the new Greenvilleflrwir�flnr. if
they can stay together.
Jeff Strother, Old School's tal-
ented drummer, brings rhythm
and beat, a meaning forgotten
since Jack Irons left The Red Hot
Chili Peppers. Dustin Shearon,
lead singer and lyricist, has a
unique voice that every good
band seeks. Like what Robert
Smithbrings to The Cure, Shearon
brings a distinctiveness only he
can muster to Old School.
Joey Balangia plays bass for
the band and Jeremv Smith plays
rhythm guitar. Together, with
Strother on drums, they form a
solid and groovy backbone from
which lead guitarist Jason Hodel
can launch gripping solos.
They sound a little like The
Chili Peppers but not too much.
Shearon sings fast, rapping on
some tunes, and Hoder grinds
funky tunes not heard since The
Ohio Players and Parlament
Funkadel ic played in the late sev-
enties.
ECU student and musician
Dave Gerow Describes Old
School as "funk with a metal edge
See SCHOOL page 9
-$�1 ! K tI� i
S,Vf
PflH7
F i"vxT

The mix
they paint
is lively,
danceable
music
somehow
blended in
a mesh of
loud, ag-
gressive,
alternative
college
music.
Old School: (top
to bottom) Jason
Hodel, Jeff
Strother, Jeremy
Smith, Joey
Balangia, Justin
Shearon.
Photo by Dail Reed
Sneak preview amuses Mendenhall audience
Mr.
Jigsaw
(Tim
Curry) is
a hairy
Wilderness
Girl
determined
to make a
cookie
sale in
"National
Lampoon's
Loaded
Weapon
I
Photo
courtesy
New Line
Cinema
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
Mendenhall's Hendrix The-
atre was packed Monday night
for the sneak preview of National
Lampoon's Loaded Weapon 1. The
new film from New Line Cinema
had been advertised two weeks
in advance and passeshad disap-
pp red within a day. Without a
doubt, students at ECU were
ready for the new movie from
The Touchstone that gave the
Animal House and the Vacation
trilogy. Weapon delivered the
goods.
The send-up of the Lethal
Weapon franchise took shots at 48
Hours, Silence of the Lambs, Die
Hard, Robocop, Basic Instinct,
Wayne's World and commercials.
Emilio Estevez plays Detec-
tive Colt and Samuel L. Jackson
portrays Detective Luger (direct
replicas of Mel Gibson and Danny
Glover's roles) who are trying to
crack the enigma of the Wilder-
ness Girl Murder.
Someone has killed Luger's
former partner, (surprise, it's
Whoppi Goldberg) who was in-
vestigating the Wilderness Girl
Cookie Company. Apparently,
someone is putting cocaine into
the cookies before they are
shipped and sold.
Luger is determined to wrap
up the case and find the mur-
derer but is forced to partner with
burned-out psycho cop Colt.
Written and directed by Ger e
Qu i n ta no (who wrote Police A cad-
emy 3 and 4), Weapon is better-
paced than Quintano's previous
work and is much funnier. The
emphasis is on Airplane! style wit;
fast-paced, relentless and detailed
with sight-gags mixed with
smart-ass one-liners.
A witness helps a police art-
ist construct an image of a sus-
pect on a Mister Potatohead and
later a man with a Potatohead for
See SNEAK page 9





1111 I -
8 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 4, 1993
'Hexed' falls short
of anything good
Details, characters ultimately irrelevant
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
A constant debate occurs be-
tween critics of all media. (And
since all people have an opinion
and hence are critics, the discus-
sion enlarges to include all man-
kind.)
The debate, from a philo-
sophical stance, centers on the
definition of good.
Interestingly, the film stir-
ring this debate is one that this
critic detested, a new movie
called Hexed.
Hexed tells the story of Mat-
thew (Arye Gross), a hotel clerk,
whose only escape from the dull
reality of life is to impersonate
other people.
As the film opens, Matthew
eShters a plush party at the hotel
in which he works dressed in a
white tuxedo. He proceeds to
pawn himself off as a debonair
socialite.
Matthew'sworld gets turned
Ujside down when he connives
a date with the famous model
Hexina (Claudia Christian).
Hexina turns out to be "totally
bonkers
ft
- Matthew intercepts a call for
Hexina in which he learns that
ie is to meet with a stranger.
9ince Hexina does not know what
ft�e man looks like, Matthew pre-
tends to be him.
Only later in the evening, af-
ter Matthew and Hexina have
consummated their deceitful re-
lationship, does Matthew learn
that Hexina is trying to kill the
man whom Matthew is imper-
sonating.
A myriad of characters gets
introduced throughout the story
to unnecessarily complicate a
simplistic plot.
The funniest is a police de-
tective whose hard-boiled antics
poke fun at the entire crime genre
of the '30s and '40s. The detec-
tive, played by R. Lee Ermey, has
cornball lines in every scene.
In one sequence a pistol is
found in Matthew's house. The
detective turns to a police officer
beside him and says in a dead-
pan voice, "Uh-huh good work
that's a gun
This film is the first by Alan
Spencer, who also wrote and di-
rected it. This critic would like to
say that, despite its ineptitude,
the film shows promise but the
statement would be false.
Not one facet of this picture
is admirable.
Hexed is the type of film that
defies criticism. How can thisbla-
tantly awful film even warrant
serious thought?
Yet the serious question
posed by this film still seeks
"What is good?"
Several members of the au-
dience watching Hexed laughed
Photo courtesy Columbia Pictures
Hotel clerks Matthew (Ayre Gross) and Gloria (Adrienne Shelly) get tangled up with a world-famous model
who turns out to be totally bonkers in the comedy thriller, "Hexed a Columbia Pictures release.
out loud. To them some enjoy-
ment was derived from the film.
To these patrons, Hexed might
rate a "good
Harlequin romances provoke
the same type of discussion.
Many people read and enjoy
these books. Are they, therefore,
"good?"
The debate about what con-
stitutes art, i.e. what is "good"
will never end.
The best that can be achieved
is resolution in one's own mind.
Hexed is definitely not good.
That statement voices an opin-
ion, not a definitive assessment.
I disliked Hexed.
The fact that others enjoyed
the film is ultimately irrelevant. I
classify Hexed as trash.
rm still
waiting to
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Carolinian
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FEBRUARY 4, 1993
The East Carolinian
m
iut ����a
Who's There?
Bar schedules here, there and everywhere .
J SNEAK
continued from page 7
Attic
Thursday
Rare Daze
Friday
Trash Gypsy
Saturday
The Stegmonds
Fizz
Saturday
Sweet Medicine
(Free admission for
Nikki's 21st birthday!)
Cat's Cradle
Thursday
Gibb Droll
Friday
Fugazi
Brewery
Saturday
Cry of Love
Corrigans
Thursday
Essence
Saturday
Old Habits
O'Rocks
Friday
Snapperhead
Saturday
Boy Oh Boy
Mugshots
Thursday
Old School
Friday
Mother Nature
Saturday
Roily Grey
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a face is seen in custody.
Colt and two robbers destroy
a convenience store in an over-
the-hilt shoot-out.
Colt's home is the trailer from
Lethal Weapon but when he enters
the door, it's a mansion inside.
A scene satirizing Silence of
the Lambs has a Garfield wind-
shield sticker on the glass parti-
tion of Dr. Leacher's cell.
Colt is obsessed with the loss
of his beloved Claire, his former
.partner who turns out to be a
golden retriever.
Luger's and Colt's car is
blown up when a valet cranks it
up; they hail a taxi and itblows up
as well.
The humor may not be on
par with Woody Allen, or Woody
Harrelson for that matter,but it
works throughout the movie
without getting old.
The best surprise in Weapon is
the casting and the many cameo
appearances.
Everyone apparently not
working that day is in this.
Tim Curry impersonates
Gruber from Die Hard. William
Shatner's role brings to mind
Schwarzenegger's enemy in Com-
mando (jeez,that's been awhile).
Jon Lovitz is on hand to be Joe
Pesci's counterpart. F. Murray
Abraham (Amadeus), Richard
Moll ("Night Court"), Charlie
Sheen, and Denis ("I think I'm
knockin' and I think I'm comin'
in") Learv are present along with
a host of others that would ruin
the plot to reveal.
Except for one: the owner of
the cookie company is played by
Allyce Beasley from "Moonlight-
ing
She starts to flirt with Colt
and when she lets her hair down,
she becomes Sports Illustrated
model Kathy Ireland (who does a
good job with her role and the
black dress she wears).
It's not Gone With the Wind
but it beats the hell out of Hexed,
which was released last weekend.
Loaded Weapon is not only
senseless, it's funny too.
SWIRLIES
ter.
I f anyone cares, the Lyres cover
"We Sell Soul "Here's a Heart
(Stiv'stune)"and "Nobody But Me
The rest, we can only assume are
Lyres' "originals Thrills!
If these are the best acts Boston,
and Taang! Records, can produce
these days, perhaps they should al-
low themselves to gestate a few more
SCHOOL
continued from page 7
years before boring the nation like
theyVedmehere.SvTrliesmighthave
something to show us after a little
more time in the womb; they have the
raw talent to grow into something
good.
The Lyres, on the other hand,
should justbeabortsd now before they
learn how to walkand hurt somebody
with their ham-fisted nostalgia trip.
continued from page 7
and rap overtones
Shearon describes their style
as "psychedelic rap
They cover "Pretty Little
Ditty" by The Chilli Peppers, The
Beastie Boys "Gratitude" and a
refreshing version of "Super
Freak
But the best part of Old
Schools' song list are their origi-
nals.
One with few words but a
funky beat that starts slow and
builds to be truly powerful is
"Jungle Jam "Spread the Word
"Sadie May" and "1.5" each have
their own style and smack of col-
lege life and college music.
One of the better things about
this band is the range of ideas
addressed in their lyrics.
From convicted murderer
Charles Manson to the vices of
Greenville nightlife they apply,
in various ways, to everyone who
likes to go downtown.
Old School will play at
Mugshots tonight.
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i
"7�77Z.
Hey,Action Fans!
Watch for another full Comics Page on Tuesday when a new comic strip,
Guardian by Jeff Grubbs, will make its debut.
Fred's Corner
By Sean Parnell
TH& WVWfc- Vpujje. . WE.
Thought for Peanut Butter Lovers:
Peanut Butter makes your stecker peck up.
-Grandpa Dillon
Rich's Nuthouse
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Moae valuable
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COMIC- BoaKg-
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Fred s Corner
By Sean Parnell
To itr Qoftt-h coMt
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by Manning and Ferguson
UH. MISS? UBCPR�SlpeuT
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�WH
Tlie East Carolinian
February 4, 1993
Sports
Page 11
Lyons' heart remains Pirates' treasure
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Lester Lyons has a tremendous
talenttoplaythegameofbasketball.
Heisthe"go-toguy"onastruggling
East Carolina basketball team. He
leads all Pirate scorers and has al-
ready etched himself firmly in the
Pirate recordbooks.
But Lyons, arguably,could play
on most any basketball team in the
natioaHehasalreadygainedarepu-
tationforbeingthePirates'top threat,
and the focus of opposing defenses.
Heis known throughouttheCAA as
perhaps the best player the league
has to offer.
So why would a tremendous
talent like Lyons choose East Caro-
lina, not exactly a legend in college
basketball? Wouldn't it have been
more beneficial forLyonstoenter an
already established program rather
thanenteringoneinbuildingstages?
The Pirate star said he chose
ECU as Lester Lyons the person, not
solelyasLyonsthebasketball player.
"This (area) is my home and my
roots. I've played in this area for a
long time Lyons said. "It's really
great to have my family around, if s
not too often that they miss a game.
That's the kind of feeling I want to
have, the closeness and everything
Lyons attended Bertie High
School, where he led the Colonial
conference in scoring. Upon his 1990
emergence at ECU Lyons immedi-
ately lethispresence be feltashewas
named theCAA'sRookieof the Year
and started in all 28 games for the
Pirates. As a sophomore, Lyons set
theECUreoaxlfOTthree-pointersand
was a member of the second All-
CAAteam.
This year, however, things are a
bitdinrentforLyons.Heisnolonger
a starter, as lately, Pirate coach Eddie
Payne has set Lyons' role at coming
off the bench. Despite the fact that
Lyons may be ECU's best player, he
seems willing to accept this role.
"Myroleforthisyear,whenIget
in the game,is to try and score and do
things offensively as well as to try to
skvthetemrxdeferisrvelyhesaid.
Lyons is awareofhis leadership
responsibilities and will concentrate
on using his experience to guide the
"My role for
this year,
when I get
in the
game, is to
try and
score and
do things
offensively
as well as to
try to slow
the tempo
defensively
Lester Lyons
11' slings his guns
with his left hand.
Lyons remains the
most lethal
weapon in the
Pirates' arsenal.
younger Pirates.
Tm a junior this year and this
team is young and needs leadership
from someone other than the
seniors J'm not one of the guys who
talks a lot to the team, I try to lead by
example; by doingthingsonfhefloor.
If I want the guys to play real hard
defense I'll go do that on my
manYoungguys tend to thinkabout
things their own way, so you don't
talk to them, you go out and show
them by your example
Lyons said hefeels that thenum-
Photo by Bin Hanson
ber of young players in the Pirate
program has caused the Pirates to
have difficulty in establishing chem-
istry. This lack of chemistry may bea
pivotal reason why the Pirates are 6-
12 for the season. Lyons said the
frustration he and the rest of the team
are feeling is understandable.
"You have to be a little frus-
trated, because you're trying so hard
to do things good and you're not
gettingany reward forit Iknow if we
keep working hard and doing the
things we'redoingandjuststayposi-
tive some of those rewards are going
to come to us
Lyons said he would like to si-
lence critics of his playing ECU bas-
ketball by letting them know he chose
to attend ECU and is happy with his
decision.
"If there is anything out there
about me going anywhere else, that's
on me, because I chose to come to
ECU. I like ECU and I'm very happy
here
See LYONS page 13
Pirates nearly
upset Tide, 59-54
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The East Carolina Pirate
basketball team fell once again
Monday night, this time to
the Crimson Tideof Alabama.
The Pirates were defeated 59-
54 despite the 14-point scor-
ing production of freshman
guard Kareem Richardson
and the strong inside play of
center Dee Copeland.
The Pirates, as in their
other losses of the season,
started thegamestrongbuild-
ing a five-point lead at half-
time, but could not produce a
second-half performance to
win theclose game. TheCrim-
son Tide matched the Pirate
score at 12:00 remaining and
after fighting for the next five
minutes took the lead for good.
Lester Lyons continued his
current scoring slump, as he
collected only nine points com-
ing off the bench.
The Pirates could not con-
tain the scoring of the Tide in-
side players as forward Caffey
and center Moore combined for
30 points and 14 rebounds,
while the Tide guards struck
for 17 from the perimeter. The
ThePiratesseemtobehurt-
ing from the loss of Anton Gill
to an elbow injury. Gill is listed
as hopeful for Saturday's
matchup with James Madison.
East Carolina must quickly
reverse the direction it is head-
ingthisseason tohave any hope
for a winning record.
Baseball almost
in full swing
(SID) � East Carolina's
baseball team opens its 1993
schedule, which includes a full
date of 56 games, on Feb. 12 at
Georgia Southern.
Theseasonopener,athree-
game series with the Eagles, is
the earliest ever for the Pirates.
"Our schedule is withouta
doubt the strongest and most
challenging in recent years at
ECU said ECU Head Coach
GaryOverton. "Our playersare
excited and I think having the
cppcrtunitytoplayalmcstdaily,
will make usa better team
Thel993 schedule features
analwaysdiallengingColonial
AthletKAsscaatwnscheduleas
well as six games with Atlantic
CoastConferencemernbersand
pre-season top 40 picks, North
Carolina and North Carolina
State University.
ECU opens the home season
on Feb. 19, withoneof four games
with UNC The teams will play
again on April 13 and 14 at Five-
County stadium in Zebulon and
then on April 28 in Chapel Hill.
Three teams from the Metro
confererKE,whichhasbeenranked
as the third toughest in the nation,
arealsoon the Pirateschedule. The
Pirates will play at UNC Char-
lotte, Virginia Tech and have a
home and home series with Vir-
giniaCommonwealth. VCUisone
of the three teamsonECU'ssched-
ule that played in 1992's NCAA
tournamentN.CS�ateandGeorge
Washington are the others. East
Carolina has three firsttime oppo-
nents on the 1993 schedule as the
Pirates play Virginia State, Hart-
ford and Coastal Carolina
See SCHEDULE page 12
O'Neal, Jordan heading
East All-Star squadron
NEWYORK(AP)�ShaquilleO'Neal,
the No. 1 draft choice and centerpieceof the
Orlando Magic, today became the first
rookie since 1985 to win election to the
starting lineup in the NBA All-Star game.
O'Neal received 826,767votes, beating
Patrick Ewing of the New York Knicks by
nearly 250,000 votes for the starting center
position on the Eastern Conference All-
Stars. Ewing received 578,368 votes.
Joining O'Neal in the Eastern Confer-
ence starting lineup is guard Michael Jor-
dan of Chicago, wholed all players in votes
for a record seventh straight year with
1,035,824 and was the last rookie to start an
TRANSACTIONS
baseball ThisWeek
American League
KANSAS CITY ROYALS�Agreed to terms
with Mike Macfarlane, catcher, on a one-year
contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES�Agreed to terms
with Neal Heaton, pitcher, on a minor league
contract.
OAKLAND ATHLETICS�Agreed to terms
with Eric Fox, outfielder, on a minor league
contract.
SEATTLE MARLNERS-Agreed to krms
with Henry Cotto. outfielder, on a one-year
contract.
National League
ATLANTABRAVES�Agreed toterms with
Jeff Bkuser, shortstop; Kent Mercker, pitcher;
and Damon BerryhiH, catcher, on one-year
contracts.
CINCINNATI REDS-Agreed to terms with
Randy Milligan, first baseman, on a minor
league contract.
LOS ANGELESDODGERS�Agreed toterms
with Jody Reed, second baseman, on a one-
year contract
All-Star game. The other Eastern starters
are guard Isiah Thomas of Detroit, and
forwards Scottie Pippin of Cuicago and
Liny Johnson of Charlotte.
The Western Conference Stars will
open with Clyde Drexler of Portland and
JohnStocktonofUtahattheguards,Charles
Barkley of Phoenix and Karl Ma lone of
Utah at the forwards and David Robinson
of San Antonio at center.
Drexler was the leading vote-getter
among Western Conference plavers with
823,482.
The NBA All-Star game will be
played Feb. 21 at Salt Lake City.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES�Agreed to
terms with Ricky Jordan, first baseman, on a
one-year contract.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
NBA�Fined Larry Johnson, Charlotte Hor-
nets forward, $3,500, for taking a swing at an
opponentinagamejan.30and Isiah Thomas,
Detroit Pistons guard, $2,000, for failing to
leave Hie court in a timely manner and using
abusive language after being ejected from a
game Jan. 30.
CLEVELANDCAVALTERS�Activatedjohn
Williams, forward, from the injured list.
SACRAMENTO KINGS�Placed Duane
Causwell, center, on the injured list. Signed
Henry James, forward, to a 10-dav contract.
FOOTBALL
National Fcxrtball League
CHICAGO BEARS�Named Tony Wise of-
fensive line coach, Bob Slowik assistant coach
and Ron Turner offensive coordinator.
DALLAS COWBOYS�Reassigned Butch
See TRANSACTIONS page 12
Swimming and
diving teams vie
for CAA titles
By Brent St. Pierre
Staff Writer
It has been over three years since East
Carolina has won the Colonial Athletic
Association swimming and diving cham-
pionships. In that time, the Pirates have
not finished better than third. This year
our swimmers and divers hope to reverse
the trend and capture the CAA title.
The road to any championship is pot-
holed with adversity and the Pirates hit
two, finishing the season 0-2 for the men
and 1-1 for tlie women.
Even though the men and women
have posted the greatest winning record
ever under the tenure of 1 lead Coach Rick
Kobe, a CAA championship banner ap-
pears more difficult to capture than origi-
nally hoped.
Saturday, the Pirates hosted UNC-
Wilmington. This was intended to be a
revenge meet for the Pirates. Revenge,
though, only came for the women. The
women were victorious 145-92. Thewomen
were led by theCAA's top lady swimmer,
senior co-captain Tia Pardue.
"This victory is the sweetest swim-
ming victon- that I've been a part of in the
four years that I have been a swimmer at
ECU. Last year Wilmington humiliated
us. After the meet they danced and sang
and destroyed our spirit. In all my years of
swimming I've never been more upset
after a swim meet. All year we've been
waiting to get them back Pardue said.
Die men, however, s'j fi'ered a late sea-
son blow. After starting the season 10-0
and posting the longest winning streak in
ECU history the men were set back 136-
107. This is the second consecutive loss for
the Pirates this season. The other loss came
at the hands of a powerful North Carolina
squad in Chapel Hill.This lateseason fizzle
though should not have that much of an
1 jMi �� �� JMfc� M
r
uh��

m
W
Photo by Biff Ranson
The swimming anddivingteamsare enjoying oneoftheirmost successful seasons. They
will soon be on tap for the CAA tournament.
adverse effect on the men come conference
championship time.
"Thelossat Chapel Hill wasexpected,
the Tar Heels have one of the top swim-
ming programs in the country. Even
though we lost, ou r swi mmers swa m some
of their best times all year, which is very-
encouraging with CAA's coming up in
two weeks Kobe said.
The lossagainst Wilmington had tobe
somewhat of a surprise though. When the
sea son sta rted, Kobe bel ie ved tha t the wi n -
ner of the CAA Championships would
have to win a horse race between three
schools; James Madison, American and
EastCarolina with Wilmington coming in
fourth. It now appears mat Wilmington
has just as viable a chance of winning the
CAA's as the other three.
With all this doom and gloom it ap-
pears that ECU will not finish better than
third or even fourth in this year's Confer-
ence showdown, right? Perhaps not. Un-
like a Dual meet the Conference meet fea-
tures the talents of every team. This wa-
ters down the scoring.
For example: if Pardue places third
the50-yard freestyleasexpected and the
best finish for a UNC-W swimmer is
14th, ECU will get seven points while
UNC-W receives no points. This is pre-
cisely why ECU has a great chance in
winning the CAA crown. ECU's best
swimmers are better most of the schools
in the CAA.
There is one more reason to believe
in the Pirates' chances: divers. The div-
ing events could be the key, meets are
often won and lost on the board.
In 1987, the Pirates actually defeated
UNC in the swimming portion of their
meet; but lost the meet because their
divers defeated our divers.
Victory on the boards is as impor-
tant as any victory for the swimmers.
ECU Diving Coach John Rose's top divers
are Matt Lawerence and Tara Roland. If
they can place high enough in the diving
portion of the meet, it could well be the
catalyst the Pirate's need to capture the
CAA crown.
The Pirates have two weeks to pre
pare for what could be the finest mo-
ment in ECU swimming history.
The CAA Championships begin Fri -
day, Feb. 17 in Wilmington.
�-�"

mmmmmmmm





12 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 4, 1993
Schedule
continued from pagan EastCarolinaBasebal I � 1993Schedule
Date.
Opponent
Site
Timo
Date
Fn. Feb.12 at Georgia Southern
Sat. Feb.13 at Georgia Southern
Sun. Feb.14 at Georgia Southern
Wed. Feb.l 7 at Campbell
Fri.Feb.19 NORTH CAROLINA
Sat. Feb. 20 UNC GREENSBORO
Sun.Feb.21 UNC CHARLOTTE
Fri. Feb.26 G. V ASH1NGTON
Sat.Feb.27 HOWARD
Sun.Feb.28 HOWARD (DH)
Wed. Mar3 VIRGINIA STATE (DH)
Sat. Mar.6 at Virginia Tech
Sun. Mar.7 at Virginia Tech
Mon. Mar.S ST. AUGUSTINE'S (DH)
Wed. Mar. 10 at N.C. State
Sat.Mar.13 JMU(DH)
Sun. Mar.14 JMU
Tue. Mar. 16 HARTFORD
Wed.Mar.l7MARlST
Thu. Mar.18 MARIST
Sat.Mar.20 atUNC-W(DH)
Sun. Mar21 at UNC-W
Wed.Mar.24atVCU
Fri. Mar. 26 ERSKINE COLLEGE
Statesboro, GA 4
Statesboro, G A 1
Statesboro, G A 1
Buies Creek, NC2
Greenville, NC 3
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Blacksburg, VA
Blacksburg, V A
Greenville, NC
Raleigh, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Greenville, NC
Wilmington, NC 1
Wilmington, NCI
Richmond, VA 4
Greenville, NC 3
Opponent
Site
Time
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
Sat. Mar.27 ERSKINE COLLEGE (DH)
Wed.Mar.31CAMTBELL
Sat. Apr.3 at Old Dominion (DH)
Sun. Apr.4 at Old Dominion
Tue. Apr.6 at Campbell
Wed. Apr.7 Kinstonlndians(Exhibition)
Thu.Apr.8 at UNC Greensboro
Sat.Apr.10 RICHMOND (DH)
Sun.Apr.ll RICHMOND
Tue. Apr.13 North Carolina
Wed. Apr.14 North Carolina
Sat. Apr.17 at William & Mary (DH)
Sun. Apr.18 at William & Mary
Tue. Apr.20 CAMTBELL
Greenville, NC 3 p.m.
Greenville, NC 3 p.m.
Norfolk, V A 1p.m.
Norfolk, V A 1:30 p.m.
Buies Creek, NC 3 p.m.
Kinston, NC 7:30 p .m.
Greensboro, NC 6 p.m.
Greenville, NC 2 p.m.
Greenville, NC 2 p.m.
Zebulon, NC 7 p.m.
Zebulon, NC 7 p.m.
WTmsburg, VA 1 p.m.
WTmsburg,VA 1 p.m.
Greenville, NC 7 p.m.
Wed. Apr.21 VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH Greenville, NC 7 p.m.
Sat. Apr.24 GEORGE MASON (DH)�
Sun.Apr.25 GEORGE MASON
Wed. Apr.28 at North Carolina
Sat. May 1 at UNC Charlotte
Sun. May 2 CO. OF CHARLESTON (DH)
Tue. May 4 N.C. STATE
Sat. May 8 N.C.WESLEYAN
Wed-Sat. Mar. 19-22 C A A Tournament
Greenville, NC 2 p.m.
Greenville, NC 2 p.m.
Chapel Hill, NC 3 p.m.
Charlotte, NC 1 p.m.
Greenville, NC 2 p.m.
Greenville, NC 7 p.m.
Greenville, NC 7 p.m.
Wilmington, NCTBA
CAPS home games (DH) Doubleheader CAA Games
TRANS
Continued from page 11
Davis, line coach, tv) defensive coordi-
nator. Announced Norv Turner will
remain o offensive coordinator and
named him assistant coach. Named
Hudson Houth offensive line OOACh
DETROIT LIONS�Named Hank
Bullough defensive coordinator.
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS�Named
Alex Gibbs offensive line coach.
NEW YORK GIANTS�Named Earl
Leggett defensive line coach, Zaven
Yaraliandefensivebacksooachand Al
Miller strength coach.
PHILADELFHIA EAGLES-Signed
Bud Carson, defensive coordinator, to
a two-year contract
HOCKEY
NEW YORK RANGERS�Recalled
Peter Andersson, defenseman, from
Bingliamtonof the American Hockey
League. Sent Fer Djoos, defenseman,
toBinghamton.
PHILADELPHIA FLYERS�Ac-
quired Bob Wilkie, defenseman, from
the Detroit Red Wings for future con-
siderations and assigned him to
HersheyoftheAHL.
QUEBEC NORD1QUESSent Bill
Lindsay, forward, to Halifax of the
AHL. '
TORONTOMAPLE LEAFS�Traded
Grant Fuhr, goaltender, and a condi-
tional draft pick in 1995, to the Buffali I
Sabres for Dae. And rvydiuk.leftvving;
Daren Puppa, goaltender,and a first-
round draff pick in 19SG.
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The University Media Board
seeks Editors and General Managers
The University Media Board is seeking full-time students
interested in serving in the following stipended posts
for the 1993-1994 academic year:
GENERAL MANAGER
Expressions minority students magazine ($175month)
EDITOR
The Rebel fine arts magazine ($175month)
GENERAL MANAGER
The East Carolinian student newspaper
(estimated 1992-1993 stipend $4,700)
GENERAL MANAGER
WZMB student radio station ($200month)
DAY STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
to the Media Board (no stipend)
All applicants should have at least a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Monday, February 8
Athletic
714 Plaza Mall
355-0500
Hours: Mon-Sat 10-9
Sun 1-6
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East Mall
756-7550
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FEBRUARY 4. 1993
The East Carolinian
13
SuperBowlfollow-up
Bills tempt fate and feel the pain
LYONS
Continued from page 11
PASADENA, Calif. (AP) �
Fate plays favorites. It kisses some
teams like long-lost relatives and
slapsothers like rent-a-mules. The
Buffalo Bills don't just tempt fate
to beat them, they insist on it.
"There's something about
this team wide receiver Andre
Reed said, "that's a mystery
Maybe so. But there's no mys-
tery about this: Three strikes are
enough. It's time to move the Bills
out of harm's way.
Perhaps to the NFC, where
they'll never get this far again. Or
to the CFL, where they can muck
up some other nation's' 'ultimate"
game. Or even to IBM, where they
won't be heard from for a long,
long time.
Frankly, it doesn't matter
where � just so long as it's O-U-
T of the Super Bowl.
They will not, cannot be al-
lowed back. No way. Not for the
rest of thedecadeatleast.lt would
be too soon, too cruel, too cold,
too painful. If not for their sake,
then for the rest of us.
We are just now forget-
ting the Denver Broncos and Min-
nesota Vikings, inglorious losers
of four Super Bowl each. Neither,
however, managed to lose three
in a row. And sad to say, by ex-
panding margins.
The first time, against
New York, the Bills came up only
one point short. Last year, against
Washington, it was 13 points and
not as close as the score suggested.
This time, it was 35 points and
only the clock showed them any
mercy.
"The word 'destiny' kind
of floated around and I thought
this team was destined to win
this game Bills wide receiver
Don Beebe said. "Then the way
we lost was very disheartening
Not exactly. "Dishearten-
ing" was what happened to the
Bills in the first of their three con-
secutive Super Bowl visits. And
maybe "demoraliz-
ing" fits the second.
But nothing short of
"demolished" fits
whathappened toBuf-
falo on this particular
Sunday.
Maybe it didn't
have to be this way.
Maybe, when the Bills
were poised 1-yard from the goal
line and trailed the Dallas Cow-
boys by only 14-7 a minute into
the second quarter, they do the
smart thing and everything that
happensafterward,happensdif-
ferently.
Maybe Buffalo quarterback
Jim Kelly eats the ball instead of
running for his life to the right
and trying to throw back to his
left through a crowd of white-
shirted defenders. Then maybe
we don't have to sit through a 52-
17 laugher.
When Buffalo running back
Thurman Thomas was asked
whether he was surprised by the
call from coach Marv Levy that
led to Kelly's throwing the mo-
mentum-shifting interception, he
replied candidly.
"Actually Thomas said, "I
was. A lot of players were. But
youcan'tquestion the call. Marv
sent it in because he thought it
would work. It didn't
But it wasn't just one bad
decision. It was an epidemic.
We should be fair about this.
The Cowboys are an exceptional
team, very possibly a dynasty in
the making. Brutal on defense,
willing to grind out yards the
toughest way imaginable, they
are worthy of the mantle of NFC
champion.
And of the tradition that has
seen them and their conference
brethren win the last nine Super
Bowls and 10 of the past 12.
They are swift, strong and
hungry, qualities that the Bills
almost certainly share. There's
"There's something
about this team that's
a mystery'
Andre Reed,
wide receiver
no way a team gets to three Super
Bowls without them.
But these Cowboys, for their
lack of experience, are already
one thing that the Bills may never
be: Smart.
Lyons sa id Magic Johnson shares
billing with his motherashisbiggest
inspiration, bo tin onand off the court.
"Magic is great, even though
he's come up with the AIDS virus
he's still working. He's not going to
quit, just likewe'rehere in thisslump
and we're not going to quit. I'm hot
quitting
Lyons said that two women in
his life have helped him mold into
the person he is, his mother and his
grandmother.
Lyons said his grandmother is
responsibleforhisspiritual upbring-
ing and is grateful that she and his
mother have instilled the discipline
to resist many of the temptations that
college life presents.
"If you've got the right back-
ground its not hard to resist thealco-
hol and other things that can steer
you the wrong way
Lyons hopes to finish a degree in
construction managementand upon
grad uation wishes toen ter that field.
"I just want people to know that
I work in other places than just in
here as he stares into the Minges
Coliseum lights. "I want people to
know that I'm trying to do more for
myself than just basketball
Sports writers' meeting today
@ 5:37 in Student Pub.
Building. Mi))3G Jo hin Bn
will be the guest speaker on
the press' role in reporting
AIDS cases involving
celebrities. Mayb�.
Please be on time.
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EAST GAROUNA UNIVERSITY
Here's what ECU
students are saying
about the hottest
new leisure sport on
campus. .
"It's a physically
challenging
experience but,
LOADS of fun
Dionne Evans, Junior
Major: Physical
Education
"The only thing
I ever climbed
were Jungle
Bars! I'm
looking forward
to my first climb
"on the tower
February 9
Mike Williams, Senior
Leisure Systems
Studies
The Climbing Tower will offer
Climb I workshops on the
following dates this spring:
February 9
February 18
March 18
March 24
April 7
Climbing I Workshops are
designed for !eginners. These
sessions teach basic techniques,
equipment fundamentals, voice
commands and give
participants the opportunity to
CLIMB ON US
Drop-in Supervised climbing is
available for persons
successfully completing
Climbing I Workshops.
Participants may purchase a day
or semester pass and climb
Wednesday & Friday from
3:00-5:0()pm or Sunday from
1:00 1:00pm
For more information regarding
The Hard ROC Tower, contact
Brian Miller, ECU Recreational
Services at 757-6387
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ARE YOU READY TO
CHOOSE?
� � �
The disease of AIDS has reached epidemic proportions; researchers and experts state that within this generation every person in the country will know at least one person who has All )S The implications of this prediction
are staggering; AIDS is not just something a person can disregard. This disease has brought the issue of safer sex to the forefront of our society, forcing people to think about subjects that otherwise they would drop as
uncomfortable.
T)e purpose ofthis four-part safer sex campaign is simply put � to save lives. The East Carolinian is not in any way promoting sex; what we are promoting is trcrystuJeiits knowledge of their choice behveen abstinence
and safer sex. Only through information, knowledge and common sense can a person make this choice, one of the most important decisions heshe will make in hisher life.
Tle first of these ads promotes the responsibility of consenting adults to make a choice in their relationship. A couple can choose to have sex with a condom, have sex without a condom or abstain from sex entirely. If
a couple choose to have sex, the AIDS epidemic has made it a necessity to use a condom. Tlie ways and methods a person can have safer sex are numerous, yet need to be addressed each in their own right. The first question
that needs to be answered, however, is not how to use or choose a condom, but are you ready for the actual physical act and the emotional ties it entails.
f&lliSjCLKA Li �4111. I x dUvy-Vy, 1a11L.J
choose (chooz) v 1. to select from a number of
possible alternatives. 2. to prefer or decide.
THE ALTERNATIVES:
A. Sex with a condom
B. Sex without a condom
C. Abstinence
When in doubt choose "C"
If you chose "4" or "8" - look for
hrr
ry 16th edition of
Mst Carolinian
ARE YOU READY FOR THIS?
AIDS has become what some have termed the "Black
Plague" of the 1980s and 1990s. The amount of deaths
of AIDS victims or people dying of AIDS related complexes
(ARCs) steadily grows with each passing month. No
longer can this disease be regulated to one particular
group of individuals; cases have been reported from
every demographic segment of the population.
AIDS does not discriminate. The disease can happen
anywhere, any time, to anyone. Race and gender have
no impact on the disease, the only prevention to AIDS
is common sense and knowledge. Through health centers
and services, a person can receive the true facts behind
this disease � not rumors and speculation.
T Fact: Latex condoms are not 100 percent effective
against the AIDS virus. They only lessen the risk of HIV
transmission.
T Fact: The HIV antibody has been documented
through several routes: contact with semen, vaginal
fluids and blood; anal or vaginal intercourse; transfer
from mother to child, including breast milk; and oral-
genital sex.
T Fact: When tested, a negative result does not mean
that the person does not have HIV antibodies. It means
that, at the time of testing, the person was not infected or
the antibodies were too low to be detected. Antibodies
may take from three months to as much as one year to
develop.
? Fact: After being diagnosed as HIV positive (which
means that HIV antibodies are present), a person may or
may not get AIDS. No test is currently available to
determine who will achieve full-blown AIDS status after
being diagnosed as HIV positive.
The issue of AIDS has brought up the much more
general issue of safer sex. If a person decides to have sex
with hisher partner, heshe assumesthe responsibilities
and risks that go along with this choice. By learning the
facts, a person can be comfortable knowing that heshe
has made an informed and educated decision.
ARE YOU READY FOR SEX?
Condoms, AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases
� three topics whose risks have received a great deal
of attention by the media lately. What has been
ignored,
however, is
possibly the
most important
question to be
posed when
talking about
sex � are you
ready for sexual
intercourse?
No black and
white answers
exist for this
question; en-
gaging in sex is
a personal and
individual
choice between
consenting
adults. People
base this choice
on a complex
and often con-
fusing mix of
knowledge, atti-
tudes, values,
beliefs and be-
havior. But, of-
ten, this decision is made without preparing oneself
emotionally for the relationship that is ready for
sex.
Though no one set of questions can totally cover
the range of questions and issues when trying to
determine if a relati ,nship is ready for sex, some
have been developed by experts.
1. Do you have feelings of guilt?
2. Are you uncomfortable with the current level of
involvement?
3. Are you confident you will not be humiliated or that
your reputation will not be hurt?
4. Is your partner pressuring you?
5. Can you and your partner discuss the potential for
STD's?
6. Can you and your partner agree on a method of
contraception?
7. Can you and your partner share responsibility and
cost of contraception?
8. Can you and your partner agree on what you would
do if pregnancy occurred?
9. Are you having sex to revitalize and improve a
relationship?
10. Are you trying to prove your love?
increase your self worth?
prove you are mature?
If you answered "yes" to either questions 1, 2, 4, 9 or 10 �
partners should consider postponing intercourse.
If you answered "no" to either questions 3, 5, 6, 7 or 8 �
partners should consider postponing intercourse.
Note: The above questions are meant solely as guidelines. The purpose of this questionnaire Is to serve as a
reference lor making a decision regarding sei. Choosing to abstain or to have Intercourse arc personal decisions that
deserve more thought than answering a few questions. Again, this Is not a tool bv which a decision should be based.
ARE YOU READY TO CHOOSE?
A person must have all the facts at their disposal
before heshe can make an : nportant decision such as
sharing an intimate act like sexual intercourse. Without
being informed and
knowledgeable, a person runs
the great risk of being placed
in a situation that heshe
cannot handle.
Being comfortable is the
rule here. Through open and
honest communication with
a partner, discussing even
those topics that might be
embarrassing to talk about, a
couple can reduce the
unknown factor when it
comes to sex. Knowledge is
the key to freeing our society
from being doomed to repeat
its past mistakes.
Take whatever time is
necessary to make a decision
that feels comfortable.
Understand the risks that are
being taken if one does decide
to have sex. AIDS is not a
lightly dismissed issue � it's
lethal. Use the means
available in order to fully
protect oneself from any
contraction of AIDS or other
STDs.
Knowledge.
TEducation.
These are the three keys with which to have a safe and
happy lifestyle. Without one, the other two are useless.
The potential tor risk � and death � is just too great not
to take the time.
T Information.





Title
The East Carolinian, February 4, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 04, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.920
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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