The East Carolinian, January 28, 1993






ri -i.��
SUPER
SUNDAY
Sports
Super Balls
'Predictions of Sunday's
Super Bowl results from
our staff and campus
and community leaders
See page 10.
Lifestyle
Shell shock
Topsail Beach
volunteers helped over
100 baby turtles reach
the safety of the sea.
See page 7.
Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 6
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, January 28,1993
12 Pages
Freshman English classes seeing rise in plagiarism
By Laura Wiser
Staff Writer
Essay. Research paper. Procrastina-
tion. Plagiarism. A flow chart that a record
number of East Carolina University fresh-
men followed during the 1992 Fall Semes-
ter.
Although university administrators
did not have an exact figure available, Dr.
James Holte, chairman of freshman com-
position, said, "dozens of cases were re-
ported to his office which is extremely
high for one semester
Holte continued to explain that at-
tempting to compute a concise figure for
plagiarism on campus is difficult because
many casesare reconciled between the pro-
fessor and the student.
The ECU Student Handbook defines
plagiarism as "copying the language, struc-
ture,ideas, andor though tsof another and
adopting them as your own (p. 22). The
penalty for the offense ranges from rewrit-
ing the paper to expulsion from the univer-
sity, depending upon the circumstances.
Onestudent found guilty of plagiarism was
brough t to the Dean of Stud ents, discipl ined
by receiving a failing grade for the course,
and was issued a permanent tag on his
record.
Consequently, if another offense of
any form, social or academic, was brought
to the attention of the administration, the
student would automarJcallybedismissed.
Students whoallow fellow classmates
to borrow, copy or rewrite a paper from a
previous semester are also gu il ty of plagia -
rism and can be brought up on charges.
The computer age has brought new
difficulties and situations in the field of pla-
giarism. Holte explained that a few years
ago the major offense was
misdocumentation. Presently, studentsdis-
cover papers "floating" in computers and
decide to declare the essay as their own.
Because thestudentwhoauthoredtheorigi-
nal assignment rarely can produce a hand-
written rough draft, both students are re-
quested to rewrite the paper.
Proving plagiarism may be the hard-
est aspect of the offense for the professor to
learn. Marjorie McKinstry, a graduate stu-
dent who teaches 1100 and 1200 level En-
glish classes said teachingassistants are not
"taught how to detect plagiarism, but are
urged to be aware of it
ThealarmingfactortoMs. McKinstry
was the appearance of cases so early in the
semester. The easiest detection of the of-
fense is the vast difference of writing styles
between assignments. Students' gradual
improvement is noted throughout the se-
mester, but a drastic change of eloquence is
a signal to the professor that a student has
committed plagiarism, she said.
Some students do make discovering
plagiarism easy, McKinstry said. Turning
in a journal with the copied term paper
tucked in the last few pages, as one student
did, is a blunder a professor cannot ignore.
The su rprising factor was not the misplace-
ment of the paper,
but the original pa-
per had received a
grade of F.
"If a student is
going to take the time
to rewrite another
person's work, why
not take the time to
do the research your-
self and avoid the
risk of getting caught'McKinstry said.
Procrastination appears to be the ma-
jor reason studentscommit plagiarism. One
student, who wished toremain anonymous,
was requested to rewrite a paper that had
been copied from a fellow classmate. The
student admitted to knowing a paper was
due, but continually pushed the assign-
ment to the "back burner
"You know, your friends want to go
downtown,or something interestingcomes
on TV, any distraction is an excuse to
avoid writing the dreaded paper the stu-
"No beer in the world is worth
getting caught for plagiarism
failing class, repeating a semester
or getting dismissed from school,
-Marjorie McKinstry,
Graduate Student
dent said.
"Then, all of a sudden it's the night
before or two hours before class and you
still have no paper. You panic and run
down the hallway or pick up the phone,
begging someone to give you ideas or the
actual paper. You don't even think about
theconsequences until your professor wants
to see you after dass
"No beer in the world is worth getting
caught for plagiarism failing class, re-
peating a semester or getting dismissed
from school McKinstry said.
The munchies
i by Jason Bosch
Many students wait between their classes to get the meal of their choice at one of the many campus
soda shops.
Faculty senate accepts
revision in drop ad policy
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
The Faculty Senate voted
Tuesday to amend the dropadd
policy proposal which was op-
posed by the SGA.
The revision, presented by
the Ad Hoc Committee on Aca-
demic Regulations, included the
stipulation, "The student's aca-
demic record will reflect any
course drop This revision was
disputed by SGA president
Courtney Jones.
"The student body does
not agree with the last sentence
regarding the stipulation
Jones said. According to the re-
vision, students receive four
"free" drops for their entire col-
lege career at ECU. "Butthis
says 'we're going to punish you
for taking that drop Jones said.
The SGA had earlier sub-
mitted a proposal of its own for
the drop add policy. In the pro-
posal, Jones said, students
would have some free drops
while pursuing a degree. The
proposal also suggested a record
of any subsequent drops to ap-
pear on student transcripts.
The committee's proposal
recommended transcript
records for all drops.
"We wanted one or the
other, but not both Jones said.
"I think that's asking a little too
much
The committee's proposal
dealt with the time allowed for
dropadds for fall, spring and
summer terms and the number
of drops for incoming transfer
students. The SGA officialy op-
posed the proposal in October
claiming that it could extend stu-
dents' academic careers and dis-
courage enrollment in more
challenging courses. However,
the transcript rule was the only
one debated by Jones at the Sen-
ate meeting.
"My main goal is to leave
the policy as it is now Jones
said after the meeting. "I would
ratherbeefuptheadvisingsys-
tem
She offered the idea of
publishing professors' names in
the registration handout next
to the course and number to
facilitate students' options.
Jones stressed that the Fac-
ulty Senate's vote is not the last
word.
"The Board of Trustees has
final approval Jones said. "But
if the students still feel strongly
against it, I'll keep fighting it as
hard as possible
Art professor in national
exhibition and competition
International competition
attracted by prints and
drawings
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
Michael Voors, associate pro-
fessor in the ECU School of Art was
recently notified that one of his prints
has been accepted into the "National
Printmaking 1993" exhibition.
The show will run until Feb. 19
at Lycoming College in Williamsport,
Pa.
Voors' work is also included in
an international competition at Minot
State University called "Americas
2000: Works on Paper" and two other
national exhibitions, one at Loyola
Marymount University, "Los Ange-
les Frintmaking Society 12th Na-
tional Juried Exhibition" and the
other at Trenton, University of Wis-
consin-Parkside, Kenosha, Wis.
called the "7th Parkside National
Small Print Exhibition
"It goes through a jurying pro-
cess Voors said. "In a national
jurying show, what it refers to is that
it is open to all 50 states
Voors said he received a mes-
sage on his answering machine on
Jan. 24 from a reporter in Wisconsin
who wanted information on an
award Voors had just won.
Voors said that was all the in-
formation he had and was waiting
to find out more about what the
reporter was talking about.
Voors described his reaction to
the news as exciting and surprising.
He concentrates in the area of
prints and drawings, and that is
what will be in the exhibitions in
which he is involved.
"Its a matter of you first send
in slides or photographic material
he said. "In the second stage, you
send the actual work.
"Much of my work is con-
cerned with the passage between
spaces, in particular the interaction
between interior and exterior
Voors said. "It is most often an on-
going search for a harmonious bal-
ance between opposiles � as much
within me as within any observed
phenomenon
Voors got his artistic start in his
home state of Indiana, he is origi-
nally from Fort Wayne.
Herer ived a Bachelor of Fine
Arts form Indiana University
andlater received a Master of Fine
Arts from Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity.
He teaches intermediate and
figure drawing in ECU's School of
Art.
Fort Fisher Hermit to recieve recognition
By Sharon Anderson
Staff Writer
Harry Warren, of the Cape Fear
Museum, will host a slide show de-
picting the life of Robert Harrell, the
Fort Fisher Hermit, on January 30th at
3:00 p.m. at the Fort Fisher Aquarium.
Harrell will also be honored on his
100th birthday at his pill-box bunker
on the second of February.
Harrell (1893-1972) left his home
in Shelby, NC, for Fort Fisher at the
age of 62. He deserted Shelby because
he was "fed up with the way people
treated each other, and corrupt poli-
tics He wanted to start a school
teaching common sense.
Harrell moved to Fort Fisher in
1952. He lived in a bunker that was the
last strong-hold of the South in the
Civil War.
At first, many residents accused
him of being part of the Secret Service
and was sent here to spy on them. The
Air Force tried to evict Harrell from
the bunker by claiming the fort was
part of their air base. Harrell remained
in the bunker until his questionable
death in 1972 Homestead Act allowed
him to live there.
The Fort Fisher hermit was
found dead inhishomeonJune4,1972
by five teenagers who had come to
visit. The investigative deputy said he
had died of natural causes; and he did
not even report evidence of possible
violence to the coroner.
George Harrill believes his fa-
ther may have been
murdered because his
raincoat was wrapped
around his neck and his
clothes were full of
sand. Harrill believes he
may have been dragged
around in his sleeping bag until he had
a heart-attack.
According to columnist Micheal
Edwards, Robert Harrell wanted to
write a book. "Harrell left to write a
book called "A Tyrant in Every Home
Edwards said, because he believed that
abusive behavior went from genera-
tion to generation.
"It received that title because he
had an abusive grandfather and
uncles Edwards said.
Edwards also believes that Harrell
had already started his school of com-
mon sense by telling his ideas to the
numerous visitors he entertained.
The Fort Fisher Hermit was a stu-
dent of The Marcus Taylor School of
Bio-Psychology. Dr. Taylor said bio-
psychology is the "science of right
thinking, right attitude, right feelings
and right living
The hermit was born Robert
Harrill. He was a linotype operator and
a traveling jeweler until his wife left
and took their three sons. He changed
his name to Harrell because another
Robert Harrill in Shelby was receiving
his mail. His wife and sons Horton and
Luther disowned Harrell. Only his son
George and his sister Mae continued to
correspond with him.
Harrell left for Fort Fisher because
he was "fed up with the way
people treated each other, and
corrupt politics
ri
Durvij his marriage to Katie
Fergeson Harrell was acutely con-
scious of their class difference. He called
his in-laws corrupt and said they tried
to have him locked up in a mental insti-
tution.
Harrell also claimed that it was
their attitude towards him that caused
his marriage to fail.
When Robert Harrells' estate was
settled he had no cash assets or per-
sonal assets.
Researchers found almost $300
stuck around Harrells' bunker.
The money was buried in the yard,
stuck in coffee cans and stuffed into
small sacks around the hut.
Check it Out
Harry Warren, of the
Cape Fear Museum, will
host a slide show depicting
the life of Robert Harrell,
the Fort Fisher Hermit, on
January 30th at 3:00 p.m.
at the Fort Fisher
Aquarium.
S
T"





�The East Carolinian
JANUARY 28, 1993
Video Yearbook sets up filming days
Tk. Seuss works donated to U.C library
Ihankyou,thankyou,SamIAm.WedosolikegreenegPs
and ham. More than 4,000 scripts, manuscripts and drawings
belonging to the esta te of Theodor "Dr. Seuss" Geisel, one of the
nation's most popular authors of children's books, had been
donated to the library at the University of California at San
Diego. The collection of work by the Pulitzer Prize-winning
writer, which includes whimsical drawings and a doodle-filled
notebook from the 70s, is appraised at almost $2.3 million The
works were selected by Geisel's widow, Audrey, and include
scnpts from the Dr. Seuss television shows, "Cat in the Hat" T-
shirts and other commercial spinoffs, journals and cartoons A
fecrure hall in the newly expanded library will be named after
rheGeisel family, and will house a permanent Dr. Seuss exhibi t.
Professors discover Mayan tombs
Two University of Central Florida archaeologists have
uncovered a number of intact tombs belonging to the ancient
royalty of one of the most important kingdoms of Mayan
civilization. The discoveries culminate eight years of research
by husband-and-wife team Arlen F. and Diane Z. Chase were
madeat Caracol, a sprawling Mayan city in the jungles of Belize
The Chases found evidence of a large middle class population
in the city, which dispels the popular notion that Mayan society
wasdivided into the wealthy eliteand peasants. Information on
toe Caracol findings was presented recently in two National
(geographic programs on cable television and PBS.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
KEPLER'S
"YOUR PET SUPPLY DEALER"
Now
Featuring: Baby Ferrets
I
Coming
Soon: Cockatiels
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
For those who like to ham it up
in front of the camera, you will soon
get your chance as the ECU Commu-
nication Department is seeking par-
ticipants to appear in its inaugural
video yearbook.
Instead of offering the conven-
tional print yearbook as in years past,
the communication department will
preserve 1993 at ECU for all of poster-
ity on videotape.
The video yearbook will be
called the Treasure Chest and, in a
vote held at die Student Store, stu-
dents adopted the slogan 'Get Your
Face in the Treasure Chest' to publi-
cize the undertaking.
According to Matt Jones, a se-
nior Communication major and co-
producer of the yearbook, students
will have ample opportunity to ap-
pear on film. Forthreedays, Feb. 8-10,
the yearbook staff will set up the cam-
eras from 10 a.m2p.m. at different
locations. On the 8th, they will shoot
in front of the Student Store, on the
9th, atMendenhall and on the 10th at
College Hill.
"We want to give everybody�
Organizers
ore looking
lor campus
groups
and
individual,
to be a part
of the film.
Representatives
from Greek
organizations
posed in
front of the
fountain in
central
campus for a
video
yearbook
photo.
students, faculty and groups � a
chance to be in the yearbook Jones
said. "Besides fraternities and sorori-
ties, which we will hand le separately,
we especially encourage organiza-
tions and clubs to come out for the
shoot. Of course, a group could also
bea group of friends who just wantto
yell something in front of the cam-
era
Jones said that if too many
people show up at one time, he may
Kepler's Animal World
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schedule an additional taping at a
later date. "We want to insure that
everyone who wants to appear in the
yearbook,actuallygetsinJonessaid.
Jones also hinted that the video
will contain more than just a mon-
tageof faces. "Thoughcertainlynoth-
ing as elaborate as the 'morphing' in
Michael Jackson's video, we will try
to incorporate a few camera tricks of
our own Jones said.
The yearbook, a class project
by Jaacn Bosch
for communication majors, has been
underway for some time. "We have
about 12 or 13 people in our class
who have been working on it since
the end of last summer Jones said.
"The main thing is, we wantto
get everybody to come out. It won't
take more than a minute to sit in
front of a camera Jones said. "You
might as well participate. At least
then you would have something to
show that you were there
ECU SKI
SPECIAL SKI PROGRAM ANNOUNCED
FOR ECU STUDENTS & FACULTY
We are pleased to announce the establishment of a special
ECU Ski Program which is being made available by the
Wmterplace Ski Resort. ECU Students and Faculty wishing
to take advantage of this special ski program must present
their ECU identification card when purchasing lift tickets,
renting ski equipment, or renting a condo.
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Winterplacc Ski Resort is under new ownership and has vastly
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m �� WinterPlcice Ski Resort is located 16 miles South ofBeckley,
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If you need additional info or need to confirm
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For latest snow conditions, call
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�Bodysuits
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Student Discounts of 10
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DOMINO'S PIZZA presents
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-
� � i ��� k .�
3 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 28, 1993
NATIONAL
Life Alert: fallen and cannot get up
SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP)
� It was billed as a plan to help
the elderly easily summon help,
with ads featuring a woman cry-
ing, "Help! I've fallen and I can't
get up
But the self-styled good Sa-
maritan, Life Alert Emergency
Response Inc is on trial for al-
leged deceptive advertising and
high-pressure sales tactics.
District attorneys from
eight counties in the state and
the California Attorney
General's Office joined in the
consumer protection lawsuit,
which was filed in September
1991. The trial began Tuesday in
Sonoma County Superior Court.
Life Alert Emergency Re-
sponse, several of its executives
and its parent company, Shepher
Inc are accused of using mis-
leading sales tactics. The com-
pany is based in Chatsworth, in
Southern California.
"Their ads are riddled with
deceptive advertising said
Alameda County prosecutor
Christopher Carpenter in his
opening statement. "They're
more interested in making
money any way they can get it,
rather than helping people
The state is seeking a per-
manent injunction, restitution to
the customers and civil penal-
ties of $2,500 for each violation.
"The product is good. It is
not a scam said attorney Will-
iam McGivern, who represents
Shepher Inc. He said the state
"is attacking the method of mar-
keting
There may have been iso-
lated incidents in which sales-
people exaggerated the system's
merits, he said, but the state can't
prove a pattern on the part of
the company.
At the time the lawsuit was
filed, an undercover investiga-
tor from the Alameda County
District Attorney's Office said
he took sales training from the
company and was instructed to
"create a need and desire, an
anxiety" in customers.
The prosecutors also
claimed then that systems were
being sold for $1,700 to $5,000
that could be rented from local
hospitals for $25 per month.
They also said that Life Alert
dispatchers who fielded emer-
gency calls simply relayed them
to 911 operators in the user's
community.
McGivern said about
100,000 Life Alert systems have
been sold.
The system allows people
to call for aid by pressing a but-
ton on a electronic pendant that
is worn around the neck.
GET TAN!
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100
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Members $2 ADMISSION REDUCED Guests $3
FREE ADMISSION FRIDAY IS&l&ftt
The University Media Board
seeks Editors and General Managers
The University Media Board is seeking full-time students
interested in serving in the following stipended posts
for the 1993-1994 academic year:
EDITOR
Expressions minority students magazine ($175month)
EDITOR
The Rebel fine arts magazine ($175month)
GENERAL MANAGER
The East Carolinian student newspaper
(estimated 1392-1993 stipend $4,700)
GENERAL MANAGER
WZMB student radio station ($200month)
DAY STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
to the Media Board (no stipend)
All applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Monday, February 8
DOC
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January 28, 1993
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the 23 miles of Daytona Beach. For more Information, call
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BIG BEACH. BIG Hit
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. �





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Fred
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by Haselrig
The World of Ghannon and Elvis
by Whiteley and Brown
Pagiiacci
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by Mark Brett
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by Stephanie Smith
AFRICA! the movie is;
ElS.1 V ABOUT A TOY CLOWN !
" njsIHO STRETCHES VlNVI
OVER THE FACES OF
HIS VICTIMS TO KILL
ThEMLWHATDiD YOU
KPECT? ,������
BOWL" P4J5�J
BOLI'S
WATCH
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IfflMM
mwiiHirs
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if you missed last year's party, come
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5STREET
PIZZERIA
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The East Carolinian
January 28, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
R )R RKNT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
SHARE 2 BEDROOM apt $200
rent 12 utilities. On 10th St. be-
hind Pantry. Call Tom 830-5158
1 BR APARTMENT on 13th St
great for pets, esp. dogs. Available
immediately. $275mo. Call 752-
9197
LARGE 1 bedroom 1 bath apt. for
one or two people. Balcony, on site
laundry and pool. 10 minute walk
to ECU. Paid cable. $310month
830-8892
ROOYIATH WANTED
2 GRADUATE STUDENTS seek-
ing roommate to live in 3 td r. house
3mi. from ECU, 1 mi. from PCMH.
$160monthperson & $160 de-
posit. Call Jason or Mandel 756-
6614 or Jason 757-6318.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Convenient location to campus
with ECU bus transportation avail-
able-Furnished bedroom with Pri-
vate Bath, Cable, Telephone,
washerdryer, kitchen privileges-
"you tend to your business and I
tend to mine philcsophy
$175.00mon includes utilities.
Call 321-1848.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Wild-
wood Villas - Assume 13 bills
and $183.33 per month rent. 3
bedroom townhouse with washer
and dryerand convenient location
to college. Call us at 758-8115.
ROOMMATENEEDED: toshare
a townhouse apartment. Rent is
$160mon and 12 utilities. Con-
venient to campus and includes
ECU bus. Contact Stacy Peterson
atCarriage House Apartments, apt
60,321-1532.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED. 1 12 miles from ECU,
bus, $17250 12 utilities. Com-
pletely furnished. Nonsmoker.
Please call Ali at 752-1782.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share a two-bedroom
apartmentwill have own room.
$155mo rent 13 utilities. Must
be responsible, reliable, and easy-
going. If interested please call 830-
4983 � if no answer, leave mes-
sage Available ASAP.
IMMEDIATE OPENING Non-
smoking female roommate needed
for two bedroom condo Ringgold
towers for Feb - July 1993. $210
moplus half utilities (RENT NEG).
Serious inquiries only call collect
1-919-683-2023 Ask for Barbara
Rilley
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
to share apartment at Tar River.
13 rent and utilities. Call: 758-
8845. Leave message on answer-
ing machine.
ROOMMATENEEDED: Toshare
a two bedroom apartment at Wil-
son Acres. 1 3 rent and utilities.
Need soon as possible. Call after
4:30pm and ask for Rhonda. 830-
9066.
ROOMMATENEEDED: Toshare
a two bedroom apartment at Wil-
son Acres. 13 rent and utilities.
Need soon as possible. Call after
4:30 pm and ask for Rhonda. 830-
9066.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share 2 bedroom, 1
12 bath apartment at Carriage
House. $160month rent 12
electric. Call Christie at 756-9261.
(Leave message)
I �" R SALL
VALENTINES SPECIAL: Don't
forget to order early this year as
we run out every year. For just
29.95 you can get your lady 1 dozen
long stem red roses arranged and
FOR SALE
boxed. 757-1007
HEY NOW! HAND DRUMS: ce-
ramic and metal doumbeks,tablas,
bodhrans, frame drums, etc. Call
756-4226 for more information.
TAKE OVER CLUB FOR
WOMEN ONLY membership!
Save $59.00 initiation fee! ONLY
$29.00mo. Call today at 756-9235
and start the new year off right.
Please leave a message.
UNRELEASED LIVE CON CERT
& STUDIO RECORDINGS FOR
SALE: from the following artists:
U2, Clapton, Beatles, Zeppelin,
SRV, Black C rowes, Lenny Kravitz,
Hendrix, REM, Matthew Sweet,
More! Call 931-2573 and leave
name, number, and requested art-
ist on message.
GRADUATING: MUST SELL!
1988 ISUZU IMPULSE TURBO
� low miles, all extras plus spoil-
ers must see and drive: $6000.
Rockford Fosgate Punch 150 car
amp. $150, Blaupunkt 20x20 amp.
$50. Dorm size microwave $25.
New blue sports coat, size 40L $30.
New "Members Only" ski jacket
(whiteblue)$50 (never worn)Call
Tommy 752-9620
DAY BED, white, iron and brass
w2 twin size Orthopedic mat-
tresses and rol lout pop-up trundle.
Never used, in box. Cost $700. $310
cash. (919) 637-4421 after 6:30 pm.
BRASS BED, queen size wframe
and deluxe Orthopedic mattress
set in factory box. Can't use. Cost
$750, sacrifice $285 cash (919) 637-
4421 after 6:30 pm.
MACINTOSH SE, 1MB RAM, 32
MB HD Imagewriter Printer, $750.
Call 752-2261 after 5 pm.
FOR SALE'830Idsmobile Firenza
AC Auto AMFM Cassette, Tilt,
Cruise $1500. 9" and 13' color TV,
Zenith, $125, $85 Call Liang-Chi
752-9125 leave message.
SKI BOOTS FOR SALE: 1993
Salomon sx 42, size 10. Never Been
Worn. Call 758-7005 . Price nego-
tiable. Please leave message and I
will return your call.
ANTED
SAVE on Spring Break '93! Ja-
maica, Cancun, Bahamas from
$459 Florida from !149! Organize
group and travel free! Contact
Susan @931 -7334 or call Sun Splash
Tour s todayl-800-426-7710.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING -
Earn $2000monthworld travel
(Hawaii, Mexico, the Caribbean,
et) Holiday, Summer and Career
employment available. No expe-
rience necessary. For employment
program call 1-206-634-0468 ext.
C5362.
ORIGINAL ARTWORK
WANTED! Looking for art that
would look good on T-shirts. We
will pay for the exclusive use of
your work. Call for an appoint-
ment 752-6953.
POOL MANAGERSAQUATIC
DIRECTORS �several positions
in Greenville & Nags Head areas.
Must be 21 yrs or older. Deadline
Feb. 21. Call Bob Wendling, 756-
1088.
TOPLESS DANCERS WANTED:
Great club, great money, unbeliev-
able tips. Work Thursday, Friday,
Saturday, 9 pm-2am. Call Sid 919-
735-7713 or Paul 919-736-0716.
MothersPlayhouse in Goldsboro.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing
brochures! Sparefull time. Set
own hours! RUSH stamped enve-
lope: Publishers (CI) 1821
HillandaleRd.lB-295Durham,NC
27705
BRODY's AND BRODY's FOR
MEN are accepting applications
for part-time sales associates. Flex-
ible schedule Salary clothing d is-
count. Apply Brody's The Plaza
HELP WANTED
MonWed. 1-4 pm
SPEND A SUMMER in New
Hampshire. Outstanding boys
girls sports camps located on New
England's largest lake are recruit-
ing individuals for all staff posi-
tions, including nurses. Applicants
must be able to assist in the in-
struction of an activity. For more
information, call Kyle at (919) 847-
4430.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for waitstaff at Professor
O'CooIs between 2-4 pm daily. No
phone calls accepted. Located be-
hind Quincy's Steak House on Gre-
enville Blvd.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES:
The Greenv ille Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the spring indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the soccer skills and
have the ability and patience to
work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people ages
5-18 in soccer fundamentals. Hours
are from 3 pm to 7 pm with some
night and weekend coaching. This
program will run from the first of
March to the first of May. Salary
rates start at $4.25 per hour. For
more information please call Ben
Jam esorMichael Daly at830-4550.
NEED FULL OR PART-TIME
non-smoking caregiver in my
home for 4 month old. Transpor-
tation and references required.
830-9082
SERVICES OFFERED
�"AWESOME SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Bahamas Cruise 6 Days
Includes 10 Meals, Great Beaches &
Nightlife! $279! Panama City
Beachfront Rooms With Kitchens
$119, Key West Oceanfront Hotel
$249, Daytona Beachfront Rooms
With Kitchens $149, Cancun $459,
Jamaica $479! Springbreak! 1-800-
678-6386
�"AWESOME SPRING BREAK
BAHAMAS CRUISE $279! In-
cludes 6 days in Bahamas, 10 meals!
Sail from Florida! Beautiful Beaches,
Great Nightlife! Drinking age 18!
Springbreak 1- �0-678-6386
���FREE DAYTONA SPRING
BREAK��Organizeonly 18people
and travel free! Stay at the Howard
Johnson's Beachfront from only
$149! CALL NOW! Take A Break
Vacations 1-800-328-SAVE
PORTRAITS DONE great gifts for
Mothers and Fathers day or birth-
days. Parents,siblings, pets,etc.done
$25 and up. For info, call Sean 931-
8162.
BABYSITTERFORHIREtrusrwor-
thy,seniorwith plenty of babysitting
experience. Call 321-2835 leave mes-
sage if no answer.
SERVICES ()FFERED
TUDENT
VAP
HOP
FORMERLY ESTATE SHOP
COIN & RING MAN
BUYING
& SELLING
w
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Jewelry(goodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
ATTENTION SPRING BREAKERS
Party Like Gods
Panama City $139. Key West $269.
Jamaca & Cancun from $450. Quality
Accomodations, Free Drink Parties'
Call Joe! ENDLESS SUMMER TOURS
1-800-234-7007
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in just a few days!
Pius a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself!
No cost. No obligation.
1-800-932-0528, ext. 65
I ZgZr �c&v Soilir�9 Void Crorars Val
�T tt.c. Bakamas or t&m Kes tt
K tttkre, tmMrfa �ee wds
nj�y fie,t(tie u'tttfior Bub Jjj
J W wfferfcram
,l-800-780r
BREAKS
PRICES FOR STAY�NOT PER NIGHT!
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND'109
5 ana 7 NIGHTS
DAYTONA BEACH� 68
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
PANAMA CITY BEACHJ 81
5 AND 7 N'HTS
STEAMBOAT'129
2 5 AND 7 NIGHTS
MUSTANG ISLAND
PORT ARANSAS'132
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
HILTON HEAD ISLAND'121
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
FORT LAUDERDALE'146
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
VAIL 1 BEAVER CREEK'299
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
12th Annual
Party!
TOLL FREE INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS
1-800-321-5911
LOSTAND FOUND
14K GOLD HEART bracelet lost
on main campus or around the
Freshman parking lots on Reade
Street. If found please contact Lara
at 931-9936. This bracelet is very
sentimental to me and a reward
will be offered for its return.
FOUN D at Speight bus stop. Gold
Bracelet. Call 757-1946.
PERSONALS
ECU RUGBY wants all interested
parties to know that you don't have
to be socially acceptable to play
rugby. Come out and play behind
Allied Health Tuesday - Thursday
at 3:30 pm.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN would
like to thank all of the models who
participated in the advertising
campaign. Thepictures look great!
THE BROTHERS OF KAPPA
DELTA RHO hope all fraternities
had a successful Spring Rush
CINDY, NICOLE, NIKKI, Piglet,
Blockbuster - We hope all of your
sweet tooth fantasies come true.
JustbePREPAREDforSatnight If
not your guardian angels will pro-
tect you from tooth decay. Happy
21st!
HAPPY, HAPPY, JOY, JOY:
Happy birthday, Cori. 22 years old
and ready to take on the pool sharks
in New York. They're in trouble.
DELTA CHI congratulates Todd
Holloway on becoming LFC Phi-
lanthropy Chairman, and Sam
Matheny for becoming IFC Public
Relations Chairman.
SIGMA PHI EPS1LON: We can't
wait forthe Nuclear Waste Bid party
on Saturday! love. Alpha Delta Pi!
ALPHA PHI would like to con-
gratulate the newly initiated Sis-
ters: Amanda Baer, Becky Bartelt,
Katy Bonney, Wendy Bostian, Julie
Breazeale, Cathy Choate, Kim
Curless, Tanga Dunn, Courtney
Faison, Janet Funderburk, Mindy
Graham,TamiHakouz,Wendi Hill,
Heather Joyce, Candace Krause,
Kathy Molnar, Amy Moss, Jennifer
Perry, Jenny Ramsey, Jodi
Rittenhouse, Amy Rogers, Kristen
Schiavone, Lynne Smith, Wendy
Spencer, Candace Sullivan, Kris
Tonn, Jonni Wainwright, J.P.
WorleyandMelindaSikes! We are
proud to call you our Sisters!
CONGRATULATIONS to all the
new EC and PC officers of ZTA!
President - Nikki Richards, VPI -
Alaina Sieg, VPU - Kim Macanga,
Recoding Secretary- Jill Wagner,
Treasurer - Rebecca Pulley, Histo-
rianReporter - Jennifer Sparboe,
Ritual Chairman - Renee Tinch,
Panhellenic Delegate - Rhonda
Sortino, Membership Chairman -
Sherry Price, Standards - Jennifer
Shetzley,Social Chairman -Christy
Barbour,Service-Krista Roth, Scho-
lastics - Jen Lyons, Music Pamela
Oliver, Judicial -Julie Hays,House
Manager- Sherry Price, Alumnae -
Lisa Melisaukas,Social (In-house) -
Krista Dalkowski, Intermurals -
DeanaCale, Sisterhood Relations-
Pamela Oliver, GAMMA Chairman
- Jennifer Stewart, GAMMA Alter-
nate - Jennifer Tysinger, Asst.
Panhellenic - Leslie Reno, Asst.
Membership - Alicia Nisbet, Asst.
DPP - Hillary Krirn, Correspond-
ing Secretary - Leslie Murry. Love,
The Sisters.
PI KAPPA ALPHA - The day was
Sun but the weekend wasn't done,
it was off to the Ramada for some
Hawaiian style fun. With the Beta
Rho's in charge we were all good to
go, ending up on Rotary who was
to know? Anthony's room served
as the dance floor, and Christine's
snowsleeveswerecertainrynobore.
But the attraction of the night were
Beth's happy feet, so THANKS
again Pi Kappa Alpha for a social
hard to beat! Love, The Sisters of
Alpha Omicron Pi.
ALPHA OMICRON PI - It all be-
gan at the Elbo Fri. night, all of
thosepeople-ohwhatasight Next,
came Sat. a day not soon forgot,
those 10 am meetings are never so
hot! The iniation of pledges was as
all time high, and thanks to Jenny
there wasn't a dry eye! But, the
afternoon passes quickly and soon
it was night, and with a party on 4th
we knew it would be done right.
Kris Kross and his gang were defi-
nitely funny, and as usual there
was lots of "Big Money Though
memories for Beta Rho's from that
night will surely haunt, but as far as
we're concerned, you're the best
new Sisters a soroity could ever
want! Love , Your Sisters.
CONGRATULATION TO AL-
PHA XI DELTA'S '93 executive
officer. Pres. - Tiffany Ferretti, V
Pres - Roberta Ferguson, Treasurer
- Christine Burdt, Recording Secre-
tary - Megan Ferretti, Corr Secre-
tary - Robin Helms, Pledge Educa-
tor - Ashlee Barnes, Philanthropy -
Dede Folk, Membership - Scarlet
Parks, Quill - Pheobe Dicerson,
Marshall - Ashley Shields, Finan-
cial - Sallie Williamson, Historian -
Caroline Hardesty, Ritual - Nicole
Shelby, Alumni - Pauline
Richardson, Social - Robin Helms
and Trina Campbell, Panhellenic -
Tamara Blanton, Scholarship -
Datherine Lynch,Chaplin-Christy
Hutson.
PHRSONALS
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to our favor-
ite stud muffins, David Daniel and
Max Price. This weekend will be
made for celebrating, especially
with your heaven sent significant
other and the "rug-rats Love that
you were born. Deb and Jane.
TOTHEBROTHERSofPiLambda
Phi: Friday night my friends and I
had a great time. Hope to do IT
again guys. Have good Rush. Love
Lisa M.
PI KAPPA PHI: We can't wait 'till
Friday Night Bid Day Party to meet
your new pledges. Love Alpha
Phi.
PIKA'S: We had a great time last
Fridaynight. Hope to seeyou again
soon! (Except for maybe those two
very brave young men). Love, The
Sisters and Pledges of Pi Delta.
S1G EPS: We're looking forward
to the Super Bowl party on Sunday!
Love the Sisters and Pledges of Pi
Delta.
PI DELTA PLEDGES: Hang in
there! Your time will come! We
love You! The Sisters.
ALL FRATERNITIES: Hope Rush
is going well for you Good Luck!
Love, The Sisters and Pledges of Pi
Delta.
SIG TAU'S: It was great being a
part of last Saturday night. Let's do
something again soon! Love, The
Sisters and Pledges of Pi Delta.
SHEILA SLOAN AND JERRY
HARDESTY - BEST WISHES TO
YOUR FUTURE. Love, your Sis-
ters Alpha Xi Delta.
CONGRATS to the Alpha Omi-
cron Pi basketball team on their 1-0
record! Keep up the good work!
Love your Sisters.
TO ALL FRATERNITIES: We
hope you're having a successful
rush. Good Luck! The Chi Ome-
gas.
PI KAPPA ALPHAS: We enjoyed
two-stepping, and burning coaches
with you. We'll have to do it again
sometime! Love, Chi-O.
YOU KIDS are perfect for each
other. I'm very happy for you &
wish you the very best life has to
offer.
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVES
Karen Bilyj
Lindsay Fernandez
Matt Hege
Aimee Lewis

Brandon Perry
CALL 919-757-6366
today for more
advertising information

I �
I
Announcements
P.U.S.H.THROI1C.HTMF
BARRIERS
If you would like to work
owards reducing the architec-
tural, as well as the attitudinal
barriers that students with spe-
cial needs are faced with every
day, then come to the next meet-
ing of P.U.S.H. (People United
to Support the Handicapped).
Meetings will be 5:00 - 6:00 on
Thursdays in Cotten Hall Lobby.
Come join th� fun
�a'
CATHOdrSTimFNT
NEWMAN CriSiTFR
Wondering what you
should get your Valentine? On
February 8th and 9th the Catho-
lic Student Newman Center is
having a fundraising event. Or-
der a carnation for your special
someone and we'll deliver it any
where on campus. Look for us
between 8:30 am and 3:30 pm in
front of the Student Store.
CATHOLIC STUDFNT
NEWMAN CENTER
Sunday Mass: 11:30 am at
the Newman Center and 8:30 pm
at the Newman Center
Wednesday Mass: 5:30
pm at the Newman Center (Fol-
lowed by fellowship Meal)
ECU LAW HONOR SOCIFTY
The ECU Law Honor So-
ciety will be holding their first
meeting of Spring Semester on
Mon Feb. 1, 1993 at 5:15 in 218
Ragsdale. New members are
invited to attend and become
involved in interesting discus-
sion of various legal issues and
careers.
PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
Martha Graham is con-
sidered one of the first innova-
tors of modern dance. The En-
semble will perform on Jan. 29,
1993, at 8 pm presenting a dance
program that showcases
Graham's style � focusing on
breathing techniques. The
dancer;s movements unfold, ori-
ental - style, from the center of
the body, and the dancers wear
loose - fitting clothing.





'�8h
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- - �-
The East Carolinian
January 28, 1993
Opinion
Page 6
Legislators must re-evaluate purpose
N.C. State legislators have once again ham-
pered the education process in North Carolina
with red tape and bureaucratic murnbo-jumbo.
In 1991, the Legislature enacted a freeze on
any increase of student fees within the UNC
college system. Currently, the UNC Board of
Governors are conducting a study to determine
the status of student fees throughout the state.
After the studv is concluded, the Legislature
the Legislature. Joyner is only a minor symptom
of what could rum out to be a full-fledged
epidemic. If the freeze is continued by the state,
current services offered by ECU � including
some that are taken for granted by students,
such as health services � could be diminished,
if not abolished.
The university bases future plans and im-
provements for campus on small raises each
will vote on any suggested changes made by the year in student fees. With this freeze in effect,
Board the university will be forced to raise the fees
This freeze has temporarily halted any fur- substantially when the freeze is lifted. No more
ther plans for the renovation of ECU's Joyner will the fees go up by five or ten dollars � after
Library. While Todd Dining Hall and the new the freeze, expect a jump as high as $30 or $40 a
recreation center proceed as planned, Joyner semester.
must wait for the legislators to pick up their feet
and stop dragging their heels.
The reasons why the dining hall and the rec
center are continuing forward are complex, but
can be broken down (albeit simply) into a few
sentences. Joyner is considered by the state as an
education building, therefore, funds for it must
come from the state. Todd Dining Hall and the
rec center do not fall under this umbrella, so
funds have been acquired from other sources.
Construction bonds have been bought for the
two ventures that will be paid off by already
existing fees.
University officials cannot be blamed for
this bureaucratic snafu; their hands are tied by
The N.C. State legislators need to take a
long, hard look at what their purpose is. They
have been elected to serve as the public's repre-
sentatives and to further that same public's
needs. By forcing the UNC system to endure
this bureaucratic red tape, they are coming
dangerously close to alienating a major portion
of their constituents.
In short, legislators, lift the freeze. Show
the traditional and non-traditional students alike
in North Carolina that you do have their inter-
ests at heart, not your own petty and personal
agenda. Better the state of education in North
Carolina and possibly, iust possibly, you'll be
re-elected next term.
By Gregory Dickens
Gays in military upholds liberty, justice
At least no one can say years
from now mat Clinton's first 100
days were uneventful.
After losing his nominee for
attorney general to an ethically-con-
scious approval committee, taking
heat for placing his daughter in a
private school and reversing his ap-
provalof mass Haitian irrarogration,
the new president, in a refreshing
change of political pace, is trying to
implement one of his campaign
pr jmises via an executive order.
However, planning to allow
publicly-acknowledged homosexu-
als into the military and successfully
doing so are worlds apart Not only
is he battling a 50-year-old ban, he
also faces the largest civil-rights con-
flictsinceBrown v. Board efEducation,
Topeka (1954). His enemy in this in-
stance isnot just Congressional hesi-
tance to choose a stance but also
generations of social stigma for ho-
mosexuals.
Clinton has to overcome the
ignorance of the general population.
Homosexuals have only recently
been even close to social admittance
hymedassstmcture-Dominantcon-
servative values have forced any
deviating tastes and practices to ex-
ist in a social underground.
The existence of such an un-
derground has led to the exodus of
manyhomosexuals,especiallyteens,
from the middle-class suburbs they
grew up in to the large cities, where
there is anatmosphereof acceptance.
And they have no incentive to re-
main home.
The dearth of openly-gay resi-
dents there, along with intolerant
religious groupsand cynical gossip-
ing that forces neighbors to project
anairoftrarquilblandness,r�aselimi-
nated any connection, much less
understanding or concern towards
homosexuals.
This lacking can be compared
to the suburban resistance toward
blacks since integra tion became con-
stitutional law. The "there-goes-the-
neighborhood"attitudeupon expo-
sure to anything outside the status
quohampersanychance ofClinton's
order being carried out with mini-
mal difficulty. Not only do theplain-
tiffswantthesubjectof their petition
to be away from them, but com-
pletely away from any possible
chance of contact that may poison
their view of society.
I hate to say it, but political
correctness had one good point
Anyone subscribing to the careful
labelling and blanket acceptance
couldn't dismiss a differing view-
pointorclose their eyestoit Because
of this, there has been a certain de-
gree of social approval. Unfortu-
nately, it has come in the form of
kitsch and sit-coms.
� TV welcomes newlifestyle
Remember theRopersand Mr.
Ferley from "Three's Company"
making fun of, but tolerating Jack's
living with two women because he
claimed to be gay? Remember the
gay chef from "Golden Girls" who
was removed from the show be-
cause the NBC feared it would be
unpopular? How 'bout "Love,
Sydney" wherein Tony Randall, in
the lead role of a homosexual, was
never allowed to say the word gay?
Possibly the only facet of society to
accept homosexuals fully is the en-
tertainment industry. As a result,
homosexualsarebeingadmitted into
the mainstream but on the level of
Bojangles and Stepin Fetchit; it is a
beginnii .g, but it shows how far we
have to go.
Clinton's most difficult prob-
lem is the military itself. A major
concern of the opposition to gay ad-
mittance is the regulation of sexual
practices off-hours. Considering
mesepeoplearegiventrainingtokill
and survive in the wilderness, it
should be assumed that they can
and will conduct themselves as
adults, something they were doing
before they volunteered for service.
The military is responsible for train-
ing individuals to protect and serve
our country and that is where the
responsibility ends. I'm confident
thatrhose individuals can choose on
their own a lifestyle mat they deem
appropriate.
� Military must change
Thearmedforceshasearnesliy
atternptedtokeeptheimageof those
who serv as tough, intelligent re-
sourceful c yd male. Virile, hairy, ci-
gar-smoking and with enough test-
osterone to choke a horse. Pride and
manhood are on the line.
Our few and proud are threat-
ened not by the Godless commies or
the curse of fascism or totalitarian-
ism, but by men and women who
want to be with others and express
themselves as they see fit which, by
the way, is a Constitutional right as
long as their actions do not infringe
upon others.
Wearearguingaboutpossible
admittance of homosexuals when
we haven't even fully allowed
women tobe in combat roles. Desert
Storm raised a sizable debate on that
topic which was later buried by the
Presidential campaign. The recent
"Tailhook" scandal involves 30
women alleging harassment and
assault.
"With liberty and justice for
all" isn't just a slogan. It should be
the creed the military seeks to up-
hold, without judgement or bias.
Considering that people join the
military to serve their country (a
noble desire and effort), perhaps the
Pentagon should be appreciative of
the lengths these individuals are go-
ing to in order to serve.
It is apparent that the military,
basically a large group of men wav-
ing tradition and armaments, is not
going to be easily molded to fit
Clinton's agenda.
However, the armed forces
must be aware that the President is
the Commander-In-Chief and that
the tail, no matter how determined,
cannot wag the dog.
THE BUCK STOPS HERE
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Dai I Reed, Photo Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters shouldbe addressed to The Editor, 77ieEajCaroZii(aj, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C, 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
ALL'S NOT FAIR IN LOVE ANP WAR
By Mike Joseph
Removal of gay ban inconsiderate to soldiers
It appears that President
Clinton will soon make good on a
campaign promise by issuing an
Executive Order lifting the 50-
year-old ban on gays in the mili-
tary. Senator Dan Coats (R-Ind.)
has said he will organize a coali-
tion of senators to oppose the
President's action. The battle has
been joined.
In leading the drive to en-
force the ban, Sen. Coats told the
Associated Press: "1 don't think
the military is the place to try a
social experiment But in saying
this, the senator ignores the
military's history of adapting to
social change far more quickly
than the civilian world.
� Ignore history and
For example, a special com-
mittee in 1941 wrote an impas-
sioned letter to the Secretary of the
Navy pleading that he consider
"the close and intimate condition
of life aboard ship, the necessity
for the highest possible degree of
unity and esprit-de-corps, and the
requirements of morale" before
allowing black seamen to fight
alongside white sailors. Despite
this advice, the military was inte-
grated before even the public
schools, and integration has
proved so right and so successful
that today the highest ranking
military officer in the land �
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff Colin Powell�is black. Fur-
ther, if one were to substitute the
words "homosexual" for "black"
and "heterosexual" for "white" in
the 1941 appeal, one would per-
fectly paraphrase the argument
used by Sen. Coats and others sup-
porting the ban.
While Coats loses touch with
history, the President can point
directly to it. Great warriors such
as Alexander the Great, Richard
the Lionhearted and Lawrence of
Arabia have left evidence suggest-
ing that they were gay. Homo-
sexuality was very much accepted
within the ranks of the successful
armies of ancient Greece. More
recently, the U.S. Army deployed
known homosexual reservistsdur-
ing the Gulf War. These troops
performed acceptably,butarenow
in danger of becoming part of the
1000 people The New York Times
reports are discharged annually
for admitting they are gay.
In 1989, the Pentagon com-
missioned a study which found
that the anti-gay policy was irra-
tional. The report never got be-
yond draft form and was rejected
as "technically flawed Another
report, which was never submit-
ted, found that gay soldiers were
less likely to drink, take drugs or
have disciplinary problems than
non-gay soldiers. Other countries
such as Australia, Canada, France,
South Africa and Japan admitgays
with no apparent problems. Great
Britain's policy of excluding gays
is under Parliamentary attack. The
old Soviet Union, however,
awarded five year prison terms to
soldiers who came out of the closet
So it would seem that the
powers of logic, decency and evi-
dence are allies of President
Clinton. If indeed they are, even
those of us who feel offended by
the president's policy must sub-
mit to its higher reason. We who
then must submit include people
like Gen. Colin Powell � a man
whose vast talents have been be-
stowed upon this nation because
of our willingness to change bad
social policy. But sinceGen. Powell
is a product of social change, and
if the policy banning gays is com-
parable to that of racial segrega-
tion, why does Gen. Powell op-
pose the president on this issue?
� Dissension in the ranks
Gen. Powell is opposed be-
cause racial segregation and a ban
on homosexuals are not compa-
rable. Racial segregation is not con-
sistent with the values and prin-
ciples adhered to by most Ameri-
cans. Neither is homosexuality.
A1988 survey by the Ameri-
can Sociological Association found
that 80 percent of Americans
"strongly disapprove" of homo-
sexuality, up from 75 percent a
decade earlier. Gay activists might
call this a "homophobic" mental-
ity, and insist that by breaking
down the barriers to homosexu-
als, "straight" society would see
that gays are as capable, patriotic
and reliable as any other citizen.
This, in the end, defines the
issue behind President Clinton's
move to lift the ban on gays. It is a
battle of principle; a war on val-
ues. The ban on gays reflects a
society that establishes some be-
haviors as right and some as
wrong. To lift the ban would
greatly alter not only activities
which Americans would be ex-
pected to tolerate, but the very
concept of how America is per-
ceived abroad.
In his push for a government
that "looks like America Presi-
dent Clinton has failed toconsider
a government that thinks and feels
like America. Homosexuality in
this country is widely disapproved
of, so the military should not be
expected to accept something the
majority of Americans don't ac-
cept.
The most recent studies in-
dicate that gays comprise about 4
percentof the U.S. population,yet
activists representing this small
group have managed to push their
agenda from the New York public
schools (through the book
"Heather has Two Mommies") to
the national level (through the
military). It is greatly inconsider-
ate of the president of the United
States to force his people to em-
brace that which most find abhor-
rent.
It is particularly inconsider-
ate of our soldiers, sailors, airmen
and Marines. Napoleon said that
the morale is to the material as
ten-to-one. What true Com-
mander-in-Chief would be so will-
ing to upset the delicate and hard
gained balance of comradeship (a
balance more essential to combat
survival than any technology) sim-
ply to enforce a social policy which
benefits so few? Only one who
loathes the military (as Bill Clinton
said he did). Because he doesn't
understand soldiers and how to
lead them, Clinton has introduced
himself to his troops by ordering
them, not to risk their lives, but to
ignore their values. For this,
Clinton will be despised by his
troops, and every order he issues
hereafter will be met with suspi-
cion rather than with "gung-ho"
enthusiasm.
It should not matter so much
touswhatothercountries do. Our
military is vastly superior to any
mentioned above. Also, if we wish
to defer to history, the three na-
tions which still exclude gays (US
Britain, Soviet Union) are the same
three which led the Allied forces
to victory in World War II.
� Whaf s the real issue?
President Clinton is right
that gay people are people, and
that they are capable of great citi-
zenship and high achievement
This is not about hating gays. It's
about establishing boundaries and
standards. This is reflected in a
recent Newsweek poll which
showed that 72 percent of those
polled thought gays could per-
form adequately in the military,
53 percent think President Clinton
should not lift the ban on gays in
the military. Yes, they can per-
form. No, there are certain places
where they don't belong.
If PresidentClinton succeeds
in eliminating the ban on gays in
the military, he has indeed effected
a major change, but it's a change
unwanted by most Americans. If
we continue to relax standards of
acceptable behavior in deference
to a philosophy of becoming a so-
ciety that embraces everyone, we
will weaken our values and blur
our identity.
If that's the kind of change
you wan t, rela x a nd enjoy the show
�yourprospectslookprettygood
right now. If that's not the kind of
change you want, call your
congressperson.
-4
:
15 '
V





�� '�'����
TJie East Carolinian
January 28, 1993
Lifestyle
t
Chapel Hill's Jennyanykind
promises brilliant show
Page 7
By Thomas Croft
Staff Writer
Anybody own a label? If so,
please sign Chapel Hill's
Jennyanykind. If not, please
check out their upcoming show Jan. 30 at
OTtockafeller's.
After only $900 and four days in the
studio with regional rising-star producer
Caleb Southern, the trio with theT.S. Eliot-
inspired name had crafted a brilliant full-
length LP. Now they're touring balsac and
all they need is a label.
Singer and guitarist Michael Holland
moved to Chapel Hill from Clemson, S.C
a year ago to start a band. His twin brother,
Mark, moved up a bit later to replace then-
drummer Peele Wimberly (of The
Connells),andJennyanykindbecame com-
plete when bassist Tom Royal wandered
in via a want ad.
Helped by the bulge Chapel Hill is
putting in the super fly blue jean scene
Norm Carolina's got going in the fashion
wave-machine sown by national pop cul-
ture media, Jennyanykind defiantly sticks
out.Evasiveof super chunky,(dillon)fence
stradd ling pop jelly, quicker to the cut than
the Peggies, Polvos and Pipes of Chapel
Hill, the Jennys whip retro-reruns with
eclectic effex '90s rare-flare smash grind,
raw and sweet and only with three people.
It's what the Romans would have done if
they Gibsons and Marshall stacks and
mounds of pedals and stomp.
Hey, it's the Michael Holland Experi-
ence.
Catch it � Jennyanykind � this Sat-
urday, Jan. 30, at CRocks. Go to the show
or blow your randomly perverse existence
withreticentignoranceand blatancy to the
inth degree.
So what's the big deal with these un-
signed no-name, whiz kid, big-label fame-
n-glory have-to-bes? Well for one, they
make the Minneapolis-spawned flannel
craze new hippoid fodder for the angst
generation.
Second, they espouse nasty screaming
and dysfuntioncal feelings fostered by dis-
placed childhoods and raucous feedback.
At times, in throbbing contrast, it's
Topsail Turtle educates
through preservation
Project founded in
memory
of deceased daughter
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy Jennyanykind
Clockwise from left: Tom Royal, Mark Holland and Michael Holland of Jennyanykind.
tender stuff, what bouquets and backrubs
by fireplaces are made of.
Jennyanykind's LP, Etc is ready-made
A&R candy: three shaggy slackers crank-
ing out dirty, brilliant music they don't
know what to do with. Michael Holland,
who writes all the lyrics, says the twelve-
song albun i is a concept record of sorts. "It's
about this guy who's so closed out from the
world that he retreats to things. It's pretty
dark stuff
Actually, theconceptuality of Etc. pro-
vides a lyrical coherence that in turn links
the musical variance of each song. (Nice
gobbledeefluff,eh?)
Rowdy thrash beats in 34 time, sly
jazzy interludes, straight-ahead four chord
grunge, down-tempo ballads with trippy
effects and bleedy vocals, and overall way-
catchy songwritingmakea nondescript title
a definitive artpiece worth noting, hyping
and, if you're into the industry thang, sign-
ing.
Jennyanykind is featured on Starter, a
meatless CD hodge-podge of unsigned lo-
cal and regionalartists.ThoughStorter isn't
worth buying, it's the only way to hear
recorded Jennyanykind (they have two
tracks on the album).
(Their LP is a demo and not for sale.
Butmaybe they'll sell itattheirshowSatur-
day night live. Ask.) Raleigh-based Insur-
gence, also featured on Starter, will open
for Jennyanykind atO'Rocks,alongwitha
local band, maybe.
Live, Jennyanykind inevitably sounds
thinner man on record (since they rock
sans guitar overdubs), but Michael Hol-
land fares well with thick distortion and an
impressive vocal deliveryscreamfest
Particularly great tunes (and crowd
pleasers) live are "The Way It Is "Gar-
den "Windchimes and an undeniably
Pixiesque ballad bash, "Starlite,Starbrite
For good vibes and dynamic trio
sounds, dig O'Rocks Saturday, Jan. 30.
If you're a business major, start a label
and bring a contract to the show.
Sea turtles pre-date dinosaurs.
These creatures have been a part of
aquatic nature for thousands and thou-
sands of years. A lower species of the
turtles we see now claimed territory in
the ocean long before human eyes saw,
taste or felt water.
In the past 20 years the turtle popu-
lationhasdropped toalarmingnumbers
and sent signals to environmentalists
thatour degradation of thesea is becom-
ing apparent.
Every species of turtles is either on
the endangered or threatened species
list.
The community of Topsail Beach
has banded together to preserve and
protect their dear friends in nature.
The Topsail Turtle Project was
formed in 1987 by Jean Beasly and her
now-deceased daughter Karen. The
project's two major goals are preserva-
tion and community education.
Last fall Topsail Island surfers, vol-
unteers for the Topsail Turtle Project,
and the town of Topsail Beach all partici-
pated in an effort to save 115 loggerhead
turtles and send them on their journey
into the sparkling sea.
Jimmy Ridder, a local surfer, said,
"Even though we may not have made a
huge environmental impact, every little
bit is worth my time
This is a tremendous step for the
environmental movement. In the past,
people were reluctant to get involved
because they couldn't see how their few
inches of help would combine with oth-
ers to makemilesofdifference in helping
the environment.
Volunteers camped outon the beach
waiting for the turtle eggs to hatch.
Finally, on Oct. 5, the turtles did
hatch,butbecauseofcold weather they
were cold-stunned and not moving.
Judi Anderson, a project volunteer,
carried the turtles to theprojectdirector's
house where they were warmed. The
tworetumed to the hatch siteand found
15 more turtles.
Jean and Judi both decided thatthe
next low tide would be perfect to re-
lease the turtles into the mighty ocean.
Local surfers were then contacted to
assistingettingthebabiespastthebreak-
ing waves.
The North Topsail Beach Police
Department began placing the tiny
turtles in warm water plastic bags that
the surfers cou Id carry ou t to release the
turtles.
Every baby turtle made it to sea.
"There's something about their
struggle to survive thatcapturesyou
Beasly said. She has been an active en-
vironmentalist since the 70s and de-
scribes the decline of the turtles as, "a
critical call from nature that the entire
human population muststop polluting
our water sources
Beasly, with her dynamic person-
ality and distinct love for nature, will
makeadifferenceinprotectingour frag-
ile ecosystem. She encourages every-
one to become involved in her organi-
zation and claims all people can leam
more from turtles man they ever imag-
ined. To become involved contact Jean
Beasly at (919) 328-1000.
Indian Chief Seattle grasped the
essence of nature hundreds of years
ago. Isn't time mat we do? "We are part
of the Earth and it is part of us, for all
thingssharethesamebreathall things
are connected
Developing your
personal aerobics plan
Paraly International
You're convinced � aerobic ex-
ercise can strengthen your heart, im-
prove your body's use of oxygen and
contribute to your overall health So,
where do you begin? First, find your
target heart range (THR). Then select
aerobic activities thatfityour physical
condition, personal interestsand envi-
ronment Fina,makeacommitrnent
to exercise aerobically for 20-30 min-
utes a minimum of 3 times a week.
Finding Your THR
Your THR is the safest range of
heartbeats per mintue during exer-
cise. To find your approximate THR,
subtract your age from 220 and multi-
pry theanswer by 60percentand by 80
percent Aim for the low range when
you first begin, gradually working
youmyuptotherugherrangeCount
your heartbeats by taking your wrist
or neck pulse for 15 seconds and mul-
tiplying the countby four. If you have
an existing medical condition or fam-
ily history of heart disease, your
healthcareprofesacrcandelErmine
your best THR.
Choosing the Right Aerobics
With so many activities tochoose
from, you may not know which
aerobicsarebestforyou. In mostcases,
the best activities are those that you
will enjoy and will keepup with. They
are also the ones that are appropriate
for your age and physical condition
Thelistofaerobicactivitiesatrightcan
help you with your choices
Scheduling Time for Aerobics
In order to be effective, aerobics
should be done for at least 20-30 min-
utesa rninimumof threetimesa week.
In less time than the average TV
"sitcom"you can actively enjoy your-
self while you improve your health.
ACTIVITY
Walking
Jogging
Running
Swimming
BENEFITS DRAWBACKS
Excellent overall con-
ditioner; can be done
by almost anyone.
Excellent overall con-
ditioner. Requires no
equipment other than
shoes.
Takes most peopie
longer to reach THR;
can be harder to fit into
busy schedules.
Can stress bones and
joints; can be too stren-
uous for beginners
overweight persons.
Exercises large mus- Must have access to
cles in legs, arms and pool; may be poor
chest; does not stress choice for people with
bones and joints. chlorine sensitivity.
Brady offers
album with Irish twist
Bicycling
Aerobic
Dancing
(ft
Handball
Racquetball
m
Exercises large mus-
cles in legs; does not
stress bones and
joints.
Excellent overall con-
ditioner; can be done
in class andor at
home.
Excellent overall con-
ditioner when done
correctly; a social
activity.
Must purchase equip-
ment; can be difficult to
pursue in poor weather
or in very hilly areas.
Requires instruction
(class, videotape, etc.);
high-impact can stress
bones and joints.
Requires partner,
equipment and facilities;
can be too strenuous
for beginners.
You can also find ways to fit aerobics
into your busy schedule�walk dur-
ing lunch, bicycle to class or work,
invite a friend to a game of handball
rather than out for drinks. It's a ques-
tion of priorities. When you set fitness
and healthasa persona) priority,you 11
find time for fitness.
Reaping the Rewards
Qice you've made the commit-
ment to a regular aerobic exercise
program, you'll know that you're
doing one of the nicest things pos-
sible foryourself�you're strength-
ening you r hear t, keeping you r bod y
in shape and improving your qual-
ity of life.
You'll have more stamina, a
brighter outlook and a sense of com-
mitment and control over life that
will enable you to handle life'sdailv
challenges.
By Pam Revels
Staff Writer
A near-naked skydiver free-
falls througha swirl of doudsand
stars.
This image, pictured on the
cover sleeve of Paul Brady's Songs
and Crazy Dreams, sets the adven-
turous and erotic tone for the new
release.
Ihemini-narrativessettomu-
sic thatappearon thiscompilation
albumresurfacefromBradspast
efforts � past efforts that gained
himaprestigiousreputationinthe
music world of his native land of
Ireland.
Bradyplayed inseveralpopu-
lar traditional Irish acts, including
the Johnston's and Planxty, and
thenmoved on tosoloprojects. He
also found himself moving from
traditional Irish music to rock. He
produced six solo albums, one of
which (Back to the Centre) won
Ireland'sHotPressAwardsofTop
Songwriter andTopAlbuminl986.
HisfellowartistsaJsobegan to
recognize his talent as a lyricist
Several capitalized on his
songwritingability. Santana,Tina
Turner, David Crosby and Bonnie
Raitthaveall recorded Bradytunes.
"Not theOnlyOnea Brady song
recorded by Raitt,becameahit on
the US. charts.
MusiclegendsMarkKnopfler
(DireStraib)and EricOaptonalso
tookspedal interestin Brady. They
played on several of his projects,
and Brady toured with them as
well.
With his statusas songwriter and
musician now clearly established,
Mercury Records released an over-
view of Brady's best efforts from 1981
to the present This album mixes folk-
style storytelling and mellow under-
tones of pianoand guitar witha tradi-
tional Irish twist
Brady's brand of rock conveys a
crjmpelJmterestinpassionand sin-
cerity, leading to
afreefallofemo-
tion.Hisonly fault
is the rare ten-
dency tofallalittle
thoughtlessly;
lazy cliches infil-
tratehisotherwise
brilliant
songwriting.
Sometimes
overused
phrases-of-the-
day work and
sometimes they
don't.
Insongssuch
as "Cr?zy
Dreams Brady
managestomake
the cliches useful
by adding some
new dimension,
which is a respectable talent for any
songwriter. Brady sings "your sweet
lovin' babe is all that I needtonight
well go and paint the townwe're
gonna drink champagne, till we both
fall down
It works. The combination of
mellow piano and the sincere context
of his story make it work. "Crazy
Dreams" is probably the highlight of
the 12-song venture.
In other songs, however, Brady
loses his individuality. "Deep in Your
Heart" isa perfect example; i tcontains
more cliches than a bad Hallmark
Photo courtesy Mercury
Adventurous, erotic: Paul Brady's
"Songs and Crazy Dreams
card. Brady's originality takes a se-
veredive, kind oflike theguy on the
coversleeve.Phraseslike"thebver's
hour" and "another bar-room in
another lonely town combined
with arrows going "straight to the
mark" and the washing away of
"empty feelings"isalittletoomuoh.
Only a few of Brady's songs
reveal these lapses into thevacuum
of cliche. The ma-
jority of the new
release brims
with the talent of
an inspired lyri-
cist. It is energiz-
ing and provoca-
tive.
Brady in-
cludes a tradi-
tional Irish song
on the album,
which is a mix-
ture of distinct
memories and
undying love for
his Irish home. It
portrayshisback-
ground perfectly,
withclassicnative
instrumentation
and lyrics-Brady
confrontssubjeds
that provoke reaction throughout
uhealbumyindudingprejudice,love,
ambitkriandbetrayal.Hecondones
adventure and permits feeling.
"Dancer in theFire"tellsastory
ofregretfornotpossessmgthenerve
to take a chance. Brady's voice,
smooth and unsure, hums over
prevalentpianocombinations. "Die
release centers on these del icate pi-
anocompositionsand theprophetic
presence of Eric Clapton's guitar
surround ing the lyrics, prod ucinga
musicalquaUtythatsealsthealbum
professionally and creatively.
M





HMBHUIbmMb
8 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 28, 1993
Two new books play word games
(AP)�New releases "Go Hang
a Salami! and I'm a Lasagna Hog
By Jon Agee, and "If I Had a Hi-Fi
By William Irvine, read well from
fronttoback,and from back tofront
as well.
Not only do the titles of these
twoentertaininglittlevolumesread
the same backward and forward,
but the books themselves do, too.
That's because they're books of
palindromes, those clever words,
phrases � and even sentences �
that read the same, whether you
start at the back or front. (At $12.21,
even the price of "Salami" is a pal-
indrome.)
In both books, the illustration
accompanying each palindrome
proves helpful in attaching some
meaning to the offbeat ones. For
example, in "Salami Jon Agee il-
lustrates "Tell Abe to voteballet"as
spoken by one ballerina to another
while President Lincoln stands at a
ballot box trying to choose from
among the names of six dances.
And in "Hi-Fi illustrator
Steven Guamaccia shows a man
holding a teacup and approaching
a men's room door that hasan "Out
of Order" sign � an intriguing set
of circumstances to justify the pal-
Disney offers
program for
graduates
Staff Reports
Students from across the na -
tion will receive "Mousters" or
"Ducktorate" degrees this win-
ter as graduatesof the 1992 Walt
Disney World Fall College Pro-
gram.
Walt Disney World College
Program participants "joined
other students representing215
colleges and universities from
throughou t the Uni ted Sta tes for
a three-part program designed
to increase their knowledge of
the entertainment and leisure
industries. The three compo-
nents of the program are living,
learning and working experi-
ences.
The "living experience"
places students in apartments
with other college programpar-
ticipantsand with international
students from EPCOT Center's
Cultural Representative pro-
gram.
The "learning experience"
is 10 weekly seminars directed
by professionals from the Disney
University.
The "work experience"
places students in positions at
the Magic Kingdom, EPCOT
Photo courtesy Wall Disney World Co.
Amy Garten (left) and April Martin participated in Disney's three-
part program designed to increase knowledge of leisure industries.
Center, Disney-MGM Studios
Theme Park and Walt Disney
World Resort areas. Students are
"cast members" in a variety of po-
sitions including merchandising,
transportation, attractions, food
services, custodial, lifeguard and
hospitality.
By applying all three as-
pects of the program, students
gain insight into the business
practices and entertainment
philosophies of The Walt Disney
World Company.
indrome "Oolong � no loo
Some others�such as Irvine's
"Spit Q-Tips" and "Somemen in-
terpret nine memos and Agee's
"Emil's niece, in slime" and "Ha-
rass Sarah � are less needy of
illustration, but a re enhanced by it
nonetheless. Readers who enjoy
word play might greet these books
with exclamations of "Ah,ha �
no matter how they look at them.
What was
your most
heinous
freshman
experience'
Whether it was
the roommate ;
from hell or
busting a in the
cafeteria, write it
down and we
might print it in
the paper. Look
for new topics to
write on each
month. Questions
and submissions
should be
directed to Dana,
Lifestyle Editor, at
Tlie East
Carolinian,
Student Pubs
Building.
DEPARTMENT OF
PHYSICAL THERAPY ECU
BACK
&
LIMB
CLINIC
Outpatient Physical
Therapy Services
Specializing In
Orthopedic &
Sports
Physical Therapy
Location:
1st Floor Belk Building
Hours:
8:00 - 5:00 Mon - Fri
for appointment
call 757-4135
��
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�frl �
JANUARY 28, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
Hypnotist tonight in Hendrix
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Hendrix Theater win host
Tom Deluca tonight at 8 p.m who
has been billed as the "Penn &
Teller of hypnotism in L.A.
Weekly.
Deluca has been named the
College Entertainer of the Year
twice by the National Association
for Campus Activities (NACA).
Having earned a masters degree
in psychology from Sangamon
State University, Deluca began his
career as a therapist appearing
before local civic group.
Encouraged to become an en-
tertainer, Deluca polished his act
and went on to become one of the
most popular college circuit per-
formers.
In a press release, Deluca's
act is described as unique because
it gives his audiences insights into
common traits. Rolling Stone
states: "His approach is to forego
the gimmickry to reveal the fun
and wonder hidden in the antics
of his volunteers' minds. There
are moments of joy and happi-
ness on stage
Check it Out
Tickets for
Deluca's show
are currently on
sale at the Central
Ticket Office for
$3 advance
tickets and $5 at
the door.
M
"STUDENT UNION
MINORITY ARTS COMMITTEE
presents
Tom
Deluca
will
mesmerize
and
hypnotize
ECU
tonight!
Student Union
Calender
'�Thursday
� Tom Deluca, hypnotist at
Hendrix Theatre, 8 p.m.
� ACU-I Co-Rec Bowling
Tournament, Mendenhall
Bowling Center, 7 -10 p.m.
Tuesday
� "Songs of My People
Hendrix Theatre, 8 p.m.
SONGS OF
MY PEOPLE
A HISTORIC FILM PROJECT ON THE
NATIONAL EXPERIENCE OF
AFRICAN-AMERICANS AND THEIR
CONTRIBUTIONS TO AMERICAN CULTURE
FEATURING ERIC EASTER PHOTOJOURNALIST
Tuesday, February 2, 1993
8 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored By The Student Union
"Are you being served? "
Episcopal
Student Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
WEDNESDAY NIGHT &' NTIYBREAK FROM CAMPUS!
� 5:30pm Student Eucharist
� Supper provided after service
�ProgramConversation after supper
� Add new friends to your life
� Bring an old friend with you!
� Be apart of a faith community
New video series begins Wednesday, January 27th
What?: "QUESTIONS OF FAITH"
Where?: ST. PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 401 E. 4th Street
(cross 5 th Street in front of Garret Hall, walk down Holly Street to 4 th Street-You Are There!) �
� Schedule of Services �
Sundays: 7:30,9:00, 11:00
Campus Minister: Marty Gartman � 752-3482
PREVIEW
Sft
ATTIC
752-7303 I 809 E. 5th St
Undefeated, Undisputed!
� rZ Thanks For Voting Us
Wednesday Jhe �Best p,ace T(f Hear
The Live Music"
VONF 1987 � 1988 1989 � 1990 � 1991 � 1992
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
Thursday, January 28
'93
GRAVITY'S PULL
opened for the CONNELLS
99C Highballs � 99g 32 oz. Draft � 99C ADMISSION til 10pm' 990 Memberships
Wffi
i
�'�
C
Summer Student
Leadership Opportunity
Available
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
ORIENTATION
STAFF
Friday, January 29
r'�ifl IN II1
BlLYCLUB
FEST
Applications Available in
Room 203 Erwin
Beginning January 25, 1993
Deadline For Completed Application
is February 19, 1993
At 4:00 PM
ONLY $5.00 ADMISSION FOR MEMBERS
$2.00 32 oz DRAFT
Saturday, January 30
PURPLE SCHOOLBUS
$2.00 32 oz DRAFT
Sunday, January 31
SUPER BOWL XXVTI
Doors Open At 5:00
0 DRAFT
FREE HOT DOGS Courtesy
Stwich Shop"
FREE JUMPS ON
GREENVILLE'S ONLY
VELCRO WALL
before and after the game
Admission only $6.00
TELEVISION SCREEN





The East Carolinian
Jtmuary 28, 1993
Sports
Page 10
Monarchs rule the
Pirates in Virginia
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The Pirate basketball team, troubled
by inconsistency and inexperience this
season, was defeated 80-60 Sunday night
by last year's CAA champion, the Old
Dominion Monarchs. The Bucs shot atro-
ciously the entire game and could not
?top the domination of Monarch forwards
Petey Sessoms and Mario Mullen, who
jcombined for 38 points and 16 rebounds.
! The Pirates' shooting woes started in
ihe first half as they scored on only six out
of 32 attempts at the rim. Lester Lyons
scored one of his pair of three-pointers,
but could not stop the Monarch onslaught.
Led by the play of Sessoms and
Mellen, as well as a strong contribution
from guard Keith Jackson, the Monarchs
shot over 50 percent in the first half and
itook a 43-25 lead into intermission.
In the second half the Pirates' frus-
trations continued as the Monarchs con-

;tinued their dominance. The tough Do-
minion defense held the Pirates to 35
percent shooting in the second half and
Dtept ECU star Lester Lyons subdued.
Lyons scored only 12 points in the
contest. Pirate forward Curley Young
�led all ECU scorers with 15 points and 7
Tebounds. ECU forward James Lewis
contributed eight to the Pirate cause, but
;the Monarch contingent proved to be too
.�powerful for the young Pirate team.
The Pirates fell to 6-9 on the season,
ll-4 in conference play. The Pirates must
jnow prepare to meet CAA opponents
William and Mary and conference fa-
vorite James Madison in the weeks
lahead.
ECUVSODU

ECU(60
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-taPtp
Young255-114-53-70115
GUI101-52-31-2104
Copeland 290-72-25-12122
Lyons303-154-42-32312
Peterson223-80-01-20i7
Jones70-30-01-20C0
James21-10-00-00C2
Richardson 252-90-00-1034
Hunter111-30-01-1032
Armstrong 172A0-01-2154
Toliver20-00-00-00C0
Lewis201-36-70-1028
Totals20019-69 18-2116-37624 60
Percentages: FG - .275, Ft. 857, 3 pt. Goals: 4-18 �
.222, Team Rebounds - 5, Blocked Shots - 1,
Turnovers -11, Steab -10.
Old Dominion (80)
Minfcftrb
m-am-ao-tapf�P
Sessoms306-116-73-73221
Mullen308-111-21-92317
Hodge233-53-31-10239
Anderson 281-32-20-1804
Jackson296-132-20-53115
Swann131-34-50-0126
Larkin161-20-11-2122
Harvey91-12-50-1014
Jones00-10-00-0000
Wright40-00-00-3020
Parker131-20-21-4012
Patriots
shut down
Lady Bucs
By Kevin Hall
Staff Writer
Totals 200 28-52 20-29 8-45 20 17 80
Percentages: FG - .538, Ft. 690,3 pt Goals: 4-11 -
.364, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots - 7,
Turnovers - 16, Steals - 6.
1st half 2nd half OT
Final
ECU
ODU
25
43
35
37
60
80
The East Carolina Lady Pirate
hoopsters set a very simple game plan
forSundayaftemoon'smatchupagainst
CAA foe George Mason: W-I-N.
That's what first year Head Coach
Rosie Thompson told the press before
the game. In order to achieve that, the
Pirates needed to shut down George
Mason guard Marcell Harrison, the
ccrrference'sbestthree-pointshooter,and
centerforward Nickie Hilton, the CAA
leader in field goal percentage.
Unfortunately, ECU did neither.
Harrison scored 24 points and Hilton
notched 16. The Patriots defeated the
Pirates in Minges Coliseum, 73-61.
Despite shooting a dismal 29 per-
cent in the first half, ECU trailed by only
four at the break, 27-23. George Mason
held Pirate center Rhonda Smith, the
conference's leading scorer going in to
Sunday's game, toonlytwopoints in the
half, both coming from the free-throw
line. Smith finished the game with eight.
ECUpointguard GaynorOTDonnell
gotintoearly foul troubleand was forced
to sit on the bench with three fouls for the
final five minutes of the first half.
The Pirates shot a little better in the
final 20 minutes, just over 40 percent,
and grabbed a 35-34 lead. The fouls,
however, mounted up on Coach T's ag-
gressive team. 30 ECU fouls converted
into 29 George Mason points. The Patri-
Practice
Makes
Perfect:
Senior
forward Toni
Thurman
(with ball)
works on her
inside game
during one of
the lady
Pirates'
practices
ots spent much of the second half at the free
throw line.
ThreeECUplayers,seniorsToina Coley
and Kim Samuels, and redshirt freshman
Tomekia 'Fruky' Blackmon fouled out.
Samuels and Blackmon each finished with
a team high 12 points.
Coley, who shot only two of 12 from
the floor, played extremely well at other
facets of the game. Despite her height, 5-
foot-7, Coley grabbed a game high 10 re-
File Photo
bounds and also chalked up an amazing
amount of steal s, eight. If the CAA gave
a Defensive Player of the Year award, it
should undoubtedly go to Toina Coley.
With the loss, the Pirates fell to 7-6
overall and 1-3 in the conference. Mason
improved to 12-3,2-1. ECU's next game
is Friday night at Old Dominion, the
preseason favorite to win the CAA. The
Monarchs are undefeated in four con-
ference games this year.
W
6 S
Swimming team's streak snapped
ECU Sports Information
5 Chapel Hill, N.C. � The East
Carolina swimming and diving
Jeams' unbeaten streak came to a
Salt against the Tarheels of UNC-
�hapel Hill. The men were de-
�feated 87-148, while the women
�fost 111-182. The losses drop the
;men's record to 10-1, the women's
to9-2.
The men's ten-consecutive-win
.streak set a school record (previ-
ously eight straight wins). Of the 14
events competed, the Pirates cap-
only three wins. The Lady
tes, whose only other loss this
; season was to American could man-
Jage only four event wins.
1 "We swam well as a team
said ECU Head Coach Rick Kobe,
I "much like we have all season As
a team, other than the combined
� seven wins, ECU finished in second
place in 11 other events. "Welostto
;avery good team today Kobe con-
I tinued, "but I am still very proud of
'jour performance
Lady Pirate winners included:
�Hilary Stokes, Stacy Doster,
JacquelineSilber and the Relay team
; of Jackie Schmieder, amie Farlow,
;Beth Humphrey, and Elizabeth
Sugg. For the men, Brian Soltz, the
'only two-event winner for ECU,
Lance Tate and the relay team of
'Carlos Ochoa, Derek Nelson, Pat
; Cassidy and Soltz.
; The Pirates will return home to
jhost the Seahawks of UNC-
IWilrnington, in their last regular
! season meet before the CAA Tour-
! nament, on Saturday at 2 p.rrt The
CAA tournament will take place in
! Wilmington on Feb. 17-20.
Head First: The
ECU men's
swim team ran
into trouble
against the
Tarheels at the
University of
North Carolina
at Chapel Hill.
The loss was
the first of the
season for the
men. The
women's team
did not fare any
better as they
also sank to the
Tarheels.
No fat boys; must be in
shape to play in NFL
By Jim Litke
AP Sports Writer
Flit Photo
Crysta I Balls
Cowboys Bills
Robert S. Todd, sports editor 23 27
Warren Sumner, asst sports editor 27 17
Kevin Hall, WZMB sports director 21 27
Courtney Jones, SGA president 35 7
Brian Bailey, Ch. 9 sports director 28 24
"Hopefully the Bills are no Broncos. They
won't loose I mean lose this one'
"The Bills will take the lead over the
Atlanta Braves in the 'dose but no cigar' race
"Bills are destined to win
"Bills are used to losing
"Emmitt Smith will be the difference
-��-���"�"�
LOS ANGELES (AP) � If
mis current downsizing craze
continues, NFL will soon stand
for "No Fatsos Left
Cowboys guard Nate New-
ton once was so big that he was
known widely as "The Kitchen
Explaining his new, svelte
self to the Super Bowl media mob
Tuesday, he said he lost 100
pounds over two months this
summer by cutting back on his
daily consumption of beer, which
can be detrimental, according to
a teammate of Newton's.
"Yeah, that beer definitely
will hurt you 6-foot-6, 319-
pound Erik Williams,
Newton's good buddy and co-
worker on the Dallas offensive
line, said Tuesday. "Even light
beer
Pro football is unquestion-
ably a big man's game. Exactly
how big, though, has become a
very tricky question.
Barely a decade ago, some
clubs still had limits of 260
pounds for offensive lineman;
today there are running backs
weighing more.
The change has resulted
from a move toward ball-con-
trol offenses � big running
backs following bigger linemen
� and the success of such
outsized specimens as
Chicago's William "Refrigera-
tor" Perry, the Washington
Redskins entire offensive line
� the appropriately named
"Hogs"�and Newton'scoun-
terpart on Buffalo's line,
Howard "House" Ballard.
The good news for the big-
is-beautiful crowd is that
people in the league's front of-
fices now take into account
bottom-line performance be-
fore settling on an absolute
waistline measurement.
The bad news is that natu-
rally big men like Newton of-
ten must strike that delicate bal-
ance on their own.
Since the end of last sea-
son, Newton's weight has yo-
yoed as high as 397 pounds
and as low as 299.
This season, which ended
with his selection to the Pro
Bowl, Newton was listed at 6-3
and 304 pounds. The first mea-
surement is certainly generous;
the latter, even Newtonadmits,
is not generous enough.
"When I fust came to Dal-
las, it was all a big joke New-
ton recalled. "I used to wonder
if my size was why they were
paying me. You know, 'Here's
this 350-pound guy, Dallas' an-
swer to 'The Fridge
"I played at330 for a while
and I always felt I should play
at 330 � which is what I'm at
now. But my friends were al-
ways saying if I'd drop a few
pounds, I'd make the Pro Bowl.
And the coaches were always
dropping hints, asking me, 'Did
you ever think about trying to
play at 310?
Did he ever? The better
question would have been: Did
he ever think about anything
else?
The spectacle of Newton
hi tch i ng up his pants after each
play became a staple of every
Cowboy game that CBS broad-
caster John Madden worked.
"I looked at my kid
(Nathaniel III, 3 years old) start-
ing to grow up and that made
me realize that, hey, if you want
to be around to see the rest of
it he said, "you better do
something
What Newton did washire
a personal trainer, limit him-
self to three meals, usually
chicken or fish, cut out snacks
and quit drinking beer. By the
time he rolled into training
camp, Newton was down to
299.
"And I was down to about
two players between me and
getting released he said. "I
was definitely too weak.
"Guys were throwing me
all over the place
Gradually, by popping the
cap on an occasional beer, New-
ton put himself back into the
comfort zone.
"I knew I'd hit the right
size he said, "when I had to
start hitching my pants up
again every once in a while


it
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
V





���
11 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 28, 1993
Bills blessed to be in Super Bowl
LOS ANGELES(AT)�Less than
two minutes into the third period of
their firstplayoffgarne,theBuffeloBills
vverehistonotreadytornakehistory.
They were without hope and
bound for an early vacation.
Just ride out the rest of the rout
which had reached 35-3 in Houston's
fevor, and disappear. No AFC tide. No
Super Bowl appearance. No way.
Then something happened that
stunned observers and maybe even
shocked the Bills. They staged the big-
gest comeback in NFL annals and, im-
probably, are right back where they
seem to belong.
"Anybody who was in our posi-
tion, down 35-3, there's no way you
think you'll come back Bills receiver
Andre Reed said Monday. "You hope
to make it dose, respectable, not be run
out at home
Buffalowonathome,wonat Pitts-
burgh, won at Miami and won con-
vincingly. The key, of course, was the
turnaround against the Oilers.
"VVehad todigdovndeep,some-
thing I've always said we've been able
to do, but some people weren't sure
added linebacker Darryl Talley. "We
were sure we amid do it"
So sure that, as they crept doser,
each of the Bills began to sense some-
tiling different
"it was maturity Reed said. "We
came togetherasa football team It took
a tot of individual efforts and determi-
nation to win that game.
"Of course, wecame the hard way
this year. There was the stigma that the
Bills couldn't win on the road, and we
ing and he would bring in the kind of
players he wanted said Cowboys re-
ceiver Michael Irvin, who played for
Johnson at the Uni versi ty of Miami. "I
knew we'd have a well-conditioned,
disdplinedteam
"Even when we werel-15(inl989),
Icould ixwewereonourway. Itwas
a case of, We've got to fill this or take
careoftrus'Wejustdicfo'thaveenough
players to go through four quarters
competitively.
"But it was, Hey, well get the
talent in here and be able to do it
So that was when things turned
did that ThK team has been through a around, Michael? When Johnson was
tot We renotateamofdestiny,just the hired, the Cowboys began their near-
y��-m�-
BuffaloBills trying to win some games
and, regardless of how we win them,
we're here
So are the Dallas Cowboys, who
can'tpointtoanyspecificturningpoints
on the way to their first NFC title since
1978. Or won't point to any.
"I knew once Coach Johnson got
there,thingswouldgetrollingand kick-
meteoric rise?
"Itwasimportant"IrvinsaidBut
there werealotofimportantthings that
got us here
They had to survive.
Survive so well that, from 1-15
came 7-9, then 11-5 and a playoff spot
And, now, the threshold of the NFL
championship.
REVIEW '93
Summer Student
Leadership Opportunity Available
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ORIENTATION STAFF
Applications Available in
Room 203 Erwin
Beginning January 25, 1993
Deadline For Completed Application
is February 19, 1993
At 4:00 PM
FREE SNEAK PREVIEW
Oh my God. They have guns!
FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Passes Available At Mendenhal! Info Desk
� ��� vauauic mu ivienaennan into Desk
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1
8:00 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
DOORS OPEN FROM 7:30-7:50
For All Sneak Preview Pass Holders
AT 7:50 OPEN SEATING-First Come First Serve
MEANS A GREAT
SUPERBOWL
PARTY!
, CHECKLIST
SfcASES OF BEER
SfllTRES OF SOFT DRINKS
sbags of chips
Stubs of sour cream
STbags of ice
Bplates and cups
ENOUGH FOR EVERYONE!
VISIT OUR DELI
Deli Party Trays and Vegetable & Seafood Platters
We're well equipped to cater your Superbowl Party needs
Build Your Own Sub Sandwiches
Fresh-Baked Breads and Rolls
Large Variety of Cheeses
Deli-Sliced Roast Beef, Ham, Turkey,
Corned Beef, Salami
and visit our Fresh Produce Section for
Lettuce, Tomatoes, Onions, Peppers
UNIVERSITY SQUARE
MON-SAT 8-10
SUNDAY 9-9
MEANS LOW PRICES ALL DAY, EVERY DAY





12 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 28, 1993
Dixie Deer Qassic off to a bang
Raleigh, N.C. �WakeCounty
Wildlife Club has announced the
thirteenth annual Dixie Deer Clas-
sic to be held March 5,6, & 71993
in the Jim Graham Building on the
North Carolina State Fairgrounds
in Raleigh.
The 1993 Classicwill offerpro-
grams by several of the nation's
top deer hunters and deer man-
agement seminars by Scott
Osborne, Big Game Program Co-
ordinator for the North Carolina
Wildlife Resources Commission.
Myles Keller will conduct
seminars on bowhunting for
whitetails and in addition, will
have on display his own trophy
whitetail deer collection.
Roger Raglin, producer of the
hunting video series "Best Kept
Secrets will speak on what is
required to photograph and pro-
duce a quality hunting video.
Gary Sefton, back again from
last year's well received specking
engagement, will talkon the fasci-
nating subject of deer vocaliza-
tion.
Certainly one of the most
let HANK'S Deliver
3 Balloons
and an
Ice-Cream
Cake
popular whitetail hunters in the
country, Dick Idol will present his
seminar which is of value and in-
terest to all whitetail buck hunt-
ers.
Especial ly in teresting this yea r
will be the World Record Replicas
Collection featuring fifteen of the
number one ranking whitetail
heads from various states and Ca-
nadian Provinces
Always the Exhibit thatdraws
the largest crowds will be the many
hundreds of deer heads from all
over the southeast brought to the
Classic each year for scoring ac-
cording to Boone and Crockett
standards. These heads will be eli-
gible for awards in their several
categories.
Commercial displays of hunt-
ing equipment, guidesand outfit-
ters, taxidermists and other sports-
men-related exhibitsshould bebig-
ger and better than ever, creating
what some have referred to as;
"The South's largest sporting
goods store, only open three days
a year
For more information,
or booth rental brochure,
contact the Dixie Deer
Classic, co Wake
County wildlife Club,
P.O. Box 12202, Raleigh,
NC 27605 or call (919)
782-5322.
BROCCOLI
&
CAULIFLOWER
vveach
1534 E. 14!hSt.
757-3311
RED & GREEN
SEEDLESS
GRAPES
99fb
M-F 10-8pm
for s 12.65 plus lax
316E. 10th St. 758-0000
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
DOWNTOWN
218 E. 5th St.�752-0022
DAILY 5-8 PM
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
2 FOR 2
SPECIAL
DINNER MENU
PIZZA SLICES . . 2 CALZONES, 2 STROMBOLIS
2 SODAS � � 2 BEERS, 2 DRINKS �
� New � �
�HAPPY IUMCH SPECIAL"
I MON-SAT12KX)-3:00PM '
$1.00
PITCHERS
3

I ALFREDO'S
2 Large Pizzas with 1 Topping
I $6.99 ii
with this coupon ��
ALFREDO'S
iUlJ. D�tD, 7 L'3-3
HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
�e 4nr All-You-Can-Eat Riblets
,0SaSSSdaY - Wednesday.
202 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, N.C.
RIBLETS ARE REALLY COOKING AT
Hpplebee's
Neighborhood Grill & Bar
TOUCHDOWN AT
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V
&
&
yoffk
1 2 PRICE
PITCHERS
OF BEER
All Day Mondays
SUNDAY PLAYOFFS
SPECIAL aQC
IdozDRAFTT
in NFL Cup I
you keep the cup!
I 2PRICE
APPETIZERS
Sun-Wed 9:00 PM - CLOSE
Dine-In Only
521 COTANCHE ST
757-1666
IF YOU WANT TO MAKE IT
IN THE REAL WORLD,
SPEND A SEMESTER IN OURS.
iff(dri$5faf
World Co.
Walt Disney World Co representatives will be on campus to present an
information session for Undergraduate Students on the Walt Disney
World SUMMERPALL '93 College Program.
WHEN: Tuesday, Feb. 2
7:00pm
WHERE: 1028 General Classroom Building
Attendance at this presentation is
required to interview for the
SummerFall '93 College Program.
Interviews will be held on Wednesday,
Feb. 3 The following majors are
encouraged to attend: SUMMER�
Business, Communication, Recreation
Leisure Studies, HospitalityRestaurant
Mgmt , and TheatreDrama. FALL�All
majors welcome.
For more information
Contact: Cooperative Education
Phone: 757-6979
An Equal Opportunity Employer
0 The Walt Disney Co.
Y
t ts .r t
SUPER BOWL
SUPER BASH '93
SUNDAY, JAN 31DOORS OPEN 4 PM
566 TICKETNCLUDEsl
L �Appetizer Platter -j
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 28, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 28, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.918
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58362
Preferred Citation
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