The East Carolinian, January 21, 1993






mill iiii
A
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Lifestyle
Dial-A-Game Time for Health
There's a lonely
sportscaster out there,
just waiting for your
900-number call.
See page 13.
Health columns return with
dieting tips to safely
prepare you for swimsuit
season.
High: 52

The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 4
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, January 21, 1993
ECU student wins leadership award
18 Pages
By Jennifer Wardrep
Staff Writer
Susan Stewart, recipient of the 1992
Martin Luther King Jr. Student Leader-
ship Award, said the award was both an
honor and a surprise. Her award was
part of a ceremony held Monday that
was sponsored by Alpha Phi Alpha fra-
ternity in honor of the slain civil rights
leader.
Awards were also presented to the
African-American students in each class
with the highest grade point average.
Stewart, 19, also received the GP A award
for the sophomore class.
"I was very surprised she said. "I
expected to receive the GPA award be-
cause they sent a letter, but I was ex-
tremely surprised to win the leadership
award. It was a great honor
Stewart, a North Carolina Teach-
ing Fellow, will major in history and
would like to become a high school
teacher.
"High school really determines
whether a young black student, or any
student, will go to college she said. "A
student needs someone to guide them in
that direction and I want to do that for
students
Stewart plans to eventually earn
her doctorate in African-American his-
tory. Since ECU only offers one course in
the subject, she said she will attend a
different university.
"I think there is a strong need for
teachers in thatarea shesaid. "It's some-
thing I've always wanted to do, and I've
always been interested in American his-
tory in general
But Stewart said she thinks history
should be taught differently in the
nation's public schools.
"I do not like the way history is
taught in our schools she said. "The
texts we use don't present both sides of
the story and they tend to downplay the
negative aspects
Slavery is one part of American his-
tory that is often minimalized, she said.
"Thereare usually
two or three paragraphs
about it she said.
"They say it was bad,
but then they leave it
alone
Stewart is active in
several campus organi-
zations and committees.
She is assistant to the president of the
Student Union and secretary of the Mi-
nority Arts Committee. She also repre-
sents the Student Union on the Media
Board and is a member of Allied Blacks
for Leadership and Equality.
Stewart received the award for the
most outstanding member of the Minor-
"High school really deter-
mines whether a young
black student, or any stu-
dent, will go to college'
Susan Stewart,
Recipient of the Leadership Award
ity Arts Committee in 1992.
The leadership awards ceremony
was theninth annual program sponsored
by the fraternity. Dr. Patricia Gayle
Brewer,principal of Agnes FulliloveHigh
School, was also honored at theceremony
for her community service work.
Non-traditional
students increase
on cam pus
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Followingnationaltrends,ECUhasseenan
increase innon-traditional students in recentyears,
as part of what Associate Director of University
Admissions Marion Sykes calls "the graying of
college campuses
Though the numbers for the spring semes-
ter have yet to be tabulated, population figures for
last fall show an increase of nearly 10 percent in
non-traditional students from the previous year.
During last semester, 709 part-time and 1049 full-
time returning adult undergraduates enrolled in
classes at ECU. An additional 738 graduate stu-
dents fell into the returning adult category.
Dr. Lucy Wright, Assistant Dean for Stu-
dent Development and Director of Special Popu-
lations, was quick to point out that the increasing
numbers were partly attributable to the general
increase in enrollment of all types of students.
"The increase seems proportionate to the increase
elsewhere, butovertheyears, wehaveseena slow
steady rise in the numbers Wright said.
Although any student who doesn't enter
college immediately out of high school could be
called a non-traditional student, the university
places most of them inacategory called returning
See Students page 8
Light of Hope
Grades remain
steady during
fall semester
ByKaren Hassell
Assistant News Editor
Photo by Jason Bosch
Cold weather did not stop many students, faculty and Greenville residents from participating in a very solemn
candlelight march from Christenbury to Mendenhall to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jrs birthday.
ECU students' grades remained steady
during the fall semester of 1992, despite the
slight increase in last fall's average SAT score.
Last semester's average SAT score
jumped from 889 to 900.
"If it went up 700 to 900, you would
expect a big jump, but with it only 889 to 900
you can't expect but so much said Ken
Lowe of Planning and Institutional Research.
The average semester grade point aver-
age of freshmen for the fall of 1991 was 2.04,
for the fall of 1992 it moved to 2.09. Sopho-
more and junior classes kept the same GPA
while seniors moved from 2.65 to 2.69.
Students earning academic honors at
ECU during the fall represent 95 of the state's
100 counties, 40 states and the District of
Columbia and 18 foreign countries.
A total of 3,953 students earned places
on the university's official honors list for the
semester, with 448 students on the
Chancellor's List, 1252 on the Dean's List and
2,253 on the Honor Roll.
See Grades page 8
Textbook prices
written in stone
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Textbook buyingand sellingatECU
has changed little in the pastyears, some-
thing that most students don't look for-
ward to at the close of each semester.
During the last two weeks of each
semester, both University Book Exchange
(UBE)and the StudentStores get ready to
open their doors to long lines of students
trying to sell their textbooks back. Both
stores hold the same policy regarding
prices when students sell their books
back.
When a student sells a book that he
or she purchased as new, at the time of
selling, it is then considered a used book.
Both bookstores will buy the book back
for one-half of the retail (or new) price. If
that book is to be used in the following
semester, the store will price the used
book at three-quarters of the new price
and then sell it to a new student.
Theamount of ti mesa bookis used
has no effect on the used price when
another student buys it A book used by
one person will have the same price as
the same book that has been used by 10
differentpeople.Thestoreswill buy back
a used book at one-half the retail price
and follow the selling policy listed above.
Liz Veytia, textbook manager at
UBE, said that the price the store will pay
depends on a number of things.
"We will buy back bx)ks until our
limit is reached Veytia said. "The price
will then drop to a wholesale, or ship-
ping, price

Wanda Scarborough, assistant
manager of Student Stores, said that Stu-
dent Stores also follows the same policy.
"We do buy back for a used book
company Scarborough said. "That's
considerably lower than whatyou would
get if the text is used another time in a
following semester
One of the biggest problems that
occurs in the book buy-back process is
when the stores send out requisition pa-
pers to the university's departments for
the books that will be needed in the
following semester.
"A lot of these book orders are not
turned in on time Veytia said. "We then
receive a massive number of late
requisitions around two weeks before
classes
Scarborough said thatthedeadline
the stores set for the professors to turn in
the orders is late February for the sum-
mer and fall semesters.
"It will depend upon whether the
faculty member sends the requisition
back in by that day Scarborough said,
"how long itwilltakeustoknowwhether
or not (the book) will be used
Ve tia said that it is not uncom-
mon for UBE to get 100 late requisition
orders in two weeks before classes start.
"lean see 50,butl00?" Veytiaques-
tioned. "It takes(UBE) two to three weeks
to get books in after they're ordered, so
students who need those books just have
to wait.
"The biggest problem is lack of
communication between the faculty and
bookstores
Nightclub's new owners renovate
Mug Shots to offer
entertainment
alternative
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
ECU students and local Greenville resi-
dents will soon have a new outlet for their
nightime entertainment. MMBInc, thecom-
pany that attempted to open a nightclub in
the Blount-Harvey building on the Evans St
mall in late 1992, has finally succeeded in
entering the nightclub business with their
takeoverof the buildingthatcurrently houses
the New Deli. The company plans to open
"Mugshots'aprivateclubmatwill provide
entertainment to patrons from ECU and the
surrounding Greenville area.
The owners of the company, Alex
Barletta and Luigi Marchionne, say the prob-
lems they encountered with the city in their
attempt to open the Blount-Harvey building
has prepared them for the opening of
"Mugshots They say that they now have a
better relationship and understanding with
the people of the city.
"(At first) I thought they were all a
bunch of nu ts against a bunch of Ital ians and
Northerners coming down Marchionne
saidButtalkingtoDonEdwards(theowner
of the Mugshots building) and some of the
business people it seems these people are
really concerned with their downtown He
said that the club will be a first-class estab-
lishment that would serve as a credit to the
downtown area.
Marchionne said that Mugshots will
differ quite a bit from the existing New Deli.
One such difference will be the entertain-
ment brought into theclub.MMB is working
IIII I' I 'Hi Mill I �
MUGSHOTS
. , , Photo by Dill R��d
Renovations have already begun on downtown's former New Deli to turn it into a
new nightclub, Mug Shots.
with Sunshine Alternative Promotions to
secure Mugshot's live entertainment Paul
Edwards, the owner of the agency, said that
the dub would have an immediate impact
on the Greenville music scene.
"Through Sunshine I have brought in
many of the acts who have come up through
the New Deli I'm going to continue to
bring in those acts that you have seen at the
DelL.the music that the people have really
liked in the club will still be there and the
music won't change, but we are going to
ennance the music of the club and bring in a
better variety and a better quality of enter-
tainment
Barletta said that he and Marchionne
have already invested $5(XK) in the renova-
tion of the nightclub to date and expect to
spend a great deal more. I le said that the
installationofheatintheupstairsbarandthe
purchase of a new beer cooler will make
major improvements that will be noticed by
the fu hi re cl ien tele. Former Deli patrons will
notice the repainting of the upstairs area as
well. Butaccording to Marchionne, the most
noticeable change in the club will be its
sanitation.
"For me cleanliness counts and it (the
New Deli) was a mess Barletta, the other
half of MMB, has also noticed the poor sani-
tary conditions in the Deli. In addition to
three calls to an exterminator, Marchionne
said a massive cleaning effort was already
underwayTt took us two weeks and 25
gallons of cleaner to get the smell out. It's
going to look nice
See Mug page 8





� ;
2 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 21, 1993
Student removes picture from exhibit
The spot where Colorado State University art student Heath
Johnson displayed a painting now has a letter from the Children's
Television Workshop, the producer of "Sesame Street hanging
in its place. Johnson had painted "Sesame's Treat which de-
picted the muppet characters Bert and Ernie in an intimate sexual
position, with Big Bird watching through the window, and dis-
played the art work in a student exhibition. "The whole thing was
meant to be a satirical comment he said. "Here's Bert and Ernie
living together so long, two guys who would be pinpointed as
being gay. They don't date any of the female characters The
Children's Television Workshop threatened to sue the university
over copyright infringement. Instead of fighting the Children's
Television Workshop, Johnson agreed to remove the painting
and left the letter in its spot at Colorado State's student center.
Paper seeks revenge on regents
In protest of the University of California Board of Regents'
decision to increase tuition by $605, the student newspaper at UC-
Santa Barbara printed the names, addresses and work telephone
number of all 18 regents, seven ex-officio regents and the student
regent. "We'd like to address a question that has dogged the UC
regents at several of your recent meetings a Daily Nexus edito-
rial said. "We've heard it issue from your politically appointed
lips more than once: 'Really, are we out of touch?' Well, dear
regents, sirs and madams,yes The editorial urged students to let
the regents know how they felt about the fee hike. The voting
records on the tuition increase and some of the regents' home
telephone numbers also were published.
Four students arrested in rape case
Bethune Cookman College officials are studying ways to
make the residence halls more secure after four Bethune Cookman
students were arrested and charged with sexually assaulting a 14-
year-old girl on campus. The victim told police that on Dec. 1 a
man stopped to talk to her at a gas station in Day tona Beach. They
drank alcohol and smoked marijuana in a campus parking lot. She
was then taken tb a dorm room and sexually assaulted, police
said. After reviewing the case, prosecutors decided to charge the
men with assault rather than rape. A college spoke .woman said
the administration is investigating the security in the dorms. She
said the suspects were automatically a suspended and will re-
main so until the case is adjudicated.
Compiled by Karon Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
University hate codes
becoming less specific
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
A recent Supreme Court ruling
has forced administrators toiookover
campus hate codes around the na-
tion.
In RAV. v. St. Paul, the Su-
preme Court concluded that an ordi-
nance prohibiting the display of a
symbol known to "arouse anger in
others on the basis of race, color, creed
violated the First Amendmentright
to freedom of speech. It based its de-
cision on the belief that the ordinance
unconstitutionally prohibited "speech
on the basis of the sub�xls the speech
addresses
Ben Irons, the university attor-
ney, said mat this ruling limits disci-
plinary proced ures to actual conduct,
not a person's speech.
"The court held, to the best I can
understand it, that it was unlawful
and unconstitutional for the city of St
Paul to issue an ordinance which pro-
hibited certain specific utterances
while allowing others Irons said.
"Someof the legalscholars have
called it 'underbreadth' rather than
'overbreadth Irons said, "which is
the term that we hear most in these
First Amendment cases
In the summer of 1992, the fac-
ulty Executive Committee proposed
changes in ECU'S Racial and Ethnic
Harassment policies in accordance
with the Court's ruling. The Board of
Trustees then approved the change in
policy, making the changes effective
in late August of 1992.
In effect, the policy waschanged
by the deletion of two subheadings
concemingacrionstakenbyindividu-
alstosingleoutothersbecauseof their
race or ethnic affiliation.
Previously, the university could
sanction a student or university em-
ployee that "subjected others to ra-
cial or ethnic insults, speech or other
actions which would haveatendency
to cause acts of violence or to harm
persons of property
With this deletion, the question
arose of how a person could seek
action against another person who
had verbally insulted himher on
the basis of race.
"If what is said is sufficiently
serious, then it would be an opportu-
nity to use the disciplinary code
Irons said. "We would not penalize a
student who allegedly uttered a slur
because of what was said.
"Rather, we would use letter E
in the Code Code of Conduct and
Disciplinary Offenses for Students,
Student Handbook, 'endangering,
injuring or threatening to injure the
purpose or property of another
Irons said.
"As long as the rule prohibits
the threat�the danger to persons or
property�then if s OK Irons said.
"As long as it's not aimed at the
specific nature of tl ie speech
Most universities around the
country are also following this trend
by changing their hate codes to a
more general base, rather than a spe-
cific one. Mark G. Yudof, dean of the
law school at the U. of Texas, Austin,
said universities that create specific
categories of hate speech create their
own problems.
"The conclusion I would reach
from theopinion is that if you take an
approach to limiting speech and you
create categories, that amounts to a
content discriminationandthaf sun-
constitutional Yudof said.
Others have stated that life at
universities becomes difficult if they
may have to face racial slurs every
day. ECU's Equal Employment Op-
portunity officer, Mary Ann Rose,
said that universities serve as micro-
cosms of society.
"Universities should be ex-
amples of living civilly Rose said.
"Yet at the same time, we cannot
violate people rights
DougScheidemantel,astudent
at Michigan State University, echoes
those concerns, "If a person can't go
to college and not worry about hav-
ing that ha tred directed toward them,
it's unfortunate Scheidemantel said.
SPECIAL SKI PROGRAM ANNOUNCED
FOR
ECU STUDENTS & FACULTY
We arc pleased to announce the establishment of a special ECU Ski
Program which is being made available by the Winterplace Ski Resort.
ECU Students and Faculty wishing to take advantage of this special ski
program must present their ECU identification card when purchasing lift
tickets, renting ski equipment, or renting a condo.
SPECIAL PRICES ARE:
Weekdays (Monday through Friday)
Lift Tickets Rental Equipment
(skis, boots, and poles)
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.$14.95 $7.95
9 a.m. to 10 p.m.$17.95 $7.95
3 p.m. to 10 p.m.$12.95 $5.95
Saturday. Sunday. Holidays
Lift Tickets Rental Eauipment
(skis, boots, and poles)
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.$27.95 $12.95
9 a.m. to 10 p.m.$34.95 $12.95
5 p.m. to 10 p.m.$18.95 7.95
ECU Special Ski Lessons
90 minute group lesson by Winterplace Professional Ski
School for only $6.95 per person - regularly $12.00!
Winterplace Condominiums
2 Bedrooms - Parlor, 2 Baths, Kitchen - sleeps 6 -
available Sunday night through Thursday night - only $125.00
per night.
Winterplace Ski Resort is under new ownership and has vastly
improved its snowmaking capability, added new trails (now 24 trails) -
new lifts (now 4 chair lifts 2 surface lifts) and a new dining and food
service.
Winterplace Ski Resort is located W miles South of Beckley, West
Virginia, 1 'i miles from the Ghent exit on Interstate 77.
If you need additional info, or need to confirm lodging reservations,
call 304 787-3221. For latest snow conditions, call snow phone 1-800-
258-3127.
Anticipated conditions for week ending January 23rd are -17 trails
open with all chairlifts operating.
'
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ALPHA SIGMA PHI
Tuesday; January 26
meet the Chi Omegas
Wednesday, January 27
P11ZA NIGHT meet the Alpha Phis
Thursday, January 28
NIGHT meet the Alpha OmicronlPis
Fnday, January 29
ORAL BID NIGHT by invitation onl
'V

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i
J
�Ai
ftiit
�!
ALL FRESHMEN WELCOME
�-Sr
V
for vore Information Call 757-3516
.�� . ��'��:�'�
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3 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 21. 1993
RLD NJWJ
Marine wounded, troops return home
MOGADISHU, Somalia (AP)
� The nighttime wounding in
Mogadishu of another comrade re-
minded the more than 500 Marines
departingforhome today of thedan-
gers of this chaotic land they sought
to pacify.
The return of the Marines to
Camp Pendleton, Calif likely will
be the last major withdrawal of
American forces from Somalia until
the United Nations acts to take over
military control from the United
States, spokesmen said.
The Marine wounded Tues-
day night, Warrant Officer Gus
Axelson, was shot and wounded in
the right shoulder while driving to
the former US. Embassy.
The bullet shattered the
shoulder blade of Axelson, of Las
Cruces, N.M who was taken to a
Swedish hospital in Mogadishu
and was up and walking around
today, military spokesmen said.
He is the fourth Marine casu-
alty since US. forces arrived in So-
malia Dec. 9 to provide security for
relief workers that this lawless coun-
try is rife with bandits, gangs and
warring clans. One Marine has been
killed and three wounded.
Marine Col. Fred Peck said the
3rd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment,
probably will be the only major unit
to leave Somalia until the U.N. Secu-
rity Council adopts a new resolution
necessary for the changeover.
U.N. officials say no timetable
has been set for a change of com-
mand.
The Marines sent home 556
troops Tuesday and another 560 to-
day, reducing their strength in So-
malia to fewer than 9,000.
They are among 24,715 Ameri-
can troops in Somalia. Another 11,805
international troops are in the coun-
try from 20 nations, the nucleus for
the U.N. peacekeeping force.
Peck had said Sunday that the
US. military is "rapidly approach-
ing the point where we'll be able to
make a very smooth handoff to the
U.N. command
The US. would like to see the
U.N. move quickly to take military
control of Somalia so more Ameri-
can troops can return home.
But U.N. officials indicate mat
such a turnover cannot be accom-
plished by Feb. 1. And Peck himself
said the handover of presidential
power from George Bush to Bill
Clinton could contribute to delays.
The top U.N. enovy to Soma-
lia, Ismat Kittani of Iraq, said in New
York that before military control is
turned over to the U.N "there has to
be a secure environment for the de-
livery of assistance throughout all
Somalia
STUDENT UNION SPECIAL EVENTS COIVHVIITTEIE
HYPNOTIST
Thursday
8:00 pm Hendrix
$3 In Advance $5 At The Door
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET
FEATURING AT THE
ilU43�7iV1
Rave
CLASSICS NIGHT
$3.00 Members $4.00 Guests
0 DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
$3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas � 504 Jello Shots � 754 Kamikazes
i:iu:ia�7iV
SWEET 16 NIGHT
$1.00 Domestics � $2.75 Pitchers � $3.00 Teas & Bahama Mamas
50C Jello Shots � 75C Kamikazes � 75? 100 M.P.H.
wmmmmmawJM
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for All 7 til 9:00
$3.00Teas & Bahama Mamas � $2.75 Pitchers � 50c Jello Shots
750 Kamakazes � 750 100 M.P.H.
wnmmm i�i �7iVmm
WEeKEnd CANOE PaRTY
Ifs 7:45 a.m. Your alarmgoesoff
You hit snooze lO times.
You get up and eat a good breakfast.
Read the paper and watch a little TV.
Make it a fast morning walk.
mPLAZAMALL
opensatlO. It'sTlMEfathe
WINTER
CLEARANCE
Ands
clean it out!
MELTsome plastic!
Is NEVER bete!
GaffQsetym'veakmm.
New SHOES'
Jewelry a stereo.
Aaftforfcnapgin-hws.
Maybe a little
something
for the DOG.
SomdkgtokehMqmt.
SOMETHING
foryourego.
yourke
Everythingyou can getyour hands on,
'cause when you see a gpeat deal, you should
get it ALL!
THE WINTER
CLEARANCE
SIDEWALK SALE.
THURSDAY - SUNDAY
January 21 - January 24
JC Penny � Belk � Brady's � Roses
The Plaza Cafe's Food Court
Shop Mon Sat 10am - 9pm, Sun. 1pm - 6pm
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el

I llliWI'iilliWIIIHilll'





4 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 21, 1993
Clinton's inaugural speech calls
for the reinvention of America
AP�On a crystal clear, cold
winter day, Clinton spoke of a new
spring in America, "A spring re-
born in the world's oldest democ-
racy, that brings forth the vision
and courage to reinvent America
Change was the theme of his
campaign, and change was his in-
augural promise in a speech re-
plete with references to his heroes
� Thomas Jefferson, Abraham
Lincoln, and John F. Kennedy.
"Not change for change's
sake, but change to preserve
America's ideals � life, liberty,
the pursuit of happiness Clinton
said. "Though we march to the
music of our time, our mission is
timeless
Looking back, Clinton sa-
luted Bush and thanked "the mil-
lions of men and women whose
steadfastness and sacrifice tri-
umphed over Depression, fascism,
and Communism
Then looking ahead, he
spoke of the new challenges in a
remarkably high-tech global
economy.
"Profound and powerful
forces are shaking and remaking
our world, and the urgent ques-
tion of our age is whether we can
make change our friend and not
our enemy the new president
declared.
"Our democracy must be not
only the envy of the world but the
engine of our own renewal. There
is nothing wrong with America
that cannot be cured by what is
right with America.
'To renew America, we must
be bold he continued. 'We must
do what no generation has had to
do before. We must invest more in
our own people and in our own
future, and at the same time cut
our massive debt. And we must do
so in a world in which we must
compete for every opportunity
In a touching passage,
Clinton borrowed Kennedy's call-
ing for Americans to think ahead,
ask not what the country could do
for them but what they could do
for it � and the children of its
future.
"Our Founders saw them-
selves in the light of posterity. We
can do no less he said. "Anyone
who has ever watched a child's
eyes wander into sleep knows what
posterity is. Posterity is the world
to come�the world for whom we
hold our ideals, from whom we
have borrowed our planet, and to
whom we bear sacred responsibil-
ity
Teachers remember accused
shooter as smart, quiet
GRAYSON, Ky. (AP) � A
shy honor student accused of
shooting to death a teacher and a
janitor in front of his classmates
recently wrote a book report on a
Stephen King novel with a simi-
lar plot, a fellow studpnt says.
Scott Pennington, 17, was
charged with two counts of capi-
tal murder and 22 of kidnapping
in Monday's 15-minute standoff
at East Carter High School in
Grayson, a town of 3,500 people
in the Appalachian foothills.
He was held in a juvenile
detention center for a hearing
Feb. 5 to decide whether he will
be tried as an adult.
Police would not discuss a
motive for the shootings.
Crystal Dyer, a senior who
said she witnessed the shooting,
said Pennington had written a
report recently on the King novel
"Rage about a deranged stu-
dent who shoots a teacher and
holds a class hostage.
Police said Pennington
walked into his senior English
class, pulled a revolver and fired
a shot over the head of 48-year-
old teacher Deanna McDavid. He
then stepped closer to McDavid
and shot her in the temple.
Janitor Marvin Hicks, 51,
rushed into the classroom,
pushed a student out of the way
and was shot in the abdomen,
police said.
Dyer said that after
Pennington shot the janitor,
Pennington "sat down in Mrs.
McDavid's chair and asked us,
'How many in here think I'm
crazy?
'No one answered Dyer
said, "and he said, 'Cat got your
tongue? Usually you can't keep
your mouths shut
Police Officer Larry Green
said when he got to the class-
room, Pennington had already
released the other students. The
teen-ager pointed to where he
had left the gun on the teacher's
desk and gave up without a
struggle, Green said.
TOURNAMENTS
BILLIARDS
TABLE
TENNIS
Men's
TONIGHT Jan 21
7 PM- 10 PM
Women's
Tues, Jan 26, 1993
7 PM-10 PM
Women's
Mon, Jan 25, 1993
7 PM- 10 PM
CHESS
Wed, Jan 27, 1993
7 PM- 10 PM
BOWLING
Co-Rec
Thurs, Jan 28, 1993
7 PM-10 PM
Registration in the Billiards Room, MSC
Fee: $2.00 G.P.A 2.0
Winners will receive an all expense paid trip to
represent East Carolina University in the Regional
Competition at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville
Sponsored by the Student Union Productions Committee
RUSH IT
"THE FIRST NON-SECRETARIAN FRATERNITY"
EVER
BE A PART OF THE REVITALIZATION
OF THE N.C. DELTA ZETA CHAPTER
OF PI LAM
FEB. 1
REFRESHMENTSMeetThe Brothers
FEB. 2
SUB NIGHTMeet The Ladies Of AZ
FEB 3
PIZZA PARTYMeet The Ladies Of AO
FEB. 4
HORS D'OEUVRESMeet The Ladies Of AHA
FEB. 5
INVITATION ONLY
Late Night, All Night With AOn
FOR FURTHER INFO AND TIMES CALL
830-1591 OR 830-3882
TAR RIVER CLUBHOUSE
SI STUDENT UNION
" HAPPENINGS
MOVIES I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
TRUE COLORS
WED & SUN, JAN 20 & 24
m �. At OUM
-eiSSS-
It
iflfe
-�
-ltwu���
HOT SHOTS
FRI & SAT, JAN 22 & 23
COFFEE HOUSE! BRIAN HUSKEY
TUES, JAN 26, 8-9:30 PM
HE UNDERGROUND, MSC
51 Admission with Student I.D.
52 Admission for General Public
SPECIAL EVENTS! TOM DELUCA
HYPNOTIST
HYPNOTIST
THURJAN28, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
$3.00 In Advance at Central Ticket Office, MSC
$5.00 At The Door
MINORITY ARTS! "SONG OF MY PEOPLE"
TUES, FEB 2, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
A historic film project on the national experience
of African-Americans and their contributions to
American culture.
FORUM � ANARCHY OR APATHY
on evening with
NOAM CHOMSKY
TUES, FEB 9, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
II "�" For More Info Call The
' University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
� mm
�iiiiihiihiii'iiii.ii iHiiiiwuir iqiiriMwi





The East Carolinian

January 21, 1993
Classifieds
Page 5
F( )R RENT1R( X )MMATE WANTEDIF( )R SALE1HELP WANTED1SERVICES ()FEEREDIPERSONALS
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
ROOM FOR RENT 4 blocks from
campus $135 dep. 757-2456.
FURNISHED 1 bedroom.
GreenMillRun Apts. 2 blocks from
campus $335 January paid, call
830-1505
SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM AFT.
ACHeat, Basic Cable, hot water
sewerincluded. 2 blocks from cam-
pus $450.00 month. Call 746-4169.
RINGGOLD TOWERS: Full fur-
nished efficiency forSublease. Call
758-3642 Leave message.
WILLOUGHBY PARK CONDO
room with bath for spring semes-
ter for responsible nonsmoker
$300mon. for all or whole 2BR
2BA$560?moind water,cable. 757-
6644.
FOR RENT: Spacious 2 bedroom
apt. ACHeat, basic cable, hot
waterSewer included. 2 blocks
from campus $450month. Call 746-
4169.
TAR RIVER APARTMENTS Act
now! Two bedroom apt new car-
pet, appliances and wallpaper.
Available in May. Free cable and
water! $460 plus deposit. Call 830-
1791 or 756-3745 for info.
SHARE 2 BEDROOM apt $200
rent 12 utilities. On 10th St. be-
hind Pantry. Call Tom 830-5158
R( M )V1 MATE WANTED
WANTED: roommate to share
apartment in Tar River area. 1
4 of rent and 14 utilities. Call
758-5207.
MALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Convenient location
to campus with ECU bus trans-
portation available- Furnished
bedroom with Private Bath,
Cable, Telephone, washer
dryer, kitchen privileges- "you
tend to your business and I tend
to mine philosophy $175.00
mon includes utilities. Call 321-
1848.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Plan-
tation Apartments, includes
Jacuzzi, pool, tanning, and
weights. Take over renewable
lease until 5-1-93. $194 200 se-
curity deposit 321-1969.
ROOMMATE WANTED! Male
roommate needed to share two
bedroom apartment. Location
near ECU campus with ECU bus
transportation. 12 rent, 12
utilities. Call 758-2122 (leave
message if no answer.)
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Wild-
wood Villas - Assume 13 bills
and $183.33 per month rent. 3
bedroom townhouse with
washer and dryer and conve-
nient location to college. Callus
at 758-8115.
MALE ROOMMATE
WANTED:Convenient location
to campus with ECU bus trans-
portation available- furnished
bedroom with Private Bath,
Cable, Telephone, Washer
Drver, kitchen privileges- "you
tent to your business and 1 tend
to mine philosophy" $175mo
includes utilities. Call 321-1848.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: to
share a townhouse apartment.
Rent is $160mon and 12 utili-
ties. Convenient to campus and
includes ECU bus. Contact Stacy
Peterson at Carriage House
Apartments, apt 60, 321-1532.
MALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: 1108 E 10th Street. 2
Br, spacious, Rent $250 Deposit
$225. Util included in Rent. Call
Chris 757-1203.
MATURE FEMALE WANTED
to share duplex, graduate, non-
smoker preferred. $125 per
month, 12 utilities. Call after
6:00 pm 830-1293.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED:To share apt. in Tar
River Estates Pay $150mon
13 utilities. Must be a non-
smoker. Please call 757-1262.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED. 1 1 2 miles from ECU,
bus,$172.50 12 utilities. Com-
pletely furnished. Nonsmoker.
Please call Ali at 752-1782.
F( )R SALL
RINGGOLD TOWERS CONDO
- One bedroom unit. Children out
of school, I want to sell fast. Call
(919) 847-1557 Raleigh, NC.
VALENTINES SPECIAL: Don't
forget to order early this year as
we run out every year. For just
29.95you can get your lady 1 dozen
long stem red roses arranged and
boxed. 757-1007
FOR SALE: Macintosh Classic, 4
MG RAM, 40 MG hard drive,
microsoft word 4.0 excel,
pagemaker, macintax, macpaint,
screen saver. Used only one se-
mester. $1,000Call Mike. Day 938-
4238, night 353-8532.
FOR SALE: 2 answering machines
� Bell South Product or Unisonic.
$20 each. Brown wingback chair
$20,830-9442.
HEY NOW! HAND DRUMS: ce-
ramic and metal doumbeks,tablas,
bodhrans, frame drums, etc. Call
756-4226 for more information.
TAKE OVER CLUB FOR
WOMEN ONLY membership!
Save $59.00 initiation fee! ONLY
$29.00mo. Call today at 756-9235
and start the new year off right.
Please leave a message.
FOR SALE: Packard Bell Legend
IVcomputer forsale. Panasonic 24
pt. printer, VGA color monitor.
Computer has hard drive, 2 floppy
drives. (5.25" and 3.5") Must sell!
$850. Includes Harvard Graphics,
Lotus 1-2-3, Multimate.PFSGraph-
ics, Grammatix, and other pro-
grams. Call (919) 321-2577 leave
message.
GRADUATING: MUST SELL!
1988 ISUZU IMPULSE TURBO -
low miles, all extras plus spoilers,
Must See and Drive: $6000. Rock-
ford Gosgate Punch 150 car amp,
Blaupunkt 20x20 amp. $50. Dorm
size microwave $25. New Blue
sports coat, size 40 L $30. New
"Members Only" ski jacket
(whiteblue)$50(neverworn. Call
Tommy 752-9620.
HELP WANTED
SAVE on Spring Break '93! Ja-
maica, Cancun, Bahamas from
$459 Florida from !149! Organize
group and travel free! Contact
Susan 0 931-7334 or cal Sun
Splash Tour s todayl-800-426-
7710.
ATTENTION STUDENT: Lam
extra cash stuffing envelopes at
home. All materials provided.
Send SASE to National Distribu-
tors PO Box 9643 Springfield, MO
65801. Immediate response.
CAMPUS REPRESENTATIVE
NEEDED by sportswear com-
pany to sell to fraternities and
sororities. Average $50 to $100
workingonenightperweek. Call
1-800-242-8104.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW HIRING
- Earn $2000month world
travel (Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
ibbean, et.Holiday, Summer
and Career employment avail-
able. No experience necessary.
For employment program call 1-
206-634-0468 ext. C5362.
WANTED: DRUMMER for
cacaphonous, hip-hop fusion en-
semble! (Brand New Heavies,
Jaco Pastorius, Public Enemy,
Charles Mingus) Should have
own drum kit and bounteous,
platitudinous, whimsical tenden-
cies! Call Link at 758-7993.
ORIGINAL ARTWORK
WANTED! Looking for art that
would look good on T-shirts. We
will pay for the exclusive use of
your work. Call for an appoint-
ment 752-6953.
WZMB needs people for the fol-
lowing positions: Promotions Di-
rector, Grants Manager, and As-
sistant News Director. Apply in
person at WZMB in Mendenhall
Student Center.
POOL MANAGERSAQUATIC
DIRECTORS � several posi-
tions in Greenville & Nags Head
areas. Must be 21 y o or older.
Deadline Feb. 21. Call Bob
Wendling, 756-1088.
TOPLESS DANCERS
WANTED: Great club, great
money, unbelievable tips. Work
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9
pm-2am. Call Sid 919-735-7713
or Paul 919-736-0716. Mothers
Playhouse in Goldsboro.
$10 - S360UP WEEKLY Mailing
brochures! Sparefull time. Set
own hours! RUSH stamped en-
velope: Publishers (GI) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295 Durham,
NC 27705
PART-TIME SALES and stock
help, heavy lifting required. Ap-
ply the Youth Shop Boutique at
Arlington Village, across from the
Plaza
BRODY's AND BRODY's FOR
MEN are accepting applications
for part-time sales associates.
Flexible scheduleSalarycloth-
ing discount. Apply Brody's The
Plaza MonWed. 1-4 pm
SPEND A SUMMER in New
Hampshire. Outstanding boys
girls sports camps located on
New England's largest lake are
recruiting individuals for all staff
positions, including nurses. Ap-
plicants must be able to assist in
the instruction of an activity. For
more information, call Kyle at
(919) 847-4430.
EASY MONEY- Beauty Contest
many prizes will be awarded.
Call 757-0127 ask for James.
SERVICES OFFERED
�"AWESOME SPRING BREAK
TRIPS! Bahamas Cruise 6 Days
Includes 10 Meals, Great Beaches
& Nightlife! $279! Panama City
Beachfront Rooms With Kitch-
ens $119, Key West Oceanfront
Hotel $249, Daytona Beachfront
Rooms With Kitchens $149,
Cancun $459, Jamaica $479!
Springbreak! 1-800-678-6386
ATTENTION SPRING BREAK-
ERS Party like Gods Panama
City $139, Key West $269, Jamaica
& Cancun from $450. Quality Ac-
commodations. Free Drink Par-
ties! Call Joe Endless Summer 1-
800-234-7007.
MODEL PORTFOLIOS Photo
Creations & Associates 355-8886.
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in just a few days!
Plus a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself!
No cost. No obligation.
1-800-932-0528, ext. 65
PRICES FOR STAY-NOT
SOUTH PADRE ISLAND
5 ana 7 MIGHTS
DAYTONA BEACH
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
PANAMA CITY BEACH
SAND 7 NIGHTS
STEAMBOAT
2 5 AND 7 NIGHTS
MUSTANG ISLAND I
P0RTARANSAS
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
HILTON HEAD ISLAND
S AND i NIGHTS
FORT LAUDERDALE
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
VAIL I BEAVER CREEK
5 AND 7 NIGHTS
12th Annual
Party!
TOLL FREE INFORMATION 4 RESERVATIONS
1-800-321-5911
Jj Cosv Soiling Volctt Cf
ffY tkc. Baktmat or tht Keys U
atuair owntriniteuatckt
u In ft, tUpirtu KtJftr vnJs
OMW met for Ok �f jEr
385 &
Waeraem
-800-780,
-4001
n
TUDENT
WAP
HOP
RMERLY ESTATE SHOP
COIN & RING MAN
BUYING
& SELLING
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
JewelryCgoodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
at UNC-CH. If you don't join this
semester, there's no telling what
you'll miss DATE: Thursday,
January 21 TIME: 3:30 in the af-
ternoon PLACE: Austin room
132. See Dr. Gordon in Austin
325-C or call 757-4104 for further
information.
LIZA, I'm still spinning while
looking at the ceiling. You took
me on a ride that night, but that's
OK bcit will be your turn one
day. Ibetyou'rewonderingwhat
itwill bebc you're W.O.M! Get
Ready, PW?
BILLY, TAD TAD TAD TAD
TAD TAD TAD TAD TAD TAD-
POLE.
ATTENTION FEMALES: Wet
T-Shirt contest contestants
wanted. Contest will be held on
Thursday Jan. 28 for more info
call Travis or James at 757-0127.
CONGRATULATIONS Pheobe
Dickerson on being elected new
Panhellinic Vice-Pres. Loveyour
Sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA XI DELTA would like to
wish all the fraternities good luck
during Spring Rush.
TO THE PLEDGES of Alpha Xi
Delta: you are all doing a great
job, keep up the good work. Love
the Sisters of Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA OMICRON PI Beta
Rho's-AAAH! It's senior night
and the FUN has just begun! Rest
Up! Love, your Sisters.
PERSONALS
ALPHA PHI will be sponsoring
a Jump Rope for Heart to raise
money for the heart foundation.
It will be held Sunday, January
24 at 1:00 in Memorial Gym. For
further information contact Kim
Parker at 758-1880.
ARE YOU READING THE
CLASSIFIEDS to find something
to do? Are you bored with life
and want a change? Then you are
reading the right ad You need
FUN and EXCITEMENT in your
life Here's the solution: EAST
CAROLINA COMPUTERCLUB!
If you want to meet new friends,
or you like computers, or even if
you know nothing about com-
puters but want to learn more
then come on by, because EV-
ERYONE is invited You'd be
crazy not to jump at an opportu-
nity like this one! Last semester
you m issed out on an AWESOME
field trip to the virtual reality lab
EAST
CAROLINIAN
So as not to ruin
Alpha Sigma
Phi's reputation
The East Carolinian
Advertising
Department
formally apologizes
for publishing
incorrect Rush
information.
January 28 AOII
WMbeatAXO.
2 & 3 BEDROOM DUPLEXES
Available immediately!
New & located close to campus.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00pm
Brand New Apartments
Available February 1!
Great location, close to campus.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00pm
tit J
Announcements
SOCIAL WORK CRIMINAL
IUSTICE
Date Application Due for
Spring Admissions: January 29,
1993. Applications may be picked
up in Room 104-B.
EDUCATION MAJORS
The Department of Speech-
Language and Auditory Pathol-
ogy (SLAP) will be providing the
speech and hearing screening for
all studentseligible foradmission
to Upper Division of Teacher Edu-
cation on Monday, January 25,
Tuesday, January 26, and Wednes-
day, January 27, 1993. The De-
partment will be testing from 5:00
to 6:00 each day. NO APPOINT-
MENT IS NEEDED (first come
basis). The SLAP Department is
located in Beik Annex on Charles
Street.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Recreational Services will
be sponsoring a Pirate Double
Dare on Thursday, January 28, at
6:30 pm. Double Dare is a special
event in which teams of four at-
tempt to answer questions worth
certain amounts of points. The
team with the most points at the
end wins! There will be physical
challenges,so beprepared toGET
NASTY! Registration ends Tues-
day, January 26 at 5:00 pm, so
register now. Call 757-6387 for
more information.
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY
CLUB
The Pre-Physical Therapy
Club will be having a meeting
Thursday, Jan. 28 at 7:30 in Men-
denhall, Room 221. Club Dues
($2.00) will be collected at the
meeting. All are welcome.
NRHH
NATIONAL RESIDENCE
HALL HONORARY MEETING:
Monday, January 25, 1993 5:15
pm. Fletcher Res. Hall Basement
(NRHH Shirts are in !).
BIOLOGY CLUBAMERICAN
RED CROSS
American Red Cross
Blood Mobi le: Give Blood Please'
Monday, January 25, 1993 12:00
noon until 6:00pm at Mendenhall
Student Center Sponsored by the
ECU Biology Club.
INTERNATIONAL PRO-
GRAMS OFFICE
Pay ECU tuition, room
and board, and study at one of
many foreign locations! No for-
eign language requirements for
many sites! Contact Stephanie
Evancho, 757-6769, for details or
stop by the International Pro-
grams office on 9th Street.
GO NATIONAL
Or you can pay ECU tu-
ition and study at another univer-
sity! Easy application procedure,
contact Stephanie Evancho, 757-
6769, for details or stop by the
international Programs office on
9th Street.
FAST CAROLINA COM-
PUTER CLUB
East Carolina Computer
Club meeting on January 21,1993.
Time3:30pm Place: Austin build-
ing in room 132Today!Comejoin
the fun!
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Are you a walker? If you
are, why not join Club Ped, ECU's
walking club? Club Ped is de-
signed for students, faculty and
staff and is an ongoing, yearly
participation club based on self-
directed walking. Prizes are
awarded after a certain number
of miles havebeen reached. Teams
of 4 are appreciated but individu-
als are welcome. Stop by room
204 Christenbury Gym for your
official walking paper, or call 757-
6387 for more information.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Mon Jan 25 � Henry
Doskev, piano, Faculty Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00pm,
Free).
EXCEL COURSE
The Department of Deci-
sion Sciences will offer a non-
credit EXCEL course at no cost.
Classes are 2-4 pm Fridays from
January 22 - February 19, 1993.
Enrollment is limited; preference
will be given to students that re-
ceived transfer credit for DSCI
2223 Introduction toComputers.
To register call (919) 757-6893 by
January 20, 1993. EXCEL is the
spreadsheet and graphics pack-
age used in business courses.
COMMUNICATING TO
ASSERT YOURSELF
The Counseling Center is of-
fering a two-session workshop for
students designed to identify ef-
fective communication techniques
forachievingassertiveness in your
life. Emphasis will be placed on
the impact of self-esteem in ac-
complishing assertive behavior.
Call 757-6661 to sign up: partici-
pation is limited, so call early!
The workshop will be held in 313
Wright, Tuesday, January 26 and
Thursday January 28 from 9-10
am.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center invites you to worship with
them. Sunday Masses: 11:30 am
and 8:30 pm at the Newman Cen-
ter, 953 F. 10th Street, two houses
from the Fletcher Music Building.
For further information, please
call Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.
P.U.S.H. THROUGH THE
BARRIERS
If you would like to work to-
wards reducing the
architechtural, as well as the atti-
tudinal barriers that students with
special needs are faced with ev-
ery day, then come to the next
meeting of P.U.S.H. (People
United to Support the Handi-
capped). The meeting will be held
5 pm on Thursday, January 21 in
Cotten Hall Lobbv. Come join the
fun!
COPING WITH 1 OSS
This support group is designed
for those who have experienced
the lossof a significant other. The
focus will be on understanding
feelings, reactions to loss, how to
move toward recovery, taking
care of needs, and developing a
possitive outlook. Dr. Will Ball
and Bob Mitchel 1 wiII be the faci 11-
tators. The group will start
Wednesday January 20 from-?
pm in 316 Wright Building.
� ' �"





The East Carolinian
� i
January 21, 1993
Opinion
Page 6
Clinton must play hardball with Iraq
Former president George Bush has left
some unfinished business for Bill Clinton to
take care of in his first day of office.
On Jan. 13, Bush ordered troops stationed
in Iraq to commence bombing raids. These raids
were in retaliation for Iraq firing on U.S. planes
in two "no-fly" zones in northern and southern
Iraq, and because of Saddam Hussein's refusal
toallow U.N. inspectors to inspect Iraq's nuclear
weapons.
A week later, officials in Iraqhavepromised
to hold off firing at allied aircraft if the bombing
raids are halted. Iraq said it wanted to give
newly-elected president Clinton a calmer
atmosphere in order to fully study the situation.
Iraq has also said that the attacks serve no
purpose as they will not force cooperation with
the U.N. inspectors.
Problems have arisen with the allied forces,
as some Arab states have begun distancing
themselves from the war. Russia has also
demanded that the United States get explicit
permission from the United Nations before any
further raids are ordered.
Though some have seen the United States'
use of force as heavy-handed, Clinton said
Monday that he "will not waver" from Bush's
policies.
Clinton needs to stand by this promise in
order to ensure that the United States stands as
a decisive power in the world. Indecision and
confusion will only relate to other countries that
our government is weak and unable to stand up
for its own convictions.
The question of whether or not Bush should
have initiated the strikes is a moot one. What's
done is done and history cannot be changed.
What faces Clinton is the task of ensuring that
Hussein and Iraq comply with the U.N. deci-
sions.
Recently, Hussein has ordered an increase
in the food rations given to Iraqis. Clinton should
not be fooled by either the cease-fire promise or
this seemingly humanitarian act. As Hussein
tries to show he is a benevolent leader, he has
broadcasted that he will pay a $15,000 reward to
any "heroes" that shoot down an enemy missile.
Hussein showed in the first part of the Gulf
War that he could not be trusted; after the troops
had been removed for the most part from Iraq,
he continued to defy the United States and the
United Nations jointly. His two-faced approach
to this most recent skirmish should not have
been unexpected.
Clinton must stand tough in one of his
most important decisions since becoming
President. Iraq must be made to comply with
U.N. sanctions and restrictions; if force is deemed
necessary, then so be it.
After this decision is made, Clinton can
continue his tough stance by addressing some
of the major problems here at home.
By Gregory Dickens
Members of Congress support Freedonia
As the new Congress hangs
out its shingle for its new
session, the media continues to
reiterate the fact that there are
so many new members and how
they were elected in a fervor of
frustration directed at the elder
statesmen who had become em-
"It's a
different
situation
than the
Middle East'
Steve Buyer (R-lnd.)
on U.S. involvement in
"�reedonia"
barrassments.
The hip, '90s Congress is
supposed to be forthright and
responsible when compared to
the bums who were thrown out
for their jaded, weaseling ways.
Those evil S.O.B(s) had gotten
too savvy and corrupt for the
reform-minded who gathered
momentum and voted away
from those previously-elected
(boo! hiss! boo!).
The new breed was to be
without political blemish; ordi-
nary citizens who had cobbled
together the gumption in an at-
tempt to replace those who knew
too much with those who would
learn the ropes as they went
along. They were to be a fresh
start, our generation's pride.
Keep this in mind.
Soon after being sworn in
and having moved in to their
offices, the new members of
Congress received phone calls
from individuals identifying
themselves as being from a rad io
talk show. The callers asked our
pride-and-joy for their opinions
on "the ethnic cleansing in
Freedonia Nick Smith (R-
Mich.) said "My impression
is we've gotta be very careful,
that moving through the United
Nations effort has a great deal
of merit right now James
Talent (R-Mo.) responded, "I
think anything we can do to use
the good offices of the U.S. gov-
ernment to assist stopping the
killing over there, we should
do
Steve Buyer (R-Ind.) ap-
proved of our involvement say-
ing: "It's a different situation
than the Middle East And
Corrine Brown (D-Fla) ended
her comments with: "I think all
of those situations are very, very
sad, and I just think we need to
take action to assist the people
However, the callers were
actually from Spy magazine, the
lampoon committed to embar-
rassing public figures and not
only were the Congressmen not
on a radio show, they obviously
were not aware that there is no
Freedonia (it was the setting for
Duck Soup, one of the Marx
Brothers' movies).
Now, I'll be the first one to
admit that no one wants to show
how little they know about
something, especially when you
think you are on a live radio
interview. No one wants to look
like an idiot. Now a great deal of
egg is on the faces of these saps.
Spy conducted a series of pranks,
this one being the best
constructed, under the theme of
hazing the "freshmen Surely,
a noble objective. But this
experiment reveals a large prob-
lem.
Are these morons unable
to recognize a fake country from
a real one? There's a lack of basic
geography here that should be
addressed before we start send-
ing Marines God knows where.
Perhaps an entrance exam for
office should be implemented.
A little geography, some math
before tackling that pesky defi-
cit and Clinton's proposed cut-
backs, possibly bookkeeping so
we won't have to endure a
check-bouncing scandal again.
Oh, and an ethics course to
assuage concerns before another
harassment suit hits the capitol
steps. Think of it, actual criteria
for judging knowledge before
choosing a candidate. It could
Think of it,
actual
criteria for
judging
knowledge
before
choosing a
candidate.
place substantial ability over
vague or untrue campaign
promises. I know, I know, it
sounds crazy. Maybe we should
take it slow.
But you gotta imagine all
those now-unemployed profes-
sional politicians laughing their
substantially-padded wallets
off. To the victor go the spoils.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Su tori us, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sunnier, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. 77ie�aMCaroini"aipublishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
orreject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications B ldg ECU,
Greenville. N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
THE BUCK STOPS HERE
By Mike Joseph
Baby-boomers to lead nation under Clinton
With all the hullabaloo
about Bill and Hillary Clinton rep-
resenting the rise to power of the
baby-boom generation, I decided
to do an informal, non-academic
Boomers spent
thousands of
hours trying
to find out
fust who or
what screwed
them up so
badly.
analysis of just what that
generation is and what it
represents as the new leadership
of the most powerful nation on
earth.
First of all, the baby-boomer
generation includes the roughly
75 million Americans born be-
tween 1946 and 1964. This huge
chunk (about one-third) of the
U.S. population has cut a unique
swath through American society,
pushing older and pulling
younger generations along with
it.
When boomers began to
reach their teens in the sixties,
their long-haired, drop-out, free-
loving, psychedelic, groovy
search for the meaning of life
permeated the nation. In the
seventies, the older boomers
began to realize that nude outdoor
meditation and organic
gardening were tough ways to
make a living. So the generation
marched into the eighties with
their MBAs and began buying
BMWs with their Visa cards. They
also dominated markets and the
media. For example, boomers be-
gan pushing their late thirties in
the mid-1980s. When approach-
ing middle age brought broader
waistlines, gray hair and crows
feet, the market exploded with
health clubs, fad diets, Nordic-
tracks, hair color "because I'm
worth it" and an inexhaustible
sea of flesh sponges for Esoterica
face cream. The media responded
with Greek god and goddess
images of what a human being
should look like and drove many
normal people into despair.
Despair is another trade-
mark of the generation � it be-
came fashionable for boomers to
see themselves as victims.
Therapy support groups and 12-
step programs sprang up like
alfalfa, and boomers spent
thousands of hours and millions
of dollars trying to find out just
who or what screwed them up so
badly.
Boomers spend money
wildly. Western Media Corpora-
tion president Phil Goodman be-
lieves that boomers have experi-
enced plentiful timesall their lives
and have been brought up to
spend rather than to save.
Boomers have a great deal of
unsecured debt and high
mortgages, which causes concern
in the banking industry. What's
more, Northwestern National Life
Insurance Co. predicts that
retirees needing home healthcare
in 2011 will deplete thei r assets in
one year. As a consequence, baby-
boomers may continue working
into their '70s or '80s.
Another drain on boomer
pocketbooks is children. Baby-
boomers have now produced
about50 million children of their
own (as a result, a boom of new
consumer parenting products has
begun). Boomers have sought to
make good homes for their off-
spring, and so have migrated to
the suburbs, which gave rise to
such thingsas shopping malls and
inner-city blight.
Boomers should also be con-
cerned about the tiny generation
caught between the baby-
boomers and boomer children.
The tiny generation has been
tagged "baby-busters and they
hate the boomers. According to
Moira Farr of the Utne Reader,
busters see in boomers a show of
over-confidence, arrogance,
moral superiority and a distorted
view of history. Largely because
of boomer social gluttony, 63
percent of busters feel it will be
harder for them to live as
comfortably as the boomers.
But despite the busters, Bill
Clinton has taken his generation
to the White House; and Bill
Clinton is a classic baby-boomer.
He comes from a dysfunctional
family. He was born William
Jefferson Blythe IV on August 19,
1946, but got "Clinton" from his
mother's second (of five) husband
(who turned out to be an abusive
alcoholic). During the sixties,
Clinton experimented with drugs
and protest (without really inhal-
ing either); eventually became a
careerist with an impressive re-
sume (Rhodes Scholar, Yale Law,
Governor of Arkansas); and
seems happily married to a-
woman who is probably stronger
and more astute than he is.
Only time will tell how ef-
fective the new generation will
be at leading the nation. One thing
that seems clear is a distinct lack
of any identifiable morality or the
kinds of values that distinguish
great leaders. Perhaps the values
are there, buttheyare hard to see,
buried as they are in such liberal
catch-phrases as "political cor-
rectness" and "globally
Boomers
should also be
concerned
about the tiny
generation
between the
baby-boomers
and boomer
children.
connected
Historian Arthur
Schlesinger Jr. has put forward
the thesis that American politics
runs in 30-year cycles. Teddy
Roosevelt at the beginning of the
century, hUK in the early thirties,
Kennedy in 1960 � all represent
new, relatively youthful blood
coming to power to get the nation
moving again. If there is any value
to Schlesinger's thesis, then
Clinton is right on time.
It is important to note, how-
ever, that after a few years of civic
enthusiasm, the nation tends to
turn to more private pursuits, cre-
ating the Roaring Twenties, the
Eisenhower years and theReagan
era. If Clinton is as reckless at
pushing bigger government as
typical baby-boomers have been
known to be with other things,
the Roaring 21st Century might
start in 1996.
MOWCOUIDA
irmeiMMMBRg
KiPATHOMeMONE
�wecooww?

&

�.
1






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SIGMA PHI EPSILON
A lodge, a crest, a handshake - none of these things
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Sigma Phi Epsilon
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goals of our fraternity. A man who wants to
associate with an outstanding brotherhood. We are looking to
the future - vour future and our future.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
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Tuesday, January 26
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meet the AAlls
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For Information or A Ride





8 The East Carolinian
Students
adult students. "We classify any in-
dividual whose high schtxl class
graduated threeormoreyearsagoas
a returning adult student Sykes
said. "Usually these students work
full or part time, usually have a fam-
ily, and normally commute
"For those individuals wehave
a performance based admissions
policy based on maturity and dedi-
cationratherthan usingSAT scores
Sykes said. "Consequently, we hold
them to a higher academic standard,
namely a2.2 GP A in their first semes-
ter.
"They are usually highly moti-
vated and verysucessful through; u t
their college careers Wright said.
"Even though they must balance
things outside of sch(xl, such as jobs
or families, they are among our most
sucessful students
Dr. Wright's department of
Student Development handles
many aspects of the returning adult
JANUARY 21, 1993
Continued from page 1
students. "We try to make sure that
these students receive services for
(lie fees they pay Wright said. "We
have a referral service, provide a
handbook for older students, and
coordinate RESA, the Returning
Adult Student Association. Their
needs are different from other stu-
dents and they like to be put in con-
tact with people like themselves
Wright said.
ECU seems to be following the
national trends in this area of demo-
graphic change. "Nationally, non-
trad i tiona 1 students are becoming the
majority at many universities, more
so in urban areas than in places like
Greenville Sykes said.
"We are eager to serve ad ults,
and wearemstirutingrnany positive
aspects in that arena Sykes said.
"For example we have more night
classes now, the bookstore is now
open evening hours and other such
positive steps
Grades
Continued from page 1
"In the fall of 1991, the av-
erage semester GPA of all under-
graduates was 2.28, for the fall of
1993 it was 2.30 Lowe said.
The only increases in grade
point averages occurred in the
freshman and senior classes.
Cumulative averages actu-
ally went down from the fall of
1991 to the fall of 1992 from 2.18
to 2.15.
Lowe said the grades se-
niors made would not likely be
linked in any way to the new
SAT scores.
The affects should show up
mostly in the freshman class,
which displayed only a slight
gain.
Only 18.1 percent of fresh-
men entering the university in
1987 graduated in four years at
ECU compared to UNC-Chapel
Hill's 61.3 percent.
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Would like to Welcome
New & Returning Students
and Invite You to Join Vs In Worship
SPRING SEMESTER
CAMPUS MASS SCHF.DT TT F
Sundays at 11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the Newman Center
Wednesday 5:30 pm at the Newman Center
followed by a fellowship meal
953 East l()th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
757-0376 757-1991
Fr, Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
For more information about these and. other programs sponsored by the Newman Center
call or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am & 11 pm.
BOWl"
�a?
BOLI'S
1 L
All Day1-0"9
2nd ANNUAL
c PARTY
Sunday, January 31
if you missed last year's party, come
experience the BEST Super Bowl Party!
4 TVs to watch the action!
Burf
BUS
TH
STREET
PIZZERIA
P80
WE DELIVER
Mas,TSA 752-BOLI
Limited Delivery Area
No checks
Mug
Continued from page 1
The establishment will no
longer serve as a restuarant, but will
sport two bars, and while the Deli
did not serve liquor, Mugshots
will.Underage patrons will be
stamped at the door to prevent un-
derage drinking, but are still wel-
come to sample the club's entertain-
ment offerings.
Marchionne said that he plans
to install video games in the dub's
game room and the downstairs area
will provide seating for those who
wish to socialize. The private club
will offer inexpensive memberships
and will feature drink specials.
Marchionneand Barletta, cous-
ins from upstate New York, said their
family has been in thenightcl ub busi-
ness since the times of prohibition, so
this endeavour is nothing new for
them. They say they hope that the
Febuary 3rd opening will bring a
new tradition of quality entertain-
ment to Greenville.
FREE CANDY!
at the News
Writer's meeting
today at 4 p.m.
at The East
Carolinian.
All news writers
are encouraged to
attend, and will
receive free candy.
Eye Exam, Frame & Lenses
Includes a comprehensive eye exam by
our doctor, Value Line frames, and our
best plastic CR-39 single vision lenses.
Add $30 for ST 28 bifocal lenses.
'Choose ami frame in stock andr. a $30.00 credit. Exam and lenses at regular price.
$9qoo
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Work with us!
The East Carolinian is
now accepting
applications for News
and Sports Writers.
Call 757-6366 for
details.
W
Our highest quality no-line plastic CR-39
bifocal lenses. 100 satisfaction
guaranteed. Includes Sola VIP or XL, and
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Eye Exam, Fitting & Contact Lenses
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doctor, then you will be fiued with standard
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Professional fees for extended wear �30.00
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f
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77ze sotf Carolinian

January21, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 9
Pacino, O'Donnell tango
through 'Scent of a Woman'
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
As Scent of A Woman begins,
collegiate Charlie Simms (Chris
O'Donnell) answers an ad forajob
overThanksgi ving so he can afford
airfare for Christmas Break.
The job involves looking after
a blind relative while the family
goes on vacation. However, the
relative in question is retired Lieu-
tenant Colonel Frank Slade (Al
Pacino). He's loud, crude, brash
and he immediately preys on
Charlie's quiet, acquiescent de-
meanor. As soon as the family
leaves, he whisks Charlie onto a
plane bound for New York City,
where Frank intends to "take a last
tour of the battleground
"I plan to stay in a first-class
hotel (the Waldorf-Astoria), eat an
agreeable meal, make love to a ter-
rific woman and blow my brains
out Charlie is expectedly un-
settled. He is suddenly a seeing-
eye dog for a heavy-d linking, spite-
ful, blind man with suicidal ten-
dencies in New York City. Also,
Charlie is in trou bleat school where
he is being threatened with expul-
sion unless he rats on his prank-
playing friends, and offered a
Harvard scholarship if he does.
The advertisements for Scent
of A Woman emphasize Pacino's
performance � this is with good
reason. It's hard to measure his
performance because Frank is such
a believable character thatit'ssimi-
lar to comparing two different in-
dividuals. While obnoxious and
outspoken, he is also so sarcastic
and blatant he becomes ingrahat-
ECU grad defines
music industry
ByJoeHorst
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy Universal Pictures
Al Pacino stars as Lieutenant Colonel Frank Slade, a blind man who wants to have one last fling in New York
before commiting suicide. Chris O'Donnell plays his "seeing-eye person
ing.
Frank's means of noticing and
appreciating what is around him
withouthissightareimpressive(he
can identify a woman's brand of
perfumeand soap from yardsaway,
a la Hannibal Lecter, hence the
movie's title). He waxes philosophi-
cal overwomen and Ferraris,drinks
constantly (he orders John Daniels
saying, "he may be Jack to you but
when you've known him as long as
I have ). And in a moment of
relaxation Frank teaches a total
stranger how to tango before her
boyfriend arrives.
Bo Goldman's script has its
strongest moments when Charlie
and Frank discuss lifestyles and
backgrounds. It makes for great
conflict; Frankhas rebuilt his world
and the manner in which he lives in
it upon being blind; Charlie has
allowed others to structure his life.
Both are influenced by the other. It
is this growth by both characters
that makes the impending scene
involving Frank's intention to kill
himself both believable and well-
constructed. Scent is basically a two-
person drama and depends on its
capable actors.
The weakness of the screen-
play occurs with Charlie's plotline
atschool.Theclimaxisdebatablein
resolution buttheacting by all those
involved carries it well. And itdoes
giveCharlieacatharsisofsorts,soit
completes its primary function in
the story. However, it reeks of Dead
Poets' Society.
Director Martin Brest (Beverly
Hills Cop, Midnight Run) handles
every scene with equal attention
and style and his actors certainly
don't hurt the end product with
their stage experience. Scent of A
Woman comes across as a strong,
well-performed taleinwhichPacino
dominates the screen and O'Donnell
shows how much potential he has.
Hard drinking, hard par-
tying and hard music that lasts
the whole night long.
That's how a lot of people
view the music industry and
the people who work in it. But
Matt Howard, an ECU gradu-
ate, works with Capricorn
Records in the publicity de-
partment, and can tell you that
it's not all just a day in the
park.
"People see this business
as a glamour industry, but it's
not all just fun and games
Howard said in an interview.
"Imagine trying to study for
three exams that are all on the
same day, pick up your girl-
friend from work, wash your
car and pay bills all at the same
time for eight hours a day
Howard graduated from
ECU in May of 1992 with a
degree in Music Business. "I
graduated on May 9 and the
Monday after that, I loaded ev-
erything I owned into a U-Hau 1
and headed for Nashville
Tenn.J Howard said.
Howard works in the pub-
licity department and as an as-
sistant to the publicity man-
ager.
He handles all tour press
servicing (distributing press
materials to towns on a sched-
uled tour), handles college pa-
pers and keeps track of all press
clippings for Capricorn groups,
such as Widespread Panic and
The Zoo.
When asked about the in-
dustry as a whole, Howard
said that contacts are the key.
"It is a who-knows-who
industry Howard said.
"People have friends and talk.
Once you get in, it's your job
to impress people Once you
mess up, you're out, change
your career
Howard got his start in
the business just the same way.
He flooded the Nashville area
with resumes beginning with
his junior year at ECU.
By January of his senior
year, Howard had made
friends with people at the
Country Music Association.
From this one contact his ca-
reer started.
"We talked regularly on
the phone and then one day
she said, 'Expect a call from
Capricorn Records Howard
said. "Five minutes later, the
phone rang and it was my
present boss. It all rolled from
there
Howard also talked about
the label that persons involved
in the music industry get.
Terms range from "a bunch of
drunken, sex-craved lunatics"
to those "record heads
Howard admits that it's a
wild industry, full of far-out
people. But he told how the
stereotypes get taken too far.
"My roommate and I have
been turned away from rent-
ing houses because of our
jobs Howard said. "We
See Music page 12
'Saturated'
released
today by
Breed 13
By Layton Croft
Staff Writer
Greatgosh North Carolina-bred mu-
sic fans, here comes Greenville!
In following suit after the concen-
trated-pockets-of-hyper-music-activity
phenomenon which is sprawling amid
the increasing abundance of live and
recorded musical output by bands in
places such as Chapel Hiil, Wilmington,
Charlotte, Raleigh and Greensboro,
Greenville is gradually etching a wor-
thy notch for itself in the state's note-
worthy "music scene" map. And in fol-
lowing with demoEPLP releases by
Greenville's The Kill Kids, Earth
Murchants and Fountain of Youth
(among others) that are available to the
public, today local record stores will
begin stocking a seven-song offering by
Breed 13.
On Saturated, Breed 13 sets a palat-
able spread of technified smash-rock
tunes caked in digital delay, grounded
on unpredictable, (mostly) original
chord patterns, and produced quite pro-
fessionally. Recorded and mixed at Re-
flection Studios in Charlotte over the
Christmas holiday, Saturated is avail-
able on cassette for $5 at CD Alley and
Quicksilver Records. With Saturated,
Breed 13hopes to contribute to the grow-
ing flock of Greenville bands making
names for themselves. Turning heads at
The Garden of Eden
By Ernest Hemingway
Charles Scribner's Sons
File Photo
Lee Hylton (top), Clay Kent (left to right), Jason Nunn and Brad Rice seem to
be the latest prodigy from The Emerald City with Breed 13's powerful sound.
record label sis the other, perhaps more
important, goal of putting out Satu-
rated, the band said in a recent inter-
view.
Formerly Euphoria, Breed 13 con-
sists of four ECU students who are also
childhood friends and Greensboro
hometowners, and who've been play-
ing music together since junior high.
(Just like The Replacements.) Now, Lee
Hylton, Clay Kent, Jason Nunn and Brad
Rice are second-year students at ECU,
See Breed page 12
'Game' nothing to cry about
By John Bullard
Staff Writer
Smackdab in the middle of a throng
of underachieving big-name movies this
season comes a brilliant film from across
the Atlantic. You'll have to travel an
hour and a half to Raleigh's Rialto the-
ater to see it. However, if you take the
road-trip you won't be disappointed.
From the director of the highly ac-
cla imed Mona Lisa, The Crying Game takes
its audienceon a roller coaster ride filled
with intrigue, terrorism, and twists. Di-
rected and written by Neil Jordan, the
movie contains an excellent cast.
The Crying Game begins with the
kidnapping of Jody, an English sol-
dier, played by Forest Whitaker. His
kidnappers turn out to be part of the
Irish Republican Army that wants an
imprisoned comradeireed, if not Jody
will be killed. While he is held captive,
Jody slowly wins the friendship of
Fergus, played by Stephen Rea.
The scenes between Jody and
Fergus are filled with tight, witty dia-
logue that brings the two together. Jody
implores Fergus to take care of his girl
in the event he is killed. The impending
execution of Jody furthers the tenseness
of the situation when, finally, the order
is given: Fergus must shoot Jody.
Out in the woods where the ex-
ecution is to take place, Jody runs, forc-
ing Fergus to chase him. Jody then
reaches a road where a British tank hits
and kil Is him. The British force goes on
to kill most of the I.R.A. soldiers, except
Fergus and two others, who aren't aware
See Game page 11
By Tammy Fedder
Staff Writer
Often when a Hemingway novel is spoken of, readers think of For Whom the
Bell Tolls, The Sun Also Rises or perhaps The Old Man and the Sea. Flashes of
Hemingway in a past literature class may entice, but more likely intimidate,
younger readers. But The Garden of Eden should not be left off your reading list.
The novel opens in the southern coast of France d uring the mid '20s. David
Bourne is a young writer honeymooning with his bride, Catherine. David has
just published his firstnovel, and his wife is independently wealthy. Their days
are filled with Perrier, nude sunbathing and swimming and making love.
Early in the novel Catherine crops her long, dark hair. With a boyish new
style, her character begins to change. As they are making love she telis David
they have switched sexes.
As the day s progress, Catherine bleaches her hairaspaleas possible, begins
to wear the garb of local fishermen, and persuades David to do the same.
Humoring her, he lets her have her way.
While lunching one day, Catherine chances to meet an intriguir vung
woman, Marita. Soon after their in-
troduction, Marita announces her
love for Catherine. Not completely
surprised by this announcement,
he accepts the young woman's pres-
ence as inevitable, although his jeal-
ousy is apparent.
In Garden, Hemingway mas-
ters a story within a story by using
David'swritingasa descriptive nar-
rativeat its finest. The settingmoves
to Africa with a tale of a young boy,
his father and their hunt for an old
elephant with tremendous tusks.
They are accompanied by a native
of the area, Juma. This tale is capti-
vating on its own as the boy learns
to love the elephant and hate his
father and Juma for hunting it.
Ironically, Catherine harbors a
growing jealousy for David's writ-
ing while Marita encourages it.
Gradually Catherine (now being
convinced of her lesbianism) with-
drawswhileat the same timepush-
ing Marita (now becoming hetero-
ERNEST HEMINGWAY
7k Cfiiim. ofEiut
A NOVEL
See Garden page 11





10 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 21, 1993

Why chronic dieting doesn't work
Only 5 percent of all dieters
will have maintained their
weight loss at the end of one
year.That'snottooencouraging
when you consider the average
American diets 3 times annu-
ally. Why are so many
people involved in
this self-defeating ,
act? An obses-
sion with thin-
ness and the
limited view j
that dieting will
help you lose
weight has Ameri-
cans running to buy JF
diet aids to the tune of
$10 billion per year.The bottom
line is that "diets" don't work.
Dieting Attitudes
One comedian said that the
root of the word diet is "to die
It conjures up the dying urge to
eat, and a life filled with wilted
celery sticks. The common
phrase "going on a diet" gives
you the feeling that it is some-
thing you start but are able to
quit. The thought of dieting
makesyouhungryforfoodsyou
had even forgotten about. Diet-
ing may be the "in" social thing
to do but the statistics show that
it simply not working.
Why Diets Don't Work
People who diet often can
lower their metabolisms enough
todecreasetheircaloric needs. This
can be done in two ways:
� First, a d iet of less than 1,000-
1,200 caloriescan actually
causea starvation-like
state and force your
body to conserve
, calories. The body
will cutback its ca-
fe loric needs to sur-
vive. Therefore,
you won't lose
more in the long run
K on a 500 calories diet
than you would on one
above 1,000 calories. This starva-
tion state can lower the metabo-
lism for as much as one year.
� Second, crash dieting can
change the body's composition.
Let's say you lost 10 pounds in two
weeks. Most of that weight was
water (5 pounds), some was fat (3
pounds)and the rest wasmuscle(2
pounds). When the weight is re-
gained (as 95 percent do), it comes
back in the form of fat and water.
Every future diet can cycle this
downward trend of muscle loss
until the chronic dieter can change
their percentage of body fat over
time from 25 percent to 35-40 per-
cent. Surprisingly, the scale may
not show large amounts of
weight change. Muscle burns
up more calories than fat and
their chronic dieting has made
them lose a large percentage of
what helps them keep trim.
This yo-yo effect of depriva-
tion and regaining can harm
the body. It is better to never
have dieted at all than to keep
losing and regaining the same
10-20 pounds.
What Does Work
What does help lose and
maintain weight ishealthy eat-
ing habitsand food choicesand
a more active lifestyle. Take a
fresh look at your daily diet
and exercise � get rid of the
idea that a diet is something to
end u re for a month a fter which
you can go back to your old
habits. Make short and long
term goals to slowly change
your lifestyle to include
healthier food choices and to
be more active at work and
play. You'll be healthier and
happier when you give up di-
eting and will be closer to
achievinga permanent weight
change by focusing on thequal-
ity of your diet and exercise
habits.
Copyright 1989 Parlay International
Attic
Thursday
The Connells
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The True and
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Gib Droll
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Friday
Spiral
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This weekend in the
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Corrigans
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Victor Hudson
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Big Bump and the
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Game
Continued from page 9
of Fergus' situation.
This is where the movie
turns toward Fergus, who his
decided to find and meet Dill,
Jody's girl, played by lave
Davidson. The two start to hit it
off when the major twist of The
Crying Game takes place, a situa-
tion which Fergus finds hard to
accept between he and Dill.
Things get worse when one
of Fergus' old I.R. A. pals from the
kidnapping shows up and in-
forms him that he has to make a
hit or they'll kill him and Dill.
From here, despite his problem
with Dill, Fergusdoeseverything
he can to save her.
The action and suspense of
The Crying Game keeps the atten-
tion of the audience glued to the
screen and are two of its major
assets, but it's Fergus' character
thatmakes the movie such a win-
ner. Neil Jordan's direction and
telling of the interesting slice of
Fergus' life shows how a caring
person handles a life full of
trouble.
Complicated, but in no way
confusing, the plot has you guess-
ing what will happen next. The
beauty of The Crying Came rests
in the fact that slowly you come
to realize that the story's power
lies not in the twists and turns
but in its consistencies. Especially
the solid character of Fergus.
Compelled to see The Cry-
ing Game because of its build up
of a suspense movie, audience's
will surely Find the movie's merit,
not in the action, but in the subtle
story of one man's ability to give
a little of himself for those around
him.
Garden
JANUARY 21, 1993
The East Carolinian
11
No Lifestyle writers meeting
today! Stop by or call Dana
for new stories next week.
Continued from page 9
sexual) into David's life and arms.
Catherine's instability shows
through as she rages in jealous frus-
tration over the situation she has
created.
Begunbyl Iemingwayinl946,
77ze Garden of Eden was never com-
pleted by meauthor.Three rewrites
of over 1,500 original manuscript
pages, notes and changes were
given by Hemingway's family for
editing and publication.
Scribner Editor Tom Jenkins
was given the task, and the final
version is a 247-page novel. "Edit-
ing Hemingway was like wrestling
with a god lenkins was quoted.
Nonetheless, The Garden of Eden is
Hemingway through and through.
Although some readers may
find the subject matter offensive
(and some do), the way
I iemingway handles the relation-
ships between Catherine, David
and Maritaishurnan and sensitive.
It is an exploration of masculine
and feminine roles, a story of hu-
man emotion on all levels.
While part of the book may be
disturbing, it is well worth the read-
ing time.
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VM
'12 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 21, 1993
Fox brings two new
series to Tuesday
NEWYORK(AP)�Tuesday's
child is full of grace. That is, unless
it's the offspring of Fox Broadcast-
ing, whose first-ever Tuesday
lineup is more on the order of, say,
Thursday's child: far to go.
Nevertheless, Tuesdaymarked
the long-delayed, somewhat-
awaited premiere of Fox's seventh
nightof programming, wifh "Class
of '96" at 8 p.m. EST and "Key
West"at9p.m.EST.
In a nutshell: "Class" dis-
missed; "West" goes south.
Of the pair, the latter series is
the greater disppointment because,
to its credit, "Key West" actually
aspires to something new .Not new
new. But at least new as in, say,
"Northern Exposure" new. Unfor-
tunately, it falls short.
"Class on the other hand, is a
dippy youthfest that claims
"Beverly Hills 90210" as a cousin
and last summer's shortlived
"Freshman Dorm" as a prerequi-
site.
This Fox carbon copy, which is
set at a small northeastern private
college, is distinguished by fewer
bikinis and more ivy than
"Freshman's" West Coast seat of
learning. That's a letter grade off,
from the get-go.
"Class" also has an irritating
tone of sensitivity, the sort of pre-
ciousness that ended up driving us
crazy on "thirtysomething
Perhaps it'snocoincidence that
Peter Horton directs the first
I "Class" episode, is listed as "series
consultant" and appears as a col-
lege professor sort of like Prof. Gary
Shepherd the role Horton played
on "thirtysomething
Why go on? It's dumb yet
harmless. But if you're expecting
more, skip "Class
Now,headingdownHighway
Breed
lwe arrive at "Key West
Its namesake, the Florida burg
at the southernmost tip of the con-
tinental U.S. is, of course, a tropical
paradise and a fabled catchbasin
for drifting eccentrics who might
otherwise just wash out to sea.
Because of this, and Key West's
visual appeal, you have a lively
setting for a comedy-drama series.
But why does everyone on
"Key West" have to be such a car-
toon? The hooker with the heart of
gold, the New Age lawman, the
blind newspaper editor, a Cajun
cook named Gumbo each seems
more contrived than the last.
More to the point, why are they
so doggone irritating? No wonder
the nice nutty people went the op-
posite direction, to "Northern
Exposure's" Cicely, Alaska.
But the biggest flaw of "Key
Wesf'isitscentralconceit: thatour
hero, Seamus (Fisher Stevens), is a
New Jersey factory worker who
wins the lottery and moves to this
homeplace of Papa Hemingway
and Tennessee Williams to fulfill
his dream as a novelist There, he
wangles a job at the local newspa-
per, where, as a reporter, he can
hone his craft as Hemingway did.
The fact that Seamus is in Key
West by choice, with lots of money
in his pocket, and with nothing in
particular at stake, robs the show of
much of its edge. Far more pro-
vocative is "Northern Exposure's"
Manhattan transplant, Dr.
Heischman, who is not just a fish
out of water in Cicely, but held
against his will in this community
he won't admit he likes.
If it does nothing else, "Key
West" makes all too clear how ac-
complished "Northern Exposure"
is at making oddballs appealing
and genuinely human.
Continued from page 9
but admit Breed 13 is the major
(priority) they're pursuing while
in college. "We'd like to make it
(with Breed 13) they concurred.
In about 35 minutes of re-
corded mu sic and sound s (incl ud-
ing a 17-second, bong-hitting
blurb), Breed 13 covers a some-
what varietal rock music spec-
trum, their most effective artistic
approaches being stark volume
level-switching and a unique tech-
nique that fluxes a song from
dense to thin and back again
within three minutes-ten.
Singer Rice belts exceptional
vocals on every track, particularly
on "One Last Crossover" and "Ra-
diance of Edwardia certainly
Saturated's best tunes. The prob-
lem with Rice's vocals (on record
at least), however, is the too-of ten
and too-heavy chorus and delay
effects that soak (and occasion-
ally drown) his voice. Not only
does Rice's voice sound (unfortu-
nately, despite the inadvertant
link with the album title) satu-
rated, and a touch unreal (like
Jane's Addiction's Perry Farrell
often sounds on record), the
band's lyrics�some of which are
thoughtful and quite intelligent�
usually range from muddy to in-
decipherable, despite Saturated's
dandy overall production.
Nunn's guitar work is the sav-
ing-grace backbone to Breed 13,
and his playing is the most cre-
ative of the four players. Though
slick distortion and delay effects
seem just as important to Breed
13's guitar sound as they do to its
vocals, Nunn works exception-
ally hard with every lick he plays,
supplying the songs with meaty
musical melodies and, in "Satu-
rated" and "Celia the needed
originality to prevent a constant
case of dull, dry, one-listen-is-
enough syndrome.
The band says its songcrafting
is a collaborative process, though
Rice writes about 90 percent of
the lyrics, most of which seem to
follow in the style of the cerebral,
sci-fi poetics of (Rush's) Neil Peart.
Hylton, guitarist-turned-
bassist, plays hard bottom bass
lines, which, when they deviate
from following major chords or
mimicking Nunn's notes, embel-
lish Breed 13's originality and up
the band's "hearty package"
sound status to "way coolstel-
lar
Almost as inspiring as Nunn's
musicianship is the taut and
Music
uppity drumming by Kent. Also
influenced by Peart, Kent plays
hiskitfullyonSflfHrated and mixes
up tempos enough to add needed
spice in some places and hints at
what could sound explosive on
stage in others. The only com-
plaint with Kent's playing is an
(over)use of his machine-gun,
super staccato, double kick drum
pedal.
In addition to the release of
Saturated, Breed 13 is starting to
play regularly around North
Carolina, including upcoming
gigs in Nags Head, Wilmington,
Booneand (of course) Greenville.
"Colorless certainly not the
best tune on Saturated, will ap-
pear on an upcoming compila-
tion CD, Escape From Emerald City,
featuring local bands.
Saturated istmiiiiibh
Would You Like To See
fireworks on February uth.
or wait until July 4th?
, 'rVrire Poem or Romantic Love Letter to you
DBfSS IT UP! CALLIGR
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EASTERN CARDIOLOGY, P.A. PRESENTS ANOTHER
"Ask the Doctor Seminar"
� Can heart disease be prevented?
� I have a family history of heart disease. What Is my risk?
� What Is the best way to start an exercise program?
� I'v been smoking tor so long � will quitting really help?
� I've been on a low-tat diet for years, and my cholesterol Is still high.
What should I do?
� How can I encourage my spouse to make lifestyle changes?
Dr. Eric B. Carlson, Cardiologist
Presents
"Heart Disease -
Beating America's tit Killer"
A Slioil Lecture FoHowed by a Ouostion and Answer Session
Refreshments Provided
Monday, January 25.7 to 8 PM. at the Gaskins-Leslie Center, Conference Room "B"
(Turn onto Stantonshurg Road off of Memorial Drive, then right at the 2nd light. Enter the
4th driveway). Call 757-1000 lor more mtormalion.
IE
tUTt!
n
T
ST. CHA1LES
Grilled. Steamed & Saw Bar
Corner of lOth and Charles
f
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Fresh Grilled Seafood, Steaks & Chicken
Fresh Steamed & Raw Casters & Clams
Fresh Steamed Shrimp, Crabs, Lobster Homemade Clam
Large Variety of Domestic & Import Beers
Now Featuring� Menu Hems under $5.00 Tues - Thur.
FRIDAYS 4:00 - 7:00
25$ EACH
Steamed & Raw Oyster
Happy Hour
Come. CkeciOnt Tit- Freshed Seafood (iti�He,
Tues-Thurs 5:00-9:30
Fri-Sat 4:00-10:00
Sun 12-9:30
752-2450
a
RECORDS
OPEN TIL 9 P.M. EVERY NIGHT
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE 758 4298
$6.98 f
USED CDs
raw CDs,
�13.95,
OR
.LESS,
A.D.A.Signage Name Blocks
Bronze Plaques Award Plaques
Trophies, Medals, Loving Cups
Signs & Name Tags Engraving
1 Bodysuits
�Full selection
of bras and
panties
�Sleepwear
� Teddies
�Bustiers
Student Discounts of 10
Bridal
Registry
Avaiable
Unlay for 55 titI) nc i�i
Quicksilver Records K CD
Continued from page 9
called this lady to rent a house
and she asked us what we did and
when we told her, she said, T
don't know about this, I've heard
the stories and I don't want you to
have any cocaine parties in the
living room. I can't rent to you
"My response was (jokingly),
'We won't have cocaine parties,
but we do need a rather large
living room to sacrifice an occa-
sional goat
"She hung up on us
Howard has also been turned
down for car and health insur-
ance, being told that the music
industry was "too risky
But with all this negative in-
put, he still loves his job.
"Name me a job where the
people you work with are leg-
ends Howard said.
"I mean, I work every day
with Hank Williams Jr Mick
Fleetwood and Billy Thorpe
TheggtfAKof a Lifetime $19.93
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Occan$
JARVIS MEMORIAL UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Begins College Class
A class for college and career persons ages
18-23 will begin Sunday, January 24 at
Jarvis Memorial. Class will meet in the
first floor kitchen at 9:45 a.m.
Kathy Jones, the DCE at Jarvis Memorial, will
lead the group using "Faith Matters a
curriculum designed especially for young adults.
All young adults welcome.
For more information call
Kathy Jones at 752-3101.
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist Church
510 S. Washington Street
Greenville, NC
mmMmmmmmmmuzimmmm
WesFel Christian Fellowship
OPEN HOUSE
Thurs.Jan.21 5:00-7:00
FREE DINNER WILL BE SERVED
join Us At:
The MethodistPresbyterian Student Center
501 East 5th St.
(Acrow from Garrett Dorm)
For More Information Call 758-2030
Si tt lunti s
Mai tli 20. IWJC
ilt signed to prehire t
GMAT
Review
Course
Course Schedule:
TuesdayFebruary 23
ThursdayFebruary 15
TuesdayMarch 2
ThursdayMarch4
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(no classes during Spring Break)
Course Time:
7:00 p.m9:00 p.m.
ONLY $149
1 ni.sliiii tiontil fees
li)poptilai GMAT
review manuals
Verbal and Math Topics To Be Reviewed:
�� Scnlcnee Correction
� Reading Comprehension
� Critical Reasoning
� Problem Solving
(Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry)
� Data Sufficiency
Location:
ECU School of Business, BB&T Center for
Leadership
Development, General Classroom Building,
Suite 1200
Instructors:
Course taught by full-time ECU faculty
Texts:
The Princeton Review:
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The Official Guide for GMAT Review
(includes actual GMAT questions with solutions)
Prtsented by
ECU School of Business � Professional Programs
1200 General Classroom Building
(91V) 7ST6377
Ul





M
�s�
The East Carolinian
January 21, 1993
Sports
Page13
ECU snaps losing streak against GMU
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
"Hallelujah, praise the Lord
East Carolina Head Coach Eddie
Payne counted his blessings after the
Pirate basketball team broke a seven-
game losing streak with a 68-64 victory
over the George Mason Patriots Monday
night.
Payne's squad re-
lied on hard-nosed de-
fense and intense all-
around play from for-
ward Anton Gill to
scratch their way past
the Patriots and
achieve their first vic-
tory in CAA competi-
tion.
The Patriots
started the game
strong, frustrating the
Pirates with the out-
side production of
guard Derek
Shackelford, who hit
three first-half three
pointers.
The Patriots held
ECU at bay through-
out much of the first
half by defending
against the shooting
talent of Lester Lyons, holding the Pi-
rates' main offensive threat to just five
points. George Mason left the floor at the
half nursing a 33-27 lead over the resil-
ient Pirates.
ECU shocked the Patriots as play
resumed with a 6-0 run that tied the
score at 1858 in the half. The inside play
of Anton Gill and Ike Copeland proved
to be too much for the Patriots as the
Pirates battled to a 13-point advantage
with 11:38 remaining.
The Patriots, however, were unwill-
ing to concede defeat, as three baskets by
Donald Ross in the span of a minute
brought his team thundering back.
The Patriots eventually tied, and a
long-awaited Pirate victory seemed in
doubt, but ECU
held the Patriots off
with good shooting
from the line in the
final three minutes
to finalize a much-
needed Pirate vic-
tory.
Eddie Payne,
after the end of the
game said that the
Pirates' battling
style of play Mon-
day night would be
representative of
the rest of the sea-
son.
"We don't have
a lot of offensive
weapons Payne
said. "We'regoingto
have to claw scratch,
bite and gouge to
win games
Anton Gill lead the Pirates with a
"double-double scoring 17 points and
collecting 10 rebounds.
Dee Copeland also frustrated the Patri-
ots, collecting seven boards and 14 points
from the inside.
The Pirates meet Florida Atlantic to-
night in Minges at 7:00.
Photo by Blft Hanson
Michael Cooper? No. It's Greg James
kickin'some flavor with the knee-highs.
As.Georye Masoij
ECU (68)l
Mingftrb
m-am-ao-taPf�P
Jones 40-00-00-0010
Lyons 276-131-30-05114
Richardson 201-52-20-1224
Hunter 171-50-11-2042
Young 225-70-52-802id
Peterson 301-32-21-261A
GUI 307-93-33-100217
Armstrong 40-10-01-1010
Lewis 151-21-21-1014
Copeland 315-64-62-70114 t t
Totals 20027-5113-2411-34131668
Percentages: FC - .529, Ft. 542, 3 pt Goals: 1-2 �
.500, Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots - 2,
Turnovers - 14, Steals -11.
George Mason(64)
Mingftrb
m-am-ao-taPP
Manns 270-61-20-2701
Shackelford285-100-00-24514
Johnson 20-00-00-0010
Buck 201-21-11-3243
Alford 91-10-00-0012
McGlone 301-10-00-01514
Ross 256-95-80-01117
Horton 345-82-32-70312
Taylor 250-31-23-6121
Totals 20023-49 9-137-29162264
Percentages: PG - .469, Ft. 692,3 pt Goals: 9-15 -
.600, Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots - 6,
Turnovers -17, Steak -8.
Photo by Bltt Ran�on
He's back! ECU'S Kevin Armstrong has returned strong from a knee
injury and helped ECU break a seven game loosing streak in Minges.
ULhalf2nd half QT
JinaL
ECU
G. Mason
27
33
41
31
68
64
Colonial Basketball Report Tltrongli Jan. 19, 199
Men CAA
James Madison 4-0
UNC Wilmington 3-1
Richmond 2-1
Old Dominion 2-2
American 2-2
William & Mary 1-2
tEAST CAROLINA 1-3
George Mason 04

1.00
.750
.667
.500
.500
333
.250
.000
Overall
11-4
11-2
6-6
8-5
4-9
8A
5-8
5-11
WomenCAAOverall
Richmond3-01.0005-7
James Madison2-01.00094
Old Dominion2-01.0005-6
George Mason1-1.50010-3
American1-1.5006-6
EAST CAROLINA0-2.0005-5
UNC Wilmington0-2.0004-9
William & Mary0-3.0005-8

.733
.846
300
.615
308
.667
385
313
o
o
.417
.692
.455
.769
.500
.500
308
.385
900 numbers reaching out
to touch someone's wallet
By Jason Tremblay
Senior Sports Writer
Bills try to avoid 'Bronco' syndrome
ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
(AP) � Crass to class.
The Buffalo Bills would like
to complete that image transfor-
mation as they prepare for their
Super Bowl meeting with the
Dallas Cowboys.
This year's Bills say they've
learned from themselves and
from their opponents the impor-
tance of keeping trash talk to a
minimum.
"When you win, you say
little. When you lose, you say
less defensive end Bruce Smith
said, crediting the saying to Bills
general manager Bill Polian.
That explains why the Bills
have been particularly humble
following thei - three playoff vic-
tories, declinir g opportunities to
gloat over their defeated oppo-
nents.
It's a change from the recent
past, when a penchant for speak-
' ing first and thinking later got
Buffalo in trouble.
The Bills are allowing others
to talk while they concentrate on
winning.
The Bills, losers of the last
two Super Bowls, said trash talk
by playoff opponents Houston,
Pittsburgh and Miami helped
motivate them on their path to a
Super Bowl matchup against
Dallas on Jan. 31.
"We learned a lot last year in
the Super Bowl nose tackle Jeff
Wright said, referring to the Bills'
37-24 loss to Washington.
"You can't talk a good game.
You've got to show up. Maybe
we talked too much and didn't
show up
Last year, several Bills
popped off duringthe week lead-
ing up to their game against the
Redskins.
Defensive end Bruce Smith
was angered by hate mail he
termed "racist running back
Thurman Thomas crusaded for
more respect, tight end Butch
Rolle complained about lack of
playing time and defensive end
Leon Seals wanted out of Buf-
falo.
Maybe the talk had no im-
pact on the game, but the Bills
say they've learned it's wiser to
remain silent.
"I think experience helps,
and maturity, and that's what's
happened here center Kent
Hull said after the Bills' 29-10
win over the Miami Dolphins in
the AFC championship.
It was the Dolphins' bad-
mouthing of the Bills that
pumped up Buffalo.
"The guys who were doing
the talking � Louis Oliver,
Bryan Cox, Marco Coleman �
these are young guys Thomas
said. "They've got to be more
careful what they say, because
if you say stuff about an indi-
vidual or an organization or a
team all it does is motivate
the players, and that's exactly
what it did for us
Added Jim Kelly: "You look
at our ballclub, we've been
through it so many times.
"I know there were a few
times where we might have been
doing the talking, but the Dol-
phins are young. They'll learn
Ken Davis said the Bills have
learned � "the hard way over a
number of years. You can't talk
about what you've got to do.
You've got to do it
"I think we're more mature
overall Davis said.
"We know what to expect so
you're kind of more low-key
about things
Hull said the Bills will use
past Super Bowl winners as ex-
amples.
"I thought the Giants were a
class act. I thought the Redskins
were a class act he said.
"Not to say that we weren't,
but I just felt they handled them-
selves very well.
'There's no reason for the
quality of people that we have
on this team that we can't be a
class organization
Coach Marv Levy has long
stressed to his players that they
refrain from making provocative
statements.
Smith said the Cowboys talk,
but "their talk is much different
from some other players' talk,
such as maybe Oliver.
"When they do talk, they talk
with respect for the opposing
team and at the same time, they
like to compliment themselves.
There's nothing wrong with
that
Anyone who watches television in the wee
hours of the morning has undoubtedly seen
commercials featuring scantily-clad, sultry
women practically begging for someone to call
and keep them company. While the images on
screen are enticing, the price tag attached to
the dubious thrill of talking to purportedly
bodacious babes (often with names like "Inga"
or "Babette") is usually staggering, typically in
the neighborhood of $2.99 per minute (you
must be 18 or older to call; Visa and
MasterCard accepted.)
With the advent of the glorious 900-
number industry has come a slew of greedy
"businessmen" out to make a quick and easy
chunk of change through the readily-available
medium of the telephone. What could be
easier than sitting an unseen (and possibly
very unattractive) woman down by the phone
to talk to some lonely guy for three bucks a
minute?
Not much could be easier, and it grows
more apparent each day as more and more
"reputable" establishments go the path of the
900-number to fast cash.
"What self-respecting institution would
enter into such a disgusting display of con-
sumer pillaging?" you might ask.
Does the name East Carolina University
ring a bell?
Alas, 'tis true. This great university of
ours now offers the "Pirate Hotline a daily
recorded message dictated by none other than
Jeff Charles, the "Voice of the Pirates Mr.
Charles "provides actualities" on the hotline
(whatever that means) for the low, low cost of
only $.99 per minute.
Even better, through a probably very
lucrative deal between ECU and TRZ Sports
Services, fans everywhere can listen to Pirate
sports on the phone for "as low as $.20 per
minute making the cost of listening to an
average Pirate basketball game somewhere
just under $31.
A ticket to see a Pirate basketball game in
Minges Coliseum costs the general public $7.
One need not be an economics major to see
that you could take a family of four to see the
entire game for less than the price of listening
to it on the phone, and still have money left
over for popcorn.
The question is really of value; you could
sit at home on the phone with a crick in your
neck and try to envision Lester Lyons ram-
ming the ball home for $31, or you could go
to Minges and see the whole thing in all of its
exciting, sweaty splendor and in full color 3-
D for the low, low price of $7 (need not be 18
or older to attend). The choice should be easy.
Unless, of course, your date with Inga and
Babette is running into overtime
Da' Bears find new head coach
LAKE FOREST, Dl. (AP) �
Dave Wannstedt is ready to launch
a new era in the tradition-wrapped
lore of the Chicago Bears, a comer-
stone franchise of the National Foot-
ball League.
The defensive coordinator of
theSuper Bowl-bound DallasCow-
boyswasnamed the lOthhead coach
of da' Bears Tuesday, succeeding
the immensely popular but some-
times raging Mike Ditka.
Ditka, hired 11 years ago al-
most to the day by team founder
George Halas, was fired by club
president Michael McCaskey two
weeks ago after compiling a 112-68
record, including the Super Bowl
championship in 1986.
"He is the right man for the
right job McCaskey said in an-
nouncing the hiring of Wannstedt,
who in four years under Jimmy
Johnson in Dallas put together the
No. 1 defense in the NFL after the
Cowboys had gone 1-15 in 1989.
"If this is the passing of the
torch, this is the right time to do it
said McCaskey. "1 think the fans
will take to him and really like the
style that will be played by da'Bears
on the field
Wannstedt, 40, was sought by
several clubs, including the New
YorkGiants,whoreportedly offered
him $3 million over five years. Terms
of his Bears contract were not re-
vealed,butthosenumberscouldbe
close.
"The decision was easy said
Wannstedt. "You look for a situa-
tion with an organization fhatgives
a coach the opportunity to win and
to win for a long time. I feel very
comfortable and I'm very excited
about the direction the Chicago
Bears will take during the '90s
After the announcement was
made in Soldier Field, Wannstedt
was whisked to Halas Hall where
he met with the assistant coaches
and front office personnel.
"I was very honest with them
and they appreciated that he said
of the assistants.
"I will hire my coordinators
first and then assemble the position
coaches
Wannstedtsaid itwould be safe
to assume he would hire his own
offensive coordinator to replace
GregLandry and thathehad talked
with defensive coordinator Vince
Tobin, "and he understands the di-
rection I want to go
Wannstedt, before leaving for
Dallas "to start reviewing film on
Buffalo said he would devote the
next two weeks to preparing the
Cowboys' defense for the Super
Bowl against the Buffalo Bills.
"My duties with da' Bears will
not kick in until after the Super
Bowl he said.
When they do, he can expect to
be judged against Ditka, whose
record and tenure with da' Bears
were second only to Halas, who
had a 326-151-32 record in more
rhan36years in four different terms.
Wannstedt's career is remark-
ably similar to Ditka's.
Both grew up in western Penn-
sylvania. Both played college foot-
ball at Pitt and both were assistants
at Dallas before getting their first
head coaching job with da' Bears
w





14 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 21, 1993
1992-93 East Carolina Pirates
ttanuzutuufr "Went, xte6e(&4tt ScfadcdA
First Row (l-R):
Manager Jimmy
Argent, Greg James,
Curley Young, Ike
Copelanc, Ronnel
Peterson, James
Lewis, Kareen
Richardson, T.J.
Long, Manager Mark
Harnly, Back Row
(L-R): Manager Rob
Sykes, Part-Time
Assistant Coach
Martin McGillan,
Assistant Coach Joe
Dooley, Head Coach
Eddie Payne, Wiblert
Hunter, Simpson
Toliver, Don
Douglas, Anton Gill,
Kevin Armstrong,
Lester Lyons, Marlon
Jones, Assistant
Coach Mike
Hopkins, Manager
Jimmy Adams,
Manager Robin
House.
Jan. 21
Jan. 25
Jan. 27
Jan.30
Feb.l
Feb. 6
Feb. 8
Feb.13
Feb.15
Feb. 18
Feb.20
Feb.24
Feb.27
Mar. 6-8
FLORIDA ATLANTIC 7 p.m.
at Old Dominion 735 p.m.
WILLIAM & MARY 7 p.m.
at UNC Wilmington (HTS-TV) 2 p.m.
at Alabama 83o p.m.
JAMES MADISON 7 p.m.
RICHMOND 7 p.m.
at George Mason (HTS-TV) 730 p.m.
at American (HTS-TV) 730 p.m.
VIRGINIA TECH
OLD DOMINION
at William & Mar)'
UNC WILMINGTON
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
730 p.m.
7 p.m.
at Richfood-Colonial Tournament (Richmond, Va.)
Seniors
Ike Copeland
TOUCHDOWN AT
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LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
500 ELIZABETH ST.
PHONE 757-3232
I �3
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AXA
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U es� y
Gufsuu2i
TUESDAY, JANUARY 26
MEET LADIES OF XQ
WEDNESDAY JANUARY 27
MEET LADIES OF AZ & AO
THURSDAY JANUARY 28
MEET LADIES OF ISI
FRIDAY, JANUARY 29
BID NIGHT WITH AZA
it
OLDEST AND MOST ESTABLISHED AT ECU"





"Siftl
15 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 21. 1993
Nobody wants to bite the Big Apple anymore
CHICAGO (AP) � What is
it with New York and sports
celebrities, anyway?
How come everybody still
takes the calls, but nobody takes
the job anymore?
Up until Tuesday, there was
reason to think this love-hate
relationship was strictly a
"baseball thing
That free agents like David
Cone, Barry Bonds and Greg
Maddux, after being wined and
dined in New York, chose Kan-
sas City, San Francisco and At-
lanta instead because the memo-
ries were still fresh of how Yan-
kee acquisition Ed Whitson was
once chased across a parking
lot by angry fans and how Met
Bobby Bonilla lost 50 points off
his batting average in just one
year.
But no.
Tuesday brought the sug-
gestion that it is becoming a
"football thing" as well.
Barely two weeks after Tom
Coughlin said he wouldn't leave
Boston College for the New York
Giants job, Dallas defensive co-
ordinator Dave Wannstedt, who
was courted even more ener-
getically as a successor to the
fired Ray Handley, turned up
in Chicago to take Mike Ditka's
old job instead.
When asked to explain why
he chose this town over that one,
Wannstedt showed some
nimble footwork for a guy who
spends most of his time plot-
ting how to stop it.
"The Giants are a great foot-
ball organization he said. "Ev-
erybody knows that
But a moment later, he said,
"Chicago has always been a
team I've really respected an
awful lot. It was just a great
opportunity for me
And a few moments after
that, with his wife at his side
and two teen-age daughters
somewhere in the back of his
mind, Wannstedt added, "Per-
sonally, with my family, we're
excited about living in Chi-
cago
Hardly anyone in the sports
world says that a bou t New York
any more.
Now, whether it's the resu It
of genetics or environment,
New Yorkers are a very suspi-
cious people. And there was
plenty in this latest rejection to
be suspicious about.
Under the guidance of Dal-
las coach Jimmy Johnson,
Wannstedt became the pick of
the litter among NFL assistants
after the Cowboys went 13-3 and
notched playoff wins over Phila-
delphia and San Francisco.
And because of their close
friendship, there was much
speculation that Wannstedt
would not risk alienating John-
son by signing on with an NFC
East team that would require
student to go up against mentor
twice each season.
Though Wannstedt never al-
luded to it, Johnson said as much
Tuesday.
At a news conference in Dal-
las, Johnson said he and
Wannstedt had discussed their
diverging paths only the day be-
fore and concluded that "our
relationship probably would
have deteriorated had he been
in this division
Beside the warm and fuzzy,
however, there was one more
relatedfactthatalmostcertainly
figured into the equation.
Wannstedt apparently
plans to take several other mem-
bers of the Dallas staff to his
new job locale, and he knows he
is. much more likely to get per-
mission if the whole lot of them
open shop in the NFC Central.
So, assuming the money was
equal in both places, what else
came into play?
Some people assumed that
Wannstedt would choose New
York, if only because he would
accept much more readily fol-
lowing a bust like Handley in-
stead of a legend like Ditka.
But they did not realize that
Wannstedt does not scare easily
and that he had a front-row seat
to watch Johnson crawl out from
Tom Landry's long shadow in
Dallas in only four seasons.
Sports Writ-
ers' meeting
today in the
Student
Publication
building at
Come taste
the flavor.
Ya know!
RUSH
Tues Jan. 26
PIG PICKING
meet the ladies of
Alpha Xi Delta
Wed Jan. 27
PIZZA
meet the ladies of
Alpha Delta Pi
Thur Jan. 28
SUBS
TAU KAPPA EPSILON
MANX MEN AS ONE
752-9144
951 East 10th Street
Fri Jan. 29
BID PARTY
(invitation only)
meet the ladies of
Chi Omega
AX
RUSH
CHI
AX
The Brotherhood Of A Lifetime"
WHERE
Kingston Place Clubhouse
WHEN
Tuesday 26th
PIZZA NIGHT
Meet sorority ladies
Wednesday 27th
SANDWICH BAR
Meet the ladies of Alpha Phi
Thursday 28th
SUB NIGHT
Meet the ladies of Chi Omega
Friday 29th
Brothers and Rushees only
For more information or rides call 321
-2107





?81
�I � ��
- �
4 .
16 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 21, 1993
LADY PIRATES
IN THE ECU
ATHLETICS
HALL OF FAME
Iwoa's Street killed in
automobile accident
Shellah Cotters
inducted 1981
Women's Basketfcall
1971 75
(AP)�There are very few days
each season when the game of bas-
ketball takes a back seat to reality.
Today is one of them.
College basketball lost a solid
player Tuesday night when Chris
Street, a promising 6-fbot-8 forward
fbrtheUniversityoflowa, was killed
inacar crash inIowaCity.Hewas20.
In this era of saturation televi-
sion coverage,Streetwasa recogniz-
able player to avid fans.
It was just last Saturday that he
wentface-to-faceonnationalTVwim
Duke's Bobby Hurley over what
Hurley believed wasoveraggressive
defense on Street's part. In the same
game, Street converted his final free
throw to give him a school-record 34
straight
The fatal car accident happened
as Street was pulling out of a restau-
rant parking lot following a team
dinner.Hiscar collided witha dump
truck, sending it into oncoming traf-
fic, where it was hit by another car.
Street's car flipped over and he was
killed instantly, Iowa sports infor-
mation director George Wine said.
"Chris was a tenacious player. I
always referred to him as the glue to
the team.
I thought he had a tremendous
career ahead of him said Drake
coach Rudy Washington, a former
Iowa assistant who recruited Street.
Street wasaveragingl45points
and 95 rebounds for the 14th-ranked
Hawkeyes, 12-3 overall and 1-2 in
the Big Ten. Iowa's game against
Noriiwestem,scheduled for tonight,
has been postponed.
Qmlj
m
tang
OHMft'ft
h
BXE
HAPPY'S
ROOM
32 oz. BUD DRAFT $2.00
Tuesday $1.00 Domestics All Day
752-6728 �" Tf'Sf7"
Across From u.b.e. Ladies Play for FREE All Night
New Life
Christian
Fellowship
Come join us each week for fun,
fellowship, and Bible study.
7:00 pm Thursdays
1003 General Classroom Building
Eddie Hilliard � 830-6814
Campus Minister
Debbie Freeman
inducted 1991
women's Basketball
1974-78
Rosie Thompson
inducted 1990
Women's Basketball
1975-80
SUPER BOWL
SUPER BASH '93
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Interfratemity Council's
Spring Rush 1993
Jan 26-29 8-11 p.m.
Transportation will be available Tuesday 26th - Friday 29
by the East Carolina Transit Buses to pick allrushees at every dorm every 30 minutes from 8 PM to 11 PM.
Look for the buses with the IFC banners.
AZD
The Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity was nationally founded in December of
1845 at Yale University. Alpha Sig has been a strong growing chapter on
the campus ofECU for many years. They give annually to the American
Lung Association and enjoy a very active intramural, academic, and
social life. If you are interested in rushing a fraternity go by and visit
Alpha Sigma Phi.
Ben
Beta Theta Pi is one of the oldest fraternities in the nation; founded on
August 8, 1839. From a small town in Ohio has stemmed one of the
greatest fraternities ever. Here on this campus we strive to combine all
aspects of fraternity life: social, academic, athletic as well as many other
activities which show the day-to-day life of a very tight brotherhood.
AX
Delta Chi was founded at ECU to break away from the "norm" in
fraternity life. We believe in strong Brotherhood, while maintaining
each Brother's distinct personality. Delta Chi has outstanding friendship
athleticism, leadership, scholarship, and most of all good times. We are
looting for men that want to make the most of college life. If you would
like to build a tradition rather than become part of one, Delta Chi is for
you. We look forward to meeting you at rush, and remember, If you can
find a better fraternity, join them!
A5XI
Delta Sigma Phi was chartered at East Carolina in April of 1971, and has
continually given what it could to better the ECU Greek system. Delta
Sigis based on three simple, butloyal principles: Leadership, Scholarship,
and Brotherhood. Brotherhood is a phenomenon that can be felt and
witnessed much better than it can be explained. It is a deep friendship
with men who can always be depended upon to help when there is a
need, and to be there to share the experience of self growth in the
incredibly complex world of college life.
KA
The Kappa Alpha Order was chartered on September 26,1958 at East
Carolina University. At KA there is a deep tradition in preserving the
quality of Southern gendemen. Kappa Alpha's athletic program is
known for its consistent rate of success. Our brotherhood would like to
extend an invitation to all interested men to attend rush at our house.
We are looking forward to meeting you during rush.
KX
Kappa Sigma was founded on the East Carolina Campus on November
20, 1966. Since then the fraternity has strived to represent the Greek
system of ECU well. Located on Tenth Street directly across from
campus, the fraternity offers a convenient spot for its member to gather
between classes, as well as being in easy walking distance from the
residence halls. The basis of the Kappa Sig fraternity is its brotherhood
and through that brotherhood we will continue to grow and prosper
long into the future.
GO GREEK
AXA
Lambda Chi Alpha is a fraternity ofhoncst friendship. Wc have over 210 fraternity
chapters nationally. Being a Lambda Chi means becoming a part of a brotherhood
of men whose friendship will last a lifetime. Being a Lambda Chi means knowing
that there will always be someone who cares about you, someone who will be
anxious to help you over those rough spots in life. The Lambda Chis invite you
to become a part of their association. Come by and look us over, we think you will
be glad you did!
OK�P
Phi Kappa Psi is one of the newest fraternities on the ECU campus. Nationally
founded in February of 1852 at Jefferson College, Phi Psi has been on the ECU
campus for 4 years and has fast become a working part of the Campus Greek
s tcm. During rush, if you are interested in rushing a fraternity, try Phi Kappa
Psi. We might be just what you're looking for in your college life.
OKT
Your college years are a prime opportunity to challenge yourself. This means
making the most ofthc classes, people, and situations you encounter. Fraternities
encourage this; Phi Kappa Tau is comprised of a solid brotherhood involved in
a wide range ofcampus activities. Wc are also very strong on a national level, with
over 10 0 chapters across the country and about S 5 0,000 in academic scholarships
awarded annually through our headquarters. The advantages of fraternity
memberships do not end upon graduation. Phi Kappa Tau graduates have the
opportunity to get together at the house every year at alumni events, such as
Homecoming. So go ahead and challenge yourself, get involved with a fraternity.
ITKA
Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity was founded on March 1,1968 at the University of
Virginia. Pika at ECU is a fraternity that takes great pride in their involvement on
the campus and around the community . Pika was rechartered at ECU six years
ago and has flourished to be one ofthc greatest supporters of the Greek system.
If you're thinking of going Greek this year check out Pi Kappa Alpha .it may be
one ofthc best decisions of you college life.
ITKO
PiKappaPhi waschartered at East Carolinain 1963. Since the beginningwe have
proven to be a strong force in the development of fine young men to serve our
campus. Wc offer a variety of activities to excel in ranging form a string athletic
program to community service and projects for the handicapped. We are known
to have a very strong social program and hold many major events throughout the
year. Wc have a very strong alumni association that helps in our endeavors. Our
scholarship program helps to develop our brothers as students. So remember,
when you're in a rush to the only way GO PI KAPP!
IN
At East Carolina, Sigma Nu is a combination of rich tradition and new membership.
First chartered in 1959 the Eta Beta chapter of Sigma Nu is among the oldest of
all Fraternities at ECU. Fraternity life at Sigma Nu offers many things for all its
members: an active social life, strong support for athletics, community service,
and academics. Nationally, Sigma Nu is among the best in all categories. With
over 230 chapters and 130 thousand brothers, it is the third largest fraternity
internationally. Its comprehensive Edu rational Foundation (L.E A.D.) provides
many scholarships and offers many great leadership development programs. Wc
encourage you to Rush Sigma Nu and above all, GO GREEK!
2X&E
At Sigma Phi Epsilon we believe that as well as providing numerous
opportunities during the college years, the fraternity experience continues
throughout one's life. Sig Ep provides an environment where a brother
develops and learns many important social skills such as sportsmanship,
scholarship, and communication among many others. Wc pride ourselves
on being one ofthc best fraternities at East Carolina as well as in the nation.
Sigma Phi Epsilon has been named ECU's most outstanding fraternity two
out of three years. On a national level the North Carolina Kappa Chapter
has been recognized as one of the best all-around Sig Ep chapters in the
nation. Sig Ep is looking for balanced men who excel not only in academics,
but in athletics, leadership, and social skills as well. We extend an invitation
to all interested, qualified men with a desire to become a part of Sigma Phi
Epsilon.
HI
The Eta Kappa chapter of Sigma Pi was the second fastest chapter in Sigma
Pi International history. Sigma Pi is the up-and-coming fraternity on
campus. Sigma Pi is known for its diversity among members yet has a very
strong brotherhood. Sigma Pi is very competitive with each and every
fraternity on campus and with your help will become an even more
dominant part of the Greek system at East Carolina. If you want to go
Greek, experience a great brotherhood, meet lots of people, and have a
good oiue then go Sigma Pi.
XTT
Sigma Tau Gamma has a long and proud heritage of offering young men
the opportunity to broaden their lives through fraternal brotherhood.
With over 100 chapters across the country, Sigma Tau Gamma is recognized
nationally and hasitshome office in Warrcnsburg, MO. Ournational office
works closely with our chapter here at East Carolina which maximizes our
bonds to one another and the community. Come see what makes Sigma
Tau Gamma fraternity the most unique and diversified on campus. Sigma
Tau Gamma - taking tradition to tomorrow.
TKE
Tau Kappa Epsilon, founded in 1899, has become the largest international
fraternity with around 365 chapters in the U.S. and Canada. TKEcallsitsclf
"the fraternity for life"and over 100,000 members worldwide are proving
it through their interest in the fraternity that continues long after graduation.
TKE participates in activities ranging form sports and scholastics to
community project. If you like what you hear, come on down to the
bottom ofthc hill to the TKE house and find out if TKE is for you.
ex
Theta Chi was first chartered at East Carolina on March 15,1958. Wc are
an established Fraternity with over 5 0 active brothers who pride themselves
on the concept of unity and closeness within the brotherhood. Theta Chi
strives among the top in athletics and scholastics and is a catalyst for
individual accomplishment. We challenge you to be a part ofour continued
success and extend an invitation to rush Theta Chi. Our new house
location is 312 East 1 lth St. (758-6969). Be a part of the Greek leader of
the 90's. ROLL CHI!
GO GREEK







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f B -vV:
THIS IS WHAT WE DID
LAST SEMESTER
Socials, Socials, Socials.
' Hours of
Community Service
Took the Lead in the Race for The
Chancellor's Cup
Tailgating
Pref Night with the Sigmas
3 Days of Homecoming Activities
Initiated New Brothers
WHAT DID YOU DO???
THIS SPRING LOOK OUT FOR
�Walk To Wilmington
� Greek Goddess
�Founder's Day Formal
�PikeFest
�More Socials
BE APARTOFIK'SMOST
OUTSTANDING FRATERNItYRUSH PIKE
TUES, JAN 26
Meet The Pikes and WED JAN 27 THUR. JAN 28
Ladies Of Alpha Phi Meet The, Pikes and Meef Jhe pjkes Qnd
Lad.es Of Ch. Omega Ladies of Alpha Delta Pi
Rush is held at the corner of
5th and Elizabeth Streets across from the ZTA sorority house.
FOR RIDES OR RUSH INFORMATION CALL 830-1256 or 758-2110
JANUAF
12:30 PM S
WALK TO WILMINGTON





Title
The East Carolinian, January 21, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 21, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.916
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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