The East Carolinian, February 02, 1993






f I
MHKM&aMMWHiilHn
Hard ROC in G'ville?
pie Recreation Outdoor Center will reopen
Is Hard ROC climbing tower for the Spring
Semester Wednesday.
See story pg. 9
Lifestyle
Cyclists against AIDS
Organizers are gearing up for the eighth
annual Bike Aid trek to benefit AIDS
research and raise awareness of the
disease, see story pg. 7
Today
Mostly
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 7
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, February 2,1993
10 Pages
RMH benefits from Pika
By Sharon Anderson
Staff Writer
The Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity and
the Greenville Ronald McDonald
House sponsored a "Walk to
Wilmington" on Friday, and raised
$5,500 to help critically ill children who
must stay at the RMH while receiving
treatment at Greenville's University
Medical Center.
Many fraternity brothers started
walking in front of the student store at
12:30 p.m and arrived in Wilmington
at 6 a.m. Saturday morning.
They walked in two shifts, with
the second shift starting in Keansville
and continuing on to Wilmington.
"We wanted to think of some
project that no one else had ever done
before said Brian Hannon, president
of the fraternity. "We wanted to have a
catch
The Pikas "Run to Raleigh" dur-
ing football season ended since East
Carolina no longer plays North Caro-
lina State University. Now the frater-
nity focuses on the basketball rivalgy
with Wilmington. Hannon said the
brothers wanted the event to still in-
volve sports.
The Pikas volunteer at the RMH
every other week. Stephanie Roberson,
public relations director of the RMH,
said that they do a lot of the household
maintenance at the house.
Roberson described the RMH as a
"home away from home for the fami-
lies of children visiting the medical
center The house serves approxi-
mately 850 families each year.
According to Roberson it takes
New Health Services director
hopes for change, progress
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
�. � . i � - . , Photo by Jason Bosch
Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity members gathered with university officials in front of the
Wright Building before the start of their Walk to Wilmington.
over $200,000 a year to keep the house
in operation, and 82 percent of the
money comes from donations and
projects such as the "Walk to
Wilmington
Last year the Pikas raise just over
$4,000 during the walk. Roberson said
the only trouble they had was getting
stopped by the highway patrol because
they were not informed about the event.
Each brother in the fraternity had
to collect $100 to participate in the walk.
Brothers who participate in the
walk get to go to their formal for free.
The University of North Carolina at
Wilmington donated 35 free basketball
tickets to the fraternity, and
McDonald's in Wilmington gave the
second shift a free breakfast.
Mike Douglas, treasurer of the
Pika's, said, "The hardest part is get-
ting everything together. The walking
is the fun part
The fraternity donated $500 of
their own money, as well as collecting
donations for the walk.
Douglas said other difficulties
include getting the permits from the
campus and local police, as well as get-
ting the food and drinks together and
informing the newspapers and radio
stations.
ECU's Health Services has changed
changed considerably over the years.
Twenty-six years ago, the service was open
day and night.
"Back then we didn't even have a
physician said Kay VanNortwick, direc-
tor of health services. "We had nurses on
staff and we were open 24 hours a day.
Back then, a nurse lived here and students
would come and ring the doorbell. She
would get out of bed to find out what was
wrong with them
VanNortwick originally joined
health services 26 years ago after graduat-
ing from ECU with a degree in business. It
was her first job.
"Since I've been here so long, I feel
like we're going in a great direction and I
want to keep moving VanNortwick said.
In September, VanNortwick was ap-
pointed director of health services. Before
her appointment, VanNortwick served as
associate administrative director.
ECU is also conducting a search for a
clinical director. Currently the position is
being shared by Dr. John Siegiel and Dr.
Jolene Jemigan.
The department is expanding upon
health education.
"Health education is one of our big
thrusts VanNortwick said. "Wewantstu-
dents to learn to look after themselves, to
be able to tell when they need to go to the
See HEALTH page 4
Chancellor addresses SGA
about student concerns
By Sharon Anderson
Staff Writer
Chancellor Richard Eakin addressed
the Student Government Association Mon-
dayona possibleaddition to Joyner Library
and a proposed tuition increase.
Chancellor Eakin said a bond referen-
dum of $300 million must be passed before
renovations on Joyner Library can begin.
Other projects include the purchase of the
building that used to be Rose High School.
The possible increase in tuition is be-
ing reviewed by the State General Assem-
bly. "The General Assembly must seek new
revenueand economize Eakin said. "State
employees want a wage increase, and there
are also Medicare and Welfare programs to
consider
He continued by saying that no one
wants tuition to go up, however; North
Carolina has one of the lowest tuition prices
in the country.
The current drop-add policy is also
being considered for revision for the 1993
fall semester. Thedrop period will beshort-
ened to seven days, and each student will be
allowed only four drops outside of this
period.
The SGA also discussed with Eakin
See SGA page 4
After being
shut down
for two years,
The
Buccaneer
may soon be
reinstituted
by the
university
Media Board.
File Photo
Board considers video, print yearixx
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
The Media Board is currently
debating whether or not to reinstate
the Buccaneer yearbook, to work in
conj unction with the fledgling video
yearbook.
In 1992, the Media Board de-
cided that there was not enough in-
terest in the print yearbook by the
students. Individuals on the Board
wanted both a video and print year-
book, but money was lacking for
both ventures. The Board decided
that they would begin a program
where the video year book would be
produced as a sole undertaking.
The Media Board provided
$50,000 for equipment to the com-
municationdepartment,onthestipu-
lation that they institute a five-year
program toproduceECU'sfirstvideo
yearbook.
Students would take a class
where they would learn, hands-on,
howtooperate video equipmentand
produce a video tape commemorat-
ing theyear's events on and off cam-
pus.
Last Thursday, the Board met
to discuss the possible reinstitution
of the Buccaneer under an entirely
new management system. "Weneed
to totally rethink the entire structure
of the yearbook Terri Avery, Me-
dia Board chairperson, said.
When asked why she felt that
the Buccaneer needed to be rein-
stated, Courtney Jones, SGA presi-
dent, gave a number of reasons.
'The Buccaneer is an ECU tra-
dition Jones said. "It's something
which all students will value either
now or later in life.
"Basically, I think it's embar-
rassing that we do not have a year-
book when our school is so large and
resourceful. If we plan it well, and
follow through on how we manage
it, it could be both popular and suc-
cessful
Problems that previous Buc-
caneer staffs encountered were apa-
thy on the part of students and stu-
dent staff quitting halfway through
the production schedule. Solutions
proposed to the Board indudea staff
member whose sole responsibility
would be the yearbook and its dead-
lines, either on a part-time or full-
time basis.
Jones contacted various
schools and institutions around
North Carolina as to how their year-
books wererun. Inher opinion, Wake
Forest's yearbook was the best run.
"They have a total student
staff Jones said. "Financed by stu-
dent fees, the yearbook has a con-
tract with Yearbook Press in Geor-
gia. This organization sells ads for
theyearlxxk,paystheyearbook$300
a page, gets the yearbook ready to
print and takes it to the publisher
The previous Buccaneer had a
similar arrangement with its pub-
lisher, but it didn't cover the ex-
penses incurred. The issue of ex-
penses arose again when discussion
of the cost of hiring an outside indi-
vidual came up and where that
money would come from.
On a rough estimate, the fig-
ure of $20,000 a year as a base salary
was given at the meeting. $5,000 of
this would be to cover the
individual's benefits, like social se-
curity and Medicare. "We wouldn't
be able to allocate nearly enough
money this year Avery said.
Another idea proposed by the
Board was the establishment of a
class by the artdepartmentwhereby
they oversee the yearbook project a s
aclass.Students would receivecredit
for working on the book, paralleling
the current video production class.
Proponents said that this would join
the communication major and the
art communication field in a way
rarely seen on this campus.
The Board also proposed mat
a graduate assistant be assigned to
head up the yearbook as editor.
Campus food
prices don't
matchup
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ECU's snack-and-grabs,
like The Wright Place and
Mendenhall Snack Shop, can't
hold a candle in price compari-
sons to convenience stores like
The Pantry.
When comparing the three
establishments, a person can
shop competitively only in the
snack and drink areas. On an
overall basis, The Pantry comes
out cheaper, with a marked dif-
ference in drinks over snacks
(such as chips or candy.)
� A 16 oz non-refundable
soda at The Wright Place will
cost you .74c, while the same
drink will cost you .49 at The
Pantry.
� Clearly Canadian bottled
water runs $1.09 at The Wright
Place, .99� at The Pantry.
� Gatorade will cost a per-
son $1.09 at Mendenhall Snack
Shop, .99� at The Pantry.
� Chips and pints of milk
run the same at both places, .69c
and .79c respectively; with
candy running from .5055c
from The Wright Place and .65-
.99c at The Pantry.
� Coffee at Mendenhall
Student Store will cost .50c for
12 oz. and .69c for 16 oz The
Pantry charges .59c for 12 oz.
and .69c for 16 oz.
�Thebiggestdifferencebe-
tween the two stores comes in
the sale of hot dogs. Mendenhall
Snack Shop charges $1.45 for
each hot dog, while The Pantry
currently has a deal going for
four hot dogs for $1.
Frank Salamon, director of
dining services, said that there
"I don't compete dollar for
dollar, but more in a gen-
eral sense of food'
Photo by Oail Reed
This student takes time out of his busy schedule to buy a snack at a local
convenience store.
is no com-
parison be-
tween the
two.
"There's
no way for
me to compete on any specific
item, but convenience stores
can't offer what I offer
Salamon said. "1 don't compete
dollar for dollar, but more in a
genera! sense of food
The dining services on
campus do offer more lunch and
dinner oriented items than The
Pantry. Offers at The Wright
Frank Salmon,
director of dining services
Place and Mendenhall Snack
Shop include salads, pizza and
sandwiches. Salad prices range
from $2.09 to $3.49, pizza can
cost a person from $5.99 to $7.50
for a whole pizza (SI.10 a slice)
See PRICES page 4
m





2 The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 2, 1993
Averted oil spill serves as a warning
Student firefighters save lives
Colin Airman's social life at Antioch University in Yellow
Springs, Ohio, revolves around four women and six other men,
a fire truck and an ambulance. Al tman and his fellow students are
all firefighters and work in what is thought to be the only student-
operated campus fire department in the United States. The
history of the fire department goes back to the late 1880s, when
a student bucket brigade put out a fire at a women's dormitory.
The student fire department was officially organized in 1936 and
served as the only fire department in Yellow Springs until 1946.
The department averages about 300 calls a year on campus, and
the firefighters go to all township calls. Airman said most of the
calls turn out to be false alarms, and about 60 percent of the calls
are for the ambulance for events ranging from serious car acci-
dents to a drunken student falling down stairs.
School spirit resolution creates flap
Student leaders, in an attempt to boost school spirit at the
University of Houston, wrotea resolution banning students from
wearing rival Southwest Conference colors. It wasn't a serious
proposal, but the reaction from some students was real enough.
The proposal said that students caught wearing "paraphernalia"
from any other Southwest Conference school would be issued a
violation and would have to do five hours of community service
on campus and write a two-page typed report to give to the Dean
of Students on the history and traditions of the university. The
Student Association did not take any action on the proposal, but
its introduction caused a minor uproar. One student told the
campus newspaper that having to do service "would take away
necessary study time Another, who transferred form the Uni-
versity of Texas-Austin, said it was her choice to wear whatever
sweatshirt or T-shirt she wanted to, and to advertise whatever
school she wanted.
Louisiana to merge university systems
In spite of objections by Louisiana's historically black uni-
versities, the state must merge its university systems to eliminate
segregation, a federal judge ruled. In order to create the best
educational environment for African-Americans, the schools
argued that they should remain separate, although they needed
increased funding to compensate for decades of discrimination.
JS. District Judge Charles Schwartz also ordered an end to
Louisiana's tradition of accepting anyone with a high school
diploma into a state university. He ordered the top universities
to set up admissions standards and to drop remedial classes.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
GREENSBORO(AP)�Aclose
call with a drifting freighter full of
400,000 gallons of oil and diesel fuel
should provide a warning about the
dangers of allowing offshore drilling,
an environmentalist says.
"The lesson here is that the wa-
tersoffthecoast of North Carolina are
treacherous; they're stormy said
Tom Bean, director of governmental
affairs for the North Carolina Wildlife
Federation.
"Anything thatyou do, whether
it's offshore drilling or tanker traffic,
has to take place with that as a major
consideration
Environmentalists and state of-
ficials are reviewing last week's inci-
dent. The state's resort and fishing
industries dodged a bullet that might
not miss next time, environmentalists
told the News & Record of Greens-
boro.
The incident began Tuesday
when the unmanned freighter Lyra,
pulled by a tugboat, broke free of its
towlines and was set adrift without
power in extremely rough weather.
Officials feared itwould runaground
and spill its fuel, possibly fouling
beaches and other coastal areas.
Meanwhile, state officials are
pleased with an emergency-response
plan that worked perfectly.
The state Division of Emer-
gency Management set up a crisis
center in Raleigh ready to quickly
dispatch cleanup crews and equip-
ment if a spill appeared imminent
The Coast Guard helped the Lyra's
owners get aboard the ship in high
seas and, after several hours of diffi-
culty, succeed in anchoring the 600-
foot ship, averting danger.
Thestate's plan gives the Coast
Guard the job of preventing a spill
but, if one occurs, shifts responsibil-
ity for its cleanup to state Emergency
Management and environmental of-
ficials.
Renee Hoffman, Emergency
Management spokesman, said the
Lyra was a good dry run.
"It scared the heck out of us,
but it never really escalated to the
point the state had to do anything
she said.
Oceanographers and other
marine experts say unique features
of theLyra incident madeitless threat-
ening than it appeared.
The v ery storm that created the
crisis prob ibly would have solved
the problem even if the freighter
spilled its fuel, said Lawrence B.
Cahoon, an oceanographer at the
University of North Carolina at
Wilmington.
"I would bet that under the
weather conditions we were seeing
then thatnone of itwould havecome
ashore Cahoon said.
The storm likely would have
pushed most of it out to sea, he said,
adding rhatdamage would havebeen
minimal. Few birds and fish were in
the area because they migrate else-
where this time of year, Cahoon said.
TOe've ?at t6e�M&(
To give your resume that
look of
Steltetce
with our quality printing.
We
a quick turn-around time!
Stop in today and see what
we can do for you.
3001 S Evans St
Greenville, N.C
355-5588 MORGAN
PRIIMTERS,Jnc.


4J
JINFORMAL SPRINGRUSH
Meet the sisters of
ZETA TAU ALPHA
February 9 "WESTERN NIGHT" and House Tour
February 10 "FIFTIES" SKIT NIGHT
February 11 "PUTTING ON THE RITZ" (invitation only)
5 PM each night
Pref Party with Pi Kappa Phi
Zeta Tau Alpha
Social Sorority
508 West 5th St.
For rides and
information call Sherry:
757-0344 or 757-181
J
'Bodysuits
�Full selection
of bras and
panties
� Sleepwear
� Teddies
�Bustiers
Student Discounts of 10
Bridal ,
Registry
Available
WHERE WILL YOU
BE IN '93?
Will you be doing the same old thing, or do you
want a new challenge?
If so, you're looking in the right place!
The U.S. Coast Guard, the nation's smallest
armed service, can offer you:
Law Enforcement
Search & Rescue
Engineering
Accounting
Computer Science Health Care
Management Aviation
Environmental Protection
Ship & Boat Handling
Positions are available in these and other specialties, at
various levels in the organization, for individuals between the
ages Of 17-27 with a High School Diploma or College Degree.
Our excellent benefit package includes:
�30 Days Paid Vacation
�Full Medical & Dental CAre
�Undergraduate & Postgraduate
Training Opportunities
Will You Take The Challenge?
If you are interested in taking the OAR Exam (Officer Aptitude
Rating Exam) to see if you qualify to become an officer in the
United States Coast Guard, Contact your local recruiting office at:
U.S. COAST GUARD
RECRUITING OFFICE
3480 SUNSET AVENUE
ROCKY MOUNT, NC 27804
(919) 443-7476 CALL COLLECT
The Coast Guard is committed to equal opportunity.
Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.
m
Ui
ii'
PREVIEW
93
Summer Student
Leadership Opportunity
Available
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
ORIENTATION
STAFF
Applications Available in
Room 203 Erwin
Beginning January 25, 1993
Deadline For Completed Application
is February 19, 1993
At 4:00 PM
h





� 1 �
FEBRUARY 2, 1993
Adopted daughter still may claim Duke fortune
The East Carolinian 3
Discover yourself become a staff
writer for The East Carolinian, todav.
DURHAM, N.C. (AP)�One
of thenation's largestendowments
may forfeit millions of dollars to a
woman adopted by billionaire to-
bacco heiress Doris Duke, even
though the two are estranged.
Doris Duke, 80, daughter of
tobacco magnate James B. Duke,
has reportedly written Chandi
Hefner out of her will. But she may
not be able to block her adopted
daughter's attempts to keep part
of at least $140 million set aside as
the Doris Duke Trust, The News &
Observer of Raleigh reported Mon-
day.
That news is of particular
interest to the Charlotte-based
Duke Endowment, one of the
nation's largest endowments and
a benefactor of Duke University
and other colleges and hospitals in
North Carolina and South Caro-
lina.
The endowment originally
stood to gain two-thirds of the trust
fund that was set aside for Ms.
Duke, because she had no children
to inherit the trust fund's millions.
The adoption threw all of that into
question.
The reclusive Ms. Duke, who
in 1988 adopted Ms. Hefner, then
35, broke off the relationship with
her adopted daughter in 1991. But
because adoption is forever in le-
gal terms, Ms. Hefner could still
bring a claim for inheritance upon
Ms. Duke's death � despite their
reportedly acrimonious split
"I don't think we could do
anything about it even if we
wanted to said Elizabeth Locke,
Duke Endowment communication
director. "I suspect that if shefound
a lawyer, then the trust would find
a lawyer, and it would go to the
courts. We'd just have to wait and
see like anyone else, I'm afraid
The split came after increas-
ingly sour relations between Ms.
Duke and Ms.
Hefner, according to the re-
cent biography, "The Richest Girl
in the World: The Extravagant Life
and Fast Times of Doris Duke by
Stephanie Mansfield. According to
Ms. Mansfield, Ms. Hefner re-
turned from taking Ms. Duke to
the airport near their Hawaii home
to find the estate's gates locked,
and she was told to leave.
Forbes Magazine reported
that the split came because of a
romance, and that Duke disinher-
ited her from a fortune estimated
at $750 million or more.
Since adoption laws are very
selective about how and why a
parent can reverse an adoption,
Ms. Hefner could still mount a
claim to money from the trust fund,
if not the inheritance, legal experts
say.
The trust stipulates that the
money would go to Ms. Duke's
"lineal" descendants, if there are
any. Had the wording been differ-
ent, said Sally Sharp, University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill fam-
ily law professor, it would have
been easier to bypass an adopted
daughter.
WHY ARE THESE STUDENTS SO HAPPY? THEY JUST GOT MONEY BACK FROM A-1 AUTO BODY REPAIR SHOP

20 Discount For All ECU Students and Faculty �Free Estimates �Insurance Claims �Painting �Fiberglass Work �Frame Straightening �Glass Work A-1 AUTO BODY REPAIR SHOP 2200 Dickenson Avenue I 355-4611 1
WHO COULDNT
USE SOME
U.S. INSPECTED WAMPLER7LONCACRE
Boneless
Chicken Breast
lb.
$f99
RED OR
Thompson White
Seedless Crapes
lb.
99
-m fl

1
PANTENE IK( )-V (�lINOM

� ��. km. ��� ' rw Km

nmnn
VALENCIA
ORANGE
lUKt
'IN THE DAIRY CASE" CHILLED
Floridagold
Orange Juice
12-Cal.
$joo
PANTENE, ALL IN ONE
Pro-v Shampoo
& Conditioner
8-
13-OZ.
$J00
StaR&Kisr'
CH0NK.llOHffaM
IN OIL OR SPRING WATER
Star-Kist Chunk
Light Tuna
2
6.125-OZ.
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE,
Diet coke or
Coca Cola Classic
2-Ltr.
fJ09
252FSHL1.995 �THE KR0CER C0 ITEMS AND PRICES
GOOD SUNDAY, JAN. 31 THROUCH SATURDAY FEB
6, 1995 IN CREENVILLE. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS
WESTERN! IMONEY
union! 'transfer
The fastest way to
send money.
AVAILABLE AT ALL
KROGER STORES.
ADVERTISED ITEM POUCY-Each ol these advertised items
is required to be readily available for sale in each Kroger
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad If we do run
out of an advertised item, we will otter you your choice of
a comparable item, when available, reflecting the same
savings or a raincheck which will entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the advertised price within 30 days
Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per item
purchased
S HOWCANYOUSPENDTHE �
J FUNNIEST NICHTOF YOUR JX
LIFETHIS WEDNESDAY FOR
ONLY$5.00?
VL SEE PACE 4
PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY
COLLEGE
NIGHT
FEATURING
THE BEST IN ALTERNATIVE
and CLASSIC ROCK
DOLLAR
LIQCIOR-dation
SALE!
$ 1.00 ADMISSION ALL NIGHT
SPECIALS
$1.00 HOUSE HIBALLS � $1.00 TALLS
$2.00 PITCHERS � 50t JELLO SHOTS
INTRODUCING
lation ol
$2.50 PJ'
s
SPECIAL SKI PROGRAM ANNOUNCED
FOR ECU STUDENTS & FACULTY
We are pleased to announce the establishment of a special
ECU Ski Program which is being made available by the
Winterplace Ski Resort. ECU Students and Faculty wishing
to take advantage of this special ski program must present
their ECU identification card when purchasing lift tickets,
renting ski equipment, or renting a condo.
SPECIAL PRICES:
WEEKDAYS (Monday through Friday)
9 am - 5 pm
9 am - 10 pm
3 pm - 10 pm
LIFT
TICKETS
$14.95
$17.95
$12.95
RENTAL
EQUIPMENT
skisbootspoles
$7.95
$7.95
$5.95
Saturday, Sunday, Holiday
LIFT
TICKETS
9 am
9 am
5 pm
10 pm
5 pm - 10 pm
RENTAL
EQUIPMENT
skisbootspoles
$12.95
$12.95
$7.95
$27.95
$34.95
$16.95
ECU SPECIAL SKI LESSONS
90 minute group lesson by Winterplace Professional Ski
School for only S6.95 per person - regularly $12.00!
WINTERPLACE CONDOMINIUMS
2 Bedrooms-Parlor, 2 baths, Kitchen - Sleeps 6 -
available Sunday night through Thursday night
only $125.00 per night.
Winterplace Ski Resort is under new ownership and has vastly
improved itssnowmaking capability, added new trails (now 24 trails),
new lifts (now 4 chair lifts 2 surface lifts) and a new dining and food
service.
Winterplace Ski Resort is located 16 miles South ofBeckley,
West Virginia, 1 12 miles from the Ghent exit on Interstate 77.
If you need additional info or need to confirm
lodging reservations, call 304787-3221.
For latest snow conditions, call
snow phone
1-800-258-3127.
V
Present skiing conditions arc
All chair lifts operating, cucllcn
skiing lop to bottom: calming
Beginners. Intermediate ami Expert ti
m
����





The East Carolinian
FEBRUARY 2, 1993
SGA
Continued from page 1
the parking problems on and sur-
rounding central campus. There is
also a proposal to make the central
campus automobile-free.
Future projects involving
parking include building two park-
ing garages and a rapid transit sys-
tem from Minges Coliseum by the
rum of the century.
Eakin said that with the con-
struction of Todd Dining Hall and
the Student Recreation Center, park-
ing will become worse.
Members of the SGA asked
Eakin his views on problems in Stu-
dent Housing.
He said the Slay and Umstead
Residence Halls will be closed at the
end of this school year for renova-
tion. There are also plans to reno-
vate some residence halls on Col-
lege Hill.
Eakin asked members of the
SGA to review the 30-year recon-
PRICES
struction plan of campus created by
O'Brian AdkinsCompany. This plan
maps out the growth of the campus
and its final design.
Assistantships for graduate
students, the 1100 student enroll-
ment increase, and the spring elec-
tion committeewere alsodiscussed.
The Student Government As-
sociation will meet again on Mon-
day, February 8th in Mendenhall
Student Center at 5 p.m.
Continued from page 1
and sandwiches run from $1.89
for bologna to $2.49 for roast beef.
Along with these extra al-
ternatives, Salamon said that his
establishments offer more than a
convenience store could.
"We offer convenience,
variety, alternative tenders (meal
plans, declining balances), and a
comprehensive food service pro-
gram that is campus-wide
Salamon said.
Salamon also said that his
establishments are run entirely
on their own, with profits going
directly back to the establish-
ment.
"This is a self-supporting
auxiliary enterprise, with funds
coming from food-service estab-
lishments Salamon said. "Our
expenditures are all campus-re-
lated.
"We're not a convenience
store, and not a grocery store
Salamon said. "We'rea retail food
service establishment
HEALTH
Continued from page 1
doctor, the pharmacy or just to
bed
Health services is also con-
ducting a new women's health
clinic and mental health services.
The mental health program
received two clinical psychologists
in the past two years and the pro-
grams provide students with psy-
chological assistance.
VanNortwick says she fell in
love wi th ECU while in high school
and still finds joy in coming tc
work each day.
Dr. James McCallum retired
from the director's position in
1992.
VanNortwick has also been
a part-time business instructor at
Pitt Community College and is a
memberof several professional or-
ganizations in the field of college
health.
VanNortwick said she wants
students to be proud of and utilize
Student Health Services.
The East Carolinian is currently accepting
applications for staff writers, apply today!
ANSWER FROM PACE 3
CLIPTHISADFOR
$2.00 ADMISSION TO
WED CoMedY
FEB3'93 ZONE
ATiTIC
$1.50 HIBALLS � I � �
$1.50TALL BOYS e 5th stT52 73�3
ALL NIGHT LONG ()
Interested in a
Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
t A certificate program open to qualified women
who have a baccalaureate degree
� Approved by the American Bar Association
� Intensive summer schedule May-August; part-time
evening schedules beginning January or September
� Placement service for graduates is without fee to
employer or graduate.
ApplicRfionr Den Mine for ihe 1993 Summer Program: March 1. 1993. For details,
cor.mci: Legal Assistant Piogrom. Continuing PJucwIon. Meredith College,
3R00 IlilUhorough Street, Rnlctgh. NC 27607-5298 (919) 829-8353.
Meredith College admits wom'n students without regard Ir race, crted, national or
ethnic ntigtn. age or hnndienp. �
mervciuhcolkgp
WVilH
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Adult
Entertainment
jf Center
MONDAYS
Football Sports Night
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE ?,
�Contestants nad w call b rrspstrr in adron.r. Mu; amix by 8.00. Wt?&f&fPTf
THURSDAYS-SATURDAYS TTVWW
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
We do Birthdays, Baceior Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
I
I
I .
I
I
I
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
mm Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt.
Dickinson Ava.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
I far II �
AMERICA'S
FAVORITE
OIL CHANGE
At Jiffy Lube, your car receives the finest, most
complete, preventive maintenance possible,
performed by a highly-trained team of specialists.
Drive into Jiffy Lube and drive out in minutes
knowing your car is ready for that long road trip.
: l
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We install a new oil filter!
3. We lubricate the whole chassisl
4. We Check and fill transmission tluidl
5. We Check and fill differential fluid!
6. We Check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fliud!
8. We Check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill battery!
10. We Check the air filter!
11. We Check the wiper blades!
12. We inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the interior!
14. We even wash your windows!
Well Have You Ready in Minutes
With No Appointment.
NC OFFICIAL SAFETY INSPECTION STATION
126 SE Greenville Blvd.756-2579M-F 8-6 Sat 8-5
Radiator
Drain & Fill
$1999
n
1
1
1
Not good with any other ooupon oiler. Cash value ol 120th of one oent.
Limit one coupon per person per visit. Good only In Greenville or Jacksonville.
Expires 0193
STUDENT UNION
HAPPENINGS
MOVIES 8 PM HENDRIXTHEATRE
AU.EADYTHE MOST TALKED ABOUT FILM OF THE YEAR.
��"
"Highest rating. The most important film of this
year, this decode, even of this generation.
This compelling film grips me audience with
classic tension and suspense uvmh mswe
ARRISO
PG
SWOT
WED & SUN, FEB 3 & 7 PATRIOT GAMES
THURFRI, &SAT, FEB 4, 5, & 6
MINORITY ARTS I TONIGHT
"SONGS OF MY PEOPLE"
TUES, FEB 2, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
A historic film project on the national experience
of African-Americans and their contributions to
American culture.
Paperback available in lobby of Hendrix & ECU Student Store
FORUM I ANARCHY OR APATHY
an evening with
NOAM CHOMSKY
TUES, FEB 9, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
FORUM I THE FUTURE OF
EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA
THE ATTIC SOCIETY REVISITED
FEB 16,8 PM
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
MINORITY ARTS I AUTHOR, AUTHOR
y tS -�
ATTIC
iSQCIETYJ
& FORUM
an evening with
EDDY HARRIS
FEB 17, 8 PM
MENDENHALL GREAT ROOM
For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
FEATURI
THE
Rove
� V J 4 � l1 I M Ti VMM
CLASSICS NIGHT
$3.00 Members $4.00 Guests
(X DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � 50 Jello Shots � 754 Kamikazes
mmmmmm i: u j ; w �iixmmmm
SWEET 16 NIGHT
$1.00 Domestics � $2.75 Pitchers � $3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas
501 Jello Shots � 75 Kamikazes � 75 100 M.P.H.
�HHMBHHU.lfJiYJHIMniH
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for All 7 til 9:00
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � $2.75 Pitchers � 500 Jello Shots
750 Kamakazes � 750 100 M.P.H.
eEkend
DRNoE PaRTY






m.
The East Carolinian
February 2, 1993
Classifieds
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
STUDENTS: Don't wait for next
semester, do it now We have
now over a hundred apartments
that will be available for May, June,
July, and August. Call 752-1375
Homelocators today for your se-
lection.
NEW 1 bedroom apartment $275.
757-0476.
R( X ).VfMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
a large one bedroom apartment.
Females only. Furnished. 4 blocks
from campus, and ECU Bus. 12
rent and utilities. Need someone
soon as possible. Please call Jill at
758-4199.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share apartment at Tar River.
13 rent and utilities. Call: 758-
8845. Leave message on answer-
ing machine.
FOR SALE
VALENTINES SPECIAL: Don't
forget to order early this year as
we run out every year. For just
29.95 you can get your lady 1 dozen
long stem red roses arranged and
boxed. 757-1007
UNRELEASED LIVE CONCERT
& STUDIO RECORDINGS FOR
SALEr from the following artists:
U2, Clapton, Beatles, Zeppelin,
SRV, BlackCrowes, Lenny Kravitz,
Hendrix, REM, Matthew Sweet,
More! Call 931-2573 and leave
name, number, and requested art-
ist on message.
DAY BED, white, iron and brass
w2 twin size Orthopedic mat-
tresses and roll-cut pop-up
trundle. Never used, in box. Cost
$700. $310 cash. (919) 637-4421 af-
ter 6:30 pm.
BRASS BED,queensizewframe
and deluxe Orthopedic mattress
set in factory box. Can't use. Cost
$750, sacrifice $285 cash (919) 637-
4421 after 6:30 pm.
MACINTOSH SE, IBM RAM, 32
MB HD Imagewriter Printer, $750.
Call 752-2261 after 5 pm.
FORSALE'8301dsmobileFirenza
AC Auto AMFM Cassette, Tilt,
Cruise $1500. 9' and 13' color TV,
Zenith, $125, $85 Call Liang-Chi
752-9125 leave message.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,Trucks, Boats, 4-wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 1-
800-436-4363 ext. c-5999.
COLOR TVZENITH19'color TV,
non-remote, older model with
minimal use. Excellent picture.
Perfect for dorm or apt. $100.00.
Call 830-9522.
MOBILE HOME. 1980Champion,
14x58. 2bedrooms&bath. Refrig-
erator, washer, dryer & stove.
FOR SALE
Curtains & blinds. Underpinned.
Good Condition. Winterville. 355-
8853.
KING SIZE WATERBED MAT-
TRESS and liner - NO LEAKS.
Heater, frame, rail pads, pedestal,
hardware, fill kit $100. 757-6688or
355-6593 ask for Carl.
HELP WANTED
SAVE on Spring Break '93!
Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas from
$459 Florida from !149! Organize
group and travel free! Contact
Susan @ 931-7334 or call Sun
Splash Tour s today 1-800-426-
7710.
ORIGINAL ARTWORK
WANTED! Looking for art that
would look good on T-shirts. We
will pay for the exclusive use of
your work. Call for an appoint-
ment 752-6953.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED:
Great club, great money, unbeliev-
able tips. Work Thursday, Friday,
Saturday, 9 pm-2 am. Call Sid 919-
735-7713 or Paul 919-736-0716.
MothersPlayhouse in Goldsboro.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing
brochures! Sparefull time. Set own
hours! RUSH stamped envelope:
Publishers (Gl) 1821 HillandaleRd.
1B-295 Durham, NC 27705
SPEND A SUMMER in New
Hampshire. Outstanding boys
girls sports camps located on New
England's largest lake are recruit-
ing individuals for all staff posi-
tions, includ ing nurses. Applicants
must be able to assist in the instruc-
tion of an activity. For more infor-
mation, call Kyle at (919) 847-4430.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for waitstaff at Professor
O'Cools between 2-4 pm daily. No
phone calls accepted. Located be-
hind Quincy's Steak House on Gre-
enville Blvd.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES:
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the spring indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages
5-18 in soccer fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 pm to 7 pm with some
night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of
March to the first of May. Salary
rates start at $4.25 per hour. For
more information please call Ben
James or Michael Daly at 83U-4550.
NEED FULL OR PART-TIME non-
smoking caregiver in my home for
4 month old. Transportation and
references required. 830-9082
STUDENTS INTERESTED in
babysitting on week-ends please
call Mrs. Dunn at 752-0356. Must
have transportation.
ROCK CLIMBING INSTRUC-
TORS NEEDED. The Outdoor
Recreation Program is recruiting
Rock Climbing Rappelling In-
structors, Applicants MUST pos-
sess current First-Aid and CPRcer-
HELP WANTED
tifications, leadership abilities,
strong interpersonal skills and
knowledgeof climbing rappelling
systems is desired. Applicants must
be able to dedicate some weekends
for training work. Interested per-
sonsmay apply in 204Christenbury
Gym, Mon-Fri between 8:00 and
5:00. Deadline for completed ap-
plications is Friday, Feb. 5 at 5:00
pm. For more information contact
Kathy Hill or Brian Miller at 757-
6387.
"AVON" Earn to $200 - $800
mo. We need Representatives in
yourarea! TrainingSupport avail-
able. Work your own hours! Call
for more information 1-800-329-
AVON.
POSTAL JOBS AVAILABLE!
Many positions, Great benefits. Call
1-800-436-4365 ext. P-3712.
SERVICES)FFERED
�"AWESOME SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Bahamas Cruise 6 Days
Includes 10 Meals, Great Beaches
& Nightlife! $279! Panama City
Beachfront Rooms With Kitchens
$119, Key West Oceanfront Hotel
$249, Daytona Beachfront Rooms
With Kitchens$149,Cancun $459,
Jamaica $479! Springbreak! 1-
800-678-6386
�"AWESOMESPR1NG BREAK
BAHAMAS CRUISE $279! In-
cludes 6 days in Bahamas, 10
meals! Sail from Florida! Beauti-
ful Beaches, Great Nightlife!
Drinking age 18! Springbreak 1-
800-678-6386
"�FREE DAYTONA SPRING
BREAK" Organize only 18
people and travel free! Stay at the
Howard Johnson's Beachfront
from only $149! CALL NOW! Take
A Break Vacations 1-800-328-
SAVE
ATTENTION SPRING BREAK-
ERS Party like Gods Panama
City $139, Key West $269, Jamaica
&Cancun From $450. Quality Ac-
commodations, Free Drink Par-
ties! Call Joe Endless Summer 1-
800-234-7007.
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in just a few days!
Plus a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself!
No cost. No obligation.
1 -800-932-0528, ext. 65
SERVICES ()FFERED
VmJ) 'asy Sotting Votctt Cr-c-ar. VjS")
' fET tie Bakamaf or tic fccuf L
o�pour (MKprmUuatctC
(i . .mimmCUpartyunrnet?
3v tpnfaU mUfa- ofy s
-800-780
4001
PRICES FOR STAY�NOT
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
5 anci 7 NIGHTS
DAYTONA BEACH
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
PANAMA CITY BEACH
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
STEAMBOAT
? S AND 7 NIGHTS
MUSTANG ISLAND I
P0RTARANSAS
S AND 7 NIGHTS
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
S flVP 7 NIGHTS
FORT LAUDERDALE
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
VAIL I BEAVER CREEK
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
12th Annual
Party!
TOLL FREE INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS
1-800-321 5911
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NiiWl USED CD'S
PERSONALS
We invite you to come by and find
out! INFORMAL SPRING RUSH FEB
9,10,11. Formore Info Call 757-1811
or 757-0344.
ALPHA OMICRON PI, BETA
RHO'S - Just when you thought it
was all over! Tomorrow's the Big
Day - ROASTS See you on 4th!
Love, your Big Sisters.
ALPHA OMICRON PI -Grabadate,
Grab a dress! Roseball's only 4 days
away!
TO POSSIBLY alone Friends. Are
you a lone, a women pretty and smart.
Of us men, where do we start? In
bars and classes do men seek you to
make passes? What are you want,
thought and need? A man, a chame-
leon, all sense she feed? Intellect,
morals, inner peace, values, spiritu-
ality, emotional release? Excitement,
passionrespectandromance. Gentle-
ness, firmness, attention, a glance?
In ways taken. In ways awakened,
not to be used, abused and refused?
To gaze, smile, gaze and break, to
gaze, smile to approach men possi-
bly in a bar and of him to partake and
for them not tonight want their bed
you to take? Your nugnces say yes -
your words say no, with you no oats
will any man sow? Is your look per-
fection - yet, are you sometimes blue
- are you a fine fine selection does it
disguise the real you? Are you some-
times caught between a rock and a
hard place, sought more not for
thought but your pretty face? Seek
first not the body, only the mind and
not all some have to give one is more
likely to find. If you like it you agree,
write your ideas in this section to me.
Page 5
PERSONALS
Jeffrey T Jones.
HEY WILDWOOD! The sun was
bright and all was right for another
great Wildwood day. The beer was
cold, but the food was hot, and we
rooted for Buffalo - NOT! 52 - 17,
that's right, the Cowboy's won. Too
bad Squirrel and Vic missed out -
headin'fortheFlorida sun. Cowboy's
rule!
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVES
Karen Bilyj
Lindsay Fernandez
Matt Hege
Aimee Lewis
Brandon Perry
CALL 919-757-6366
today for more
advertising information
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-3 rings in Garrett basement
on 1-25-93. Reward offered. Sen-
timental value. Call 931-7886.
(Blue topaz birthstonewfour dia-
monds, gold dome ring, and High
School class ring w ruby in cen-
ter.)
PERSONALS
DELTA CHI THOUGHT: "To say
nothing about something you dis-
agree with is to support it
CONGRATULATIONS! Tina Hoke
and Beth Overton for their Laveliers
and Kacey Young and Brittany Olson
for their engagements! Good Luck
Girls! Love, The Sisters and Pledges
of Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA: SIGMA PI appreci-
ates the enormous turn out Tuesday
night, hope to party with you in the
future. Love Sigma Pi.
SIGMA PI GROUPIES, Thanks for
coming to Rush. Now you've seen us
SOBER! We'll do you-Friday. Love
Sigma Pi.
CHI OMEGA: Thanks for the good
turn out as usual. You guys
are "killer Love ya Sigma Pi.
WHAT'S SO GREAT ABOUTZTA?
BRAND NEW APARTMENTS
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
Available March 1st Ideal location, close to
campus with ECU Bus transportation
provided. One and two bedrooms.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
EXCEPTIONAL VALUE FOR
SPACIOUS DUPLEXES
Get deposits in now for Summer and Fall.
2 and 3 bedroom duplexes offering
lots of space and convenient locations
close to campus.
Water and sewer is paid by us.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm.
fr
QjrnpsDoo

What Are Your Plans For This Summer?
maybe a job in summer camping!
Counselors, Lifeguards, SaiHrrg ifc�l
Canoeing, Crafts, Nature, and. - v"
Adventure Instructors. Many other positions J&
Now Taking Applications for Positions beginning June 1,1993 '&
For Information and Applications Call 1-800-535-5475
Rev. John Farmer will be at Wes2Fel Tues Feb. 4 at 5 pm
to discuss this employment opportunity. Supper will be
served. Call for reservations at 758-2030.
J)
Announcements
GOLDEN KEY NATtONA.1
honor soctfty
Golden Key National Honor
Society will have a meeting on Feb
4th at 3pm in 313 Speight. All
mem bers a re encou ragedtoattend.
We will be discussing the Regional
Conference and the Campus
Awareness Campaign. Any ques-
tions, call 756-5381.
GREENVILLE - pitt coi iNTY
SPECIAI QIYMPfCS
There will be a Track and Field
CoachesTrainingSchool on Satur-
day February 13 from 9am - 4pm
for all individuals interested in
volunteering to coach in the fol-
lowing sports: Swimming, Bowl-
ing, Cymnastics, Roller-skating,
Powerlifting and Volleyball. No
experience is necessary. For more
information call Creg Epperson at
830-4551.
VOLUNTEERS FOR RE-
SEARCH STUDY
The Section of Infectious Dis-
eases ECU School of Medicine in
conjunction with the Student
Health Center is conducting a
study on the sexual spread of
herpes viruses.
We are looking for men and
women 18 years and older who
have never had genital herpes. If
you are interested in obtaining
more information,call Jean Askew,
R.N. at 919-551-2578.
LATIN AMFRirAN ARFA
STUDIES COMMITTFF AND
HONORS
Spring lecture series - New
World Meets Old. Disease and
Death in the Americas: New In-
sights into Amerindian Depopu-
lation. Thomas Whitmore, Dept.
of Geography, UNC Chapel Hill
Feb. 4 (Thursday), 7:30 pm,
Brewster Bldg Room C103, ECU
Reception to Follow in Brewster
C203.
CATHOLIC STUDENT NEW-
MAN CENTER
Wondering what you
should get your Valentine? On
February 8th and 9th the Catholic
Student Newman Center is hav-
ing a fundraising event. Order a
carnation for your special some-
one and we'll deliver il any when'
on Campus. Look for us between
3:30 am and 3:30 pm in front of the
Student Store.
CATHOLIC STUDENT NFW-
MAN CENTFR
Sunday Mass: 11:30 am
Newman Center: 8:30 pm
Newman Center
Wednesday Mass: 5:30
pm Newman Center (Followed by
fellowship Meal)
WATER SKI OUR NP
TEAM
There will be a meeting for
spring of '93 on Tuesday Feb 2 and
Feb 9 at 9:00 pm in room 14 at
MendenhallorcallThomasat758-
8215. Beginners welcomed.
EPSIIONS1CMA A1PHA
There will be a "Coin Drive" for
St. Jude's Children's Hospital, in
front of the St udent Store on Wed
Feb. 3 and Thurs Feb. 4. Please
come by, drop your spare change
in the yellow can and take a piece
of candy - every penny will help!
Thank you and we look forward to
seeing you there.
STUDY ABROAD FYPO
Interested in a change next sum-
mer? Come by the lobby of the
General Classroom Building on
Wednesday, Feb. 3, between 8:30-
2:00 for information on study and
work abroad programs and ex-
changes. It'seasierthanyou think!
Contact International Programs,
757-6769, for further information.
EAST CARPI IN A CAMPUS
All former Jr. Civitans are
asked to attend an organizational
meeting for a possible Campus
Civitan club at ECU. Meeting is
Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 5.00 pm inMSC
Rm 212.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION
OFINDUSTRIAI
TECHNOLOGY
The ECU chapter of NAIT will
hold a meeting on Thursday Feb-
ruary 4th at :00 pm in Flanagan
109. The guest speaker will be Dr.
Davis, Dean of the School of In-
dustry and Technology. For fur-
ther information call Patrick
Carroll at 830-1765.
IMMUNIZATION CLINIC
ONE DAY ONLY-Immuniza-
tion Clinic Student Health Center
February 10, 1993 8:30 am - 11:30
am ami 1:30 pm - -100 pm. No
appointment necessary.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION
ECHO will be meeting Wednes-
day, Feb, 3 at 5pm inGCB. Be sure
to make this one. We will be dis-
cussing our Valentine's Day
project, quiz bowl, and Scholar
weekend. All students with a 3.4
GPA or above are welcome.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
GRAND RE-OPENING: The
Hard Roc Tower, ECU's climbing
wall will be re-opening for spring
'93 Wednesday, Feb.3. Be sure to
sign up for Climbing Workshops
and Drop-in Climbing opportuni-
ties. For more details call ECU
Recreational Services at 757-6387.
Come on and CLIMB ON US
RLCREATIONAI SFRVICFS
Let's Roll With Team Bowl-
ing sponsored by Recreational Ser-
vices. Registration will beon Tues-
day, February 2 at 5:30 pm in Biol-
ogy 103. A team representative
must attend - 4 people per team
please1 For more information call
757-63S7.
RLCREATIONAI SFRVICFS
Here
Kl
roundroundround Recre-
ational Services will be hosting a
Roundball Rama. A information
meeting will be held on Tuesday,
Feb.2 at 5 pm in Biology 103. This
event includes 3 point Shootout,
The Reebok Hot Shots Contest, and
Free Throw Contest. You could
wa 1 k out w ith a new pa i r of Reebok
pumps! For more information call
757-6387.
NATIVE AMFRICAN
ORGANIZATION
East Carolina Native American
Organization will meet on Mon-
day, Feb. 8 at 6:30 pm. The meet-
ing will be held at Forest Manor,
Apt. 3. If you need directions call
Enid Locklear at 758-5388. Please
bring $1.00 for candy and $5.00 for
dues. Officers elected at the last
meeting are : President, Kim
Sampson: Vice President, Tina
Lynch: Historian, LaTonya
Richardson: Treasurer, Jennings
Jacobs: and Secretary, Pamela Rev-
els.
ECU AMATEUR RADIO Cl.UB
To all students interested in join-
ing, please call Michael at 757-1273
for more information.
�� " .





The East Carolinian
February 2, 1993
Opinion
Page 6
"i
Society must examine deviancy closely
'The criminal of today is the innovator of
tomorrow
Emile Durkheim
segregational issues. The problem comes when
we look to the future and to what constitutes
crime today that may not tomorrow.
Looking at the matter with a very extreme
viewpoint, one can argue that, in the near fu-
ture, our high-penalty crimes (like murder and
�ape) can be so legalized by mitigating circum-
stances as to render the pun-
ishment ineffectual. Therefore,
society would begin to move
lesser-penalty crimes (likebur-
glary or robbery) up the ladder
to harsher punishments. The
balance that was skewed by re-
defining deviancy is once again
restored.
Of course, one can say that
humanity would never come
to accept such heinous crimes
as murder or rape. But think
about this fact: In 1929, four
gunmen shot and killed seven gangsters in what
was termed "The St. Valentine's Day Massa-
cre Today, in cities like New York or Los
Angeles, reports of gang wars and killings (with
body counts exceeding the one mentioned above)
are commonplace.
Humanity needs to keep a watchful eye on
what is considered criminal now and in the
future. We speak forcefully in public about the
plight of the homeless, the degeneration of our
public schools and the need for stiffer penalties.
But, when we go back to our homes, do we
follow this same philosophy?
Deviancy is not a slide-rule that one can
move back and forth to accommodate a situa-
tion. If we begin to consider it as such, 1984 may
well have been titled a decade later.
A trend has begun in our society in the past
few years, and without careful supervision,
could propel is country into an Orwellian
society before it knows it.
; This trend of "defining deviancy down
as! one researcher puts it, began in the '60s and
continues three centuries later. Simply put, our
sojziety is continually accepting
behavior that, in the past, it con-
demned. Starting with the civil
rights movement (with its sit-
ins and peaceful protests) to the
present day (aiminal violence's
grpwth), people every day con-
ddne acts that were considered
illegal, or immoral, by their an-
cestors.
Thirty years ago, the
thought of an unwed mother
wfcs tantamount to blasphemy.
Now, one-fifth of white babies
arp born to unmarried mothers and the rate for
blick children is two-thirds. Society now sees
single motherhood as a "alternative lifestyle
choice rather than a whispered horror.
; Noted criminologist Emile Durkheim has
pdstulated that no society should ever be crime-
free. Hepointsoutthatcriminals serve as bench-
marks for others to use as guides to socially
acceptable and unacceptable behavior.
Durkheim also stated that communities only
redefine "crime" to accommodate their means
of dealing with it.
Though the '60s civil rights movement was
a major example of this trend, it did serve its
own specific good. African-Americans were rec-
ognized as individuals with their own inalien-
able rights, negating Jim Crow laws and other
By Amy E. Wirtz
Gays in military nothing new, just hidden
' Gaysinthemilitary.Icouldn't
let mis issue disappear into the
history books withoutopeningmy
mourn. Since so much has been
voiced and written about this
highly emotional debate, I ask that
you lend a fair and impartial ear to
my commentary.
Last week, The East
Carolinian's Opinion section ran an
entire page (with opposing views)
on the impending decision. Both of
my colleagues' articles were well
written. One had clear, valid argu-
ments; the other reeked of fear and
intolerance But that seems to be
running rampant these days.
A year ago, it would have
been unspeakable for a political
figure to mention the words "gay"
and "lesbian" in public, letalone in
the privacy of their own home. So
it was surprising to many when
Bill Clinton not only campaigned
for the gay vote, bu t announced his
plans for ending the 50-year-old
ban against gays in the military.
l What gets me is that cur-
rently, there are thousands of gays
in the military. Thousands who
hayehidden their identities to serve
our country. And now, with this
issue in the limel ight, certain mem-
bers of our society rear their ugly
heads and proclaim that allowing
gays in the military would rip apart
theseam that keeps our so-called
democratic nation together.
q Is this the real issue? Is "es-
tablishing boundaries and stan-
dards" really whatthe commotion
is all about? I don't believe it is.
Many cry "homophobia" and pass
mis off as a discriminatory battle.
This goes beyond a dislike of ho-
mosexuals. There is a much larger
fear: a fear of changing society's
norm.
� Manipulated words
To cloak this fear, people say
that morale and discipline would
be ruined if the military is inte-
grated. Would it really? Has it in
the past? No. You see, words are
very powerful. Things can be
twisted around to suit the need of
all viewpoints. The conservative
opposers,en masse, cry thathomo-
sexuals living side by side with
heterosexualswould disrupt daily
activities with military personnel:
i.e. showers. I have an answer for
them regarding this moot point:
why not section off shower stalls
not unlike any health club or
YMCA?
The people that fear this ho-
mosexual "invasion" see gays and
lesbians as sexually-crazed nym-
phomaniacs. Come on, do you re-
ally believe this? Tomakea sweep-
ing generalization about a group
of people is unfounded. Not to
shock anyone, but there are even
homosexual virgins(Oh no, what's
next?).
The most important issue �
in fact, the only issue that should
be focused on�is that the military
should makeand uphold strict law s
concerning sexual behavior. It can
enforce any sort of sexual prohibi-
tion or aggression, but a clear dis-
tinction should be made between
sexual behavior and sexual orien-
tation.
Sexual misconduct has no
place in the military. And, quite
frankly, people aren't doing their
jobs if they're concerning them-
selves about sexual matters.
In an attempt to read Joseph's
article Can. 28,1993) with a clear
and open mind, I found myself
completely unable to do just that.
Joseph writes that "there are cer-
tain places where (homosexuals)
don't belong Joseph seems to be
playing God here. Undoubtedly,
there are countless other places he
would ban homosexuals from. I
would hate to be the one to advise
him of this issue, but homosexuals
are already everywhere that het-
erosexuals are. Many may see it as
"TheGreat Invasion but I seeitas
a fact of life.
Gays in the military will not
be thecauseof a societal collapse. If
anything a few hundred, close-
minded military personnel willnot
re-enlist. If we really want to up-
hold the American ideal, then the
only answer is to allow all people
theopportunity to serve in the mili-
tary. Tobe"a society thatembraces
everyone we can only improve
our standing by lifting the ban
against homosexuals.
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batchelor
Homosexuality: Congress decides morality
And if two people walk
in and sing a bar of 'Alice's Res-
taurant in harmony, then the
army may think they're both fag-
gots and they won't take either of
'em Arlo Guthrie, "Alice's Res-
taurant
Six months from now,
Guthrie may have to amend those
lyrics a little. That is if President
Clinton's philosophy of allowing
homosexuals to serve in the mili-
tary prevails.
At least one Republican sena-
tor, Alphonse D'Amato of New
York, believes Clinton is right. On a
talk show Friday, D'Amato said he
felt it would be immoral not to let
gays serve in the armed forces.
I have been following this
controversy with great interest, as
most Americans have, and when
D'Amato used the word "im-
moral I was a bit surprised. Sen.s
DanCoats,StromThurmond,Bob
Dole and Sam Nunn � I have
heard speak out against gays and
lesbians serving in the military.
� Morality rears its head.
They citedall the reasons that
have been written and talked
about lately: the compromising of
morale and esprit de corps, the
problems of having gay men and
women showering and sharing
close quarters with straight mili-
tary personnel and the perceived
threat of AIDS transmission in a
battlefield situation. But not once
� before D'Amato's remarks �
did I hear this issue related in terms
of morality.
I have watched members of
our government who are opposed
to gays serving in the armed forces
struggling to explain their posi-
tion. "My office has been flooded
with phone calls from constitu-
ents, and those calls have been
running five-to-one (or more)
against allowing homosexuals to
serve in the military these mem-
bers said.
"Many people retort the
proponents of Clinton's plan,
"were against integrating blacks
into the military in the '40s. Do
you think blacks should be ex-
cluded from service too?" A spe-
cious, but nevertheless difficult
rgument to defeat.
"What about the AIDS
threat?" asks the congressman.
"The Executive Order ban-
ning gays was issued long before
the disease ever existed answer
the proponents. "AIDS is not a
real issue
And so it goes. While the
objections noted above do war-
rant some thought, I get the feel-
ing most of the politicians want to
say something mat the nature of
politics absolutely will not allow
� a sentiment held by many of
those constituents besieging the
White House switchboards with
phone calls � and that sentiment
is, homosexuality is immoral.
Granted, academicians and
philosophers have long debated
the nature of morality. But while
the theoretical debate rages on,
societies adopt an utilitarian sys-
tem of morality that reflects the
long-held values of its members.
� Behavior or orientation?
Pooh-poohing this notion,
"enlightened" members of our
society argue that a person should
thmk Ntart rr
COWCONHEMT& ALW�"�
BEEN SOME ABSTRACT
EMTir fAK MMCvro
tu Wrm TME BOCMCRS
in, suoocnl'v it'
immid'ate; these koplm.
raised in the mm
PKOtiftttaiVB AMERICA
WE WKKC.
be excluded from the military only
on grounds of acceptable behav-
ior, that sexual orientation per se
should not be a factor. Consider
mis exchange:
RECRUITER: Okay, now I
have a few questions for you. Are
you a homosexual?
RECRUIT: No, I'm not.
RECRUITER: Good, have
you ever �
RECRUIT: But I am a
pedophiliac.
RECRUITER: What'd you
say?
RECRUIT: I said, I'm a
pedophiliac.
RECRUITER: Well, have
you had sex with any children?
RECRUIT:No,of course not
And I don't plan to either.
RECRUITER: You're okay,
then. Just sign here, son.
So the question becomes,
should we allow pedophiliacs
serve in the military? If so, then
what about hard-core sadists?
Masochists? Is it really just behav-
ior we give credence to, or does
America's shared idea of morality
permeate deeper man that?
D'Amato's remark that it
would be immoral not to let gays
into the military tells us that he
believes in a system of morals,
that there is a right and wrong.
Therefore, the deceptively simple
question Congress and America
have to answer is whether or not
homosexuality is okay. As this
drama unfolds, this nation and
the world will get to see which
way the winds of morality are
blowing. It's going to be an inter-
esting year.
1
AU.friC.HT, CONGRESS,
NAr TIME
JOE OF ALL TRADES
By Joe Horst
Coddling criminals detrimental to society
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECUstudents. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000copiesevery Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial ineach
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The Last Carolinian reserves the right to edit
orreject letters for publication. letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
You know, I think of myself
as a pretty liberal guy. I can see
most opposing points of view, can
understand pretty much what
other people go through even
when 1 haven't gone through it
myself, I can even listen to most
any type of music known to man.
On the other hand, I'm find-
ing more and more that there are
some things that I'm totally and
unequivocally conservative on.
Oneof these ever-appearingthings
is crime and the criminal.
Some individuals feel that a
criminal is a person who should
be rehabilitated instead of pun-
ished. That the person is malad-
justed, came from a dysfunctional
family or is just plain misunder-
stood. I just find it hard to accept
that a person does not know when
he or she has committed a crime.
Mind you, I'm not talking about
some long-forgotten law slowly
gathering dust in the annals of
some equally forgotten law tome.
What I mean is how someone can
lay the blame for such a heinous
crime as murder or rape on the
feet of some dogma called "dys-
function
I feel that if someone has
gotten caught committing the
crime, they should pay the conse-
quences. As the saying goes, "Do
the crime do the time The
morals and ethics of society are
clearenough (though byall means,
not crystal) for anyone with just a
little common sense to see what
inactions are not only illegal, but
immoral and unethical as well.
Common sense is the key
here, people. How can anyone let
another person get away from ac-
cepting their responsibility for a
given situation? Being wishy-
washy, or saying some circum-
stances mitigate different means,
laughs in the face of our societal
norms. Most of these people say-
ing that they're "dysfunctional"
are just using this excuse to get out
of serving some well-deserved
hard time. To date, there does not
exist any tried and true method
for determining a person's intent
when they commit any specific
action. So how many malcontents
are getting off scot-free because
they pulled a fast one on the sys-
tem? Justice may be blind, but that
doesn't mean it has to be stupid as
well.
Take a little time. Think
about why we have these societal
norms and mores. If we've had
them for this long, don't you think
there's a damn good reason for
them? Punishment by incarcera-
tion is not just an idea that sud-
denlycameintovogueafewyears
ago; it's been around for decades.
Granted, so has rehabilitation �
but if you're gonna abuse it, get
rid of it.
These concepts are so com-
mon to discover if people would
just take the time to study them-
selves or the people around them.
Mankind repeats itself sooften it's
surprising that more people
haven't discovered the similari-
ties. If something happens often
enough, isn't it worth more than
just a cursory glance?
Liberalism isnot a bad thing.
In certain situations, having an
open mind is what promotes
progress in this country. But cod-
dling criminals by holding their
ha nd s a s they go through the cri mi-
nal justice system only serves one
purpose � to give those same
criminals one hell of a laugh.
t-l





The Last Carolinian
February 2.
Lifestyle
Page 7
'Songs' exposes
new outlook on
African-Americans
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Hendrix Theater will hosl a
unique slide show ak presenta-
tion tonight at 8 p.m ai
American piece title ifm
People
The slide show will I. ature
images from "Son gsofMy People
a bookand intern.ition.il exhibition
currently in Washington, I
Consisting of ph t s m in
50blackphotojournalist:
country, the slide show tries tocap-
ture the wide range anddiversity of
the African-American exi eriei
Slides depict the Afri
American heritage in musi
fashion,sportsand man) othervari-
ous occupations and walks of life.
Broughttol I In theStudent
Union Minoritv Art ('omn
"Songs of My People" is desi
not for one spe I . i,im,
but for everybody, according to J.
Marshall, assistant director o(
courtesy New African Visions
ric Easter
ipus
Marsl n't just
Chomsky to offer
alternative view
versih
Jruon
Photograph from "Songs of my People" published by I ittle, Brown and
Compjnv on February 12, 1992.
" The basic concept I I
nority Arts con
people to see and experii n
as ir
-)(,s
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
it of America doesn't
know him, but all of America
should
im Chomsky will present
a lecture entitled "Anarchy or
Apathy"in Hendrix rheatreFeb.
9at8p m
rhecontroversythismanhas
stirred with his brilliant political
thinking has al-
lowed thedoorof
truth to sli
� popen.Many
argue that we, the
college popula-
tion, have a rea-
son fi r ,i political
i tlution ani I
should stand
firmlyatthatdoor
knex king and de-
manding the truth
from our govern-
ment
( homsky is a master at Un-
ities. Like Rousseau,
Chomsky believes the human
n operates on a set of fixed
� hes. Ihese switches are ac-
tivated sorting at the aee of 2,
when a child is able b fi rm sen -
tences, and is "set" according to
our culture. Chomsky believes
within this circuit in our brains
then ij acity for
itivity and a basic
for freedom
This "instinct for freed
�ayswill come into
battle with a controlling aspect
of life- the government
In a 1992 Rolling Stone inter-
view, Chomskv
slid the best
way to maximize
our genetically en-
d freedom is
through anar-
hism, whi( h he
defines as libertar-
ian socialism
Before you
put the paper
down and declare
him"unpatriotic
realize that i
book, or lecture is based
on thoroughly resean hed u
mation.
He is not a man who em-
braces the American political
See CHOMSKY page 8
Photo courtesy S. Secttor
Noam Chomsky
Dixie Dregs
Bring 'Em Back Alive
Hv John Pntrus
Staff Writer
Faithful
The
ph
an t
,t is aptly
-for jigs
� i izine.
groups, the
tinsti id tumsto
' riti ism.
.� " �� . �� � usual
rft;11 form.
ike up m
h attitude. In
A-hichtl
� it Atii.
� ith free-
guitar leads
�rds, drums and
ition that
its highlight,
alsofthis
'� rest oi the
' ' erecord,
i .s or
' the hand's timds
� son this
�V the trai k
�Mas the
�� that
il r
"You
wouldn't
categorize
Goedicke
as a femi-
nist. But she
does write
about the
timeless as
well as
timely prob-
lems of
women
� Dr. Peter
Makuck, ECU
English professor
Photo cour
Open poetry delves into diversity
By Marjorie McKinstry
Staff Writei
t!
the audieni e within tb
will read poems �
tlei ts oneoniinous the
- poen
am 1 trav i
irize her as a
said Dr. Peter Makuck, an En-
glish professor at TCI "But she does
�� ibout the timeless as well as timelv
f womei ithout exclud-
� ' ' revery elcoming.
i into their world, but not
1 ler light touch is evident by the open

esnotdivor
power,
try is not flat; it uses strong
Makuck said. These
phasize the subjects of her
u h as the fe helpless
experienced bj a hospital
itient. As a former i a
rself,( l e, lii ke ; ulls from per-
sonal emotion to create these au!
graphical piec es.
An therinterestingsubjectGoedicke
expK'tes is the i epressie political regimes
she encountered while in Central and
South on' rica. Goedicke is interested in
thelivesofl : � .orthedisap-
pean se unfortunate rit
who disagree with the government are
ippear
poem i m the subjec t opens in the
market place, a world of leather, beltsand
purses isdescribed. The narrator notices
a deep red flower-like design on the
�ut is startled to realize that it is
if an ominous trail ofblood. The
POETRY page 8
Cross-counhy bike trek to raise AIDS awareness
VIc( rory
and


imilies will houseand feed the riders during
hers
I
' C Verthe

-





K9j! i 1
5 The East Carolinian
CHOMSKY
FEBRUARY 2, 1993
Continued from page 7
system because his intelligence has
overcome it and believes it to be a
griping and misleading hierarchy.
Chomsky began his political
outcry in the 1960s when he real-
ized the atrocities of the Vietnam
War. He began public speakings
against the war and stopped pay-
ing his taxes.
Although he didn't spend any
time in jail, as Thoreau did, he did
inprison himself into the fascinat-
ing world of American political
truth and freedom.
For the next 30 years he investi-
gated and factually reported the
results on issues such as : United
States aggression in the Third
World, the Israel-Palestinian con-
flict, the wars of Southeast Asia and
the ever-present problem of inter-
national terrorism.
"The reason we bring him here
is because he is such an amazing
thinker said Mike Preston, a Stu-
dent Union coordinator. "He offers
a very opinionated point of view.
Whe ther you're conservative or lib-
eral, he'll leave you wanting to in-
vestigate things for yourself
The program, "Anarchy or
Apathy will bring this interesting
POETRY
and controversial speaker to our
campus. The only other campus
that will host Chomsky this year is
The University of Southern Califor-
nia at Berkley. Student Union coor-
dinators think this speaker maypro-
vide ECU a chance to live down past
negative images of the school and
build a reputation of higher learn-
ing-
"Judged in terms of the power,
range, novelty and influence of his
thought, Noam Chomsky is, argu-
ably, one of the most important in-
tellectuals alivetoday'accordingto
a review in The Toronto Star.
Continued from page 7
SONGS
trail is followed, as it zigs and
zags through the market place
and into town, until the blood
ceases to be a trail and becomes a
large puddle.
The puddle of blood, belong-
ing to a person forced from the
marketplace, poolson the ground
outside of the police station. One
more person has been made to
disappear.
Such poetry, according to
Makuck, "is not a flat political
statement. It makes a point by
way of particular details, like the
trail of blood.
There is no generalized or
veiled hating of the totalitarian gov-
ernment. Instead, the poem is
frightening because of its political
consequences. Itisajourneyintoa
real nightmare Goedicke will be
in room 1032 of the General Class-
room Building at 8 p.m. Feb. 4.
Continued from page 7
sis of identity" for African-Ameri-
cans.
"Foryears, African-Americans
have been portrayed in what some
have called 'five deadly ways
Easter said. "Less intelligent, less
hard-working, more violent, less
universal and less patriotic
New African Visions, Inc. is a
not-for-profit organization that is
dedicated toprovidingabalanced
viewofthe African-American com-
munity through the medium of
visual arts.
Susan Stewart, head of the Mi-
nority Arts Committee, said that
the show should havea surprising
effect on its audience.
Songs' displays African-
Americans in ways that a lot of
peopledon'tsee'Stewartsaid. "It
showsalifethatmanypeoplearen't
exposed toorassociateblack people
with�a view opposed to the one
shown by television
"Songs of My People" will be
free and open to the public.
Copies of the paperback,
"Songs of My People will be on
sale at the slide show and also at
the Student Stores.
-SinrfwK Shap-
215 E. 4th Street
Greenville, NC
(919)752-2183
316 S.W.Greenville Blvd.
(919)756-7171
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while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street Hours:
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SPECIAL RATES
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"Are you being served? "
Episcopal
Student Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
WEDNESDAYNIGHT SANITYBREAK FROM CAMPUS?
� 5:30pm Student Eucharist
� Supper provided after service
�ProgramConversation after supper
� Add new friends to your life!
� Bring an old friend with you!
� Be apart of a faith community
New video series begins Wednesday, January 27th
What?: "QUESTIONS OF FAITH"
Where?: ST. PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 401 E. 4th Street
(cross 5th Street in front of Garret Hall, walk down HoUy Street to 4th Street-You Are There!)
� Schedule of Services �i
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TllllLiimi ii i i i i :rrrrj
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DAY
TUESDAYS IN FEBRUARY at
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Present your 1993 Student ID
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ANY DINNER FOR ONLY
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iopcnino
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GAME
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WITH POOL
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MMES
B D
The University Media Board
seeks Editors and General Managers
The University Media Board is seeking full-time students
interested in serving in the following stipended posts
for the 1993-1994 academic year
GENERAL MANAGER
Expressions minority students magazine $175month)
Tu m EDITOR
The Rebel fine arts magazine ($175month)
GENERAL MANAGER
The East Carolinian student newspaper
(estimated 1992-1993 stipend $4,700)
i,�n GENERAL MANAGER
WZMB student radio station ($200month)
DAY STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
to the Media Board (no stipend)
All applicants should have at least a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor. Student Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Monday, February 8
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fjl I MEMBERSHIPS S1.00 until February 2nd CALL 321-1349 9-7





February 1, 1993
The East L aroilman
Sports
Page 9
Double overtime unkind to ECU
By Warren Suinner
Assistant Sports Editor
A losng streak isoneof Ihe m st dreaded
cursesan athletic team can be afflicted with. It
is frustrating,depressing, and incredibly diffi-
cult to o'ercome.
Unfortunately. the players and a vtdies d
the ECU men's basketball team know all too
wellwhatfriisciirsefeelslike,astlieaa'feeling
the vex idax i theCAA this season. The Pirates
are 1-6 in conference play, as they fell 7-72 to
LTC-VVilmirigtLTnScitiia1ay,despitetakingthe
contest into double o'ertime.
IhePiratesOTuldnotreyersetheirtrei d oi
pi xir shooting as bey connected for only 2i I ot
69 field goal attempts for the game. The Pirates
started thegameterrihKasfJ-iepenom-iancesof
Seahawk guard Reggie Veaey and forward
Sherif B-SaoacHy frustrated ECU'S interior
defense. El-Sanadily and center Darren N looe
combined for nine fast-half rebounds and 10
points while Veney fired 10 points from the
perimeter. The Seahawks held the- Pirates 1.1
just 35 percent shooting in the first half and
held the leading Pirate scoring threat, Lester
Lyons, to four first-half points.
Artertrailini:4?-2nathalftime the Pirate-
foughthardtoproducea thnllingsecoi id-half
comeback, tying the score with Kareem
Richardson's three-pointer as time expired.
This shot sent the contest into overtime, but
the Pirates could not hold off tine Seahawks in
the extra period as the Seahawks forced a
second overtime.
The Pirates struggled through overtime
as costly fouls set the Seahawk lead at five
when the contest ended. The Pirates must
meetC AA favoritejames Madison in Minges
on Saturday.
Double your pleasure,
double your fun in two OTs
Co for
broke: The
ECU men's
basketball
team is in
the midst of
another
losing
streak. The
Pirates play
conference
foe James
Madison in
Minges on
Saturday.
ECU us.UfJC-W
fCUlvs William and l.lai
ECU
(72)
Min
41
Young
Lews 27
Copdand -il
Lyons 2S
Peterson 38
Armstrong 13
Richardson 36
James 10
Hunter 7
Gill 9

m-a
3-ID
1-2
3 D
2-12
5-Id
0-2
4-14
1-4
0-1
0-1
ft
m-a
2 ii
i
3 5
9-11
0-0
0-0
1-2
1-2
rh
o-t
i :
7-9
1-4
- 8
1-1
2-3
1-4
0-0
an. 30,1993
a
1
0
0
1
4
0
0
0
0
�r
8
5
6
9
20
I!
17
3
3
1
Totals 200 20-69 26-41 27-48 8 27 T.
Percentages: FG - .290, Ft. 630, 3 pt. Gods: 6-18
.330, Team Rebounds - 9. Blocked Shots - 1,
Turnovers - 18, Steals - 8.
UNC-W (77)
Min
El-SanadiK34
fg
m-a
Shaw365-16
Moore403-4
(ones314-8
Veney356-11
Spartn141-2
Phillips15- �
Meighen201-6
Adkins251 2
ft
m-a
6-6
3-4
4-10
0-0
3-4
I 3
0-0
3-5
rb
o-t
-
5-n
1-9
1-2
0 1
0 0
0-1
pf
4
tp
10
13
10
8
19
3
4
Totals 20025-57 22-35 15-41 17 24 77
Percentages: FG - .440, Ft. 630, 3 pt. Goals:5-
310, Team Rebounds - 7, Blocked Shots - 9,
Turnovers - 18, Steals - 9.
16
ECU
UNCW
1st half
26
43
2nd half OT
35 4
18 4
OT
7
12
ECU
Final
72
77
(65)
Min
Jan. 27, 1993
fg
rh
l.in 14
2-1
Hunt
Young 22
Peters n
Armstrong!
Lewis
ind 32
m-a
2-6
3 11
1 8
1-7
6-13
: 6
0-0
4-8
m-a
i '�
o:
0-0
1-1
o-t
5 5
5-6
2-3
1-2
0-1
4 8
Pf tp
Totals 200 2.V69 10-14 21-35 12
Percentages: FG - 362, Pt. 714, 3 pt. CoJ
278, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots -
Turnovers - 10, Steals- 12
William &M
Min
Verkey
Cox
Small
Shafer
Duff
Parker
irn 2(
Robert
30
39
36
10
21
arv

m a
4 8
6 14
;
(81)
ft
ni .i
3-4
11-13
4-6
0-o
0 0
rb
o-t
3-5
2-3
0 2
0-0
n 2
-
Pf
12
Totals 200 24-49 27-33 12-38 16 14 81
Percentages: FG - .489, Ft. 818, 3 pt. Goals: 615
.400, Team Rebounds - 4, Blocked Shot - 1,
Turnovers - 15, Steals - 8.
ECU
Wm. & M.
1st half
33
34
2nd half
32
47
OT
Final
65
81
Photo by Birt Ranson
I must be
front row
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
Did you know only one in
10,000 college football players
makes it to the NFL? On top of tha t,
the average career is only four years
long. However the average career
for college graduates is nine years
with the average salary being 16
percenthigher than non-graduates.
The average salary for an NFL
player over a nine-year period is
$650,000.1 guess it really does pay
to stav in school (unless you are a
'Rocket' worth about $26 million).
Ya'know?
� ECU is ranked 232 in the na-
tion in men's Div. I basketball,
based on David Saragin's com-
puter rating system. The Pirates
boast a 65.81 rating.
�ECU point guard Ronnell
Peterson's hot shooting has cooled
off a bit. Since sinking six three-
pointers against Appalachian
State, he has shot 32 percent from
three-point range. However his .458
overall percentage from behind the
three-point line is higher than the
overall shooting percentage of ev-
ery other Buc except four.
�AntonGillhasbeenTheMan
for the Bucs of late. From Jan. 9 to
Jan. 21, Gill averaged 14.4 points,
6.6 rebound sand shot 57.7 percent
from the floor.
�Wilbert Hunter,a promising
JUCO transfer, is having difficulty
at the free-throw line. He has only
managed to connect on 11 of 28
shots (393 percent).
� The Lady Pirates' point
guard Gaynor O'Donnell is lead-
ing the nation in assists for the
second straight week with a 10.23
average per game. She previously
lead the country from Dec. 13 to
Jan. 12. Currently, she has 666 ca-
reer assists (an ECU record) and a
single-game high of 20 against
UNC-Ashviile in December (also
the nation's single game high this
season).
�O'Donnell'sbackcourt mate,
Toina Coley, is second in the na-
tion in steals at 4.6 per game. She
needs just 36 more steals to be-
come ECU's all-time leader.
�The Charlotte Hornets
waived former Georgia Tech star
Tom Hammonds. "So, what you
say? They traded guard Rex
Chapman for him. So, in other
words, they gave away a player
with an enormous amount of po-
tential for nothing. Alan Bristow is
an idiot.
�Wrestling great Andre the
Giant died Thursday in France at
the age of 46. Andre Rouissimoff
had a disorder, acromegaly, which
secreted an excess of growth hor-
mones into his body causing en-
la rgement of the head, hands, feet
and chest. Rouissimoff was seven
feet, four inches tall and weighed
520 pounds.
Photo courtesy of Rec Services
The Hard ROC tower has re-opened to offer students a variety of activities
centered around the tower located behind the Allied Health Building.
Rec services
offers more
to students
By Thad Peoples
Staff Writer
Roundball Rama is the Recre-
ational Services h test attempt hi pane
that there truly are some roundballers
at East Carolina. Roundball Rama is a
thive-e'mtbasketballhxiiTvirnento in-
sisting of the Reebok Spot shot, free
throw slxxting contest, and a 3-point
shcKitoutRoundballRimiistobeheld
on Tuesday, Feb.9fromS3( ito 11 pm
in Minges Coliseum and on' Wednes-
day, Feb. 10 from 4 to 6 p.m. at
Christenbury gymnasium. An indi-
vidual may only participate on one of
these two days. To participate, v hi
must proide your ECU ID or picture
identification.
Toenter this fine ewer, yt� must
attend the Roundball Rama Registra-
tion meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 2 at 5
p.m. in biologynxmltflintiV Biology
building of Howell Science Complex
Due to the abundance ' willing
competitors in the intramural hv
haIlprogramhereatECU,youmu I
See REC page 10
Lady Pirates' ship
demolished by ODU
ECU
(39)
Min
Jan. 29,1993
O'Donnell turns ball
over 13 times against
ODU's Monarchs
By Billy Weaver
Staff Writer
Head Coach Rosie Thompson de-
scribed Friday night's 75-39 rout at
ODU as "a rude awakening
The Lady Monarchs dominated
ECU on both ends of the court. ODU
handed the Pirates their fourth straight
CAA loss (1-4, 7-7 overall).
After controlling the opening tij
off and posting a 4-0 lead, ECU fell
apart.
ODU's six-foot-two-inch Lateefah
Robinson went on a rampage, hitting
all four of her shots from the floor and
five of six from the free throw line. She
also put stamps on six Pirate shol
sent them air mail ba k down 1 '
throat
E 's all-tii adei' �
O'Donnell couldn't seem to get a handle
on the ball � she turned it over 13
times.
On the plus side she did manage to
reel off eight assists, adding to her al-
ready impressive career total.
The Monarchs only scare came when
CAA player-of-the-week Celeste Hill
twisted her knee after a travelling call
early in the second half. r ill later re-
turned to help ODU put the finishing
touch . n the Pirates.
ECU'sonly highlight came with 5:16
left in the game. O'Donnell cut the
lead to 40 on a fast break.
The game was the first of a four-
ad stint for the Pirates,
must fate two more critical CAA i
rtents.
hi at William.ind Mary
and UNCW to have any hopes oi re-
turning 'Is.
� town and
hard'( oat h "hompsoi I . may
1 to do more than that to finish the
table re
Thurman 27
Samuels 31
Smith 29
Coley 30
O'Donnell40
Cagle
Rodgerson 2
James 6
Sutton 7
Baker 6
Blackmon 15 6-1U OI
Totals 20017-62 5-8
Percentages: FG - .274, Ft
Team Rebounds
Turnovers - 33,
ODU (75)
Min
m-a
2-3
3-9
3-14
1-13
2-8
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-1
0-2
6-10
ft
m-a
0-0
1-2
2-2
2-2
0-1
0-0
0-0
0-0
rb
o-t
1-2
3-3
4-11
2-3
0-J
1-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
2-2
3-5
21-37
a
0
0
1
1
8
1
0
0
0
0
0
11
Pf
3
3
4
3
2
0
0
0
2
0
3
21
tp
4
4
4
1
0
0
0
0
12
39
Cowboys destroy Bills, 52-17
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
.625, 3 pt Coals: 0-4
5, Blocked Shots - 2,
13.
fg ft rb
m-a m-a o-t
angleton 18 3-9 0-1 2-8
2-3 6S 2-11
5-7 2 4 3-4
3-6 0-0 2-6
3-6 0- 0-0
3 4 4 5 1-2
14 5-6 3-7
0-0 o-O 0-0
1-5 D
0-0 2 2
1-2 il : i
nl 0-0 0-2
1-5 3-3
200 26 20-27 1
� . I �
17.
Hill
Gilmore
Huntley
Robinson
Rowley
Mason
Craven
ids 11
12
Total
26
19
22
13
17
12
1
1
o
0
0
0
0
1
0
-4� 11
Pf
3
2
0
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
14
tP
6
10
12
6
8
11
13
0
2
2
3
0
75
( t!
1st half
14
:ml half OI
final
The Buffalo Bills fumbled, bumbled
and threw away their chance at winning
Sunday's Super Bowl match-up against
the Dallas Cowboys. The Bills, losing the
Super Bowl for the third year in a row,
weredestroyed 52-17 by a combina tion of
their own offensive blunders and the in-
ability of their defense to stop Dallas's
high-octane offensive attack.
The Cowboys forced nine Buffalo
turnovers, a Super Bowl record, as they
routed the AFC champions in the third
worst defeat in Super Bowl history.
Surprisingly, the Bills struck first af-
ter 5 minutes had elapsed, as starting
Bills quarterback jim Kelly drove his of-
fense down the field setting up a 2-yard
Thurman Thomas touchdown run. The
experienced Bills seemed ready to put the
"upstarts from Texas" far behind, until
two Cowboy touchdowns in the span ot
15 seconds had them shaking their hi ads
in disb lief.
I r. y Aikman was responsible for the
firstlowboy score,ashe ompleteda23
yard touchdown pass to Ja)
heCowboysfin i ba( k aftei tl
as a sack of Jim Kelly caused a critical
fumble and Cowboy defensive tackle
ji mmie Jones thundered into the endzone
for the final score of the first quarter.
Two touchdown passes to receiver
Michael Irvin put Dallas quarterback
Aikman in the spotlight, while a rare
Cowboy blitz put Jim Kelley out of the
contest midway through the second quar-
ter. The Bills had already committed four
turnovers: two interceptions and two
fumble
The Bills looked at the scoreboai
halftime and saw themselves behin
10 and wondered how they would I
come the w hirhvind they encountered in
the young Cowboy defense. When the
contest resumed the answer came riding
on a Dallas wind: They wouldn't.
Dallas struck once again in the
period after driving deep inside Bu
territory with 20 yardfieldgoal hi
countered, after taking advantage
rare opening in the Cowboy defen;
Frank Reich connected with Don 0
for a 40-yard score he owb
insurfaced,shuttingtl
with forced fuml
1" yard Norton fumble rec
theBillsdeft I





10 The East Carolinian
REC
FEBRUARY 2, 1993
Continued from page 9
fest if you wish to play in this tourna-
ment There are approximately 170
teams in the current Recreational Ser-
vices intramural league, so the compe-
tition is plentiful. For a spot in this
tournament you are going to ha to
work hard and fast
If you would like toshowoff your
skills and all-around abilities, step up
andgetonthecourtThisisyour chance
toputyour money where your mouth
is. This is your chanoe to show your
stuff or get laughed off the court
Showtime is now, Roundball Rama is
herd
Hard ROC Tower re-opens
The Recreation Outdoor Center
will reopen its climbing tower, located
behind the Allied Health Building,
Wednesday, Feb. 3 for the use of the
ECU Community. The tower, which
was used and used and used some
more during the first semester, will
again be available for use on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday from 3 until 5
pmandthenagainonSundayfroml
to4pm.
To use the tower, those
interestedare encouraged toattend a
climbingworkshop.Theseworkshops
are designed to teach the appropriate
equipment, skillsandbehaviorneeded
for the proper use of the tower. These
workshops are meant for your safety
and thatyou may beableto fully enjoy
your climbing experience. If you are
interested inatterKiingadimbingwork-
shop,stopbytheRecreationalOutdoor
CenterforfurtherdetaikTheflrstdimb-
ing workshop scheduled is being hdd
onFeb. 9at3p.m. Therearealsoseveral
clirrfcingworkshorbeingplanned for
March.
Wheneveryou fed anoverioad of
stress, anxiety or an abundance of en-
ergy, the Hard ROC tower is there for
you. It is an excellent outlet for positive
exsertion of energy as wdl as an out-
standing form of exercise. The tower
got an excellent billing from its first
semester users and has been a great
release for many partidpants.
If you have any questions about
the Hand ROC Tower, contact Recre-
ational Services at 757-6387 with any
inquiries.
Council improves programs
Recreational Services Advisory
Council is an organiza tion designed to
improvethequalityofprogrammingin
East Carolina's already excellent De-
partment of Recreational Services. Af-
ter much success in the past few years,
the staff at Rec Services finds itself con-
stantly reaching for even greater im-
provement and success. The Advisory
Council is one big step thatthe staff has
taken to hdp in achieving these goals
Thecouncilisrnadeupoftheheads
of each department at Rec Services,
representatives of the ECU students
and faculty, a few student employees
and the head of the Department of
Recreational Services, Nancy Mize.
The coundl serves as a communi-
cation link between the programs and
the campus community, with the goal
crfimprovingRecServicesprogramsso
that they meet the needs of the East
Carolina community.
In an aim for continued growth,
thecoundldiscussesandanaryzeseach
program area and the successes found
in that program so that improvements
may be made.
In the fall semester, the Advisory
coundl met four times and discussed a
variety of topics,indudingplans for the
new recreation building and ideas for
increased partidpation among East
Carolina students.TheAdvisoryCoun-
dl plans to meet once each month dur-
ing the spring semester, and hopefully
will be able toact upon the needsof the
students, faculty and staff here at East
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Communication is the key to suc-
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council hopes to improve the commu-
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wishes may be met
Toachieve this, the council some-
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various campus organizations to en-
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needs.
RecServioesalsotriestoparticipate
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possible to try to get a better feel for
student life.
This has served as a very helpful
tool in the Rec Services quest for im-
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 02, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 02, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.919
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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