The East Carolinian, January 26, 1993






wimmers on top
ECU men's and women's
swim team are having
successful years.
See page 12.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 5
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday , January 26, 1993
14 Pages
Abortion activists confront each other on anniversary
ECU students, faculty participate
in Roe Vs. Wade rally
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ECU sophomore Thomas Blue confronts a Greenvilleroif?'anti-
abortion supporter.
Chilly weather Friday night
did not deter supporters and op-
ponents alike from commemo-
rating the 20th anniversary of the
landmark Supreme Court deci-
sion, Roe v. Wade.
As the sun set and the night
grew colder, both sides began
lighting candles to honor the
event from their respective
views. At 5:45 p.m the pro-
choice side gathered on the east
steps of the Pitt County Court-
house, with the anti-abortion
advocates on the south side.
As bells tolled the six
o'clock hour in the background,
the two sides met on the south
steps to try to outdo each other
in volume and message content.
Before the meeting of the
two sides, individuals from each
group were equally voiceful on
the subject.
"I think Roe v. Wade is very
important for women because
with the issues today like pov-
erty and economic turmoil, you
want to be sure that you have an
extra option said Tim Truzy,
an ECU graduate student. "Who
wants to bring up a child in the
conditions we live in today?"
Though these people were
pro-choice, some did not believe
that abortion was right. Michelle
Glad, an ECU junior, believes
that the woman has the right to
make that choice, though she per-
sonally is against abortion.
Student's
death
explained
ByWarren Sumner
Staff Writer
Many ECU students turned out to show thier support for both Vthe 'pro-
choice and pro-life sides.
"Who are you to tell me
(how to act?)" Glad said. "It's
none of your business what I do
Individuals on the anti-
abortion side replied with equal
emotion to the controversial is-
sue.
"(The Roe v. Wade decision)
was a pretty black day, we feel,
as far as humanity is concerned
said John Andrason, grand
knight of the Greenville Knights
ofColumbus. "Wedo believe that
human life starts at conception
� that's the number one bottom
line � and from there we grow
"I think that (the decision)
is something that should be re-
considered and looked at from a
more modernistic and biblical
point of view said Keith Webb,
an ECU graduate student.
Though on the anti-abor-
tion side, some people professed
views that fell into a gray area of
debate.
"I don't believe that abor-
tion in the case of incest or rape
is the wrong thing Webb said.
"Or abortion in the case of dan-
ger to the mother � those I agree
with, because instead of losing
two lives, you're only aborting
one
"The only thing I know
that's black and white is death
and taxes Andrason said.
"What's in between, there's room
for compromise. I just hope
that common sense prevails in
this, because it has polarized
One aspect of both groups
See MARCH page 4
mgural
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Filled with hope and idealism, some
20 members of the ECU College Demo-
crats travelled to the nation's capitol last
week to participate in the inaugural fes-
tivities.
Their hard work throughout the
campaign had finally paid off, as this trip
was the reward for meeting with candi-
dates, volunteering at rallies and passing
out flyers during the past semester.
Thomas Blue, president of the Col-
lege Democrats, led the first caravan to
Washington, leaving at 3 a.m. Jan. 17 in
order to attend a volunteer's meeting in
DC. "If we had volunteered, we would
have had to pass out flags along the pa-
rade route all day long and we would
have missed the swearing-in ceremony,
so we decided against it Blue said.
The first event in which the group
participated was the America's Reunion
on the Mall on Sunday afternoon. Scarlette
Gardner, another College Democrat, de-
scribed the event by saying, "Tents were
set up for various entertainment groups
and food from all over America and the
world was available Blue added, "We
also got to see Peter, Paul and Mary, some
awesome fireworks, and even Chelsea
Clinton was there
Bill Gheen, the vice president of the
ECU College Democrats, attended a new,
but promising event on Monday spon-
sored by the Young People's National
Service Coalition. "The purpose of this
group is to create the first ever youth
think tank in Washington to increase the
involvement of young people in govern-
mental the grass roots level Gheen said.
Later that day, the ECU group at-
tended what most people saw on lV.
Tuesday night as the Presidential Gala.
Called the American Gala, the show was
actual ly a dress rehearsal for the televised
event. "The performers weren't nearly as
relaxed as they were the night before, and
the Fleetwood Mac performance on T.V.
was lame compared to Monday night
Gardner said.
Bill Gheen said the Gala conveyed a
message beyond the entertainment. "This
kind of thing instills a positive attitude in
people that we can change the future for
the better Gheen said.
Other members of the group went
to a Youth Town Meeting in which they
participated in a Question and Answer
session with Congressional leaders such
as Maxine Waters (D-Ca), and Patricia
Schroeder (D-Co).
Member Steve Benzkofer said, "The
Representatives really focused on the is-
sues currently affecting the Administra-
tion such as the policy or. the Haitians and
race relations
Despite standing almost a block
away from the stage, the College Demo-
crats were able to obtain tickets for all of
their members to the swearing-in cer-
emony Wednesday morning. "I thought
Clinton's speech was very effective, and
Maya Angelou's poem was very moving
also Benzkofer said.
Donning tuxedos and evening
gowns, the fun began in earnest later that
evening as the group was represented at
several inaugural balls across town.
Several people, including Gheen,
made a brief appearance at the Youth
Ball, one of the 11 official balls held that
evening. "It was basically stale and bor-
ing, in part because they invited more
security than guests Gheen said.
Later, the College Democrats pro-
ceeded to the North Carolina Inaugural
Ball, where they began to enjoy them-
selves. "It was well-organized, and they
had a good spread of food and an open
bar Blue said. '
"We met and talked with Gov. Hunt,
the North Carolina Congressional del-
egation, and the entire Council of State. It
made me feel like we were really playing
a part in government Blue said. To fin-
ish off the evening in style, some enter-
prising Democrats found a discount lim-
ousine service to take them back to their
See INAUGURAL page 3
Autopsy findings have de-
termined that the sudden death
of ECU student Richard Louis
DeOliveira was a result of natu-
ral causes. According to the
medical examiner's office at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital, the
autopsy showed that DeOliveira
was a victim of Ischemic heart
disease, a condition defined by
the small size of DeOliveira's
coronary arteries.
These arteries depleted the
level of blood supplied to
DeOliveira's heart, and the lack
of circulation of this blood
caused DeOliveira to suffer a
fatal heart attack.
DeOliveira, on the morn-
ing of December 4, collapsed and
lost consciousness while walk-
ing to a friend's apartment after
a night in downtown Greenville.
When his companion noticed
DeOliveira was having diffi-
culty breathing, he called for
emergency assistance.
Deoliveira was trans-
ported to Pitt County Memorial
Hospital, where doctors pro-
See AUTOPSY page 4
ECU'S College
Democrats
listened to a
speech by Vice
President Al
Gore and his
wife, Tipper, at
the Youth
Inaugural Ball
while they were
in Washington,
D.C. last week
for the
presidential
inauguration.
Photo Courtesy ECU College Democrats
College Democrats prepare to fight
tuition increase
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Though the ECU College Demo-
crats primarily used the past week to
celebrate their victories, some mem-
bers of the group began organizing for
their next campaign, that of trying to
prevent an increase in tuition.
Last Tuesday, Thomas Blue, presi-
dent of the group, and others touted
the Capitol, going door-to-door speak-
ing with North Carolina's Congres-
sional delegation. "Everyone re-
sponded positively, and seemed like they
wanted to help Blue said.
Blue also said that Rep. Martin
Lancaster in particular is committed to
fighting for college students, as ECU now
falls in his district.
The North Carolina Inaugural Ball
on Wednesday afforded another occa-
sion to speak with government leaders
about the proposed tuition hike.
Blue said that when asked if he
would help keep the cost of an education
See TUITION page 3
Inter-Fraternity Council prepares for spring Rush
Organizers hope for a new,
positive image
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
ECU fraternities have been on
thegothepastfew weeks withprepa-
rations for their Spring rush activi-
ties.
Starting today and running
through Thursday, the various fra-
ternities will hold activities that will
allow prospective members to get
acquainted with present members
and the fraternity life. Bids from each
individual fraternity will be given
out Thursday night after midnight.
"RushJ is all what the rushee
wan's to do said Ian Eastman,Inter-
Fraternity Council president.
"Tha t's probably the best thingabou t
rush.
"Themost important thingwas
thattherusheecouldmakeachoice.
If he didn't like someone in that
house, the rushee didn't want to go
there, he could go somewhere else
A major aspect of the spring
rush this year will be the nightly
running of the 1FC transit service.
One bus will circulate among the
residence halls on campus and drop
individuals off at various fraternity
houses and meeting places through-
out the city.
"We're renting one of the ECU
Transit buses Eastman said. "The
bus should be around every house
every 30 minutes. We're going U i get
it going from 8 p.m. to 10:30-11:00.
It's free of charge for all potential
rushees
Each fraternity will follow its
own schedule of activities for the
three-night period of spring rush.
Events range from get-togethers with
various sororities to slide shows and
presentations highlighting each
fraternity's offerings.
Eastman has taken over the
job of IFC president this semester
because of the previous president's
graduation and plans to continue
toe upward swing that IFC has been
having.
"I want to see the image of the
fraternity on this campus to im-
prove Eastman said. "I want it to
be the top organization on this cam-
pus. The fraternities are just trying
to give both the fraternities and the
school a positive image.
"When people see fraternity
banners outside, I want them to look
at them and go, 'Golly, I've heard a
lot of good things about them
Eastman also plans to hold
fundraisers that would raise money
ranging from $5,000-6,000, which
would be donated tocharitjes under
thePanhellenic-lFCofEast Carolina
University.
"We want the campus to look
at us as something they can rely on
Eastman said.
"Instead of being part of the
problem, we want to be part of the
solution
Eastman plans to use this
spring rushasaplatform from which
IFC can continue to "move up
"I just want to see IFC go up
EastmansaidTflcanshowthrough
my positive image, hopefuliv,that
will reflect on the Greek system





i-i

2 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 26, 1993
SGA opposes proposed dropadd policy
Snowball fight turns ugly
Michigan State University officials are investigating how
a campus snowball fight escalated into a melee that left five
students injured and nearly $3,000 in damage to dormitories
and automobiles. The fight, which lasted about eight hours,
began in the early evening of Dec. 10 and wasn't finished until
the next day. The injuries included broken fingers, nose
injuries, a dislocated knee and shoulder and a head concus-
sion. Officials said four students were arrested and charged
with malicious destruction of property, disorderly behavior
and violation of a vehicle code. The melee apparently began
as a stress-relieving snowball fight that escalated into a near-
riot that moved from one campus to another as snow supplies
dwindled, school officials said. Several cars were damaged by
the snowballs, and one vehicle was kicked by a student.
Magazine launched for young males
A magazine begun by two Harvard University students
that targets males from the ages 15-22 will be launched
nationwide by Warner Publisher Services, a division of Time
Warner. EDGE will make its debut April 20 with an initial
press run of 200,000 copies. "We expect EDGE to make a swift
and dramatic impact across the country, in Canada and
internationally as well said Aaron Shapiro, an undergradu-
ate at Harvard and publisher of the magazine. Some topics
include sports, music, dating, partying, style and fitness. A
major marketing campaign will accompany the launch, tar-
geting high schools and colleges and universities.
Rape victim files $18.9 million suit
A young woman has filed an $18.9 million suit against
George Mason University, claiming that campus police
bungled the investigation of her alleged rape. The woman,
who was a 17-year-old freshman at the time of the attack, said
she was raped and sodomized by three men in her dormitory
room at 2:20 a.m. Sept. 2, 1991, the campus newspaper re-
ported. The suit claims that Jane Doe was not taken to the
hospital until 6 a.m and she was not examined unti 19 a.m. In
addition, the suit claims that university police "took the
wrong bedding to the forensic laboratory" and "failed to
monitor the collection and evaluation of evidence
Compiled by Karon Hassoll. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Jennifer Wardrep
Staff Writer
After much debate and contro-
versy, the SGA will formallyopposea
new dropadd rule proposal at the
Faculty Senate meeting today.
Courtney Jones, SGA president, told
SGAmembersMondaythatsheplans
to speak to the Senate on behalf of the
organization.
The rule proposal states that,
"During the first week of classes of the
fall and spring semesters a student
may drop or add a course or courses
to his or her schedule following con-
sultation with his or her adviser For
summer sessions, the period is the
firsttwodaysofclasses,therulestates.
According to the proposal, a
student may drup a course during
the first 40 of class meetings, and
may drop up to four courses while
pursuing a degree. The number of
courses a student may drop is pro-
rated by the number of the students'
completed hours. For example, a stu-
dent entering ECU with 32-63 credit
hours may drop three courses.
The dropadd proposal also
states that, "The student's academic
record will reflect any course drop
This stipulation is the target of the
SGA's opposition.
"If that sentence were deleted,
I'd be fine with this policy Jones
said. "They're saying that's it is ac-
ceptable forastudenttodropacourse,
but then they say it will be reflected
on their records. Thaf s not fair
In its October resolution, the
SGA gave several reasons for oppos-
ing the resolution and recognizing a
need for improvements to the pro-
posal, including a lack of statistics on
students' reasons for dropping
courses.The resolution also says that
the policy could prevent students
from taking challenging courses and
may cause them to take fewer hours
of courses each semester, which
would lengthen their academic ca-
reer.
Joneswillpresentpetitionswith
about 1,060 student signatures in
opposition of the policy. The Faculty
Senate will meet today at 2:10p.m. in
the Mendenhall Student Center
Great Room.
During the meeting Monday,
Keith Dyer, SGA vice president,
asked for committee volunteers to
help produce an organizational
newsletter. The SGA newsletter will
be distributed twice during each se-
mester, campus-wide, Dyer said.
Also during the meeting, the
SGAinducted new senior class offic-
ers: MichaelOT-Ioppe,president;Bill
Wiggins, vicepresident;and George
Sartiano, secretarytreasurer.
TheSGAapproved appropria-
tions in the amount of $600 to the
Inter-Fraternity Council for an up-
corrungconference,andtothe Aquatic
Science Club in the amount of $165.
ECU hosts medical lecture series
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
For the next three months, ECU
will be continuing to host a lecture
series entitled Ethics & the Techno-
logical Revolution in Health Care.
"With the emphasis on high
technology in our health care system
and the benefits and burdens that
this brings, we thought this would be
a natural area for use to pursue a
lecture series saidDr. John Moskop,
of the department of medical hu-
manities.
Today the medical field in-
volves working with DNA
constuction, fetal tissueand extended
life support systems. These areas,
among others, promote ethical is-
sues whichcanbedifficulttoanswer.
"We want to attract a good
diversity to attend said Moskop.
The lecture series was orga-
nized by Moskop and Loretta
Kopelman of thedepartmentof medi-
cal humanities, Maire Pokomy of the
school of nursing and Richard
McCarty of the department of phi-
losophy. The first lecture was en-
titled "Ethics and Human Gene
Therapy" and hosted by Dr. LeRoy
Walters. According to Moskop, some
critics charge that altering genes is a
dangerous area in medicine. Ethical
considerations on which humans
should be used for gene therapy test-
ing and the usage of gene therapy to
enhance certain physical traits all
worked into last Thursday's lecture.
Future lectures include"Moral
Issues in Human Organ Transplan-
tation" with Dr. James Childress,
"Intensive Care Ethics" with Sara
Fry, Ph.D RN. and "The Techno-
logical Imperative and the U.S.
Health Care System: A Moral and
Policy Appraisal" with Dr. Daniel
Callahan.
Each lecture will take place on
a Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in the Brody
Medical Science Building.
WHO COULDN'T
USE SOME
& HOWCANYOUSPENDTHE Xj
y FUNNIESTNICHTOF YOUR JX
LIFE THIS WEDNESDAY FOR JX
ONLY$5.00?
SEE PACEIO
r.
PROCTOR BARBER SHOP
Men's Hairstyling
222-D Cotanche St.
758-3802
$1.00 OFF
for all ECU Students
gl Corner of 3rd &
Cotanche
COTANCHE
sj JrZl � � JS�1�?
Six Mi ofiotn vcssions dt signed u p
for tin fin nidi mill nnuiit of the
Man h 20, IWM,MAT Exam
GMAT
Review
Course
Course Schedule:
TuesdayFebruary 23
ThursdayFebruary 15
TuesdayMarch 2
ThursdayMarch 4
TuesdayMarch 16
ThursdayMarch 18
Inn clmses during Spring Brent)
Course Time:
7:(X)p.m):O0p.m.
ONLY $149
Cost nit hides
till niMliit lltiiitlJ fee
and twoi(iiiIii GMA'I
review manuals
Verbal and Math Topics To He Reviewed:
� Sentence Correction
� Reading Comprehension
� Critical Reasoning
� Problem Solving
(Arithmetic Algebra, Geometry)
� Data Sufficiency
Location:
ECU School of Business, BB&T Center for
leadership
Development, General Classroom Building,
Suite 1200
Instructors:
Course taught by lull-time ECU (acuity
Texts:
The Princeton Review:
Cracking the System: The GMAT
'The Official Guide for GMAT Review
Oncludet actual GMAT queali- ,a with aokltiom)
Presented by
ECU Si hoot of Business Professional Programs
1200 General Classroom Budding
(9i9) 7J7�S.t77
FROZEN ASSORTED VARIETIES
Totlno's
Microwave Pizzas
Buy One-Cut one
3.9-
4.2-OZ,
FREE!
IN THE DAIRY CASE" CHILLED
Kroger
Orange Juice
Gal.
$J99
Lay's
Potato Chips
6-oz.

CAFFEINE FREE DIET PEPSI, DIET PEPSI,
Mountain Dew
or Pepsi Cola
2-Ltr.
$09
COPYRIGHT 1995 - THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND PRICES
GOOD SUNDAY, JAN. 24 THROUGH SATURDAY, JAN
50, 1995 IN GREENVILLE WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO
LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO DEALERS
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY Each of these advertised items
is required to be readily available for sale in each Kroger
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad If we do run
out of an advertised item, we will otter you your choice ol
a comparable item, when available, reflecting ihe same
savings or a raincheck which will entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the advertised price within 30 days
Only one vendor coupon will be accepted per tlem
purchased
m
l







3 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 26, 1993
VgRLP NEWSI
Sodal Democrat to become new Danish prime minister
Vietnamese celebrates Tet, 25
years after Tet Offensive
Copenhagen, Denmark (AP) -
Social Democrat Poul Nyrup
Rasmussen returned his party to
power Friday after a decade's ab-
sencebyputtingtogether Denmark's
first majority coalition government
since 1972.
"It's a new start Rasmussen
said after telling his socialist party,
the country's largest, that he will be
the next prime minister.
Rasmussen, 49, met
Denmark's figurehead monarch,
Queen Margrethe II, for more than
an hour late Friday to inform her of
the change in government and seek
her formal endorsement.
Rasmussen, an economist and
chairman of theSocialistDemocratic
Party, later said he would present
his governmentMonday afternoon.
The new four-party coalition was to
spend theweekendsettingupacabi-
net.
Rasmussen succeeds Conser-
vative Poul Schlueter, who quit Jan.
15 after 10 years as prime minister
when a judicial commission said he
had misled Parliamentabouta policy
of stalling visas for Tamil refugees.
The change in government
was taking place just three weeks
into Denmark's six-month term as
holder of European Community
presidency, which rotates between
the 12 member nations.
The coalition's policy state-
ment said the Danish ECpresidency
would not beaffected by thechange,
because a majority of Parliament's
eight parties had already endorsed
the agenda drafted by the outgoing
government.
Rasmussen's government will
be the country's first majority coali-
tion since a three-party, liberal-cen-
ter cabinet resigned in 1972.
The coalition holds 90 seats in
Parliament, the minimum needed
for a majority in the 179-seat legisla-
ture.
The Social Democratic-led
government will have "a strong em-
ployment policy, a green (environ-
mental) line, a business-minded line
and respect for the labor market
said Rasmussen, whose party iscred-
ited with building the Danish wel-
fare state.
Since Parliament has already
adopted Denmark's 1993 national
budget, the new administration was
not expected immediately to make
any sweeping economic reforms.
NATIONAL
Racially motivated murders on the rise
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
(AP)�Earsplittingfireworks explo-
sions resounded through the streets
Saurday as Vietnamese celebrated
Tet, the start of the lunar New Year.
The festive mood was buoyed
by a burgeoning economy and the
return for the holiday of tens of thou-
sands of Vietnamese who fled their
country around the time of the com-
munist takeover in 1975.
This Tet "is the happiest in the
last 50 year said Nguyen Xuan
Qanh, a Harvard-educated econo-
mist and adviser to the Vietnamese
government. "We want to look to the
fu ture, to let bygones be bygonesand
work hard to rebuild our country
"The economic situation is
Inaugural
good. The political one is good, and
hopefully the American govern-
ment will lift the (economic) em-
bargo sometime this year he said.
The celebration over the next
several days will be a marked con-
trast to 25 years ago, when Viet-
namese communist forces launched
the bloody "Tet offensive" across
south Vietnam, setting the stage for
the U.S. withdrawal in the Vietnam
War.
But few people were dwell-
ing on memories of the offensive;
for them Tet is a tradition of family
reunions and spiritual renewal.
And after three wars and yers of
international isolation, many Viet-
namese are looking ahead.
Continued from page 1
NORTH CHARLESTON,S.C.
(AP) � People can't stop talking
about the crimes, partly because of
theirbrutality�a womanheregang-
raped and murdered, a man in
Florida doused with gasoline and set
afire�butalsobecauseofaquestion
that makes folks shudder.
Were the victims singled out
because of their race?
In the Tampa case, the victim
wasblackand all threesuspects white.
Here, the victim was white and all
eight suspects black.
"I'd like to know what they
were thinking said Mike Kelley of
North Charleston, who lives a few
trailers down from the scene of the
rape and knew some of me suspects
as neighbors. He and others shook
their head s while discussing the case
on a recent rainy evening.
To many in the South and else-
where, racially motivated crimes
seem like throwbacks to the days of
rynchings genera tionsago,or to more
recent times when official segrega-
tion creatEd suspicion, tension and
hatred between blacks and whites.
"We've come a long way in-
sisted Frank Binarr, another disbe-
lieving neighbor here. "Whites and
blacks get along
Even if that is broadly true,
racially motivated violence is none-
theless on the rise, the numbers indi-
cate.
More than 50 murders across
the United States in 1991 and '92
were classified as hate crimes by
Klanwatch, a research group in Bir-
mingham, Ala that has monitored
hate group activity since 1979.
"Hatecrimesused to be strictly
white on black. Now, it's every racial
group said Klanwatch researcher
Angie Lowry. As she worked on an
analysisof 1992 data, shesaid, "Hate
crimes in just about every category
are up
A just-released study of 10 cit-
ies' 1992 police figures found a 24
percent rise in bias crimes from '91.
The study, prepared for the Los An-
geles law firm Stroock & Stroock &
Lavan, was part of a U.S. Supreme
Court brief in defense of a Wisconsin
law increasing penal ties for ha te-mo-
tivated crimes.
In some ways, the Florida and
South Carolina crimes were mirror
images, with numerous eerie paral-
lelsbutthe races of victim and attack-
ers reversed.Both victims, authori-
ties say, were chosen at random.
Christopher Wilson,31, a black
New York tourist, was abducted at
gunpoint from a Tampa-area shop-
ping center on New Year's Day.
Police say he was driven to an
isolated area, robbed, doused with
gasoline and set ablaze.
Burned over 40 percent of his
body,heremains hospitalized.Three
white men who worked in a local
labor pool have been charged with
attempted murder.
Just two days earlier in North
Charleston, police say, 25-year-old
Melissa McLauchlin was abducted
while walking across a street, taken
to a trailer park, raped by at least five
men, then driven out of town, shot
six times and dumped on a rural
road.
Five men have been arrested
and a sixth is being sought on mur-
der, rape and related charges; two
women have been charged as acces-
sories. All the suspects are black.
In each case, there is chilling
evidence ma t race was at least part of
the motive.
In Tampa, investigators found
a note that read: "One less nigger,
one more to go It was signed
"KKK but the suspects have de-
nied being part of any hate group
and Ku Klux Klan officials have de-
nied involvement
Wilson told police his abduc-
tors taunted him with racial slurs.
FBI agents are looking into possible
civil rights charges.
&m
PREVIEW
93
&
I
iV

&
Summer Student
Leadership Opportunity
Available
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
ORIENTATION
STAFF
Applications Available in
Room 203 Erwin
Beginning January 25, 1993
Deadline For Completed Application
is February 19, 1993
At 4:00 PM
hotels.
Xymena Solano, another Col-
lege Democrat from ECU,artended
yet another official ball at Union
Station. "It was great. Steven Stills
of Crosby, Stills and Nash pro-
vided the entertainment and Bill
and Hillary showed up Solano
said.
The group returned to
Greenville about midday Thurs-
Tuition
day, Jan. 21, exhausted from the
week's activities, but witnesses to
an historic occasion.
"I think we saw the passing
of the torch from one generation to
the next.
While Reagan had Frank
Sinatra, Bill Clinton had the Grate-
ful Dead, and people that I actu-
ally have in my CD. box Blue
said. "We had real people
Continued from page 1
down, State Representative
Charles MacLawhorn responded,
"You bet
Bill Gheen, vice president of
the College Democrats also re-
ported that Gov. Jim Hunt and Lt.
Gov. Dennis Wicker expressed
support for the initiative as well.
"The governor and the lieu-
tenant governor said that they
support us all the way Gheen
said.
Gheen said that the tuition
question will be the group'9 "next
major cause and hopes that the
entire student body will support
them.
"I think our group and other
groups also can rally behind this
issue Blue said.
Club Ped
is a walking dub for all faculty, staffand students Individuals or groups of four are
encouraged to register at any time during the year. This program is free of charge.
Participants interested in joining should pick up their "Walking Papers in 204
Christenbury Gymnasium and complete program
registration information.
Prizes will be awarded when individuals reach specific "mileposts" along either campus
Routes to Fitness oral a location convenient to each participant. Mileage forms are
collected at the end of each month
Additional benefits include:
The "Walking Paper"
A monthly newsletter for Club Ped members packed with lips and upcoming Club Ped
activities.
Ped Parties
Special events for club members only which may include 'shoe shoptalks' or informa-
tion sessions on topics of interest to fitness walkers.
This program is offered through the Office of Health Promotion and Well-Being and
ECU Recreational Setvices. For more details call 757-6387.





4 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 26, 1993
Autopsy
Continued from pagel
March
Continued from pagel
I
1
nounced him dead on arrival.
Tina Stilley, who dated
DeOliveira for nearly six months
before he died, said that
DeOliveira was the kind of per-
son who hated to cause his
friends and family distress, and
believes that if he could, he
would do his best to alleviate
the sadness those close to him
feel.
"Richard was a very
thoughtful person Stilley said.
"If he had known he was going
to die ahead of time he would
have done everything he could
to put the pain on himself and
take it away from everybody
else
Stilley said that DeOliveira
had many friends at the univer-
sity and was "a very well-liked"
peison, and that she could hon-
estly think of no flaws in her
relationship with him.
"Our relationship was per-
fect from the very beginning, the
first moment that I saw him, it
was real strange because I knew
it was an immediate bond we
went riding on his motorcycle, it
was the first time I'd ever been
on one He was the only guy
I'd ever kissed where I didn't
feel awkward kissing him the
first time. Nothing about dating
Richard was ever difficult
Stilley said that DeOliveira
was very motivated in school
and in life, as he wanted to be a
success. She said he was very
close to his family and main-
tained a good relationship with
them.
She said he was the type of
person who liked to plan ahead
and believes that if he had lived
they would have eventually
married .
Stilley said that she could
not comment on what her fond-
est memory of DeOliveira was,
because it was impossible to de-
cipher that from any other time.
"Every moment with Rich-
ard was wonderful Stilley said.
that night was the fact that mem-
bers of the group against abor-
tion had their children present,
but no children were on the pro-
choice side.
As the night progressed,
both groups chanted and sang
songs in support of their indi-
vidual causes. At one time, both
groups inadvertently joined to-
gether in a rendition of "Amaz-
ing Grace Through the night,
religious hymns vied with chants
of "We shall overcome" and "The
gag rule is dead
Newly elected President Bill
Clinton overturned the contro-
versial "gag rule" on this anni-
versary, freeing up any publicly
funded health clinic to mention
abortion as a viable alternative to
pregnancy.
This change does not affect
the recent Supreme Court deci-
sions affecting the various
choices available, nor do some
feel that Clinton will necessarily
make things easier for pro-choice
individuals.
"(The Court) has made de-
cisions in certain states, for ex-
ample, that a minor must have
permission of a parent or court-
appointed representative said
Dr. Marie Farr, an ECU English
professor. "They've made deci-
sions that some wives must ask
permission of their husbands.
Those are definitely restrictions
that have been placed
"I don't think the battle is
over said Thomas Blue, an ECU
sophomore. "I think the Supreme
Court is really the key. Whether
or not President Clinton makes
appointments � the freedom of
choice amendment is still very
much in danger
Police were not present at
what turned out to be a peaceful
demonstration, though personal
confrontations did occur.
coupon ,1t
Greenville
Opticians, Inc.
FREE FRAMES
r
i
i
i
i
i
I Call for details some restrictions apply
offer expires Jan 31, 1993
r L. IB .ficiuwT
Coupon must be presented at time of purchasetmfTRSm
I EYE EXAMS AVAILABLE NEXT DOOR memkilu
I AT GREENVILLE EYE CLINIC . .
eyewear at reasonable prices Wilhelmina Nelson
� Doctor's Park, Bldg. 1 OPTICIAN
I Stantonsburg Road (919W52 4018
� Greenville, NC 27834
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Adult
Entertainment
M Center
MONDAYS
Football Sports Night
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE 0y -
'Contestants need to call & register m advance. Must amir by 8fiQ. &&9j&tPtT
THURSDAYS -SATURDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
We do Birthdays, Bacelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
tEsmm Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 AIL
Dlcklnaon Ava.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
I 1, fir 1 m - � � J ���� i jE9llmSiMllilllllllT iiii'vmiTiHiirv llh'lllllllTIIIIIPS iiiiirliilliiriiiliiv lnr.24lHiurs. slimiiriiinrlMilr iv jlliiiiil lulling il. Slirnini'iijiiv iillllirplriisiirrs nlilii'llrsli. llllSlllllTilllllir!illll r fliii GRlRfl � CHRIS BflCHRLB � 11 BllCWiffl '
Wcfuprttiepiltjr" jencnrii li c
1) rtt r fY -V'f' rvfP
�� vm: � � ��-��� ���
, rldWftfc THE COMIC BOOK STORE iw�pPfrVTfr 919 Dickenson Ave. Open 7 Days yMWJMlW Greenville, NC x Aw�?k VJ W qiq 7CQ enno Mon-Sat9:30-6 " 919-758-6909 Sun 2:00-6
I
HI STODEOT UNIONS
HAPPENINGS "
MOVIES I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
HOW WOULD
IF SHE COULD
AND SHE WILL
COOL WORLD
THUR, FRI & SAT, JAN 28, 29 & 30
RAN
SUN, JAN 31
IPG 13
COFFEE HOUSE! TONIGHT
BRIAN HUSKEY
8 PM THE UNDERGROUND, MSC
'�1 Admission with Student I.D.
$2 Admission for General Public
SPECIAL EVENTS! TOM DELUCA
HYPNOTIST
THURJAN28, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
$3.00 In Advance at Central Ticket Office, MSC
$5.00 At The Door
HYPNOTIST
MINORITY ARTS! "SONG OF MY PEOPLE"
TUES, FEB 2, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
A historic film project on the national experience
of African-Americans and their contributions to
American culture.
FORUM I ANARCHY OR APATHY
an evening with
NOAM CHOMSKY
TUES, FEB 9, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
TOURNAMENTS
BILLIARDS
TONIGHT
Women's
Tues, Jan 26, 1993
7 PM-10 PM
CHESS
Wed, Jan 27, 1993
7 PM- 10 PM
BOWLING
Co-Rec
Thurs, Jan 28,1993
7 PM-10 PM
Registration in the Billiards Room, MSC
Fee: $2.00 G.P.A 2.0
Winners will receive an all expense paid trip to
represent East Carolina University in the Regional
Competition at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville
Sponsored by the Student Union Productions Committee





� � -
The East Carolinian
January 26, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
F( )R RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
SHARE 2 BEDROOM apt $200
rent 12 utilities. On 10th St. be-
hind Pantry. Call Tom 830-5158
1 BR APARTMENT on 13th St
great for pets, esp. dogs. Available
immediately. $275mo. Call 752-
9197
2 GRADUATE STUDENTS seek-
ing roommate to live in 3 bdr. house
3 mi. from ECU, 1 mi. from PCMH.
$160monthperson & $160 de-
posit. Call Jason or Mandel 756-
6614 or Jason 757-6318.
LARGE 1 bedroom 1 bath apt. for
one or two people. Balcony, on site
laundry and pool. 10 minute walk
to ECU. Paid cable. $310month
830-8892
ROOMMATE NEEDED: To share
a two bedroom apartment at Wil-
son Acres. 13 rent and utilities.
Need soon as possible. Call after
4:30 pm and ask for Rhonda. 830-
9066.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share 2 bedroom, 1
12 bath apartment at Carriage
House. $160month rent 12
electric. Call Christie at 756-9261.
(Leave message)
ROOMY!ATI-W ANTED
WANTED: roommate to share
apartment in Tar River area. 14
of rent and 14 utilities. Call 758-
5207.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Convenient location to campus
with ECU bus transportation avail-
able- Furnished bedroom with Pri-
vate Bath, Cable, Telephone,
washerdryer, kitchen privileges-
"you tend to your business and I
tend to mine philosophy
$175.00mon includes utilities.
Call 321-1848.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Wild-
wood Villas - Assume 13 bills
and $183.33 per month rent. 3
bedroom townhouse with washer
and d ryer and convenient location
to college. Call us at 758-8115.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to share
a townhouse apartment. Rent is
$160 mon and 12 utilities. Con-
venient to campus and includes
ECU bus. Contact Stacy Peterson
at Carriage House Apartments, apt
60, 321-1532.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED. 112 miles from ECU,
bus, $17250 12 utilities. Com-
pletely furnished. Nonsmoker.
Please call Ali at 752-1782.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: to share a two-bedroom
apartmentvill have own room.
$155mo rent -r 1 3 utilities. Must
be responsible, reliable, and easy-
R( )()MMATE WANTED
going. If interested please call 830-
4983 � if no answe, leave message
Available ASAP
F( )R SALE
RINGGOLD TOWERS cONDO
- One bedroom unit. Children
out of school, I want to sell fast.
Call (919) 847-1557 Raleigh, NC.
VALENTINES SPECIAL: Don't
forget to order early this year as
we run out every year. For just
29.95 you can get your lady 1
dozen long stem red roses ar-
ranged and boxed. 757-1007
HEY NOW! HAND DRUMS: ce-
ramic and metal doumbeks,
tablas, bodhrans, frame drums,
etc. Call 756-4226 for more infor-
mation.
TAKE OVER CLUB FOR
WOMEN ONLY membership!
Save$59.00 initiation fee! ONLY
$29.00mo. Call today at 756-
9235 and start the new year off
right. Please leave a message.
FOR SALE: Packard Bell Legend
IV computer for sale. Panasonic
24 pt. printer, VGA color moni-
tor. Computer has hard drive, 2
floppy drives. (5.25" and 3.5")
Must sell! $850. Includes Harvard
Graphics, Lotus 1-2-3, Multimate,
PFS Graphics, Grammatix, and
other programs. Call (919) 321-
2577 leave message.
FOR SALE: Nintendo with great
accessories. Call & leave message,
758-8319 Great price.
FOR SALE: Mountain bike �
Gary Fisher advance model. High
quality Shimano components, six
months old, excellent condition,
and U-lock included. $375 nego-
tiable, call David at 758-2879
UNRELEASED LIVE CON-
CERT & STUDIO RECORD-
INGS FOR SALE: from the fol-
lowing artists: U2, Clapton,
Beatles, Zeppelin, SRV, Black
Crowes, Lenny Kravitz, Hendrix,
REM, Matthew Sweet, More! Call
931-2573 and leave name, num-
ber, and requested artist on mes-
sage.
GRADUATING: MUST SELL!
1988 ISUZU IMPULSE TURBO
� low miles, all extras plus spoil-
ers must see and drive: $6000.
Rockford Fosgate Punch 150 car
amp. $150, Blaupunkt 20x20 amp.
$50. Dorm size microwave $25.
New blue sports coat, size 40L
$30. New "Members Only" ski
jacket (whiteblue)$ 50 (never
worn) Call Tommy 752-9620
DAY BED, white, iron and brass
w2 twin size Orthopedic mat-
tresses and rollout pop-up
trund le. Never used, in box. Cost
$700. $310 cash. (919) 637-4421
after 6:30 pm.
BRASS BED, queen size w
frame and deluxe Orthopedic
mattress set in factor' box. Can't
use. Cost $750, sacrifice $285 cash
(919) 637-4421 after 6:30 pm.
HELP WANTED
SAVE on Spring Break '93! Ja-
maica, Cancun, Bahamas from
$459 Florida from !149! Organize
group and travel free! Contact
Susan @ 931-7334 or call Sun
Splash Tour s todayl-800-426-
7710.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
- Earn $2000month world
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
ibbean, et.Holiday, Summer
and Career employment avail
able. No experience necessary.
For employment program call 1-
206-634-0468 ext. C5362.
ORIGINAL ARTWORK
WANTED! Looking for art that
would look good on T-shirts. We
will pay for the exclusive use of
your work. Call for an appoint-
ment 752-6953.
POOL MANAGERSAQUATIC
DIRECTORS � several posi-
tions in Greenville & Nags Head
areas. Must be 21 yrs or older.
Deadline Feb. 21. Call Bob
Wendling, 756-1088.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED: Great club, great
money, unbelievable tips. Work
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9
pm-2am. Call Sid 919-735-7713
or Paul 919-736-0716. Mothers
Playhouse in Goldsboro.
$10 - $360UP WEEKLY Mailing
brochures! Sparefull time. Set
own hours! RUSH stamped en-
velope: Publisher- (GI) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham,
NC 27705
BRODY's AND BRODY's FOR
MEN are accepting applications
for part-time sales associates.
Flexible scheduleSalarycloth-
ing discount. Apply Brody's The
Plaza MonWed. 1-4 pm
SPEND A SUMMER in New
Hampshire. Outstanding boys
girls sports camps located on
New England's largest lake are
recruiting individuals forall staff
positions, including nurses. Ap-
plicants must be able to assist in
the instruction of an activity. For
more information, call Kyle at
(919) 847-4430.
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICA-
TIONS for waitstaff at Professor
O'Cools between 2-4 pm daily.
No phone calls accepted. Located
behind Quincy's Steak House on
Greenville Blvd.
WANTED: loving after school
care for 7 year old girl. 2:30-5:30,
Monday-Friday. Non-smoker.
Transportation and references re-
quired. 355-3716 after 6 pm.
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES:
The Greenville Recreation &
Parks Department is recruiting
12 to 16 part-time youth soccer
coaches forthespringindoorsoc-
cer program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of the
soccer skills and have the ability
and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours are from 3
HELP WANTED
pm to 7 pm with some night and
weekend coaching.This program
will run from the first of March to
the first of May. Salary rates start
at $4.25 per hour. For more infor-
mation please call Ben jarnes or
Michael Daly at 830-4550.
SERVICES ()FFERED
AWESOME SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Bahamas Cruise 6 Days
Includes 10 Meals, Great Beaches &
Nightlife! $279! Panama City
Beachfront Rooms With Kitchens
$119, Key West Oceanfront Hotel
$249, Daytona Beachfront Rooms
With Kitchens $149, Cancun $459,
Jamaica $479! Springbreak! 1-800-
678-6386
ATTENTION SPRING BREAK-
ERS Party like Gods Panama
City $139, Key West $269, Jamaica
& Cancun from $450. Quality Ac-
commodations,FreeDrinkParti
Calljoe Endless Summerl-800-234-
7007.
MODEL PORTFOLIOS Photo
Creations & Associates 355-8886.
�"AWESOME SPRING BREAK
BAHAMAS CRUISE $279! In-
cludes6days in Bahamas, lOmeals!
Sail from Florida! Beautiful Beaches,
Great Nightlife! Drinking age 18!
Springbreak 1-800-678-6386
��FREE DAYTONA SPRING
BREAK Organize only 18 people
and travel free! Stay at the Howard
Johnson's Beachfront from only
$149! CALL NOW! Take A Break
Vacations 1-800-328-SAVE
PORTRAITS DONE great gifts for
Mothers and Fathers day or birth-
days. Parents, siblings, pets, etc.
done $25 and up. For info, call Sean
931-8162.
BABYSITTER FOR HIRE trust-
worthy, senior with plenty of
babysitting experience. Call 321-
2835 leave message if no answer.
MONEY FOR COLLEGE IS
AVAILABLE! Get your fair share!
Let us help you! Call for free infor-
mation. 1-800-995-9013, anytime!
SERVICES OIT-ERED
�qsv SoiUtq V�(tt Charters
prssem
tkt oakamaf &� the fcef 15
JW
OKuoar ownprivate-uatcU
?cera( t&i mm '�
$385
,1
800-780,
-4001
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in just a few days!
Plus a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself!
No cost. No obligation.
1-800-932-0528, ext. 65
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
HQ2H USED CD'S
BREAKS
PRICES FOR ST A Y�NOT
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
5 3na 7 NIGHTS
DAYTONA BEACH
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
PANAMA CITY BEACH
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
STEAMBOAT
2 5 AND 7 NIGHTS
MUSTANG ISLAND I
PORTARANSAS
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
FORT LAUDERDALE
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
VAIL BEAVERCREEK
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
12th Annual
Party!
TOLL FREE INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS
1-800-321-5911
ATTENTION FEMALES: Wet T-
Shirt contest contestants wanted.
Contest will be held on Thursday
Jan. 28 for more info call Travis or
James at 757-0127.
CONGRATULATIONS Alexis
Hickman on placing in Miss Green-
ville Sigma Sigma Sigma
THE LADIES OF DELTA ZETA
would like to wish everyone a good
luck in the Spring semester, and a
special good luck goes out to all of
you fraternitiesduringRUSH! Have
a super semester!
DELTA CHI THOUGHT: "Associ-
ate yourself with men of good qual-
ity if you value your own reputa-
tion; for it is better to be aolne than in
bad company
DELTA CHI wishes all fraternities
good luck with RUSH
CONGRATULATIONS Anna
Harrington on Panhellenic Presi-
dent. You'll do a great job. We are
proud of YOU. Sigma Sigma Sigma
ALPHA PHI would like to wish all
fraternities good luck with rush this
week! Go Greek!
PERSONALS
CONGRATS TO ALPHA OMI-
CRON PI on winning the fall
Chancellor's Cup for intramural ex-
cellence! Way to go!
KAPPA ALPHA, Sigma Phi Epsi-
lon And Lambda Chi Alpha we look
forward to helping you w rush.
Sligma Sigma Sigma
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
NEWLYINITIATED SISTERS OF
ALPHA OMICRON PI � Jule
Fisher, Holy Fleming, Melody
Grover, Bonnie Hiser, Amy John-
son, Tami Johnson, Lisa Stine, Beth
McGee, Amanda Smith, Meredith
Stevens,ChristineZamzowJennifer
Kula, Amanda Whichard, and Jill
Woolard. Love, your sisters.
TOTHEDEERSLAYER�I'mvery
happy for you & your business ven-
ture! I hope you have a wonderful
and productive week. Thanks forall
of your help & support don't ever
forget who loves ya' most, HON.
ALPHA DELTA PI wishes all ECU
fraternities good luck for a great
Spring Rush!
GOOD LUCK to all fraternities on
Rush .Sigma Sigma Sigma
ECU RUGBY wants all interested
parties to know that you don't have
to be socially acceptable to play
rugby. Come out and play behind
Allied Health Tuesday - Thursdav
at 3:30 pm.
ANDY - Just wanted to say thanks
for dinner. That's one down and
TWO more to go. Had agreat time!
Aimee
HEY PEZZ - You know my eyes
have seen it all now! I want to
sincerely thank you for all the fun
these past 3 weeks. The friendship
love I feel will hopefully stay with
usforyearstocomenomatterwhere
you end up! Not a Hag!
EAST
CAROLINIAN
ACCOUNT
EXECUTIVES
Karen Bilyj
Lindsay Fernandez
Matt Hege

Aimee Lewis
-�
Brandon Perry
CALL 919-757-6366
today for more
advertising information
Announcements
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Recreational Services will be
sponsoring a Pirate Double Dare
on Thursday, January 28, at 6:30
pm. Double Dare is a special event
in which teams of four attempt to
answer questions worth certain
amounts of points. The team with
the most points at the end wins!
There will be physical challenges,
so be prepared to GET NASTY!
Registration ends Tuesday, Janu-
ary 26 at 5:00 pm, so register now.
Call 757-6387 formore information.
PRE-PHYSICAL THFRAPY
OJUi
The Pre-Physical Therapy
Club will be having a meeting
Thursday, Jan. 28 at 7:30 in
Mendenhall, Room 221. Club Dues
($2.00) will becollected at the meet-
ing. All are welcome.
COMMUNICATING TO
ASSERT YOURSELF
The Counseling Center is of-
fering a two-session workshop for
students deisgned to identify effec-
tive communication techniques for
acheiving assertiveness in your life.
Emphasis will be placed on the
impact of self-esteem in accomplish-
ing assertive behavior. Call 757-
6661 to sign up: participation is
limited, socallearly! The workshop
will be held in 313 Wright,Tuesday,
January 26 and Thursday January
28 from 9-10 am.
GONATIONAI"
Pay ECU tuition and study at
another university! Easy applica-
tion procedure. Contact Stephanie
Evancho, 757-6769, for details, or
stop by the International Programs
office on 9th Street.
GO INTERN ATION AIM
Pay ECU tuition, room and
board, and study at one of many
foreign locations! No foreign lan-
guage requirements for many sites!
Contact Stephanie Evancho, 757-
6769, for details or stop by the
International Programs office on
9th Street.
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Service! Friendship! Equality!
Attention all ECU females:Gamma
Sigma Sigma, a national service
sorority will hold its Spring
Chatterings January 26-28 from 7-9
pm in theCentral Campus Meeting
Room located in the basement of
Fleming Dorm. Refreshments and
good company provided Formore
in f orm a tion, con tact Bess, 757-2921
or Beth, 757-2782.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FEL-
LOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and serviceprojects? Need a refuge
from time to time? Campus
Christian Fellowship may be what
you are looking for. Our weekly
meetings are at 7 pm Wednesdays
at our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across
Cotanche St. from MendenhallStu-
dent Center. Everyone is welcome.
For more information, call Tim
Turner, Campus Minister, at 752-
7199.
SPECIAL OLYMPICS
The Greenville-Pitt County
Special Olympics will be conduct-
ing a T rack and Field coaches tra in-
ing school on Saturday, February
13 from 9 am-4 pm for all individu-
als interested in volunteering to
coach track and feild. We are also
looking for volunteer coaches in
the following sports: Swimming,
Bowling, Gymnastics,
Rollerskating, Powerlifting and
Volleyball. No experience is neces-
sary. For more information contact
Greg Epperson at 830-4551.
AMERICAN MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
The American Marketing As-
sociation will hold a general meet-
ing on Wednesday, Jan. 27, at 4 pm
in Room 1032 of the General Class-
room Building. The A.M.A. offic-
ers and president Brian kerns will
discuss the 1993 Spring semester
agenda for the chapter and refresh-
ments will be served following the
meeting.
SAM (SOCIETY FOR AD-
VANCEMENT OF MANAGE-
MENT)
Spring organizational meeting
Tuesday, Jan. 26th GC 1028 � 3:30
pm. Current and new members are
welcomed to attend. Refreshments
will be served after the meeting.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention Gamma Beta Phi
members! We will be having our
first meeting of the semester Wed.
Jan. 27th at 5 pm in General Class-
room Building Room 1005. We look
forward to seeing all of you there!
EAST CAROLINA NATIVF
AMERICAN ORGANIZATION
All persons interested in join-
ing the East Carolina Native Ameri-
can organization there will be a
meeting Jan. 26 at 6:30 pm until 7:30
in Room 14 Mendenhall. You do
not have to be Native American.
Dues of $5.00 will be collected.
PUSH. THROUGH THF
BARRIERS
If you would like to work to-
wards reducing the architectural,
as well as the attitudinal barriers
that students with special needs
are faced with every day, then come
to the next meeting of P.U.S.H.
(People United to Support the
Handicapped). Meetings will be
5:00 - 6:00 on Thursdays in Cotten
Hall Lobby. Come join the fun
ECU LACROSSE CM IB
The ECU Lacrosse Club will
hold a meeting on Thursday
January 28 at 5:00 pm in Room 102
Christenbury gym nas ium. Anyone
interested in playing spring lacrosse
should attend. For further
information, contact Lake at 757-
2465.
PERFORMING ARTS SFRIFS
Martha Graham is considered
oneof the first innovatorsof modem
dance. The Ensemble will perform
on Friday, January 29,1993, at 8:00
pm presenting a dance program
that showcases Graham's style �
one that focuses on breathing
techniques. The dancers'
movements unfold, oriental-style,
from the center of the body, and
they wear loose-fitting clothing, a
Graham trademark.
SPRING LECTURE SERIFS -
NEW WORLD MEETS OLD
The Culinary Encounter: Im-
pact of New-World Food Crops,
1492-1992. John Sabella,
Agricultural Consultant,
Greenville, NC Jan. 28 (Thursday),
7:30 pm, NBrewster Bldg Room
C103 ECU campus. Dr. Sabella is
concerned about the loss of genetic
diversity among food-crop plants
and their undomesticated relatives
still growing in the wild. He will
address this long-tem problem in
the context of how agricultural
practices change in response to
economic and political
considerations.
COUNSELING CENTER
Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual:
This weekly group experience
intends tooffer a safe and accepting
environment in which to share
feelings and concerns. The
challenges presented by alternative
lifestyles in a homophobic society
will be discussed. Please call 757-
6661 for an appointment and more
information.
ECU LAW HONOR SOCIETY
The ECU Law Honor Society
will be holding their first meeting
of Spring semester on Monday,
February 1, 1993 at 5:15 in 218
Ragsdale. New members are
invited to attend and become
involved in interesting discussion
of various legal issues and careers.





111 ' ' ' " ��
- fi' ,
V- �
� �
AEOB 0n AX AEOKAKXAXAOKOKTnKAnKOXNIOKT
Tues. DELI NIGHT with the ladies of XQ
Wed. PIZZA with the ladies of AO
Thur. BARBECUE with the ladies of AGTI
Ben
Tues. FIESTA NIGHT
Wed. BASKETBALL NIGHT (chips & salsa)
Thur. FIESTA NIGHT
AX
Tues. PIZZA
Wed. SANDWICH B AR with the ladies of AO
Thur. SUB NIGHT with ladies of XQ
KL
Tues. HOR'SDOURVES with the ladies of AEA
Wed. PARTY SUBS with the ladies of AAFI
Thur. PIZZA with the ladies of AO
AXA
Tues. SLIDE SHOW, REFRESHMENTS with the ladies of XQ
Wed. SLIDE SHOW, REFRESHMENTS with the ladies of AZ
Thur. REFRESHMENTS with the ladies of III
Interfraterr
Spring B
January 26
ELIZABETH
axaT
ASt
TTKA
.ITC
DlCKINSON
14th
LOOKER
TTKt
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
DOWN-
TOWN
READE
ecu
10th
nth
GREENVILLE
AI0
Tues. LUAU with the ladies of AOn
Wed. OLYMPIC GAMES with the ladies of FIA
Thur. GRAFFITI NIGHT
IlKA
Tues. SUBS with the ladies of AO
Wed. SHISH KEBABS with the ladies of XQ.
Thur. PIZZA with the ladies of A Afl
0KF
Tues. DELITR
Wed. BURGER:
Thur. SANDWK
Sponsored By:
KA
Tues. HICKORY HAMS with the ladies of III
Wed. WARREN'S "HOT" DOGS with the ladies of AEA
Thur. ST. CHARLES OYSTER BAR with the ladies of EQ
GOG
Pepsi Cola Bottling Company of G. enville, NC
Transportation will be available Tuesday 26th - Friday 2S
at every dorm every 30 minutes from 8 to
For Further Inforn
XAOKOKTnKAnKOSNZOESnETrTKEGSOEEnXTrT
f
' .
l �





T�r�
iiV 'r�ii �
IP
' L
nKTrTKEGXAEOBGnAXAXOKAKXAXAOKOKTnKAn
lity Council's
Aish 1993
-29 8-11 p.m.
DKT
Tues. SUBS with the ladies of XO
Wed. HOR'S DOUVES with the ladies of AZ
Thur. PIZZA with the ladies of AEA
liko
Tues. PIGPICKIN
Wed. 1st ANNUAL BEST SUB in Greenville Contest
Thur. TOGA, VIDEOSLIDE SHOW
IOE
Tues. CHICKEN WINGS with the ladies of AAn
Wed. OYSTERS with the ladies of III
Thur. SUBS with the ladies of AHA
in
Tues. SUBS with the ladies of AZ
Wed. Sorority Representatives
Thur. PIZZA with the ladies of XQ.
Tues. SUBS with the ladies of AO
Wed. PIZZA with the ladies of AZ
Thur. WET T-SHIRT CONTEST!
OOCATIJftNS
� rirTAR river
KY WOODLAWN , st CLUBHOUSE
WOODLAWN ,st
2nd
3rd
4 th
5 th
campus
ELM
-JSK
KI
CHARLES"
TKE
COLLEGE
HILL
KINGSTON
PLACE
14th
BLVD
AX
fa with the ladies of AAn at AAn house
I & DOGS with the ladies of XQ at 106 Woodlawr
:HE3with the ladies of AEA at 106 Woodlawn St.
TKE
Tues. PIGPICKIN'
Wed. PIZZA with the ladies of AAn
Thur. SUBS with the ladies of AEA
0X
Tues. BUFFALO WINGS
Wed. PIZZA
Thur. HOR'S DOURVES
JftfcrJfafXC
IN
Tues. REFRESHMENTS and Sorority Representatives
Wed. REFRESHMENTS and the ladies of AOn
Thur. REFRESHMENTS with the ladies of AO
Sponsored By:
'HOT' ZW
Warren's "HOT" Dogs, Greenville, NC
m
MfcEbv the East Carolina Transit Buses to pick up all rushees
KL Look for the buses with the IFC banners.
mtion Call 757-4706
KEOXKAKIAXAOKOKTnKAnKOINIOEEnETrTKEG
�� ' �"��" ��





��� �� � �
7Vit? East Carolinian
January 26, 1993
Opinion
Page 8
Roe v. Wade viewed as liberal milestone

Friday commemorated the 20th
anniversary of one of the most important days
in the freedom of choice movement, the Roe v.
Wade decision.
In 1973, the Supreme Court decided in
this landmark case that a
woman had the right to abort
her pregnancy in the first
trimester (three months) in
conjunction with her doctor's
"medical judgement in the
second trimester, the state
could regulate abortions "in
ways that are related to
maternal health and in the
last trimester, the state could
"regulate, and even
proscribe" abortions with the
exception of where the birth
may endanger the mother's health
More recently, the Supreme Court has
the
freedom of
choice
amendment is
still very much
in danger
ECU sophomore Thomas Blue
adoption and keeping the baby.
Abortion is the right and the choice of the
woman involved. Though this issue should not
be without its regulations, over-regulating it is
not the answer. Regulations should be in place
to aid the mother in her
decision, not hinder her once
she has made that decision.
The recent restrictions
placed by the Supreme Court
come dangerously close to
harming the essential right of
choice given to all Americans.
Restrictions that are placed
should be for the sole purpose
of regulation; and that
regulation should follow
Wade's rule and be concerned
with the health of the mother.
The editorial board at The East Carolinian
does not advocate the killing of babies; rather,
placed certain guidelines and restrictions on we advocate the ability of a pregnant woman to
the process of getting an abortion. In some make her own informed and knowledgeable
states, a minor must get written permission choice about the matter,
from her parents before getting an abortion Abortion is not the only alternative offered
and some wives are required to get permission to a future mother; it is just one of many that
from their husbands. she may choose from.
Newly elected president Clinton honored Freedom of choice is an essential part of
the anniversary by overturning the what America's forefathers dreamed that this
controversial "gag rule" thathadbeen imposed, country could be. Limiting this freedom by
This rule forbode any health centers from restricting the choice of having an abortion
mentioning to pregnant women the option of only serves to mock the very document our
having an abortion. Now, abortion has been forefathers based this country of ours on: the
added to the list of alternatives that include United States Constitution.
By Amy E. Wirtz
Vegetarianism defined to uninitiated few
Vegetarianism is not a
dirty word. It is a legitimate
lifestyle choice of millions.
George Bernard Shaw saw a cer-
tain beauty in it: "Think of the
fierce energy concentrated in
an acorn! You bury it in the
ground, and it explodes into a
great oak. Bury a sheep, and
nothing happens but decay
In a way, humans suffer
from a sort of decay by eating
meat continually in their diets.
Clearly, vegetarian and near-
vegetarian diets have medical,
economic, political and hu-
manitarian benefits that are
enormous in their scope. Yet,
we choose to ignore this, even
when it has been reported by
the U.S. surgeon general for
several years that excess fat and
cholesterol should be cut from
our diets. Dr. Koop stated that
our standard, fat-laden Ameri-
can diet is "killing millions pre-
maturely and ruining the lives
of tens of millions Saturated
fat and cholesterol come solely
rrom animal products; there is
no mystery in that.
Granted, no one should
tell you what toeat�thattends
to be intensely personal. But
everyone should be informed
as to how hisher eating habits
effect them and the entire
planet. On the whole, vegetari-
anism has gotten a bad rap. It
has been considered something
odd that some people get into,
a practice that non-vegetarians
tolerated. Dietary and nutri-
tional organizations now agree
that vegetarianism is beneficial
to an overall healthy lifestyle.
Well-planned vegetarian
diets can reduce the risk of obe-
sity, lower blood pressure and
lower rates of diabetes. These
diets also help people suffer less
from hypertension, lung cancer,
osteoporosis, kidney stones,
gallstones and diverticular
diseases.
In addition to these obvi-
ous health aspects, there are
other valid reasons for the
adoption of a vegetarian diet.
These reasons include: (a) pres-
ervation of the environment by
eating foods low on the food
"Think of the
fierce energy
concentrated in
an acorn! You
bury it in the
ground, and it
explodes into a
great oak"
George Bernard Shaw
chain, (b) a solution to world
hunger by decreasing the
demand on the world's food re-
sources, (c) low cost, since diets
low in animal Proteins typically
are less expensive than meat-
based diets, and (d) philosophi-
cal or ethical concerns,
including opposition tocruelty
to animals and attitudes toward
violence.
Many Americans choose
to ignore the adverse effects
that their diets have on others
in this world. Some consider it
"their own problem" and shrug
it off as "none of anyone's
business How wrong they are.
According to Diet for a New
America, over a billion people
could be fed by the grain and
soybeans eaten by U.S. livestock
every year. That same livestock
production accounts for more
than half of all the water
consumed (for all purposes) in
the U.S.
It is speculated that if
Americans reduced their meat
intake by just 10 percent, the
savings in grains and soybeans
could adequately feed 60 mil-
lion people � the number of
people who starve to death,
worldwide, each year. Try and
convince me that what you eat
doesn't effect other people. It
accounts for the significant
reduction of tropical rainforests
because of tree cutting for graz-
ing land, the water shortages in
so many areas of the world and
even air and water pollution.
I think it is the ignorance
that disturbs me the most in
this ongoing debate. People are
simply not being educated to
the benefits of vegetarianism.
To make a difference, it
doesn't take much. First, try eat-
ing less meat. Then increase
your intakeof fruits, grains and
vegetables.
Gradually, you'll find
yourself eating less and less
meat, and not even missing it.
You start to lose the stomach
for it and eventually end up
disliking it completely.
At least that's what hap-
pened to me. I also developed a
strange affection for cows, but I
almost guarantee that won't
happen to you. And one more
thing: Happy vegging!
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
orreject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
E5�Vi 1 mOBVK � W'
jmk man
m piscipun&J
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batchelor
Inauguration symbolistic, not reality-based
"The terms of the President
and Vice President shall end at
noon on the 20th day of January
and the terms of their succes-
sors shall then begin U.S. Con-
stitution, Amendment XX, Sec-
tion 1.
At the time of this writing,
Bill Clinton will have been presi-
dent for about 75 hours. That's 75
down, 34,965 to go. Yes, I'm count-
ing.
It's not that Mr. Clinton isn't
a likeable sort of fellow that I
mark the hours until his tenure
expires. I'm sure he's a nice
enough guy on a personal level.
But his ideas are wrong-headed,
and, contrary to what some may
think, ideas do have conse-
quences.
Take his obsession with
symbolism, for example.
Clinton's pre-inaugural festivities
absolutely oozed with symbolic
gestures. There was a mass
touchy-feely, Up-With-Change
fete staged near the Lincoln Me-
morial via HBO; Clinton took the
same travel route to Washington
that Thomas Jefferson took for
his inauguration; there was even
a replica of the Liberty Bell on
hand which the president-elect
could "ring in" change across the
land. If Clinton's inaugural events
became a work of literature, it
would no doubt be an allegory.
I half expected him to break
out in a verse or two of "If I Had
a Hammer But I guess that's
brother Roger's department.
Then there were the inau-
gural balls. Several of them. I
knowClintondeeplydesired that
everyone in America could at-
tend the inaugural celebration,
but come on. This change of
power sported more balls than a
pool table. Clinton attended most,
if not all, of the parties (qualify-
ing for honorary statusasan ECU
student).
It was in association with
these bashes that I first heard the
word "people's" being bandied
about. The melange at the Lin-
coln Memorial was billed as "The
People's Inaugural Celebration
or something like that.
Watch out for anything that
begins "The People's Com-
munist North Korea calls itself
the Democratic (there's a laugh!)
People's Republic of Korea. Like-
wise, Albania is The People's So-
cialist (at least they're honest) Re-
public of Albania. Come to think
ofit, the People's Republic of Co-
lumbia wouldn't be a bad name
for Washington, D.C if it
achieves statehood. (I'm all for
truth for labeling.)
This brings me to President
Clinton's inaugural address. Of
Bill Clinton
will have been
president for
about 75
hours. That's
75 down,
34,965 to go.
this speech, the Greenville Daily
Reflector wrote: "With a forceful
inaugural speech punctuated
with the themes of his campaign,
Bill Clinton set the tone for the
new administration, saying
America must be bold to face its
many challenges Bill Clinton's
speech set the tone for his admin-
istration, alright, and that tone
was symbolism over substance.
Let us review.
Hard-line communist politi-
cos in Russia threaten to reinsti-
tute a pernicious form of govern-
ment we saw emasculated dur-
ing the Reagan-Bush years; in So-
malia, people are still starving to
death and dying from weapons
fire; Bosnia-Hercegovina isa daily
threat to neighboring European
states; Iraq's Saddam Hussein
continues to defy lawful U.N.
sanctions despite repeated
military reprisals from U.Sled
forces; Pakistan has the A-bomb,
or the ability to put one together,
and may have destructive designs
on India; the E.Cs Maastricht
Treaty is looking a little green
around the gills; and Haitians are
fleeing their country for America
in bathtubs, canoes and just about
anything else that'll float.
Clinton's speech didn't
touch on these topics much. Al-
ways the savvy politician, he
stuck with the empty, misleading
rhetoric which got him elected,
most of which dealt with domes-
tic issues.
President Clinton spoke of
the U.S. economy in a somber
tone adopted by many a hand-
wringing liberal. What he didn't
mention was the fact that our
economy, while not experienc-
ing a boom, is growing steadily,
healthily and is stable. He also
didn't mention that fact that the
recession, which became a rally-
ing point for Clintonites during
the campaign, ended in March of
1991, and that we've been climb-
ing out of it slowly and surely
ever since then.
On the social front, Clinton
sprinkled his speech with the
usual insipid platitudes so com-
mon to Democratic rhetoric. It
was a rehash of the ol "I feel
your pain spiel. Well, here's a
newsflash for you readers out
there: regardless of what Bill
Clinton says, there is little power
in a president's purview to con- -
trol social problems largely im-
mune to government. "For ex-
ample ascolumnistGeorge Will
writes, "the inadequacy of edu-
cation in grades K-12, and the
urban regression in the midst of
societal prosperity, are problems
of cultural values, character, behav-
ior and family breakdonm (italics
added).
Clinton said, "There is noth-
ing wrong with America thatcan-
not be cured by what is right with
America
Exactly. I only hope
President Clinton really listened
to what he said.
FROM
MAGAZINE
When You Care Enough to Display Synthetic Emotion
Hallmark Cards has staked its future on a new market�"nonoccasion" greetings. In
other words, cards for people with nothing special to say and no holiday on which they
feel obliged to say it. The 520 cards in Hallmarks "Just How I Feel" nonoccasion line
are divided into seven categories, according to what feelings you, the buyer, are trying
to express. Here are some of the messages; we've taken the liberty of clarifying
Hallmarks rather vaguely worded feelings in order to make shopping even easier.
Feeling: "Sorry I Smacked You Around
Cover Art: Rolling waves in solemn
turquoise and aquamarine
Inscription: anger is a powerful thing.
IT CAN START OUT SO SMALL, YETIT CAN
TAKE ON A LIKE OF ITS OWN
Feeling: "For the Abused Child in My
Life
Cover Art: Child's crayon drawing of
tulips and a white picket fence
Inscription: i know i havent always
BEEN THE PERFECT MOM
Feeling: "You'd Make a Great Second
Husband
Cover Art: Crayon drawing of a man in a
child's wagon
Inscription: i love to watch you
WITH THE CHILDREN, BECAUSE ITS
OBVIOUS YOU SHARE SOMETHING VERY
SPECIAL
Feeling: "The Threat of a Sexual-
Harassment Suit Has Led Me to This
Unconventional Approach
Cover Art: Two sharp pencils and a cup of
coffee
Inscription: we cant choose the people
WE WORK WITH, BUT SOMETIMES WE GET
LUCKY AND WIND UP WORKING WITH
SOMEONE SPECIAL.
Feeling: " Was Just a Fling, Honest
Cover Art: Watercolor seashore scene
Inscription: i know that no words can
MAKE UP FOR WHAT I'VE PUT YOU
THROUGH. BUT, OVER TIME, I HOPE I CAN
PROVE TO YOU THAT YOU CAN TRUST ME
AGAIN
f
�i :
��-





The East Carolinian
January 26, 1393
Lifestyle
Page 9
The Connells' charm graces
Emerald City's nightlife
Raleigh band rocks the Attic
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
One simple word: Charm.
If therehaseverbeenaband that
knows when to hold back and when
to deliver the big hooks, its Raleigh's
own The Connells.
Usingfhemind'sear,trytoimag-
ineanatural imagery escapingamisty
obscurity to travel on a level of rev-
elation witheleganceinreserve.Now
try to imagine the sameband visiting
The Attic Jan. 24 and deliveringa set
mat flowed like an electric wooden
raft with a steady mid-tempo sail
againstthe river of trendsand genres.
In order to understand a band
whose music flows like a conversa-
tion among friends, we must strip
awaytheouterveneerandtalkabout
a plaintive shyness and animated
playfulness mat has become a staple
of The Connells.
The Connells introduced what
they jokingly call "New Stream"
music in 1984 in and around Raleigh
and Chapel Hill. The band began
withMikeCoraefla�kinghisDrother
and bassist, David, to help him start
a band. Lead vocalist Doug
MacMillan was brought in by the
barid'sfirstdnimTner,whowassoon
replaced by PedeWimberley,drum-
mer for (at the time, punk band)
Johnny Quest The last person to join
was George Huntiey on guitar, key-
boards and vocals.
Guitarist Mike Connell had just
finished passing the Bar exam tobe-
come a lawyer, Huntiey was doing
bio-statistician research, David
Ccrff�ellfcrsakeahistorydegree,and
MacMillan gaveuphisjobasaswim-
ming instructor to collectively be-
come "rock stars
As a interesting point of refer-
ence,DougMacMillanattendedECU
from 1981 until 1984 whenhemoved
toRaleigh to join The Connells. In an
after-show interview, MacMillan re-
flected on thoseyearsof pirateship. "I
was on the swimming team, so I
stayed up at Scott dorm said
MacMillan. "I can remember sitting
up in room 111-B listening to tapes of
Mike's Connell songs, and trying to
sing to them There seems to be
something magical about "Pirate
Pride" for MacMillan in that he still
goes to ECU games. All during the
show Thursday night at The Attic he
kept yelling "Gimme Some Pirate
to get the little pirate to move above
fheexitdoor. AccordingtoMacMillan,
perhaps the most noticeable change
was the newspaper. "The East Caro-
linian has gone color MacMillan,
jokingly said.
In he beginning The Connells
played parties. The band had eight or
nine originals, and when the band
had to play two sets, the band would
just play the same songs over again
rearranging the order.
By March of 1985 The Connells
had landed their first single, "Darker
Days on a Dolphin Records compi-
lation called the More Mondo sam-
pler.
After hearing the single, North
Carolina producerDonDixonoffered
tostepinandproducesome songs for
the band. Some of these songs were
recorded and later released as Darker
Days, the bands first full-length LP.
The album was released in the UJK.
cnDemonrecoro(co-ownedbyElvis
Costello). Critics loved the record,
and due to popular demand the al-
bum was released on Black Park
Records, The ConneU's and their
managerfriend Ed Morgan's own
label in the Unted States.
Ata New Year's Eve 1986 show-
case at the Brewery in Raleigh, Lets
Activefrontmanand producer Mitch
Easter noticed the band and was
blown away by their performance.
He offered to produce their next
In Review
Equal Affections
By David Leavitt
Weidenfeld & Nicholson, 1989
By Tammy Fedder
Staff Writer
A mother, a father, one son and one daughter; the basic American
family unit
"IualAf&ctionsisabouttheG�rfarr
the majority of the novel is set in the 1980s, Leavitt uses stories, memories
and flashbacks to illustrate the family history previous to World War H.
Nat Cooper was once his family's disappointment They couldn't
understand why Nathad towaste his life with computers. Thatwas in the
195&.Aftetheirriusttybegantotakeoffmthe
one. Nat is a professor of computer science.
Louise is contentwifhherhusband She lrvesadecentlife,butforyears
they have lived under trieshadowsLouise'srecurringcancer.Emotionally,
she is reserved with her family and, as the story unfolds we find that Louise
has a past she does not want her children to know about
April Cooper is a musician. She began her career on the tail end of the
protest movement of the early 70s. The author follows her life and career
truoughboyfriends, then lovers, andfhefeministsnxjvementduringpost-
Vietnam era. She is moderately successful in general, but very successful
with women audiences. April lives constantly on the road, although she
keeps a home in California.
ThmtherebTvid.YcnmgerthanAprilbynineyears,heorKxidolized
her.Hetravelled as part ofher entourage over two years. Then he metWait
He never left New Haven again for any reason other than short trips.
David and Walter are bothsuccessful lawyers. They haveahome in the
suburbsandlrveaverydornesticlife. David ishappy with hislife and home
in Connecticut Walter, on the other hand, is a little restless, and spends a
growing amount of time at his computer communicating with strangers
through a gay electronic mail network.
Eleanor is Louise's younger sister. Eleanor and her husband spend a
good deal oftinieincourtsuingpeopleorbeingsued.Alwaysonthelookout
to make an easy buck, Eleanor and Sid have spent most their lives close to
bankruptcy. Although she never will sayittohersister'sface,Eleanorcan't
help but wonder why both her sister's children are gay.
"Equal Affections" is about relationships, emotions and fears. It is
aboutlivinganddyingand how one family deals with them. David Leavitt
also wrote "The Lost Language of Cranes which you may recall, was
producedonPBSlastfall.Both"LostLanguage"and "Equal Affections"are
well-written novels. HBr those interested, they are in the stacks at Joyner
Photo by Dail Read
Doug MacMillan, lead singer for The Connells, was tickled to return to
Greenville's Attic Thursday night.
record Boylan Heights . In the fall of
1987, it was released and quickly be-
came a college favorite. The album
scaled Rolling Stone's National Al-
ternative chart (4) and stayed in the
top ten for twosolid months. With the
success of the single "Over There
TVTRecords picked up the band and
released fhealbumnationwide. With
the success of this record the group
began and seemingly endless tour.
"Sometimesitgotrealtough;vvewent
from having one case of beer on our
rider to cases and a bottle of 'kickin'
chicken MacMillan said.
In 1989 The Connells recorded
and released Fun & Games. The
album was produced by Gary Smith
(Pixies, Throwing Muses), and the
album's sound changed to a more
raw, simple, live sound that landed
The Connells in the top 10 of every
See CONNELLS page 11
'Body' considered
dead on arrival
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
A large mansion at night. A
blonde woman straddling an older
man in bed. He is tied to the bedpost
and later found dead. Investigators
swarm the boudoir, picking clues
and joking over the various equip-
ment and accessories discovered
there.
The woman is later accused of
murder during sex and the man
assigned to help her becomes at-
tracted to her while not yet con-
vinced of her innocence.
Basic Instinct, you ask? Nope,
but the makers of Body of Evidence
would love you to think of their
movie so highly. Or be able to claim
their product is as good as Paul
Verhoven's thriller from last year.
So does Body of Evidence measure
up?
Not even close. Rebecca Carlson
(Madonna) is accused of seducing
older men in order to get into their
wills and then killing them with
sex. No, really. Their heartsare feeble
and they become soenthralled, they
kick off. Frank Dulaney (Willem
Dafoe)isherattorney,a family man
who becomes attracted to her fe-
tishes and attitudes. Body is a
courtroom drama and during the
trial, the DA uses her reputation as
a wanton to portray her as afemme
fatale . As Frank tires to fight the
media and a hard-nosed judge (
Lillian Lehman, in the movie's best-
written role), he also is frustrated
with the DA's evidence against
Rebecca, especially when she tells
him so little in her defense. Each
revelation in the court leads to a sex
scene in which Dafoe becomes more
adventurous as Rebecca controls
him more.
Body suffers from not being
able to exploit a good theme. Direc-
tor Uli Edel is unwavering in his
attempt to film a murder mystery
but Brad Mirman has written a
subtle tale of conflicting attitudes
toward sex and how society views
those outside sexual conservative-
ness.
Set in Portland, Or the movie
has numerous references to an
assumed collective attitude. Frank
argues thafpeopleherehavepretty
conservative viewsof sex Rebecca
responds, "No they don't. They just
don't talk about it The media
covering the trial is cordoned off in
a balcony, hoveringover the balcony
like vulture but do they want to
knowaboutthemurderorthelurid
details of her sex life? Rebecca is
also convinced the jury hates her.
"The women think I'm a whore and
the men see me as every chick that
blew them off in a bar The DA
tries to equate her libido with an
ability tocommitmurder. He argues
that her interest in S & M makes her
more capable of killing her lover
than a sexually-passive woman.
The true story in Body is Dafoe's
seduction. Initially a devoted hus-
band and father, he is amused and
later enticed by her penchants. With
each encounter, he is physically
scarred in someway. She pours hot
candle wax on him and later they
make love while he lies on top of
broken glass. It is a theme of sacri-
fice involved in a new experience,
an initiation of sorts. It also fore-
shadows possible danger for him if
their sex continues. His stigmas are
comparable to Dimmesdale from
"The Scarlet Letter" and Lucy and
Mina's corruption in Bram Stoker's
Dracula.
Edel and Mirman try to keep
the murder plot as tangible and
debatable as the "did she or didn't
she" ending of Instinct. However,
the screenplay doesn't have near
enough intrigue and detail. In fact,
Body is lacking in comparison in
many ways.
Instinct isawell-photographed.
See BODY page 11
Art message conveyed through work
Sparrow leans toward
the dark and brooding
By Mike Harrison
Staff Writer
Mendenhall hosted a series of paintings
by ECU School of Art senior, William Craig
Sparrow. The show ran from Jan. 10 -17.
Sparrow's work represents a variety of
art media and materials. Sparrow occasion-
ally produces a vibrant painting, but most
often paints works that Are dark and brood-
ing.
"Being able to relay messages through
painting, other than the written word, is an
important characteristic of an artist Spar-
row said, adding he likes to choose subjects
that he is familiar with.
Choosing works for the show was a col-
laborative effort by Sparrow, a professor, a
painting faculty advisor, as well as an art
education advisor. Sparrow also met the fac-
ulty inMendenhall.Aftertheshowwasup,he
had to present slides of the paintings to the art
media center.
Approval of individual paintings and
their content was done by Sparrow and advi-
sors. Nevertheless, subject matter was a less
serious issue in Sparrow's show than the
paintings' overall effectiveness.
"I could tell by being with the work and
seeing it everyday which pieces were weaker
and which were stronger Sparrow said.
"Sometimes space is a limiting factor
when putting together a show Sparrow
added, citing the Mendenhall showing as an
example. He originally intended the gallery
to show 22 to 23 paintings. Space limited the
number to 19.
"Criticism can be very difficult for an
artist sometimes Sparrow said. "Being an
art person and having your work scrutinized
� literally trashed at times � by professors,
you really ha ve to have a thick skin
Sometimes a person's artistic taste is to-
tally separate from what he paints he said.
Adding, "the only thing a lot of people wan t
are valentinesonthewallordeer pain tings�
you know, these ducks-on- the-pond things
'cute' things
Sparrow said he thinks ECU School of
Artisagreatart school. "I've been told thatthe
Art School here is about the best in the state. I
One of 19
works by
Sparrow
that were
on display
Jan. 10-17.
mean, nothing else can really touch it in the
state
Sparrow is from Snow Hill, a small town he
said has a population between 2,000 - 3,000.
His artistic interest gained notable head-
way while attending a community college. He
eventually transferred to ECU and is now con-
centrating his art major in painting.
He has worked all through college, han-
dling every job from sales to driving a forklift
truck. Hehasalso worked athis old high school,
GreeneCentralHigh,teachingstudentstopaint
Sparrow uses subjects in his works that
have character. Old, weathered objects are his
favorite. His paintings are sometimes mono-
chromatic, often containing a lot of black paint.
He paints to create an image of movement
and energy. He said, "A lot of times I like my
things to look fresh, like I just did them.
"Most of the time I work in spurts. Oneday
I might work five hours. One day I might work
three to four
Sometimes he leavesa particularworkalone
fora longtime. When he works onitagain later,
he can approach it with a fresh perspective.
Sparrow said he likes to play tennis to relax
and hasa large interestin reading. "In order to be
an artist, you have to be literate, not just in your
field he said. "I don't like TV very much
Sparrow plans to go to graduate school,
either here, Pennsylvania or out west. He also
has plans tostudent teach in a publicschool later
this year.
Photo by Dai! Heed
1" �
ft
Photo by Dail Reed
William Craig Sparrow





10 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 26, 1993
Ensemble to bring mythology, sexuality to Wright
By Marjorie McKinstry
Staff Writer
The Martha Graham En-
semble, a dance troupe designed
to showcase the innovative tech-
niques of Martha Graham, will
display their unique talents
Friday,Jan.29,at8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
The dances will reflect the
choreography of Graham that in-
spired her repu ta tion as the leader
of modern dance. The dancer's
movements are oriental in style:
all arms, legs and gestures unfold
from the body. Breathing is also a
major focus, because Graham
Jikes to highlight what she con-
siders the most "organic aspect of
life Diaphragm con tractionsand
releases are emphasized, creat-
ing a sexual tension, since the
movements originate "in the
dancer's pelvis, creating a per-
cussive angular movement
Graham's ensemble also will
d isplay her interest in mythology
� Greek, Roman and Judeo-
Christian. The dance "El
Penitente" explains the relation-
ship between religion, sin and re-
pentance, but only uses three
dancers, one to represent the
Virgin, Magdalene and the
mother.
Sexuality is inherent in the
Creek-inspired dances, in which
Pholo by John White
Anne Westwick and John White, part of the Martha Graham Ensemble,
perform here in "Diversion of Angels
Graham allows mythological
characters like Medea, Jocasta,
Phaedra and Clytemnestra to
"bear the passions that humans
like to recognize in themselves,
but that Graham exposes with
Bible Archaeology and
Prophecy Fulfillment
A Slide Presentation of
Some Interesting Discoveries
unflinching scrutiny Graham's
choreography was designed to
capture and communicate the in-
ternal emotions humans experi-
ence. Traditional steps are
avoided, pointed graceful toesare
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
replaced by flat feet; hands vent
anger, frustration and love, in-
stead of languidly flowingaround
the body.
Such changes in choreogra-
phy and subject choice define
Graham's idea of modern dance,
and explains why her style is so
controversial. Few peopleare un-
affected by Graham's interpreta-
tion of dance�most fa 11 into two
schools: those frustrated and irri-
tated by her divergence from tra-
ditional dance,and those inspired
and fascinated by her use of cul-
tures varying from Native Ameri-
can mythology to the Bible.
As the dancers pounce on
stage Friday evening, it will be
interesting to see how Greenville
will respond to the Martha Gra-
ham Ensemble.
Check it Out
Tickets are on sale at
the Central Ticket
Office, Mon. - Fri, 8:30
a.m. to 6 p.m. Advance
tickets are $7for stu-
dents,$W for faculty I
staff and $15 for the
general public. Tickets
at the door will he $15.
Staff Reports
East Carolina's travel adven-
ture series continues Wednesday
evening Jan.27, wi th theshowing
of Israel a cinematic voyage
through the holy places of Juda-
ism, Christianity and Islam.
The film, directed and pro-
duced by Fran and Brooke
Reidelberger,highlightsholidays
suchasIsrael'sIndependenceDay,
andhistoricareasjikeancientjaffa,
the ruins of Caesarea and Bahai
Temple.
The film also explores some
modem day towns and places,
includingthebeachesofElat,Hula
Valley agriculture and the Hula
Ma tu re Reserve.
Glimpses into personal lives
alsoshow typical daily activities in
a kibbutz.
The film also features
Bedouins in the Negev Desert and
an emotional view of Hasidicsand
Jews worshiping at the Wailing
Wall.
The birthplace of Jesus,
Bethlehem, will be a major focus.
Thecityofjerusalem brightens the
screen as the city's spills over with
"Christian Pilgrims visit the the
Stations of the Cross and the
Church of the Holy Sepulcher
Free student tickets for the film
series are available at the Central
Ticket Office, and may be picked
up in advance. Future films in the
Travel Adventure Series will in-
clude Highway to Alaska in March
and Charm of the South in April.

Reminder
Lifestyle Writers
Don't forget to sign payroll
sheets by 5 p.m. today or
you won't get paid!

Mendenhall Room 248
7:15 pm
Tuesday, January 26 &
Wednesday, January 27
Apostolic Campus Ministry
DOWNTOWN
218 E. 5th St.�752-0022
New
HAPPY LUi KH oP�CA
MON-SAT. 12:00-3:00PM
$1.00
PITCHERS
PIZZA SLICES
2 SODAS
� DAILY 5-8 PM
� BUY ONE GET ONE FREE
2 FOR 2
SPECIAL
I DINNER MENU
� 2 CALZONES, 2 STROMBOLIS
2 BEERS, 2 DRINKS
ANSWER FROM PAGE 2
CLIPTHISADFOR
$2.00 ADMISSION TO
WED COMedY
JAN 27. 93 .iSS1
zone ATiTir
$1.50 HIBALLS � I � �
$1.50TALL BOYS sthVa752 73�3
ALL NIGHT LONG (V
s
STUDENT
STORES
LAST DAY
TO RETURN
TEXTBOOKS FOR FULL REFUND
FEATURING AT THE
TUESDAY JANUARY Z6TH
lU43�IiY4
MUST HAVE RECEIPT FOR
FULL REFUND
One Sfofr S6ofifeirtf
ECU Sfudent Stores: More than just books�your dollars support student scholars
Wright Building � 757-6731
Rave
�71 i �: I M �7iY4M
CLASSICS NIGHT
$3.00 Members $4.00 Guests
0 DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
D Teas & Bahama Mamas � 50 Jello Shots � 75' kamikazes
i:iU:M�7iV
SWEET 16 NIGHT
$1.00 Domestics � $2.75 Pitchers � $3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas
50C Jello Shots � 75f Kamikazes � 75� 100 M.P.H.
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for All 7 til 9:00
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � S2 75 Pitchers � 50c Jello Shots
75c Kamakazes � 75c 100 M.P.H
sriUViUiiVi
WEeKEnd
DRNcE PaRTY





JANUARY 26, 1993
The East Carolinian
11
CONNELLS
Continued from page 9
alternative chart in existence. With all
this new success the band began
touring theUS selling out 1,000 seat
venues even on the west coast
In 1990 The Cornells toured Eu-
rope for the first time en route to
record One Simple Word with pro-
ducerHugh Jones (Ultra VividScene,
EchoardTheBunnymeaDelArnitri).
Mike Cornell kept hearing fans say
thattheband was muchmore power-
ful live, so the band looked at the new
record with adifferent goal in mind.
Instead of imitatingtherecord live,let
therecordimitatetheliveshow. Word
stresses performance over studio
tricks. During the recording it was
common for the band to put in about
15 hours a day.
With all of this as back ground
information, we come to Thursday
night Jan. 21st, as the group pays one
last visit to Greenville before its off to
record their fifth album in February.
Theshowbeganwithappearancesby
BODY
Gravity's Pull from Chapel Hill and
Battersea Park from Raleigh opening
up.
The Connells took the stage a
UrUeaftermidnightwifriafastversion
of "Something To Say the crowd
was impatient with excitement and
wenrnuts,causingmeentirebuilding
to shake.
The band continued straight
through with enough smiles and in-
tensity to make the crowd rather than
the band to feel at home. MacMillan
dressed in the oldest ECU shirt still
wearable, whirled and whipped
stumpily around thestage while con-
trolling the crowds every move with
a microphone cord and pair of worn
out glasses.
In between songs it was fairly
common for MacMillan tobombasti-
cally sing bits of Burt Bacharach
compostionsaswellasoldCarStevens
tunes.
The show ended with an acous-
Continued from page 9
tic version of "Hey Wow that took
the crowd off of the roller coaster in
order to allow them to return home.
Thecrowdexperienced thepleas-
ant afterglow of a good show, a pri-
vateandpostcoital sort ofbuzz. Fight-
ing and yelling over autograph seek-
ers a short interview was held and I
witnessedaincredibleglimpseofwhat
the band is really like.
One example is when MacMillan
was trying to think of a quote, he was
interrupted by a road crew member
towhomhesaid "Shut up I'm giving
aquote'TheinterviewslowIy turned
into a storytelling session
The Connells will be recording a
newalbuminFebruaryinWoodstock,
New York.
According to Mike Cormell, the
studio is located where Bob Dylan
had his infamous motorcycle wreck
in 1967. After hearing some of the
new songs live, we should be in store
for yet "Another Souvenir
frenetic, sensual picture with com-
plex charactersandgreatacting. The
accused Catherine (Sharon Stone)
was intelligent, cunning, seductive
and intimidating; the '90s first real
femmefatale. The story tackled the
psychological effects of a sexual re-
lationship without trust or bound-
aries on a cop involved with the
prime murder suspect. Body is a
patchworkofstockcharacters,bland
production and ridiculous dialogue.
The interrogation scene is half-
heartedly stolen from Instinct and
details suchas malebondage (hand-
cuffs vs. white silk), vague suspects,
sexual murder, and homosexuality
are directly lifted.
It would have been more im-
pressive if Edel had taken the effort
to copy Instinct" cinematography,
style and attitude. And Madonna,
who is a vixen on stage and record,
isunconvincmg and dull; a true lack
of effort after her Breathless in Dick
Tracy.
Body just doesn't hold tension
or surprise. In fact, if s difficult to
say the movie holds your attention
whentheaudienceislaughingwhen
Madonna is slapped by Frank'swife.
Or when Frank throws Rebecca to
die floor in rage and frustration and
she casually throws her robe open
in earnest invite. Or when she de-
scribes how she used to pick wild
strawberries and appreciated their
"sweetness" more when the wooden
fence scraped her legsand the thorns
caught her fingers.
Instances like these make it ap-
parent that Madonna chose this
movie as a continuation of her
heightened sexuality from "Erotica"
and her "Sex" book.
If the producers had the
foresight to concentrate on her
willingnesstobenudeand naughty
and scrapped the murder plot
altogether, then at least Body of
Evidence would have been further
removed from comparison with
Basic Instinct and, perhaps, slightly
more entertaining.
The East
Carolinian
regrets
wrongly
identifying
Alexis
Hickman
deft),
second
runner-up
in the
Miss
Greenville
Pageant
on Jan.
16, as
Jennifer
West in
the Jan.
19 issue.
THIS
KSJ 1 "Are you being served?"
J Episcopal
Student Fellowship
Invites You to Join Us Each Week for
WFDNESDAyNTGHT SANITY BREAK FROM CAMPUS!
� 5:30pm Student Eucharist
� Supper provided after service
�ProgramConversation after supper
� Add new friends to your life!
� Bring an old friend with you!
� Be apart of a faith community
Newvideo series begins Wednesday, January 27th
What?: "QUESTIONS OF FAITH"
Where?: ST. PAUL'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 401E. 4th Street
(cross 5th Street in front of Garret Hall walk down Holly Street to 4th Street-You Are There!)
C� Schedule of Services �i
Sundays: 7:30,9:00,11:00
Campus Minister: Marty Gartman � 752-3482
Tuesday
College Night
The Best Mix
DanceTop 40
& Rock n Roll
Free Cover untii 10:00
Doors open at 8:00
Wednesday
Alive After Five
Live Beach Music at 7:00
Doors open at 5:30
Thursday
Coontemporary Country
Live Country Music
Doors open at 900
v.zqNEt
Friday
Comedy Zone
& Late Night Dancing
Doors open st 8:00
Comedy Show at 9:00
Saturday
Super Saturday
Greenville's
Largest Dance Party ,
Doors open at 9:00 ,&
'jirj a, a. a
C C D D D D P
The University Media Board
seeks Editors and General Managers
The University Media Board is seeking full-time students
interested in serving in the following stipended posts
for the 1993-1994 academic year:
EDITOR
Expressions minority students magazine ($175montnj
EDITOR
The Rebel fine arts magazine ($175month)
GENERAL MANAGER
The East Carolinian student newspaper
(estimated 1992-1993 stipend $4,700)
GENERAL MANAGER
WZMB student radio station
DAY STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
to the Media Board (no stipend)
All applicants should have a 2.5 grade point average
Contact: University Media Board
2nd Floor, Student Publications Building
Telephone 757-6009
Deadline for Applications: 5 p.m. Monday, February 8
nancacnn a n c
I
Telephone 355 5000
207 SW Greenville Boulevard
Greenville, NC
2t2S�
FREE
BREADS
2 SOFTS
DRINK
REVIEW '93
Summer Student
Leadership Opportunity Available
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ORIENTATION STAFF
Applications Available in
Room 203 Erwin
Beginning January 25, 1993
Deadline For Completed Application
is February 19, 1993
At 4:00 PM
GREENVILLE
)TH Street ot Greenville Btv
(next to Food Lion)
757-1212
LOW PRICE
GREENVILLE
393 Arlington Blvd.
MEDIUM SIZE
PLUS TAX
756-7256
little Caesare)Pizza!Plzzar
Two great pizzas! One low price: Alwaysl Always!





Ttie East Carolinian
January 26, 1993
Lewis stays true to
the game, next
assist goes to kids
Pirate star hopes to teach
values to misguided youths
By Jason Tremblay
Staff Writer
Senior James "Pookie" Lewis,
in his final year as East Carolina's
alternating forward and center, is
preparingforhisimpendinggradu-
ation with a sense of purpose, hope-
ful and ready for a promising fu-
ture.
A Justice major focusing on ju-
venile delinquency, Lewis hopes to
one day aid troubled children in
their reformation. Gting grade
school counselors and probation
officers as possible career options,
Lewis feels sympathetic toward
misguided youth.
"I always wanted to do that,
always just wanted to make a dif-
ference in a kid because my life
wasn't easy, and I thought I kind of
got a feel for kids, you know, espe-
cially delinquent kids or kids with
problems Lewis said.
Despite a troubled childhood,
Lewis proudly proclaims the
strength and love of his family, as
well as his admiration for them.
With 2 brothers and 3 sisters (com-
monly known as Baaahb, Boo-Boo,
Mynie, Dean, Pig, and of course,
Pookie himself,) there seems to be
no shortage of positive role models
in the Lewis household. James is
also very proud of his parents, and
appreciates the chances that he has
been given.
"You really don't realize how
lucky you are until you get away
fromyour family Lewis said, "and
I'd just like to say thanks to them
Lewis comes to ECU from
Batesburg, SC with a positive atti-
tude about Pirate basketball.
"We got something set out to
provethisyear.I thinkalotof people
got doubts about us, a lot of people
don't believe in us, and I guess be-
cause it's been a traditional thing
for an ECU basketball team. We've
got the talent and we've got the
coaching to do it this year Lewis
said.
When asked aboutcompetition
on the team. Lewis shrugs with Zen-
like understandingand explainsIf
you want to get some playing time,
you better practice hard and show
your talent and give 110 percent. If
you don't, they're there to take your
spot
With his final season almost
half over, Lewis looks back on his
basketball career as a positive learn-
ing experience, one which he will
miss.
"Yeah, in a way I think I'm
going to miss it a little, you know,
being away from basketball and
everything, but life goes on. The
experience and stuff I have learned
from basketball have prepared me
for what I have to confront later on
in the future said Lewis.
Regarding the renovationof the
Minges athletic facility in 1994,
Sports
Page 12
Photo by Dail Rd
LOOK! James Lewis finds a path for the ball despite his self-inflicted
blindness. He vision for the future is much more clear.
Lewis maintains an attitude of de-
tached benevolence about the
project, owing to the fact that he will
never play in the improved facility
professionally.
"Thenewkidsareexcited about
it Lewis said I think it will bring
a different typeof atmosphere here,
but ECU players are playing in
something new, and they want to
establish themselves in that place. I
won't get a chance to play in it he
adds, "but still, I think if s some-
thing good towards the sport
Lewis believes that the im-
proved facility will bringmore sup-
porters to tine ECU home games,
and says that the fans are an impor-
tant aspect of the game for the ath-
letes.
"Just come out and talk to us
Lewis said, "askus,you know,how's
everything, how's practice going,
and showing they're concerned,
which they've been doinga good job
of so far. We appreciate stuff like
that, that gives us an extra boost to
do better
Swimmers make a
winning splash
By Brent St Pierre
Staff Writer
Quick quiz! What is the most
successful athletic program this
year at ECU?
A. Football,
B. Men's Basketball,
C. Women's Basketball or
D. Men's and Women's
Swimming?
If you answered "A" it is ob-
vious you are having flashbacks
from last year and are suffering
from severe football withdrawal
symptoms. If you answered "B"
or "C" it is equally obvious that
you are innocently mistaking
ECU basketball with its more suc-
cessful twin brother in Chapel
Hill. Thatonly leaves one answer,
the correct answer. "D the men's
and women's swim team.
East Carolina's swim teams
are off to their greatest start ever.
The men are 10-0 and have yet to
be challenged.
The women are 9-1 and in
position to post the greatest one-
year turn around in the 13 years
that Coach Rick Kobe has been
involved with ECU swimming.
On Jan. 16 the Pirates
drowned the Duke Blue Devils.
Last year the Devils handled
the Pirate's easily, defeating the
men 132-111 and the women 129-
114.
But a year later, the emer-
gence of a loaded freshmen class
had the Pirate's poised for re-
venge.
Chanting the cry "Dookie
doesn't swim it floats" the Pirates
went forth and buried tile visit-
ing Blue Devils from Durham.
The men were victorious 147-88
while the women won 129-111.
The victory by the men tied the
ECU record for consecutive vic-
tories at eight.
On Friday, the Pirates hosted
the College of Charleston. Kobe's
Pirates had little trouble in route
to a 129-96 pasting of the Cougar
women. Weary that the upset
minded Cougar's might feel that
the luck of their basketball team
may have rubbed off on their
swim team, Kobe's men quickly
reminded them that this is not
basketball and we are not Geor-
gia Tech. The men rolled to a 123-
81 victory.
The men were led by a pair of
triple-winners, Patrick Cassidy
and Brian Soltz. The ladies had
three triple-winners in Tia
Pardue, Beth Humphry and
Jackie Schmieder.
The Pirate's had little time to
savor their victory because the
Monarchsof Old Dominion were
coming to Minges next.
This important conference
meet served as a calling card to
the rest of the Colonial Athletic
Conference.
The Ladies swam to an easy
134-95 victory. They were led by
triple-winner and senior co-cap-
ta?n Tia Pardue.
The men were equally as im-
pressive, winning 126-100. The
men were led by triple-winners
Derrick Nelson and Brian Soltz.
Kobe was pleased to say the least.
"The victory by the men
broke the all-time consecutive
wins record and puts us in posi-
tion to win the CAA champion-
ships Kobe said. "The win by
the ladies ties the greatest start
See SWIM page 14

rs�Wmm
1 pcuVS.Fla.At Ian;m
ECU (74)
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-taPfp
Jones 1234i04)0-1008
Lyons 257-163-43-42019
Richardson 140-10-01-1320
Hunter 291-50-53-5112
Young 113-50-13-5136
Peterson 29M4-11-15112
Gill 294-94-64-82212
Armstrong 51-1OOOO032
Lewis 182-42-42-3016
Copeland281-45-72-6127
Totals 20025-5718-3122-38151574
Percentages: FG - .439, Ft. 580,3 pt Goals: 6-20 -
300, Team Rebounds - 4, Blocked Shots - 3,
Turnovers -16, Steals -10.
Florida Atlantic(60)
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-taptP
Horford61-20-00-0002
Saab182-31-10-2015
Eddcn191-22-42-2454
Hazell34 12-196-81-70430
Harvey223-50-03-4306
Yeadon141-40-01-1012
Brown211-50-00-1142
Hitter272-70-01-2035
Cargill241-2OO2-5132
Bdlan90-1OO0-0000
Wilcox60-02-21-1132
Totals200 24-5011-15 12-31102460
Percentages: FG - .480, Ft 733,3 pt Goals: 1-8 -
.125, Team Rebounds - 6, Blocked Shots - 2,
Turnovers -19, Steals - 5.
1st half 2nd half OT
ECU
Fla. Atlantic
45
29
29
31
Final
74
60
Work Ethic:
ECU out-
muscled and
out-husted
the over-
matched the
Div. II Owls.
How many
licks does it
take to get to
the center of
a Tootsie
Pop? The
world may
never know.
Photo by Biff Ranson
Payne's Bucs go Owl-hunting
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU men's basketball team,
plagued by the tough competition in the
CAA conference, has faced many tough
teams,as is reflected in thePirates'6-o record.
They have been forced to scratch and claw in
every contest they have played, just to have
a chance of winning, or at least not getting
blown out
How relieved the Pirates must have
beenafter their 7460thrashingoftheFlorida
Atlantic Owls in Minges on Thursday night
The Pirates never trailed against the
Division II Owls and outmatched their op-
ponents from the outset of the game. Strong
inside shooting by Anton Gill and Curley
Young dominated the Owls in the first half
as the Pirates put together a 11-0 run mid-
way through the period to knot the score at
30-12. An Owl timeout was calledat833, but
was answered with a Lester Lyons three-
pointer. The Owls attempted a comeback
led by theoutsideproduction of guard Elvin
Hazell,butthePirates,relyingontheirphysi-
cal advantage, took a 16-point lead to the
locker room at halftime.
Both teams came out gunning when
play resumed as the contest became a scor-
ing exhibition at the beginning of the second
half. Lester Lyons and Hazell traded slam
dunks and outside shots, but the superior
talent on the Pirate squad overwhelmed the
Owls. The Pirates, despite outmatching the
Owls on die inside, put forth a perimeter
onslaught to put Florida Atlantic behind by
18 with 5:00 remaining. The Owls then pro-
ceeded with a desparation "foul-a rama" to
try to pull closer with 73 percent shooting
from the line, but could not bridge the gap
the Pirates had built throughout the game.
ECU pool tournaments break out
By Billy Weaver
Staff Writer
The ECU men's Billiards Tourna-
ment, held Thursday Jan. 21 in
Mendenhall, saw 32 players contending
for the title. The tournament was open to
all ECU students, with the only re-
quirement being a minimum 2.0
g.p-a.
Lynn Jobes, Director of
Student Union, said that this
year's competition entries
were "slightly down from
last year which may be a
result of the recently instated
2.0 g.p.a. requirement.
"We would rather have less en
tries and higher academics she said.
The lower numbers, however, only en-
hanced the intensity of the competition.
Each contestant was shooting for the
chance to represent ECU in the Associa-
tion of College Unions-International re-
gional tournament held at the Univer-
sity of Tennessee, in Knoxville.
Last year's winner, Rodney
Strickland, was eliminated in
the final four by Shawn
Bartley. Winning first
place from the "losers"
column in this double elimi-
nation contest, Bartley will
ay the winner of the best 2-of-
3 between Lewis Croom and Devin
Scully. Both Scully and Croom being
undefeated throughout the tournament,
Bartley must defeat the winner twice in
order to advance to the regionals in Ten-
nessee. These final three contestants will
shoot it out Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Billiards Center.
Check it Out
There will also be a
women's preliminary
held tonight at 7 p.m.
in the Mendenhall
Student Center.
Lady Pirates
earn first
CAA victory
By Kevin Hall
Staff Writer
trying to erase the goose-egg in
the win column of their conference record,
the East Carolina Lady Pirate basketball
teambattled AmericanUniversity inMinges
Coliseum Friday night.
Head coach Rosie Thompson was
pleased with her team's performance and,
moreimportantly,their first conferencewin.
"We won and that'salwaysgood
Coach Thompson said, after the 70-62 vic-
tory. "We shot the ball well from the out-
side, and Toina (Coley) continues to play
good defense for us
Coley, a Senior guard,
p:ckpocketed the Lady Eagles five times, to
improve her conference best steals total to
52. Coley also scored a career high22 points.
The Pirates grabbed an early 7-0
lead, but American was able to creep back
into the game. ECU was charged with eight
fouls before American received their first
The partisan Pirate fans on hand in Minges
voiced their displeasure to the referees
throughout the game.
However, the Pirates led the entire
way, except for a 21-21 tie with 6:15 left in
the first half. ECU fired back with one of
their many offensive spurts to extend the
lead to 31-21, before the Eagles closed the
gap to 31-27 at the half.
Less than a minute into the second
half, American's first-half scoring leader
Karen Jenkins went down with a knee in-
jury. The Eagles played without her ser-
vices for the remainder of the game.
ECU grabbed several 10-point
leads in the second half, but the stubborn
Eagles hung tough and cut the lead to 52-49
with 7:00 left, but didn't get any closer.
ECUexploded ona 15-2 run, keyed
by some nice no-look passes by seniorpoint
guard Gaynor ODonnell.
O'Donnell, the nation's assist
leader, dished out 12 and also scored ten
points. CAA leading scorer Rhonda Smith
continued her bid for conference player of
the year, achieving her seventh double-
double of the year with 15 points and 11
boards.
In order to stay close in this year's
conference race, the defending CAA regu-
lar season champion Pirates desperately
needed this victory. ECU improved to 7-5
overall and 1-2 in theCAA. American fell to
6-7,1-2.
BU vs.Ameiiiwi
ECU (70)
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-taPf�P
Coley 367-138-84-72422
Cagle 10-00-0OO000
OTonnell394-111-20312510
Thurman 274-604)2-4348
Smith 275-125-74-113415
Baker 90-10-00-1100
Samuels 352-62-31-6026
Blackmon 263-73-63-4129
Totals 20025-5619-26 16-40 22 21 70
Percentages: FG - .446, Ft. 731,3 pt. Goals: 1-5 -
.200, Team Rebounds - 4, Blocked Shots -1,
Turnovers - 21, Steals -11.
American(62)
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-ta?f�P
Dorfmeijter.B. 60-22-204)002
DorfmelMer,A.200CM)OO010
Turner 282-91-13-4235
Connell 90-30-01-2210
Keller 262-95-83-8149
Dorezas 141-31-22-2333
Baker 141-304)34132
Greenfield 92-30-03-3004
Jenkins 142-32-30-1226
Wilkins 296-132-5OO1315
Hirschler 19440-12-5008
loseoski 303-112-24-9108
Totals 20033-7019-29 11-49 24 20 95
Percentages: FG - .343, Ft. 625,3 pt. Goals: 1-10 -
.100, Team Rebounds - 7, Blocked Shots -1,
Turnovers - 24, Steals -15.
1st half 2nd half
J
�'
Photo by Biff Ranson
Got 'Em! Point guard Gaynor O'Donnell
chalks up another assist.
,





13 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 26, 1993
Rugby team prepares for championship
Team must
rebuild to defend
N.C. title
By Jason Webb
Staff Writer
Taking up where they left
off last fall, the Pirate Rugby
Club has started preparing a
defense of its eastern North
Carolina Collegiate Champion-
ship.
The team is confident of suc-
cess this spring and has an am-
bitious schedule to toughen new
players as well as test the veter-
ans against some of the best
teams in the southeast.
One of the major challenges
will come on March 20 when
powerful Maryland R.F.C. visits
ECU.
The Terrapin ruggers have
already made it to the National
Championships and are peren-
nial contenders for Group III re-
gion honors.
Pirates' missing men
Several key players from last
fall's successful Pirates will be
missing and the team hopes their
replacements are ready.
Gone are props Burt Hewitt
and Rich Hooten who anchored
the forwards. Flanker Linwood
Obriant and Chris Carney are
also gone.
These four represent half of
the most dominant scrum in
North Carolina so their absence
will be sorely felt.
Coach Larry Babits and his
playing advisors Jason Webb,
Jay Keller and Richard Moss are
seeking to mould a new pack
around veterans and B team stal-
warts who saw extensive ser-
vice last year.
It takes leather balls to play rugby: Key loses have set the mighty Pirate rugby team back a few steps. They hope
to recover and maintain their dominance in the state.
No positions are finalized
this early in the season and
Babits is looking for strong, fast
thinkers who could fit into this
year's edition.
"Actually, size is not that
important if one is quick and
agile and has the desire to do
well said Moss, who plays full-
back.
Building on the '92 season
Last fall, the Pirate ruggers
came up short in an attempt to
win the North Carolina Colle-
giate Championship outright.
The loss did not prevent
them from obtaining a wild-
card entry into the Group III
Championship tournament but
again, the ruggers came up
short.
IF YOU WANT TO MAKE IT
IN THE REAL WORLD,
SPEND A SEMESTER IN OURS.
tffi(VAXktep
World Co.
Walt Disney World Co. representatives will be on campus to present an
information session for Undergraduate Students on the Walt Disney
World SUMMERFALL '93 College Program.
WHEN: Tuesday, Feb. 2
7:00pm
WHERE: 1028 General Classroom Building
Attendance at this presentation is
required to interview for the
SummerFall '93 College Program.
Interviews will be held on Wednesday,
Feb. 3 The following majors are
encouraged to attend: SUMMER�
Business, Communication, Recreation
Leisure Studies, Hospitality Restaurant
Mgmt , and TheatreDrama. FALL�All
major wHrome.
For more information
Contact: Cooperative Education
Phone: 757-6979
An Equal Opportunity Employer
� The Walt Disney Co.
I I ������-�-�����������������'��� -i
Tuesday
is
Student Appreciation
Day
During February
SEAFOOD
626 S. Memorial Drive
Present your 1993 Student ID
Card and get:
YOUR CHOICE OF
ANY DINNER FOR ONLY
$Q29
3
Excluding platters & family packs
Not valid with any other discounts
Beverages and desserts not included
tttttttttttttttttttttttttt
"Last year was a disappoint-
ment because we did so well
early on and then were stale
when it really counted said
Babits.
"This spring, we are rebuild-
ing but taking on tougher oppo-
sition to show the younger play-
ers what top-flight rugby is all
about
Babits is quick to point out
that first time players made the
A side last fall and many more
rookies could move up this
spring.
"All that is really needed is
basic athletic skills and a desire
to learn a sport which you can
play into your fifties said
Babits.
Keller also pointed out that
everyone plays because the
matches include games against
the B and C sides in conjunction
with the A side match which
counts for the North Carolina
championship.
The second and third side
games are real learning experi-
ences because veteran players
are available for on-field coach-
ing during the game.
Practice is currently under-
way Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday from 3:30 to 5p.m. on
the Allied Health fields.
5-vV
DISCOVER
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
FOSDICK'S W
1890 SEAFOOD ir
3003 S. EVANS STREET
756-2011
2 REGULAR
COMBINATION PLATTERS
9
Dine In or Take Out r fS
Qood Any Time ?27��7�
(reg. $15.90)
Choose From Any 2 Seafoods
For Each Platter-
Shrimp, Trout, Clams, Deviled Crab, 2k
k Crab Cakes, r3aby Flounder, Perch '
k Oysters or Scallops
$ 1.00 extra per item per plate
Mot yood with any other coupons
kor specials. Beveraye not Included.
Expires 2893
Vlth this coupon only
Bodysuits
9Full selection
of bras and
panties
Sleepwear
� Teddies
Bustiers
Student Discounts of 10
Bridal
Registry
Avaiable
Track Scores
Week 2
This week: The Pirate track
teams have a week off, return-
ing to action at the Barnette
Bank Invitational at the Uni-
versity of Florida Jan. 30.
Last Week: Danita
Roseboro and Susan Schram
collected third place finishes
to lead the Lady Pirates at the
Joe Hilton Invitational at the
University of North Carolina
on Jan. 16.
Roseboro finished third in
the 55 meters with a time of
7.08. Shram finished third in the
shot put with a mark of 43-10.5
Other Lady Pirates that placed
included Stacy Green's fourth
place finish in the mile with a
time of 5:21.3. Alexis Jacks fin-
ished fifth with a time of 2:30.0
in the 880. The Lady Pirate re-
lay team finished fourth in the
mile relay with a time 4:21.4.
The Pirate men, originally
scheduled to run at the Joe
Hilton Invitational,did not com-
pete.
Men
Jan. 9Father Diamond InvitationalFairfax, Va.
16UNC InvitationalChapel Hill, N.C
31Barnette Bank InvitationalGainesville, Fla.
Feb. 7Mobil 1 InvitationalFairfax, Va.
12&13Husker InvitationalLincoln, Neb.
20Collegiate InvitationalFairfax, Va.
28Fairfax Indoor ClassicFairfax, Va.
Mar. 6&7IC4A's Indoor Championshipis Boston, Mass.
12&13 NCAA Indoor Championships Indianapolis, Ind
Women
Jan. 9
16
30
Feb. 6
12
20
26
Mar. 6
13
Father Diamond Invitational
UNC Invitational
Barnette Bank Invitational
Virginia Tech Relays
University of North Carolina
Collegiate Invitational
University of North Carolina
ECAC Indoor Championships Boston, Mass.
NCAA Indoor Championships Indianapolis, Ind
Fairfax, Va.
Chapel Hill, N.C.
Gainesville, Fla.
Blacksburg, Va.
Chapel Hill, N.C
Fairfax, Va.
Chapel Hill, N.C.
WHY ARE THESE
STUDENTS
SO HAPPY?
THEY JUST GOT
MONEY BACK FROM
A-l
AUTO BODY
REPAIR SHOP
20 Discount For All
ECU Students and Faculty
�Free Estimates �Insurance Claims
�Painting �Fiberglass Work
�Frame Straightening �Glass Work
A-1 AUTO BODY REPAIR SHOP
2200 Dickenson Avenue
355-4611
shai
if I ever fall in love
CASSETTE m J
S7.98 $10.98
We Now Buy & Sell Used
CDs � Nintendo
Super Nintendo � Sega Genesis
1109 Charles St
758-4251






14 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 26, 1993
1992-93 ECU Swimming and Diving
best times of year.
(Through Duke meet, Jan. 16)

Men
50 Freestyle:
100 Freestyle:
200 Freestyle:
Brian Soltz
Brian Soltz
Derek Nelson
21.87
48.23
1:44.70
SWIM
Seahawks fall to William & Maiy, drop in CAA
WILUAMSBURG, Va. (AP) �
ThomasRobertshitajumperand Kurt
Small followed up with a bank shot
from the left Saturday to keep Will-
iam & Mary ahead of North Carolina-
Wilmington 67-63.
Keith Adkins missed a shot for
North Carolina-Wilmington (11-3
overall, 3-2 Colonial Athletic Associa-
tion) and teammate Tim Shaw
knocked the ball out of bounds.
Brendan Connor made his sec-
ond foul shot for the final margin as
William & Mary improved to 9-5 over-
all, 2-3 in the CAA.
North Carolina-Wilmington
tied it twice during the final five
minutes, the second time on a re-
verse plus a free throw from Darren
Moore to make it 57-57 with 3:44
remaining.
A Reggie Veney layup off a
steal put North Carolina-Wilming-
ton up 59-57, their first lead of the
half.
Small made a foul shot to pull
the Tribe within 59-58, and the
teams exchanged a one-point lead
until Roberts' jumper.
William & Mary had lead by as
much as 12 points three times
in the second half, the last time
at 48-36 with 12:04 remaining.
The Seahawks cut that lead
with a 9-0 run, including a 3-
pointer from Chris Meighen
and two field goals fromShaw.
Small led William & Mary
with21 points. ToddCauthom
had 16 points and 11 re-
bounds. Roberts scored 11
points.
For North Carolina-
Wilmington, Moore scored 22
points.
Continued from page 12
ever by an ECU team
Only one year ago, the ladies
record was five up and seven
down, a far cry from this years 9-
1 "Jeckyl and Hyde" reversal.
With only two dual meets re-
maining on this year's schedule
the Pirates prepare for the CAA
Championships next month.
If the Pirates can split their
remaining two meets against
North Carolina and UNC-Wilm-
ington, both the men and women
will have posted the greatest win-
ning percentage under Rick Kobe
since he has bee" here.
A split would be a combined
record of 21-3.
The best combined record
before this year was 21-5 set in
1986. The '86 team went on to win
the CAA Championships.
The Pirates' next home meet
is Saturday, Jan. 30, at 2 p.m.
Kansas rules AP college hoops poll
The Top Twenty Five teams in The
Associated Press' college basketball
poll, with first-place votes in parenthe-
ses, records through Jan.24, total points
based on 25 points for a first-place vote
through one point for a 25th-place vote
and previous rankings:
1. Kansas (49)
2. Indiana (7)
3. North Carolina (9)
4. Kentucky
5. Michigan
6. Cincinnati
7. Duke
8. Arizona
9,SetonHall
10.UNLV
11. Iowa
lLVanderbilt
13. Pittsburgh
14. Purdue
15. Virginia
16. Arkansas
17. Utah
18. Georgia Tech
19. Florida St.
20. Oklahoma
21. Georgetown
22. Connecticut
23.Tulane
24. Marquette
25. Houston
Other receiving votes: Wake For-
est 101, Wisconsin 66, Michigan St 65,
UCLA58,New Orleans 42, Massachu-
setts 34, Xavier, Ohio31,Minnesota 26,
Brigham Young 21, St John's 20, Iowa
St 17, Kansas St 15, Missouri 13,
California 10, Ohio St 10, Mem-
phis St 8, LSU 7, Syracuse 5, Bos-
ton College 4, New Mexico St 4,
Long Beach St 3, NE Louisiana 3,
Southern Cal 3, WiCentucky 3,
James Madison 2.
FIRST ANNUAL ST. CHARLES
SUPER BOWL PARTY
featuring:
�Over 25
DomesticImport Beers
�Free Snacks
�Two TV Screens
�All-You-Can-Eat
Crab Legs & Steamed Shrimp
SUPER BOWL SPECIAL
250 Steamed Oysters
All Day
Super Bowl Sunday Hours
12:00 til the fat lady sings
ST. CHA1LES
Grilled. Steamed & Raw Bar
1 2 PRICE
PITCHERS
OF BEER
All Day Mondays
SUNDAY PLAYOFFS
SPECIAL aQC
16 oz DRAFT 3"
in NFL Cup
you keep the cup!
12 PRICE
APPETIZERS
Sun-Wed 9:00 PM - CLOSE
Dine-In Only
Corner of 10th and Charles
Tues-Thurs 500-9:30
Fri-Sat 4:00-10:00 Sun 12-9:30
752-2450
GET TAN!
WITHOUT GOING BROKE
BASKETS BY CHOICE
Carolina East Centre
(beside the Plitt Theatres)
PRICES
1 MONTH $49.00
2 MONTH $75.00
3 MONTH $99.00
�Wolff tanning beds
� Open 7 days a week
� Always fresh bulbs
� Personal service;
� Lowest prices around
TOUCHDOWN AT
TOO
TANNING BED VISITS FOR
$99.00
limited number will be sold
FREE VISIT CALL 321-0709
ADMISSION PRICE UNTIL 10:30pm
Wednesday, January 27, 1993
Present This Coupon At The Door
Interested in a
Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
A certificate program open to qualified women
who have a baccalaureate degree
Approved by the American Bar Association
Intensive summer schedule May-August; part-time
evening schedules beginning January or September
Placement service for graduates is without fee to
employer or graduate.
Applications Deadline forihe 1993 Summer Program: March 1. 1993. For details,
contact: Legal Assistants Program, Continuing Education, Meredith College,
3800 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27607-5298 (919) 829-8353.
Meredith College admits women students without regard to race, creed, national or
ethnic origin, age or handicap. � ���
menechthedtegp
QfFaqtastic Snys
the Original Family HaircutterSi
South Park Shopping Center
115 Red Banks Road
355-9515
NEW HOURS
Open Sunday 1-6
Appointment
Necessary ,5T
OPEN MON-SUN
Mon-Fri 9-8
Sat 9-6 Sun 1-6
3
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
WINTERIZATION SPECIAL
�Drain cooling system and replace
anti-freeze for protection to 20-30
degrees below zero
�Check all fluid levels.
�Check battery and starter.
�Clean and inspect battery 5
terminalscables.
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 2-13-93
l
r
-�
Wanted:
V Licensed Stylists
f Fantastic Sam'a f Fantaatie Sa
PERMS J ADULT
i 522.95 swHAIR CUT.
- - $8.00 I
�20 95 '
. VfcW.�Jl - (Shampoo included) .
V Long Hair Extra VV DtiH Cuta ErtrJ
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
MINOR TUNE-UP
�Install Toyota-brand spark plugs.
�Check air, fuel and emission filters.
�Inspect ignition wires, distributor cap
and rotor, belts, braces and PVC valve.
�6-cylinder or 60,000-miIe platinum plugs $A �
slightly higher. MtJ�J
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
I I
NEW SERVICE HOURS
SATURDAY
9 am -1 pm
321-3000
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
OIL CHANGE WITH FILTER
�Includes up to 5 quarts Premium grade
Kendall Motor Oil and Genuine Toyota
double-filtering oil filter.
�Complete under-thc-hood check
of all belts, hoses and fluid levels.
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
AUTOMATIC
TRANSMISSION
TUNE-UP
"1
?39.95
L
r
�Replace pan, gasket and fluid. 'Clean screen.
�Adjust brands as well as manual and throttle linkage
(where applicable).
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 2-13-93
J
L.
Coupon expires 2-13-93
'I love what you do for me
. J I
15.95
i.
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 2-13-93
L
GENUINE TOYOTA
OIL FILTER 4,OC
�Double-stage filtering element
with anti-drainback valve.
Regular Price $6.13 Limit 2 plus tax.
Not valid with other coupons. Over the counter sales only.
Please present coupon at time of purchase.
Coupon expires 2-13-93
J
� toyota Greenville Toyota
Service Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 6pm Saturday 9am
3615 South Memorial Drive
Located Across From Carolina East Mall
lpm
.





Title
The East Carolinian, January 26, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 26, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.917
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy