The East Carolinian, January 14, 1993






� Vfift
Sports
Right at home
Former Lady Pirate
Rosie Thompson
coaches her Alma Mater
in the start of season
play. See story page 13.
i
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 2
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, January 14, 1993
20 Pages
Proposed hike could double
tuition rates for students
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
A p roposed tuition hike by
the North Carolina State legis-
lature could hurt the wallets of
students at ECU and other N.C.
state schools.
The Government Perfor-
mance Audit Committee, which
was asked by the state to review
the appropriations, said that leg-
islators should redefine part of
the state's Constitution as to its
"contemporary meaning" and
"as far as is practicable
The state Constitution says
that tuition costs should be as
close to free "as practicable
"It is time to re-evaluate
the concept of low cost and to
determine what the meaning of
that concept should be for the
next several years the report
stated.
Currently, ECU students
pay about 10.9 percent of their
total education costs. The rec-
ommendation would raise that
level to about 25 percent within
the next five years. For students,
mis means that the current cost
per year of $718 for tuition and
fees at ECU would be more than
doubled totheamountof$l,632.
Al Matthews, vice chancel-
lor for student life, said he thinks
students could handle an in-
crease because most other states
charge hi gher tuition than ECU.
"It's going to cause some
people some difficulty getting
Professor Donald
Cassel dies at age 6!
Photo by Jason Botch
Many ECU students may find that paying tuition will become more difficult if a proposed tuition hike is
enacted by the North Carolina State legislature.
used to Matthews said. "But
you have another 40 or 50 states
where students are doing it
Eleven states considered
comparable to North Carolina
charge students between 25 per-
cent and 35 percent of the total
cost of education.
Richard Brown, vice chan-
cellor for business affairs, stated
that the increase would hurt
middle income students the
most.
"If tuition is increased, the
lower-income students will get
financial aid to offset the cost
Brown said. Also, Brown said
that upper-income students
would be able to afford any of
the higher tuition costs.
Courtney Jones, SGA presi-
dent, fears that any tuition hike
will turn away prospective stu-
dents.
"North Carolina is known
for providing a good education
at a reasonable cost, benefitting
rural areas Jones said. "I'm
See Tuition page 5
By Jennifer Wardrep
Staff Writer
Dr. Donald F Cassel, a 62-
year-old professor in ECU's De-
partment of Industry and Tech-
nology, died Sunday of cardiac
arrest in Pitt County Memorial
Hospital. Funeral services for
Cassel, a native of Warner,
Alberta, Canada, were held
Wednesday.
Cassel had been teaching
at ECU for two years. He taught
classes in industrial and metal-
lurcv for the deDartment and
was described by colleagues as
a well-rounded and well-liked
individual.
"He was great, a very in-
telligent fellow said Dr. Darry 1
Davis, dean of the School of In-
dustry and Technology. "He
was everything from a piano
teacher to a weapons expert to
an expert in the treatment of
metals. He was quite a charac-
ter
Cassel had a history of
heart problems, but never se-
vere enough to require hospi-
talization, Davis said.
"The students just abso-
lutely loved him Davis said.
"He spent a lot of time outside
of class with them
Cassel earned both his
Bachelor of Ed uca tion and Mas-
ter of Education degrees from
the University of Alberta.
He began his teaching ca-
reer as an industrial arts instruc-
tor for Parkland and Strathcona
counties in Alberta. Later, he
worked as a high school
automotives instructor.
He also worked as a gradu-
ate assistant at the University
of Northern Iowa while work-
ing on his Doctorate in Indus-
trial Technology, which he re-
ceived in 1989.
"This was sort of a post-
retirement career for him said
Davis. "He d idn't start working
on his doctoral work until he
was in his 50s
While at ECU, Cassel re-
mained actively involved in re-
search related to heat treatment
of metals and the historical de-
velopment of military ordi-
nance. He was also involved in
the Alberta Teachers Associa-
tion, the.National Association
of Industrial Technology and
the National Association of In-
dustrial and Technical Teacher
Educators.
Cassel initiated and co-
ordinated a student exchange
program with the Yamate
School in Japan while he was
teaching for the Edmonton Pub-
lic School System.
Cassel's wife, Vera, has re-
turned to Alberta, where the
family will hold an additional
memorial service.
Instead of flowers, the
family has asked that memori-
als be made to the Arlington
Street Baptist Church in
Greenville, or the Department
of Industry and Technology at
ECU.
Student fees allocated
to different projects
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Construction plans for the new rec-
reation center are moving faster than
renovations of Joyner Library because
of a two-year freeze placed on raises in
student fees by the North Carolina Leg-
islature.
Viewed as a building part of the
educational program at ECU, the library
must wait until the UNC Board of Gov-
ernors concludes its study on student
feesof institutions throughout the state.
The recreation center does not fall under
this umbrella, therefore, it does not have
to wait for state appropriated money.
Self-liquidating' projects, suchas
the rec center, are functions that the
state considers to not be part of the edu-
cational program said Richard Brown,
vice chancellor of business affairs.
"The recreation center is a fee-
based budget that will be funded by
construction bonds which will be paid
off by student fees said Alfred
Matthews, vice chancellor for student
life.
The last increase in student fees
happened two years ago before the Leg-
islature imposed the freeze. Since the
university usually raises fees on a
gradual basis to cover rising costs, the
freeze will force a massi ,e hike to cover
the two-year ban after it is lifted.
"The plan was that we would have
small increases over the last two years,
so there would never be a big jump
Matthews said. "My guess is that it an
increase is going to be 30 or 40 dollars a
semester
All raises in student fees by North
Carolina educational institutions were
affected by the freeze, except for two
projects, Matthews said. "One was a
UNCC Coliseum and the other was the
expansion of Minges Coliseum
Matthews said. This raise constituted an
additional $15 a semester, or $30 a year.
Food services and dorms are also
exempt from the fee freeze because they
are considered to be services to the cam-
puses. Individuals in effect pay rent for
the services provided.
Currently, students pay a total of
$124 for student activities' fees. The fol-
lowing is a hreakdown of that total:
$12.50 for Student Union, $44 for
intramurals, $2 for Student Fund Ac-
counting, $6 for Minges operation costs,
$18 for Mendenhall and $41.50 for stu-
dent government.
Also, the university charges each
student $114 for health services, $175 for
athletics, $15 for Ficklen debt, $74 for
Mendenhall debt, $26 for the recreation
center and $50 for computing costs.
The Ficklen debt is comprised of
recent construction costs on the stadium
and maintenance performed on a rou-
tine basis. The Mendenhall debt pays off
the costs of the new extension in
Mendenhall which was started in the
late 1980s.
If continued, the freeze may hurt
some of the services offered at ECU,
Matthews said.
For example, the health services
offered here has been forced to dip into
its reserve fund in order to match the
growing cost of supplying students with
necessary health care.
"Weha vecutintoour reserve funds
to such an extent, that if the freeze is not
lifted this next year, we'll have to curtail
services Matthews said. "We would
have to start charging for aspirin they
get over the counter, we would maybe
have to drop some services
Matthews said he hopes to offset
the rise in fees by holding down any
raises in housing and food services fees,
which are unaffected by the freeze be-
cause of their status as services.
"We have a contract with A.R.A.
that guarantees a cost of living increase
Matthews said. "Housing is again not
classified as a fee by the systems
U.S. forces bomb Iraq in retaliation
WASHINGTON (AP) � A United
States-led coalition bombed targets in Iraq
Wednesday in retaliation for weeks of
provocations by Saddam Hussein thatoffi-
cials said violated the agreement halting
the 1991 Persian Gulf War.
The attack was confirmed by a variety
of officials in the United States and France.
There was no immediate word on the
sites selected for the action, which was
launched under cover of darkness, nor on
thenumber of aircraft involved,orwhether
any planes were lost in the raids.
One American official refused to dis-
cuss the targets of the action, but said, "I
wouldn't minimize its scope
An allied military officer stationed in
Saudi Arabia said in a brief telephone con-
versation Wednesday: "There is an allied
operation now under way. I cannot discuss
it at this time
The strike was launched two years
after the beginning of the Persian Gulf War
in which the United States-led coalition
routed Iraq, and a scant seven days before
President Bush was to turn over power to
President-elect Clinton.
The incoming president was in Little
Rock, and he has said repeatedly in recent
days that the administration was keeping
him fully informed of its decisions relating
to Iraq.
"We have made clear we would sup-
port such an action. These viola nonscanno
be tolerated said a senior Clinton transi-
tion adviser, speaking on condition of ano-
nymity.
Despite the allied victory two years
ago, the Iraqi leader stayed in power. He
has consistently been an irritantto the Bush
administration, first by interfering with in-
ternational inspectors trying to ferret out
any weapons of mass destruction in Iraq,
and more recently bydispatching his planes
over a no-fly zone that was part of the cease-
fire for the Persian Gulf War.
Two weeks ago, the United States
shot down an Iraqi plane over the no-fly
zone .Shortly afterwards, the United States
warned Saddam to dismantle missile bat-
teries that posed a threat to allied aircraft.
Throughout it all Bush and his aides is-
sued ever-escalating warnings, until they
announced there would be no more ad-
monitions � onlv action.
J
Capitol Hill Wednesday,Secretaryof
State-designate Warren Christopher said
Iraq is testing the "will and the strength
See Iraq page 5
When it rains, it pours
Students returning for a new semester were greeted by unexpected and
unwelcome stormy weather.
Photo by Jason Bosch
TV
�.






The East Carolinian
JANUARY 14. 1993
Medical school tests
state-of-the-art technology
Safe sex delivered in newspapers
Readers of The Anchor, Rhode Island College's student
newspaper, got a hint about the main subject of a recent issue
when a condom, ever so discreetly wrapped in lime-green
paper, arrived with each copy. The newspaper published a
special safe sex issue and distributed 5,000 condoms. The
condoms cost the school's student government S502, said Jeff
Wallace, the paper's editor. "By noon Wednesday, if you
could find an issue on campus you were very lucky said
copy editor Joe Hutnak. The issue contained articles on
various subjects, including questions about AIDS and gay
rights, a condom drive-through store, having a blood test to
test for HIV and a survey on virginity.
Graduates more likely to repay loans
Graduation is a key factor in the repayment of college
loans, according to a study at the University of North Caro-
lina at Greensboro that recommended universities develop
stronger programs to encourage students to complete their
education. Graduation lowers the probability of default by 10
percentage points, according to economic professor and co-
author of the study, Terry Seaks. College students who are
most likely to leave college and fail to pay back loans tend to
come from lower-income, black, or single-parent families.
But the authors also said that other factors were at work and
said their findings "should serve as a warning against too
quickly singling out colleges with a disproportionate num-
ber of students from low-income, black or single-parent
families
Attempted suicide won 't lead to eviction
A student who was evicted from an Iowa State Univer-
sity residence hall while he was recovering from a suicide
attempt will be allowed to stay in hb dormitory room, ac-
cording to school officials who earlier had requested that he
leave. After drinking a half a bottle of jack Daniels bourbon
and taking 11 sleeping pills, the unnamed student attempted
to slash his wrists with a razor in a dorm bathroom. The
student, who said he had been under intense pressure be-
cause of personal and family problems, appealed to the
committee, which eventually met with him and reversed the
decision. The student has agreed to undergo counseling for
his emotional problems.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
A" concept known as
telemedicine is being tested at
ECU'S School of Medicine. With
this technology, medical special-
ists expect to be able to share their
expertise more easily with their
medical colleagues and patients
in rural areas of the eastern part
of North Carolina.
Using the telephone, televi-
sion and fax machine, professors
will be able to share their lessons
with students at two remote sites
initially set up on the network.
The program is being launched
by the Network for Interactive
Learning in Eastern North Caro-
lina (NILEC).
Over a six-month period,
NILEC will test several applica-
tions of interactive communica-
tions.
The pilot program will in-
clude a weekly cardiology clinic
and two university course offer-
ings. A secondary school admin-
istration course originating from
Joyner Library will be offered at
Coastal Community College in
Jacksonville. The ECU school of
nursing will also broadcast a nurs-
ing course to Ahoskie.
"We feel strongly that an in-
teractive learning system such as
the one that NILEC offers will be
beneficial to meeting both educa-
tional and medical needs in our
region said David Balch, direc-
tor of the Center for Health Sci-
ences Communication in the ECU
Division of Health Sciences.
During the sessions, profes-
sors at ECU can instruct students
at the sites. Two-way communi-
cation allows students to respond
to lectures.
ECU professor competes
in national competition
Cardiologists will use the
system to conduct weekly medi-
cal clinics.
Through a televideoconfer-
ence, the specialist, the local phy-
sician and the patient will beable
to communicate visually on con-
sultations and referrals.
The specialist will also be
able to perform parts of the physi-
cal examination during the tele-
conference using a special elec-
tronic stethoscope.
According to Balch, the
costs of health care using
televideo systems will be greatly
reduced because both patients
and their physicians will save
time and money.
"Telemedicine, because of
its potential cost-savings, will
sweep the country and have an
impact on the way medicine is
practiced over the next 10 years
he said.
The program is designed af-
ter a similar one at Texas Tech
University Medical Center in
Lubbock.
NILEC has the potential to
offer several opportunities for
distance learning, networking
and resource sharing throughout
eastern North Carolina.
"Televideo and telecommu-
nication is part of our future
Balch said.
"The university wants to
make use of it early so that it can
show its benefits to our region
The six-month test period
for the clinic and the instructional
courses are funded by the uni-
versity with support from Caro-
lina Telephone & Telegraph Co.
Carol inaTelephonehas supplied
the university with about
$150,000 worth of equipment.
m
aiHi

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By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
Assistant Professor Paul
Wertheim, of the School of Busi-
ness is competing in a risk-free
stock market challenge that al-
lows contestants to work the
stock market without using real
money, while gaining Wall
Street experience.
The AT&T Collegiate In-
vestment Challenge is a nation-
wide educational stock trading
competition that helps students
learn the ups and downs of the
stock market without risking
real money.
"I just entered for the fun
of it Wertheim said. "It gives
me a chance to enter the stock
market with no risks
The competi tion, which be-
gan on Nov. 2, starts players off
with a fictional account of
$500,000, a stock market setting
and the challenge to turn the
account into the highest portfo-
lio value before the competition
closes on Feb. 26.
In December, Wertheim
was ranked in fourth place in a
LEFT
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Student Discounts of 10
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competition that involves about
20,000 players.
He is unsure what his cur-
rent standing is, although he
suspects that it is not as high as
his December ranking.
Stocks are traded and
compared, via an 800 number,
on the AMEX, NYSE and
NASDAQ exchanges.
"AT&T is proud to be
sponsoring the competition for
the fifth year said Elise
Haderer, AT&T College Mar-
ket Manager. "It is a great way
for students and teachers to try
out skills and build knowl-
edge
More than $200,000 will
be awarded in cash and prizes
to the top performers, including
cash prizes,automobiles and elec-
tronic equipment.
"A thousand books about
the market (stock) wouldn't
teach you as much, and a thou-
sand days on the beach
wouldn't be as much fun said
Manuel Lopez, a foreign ex-
change student from Spain and
last year's winner in the high
school division.
Sunday Spectacular
EVERY
THING
ISA
DOLLAR
r�M i in.rii
This Sunday,
GREENVILLE January 17, 1993
Corhgan 's Is The Late Night Place To Be
7 NIGHTS A WEEK
Private Club For Members & Invited Guests
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
invites applications for the
Summer Pre-Graduate Research Experience
�J0 week Summer Research Project with
UNC-CH Faculty Mentor
�Rising Senior Minority Undergraduates
�Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Physical
Sciences, Biomedical Sciences, and Public Health
including Environmental Sciences and Engineering
�Skill Enhancement Workshops Available
�Housing plus $1,000 Food Allowance and
$2,500 Stipend
�Application Deadline is February 26, 1993
�Period of Program: May 25, 1993 to July 30, 1993
UNC-CH Contact is:
Associate Dean, Dr. Henry T. Frierson, Jr.
The Graduate School
200 Bynum Hall CB 4010
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Telephone: 919-966-2611
For Application Forms and Additional Information Contact:
Dr. Brian Haynes
204 Whichard Building � 757-6495
ECU Chapter of the
IPHI KAPPA PHI!
Honor Society
is inviting applications from senior
students for competitive fellowships
worth up to $7,000 for first year
graduates or professional studies.
Applications due
February 1, 1993.
For information or applications
contact Dr. Deedee Glascoff
757-6583





3
The East Carolinian
JANUARY 14 1QQ3
5TATE
-News
Hunt urges
educators to
improve schools
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) �
Gov.JimHunthaschallenged sev-
eral hundred educators and
county officials to improve educa-
tion and work with him to expand
preschool programs.
Public schools must help res-
cue North Carolina's poor chil-
dren from stunted lives, Hunt said
during his address to the Winter
Leadership Conference in Win-
ston-Salem Tuesday.
Saying the state's public
schools are "on trial Hunt told
education and government offi-
cials they must take advantage of
reforms that are pushing author-
ity to the local level, The News &
Observer of Raleigh reported.
"My responsibility as gov-
ernor is not to dictate to you, but to
support you he said. "But I'm
going to push you because 1 want
every school and every county to
be creative and show me real re-
form
The governor's speech re-
peated the theme of his inaugural
address: the urgency of getting
help to abused and neglected chil-
dren early in their lives.
"It's those earliest years
when the self confidence really
begins to flourish, when kids be-
gan to think '1 am somebody
Hunt said. "But a lot of kids don't
get that.
"By the time they come to
kindergarten at age 5, many of
them have been so hurt, neglected
and abused that they can't ever be
what they ought to be he said.
Hunt has not said how much
it will cost to expand services to
preschool children.
Three Durham nurses
file harassment charges
DURHAM (AP) � Three
nurses have filed a lawsuit al-
leging they were forced to per-
form sexual acts and swim nude
in front of guests while work-
ing as caretakers for a lawyer's
paralyzed brother.
The registered nurses, who
filed the suit Friday in Durham
County Superior Court, also al-
lege that malpractice attorney
Marie Sides periodically un-
hooked her brother's life-sup-
port system while making them
stand by and watch him suffer.
The suit, filed by Lovie
Trice, Dovie Bass and Jane
Nichols, alleges that when they
refused to go along with Sides'
orders, she retaliated by lower-
ing their pay.
Sides hadn't heard about
the suit Tuesday but said the
allegations were false.
"My reaction is shock
she told The News & Observer
of Raleigh. "I'm shocked by the
untruth
According to the suit,
Sides hired Trice and Bass in
1987 to care for her brother,
Robert, who is paralyzed and
confined to bed.
When Trice and Bass
started, the suit says, Sides also
asked them to do extra chores
around the house.
The nurses also say Sides
called them names and used
profanity.
Two years after they were
hired, the nurses claim, Sides
tried to force them to perform
"manual penis stimulation" on
her brother.
The nurses say Sides threat-
ened to fire them if they did not
comply.
At about the same time, the
women contend, Sides asked them
to disconnect her brother's oxygen
system.
When they refused, the suit
says, Sides unplugged the equip-
ment herself for three to five min-
utes at time.
The suit says Nichols was also
hired to care for Sides' brother. In
the suit, Nichols says that during
the summer of 1990, Sides tried to
goad her into swimming naked in
front of two men. Sides also de-
manded that Nichols "get on top of
Robert Sides, and perform various
sexual acts the suit says.
Nichols, Trice and Bass could
not be reached for comment. John
Constantinou, theirattorney, did not
return phone calls.
Sides, a former nurse herself,
is best known for her involvement
in a controversial case involving
Duke University doctors who used
an experimental cancer test on sev-
eral patients.
Sides represented Betty Jean
Eldreth, who charged that the doc-
tors had misdiagnosed her as hav-
ing cancer and performed unneces-
sary surgery that left her disfigured.
Theallegations by Eldreth and
Sides about the controversial can-
cer test � known as B72.3 � led to
congressional subcommittee hear-
ings about scientific fraud and
prompted several other lawsuits
against Duke by former cancer pa-
tients.
Eldreth settled out of court for
an undisclosed sum.
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The East Carolinian
Clinton nears final
decisions on
White House staff
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) � Presi-
dent-elect Ginton is putting die finishing
touches on a White House team anchored by
an array of trusted campaign aides while
hedging on a pledge to chop the president's
staff by 25 percent.
With his inauguration as the nation's
42nd presidentone week fromtoday,Clinton
has yet to announce much of his senior Whi te
House staff or the top deputies at major
government departments.
Buthehas settled on many of his picks,
and aides said Tuesday thata flurry of White
House staff announcements was imminent,
perhaps as early as today. Manyof those said
to be in line for ad ministration posts were on
hand in Little Rock.
Most are familiar faces from Clinton's
winning campaign, including communica-
tions director George Stephanopoulos, press
secretary Dee Dee Myers and Mark Gearan,
a senior Clinton adviser who ran Vice Presi-
dent-elect Al Gore's campaign, and Clinton
confidant Bruce Lindsey.
But there are also some new � and
relatively new�additions. Included in this
group is Howard Paster, a Washington lob-
byist who had been heading the transition's
congressional relations and is set to continue
that work at the White House.
David Dreyer, a top adviser to House
Majority Leader Richard Gephardt of Mis-
souri, was recruited by Stephanopoulos to
assume a major role in the communications
office, which will oversee the White House
media-related operations.
Set to be announced with the senior
WhiteHousestaff is Qinton'schoiceof David
Wilhelm as the next chairman of the Demo-
cratic National Committee,apostfrom which
Wilhelm will direct Clinton's political opera-
tions.
Wilhelm, a Chicago political consult-
ant who was Clinton'scampaign manager, is
working with other campaign consultants
on an ambitious research and outreach pro-
gram designed to help Clinton make policy
decisions while laying the groundwork for a
re-election run in four years.
University police chief's husband
accused in campus rape
BLOOMSBURG, Pa. (AP) � The
husband of Bloomsburg University's
new police chief is accused of raping a
co-worker and is under investigation
in four more attacks � one that oc-
curred when he and his wife were in
town for her job interview.
Michael Reece Boykin blamed his
arrest on racism, and a university
trustee said resentment and suspicion
have dogged the couple since the wife
took over campus security.
"Bloomsburg University is fa-
mous for shafting men of color
Boykin, who like his wife is black, said
in a letter to university officials. "I did
not relocate to this unfriendly, forbid-
den town to have my good name sul-
lied
Boykin, 41, a university mainte-
nance worker, is married to former
Chicago police officer Margaret
Boykin. They took their campus jobs
Oct. 31.
That afternoon, a student was
raped in a gymnasium. Rapes on or
near the campus followed on Nov. 27
and Dec. 11. On Dec. 18, one of
Boykin's co-workers was raped in a
university pickup truck, and she
named him as the attacker.
He pleaded innocent to rape
charges Monday in that attack and
was held on $75,000 bail.
District Attorney William S.
Kreisher said state and Bloomsburg
police were investigating the possibil-
ity that Boykin committed the other
attacks.
He also said Boykin is a suspect
in another campus-related rape on
Dec. 15, 1991 � when the Boykins
were in town for Mrs. Boykin's inter-
view.
After the rapes started last se-
mester, women walked in groups and
those who lived off campus were of-
fered dormitory rooms, though only a
few took advantage of it. The univer-
sity also set up an escort system.
Investigators took blood and se-
men from Boykin after his arrest for
comparison to evidence taken in the
previous cases. Genetic tests linked
some of the earlier rapes to the same
person, Kreisher said.
"But there was nobody to com-
pare them to. We had no suspect until
now he said.
Bloomsburg, a town of 12,000 in
north-central Pennsylvania, is mostly
white. Only 206 of the university's
6,378 full-time students are black.
University trustee Howard
Johnson, who is black, said the arrest
has "overtones of being racially moti-
vated
"There are people who don't
want Maggie and her family here he
said. "They look at blacks as crimi-
nals, rapists and thieves
University spokeswoman Susan
Schantz said some in the community
were not happy with Mrs. Boykin's
appointment or the hiring of her hus-
band.
She would not comment directly
on whether the opposition was split
along racial lines, but said, "You can
go downtown and talk to any redneck
if that's what you want to find out
Mrs. Boykin, who has taken leave
from her job, is paid up to $41,804 per
year. Her husband's pay is $7.21 per
hour.
There was considerable grum-
bling when the Boykins were hired
because a condition of Mrs. Boykin's
employment was that her husband
receive a job.
Schantz said it is customary to
help an employee's spouse find work
if a family is brought in from far away.
"There will be people who are
going to say, 'I told you so Johnson
said. "People within his department
didn't like the way he was hired. There
was resentment
Senators tell Bush to slow-
down on trade negotiations
WASHINGTON (AP) � Eleven
senators, many from textile-producing
states, have told President Bush that
his rush to conclude a trade agreement
by Friday could seriously damage the
industry.
"Your negotiators are rushing
pell-mell to conclude a Uruguay Round
Agreement, and in the process are of-
fering new concessions that should not
and need not be made the senators
wrote to Bush in a letter released
Wednesday.
The senators include some of the
chamber's most senior members, in-
cluding Republican Strom Thurmond
and Democrat Ernest "Fritz" Hollings
of South Carolina and Republicans John
Warner of Virginia and Jesse Helms of
North Carolina.
"By weakening dumping and
countervailing duty laws, the draft
agreement restricts U.S. industry's abil-
ity to redress unfair trade practices
the letter said.
The senators also criticized elimi-
nation of the "multifiber arrangement"
which they said "would directly
threaten 1.8 million U.S. textile jobs
Hollings, who released the letter,
said new tariff reductions would allow
imports to undercut American-made
goods. He and the other senators also
said that allowing a multilateral trade
organization to set trading rules irri-
properly ceded American sovereignty.
Others signing the letter were
Sens. Lauch Faircloth, D-N.C; Richard
Shelby, D-Ala Howell Heflin, D-Ala
Jim Sasser, D-Tenn Harlan Mathews,
D-Tenn Ben Nighthorse Campbell, D-
Colo and William Cohen, R-Maine
Allen accused of child abuse
NEW YORK (AP) � Woody Allen's
7-year-old daughter told police she and
her 5-year-old brother saw Allen having
sex with their older sister, Soon-Yi Previn,
Mia Farrow's lawyer says.
Allen has acknowledged he is ro-
mantically involved with Ms. Previn,
Farrow's college-age adopted daughter.
But he vehemently denied daughter Dylan
or son Satchel ever saw the two having
sex.
The latest round in the bitter cus-
tody dispute between the filmmaker and
Farrow came Tuesday during a hearing
on Allen's rights to visit with Dylan,
Satchel and the couple's 14-year-old son
Moses.
Farrow's lawyer, Eleanor Alter, also
alleged that Allen pushed Satchel's face
intoaplateof hot spaghetti inanger. Alter
alleged that later, when Allen would get
angry with the boy, Allen would warn,
"I'm going to make spaghetti
The lawyer also alleged that Allen
had twisted the boy's legs and threatened
to break them.
Dylan reported witnessing sex be-
tween Allen and Previn when Connecti-
cut police asked her why she knew how tD
position anatomically correct dolls to de
pict sex, Alter said. Dylan made the alle-
gation Dec. 30 and said she saw the
lovemaking sometime last year at Allen's
Manhattan apartment, the lawyer said.
Allen told reporters after the heat-
ing that Farrow is "drumming lies" into
Dylan.
"I think that when Mia needs some-
thing, she takes our daughter and makes
her say it Allen said.
No immediate rulings on Allen
visitation rights were made. Another hear
ing was set for Jan. 26.
Farrow was Allen's lover from 1980
until January 192, when she learned of
Allen's affair with Previn. Farrow, who
has 11 children, adopted Previn while
married to conductor Andre Previn.
�f
ow to get started
If you have never climbed before, you must
participate in a Climbing I workshop before
eligibility is received to purchase a Drop-In
Supervised Climbing Pass.
Fill your spring 1993 with excitement and adventure through the following Recreational Services programs.
Home Brewed Adventures
l ake a minute to develop your creativ.ty visiting the Outdoor
Program Resource Library. A little knowledge can go a long way
towards planning a truly great outdoor adventure. What can I do?
What's the quickest route to my destination? What type of equipment
will I need? Do I want to camp or hotel it? What are the park rules
for National and State Parks? What safety precautions should I be
aware of this weekend? Are there specific points of interest or
naturally historical sites along the way?
You may browse through a vast collection of books, maps, and
magazines geared specifically towards your outdoor adventure. Files
are maintained regarding outdoor recreation information from all 50
states. Brochures, maps and books have also been donated by a
number of resources and are always appreciated.
The Trip Planning Resource Center would love to help you "brew-
up" your next outdoor recreation adventure. So let's get cookin
Get in gear for
adventure at the r.o.c.
As you get geared up for spring semester so is the staff at the R.O.C.
(Recreational Outdoor Center). While you've been registering and
dropping & adding coursework the R.O.C. crew have been getting
ready for adventure trip registrations and adding quality equipment
to the long list of adventure necessities available to all facultystaff
and students.
All equipment items are at ROC bottom prices for that student
budget. Prices are based on daily and extended use rates. Check-out
any of the items below. For a complete list of equipment rental
items, browse by the R.O.C. during hours of operation or slop by
room 204 Christenbury Gymnasium for a complete rental list.
IrVorkshops
CLIMBING I WORKSHOP DATES:
FEBRUARY 9 & 18; MARCH 18 & 24; APRIL 7
CLIMBING II WORKSHOP DATES:
MARCH 31; APRIL 15
Drop-in pass prices
Day Pass
$1.00 for students
$2.00 for facultystaff guest
Semester Pass
$25.00 for students
$35.00 for facultystaffguest
Passes may be purchased in 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm
after you receive climber eligibility.
Drop-in climbing hours
Wednesday
Friday
Sunday
3:OOpm-5:OOpm
3:00pm-5:00pm
1:00pm-4:00pm
Beginning March 16 the Tower will be open one
hour later than above schedule.
Adventure Trips and Workshops
Registration for all fall adventure trips and workshops begin 1
13. Pre-reglstration prior to Pre-Trlp Meeting required.
TripsPre-Trlp Mtg.Takes Place
Downhill Skiing120; 5pm; BD101123-24
Spring Break Adventure31; 5pm; BD10136-13
Beach Horseback Riding317; 5pm; BD101321
Canoeing Day Trip324; 5pm; BD101327
Backpacking331; 5pm; BD10142-4
Climb & Camp414; 5pm; BD101416-18
Adventure WorkshopsDate Timelocation
Windsurfing I225 . 7:30pm .CG Pool
Terrain Biking320 . 10:30am .CGI 17
Tar River Clean Up423 � 2pm .CGI 17
Climbing Workshops
Climbing I Dates: 29; 218; 318; 324; 47 Climb Tower
Cimbing 11 Dates: 331; 415 Climb Tower
All Climbing Workshops begin al 300pm Come by the ROC for Drop-In
Climb times; Climbing Pass purchase, & Group Climb info.
StudentFS
Adventure Item Day FeeDay Fee
Tents (2 person) $3 00$4.00
Tents (4person) $500$6.00
liackfmcks $2 00$2.50
Cook Sets $100$1.50
Volleyball Sets $1.50$2.00
There's much much more. Great for
Greek, campus organization, residence
hall and office functions.
The ROC - Recreational Outdoor Center
117 Christenbury Gymnasium
Phone: 757-6387 or 757-6911
Monday & Friday
Tuesday - Thursday
Saturday & Sunday
11:30am-1:30pm &
3:00pm-6:00pm
3:00pm-6:00pm
Closed
A complete equipment and rental fee listing, information regarding
outdoor resources as well as trip planning assistance is also available at
the ROC during operational hours
for information regarding
trip destinations, costs,
adventure specifics or Hard
ROC Tower details, drop by
the R.O.C. during the indi-
cated hours of operation or
stop by room 204
Christenbury Gym for a copy
of the R.O.C. Review.
K�;
ff
i





The
JANUARY 14, 1993
Tuition
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Continued from page 1
munity
( hristopher, departing from
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morning administration,
,(Vl til.lt test
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linton "will insist upon the
�lull compliance with the
resolutions.
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thatwestand shoulder-to-shoulder
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Saddam i lussein does not misca
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fewsS
l�J;lim;l;IM'l
"BE THE BEST
DO IT WITH CLASS"
SPRING RUSH 1993
January 19-22
Kingston Place Clubhouse
TUES THURS
, PizIaUEp!rty suoght� SJW?m
t the Brothers Bid Night
For rides & more information call the Rush Chairman
758-6425
w
&
rr-
GO FOR THE MAGIC-
GO FOR THE MEMORIES-
GO FOR MICKEY AND MINNIE!
WHATEVER THE REASON,
rf GiO
ON THE ECU STUDENT UNION
SPRING BREAK TRIP TO CENTRAL FLORIDA
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ANY QUESTIONS?
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Greenville Square Shopping Center
756-7)77
Mon-Sat 9:30am-9:30pm. Sun 9arr9:3 Dpm





k-
r .3
TTze East Carolinian
January 14. 1993
Opinion
Page 6
N.C. Legislature consider tuition hike
The North Carolina State Legislature is
considering a proposal that would raise the
tuition rates of in-state students here at ECU
and at other state-run institutions.
Students in North Carolina now pay 10.9
percent of their total education costs, accord-
ing toa group of auditors. Theseauditors have
recommended that within the next five years,
students should pay about 25 percent of those
costs.
In the University of North Carolina Sys-
tem, undergraduates pay an average of $819
each year in tuition and academic fees. If ap-
proved, the proposal would raise this rate 81
percent to a total of $1,350 over the next five
years. Graduate students would be faced with
a 50 percent increase.
At ECU, the hike will be felt even harder.
Currently, undergraduate and graduate stu-
dents pay about $718 a year in tuition and fees.
If the tuition increase is passed by the legisla-
ture, that rate would more than double to $1,632
per year.
North Carolina's constitution provides
that a university education for students resid-
ing within the state be as close to free "as
practical By raising the tuition for state-sup-
ported schools, legislators are in effect ignor-
ing this provision. Balancing the state's budget
does not take precedence over insuring that
students receive their right to education.
This proposed raise in tuition may not be
costly in the short run, but will injure students'
opportunities, most significantly those in the
middle-class income bracket. Lower income
will still be able to receive financial aid and
higher income will be able to afford the in-
crease, but middle income students may very
well be forced out of school.
Legislators have also suggested that the
amount of financial aid given by both state and
federal agencies would be increased to cover
the difference in tuition. With institutionsbarely
able to find sufficient aid with the present
tuition rates, the chance of finding more to
cover a hike looks improbable, if not impos-
sible.
Education is the cornerstone to progress
in North Carolina. If the proposed tuition hike
is enacted, it will force many students to leave
their college education unfinished. Legislators
looking into the future of our state is their job;
this hike will effectively destroy many of the
chances of making it a better one.
Editorial Notebook
By Robert If. Nelson
Environmental policy effective, expensive
(Editor's note: Nelson is a se
nior economist with the Department
of the Interior. The preceding was
taken from a speech he gave to The
Heritage Foundation in 1992. His
views do not reflect the views of the
Interiur Department.)
There are many problems
with the way we make environ-
mental policy. But before I exam-
ine the problems, it may be useful
to say a few god things. It is im-
portant to keep in mind that, on
the whole, the American envi-
ronment is much cleaner than
many others around the world.
In fact, many people make
the point thatthesuperiorquality
of the American environment is
one of the signs that capitalism
and the American system work
better than other systems. But you
cannot then turn around and say
that environmental policy in
America has been totally
unsuccessful.
Yet my overall verdict is that
current environmental policy is
failing. The problem is the
extremely high cost. It is a good
thing we are a wealthy nation,
because that is the only way we
have been able to afford the costs.
Moreover, the costs of
environmental protection are
rising rapidly.
The Environmental
Protection Agency in December
of 1990 published figures on the
total U.S. costs for all pollution
control activities. These figures
show that we spent about $30
billion for pollution control in
1972, this rose to $98 billion in
1987, and then again to $115 bil-
lion in 1990. EPA also made the
projection that in the year 2000 the
total cost of pollution control will
be between $171 billion and $185
billion.
As a percentage of GNP,
pollution control will have risen
from taking less than 1 percent of
GNP in 1972 to 2.5 percent in the
year 2000. If current trends
continue, it would not b very
surprising to see a situation in
which EPA commands more
resources of the American
economy than the military.
The expected net economic
cost � not the gross, which is
much larger � of keeping oil
drilling out of the Arctic National
Wildlife Refugeislikelytobeabout
$15 billion to $20 billion.
Perhaps the single most
prominent area of environmental
policy is air pollution control. The
smog in Los Angeles has probably
done as much as any one thing in
America to heighten
environmental awareness. Air
pollution illustrates many of the
problems we are facing today.
Let us first go back to the
Clean Air Act of 1970. There was
in fact already considerable effort
then being made to clean up the
air. Then in 1970 the Clean Air Act
imposed a whole new regime with
much more central control by the
EPA. The level of spending on air
pollution control began to rise
sharply, for the United States as a
whole going from $8 billion in
1972 toaround $30billion in 1990.
And all this again produced
some useful results. Pollution lev-
els nationwide fell again by more
than 90 percent from 1970 to 1990.
Levelsof lead in the air have fallen
by more than 90 percent since 1980,
and there have been declines in
levels of sulfur dioxides and car-
bon monoxides.
How does all this play out in
terms of benefits compared with
the costs?It is clear thatestimating
a dollar value will not be easy. It
requires us to put dollar figures
on days of work that are not lost,
on deaths that are avoided (or,
more accurately, deferred), on
aesthetic improvements and so
forth.
Now in the judgement of
some respected analysts, the best
available calculations of benefits
from the Clean Air Act were done
by professor Myrick Freeman.
Using 1978 as a benchmark year
for examining benefits, Freeman
came up with a most-likely
estimate of around $37 billion in
benefits in that year, measured in
1984 dollars.
The EPA recently published
figures showing that air pollution
costs in 1978 were about $16
billion, measured in 1986 dollars.
So it is at least a reasonable
possibility that we have been
getting a good deal here. The
benefits may even have been twice
the costs.
As time goes on, however, it
is going to get harder to get further
improvements in environmental
quality. The law of diminishing
returnsapplies to the environment
as well as other areas of life.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Advertising Director
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Buliard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Creative Director
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. TheEast Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the rieht to edit
orreject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications B Ide ECU
Greenville, N.C, 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
?i-
IMAMBMM t�� !��������� Mw.i� ��-
N.C. STATE LEGISLATORS
Freedom's Call
Quote of
the Day:
Government
is too big
and
important,
to be left to
the
politicians.
Chester Bowles
By Jim Shamlin
,v
�ft
United States compared to Roman Empire
At certain spots in the Car-
ibbean, one can look overboard
and see villages on the ocean
floor � entire islands that have
sunk. At first, it seems amazing,
but it's not unimaginable. Geol-
ogy provides evidence that most
land masses are sinking. Even
North America slips into the sea,
a few centimeters every year. The
process is slow, and isn't much
to worry about�at least not yet.
But looking at those under-
water towns, one can't help but
They (humans)
will see danger
coming, hut
won't react
until they
perceive an
immediate
threat.
wonder: at what point did the
people who lived in these vil-
lages realize their civilization
was sinking and decide to move
on? Certainly, one or two villag-
ers may have noticed the rising
waterline � one may have even
noticed the connection and
warned his neighbors. He was
probably dismissed, like Chicken
Little or those Hippies who used
to wear sandwichboards that
read "THE WORLD WILL END
TOMORROW
In time, though, the water
would have risen further, until
mostof theislandersrealized that
their land was sinking. Some may
have sensed the danger when
the water began to creep over the
land; others may have waited
until it was visible from their
homes; most would have left
when the water began to fill the
streets. It would be curious to
know how many bodies under-
water archaeologists find �
corpses of people who drowned
in their cottages, waiting for the
water to recede, believing it was
only a temporary situation.
Most humans, whether by
nature or choice, are crisis-ori-
ented. They will see danger com-
ing, but won't react until they
perceive an immediate threat.
The same is true of political situ-
ations, which is why the political
upheaval of the last decade �
the collapse of the Berlin Wall,
the massacre in Tienanmen
Square and the fall of the Soviet
Union � seems to have hap-
pened overnight. Political
change isn't as gradual as rising
waterlines. It comes like a flash
flood�unexpected�and many
are unprepared. Warning is nec-
essary far in advance to make
preparation � and even then,
few will heed.
At the risk of being dis-
missed like the islander who told
his neighbors far in advance that
the island was sinking, this col-
umnist offers a warning: our
country is headed for a fall. This
claim is nothing new. For de-
cades, historians ha ve compared
events in the United States to
those which preceded the fall of
the Roman Empire. The water, at
the time, was far too low for
people to take these warnings
seriously � but now, the threat
is much more imminent, and the
danger is more obvious. If one
recounts the events preced ing the
first revolution in our country
and compares them to current
events, ominous parallels be-
come evident.
The first stage in political
action is dissent, evidenced by
the popular opinion that gov-
ernment has become destructive
of its powers. Before the first
revolution, many colonists felt
that the English government was
exploiting them. Their opinions,
printed in pamphlets, circulated
among the masses. Today, it is
almost impossible to find a per-
son who is satisfied with the gov-
ernment, and the media � both
printed and audiovisual � are
filled with voices of dissent.
The second stage is rebel-
lion, most evident in acts of vio-
lence � generally directionless,
but spawned by discontent. The
most common recollection of re-
bellion in eighteenth-century
America was the Boston Tea
Party, when colonists, frustrated
by economic oppression, de-
stroyed the property of mer-
chants to demonstrate their an-
ger at King George. A similar
event happened in Los Angeles.
While the immediate stimulus
was the verdict of the King trial,
many rioters admitted that the
source of their anger was far
deeper � their violence, more
than anything else, was born of
frustration, spawned by eco-
nomic oppression and the de-
struction of merchants' property
was to demonstrate their anger
at President George.
The final stage is revolu-
tion � the unseating of one
leader and his replacement by
another. Luckily, our present
situation provides for a blood-
less coup with every election, a
revolution fought with ballots
instead of bullets. The problem
is that an election is not typically
the choice of the best leader, but
a dilemma that entails deciding
who is the least reprehensible.
This is the case in the last elec-
tion: polls have shown that most
of the people who voted for
Clinton in November were not
so much in favor of Clinton as
they were disgusted with Bush.
While, through the metapolitical
tap-dance of the campaign,
Clinton has presented some good
ideas, there are still several ma-
jor problems.
First of all, he is only one
man and has little control over
what happens within our coun-
try. The bodies that control do-
mestic policy, the Senate and
Congress, are largely composed
of reelected incumbents � the
same pack of sad clowns who
have been running this country
into the ground for years.
Furthermore, the 100-day
plan Clinton touts, even if it
passes, is impotent by design.
Primarily, it consists of a few
dabs of makeup to prettify a tu-
mor thatneeds excision. The per-
manent and effective change this
country needs is far deeper, be-
yond Clinton'sexpertise, control
and, evidently, his perception.
Finally, the present eco-
nomic situation is fragile. There
are too many people living hand-
to-mouth, people for whom a
slight miscalculation in govern-
ment policy can result in pov-
erty and desperation. Returning
to history, it has always been the
poor and the desperate � colo-
nists in America, peasants in
France and the poor in Los An-
geles � who express their dis-
He (Clinton) is
only one man
and has little
control over
what happens
within our
country.
content in violence.
In sum, the American
people have recognized the
threat and have acted to stop the
rising water; the step we have
taken is a small measure, dispro-
portionate to the size of the prob-
lem we face. It is not yet time to
take drastic action. We must wait
and see how well our dam holds
back the rising tide � but at the
same time, we must prepare for
the worst to occur.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Students congratulated for behavior on Halloween
To the Editor:
A couple of weeks have
passed since Halloween and to
most of it may be just a blurred
memory. The Division of Student
Life and the Department of Uni-
versity Unions has completed an
evaluation of our first annual
Midnight Madness.
We were busy patting our-
selves on the back at 4 a.m. Sun-
day morn ing after Hal loween, but
several of uscommented as to the
cooperation and positiveattitude
of the students and their guests
who participated in Midnight
Madness. I would go one step
further in stating that the com-
ments I have heard from both
students and staff is that the
people who congregated down-
town acted responsibly as well.
To East Carolina University stu-
dents and the city of Greenville,
congratulations and thanks.
Too often we anticipate the
worst, but Halloween and Mid-
night Madness is a clear example
that everyone can respect others,
be courteous and have a good
time.
I, for one, am looking for-
ward to the second annual Mid- j
night Madness. We hope you are
too!
J. Marshall
Asst. DirectorStudent Ac-
tivities
ECU





V
The East Carolinian
January 14, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 7
Two approaches to realism on display at Gray Gallery
By Marjorie McKinstry
Staff Writer
From Technicolor toys to
black and white etchings of the
human form, the world of realism
is detailed in the latest exhibition
at Gray Art Gallery.
The show is a combination of
the works of two artists, Leland
Wallin and Sigmund Abeles. Each
artist explores his interpretation
of realism, that "quaint, even re-
actionary practice" often snubbed
by today's art world.
Although the Wallin and
Abeles styles differ radically �
Wallin preferring a color en-
hanced view of toydom, and
Abeles drawing his life from gut
reactions�both illicit emotional
reactions beyond thesailboat-at-
sunset fare of realism. Abeles
work in particular probes the
viewers mind, often painfully.
Hissketchesdetail variousnudes
crouched in chairs, tensely sit-
ting on beds and staring directly
out from the canvas.
The burden of viewing nude
after nude is lifted once the pas-
tel 'H is Saturday' is reached. This
piece depicts an old man slum-
bering in a kitchen chair, while
his surroundings hint toward a
depressing understanding of a
not-so-jolly-fellow. The counter
is cluttered with kitchen appara-
tus and a small TV with an
umbilically linked extension cord
glows with the dark formsof pro-
fessional wrestling. Sprawled
across the floor is a nudie maga-
zine, with the open thighs and
garter belt of a woman hazily pre-
sented across the fold of the page.
This piece is considered to be
too much of an illustration by
some a darker style derived from
Norman Rockwell. However,
anyone who feels that Abeles
work fails to illicit any real emo-
tional response needs to walk
only a little further to the small
series of drawings showing
Abeles infant son lost in a tangle
of tubes and IVs, his face veiled
by an monstrous respirator. The
four small sketches narrate the
first month of the child's difficult
life, from birth, through a heart
operation, to the day his face is
finally free of machinery, and he
is able sleep peacefully with his
arm outstretched to the viewer.
With all this emotional up-
heaval, it can be quite a shock to
turn a corner in the gallery and
suddenly be confronted by enor-
mous and almost luridly colored
paintings of toys. Wallin's col-
lection of still life images of dolls,
trucks, tops and other assorted
childhood paraphernalia is care-
fully arranged from canvass to
canvass. The outlines are defi-
nite, and each shape and curve is
carved from memory to a point
where realism meets surrealism.
The colors are too bright to be
nostalgic, the forms and lines too
precise to be comfortable, and
the toys too new looking to be
the fond hand-me-downs of heri-
tage. The art is disconcerting,
lacking an edge of familiarity,
which is probably intentional.
A large painting of a nude
woman seated stiffly on carousel
horse juts out from the center of
the room. She appears as "inani-
mate as the horse with her
twisted upper body bizarrely
parallel to the decay of the ani-
mal, the only toy that shows age.
Amid all the representations of
dump trucks and snatch games,
she is out of place. But even
though her body lacks the grace
and reality of Abeles' drawings,
the discomfort she emanates may
be the most realistic expression
in Wallin's paintings, since it
draws its appeal less from stylis-
tic "color relations and composi-
tion structure and more from
an adult perception of childhood.
Both exhibitions will remain
on display until January 21, at
Gray Art Gallery in the Jenkins
art building. The Gallery is open
Monday through Saturday from
10 a.m. until 5 p.m and Thurs-
day until 8 p .m. Admission is free.
BCXK
The Tale of the Body Thdef
By Anne Rice
Alfred Knopf, N.Y.
By John Bullard
Staf f Writer
For all you Anne Rice freaks out there who were waiting for the release of the
new installment in The Vampire Chronicles, relief came just in time for Santa and the
New Year.
Rice continues her series with The Tale of the Body Thief. The plot structure
resembles Interview with a Vampire, the now-classic novel which began The Vampire
Chronicles. Unlike in the middle books, Rice uses a limited cast of characters in Tale.
The small number of figures in the new story comes as a relief from the
overwhelmingnumberswhich paraded through The Vampire Lestat and The Qiieen of
the Damned.
So who's back? Not many. In fact, Tale includes barely three vampires. Don't
worry though: Lestat, everybody's favorite blood-sucker, is back, along wi th h is first
victim, Louis. A very brief scene contains Marius, who only shoots a dirty look at
Lestat. That's it for vampires. For the mortalsamong immortals returns David Talbot,
the paranormal expert.
For all those who don't recognize these names, there's nothing to worry about
Like the other novels in The Vampire Chronicles, you need not to have read the
previous books.
New to the series comes, of course, the body thief. Rice also throws in a German
shepherd and a nun, believe it or not, as Lestat's love interest in The Tale of the Body
Thief.
The action of the story revolves around every vampire's dream of becoming
mortal for a day. Lestat, our foolish fiend, gets just that His opportunity arises from
the mysterious body thief, an unknown mortal who can jump into other bod ies, who
offers him the chance to see the sun again. There's only one catch: Lestat must give
up his own vampire body for the allotted time.
Of course, Lestat leaps at the offer without giving it much thought and the fun
begins. After the spiritsof Lestat and the body thief exchange anatomies, Lestat wakes
to find that he has indeed become mortal and that all the money he stashed to use has
been stolen by the body thief. Lestat realizes he is helpless and will probably never
get his immortal body back.
Sick and lost in the streets, Lestat befriends a dog, makes out with a waitress,
and falls in love with a nun. After givingthenun whatshehasbeen depriving herself
of, Lestat heads for New Orleans and the vampire Louis.
In Cajun country Lestat appeals to Louis, after convincing Louis that indeed it
is he (Lestat) in another body. Louis refuses him in a torment of confusion. What is
poor Lestat to do?
Following some convincing from Lestat, David Talbot, the mortal, then comes
to the rescue. The retired head of the Talamasca (the world's leading paranormal
society) helps Lestat to figure out who the mysterious body thief isand how to track
him down.
From here Lestat and David use all their humanly power to pursue the body
thief, who has been wreckinghavocalloverthe globe. Thechase, in typical Anne Rice
fashion, takes us all around the world at lightning, heart-pounding pace.
WftTheTaleofthe
Body Thief, Anne Rice
continues to captivate
readers through the
world of vampires.
Within Tale and its sus-
penseful pi ' Rice also
gives some con i relief.
The mortal Lestat's agi-
tation with bowel move-
ments and his rediscov-
ering the use of the male
member provides for
some laughs in a couple
of very tense situations.
Overall, The Tale of
t he Body Thief shows tha t
Anne Rice can hold her
readers' attention for
four straight books. It's
well worth reading, es-
pecially if you have a
free weekend. Nodoubt,
all Vampire Chronicle
faithfuls will seek it out
Many have picked up
the second or third book
first and ha ve gone back
to read the rest. Who
knows? The 7.7 of the
Body Thief may just be
your starting point.
Torever Young' fails as drama
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
In Forever Young, it is 1939 and
Daniel McCormick (Mel Gibson) is
the "hot dog" of the newly-formed
AirCorpsand inlovewithhischild-
hood friend and sweetheart, Helen
(Isabel Glaser).
However, before he can ask
her to marry him, she immediately
is involved in a accident that puts
her in a coma. Daniel is shattered.
His only hope is to be frozen
and reawakened when Helen re-
vives. Butheawakens50years later.
Bewildered, he befriendsa boy,
Nat (Elijah Wood), and his single
mother,Claire (Jamie Lee Curtis) as
he tries to find Helen while under-
going a mysterious ailment.
These are really good actors
trapped in a pathetic movie.
Gibson's charm and demeanor
makehimhard not tolikeand Curtis
is an underappreciated comic ac-
tress.
God love 'em, they try really
hard, bless their hearts.
But Jeffrey Abrams has written
another smaltzy woe-unto-the-
malemedical tragedy love-story.
Remember Regarding Henry? If not,
watch Forever Young. It's the same
movie. But thisone is truly horrible.
In order to connect 1939 and
1992 cohesively within one charac-
Photo courtesy Warner Bros. Inc.
Daniel (Mel Gibson) gives young Nat (Elijah Wood) a flying lesson in "Forever Young a
flailing drama about life, love and death.
ter, that character has to be well-
developed. Daniel is not. We
learn nothing about him and
have no reason to like him, were
it not Gibson's role. The possible
romance between Daniel and
Qa ire isdropped suddenly with
mimimal change in interaction.
Theway in which Daniel isa wak-
ened from his sleep is preposter-
ous. Characters are introduced
and almost immediately dis-
carded, such as Nat's friend
and his brother. The fish-out-
of-water plot is not beliveable
as Daniel adapts too well to
everything. The too-cute boys
wear out their charm fast and
the ending is contrived and
disappointing. There is even
an obligatory Fedsgood guys
chase scene.
What is so frustrating
about Forever Young isa collec-
tion of potentially-promising
scenes and plot lines that
wither away into cliche and
predictability.
If this were to have aired
on television as a movie-of-
the-week, it would have been
buried by any of the numer-
ous Amy Fischer stories.
What an appropriate fate
for such an undeveloped
movie.
By Thomas Croft
Staff Writer
Keep Serening:
MC's solo effort
Pavement's 'Slanted' considered lasne
all but enchanting
Anne Rice's latest add;t;on to me Vampire chronicles
takes a new twist m immort J sorvtelling
j
Grunge has nothing to do with Se-
attle. It never has.
Grunge iscacophony,despair, miss-
ing bass notes, sounding like ass, un-
shaven, putrid, johnny Rotten, carefully
uncarefu l, rand omly though tfu I. Grunge
is ravement: bear with them as they're
bare as can be.
Pavement's newest offering, Slanted
and Emhanted, was recorded in the first
month of 1991, released in 1992 and here
it is 1993. Anyway, finally put out on
Matador Records (see Superchunk, old
Teenage Fanclub), Slantedand Enchanted
is a 14-track musical amalgam by three
Stockton, Ca scrubs.
Guitars collide, sometimes off-key,
the drums sound like a used, beat-up
three-piece Ludwig, the production
sucks, and the bass is turned too low.
Gracefully, it's the songs that reign.
Recorded in a week, Slanted almost
sounds so unprofessional as to have been
recorded on a four-track. On "In the
Mouth a Desert humming mimics the
guitar solo to sound like a late 1980s Rcxi
Stewart song.
In almost every song there'sa main-
tenanceofharmonicvalidity which gives
any grungehead sonic orgasm at the
sound of slapstick guitar distortion go-
ing loopy bonkers while the patient bass
line meanders through its steady four
note pattern, thereby providing a sem-
blance of coherence, or at least purpose.
TheepicenterofPavement'senigma
must be the lyrics. Meager pecking at
critical keys in search of words to de-
scribe does no justice, so here's a sam-
pler.
"Fun for an hour when he's gone
can one trick nights feed 40days? In my
bed at the break of dawn sheshivered like
a vein slashed bright and newShe's got
the radio active, it makesme feel ok (I
don't feel ok)Grip force the vials, strip the
locks smashthe set and slash the beds and
when itlooks like a wife's ex-plot we'll
coverall the rugs with cheap perfume
(from "Perfum-V"); "And all the sterile
strikingitdefendsanemptvdockvoucast
awaya rain up on vour forehead where
the mist's for hire if it's just too clear Let's
spend our last14 stance randomlygo
down to the outlet once againPainted
portrait of minions and slavesCrotch
maidensand one-night playsAre they the
only ones wholaugh? (from "Here the
album's best cut).
No doubt, the lyrical conundrum of
Pavement'sconcoctions makes tor refresh-
ing intrigue and sloppy guitar music. Cer-
tainly not for everyone, Slanted and En-
clianted deals a different dose of angst, not
necessarily mad, just very neatly skewed.
Slanted and Emhanted
Rapper MC Serch's tune "Here It
Comes" was one of the best singles in
1992. Sadly, the album from which it
came, Return of the Product, fails to pro-
duce anything close to "Here It Comes
The record wears terribly thinabou t mid -
wav through and sports three worthy
cuts, including "Social Narcotics" and the
title track.
Perhaps the word Return in the
album's title suggests a sequel of sorts
(see Re turn of the jedi), and every on e knows
sequels are always worse than the origi-
nal, so Serch's LP is therefore intended to
be bad, right? Sorry Serch (and 3rd Bass)
fans, that formula won't work because
Return of the Product is Serch's debut ef-
fort, and his first since his split with Pete
Nice and the unfortunate breakup of 3rd
Bass.
Now Niceisdoinghisown thing too,
and it looks like the derelicts of dialect,
important staples in hard beat, streetwise,
old school rap, are gone for good. Only
fellow Caucasians and New Yorkers
Beasrie Boys are as talented (and re-
spected) as3rd Bass was. Unfortunately
the magic duo that put out semi-cross-
over hit "Pop Goes the Weasel" (a righ-
teous indictment on white not-rap
treasonists such as Vanilla Ice) among
other gems, and who dealt sly rhymes
with smooth deliveries on fat beats for
four years, are no more.
Serch's solo project seems to be no
consolation, and he better find a new
partner. His lyrics on Return ate fine�
some b-boy, some preaching social con
science, some saying nothing�hut the
music in ever)' tune except Here It
Comes" sounds last-minute, lame and
limp.
Like every rapper,Serch brags about
rus dope beats, fry basslines, kkkin' lyri-
cal messages, and so on. The problem is
See Music page 11
I





���- i
� -
8 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 14, 1993
Tournament
Men's table tennis tour-
nament will be held Tuesday,
Jan. 19 from 7-10 p.m.
The Women's table
tennis tournament will be
held on Monday, Jan.25,1993
from7p.m 10p.m. Both the
men'sandwomen'stableten-
nis tournaments wiU beheld
inMendenhall.
The men's billiards
tournament will be held
Thursday, Jan. 21, from7-
lOpmThemerisbillards
tournament will be held
in the Mendenhall Bil-
liards Center.
The women's billiards
tournament will be held Tues-
day, Jan. 26 from 7 -10 p.m. The
women's billiards tournaments
will also be held in the
Mendenhall Billiards Center.
The chess tournament
will be held Wednesday, Jan. 27
- 28 on the ground floor of
Mendenhall Student Center
rooms 8-C,D, and E. The com-
petition will run from 7-10 p.m.
The bowling tourna-
ment will be held on Thursday,
Jan. 28 from 7-10 p.m. at The
Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling Alley.
i fmi
m
imiiMimmiiimiimMUiiii
in Ti rii ii n
Youth hostels help make
student travel affordable
For more info call Lynn Jobes at 757-4766.
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Holiday travellers, college
road-trippers, those who love to
span America's highways in a
desparate attempt to flee the mo-
notony of everyday life: take
heed, for your deliverance has
arrived.
No more outrageous hotel
bills, no more $19.95-a-night-
roach-infested-holes in the wall.
American Youth Hostels pro-
vides an affordable, quality al-
ternative to the unecessary ex-
penses such travellers incur.
With prices ranging from $7-
$15 a night, these dormitory-style
hostels provideaffordable travel
lodging in a number of tourist
spots around the world.
Equipped with self-service kitch-
ens, dining rooms and late-night
access availability, the hostels
provide the freedom and
economy desired by vacationing
college students.
Provided by the International
Youth Hostel Federation (1YHF),
the largest travel organization in
the world, there are 300 hostels
spanning the United States and
Canada (over 6,000 worldwide).
The purpose of the IYHF,
according to its newsletter, is "to
helpall,especiallyyoungpeople,
gain a greater understanding of
the world and its people through
its network of hostels and edu-
cational and recreational travel
programs
Most hostels are located in
major American cities and tour-
ist spots around the world. For
example, one Los Angeles hostel
runs $14 per night; an overnight
stay in Miami runs $10; and one
night at a New York City hostel
is affordable at $18.75 a night.
Normal hotel accomodations at
their cheapest could run over
three times those amounts.
In addition to lodging, the
hostels provide free or low-cost
recreational and social activities
for their guests. There are loca-
tions in many historical districts
and in some of the nations most
exotic locations. Guests can stay
in a lighthouse on the California
coast, or in a treehouse in a Geor-
gia pine forest.
There is something for every-
one in this program. For more
information contact:
Hostelling Inter-
national
American Youth
Hostel Dept
481
P.O. Box 37613
Washington, D.C.
20013-7613(202)
783-6161.
'Leap of Faith7 feeds off unquestioning belief
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
When "Leap erf Faith" opens,
we see the town of Rustwater, Kan
theCornrelish Capitol of the World,
on the verge of desolation. Unem-
ployment is high,the corn crop
threatens tobeatotallossdue to lack
of rain and the town is fragmenting
socially. Rustwater is becoming a
haven of apathy, inertia and pessi-
mism;its citizens haveno hope and
nothing to believe in.
Enter Jonas Nightingaleand His
Angels of Glory, a caravan of con
artists travelling in customized
shuttles and tractor-trailers under
theguiseofanomadicrevival. When
one of the trucks breaks down and
cannot berepaired foralmosta week,
Nightingale (Steve Martin) decides
to pitch camp and swindle the lo-
cals. Akledby his majordomo, Janet
(Debra Winger), who uses a laptop
to access scam-related info, and an
impressive choir, Nightingale as-
sembleshistentsand souvenir stands
and advertises his message of how
Rustwater can seek blessing and
healing from Jesus through Jonzs.
The townspeople swallow it
whole. They are bedazzled by
Nightingale'stheatrksand hissec-
ond sight; the Call which, in real-
ity, is Janet with a personal micro-
phone hook-up to Jonas and notes
supplied by planted members of the
audience. Trie congregations swoon
and give generous portions of their
much-needed paychecks. Jonas
promises relief spiritually and eco-
nomically and "heals" the afflicted.
He becomes Rustwater's celebrity
and savior.
However, not all are
impressed.The town sheriff (Liam
Neeson,tryinghard tocoverhisScot-
tish burr with Midwest compone)
immediately isawareof Jonas' scam
and tries to court Janet away from
Nightingale. A local waitress dis-
trusts the revival despi te her younger
brother's belief that Jonas can heal
his injured leg.
This is a subtle, affecting movie.
The premise of blind faith thrust
onto the con man who feeds off of
such unquestkxiingbelief isnotnew;
there have been numerous takes on
the "Rainmaker" theme. Martin as
Nightingale is apathetic toward the
plight of the townspeople; his only
interest is to bleed die town dry. He
isdevious,conniving,arrogantand,
worst of all, good at what he does.
Where other actors may have
faltered, Martin's experience with a
v live audience allows him total com-
fort and control with the congrega-
tions. He knows how to work a
crowd; his stage choreography is a
combination of Irish folk and James
Brown soul-stepping. Nightingale
isanunlikeablebutfascinatingchar-
$ A
X
Deal.
Ski Wintergreen, VA
January 23 &24
Who: All ECU Students, Faculty, & Staff
What: Wintergreen Ski Trip
When: January 23 & 24; Pre-Trip Meeting January 20,
5:00pm, BD-101
Cost: $115Students, $125Faculty & Staff (includes, 1 meal,
transportation, lodging - quad occupancy, and a 2 day lift ticket)
Register now through January 15 in 117 Christenbury Gym.
$70.00 deposit is required. For more information call 757-6911 or
757-6387.
Makes for an
Uphill Thrill!
acter � Martin's best
since "Dirty, Rotten
Scoundrels. "Winger
and LukasHaas sup-
port their scenes well,
but this is without a
doubtMartin'smovie.
The screenplay is
bold, considering it's
release date and tar-
get audience (couples
age 24-35). "Faith"
doesn'tflinch from the
implications of ma-
nipulating faith, nor from using
Christian doctorines to disguise a
money-making operation. But the
main point is this: is faith any less
effective or noble when focused
through someone like Jonas Night-
ingale?
At one point in the movie, one
character asks Nightingale if he is a
fake and Jonas replies, "it doesn't
matter as long as it works
He (Steve Martin) knows
how to work a crowd; his
stage choreography is a
combination of Irish folk
and James Brown soul-
stepping.
But is the "it" the faith or the
scam? And can Jonas go through
with theshow withoutbeingaffected
by Rustwater's sincerity of belief?
"LeapofFaim"isrecornrnended
for its intelligence, wit and presenta-
tion of the "power of belief' ques-
tion.
The necessity of faith is posed
on a scale the audience can appreci-
ate.
THERE
WILL BE
A
WRITERS
MEETING
AT 4 P.M.
TODAY.
WE WILL
IIJKtLIKU
SPRING
SEMESTER
PLANS,
UPDATE
THE I
BEAT
SYSTEM
AND GO
OVER
STORY
ASSIGN-
MENTS.
YOU
BETTER
THERE! ALL
YOU ASPIRING
JOURNALISTS
OUT THERE
INTERESTED IN
BECOMING A
REPORTER,
JOIN US AND
FILL OUT AN
APPLICATION.
DONT FORGET.
v
4
I
m �
The sun worshiping. The primitive dances. The mating
rituals. The primal screams. Only one beach can bold this
much culture on its 23-mile sandy stretch. This Spring
Break, head 'or Dayton, Beach. For more information, call
1-&00-&54-1234 for your free Spring Break Planning Kit.
D�
BIGBMCaaSRIV.





fc��r iii��fci ii
kMHWHi
JANUARY 14, 1993
The East Carolinian
9
ASSISTANT LIFESTYLE EDITOR NEEDED
If you like music, books, bands, etc. and can write, meet Dana
(Lifestyle Editor) and fill out an application at TJie East Carolinian,
Photo courtesy Universal Studios
Art Evans, left, portrays Bradlee, a squatter forced to side with his own desperate captor, fireman Vince
(Bill Paxton). 'Trespass' has good story intention and actors, but doesn't live up to viewer expectations.
Trespass' all talk, little action
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
It'samazing whata little thing like
a title can do to a movie.
Universal's Trespass was sched-
uJedfbra late-summer release in 1992.
However the movie was then titled
Looters and Universal,fearingbad pub-
licity stemming from the L.A. riots,
thought a name change would make
the movie more accessible to a larger
audience. They also moved thismovie
to the middle of the Christmas
season,whenwyCTjwantstoseevio-
lerweandexhaustiveprotanity,tohope-
fully compete with the huge movies
that traditionally are released this time
of year. They really shouldn't have
bothered.
In LootersTrespass,two Arkansas
firemen (Bill Paxton and William
Sandier) ate given a map that leads
them to East Saint Louis to find gold
buried in a derelict warehouse. While
there,they stumble upon Bradlee, a
homeless black man( Art Evans), who
doesn't know about the gold. But as
they tear up the building, they witness
amurder committed by the local gang,
King James (kK"T) and his "business
associates The gang comers the fire-
men in an attempt toget them off what
they consider to be their property.
Thegangdoesn'tknowaboutthe
gold and wants to know what these
white guys are doing in their ghetto.
Thegangdoesn'twantanyonetoknow
they murdered someone and the fire-
men are a ware that King James has no
reservation about killing them They
then have to decide whether to cut a
deal with Bradlee over the gold in
order to escape or wait and hope the
police show up.
It's odd to think of such a story
being written by Robert Zemeckisand
Bob Gale, the collaboration that gave
usthefticfctofteFHhwtrilogy.Itwould
be a strong achievement for the team
known for high-speed comedy and
subtle exposition to pull off a tense
action tale with racial conflict such that
Trespass almost delivers. And you
would think that director Walter Hill,
who directed both 48 Hours movies,
wou Id give us another dynamic gun-
fight of a movie.
Unfortunately, the script doesn't
give Hill anything to work with. The
set-up, two white men versus an ur-
ban gang for the right to a decrepid
buildingforvariousreastTtswhileboth
try to keep fromarousing police suspi-
cions, is ripe. Ethnic tension, social
conflict, gunplay, and pride versus
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greed on a basic level; you can't ask for
better ingredients from a 90-minute
movie. But Zemeckis and Gale's story
doesn't expand to potential.
The basic premise is strong. Man
struggling to survive, man struggling
to be rich; if sa simple plot However,
the complication of possession gives
Trespass its edge. Who can claim the
right to the building and its contents?
The fortune-seekerefromanother state,
the gang members who use the build-
ing tocommita murder and consider
it part of their turf or the man forced to
reside in it? EXes anyone have the
privilege to call it theirs? If not, what
means will be taken to enforce a par-
ticular viewpoint?
The obvious answer is tons of
violence and make it snappy. And itis
the almost-certain means that men re-
sort to in order to gain property and
pride that Trespass is truly about. The
events leadingupto the confrontation
is the story itself with the action as an
epilogue (it seems that way due to its
detachment from the plot). Which is
why the movie suffers: with these ac-
tors, you want the action, yet it isn't
sufficient for the amount of time wait-
ing for it
Themtviehasnowomen(butthe
See Trespass page 11
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
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For information and reservations contact:
Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
757-4788





�WL'jU
n.i'jra Tilt"
MMa-HMM
tO 77itf fas Carolinian
JANUARY 14, 1993
Williams' performance unmagical
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
rtr
Toys is a new movie starring
1 Robin Williams. He plays a
toyrnakernarned Leslie Zevo who
tries to save a toy factory from the
dutches of his evil uncle (Michael
Gambon).
Toys was directed by Barry
tevinson, who had previously di-
reeled Diner, Rainman, Avalon and
nancHhernxniestaiTingRobinWiIl-
4 jams called Good Morning Vietnam.
Thesupportmgcastincludesa
, cameo by Donald O'Connor (re-
'kerrberSingm'mtheRain'sMake
"Em Laugh"?), aremaricably suave
jwfonrianoeby rapper LL Cool J
and another ditzy performance by
banCusack.
The sets in Toys provide strik-
ig visuals. From a giant elephant
c1bmbstone that blows bubbles to a
'toy factory filled with wonderful
inventions, the colors and props
jtfcllate the eyes.
�� With so many attributes then,
3ne has to wonder why Toys is a
Jiisaster of such monumental pro-
portions. It provides absolutely no
Ssntertainment and fails miserable
as a parable of the dangers of mod-
�m technology.
Not since Hocfchasa film upset
jne so completeV- Toys, like Hook,
Jwasanarduouschoretositthrough.
Jjevinson, like Spielberg, seems in-
Sent on showcasing the sets to such
enextentmathepaysnoheedtothe
convoluted, repulsive, superficial
Jtory.
; If viewed separately, like in a
tiagazirestoryorairoviepreview.
the sets appear magical. But in the
context of thisgrim tale of war toys the
sets seem garishly misplaced. The
bright colors belie the dark tone of the
film.
RcWnWilliams'jokesseemasmis-
placed as the toys. He blithely drops
glib one-liners while his life is falling
apart He might have been funny if
only he were not so pitiful.
Instead of evoking laughter, his
inappropriate repartee pains the
viewer. The effect of these jokes is to
paint the director as a sadist, inflicting
pain on the character and also on the
viewer.
The story is a simple one. The
head of Zevo Toys, Kenny Zevo
(Ionald O'Connor) dies and wills the
toy factory to his militaristic brother,
Leland (Gambon).
Leland gets the idea to create war
toys thatare real�thatis they fire real
ammunition He hires his son Patrick
(LL. Cool).) to head the security divi-
sion and scon most of the factory be-
comes a highly restricted area.
Kenny Zero's children, Leslie
(Robin William) and Alsatia (Joan
Cusack), watch helplessly as their
father's factory is overrun. They won-
der why Dad would have left the toy
factory to his brother. (It would seem
that Kenny Zevo had no more sense
than these filmmakers.)
Toys is a jumbled mess of ideas
and characters. Not much in this film
makes sense.
Near the end of the film, for ex-
ample, Patrick decides to help Leslie
tiytogetthefactorybackNowPatrick,
remember,is the head of security. Yet,
Patrick does not see a tiny elephant
with a camera in his trunk spying on
himashe tells Leslie aliabouttheplans
Leland has for the war toys.
The music in this film is awful.
Even when the songs are supposed to
behappy,toshowhowhappy factory
lifeisbeforeLelardanives,tr-eysound
menacing. And when themuskshould
be menacing it sounds hollow. The
cacopbxriythatpassesfora sound track
isoreofthemostblatantlyawfullhave
ever heard.
The most bothersome aspect of
Toysis themismatchof moodsenconv
passed within the film's fabric
ToystriestofocusonLeland'swar
obsession and Leslie's innocence. Yet
toere is an inappropriate scene where
Patrick and his girlfriend are kissing
passkratelywhensherevealsthatshe
has been sleeping with Leland. The
scene is played as neither comedy nor
drama�she could have been telling
Patrick that his socks did not match.
Theoperungsequencewithdane-
ers pirouetting around a snow cov-
ered stage seemshopelessly misplaced
� like Levinson shot the scene for
another movie but decided to use it in
this one.
Thepinnadeofthispiteousfilmis
the slow motion used during the cli-
mactic confrontation between Leslie
and Leland. While listening to grating
musicand watching the grainyslowed
down images disgrace the screen, one
will feelasifheorsheisina horror
movie
Hctrorisanappropriateadjective
to describe my reaction to Toys. This
film should be avoided. Do not ever
botherwiththevideo(which will prob-
ably be out in three month judging
from it pitiful box-officeperformance).
Just say no!
The end of the "Murphy movie" era
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
"Entertainment Weekly" re-
cently ran a cover story on Eddie
Murphy. The question they posed
was: "Has Eddie still got it?"
Murphy'snewest film, The Dis-
tinguished Gentleman, may not give
a definitive answer but it does
present convincing evidence mat
Eddie still has "it The "it " in
question just needs to be clarified.
Murphy no longer seems to
have the assured confidence he once
possessed. Hiscockiness has faded
and so has his edge.
Judging from Murphy's recent
films, character like Axle Foley
(Beverly Hills Cop) and Billy Ray
Valentine (Trading Places)wiHneveT
again be seen. Because Murphy has
tasted too many bitter fruits or
maybe because he is maturing
(which, in this case, is not meantas
a compliment) he no longer infuses
his character with the gritty self-
assurance that propelled him early
in his career. Murphy has mel-
lowed.
In Distinguished Gentleman,
Murphy plays Thomas Jefferson
Johnson, a con artist who decides
to run for Congressman. He wins
the seat solely on his name.
Johnson takes hiscon team with
him to Washington to serve as his
staff. He figures to make a fortune
by voting the way lobbyists pay
him to vote. Of course, Johnson
soon learns that there is more to life
than money and that his position
brings with ita lot of responsibility.
The cliched script does not
dwell on Johnson's conversion but
instead spends time developing a
host of supporting characters led
by Joe Don Baker, a shady busi-
nessman and Lane Smith, a shady
congressman.
Grant Shaud (Miles Silverberg
on "Murphy Brown"), Sheryl Lee
Ralph, Victoria Rowell, Kevin
McCarthy (the star of the original
"invasion of the Body Snatchers")
and Charles Dutton (the title rove
in the television's "Roc") also pro-
vide quality support.
The pace of Distinguished
Gentleman must be credited to
Jonathan Lynn, the director. Hehas
a- .innate sense of timing, knowing
just how long to carry out a joke
and just how much seriousness is
needed so that the story can move
alongwithoutbecomingawkward.
Lynn won much respect with
one of last year's sleeper hits, My
Cousin Vinny. In mat film, like in
Distinguished Gentleman, he deftly
navigated the treacherous terrain
of comedy�making jokes while
not being offensive and tackling
romance with a light, deft touch.
One of the funniest sequences
in the movie occurs when a lobby-
ist tries to convince Congressman
Johnson that semi-automatic weap-
ons should be legalized. Johnson
goes duck hunting with a group of
hunters using these weapons and
the expressions on Johnson's face
evokes memories of the old Eddie
Murphy who could make people
laugh with a smirk.
Unfortunately Murphy now
relies on able direction, a decent
script and a good supporting cast.
Murphy's best films also had
these three ingredients but one
felt that Murphy could succeed
even without them. Now
Murphy is just an actor. He no
longer commands the attention
he once did. Hecan still be funny
but he is no longer a centerpiece.
Will thereever beanother "Eddie
Murphy" movie?
When a film is referred to as
an "Eddie Murphy movie" or an
"Arnold Schwarzenegger
movie" it means that the main
reason that particular film was
made and the main reason to see
it is because of the star.
Recently A Few Good Men
has been referred to as a 'Tom
Cruise movie This is entirely
inappropriate. Critics and
movie-goersneed tobejudidous
in their labels. AFewGoodMen is
a court-room drama with a ter-
rific ensemble cast based on a
powerful play and is expertly
directed. It is not a Tom Cruise
movie, it is a movie in which
Tome Cruise stars.
The point may be small but
is is irksome since many film
goers may be turned off by the
label. They may expect a Top
Gun (which was a "Tom Cruise
movie").
So I reiterate that there will
probably be no more "Eddie
Murphy movies Because
Murphy is no longer a superstar
with the charisma to carry a film,
there will only be movies which
star Eddie Murphy in the future.
I, for one, lament the loss of
"Eddie Murphy movies
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11 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 14, 1993
Who's There?
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
THIS WEEKEND
ATTIC
THURSDAY
HEADSTONE CIRCUS
FRIDAY
ECU NEW YEARS PARTY
SATURDAY
CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD
FIZZ
THURSDAY
KEEL - acoustic guitar
FRIDAY
COLD SWEAT
SATURDAY
AMSTERDAM
CROCKS
THURSDAY
DOLLAR NIGHT
FRIDAY
BREED 13
PANDORA'S LUNCHBOX
SATURDAY
DOOLITTLE
CORRIGANS
THURSDAY
THE ESSENCE
SATURDAY
MOTHER NATURE
COMPILED BY DANA DANIELSON
HAPPY'S
POOL
ROOM
752-6728
Across From U.B.E
32 oz. BUD DRAFT $2.00
Tuesday $1.00 Do. nt sties All Day
Wednesday Night is LADIES NIGHT
Ladies Play for FREE All Night
Pantana Bob's
ECU'S Original Home Of
EVERTHING IS A DOLLAR NIGHT!
This Sunday, January 18, 1993
EVERYTHING IS A DOLLAR!
a private club for members and invited guests guests only
f)XVl 1:K
DAN'
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, Collectables,
Antiques, Furniture
"Where Lost
Memories
Are Found
417 Evans St Mall
Downtown
752-1750
BUY � SELL � TRADE
SLTe
"KEEP THE DREAM ALIVE
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee
presents its
ANNUAL DR. MARTIN
LUTHER KING, JR.
CANDLELIGHT MARCH
Monday, January 18, 1993
7:00 PM
Starting at Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium
East Carolina University
Everyone is welcome
H
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN BEING A
FUTURE BUSINESS LEADER, THEN PHI
BETA LAMBDA IS THE ANSWER FOR YOU!
The members of Phi Beta Lambda organization are holding an
open house for business oriented young adults. Come by the
I General College Building on Tuesday. January 19th at 4:00pm
in Room 2014 to find out how to get a step on tomorrow today.
Advantages of membership are:
- Development of leadership skills
- Meeting today's top executives
- Attending business conferences
- Building voui resume
Business school not required
No minimum G.RA.
Refresh ments Available

jp?:
Trespass
Continued from page 9
gangmembersamstantlyrefertneach
other as'Tjitoh'someonethcxightthat
was fair) but t' actors are farriliar
with this genre of film and work the
material well. Bill Paxton played
Hudson,the frantic marine in Aliens.
Sandier played the lead terrorist in Die
Hard II. Ice-Tand Ice Cube,who plays
James's right-hand man, have made
careers of off playing their characters
in rap and in New Jack City and Boyz 'N
the Hood.
Ice-T is the standout Combining
collected leadershipand charisma with
prideand anger, Jamesisacharged-up
personality.Hecfomiratesthecastand
gains the audience's confidence. As a
result, he becomes the "good guy" of
the film and the one to root for. He's
intelligent and righteous, seeing the
firemen as a symbol of all white men
intmclinginhisbusinessaffairsThe
white man makes thedrugs, gives i t to
us, buys it from us, and then puts us in
jail for selling it he raves. The script
presents James as a stereotype, Ice-T
makes it more.
Trespass isa good attemptatusing
recenteventsasabackdropforadassic
moral story. However, it doesn't pull
its elements together and theaudience
is left with just another shoot-em-up
that even the cast can't save.
Music
Continued from page 9
however, he can't prove he ever had
a product (even after eleven songs)
and, asaresult,the record isn'tworth
buying, even bargain-bin style.
Maybe Serch should have
sampled more from other artists, af
used live instruments (see Beastie
Boys, Brand New Heavies) instead
of programmed drums and synths.
In Serch's rap on "Hits the
Head he unknowingly reveals the
reason why his record stinks: "I ain't
got no DJ, but that's all right1 ain't
got no dancers, but that's all rightI
ain'tgotnochoir,butthaf sail right
All I got left is the mic
Too conscious of differentiating
himself from bogus nofhip-hopsters
such as Hammer et al, Serch misses
an essential ingredient to good hip-
hop: open mindedness. How can
rap as a viable pop music genre not
progress without variety, without
deviance, without experiment?
Bystickingtooclosetoold-school
ethic and stilted lyrics too quick to
criticize, and probably written out of
paranoia ofbeingdissed themselves,
Serch isolateshisartistTy and plagues
his songs with a no-grow, conserva-
tive brand of rap: just the thing hip-
hop needs to leave behind. Send this
product back to the manufacturer.
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Would like to Welcome
New & Returning Students
and Invite You to Join Us In Worship
SPRING SEMESTER
CAMPUS MASS SCHFm IT ,F
Sundays at 11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the Newman Center
Wednesday 5:30 pm at the Newman Center
followed by a fellowship meat
953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
757-0376 757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
For more information about these and other programs sponsored by the Newman Center,
call or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am & 11 pm.
Introducing our
new "Captain's Catch"
Fish Sandwich.
It's a real fish filet on a multigrain bun, with cheese,
lettuce and our own special dill tartar sauce. Try one today.
SUPER SENIOR WEDNESDAY
ANY DINNER � O 9 Q
Plus Free Drink "O
(Excludes Platter and Parks!
lAGt 60 & OVER
KIDS EAT FREE
ON THURSDAY
Kids 12 & younger. Limit 2
with each adult dinner at reg
price Dining room only.
SEAFOOD
626 South
Memorial Drive
758-6761
STEVE BRILEYS
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER
Estimates Given First
3140-H Mosely Drive
behind Parker's Barbecue on Greenville Blvd.
752-5043
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��� III!
mtmmmmmmmmm
12 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 14. 1993
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
FUN FOR ALL
SPRING 1993
ALL FOR FUN.
EZi
EIGHT ROOMS
CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM
Mon-Thurs6:45pm-9:00pm
Friday6:45pm-6:00pm
Saturday12noon-5:00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
GARRETT & AYCOCK HALLS
Mon-Thurs1:00pm-8:00pm
Friday1:00pm-5:00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
MINGES COLISEUM
Mon & Wed2:00pm-8:00pm
Tues & Thurs2:30pm-8:00pm
Friday2:00pm-5:00pm
WIMMING POOLS
CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM
MonWedFri6:30am-8:30am
Tues & Thurs6:30am-8:00am
Mon-Fri11:30am-1:30pm
Mon-Thurs3:00pm-6:30pm
Friday3:00pm-6:00pm
Saturday12noon-5:00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
MINGES COLISEUM
MonWedFri7:30pm-9:00pm
Tues & Thurs6:00pm-8:00pm
Sunday2:00pm-5:00pm
?
s.v.p.
YMNASIUM
CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM
MonWedFri12noon-l :00pm
Mon & Wed3:00pm-6:30pm
Tues & Thurs4:00pm-6:30pm
Friday3:00pm-6:00pm
Saturday12noon-5:00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
Drop-in Volleyball begins at 5pm
QUIPMENT CHECK OUT
115 CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM
Mon-Th urs10:00am-9:00pm
Friday10:00am-6:30pm
Saturday12noon-5:30pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:30pm
ACQUETBALL COURTS
Reservations can be made in person at 115
Chrlstenbury Gymnasium or by calling
757-6911. Court reservations are mace
one day in advance Monday-Thursday,
Reservations are made on Friday for
Saturday, Sunday & Monday. Courts may
be reserved in person from
11:30am-3:00pm and from 12 to 3:00pm
by phone.
AIN CHECK HOTLINE
Call 757-6443 for information regarding
game rain-outs and holidayspecial
campus facility closings.
dventure trips
DOWNHILL SKIING
SPRING BREAK ADVENTURE
BEACH HORSEBACK RIDING
CANOEING DAY TRIP
BACKPACKING
CLIMB & CAMP
JANUARY 23-24
MARCH 6-1 3
MARCH 21
MARCH 27
APRIL 2-4
APRIL 16-18
Registration for all spring adventure trips and workshops begin
lanuary 13. Pre-registration is required. Call 757-6387 for details.
LIMBING PROGRAM
She's just about to make the crux move, 25 feet of
air below her, balancing her weight delicately so as
not to swing free from the structure. Sh.e slowly
reaches her left foot up to hip height and makes the
foothold. Solid. She thrusts her right hand upward,
grasps the edge of the last hold and
knuckles on to victory! A scream of confidence and joy,
"Yahoo reviberates from the tower wall. The climbers
below applaud as she descends.
She made it.
ow to get started
If you have never climbed before, you must
participate in a Climbing I workshop before
eligibility is received to purchase a Drop-In
Supervised Climbing Pass.
lAforkshops
CLIMBING I WORKSHOP DATES:
FEBRUARY 9 & 1 8; MARCH 18 & 24; APRIL 7
CLIMBING II WORKSHOP DATES:
MARCH 31; APRIL 15
Urop-in pass prices
Day Pass
$1.00 for students
$2.00 for facultystaffguest
Semester Pass
$25.00 for students
$35.00 for facultystaffguest
Passes may be purchased in 204 Christenbury
Gvmnasium Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm
after you receive climber eligibility.
Drop-in climbing hours
Wednesday
Friday
Sunday
3:00pm-5:00pm
3:00pm-5:00pm
1:00pm-4:00pm
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
VITALITY PLAN
FITNESS CLASSES
REGISTRATION DATES
JANUARY 19-22
SESSION DATES
JANUARY 25-MARCH 4
COSTS PER SESSION
$10STUDENTS
S20FACULTYSTAFFSPOUSE
COSTS PER DROP-IN
$5 FOR 5 CLASSESSTUDENTS
$10FACULTYSTAFFSPOUSE
FITNESS FIZZICAL
This service is FREE to all ECU
students. The Fitness Fizzicals
Program assesses body
composition, cardiovascular
endurance, muscular strength &
endurance, flexibility and blood
pressure. Results help in
formulating a personalized plan for
improving and maintaining
optimal fitness with testing
conducted by the Human
Performance Lab. (M-T-Th-F from
1-5pm). Appointments and
wellness information may be
obtained during hours of
operation Monday-Thursday from
3:00pm-5:00pm in 107ACG. $15
for facultystaff.
BEGINNING WEIGHT
TRAINING WORKSHOP
Held February 2 & 4 from 8-10pm in
Christenbury Weight Room. Register in 204
Christenbury Gym from January 25-February
3. $3 for students and $5 for
facultystaffdependent. Participants learn
beginning weight training techniques applied
to Fixed and free weight equipment.
CLUB PED
Club Ped is a walking club for teams of four.
Individuals passing various 'mileposts and
accomplish goals established during
registration become eligible for awards.
Residence hall groups, departmental offices,
Greeks and all campus organizations are
encouraged to enter groups. Pick up your
"Walking Papers" when you register
beginning January 11 in 204 Cnristenbury
Gym. Co-Sponsored by Recreational Services
and the Office of Health Promotion &
Well-Being.
COMMIT-TO-FITNESS
CLUB
Participants receive 3 points for each 12 hour
of aerobic activity and hour of anaerobic
activity. If you climb, walk, swim, lift weights,
play basketball, or are involved in any other
form of fitness routine, you're eligible to sign
up. Members who reach 150 points during
the 14 week program are eligible for t-shirt
awards. Work out on your own and you're a
winner To get more information and sign-up
for the program, drop by 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium.
�W
-
Beginning March 16 the Tower will be open
one hour later than above schedule.
dventure workshops
WINDSURFING I
ALL TERRAIN BIKING
TAR RIVER CLEAN UP
FEBRUARY 25 AT 7PM
IN CG POOL
MARCH 20 AT
10:30AM AT CG 117
APRIL 23 AT 2PM AT
CG 117
Registration for all spring workshops begin lanuary 1 3.
Pre-registration is required 24 hours before workshop date.
��
For information regarding these programs or other services offered by ECU Recreational Services come by 204 Christenbury Gymnasium or call 757-6387.





H
The East Carolinian
January 14, 1993
Sports
Page 13
Jesse Jackson issues demand to baseball owners
GRAPEVINE, Texas (AP) � Base-
ball owners have heard what the Rev.
Jesse Jackson has to say. Now they must
decide what to do.
Jackson presented his 14-point
agenda at a major league meeting Tues-
day, called on current players to join his
campaign for the integration of front
offices and threatened boycotts if teams
don't develop affirmative action plans.
"The problems Rev. Jackson dis-
cussed will not be solved in one night or
season Texas Rangers owner George
W. Bush said. "But I think his purpose
was to make sure the consciousness of
the decision-makers was aroused
Milwaukee Brewers owner Bud
Selig, chairman of the ruling executive
council, called Jackson's speech reasoned
and said he and National League presi-
dent Bill White � who is black � will
formulate baseball's reply expeditiously.
"He made a constructive and sensi-
tive presentation this morning, and one
that we will respond (to) with the dig-
nity it deserves Selig said, declining to
give specifics.
Jackson, accompanied by a delega-
tion that included the Rev. Al Sharpton,
spoke to owners for about 45 minutes.
Jackson had a short conversation with
Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott,
who made a surprise appearance at the
meeting but didn't speak during it, ac-
cording to Selig. Alleged racial remarks
attributed to Schott renewed debate last
fall about baseball's hiring practices.
"She has done grave injury to our
society and to the game of baseball
Jackson said at a news conference. "She
must be removed or suspended from
baseball, at the least, for a period of time.
She must be fined and she must be reha-
bilitated
In other business:
�The teams unani mously approved
tr- B sale of the San Francisco Giants from
Bob Lurie to a group headed by Safeway
Inc. chairman Peter Magowan.
� The executive council appointed
an eight-person search committee for a
commissioner to replace Fay Vincent,
who quit under pressure Sept. 7. On the
committee are Jackie Autry of Califor-
nia, Bill Bartholomay of Atlanta, Paul
Beeston of Toronto, Douglas Danforth of
Pittsburgh, Fred Kuhlmann of St. Louis,
Carl Pohlad of Minnesota, Haywood
Sullivan of Boston and Fred Wilpon of
the New York Mets.
� Beeston and Wilpon gave an in-
terim report from the committee restruc-
turing the commissioner's job. Selig said
"
he hoped for a final report in 2-
to-6 weeks.
� John Harrington of the
Red Sox reported on surveys
of fan reception to the possibil-
ity of expanded playoffs. Selig
said the matter wouldn't be
addreesed in depth until at
least March.
Jackson said his exchange
with Schott wasn't too signifi-
cant and that his concern was a
broader effort to increase minority hir-
ing of all professional sports teams, col-
leges and sports media. Schott is to an-
swer the allegations in a Jan. 22 meeting
with the ruling executive council.
"To keep focus on her and to martyr
her would be to takeaway focus from the
real problem in athletics Jackson said.
"We're moving on beyond that
She (Marge Schott) must
be removed or suspended
from baseball, at the least,
for a period of time. She must
be fined and she must be
rehabilitated
The Rev. Jesse Jackson
Jackson proposed that White, whose
term as NL president expires in March,
be considered for commissioner and sug-
gested Hank Aaron as another possibil-
ity
White repeated that he wasn't inter-
ested. "I'veconveyed that toeveryone in
the world White said.
Thompson takes control of her ship
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU Women's basketball
team is preparing for its first con-
ference game when it travels to
James Madison Friday to meet the
Lady Dukes. The Lady Pirates are
looking for a tough game against
JMU, who has a 5-1 record while
playingathome. Head CoachRosie
Thompson said that the team'sdis-
appointing 74-60 loss to Coppin
State on Jan. 9 would offer little
indication on how the team would
fare against James Madison.
"We felt real good going into
the Coppin State game Thomp-
son said. "But we just could not
shoot the ball at all, and that was
realdisarpcmtingconsideringhow
hard we played Despite the
Coppin State setback, Thompson
said she is sure that the Lady Pi-
rates will be an exciting and unpre-
dictable team in the CAA.
"As far as the conference is
concerned, its pretty wide-open,
even though(inthepre-season)we
were predicted to finish second in
the conferencewe're just seeing
how the other teams have played,
how they've performed against
some of the competition we've
played, its going to be one of those
things thatyou'renot going toknow
whaf s going to happen until the
very end. Butatleastwith theexpe-
rience on our team because they
know what it takes to win, and
because they all get along great
we should do real well, but it all
will depend on how well we shoot
and how aggressive we are on de-
fense Thompson also believes the
chemistry she has seen in her team
will be a great help to them in their
conference play, partial larlyin the
unselfishness they show on the of-
fensive side of the ball.
Pnoio by Dai! Rwd
Where's the 'D Guard Toina Coley may be the best defensive player
in the CAA. She is leading the conference in steals with 4.1 per game.
"Up to this point we've had
five people in double figures, that's
the average. We're definitely not
shy about passing the ball to any-
body and we love to run
Thompson said that the play of
Gaynor CDonnell has helped the
Pirate offense tremendously.
OTJonnell, a foreign student
from Merseyside, England, leads
the nation in assists per game, with
1025. She already holds ECU's ca-
reer assists record with 615. While
O'Donnell leads the passing attack,
her backcourt mate Toina Coley has
proven herself a defensive force to
be reckoned with.
Coley, a 5-7 senior guard, is
averaging 4.1 steals a game and
according to Thompson can effec-
tively guard anyone,no matter what
height advantage they may have.
Anybody who's on the perim-
eter, regardless of how big they
arc.if they're their best outside
shooter Toina usually gets the as-
signment. She sort of expects that
now, I guess Thompson said.
When talking about the Lady
Pirates' scoring capabilities, Thomp-
son turns immediately to 6-1 center
Rhonda Smith. Smith, plagued by a
knee injury since last season, is cur-
rently second in theC AA in scoring,
averaging 163 points per game, and
is third in rheconference in rebound-
ing.
"Rhonda is a big factor prob-
ably because of the fact that she's 6-
lshe's real strong and has a real
nice shooting touch. Whenever she
gets in foul trouble everyone else
has to pick it up a notch to make ui
for the size we lose inside
Thompson said that one thing
that helps her relate to her players is
the fact that she
has travelled
the same road
as they are on
now. Thomp-
son was a Lady
Pirate from
1975-1980 and
is the only fe-
male player
ever to have a
jersey retired at
East Carolina. Thompson is ECU's
all time leading scorer and
rebounder and holds the East Caro-
lina record for single season scoring.
Thompson feels her past successes
at ECU give her players something
to relate to.
"I think that the players, when
we ask them to do something can
say, 'Hey she's at least done this
before.U I think those things help a
great deal
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
Rosie Thomp-
son
�ECU football will openagainstSyracuse on ESPN. The game has
been moved back toThursday,Sept. 9,fromSaturday,Sept. 11 for the
telecast.
"That certainly speaks well for the rapid growth of our program
at a national level. It's exciting for our players, students and fans. We
look forward to having ESPN back in Greenville East Carolina
athletic director Dave Hart told reporters.
Last season, ESPN broadcast the East Carolina-Southern Missis-
sippi contest, the first-ever live national telecast from Greenville. The
Pirates' ship sank, 38-21, causing many fans to believe ECU would
never appear on national television igain.
It is a good thing the Orangemen had such a successful season.
The Bucs opened and closed their 1991 season on ESPN. ECU has
appeared on six national telecasts in its football history.
� The ECU football team received verbal commitments from J.H.
Rose's Dante Randolph and Sarasota (Ha.) Cardinal Mooney's John
Peacock. Peacock played linebacker, wide receiver and fullback butis
likely to see action at linebacker for the Bucs. Peacock runs a 459 40-
yard dash and bench presses 375 pounds.
� ECU may need Peacock on both sides of
the ball next season. Although unconfirmed,
' linebacker Tony Davis and wide receiver Dia
Hicks are rumored to be ineligible for next
season. Athletic Director Dave Hart and Head
football coach Steve Logan will not be available
to confirm or deny the rumor until sometime
next week.
� The ECU men's basketball team is the
parent of a six-game loosing streak (all on the
road and two in overtime). The Pirates' offense
is like a donut�there is nothing in the middle.
Opposing defenses can feast on the outside shooters and not
worry about ECU pounding the ball in the paint Proof positive is the
combined shooting of Lester Lyons, Ronnell Peterson, "Ice" Kareem
Richardson, and Anton Gill. In the first five games they combined to
shoot 51 percent In the last six games they have fallen to 37 percent
Forward James Lewisand swing-man Curley Youngare theonly
Pirates shooting over 50 percent for the season.
Tony Davis
See ROW page 18
Football cham-
pionship may
become reality
BOSTON (AP) � The executive direc-
tor of the NCAA reportedly will call for
consideration of a one-game champion-
ship playoff in Division 1-A college foot-
ball, which would be played after all the
bowl games.
Dick Schultz was expected to suggest
the playoff system in his annual "State of
the NCAA" speech today in Dallas, The
Boston Globe reported.
While Schultz cannot force the mem-
bership to adopt the plan, he will suggest
the schools consider it as a way to generate
more money in the same manner as the
NCAA basketball tournament.
The idea of a college football champi-
onship playoff has been around for years,
bui has met stiff opposition from the bowl
games.
Coachesand collegeaclministratorsalso
have generally opposed playoffs, arguing
they didn't want to extend the season any
further.
The extra revenue, however, could be
attractive to athletic directors who must
deal with rising costs and the implementa-
tion of more women's programs to meet
certain requirements.
This year, the No. 1 and No. 2 ranked
teams met in the Sugar Bowl, with second -
ranked Alabama defeating Miami for the
rational title.Butsuchmatch-upshave been
rare.
ECUvs.JM
ECU
(82)
Min
James 2
Lyons 28
Richardson 18
Hunter 26
Young 14
Peterson 35
Gill 33
Toliver 1
fgftrb
m-am-ao-ta
0-10-00-00
4-135-7M1
5-62-21-20
6-110-01-51
1-32-20-01
5-170-00-14
7-112-21-40
0-0o-o04)0
pf
1
5
5
4
3
3
4
1
tP
0
14
13
13
4
12
16
0
Lewis
10 1-2 0-2
Copeland 33 3-6 2-2
1-2
6-10
Totals 200 32-7013-17 12-31 7 31 82
Percentages: FG - .457, Ft. 765, 3 pt. Goals: 5-24 -
.208, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots - 0,
Turnovers - 12, Steals - 8.
James Madison(98)
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-taPftp
Robinson 100-01-20-2021
McLinton 80-04-60-0014
Edwards 325-122-20-22215
Venson 40-02-40-2002
Culuko 303-87-70-21216
Davis 213-8 13-14141128
Chambers 351-39-100-52211
Carter 314-44-50-31313
Ritter 294-60-01-5108
Totals 200 24-4142-50 3-28 8 13 98
Percentages: FG - .585, Ft. 840, 3 pt. Goals: 8-15 -
333, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots -5,
Turnovers - 16, Steals - 6.
1st half
2nd half OT
Final
ECU
JMU
38
46
44
52
82
98
JMU sinks
Pirates' ship,
98-82
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU Pirate basketball squad,
trying to break a five-game losing streak,
fell once again, 98-82, to a powerful James
Madison squad.
The loss furthered the Pirate skid to
six in a row.
The Pirates trailed for most of the
game, as stellar first-half performances
from JMU guards Bryan Edwards and
Kent Culuko buried the Pirates.
Edwards and Culuko, sporting 10
first-half points each, were backed up by
the rebounding of forward Clayton Ritter
as he snatched down five boards in the
first period.
Despite the productivity of Pirate
guards Ronnell Peterson and Anton Gill
with eight points each, the Dukes ended
the half enjoying an eight-point
advantage
When play resumed in the second
half, the Dukes pulled further ahead of
the Pirates after they began committing
costly fouls. The Dukes hit 36 of 44 sec-
ond-half free throws to offset a 13-point
performance by Pirate guard Lester
Lyons.
The Pirates, after the final seconds
elapsed. sUxxl 4-6 on the season, won-
dering when their bad luck would end.
Richmond
ECU (65)
MinfRftrb
m-am-ao-taPftp
Hunter 274-80-12-5209
GUI 324-91-30-6139
Copeland 31 Lyons 255-11 6-100-1 3-57-11 0-11 44 410 16
Peterson 366-110-01-22415
Jones 70-10-00-0000
Richardson 211-50-00-0233
Young 7 ' ewis 141-2 0-10-0 1-20-1 1-30 22 12 1
Totals 20027-55-1212-30142165
Percentages: FG - .466, Ft. 417, 3 pt. Goals: 6-21 -
.286, Team Rebounds - 1, Blocked Shots -1,
Turnovers - 16, Steals - 7.
Richmond(74)
Minftftrb
m-am-ao-taPfP
Fleming 214-71-20-10311
Wood 385-122-22-102113
Metzger 202-52-21-3026
Jarmon 397-113-40-13219
Burroughs 362-45-70-5749
Weaver 50-00-11-1010
Weathers 185-70-01-21112
Springer 191-1243-7234
Hodges 40-00-01-1200
Totals 200 26-4715-22 9-34 17 17 74
Percentages: FG - .553, Ft. 682, 3 pt. Goals: 7-11 -
.636, Team Rebounds - 3, Blocked Shots - 2,
Turnovers - 14, Steals - 5
1st half
2nd half OT
Final
ECU
Richmond
M
34
35
40
65
74
Lemieux
stalled by
Hodgkin's
PITTSBURGH (AP) � Mario
Lemieux's career has been part triumph
and part tragedy, replete with scoring
titles and Stanley Cup championships,
but also with repeated medical setbacks.
Still, neither the Pittsburgh Penguins
nor the NHL were prepared for this stun-
ning news: Lemieux, hockey's predomi-
nate and highest-paid star, has cancer.
Lemieux, the NHL's leading scorer,
already may have started four to five
weeks of radiation treatment for
Hodgkin's disease, a usually treatable
form of cancer that attacks the lymph
nodes.
Lemieux, 27, was diagnosed in the
early stages of the disease after a large
lymph node was removed from his neck,
according to a statement approved Tues-
day by team physician Dr. Charles Burke.
The disease is confined to the abnor-
mal lymph node, and subsequent tests
have shown no evidence of any other
problems, the doctor said. The Penguins
said Lemieux could resume playing in
four to six weeks, though doctors said
those projections seem overly optimistic.
"I don't know what more that guy is
going to have to go through Penguins
winger Troy Loney said. "1 just feel for
him. I couldn't care less vhen he comes
See Lemieux pageAb





14
The East Carolinian
JANUARY 14, 1993
AFC teams have slim chance of
winning Super Bowl XXVII
(AP)�Think about it. For all the
infusion those Roman numerals a re
supposed to create, Super Bowl
WV11 isstill some three weeks aw, v
and everybody already knows the
"i ginning, middle and even the end.
Kickoff.
Halftime show.
NFC celebration.
That, at least, has been prettv
much the scenario for each of the last
n;ht Super Bowls, and 10 of the last
11. And it will be repeated Jan. 31,
when the National Football Confer-
ence representative will run away
from its American Football Confer-
ence counterpart h a score approxi-
mating 37-16 (or XWYII-Wh.One
other thing: The game will be a
mi ooze.
The Super Bowl has become so
predictable that even the British
bookies, whose X'FL handle is about
the same as test cricket in Vegas, got
the line right on the first try.
They pegged NFC entries San
Francisco at 6-5 and Dallas at 2-1;
AFC entries Miami and Buffalo were
both at 5-1.
It shouldn't be that easy. The
conferences draw talent from the
same labor and management pools,
they play by the same rules, they
even share most of the same
accountants. And yet, the same side
always wins.
So what gives?
Well, unless one of the players
on either side in this year's "ulti-
mate" game has the "ultimate" an-
swer, debate on this issue could eas-
ily stretch into the next century.
For a while, AFC people insisted
that it was simply a "cyclical thing
But they've been spinning so bad
forso long that it'salmost impossible
to find anyone who can stand still
long enough to take the question.
The NFC version, meanwhile,
has been handed down from locker
room to locker room with such non-
chalance wear after year that you
can't tel 1 f r su re whether the play-
ers who mouth it genuinely be-
lieve it.
Here it is anyway: bigger, as
in team sizes; better, as in the cali-
ber of defenses; and battle-tested,
by the competition they play regu-
larly. And there might be some-
thing to it.
Heading into last weekend,
the four remaining NFC teams in-
cluded the winners of four of the
last five Super Bowls.
And it was hardlv coincidence
that three ot them called the NFC
East home, where the big and bad
meet to sort things out nearly ev-
ery week T the season. It
makes for ornery survivors.
Moments after
Washington's humiliation of
Buffalo in last year's Super
Bowl, someone asked the
Redskin Ron Middleton the
NFC-AFC question.
"I ought to know a little
bit about it because I played
in both he began "But I can't
put a finger on it
The fact was, Middleton's
6-foot-2, 270-pound frame,
with most of a season's worth
of bruises intact, spoke vol-
umes about the difference.
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CBy Invitation OnCy
FITNESS CLASS INFORMATION
Registration Dates
January 19-22
Cost per Session
$10.00 Students
$20.00Faculty Staff Spouse-
Session Dates
January 25-March 4
Cost per Drop-in Class
S3.00 for 5 classesStudents
$ 10.00FacultyStaffSpouse
Choose from Aerobics, STEP, Low impact, Hi Lo, Funk, Belly Busters,
Aquarobics, Hi Lo STEP, Power STEP, Super STEP and Toning. Pick up
a spring class schedule with times, days, location and instructor infor-
mation in 204 Christenbury Gym and register from 9:00am-5:00pm.
Faculty, Staff Exercise Wisely
Offered each Mon Wed and Fri from 12:05 12:55pm in 108
Christenbury Gymnasium for $10.00 each semester. Please pay prior to
participation in 204 CG.
Beginning
Weight
Training
Workshops
Held February 2 & from 8:00-
10:00pm in Christenbury Weight
Room. Register in 204
Christenbury' Gym from January
25-February 3 Cost is S3.00 for
students & $500 for faculty staff
dependent
Fitness Fizzicals
FREE to all ECU students. The Fitness Fizzicles Pro-
gram assesses body composition, cardiovascular
endurance, muscular strength, flexibility and blood
pressure. Results help in formulating a personal-
ized plan for improving and maintaining optimal
fitness with testing conducted by the Human Perfor-
mance Lab (M-T-Th-F l-5pm). Appointments and
wellness information may be obtained during hours
of operation Monday Thursday from 3:00pm-
5:30pm. $15 for faculty and staff.
Commit-To-Fitness Club
The Commit-To-Fitness Club is an individual self-directed fitness activity program
based on accumulating points through exercise. Participants receive three points
each half hour of aerobic activity and each full hour of continuous anaerobic
activity. Members who reach 150 points during the 14 week program are eligible
for a Commit-To-Fitness t-shitt award. Participants may work out at times and
locations based on personal preference.
Spring Fitness Class Highlights
Supra Hi-Lo STEP
Early Bird Fitness
MonWedFri 6:30am-7:30am
Getting Started in Fitness
MonWed 3:00pm-4:00pm
Club Fed is a FREE walking club for teams of
four. Individuals passing various 'mile posts"
and accomplishing goals established during
registration become eligible for awards. Resi
dence hall groups, departmental offices,
Greeks and all campus organizations are en-
couraged to enter groups. Individuals may
enter and be placed within a group if so
desired. Get your "Walking Papers" at regis-
tration beginning January 11 in 204
Christenbury Gym or at the Office of Health
Promotion & Well Being.
iclt,





��i i
15 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 14. 1993





��
8
1
I
49ers' Holt was a Dallas fan
SANTACLARA, Calif. (AP) �
Pierce Holt grew up rcxiting for the
Dallas Cowboys.
In Sunday'sNFCchampionship
game, he'll be digging in against
them as the anchor of the San
Francisco 49ers defensive line.
"I was a big Cowboys fan. Now,
they're just another football team
we have toplay said Holt, i native
of Martin, Texas.
But he admits one Cowboys
player still remains special to him:
Randy White, a standout defensive
tackle for Dallas who retired four
years ago after a 12-year career.
"The guy was my idol. Shoot, I
watched just about every down he
ever played Holt said.
Holt modeled himself after
White's determined brand of play,
and he has emerged as a defensive
force for San Francisco.
"He's one of the best defensive
linemen in football right now San
Franciscocoach George Seifert said,
likening Holt's twisting, relentless
driven in the trenches to the twirling
"Tasmanian Devil" cartoon
character.
Holt, named to the Pro Bowl for
the first time in his five-year career,
had 55 tackles and 5 12 sacks this
season, and his push up the middle
also created opportunities for San
Francisco's outside pass rusher, Ti m
Harris, who had 17 sacks.
"Pierce has been the best player
on this defense by far 49ers
linebacker Michael Walter said.
"You know a lot of times, great
players kind of do their own thing.
They have a lot of leeway as far as
being able to slant. But Tierce plays
within the defense and still makes
great plays
Holt helped the 49ers reach the
title game against Dallas with a
three-sack effort d uring last week's
20-13 victory over Washington in a
divisional playoff. Two of the sacks
came during the Redskins' final
series did come up with three
sacks in that game, but there's
probably games I've played better
in throughout the year Holt said.
"But people are so into the sacks
tha t they probably wouldn't beable
to realize that unless they watched
the game film.
"I approach every game the
same. Makinga tackle isasimportant
to me as getting pressure on the
quarterback, just because every
down is important to me. I try to be
as intense as possible on every
down
Much has been made about the
marquee matchup pitting San
Francisco's top-ranked offense
against Dallas' top-ranked defense.
But the game could very well be
decided by how well Sari Francisco's
defense deals with the Cowboys,
who in many respects are similar to
the 49ers in their offensive
capabilities.
"Stopping Emmitt Smith and
getting pressure on Troy Aikman
are the key s, and that's going to be a
challenge Holt said.
Free agents are key to Cowboys
IRVING, Texas (AP) � Dallas
Cowboys coach Jimmy Johnson
prides himself on knowing the
whprpahmiK nf frpp apwits who
might produce for the NFL team in
an emergency.
Tight end Derek Tennell and
ainning back Derrick Gainer are
two prime examples of how
Johnson's talent network pays off as
both scored touchdowns in the
Cowboys' 34-10NFC playoff victory
over the Philadelphia Eagles.
A season-ending knee injury to
Alfredo Roberts prompted the
Cowboys to sign Tennell, a fifth-
year free agent who played in three
games earlier this season for the
Minnesota Vikings. Hewasplugged
into the Dallas offense only a week
before Sunday's NFC divisional
game, yet was on the receiving end
of a short touchdown pass from
Troy Aikman.
Offensive coordinator Norv
Turner surprised both Aikman and
Tennell by calling the play.
"We had it in the game plan,
but I didn't think we'd call i
Aikman said.
"They put in the play on the
goal line where Troy fakes to Emmitt,
but I really didn't think they would
use it Tennell said. "I was really
surprised.Then I was so wideopen,
I was worried about dropping the
ball
It was Tennell's first touchdown
since 1989, when he scored for the
Cleveland Browns.
Gainer has been with the
Cowboys since Oct. 15 after being
released by the Los Angeles Raiders.
Ga iner, who played at Florida A&M,
scored a touchdown and gained 29
yards on nine carries in relief of
Emmitt Smith on Sunday. Gainer, a
burly 5-foot-ll, 24()-pounder who
was drafted in the eighth round by
the Los Angeles Raiders in 1989,
also played for Cleveland in 1990.
He had 32 carries for 91 yards until
Sunday's game.
"It felt ereat getting into action,
but I knew one thing: I better not
fumble Gainer said.
Gainer got his job because
Curvin Richards was released for
fumbling twice in the season finale
against the Chicago Bears.
"It's just a highlight for me
playing in the NFL again he said.
"I was wondering if I would ever
get play again. You never know
"It's really weird how all this
has worked out said Tennell, who
had a career total of 25 catches for
249 yards before Sunday.
Tennell played at UCLA, where
he was a teammate of Cowboys'
linebacker Ken Norton and safety
James Washington. "Never thought
I'd be here wi th them Tennell said.
"Now we've got a chance to go to
the Super Bowl. Incredible
TONIGHT
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The East Qirolinian is accepting applications for the positions of Circulation
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BIG WEEKEND
THURSDAY
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� -
� �i�j- iiiiiii r n-iia,
16 The East Carolinian
Leimieux
tsummmmmmm
JANUARY 14, 1993
Continued from page 13
back, just that he gets healthy
Hodgkin'sdisease,named for
Thomas Hodgkin, the English phy-
sician who discovered it, is a dis-
ease characterized by the progres-
sive enlargement of the lymph
nodes and inflammation of organs
such as the spleen and liver.
For the Penguins themselves,
it was the second such shocker in
less than 18 months. Coach Bob
Johnson died of brain cancer in
November 1991, just six months
after coaching the Penguins to the
first of theirtwoStanleyCup cham-
pionships.
"It's a pretty scary situation.
We just can't afford to lose people
of his caliber in our game said
Wayne Gretzky, hockey's unques-
tioned star until Lemieux came
into the league in 1985. "He is too
important, he is too talented. It has
got to be frustrating, not only for
him and the Penguins but the
whole NHL.
"More importantly, he has to
worry about his health now. He
has a difficult time ahead of him
Penguins general manager
Craig Patrick was in California,
reportedly meeting with team
owner Howard Baldwin, but is to
return for a news conference Fri-
day that Lemieux will also attend.
A typical treatment for
Hodgkm's consists of five to 10
minutes of radiation five times a
week for four to five weeks.
The fact that Lemieux will un-
dergo radiation therapy is an indi-
cation that doctors found the can-
cer in itsearly stages, said Dr. Den-
nis Meisner, an oncologist at
Shadyside Hospital in Pittsburgh.
Meisner said the Penguins'
contention that the type of
Hodgkin'sdiagnosed in Lemieux's
case is the "most favorable" may
be misleading.
"It is a cancer, and all types of
cancer are very serious Meisner
said. "As a cancer, it can become
life-threatening
If the disease is limited to one
lymph node that was removed, it
is classified as Stage One
Hodgkin's, which has a cure rate
of 95 percent, he said.
Radiation therapy causes fa-
tigue and weight loss, and could
make someone too tired to play
hockey, Meisner said. The cancer
can spread to other parts of the
body, including the bone marrow
and lungs, but usually only if it
goes undetected for a long period.
Until now, Lemieux's frequent
medical problems have been con-
fined mostly to a chronically bad
back.
He was enjoying his most in-
jury-free and successful season un-
til last week, when he again expe-
rienced the back pain that has
forced him to miss more than 100
games the last four seasons.
With 104 points in 40 games,
he was threatening Wayne
Gretzky's NHL scoring record of
216 points until missing the Pen-
guins' last two games.
He won his third NHL scoring
title in five years with 131 points
last season, despite missing 16
games with back-related prob-
lems.
He was limited to 26 games in
1990-91, missing the Penguins' first
50 games after surgery before re-
turning for the Penguins' first
Stanley Cup.
Student Stores
more tnanjustoo�e.
The East Carolinian is an equal oppor-
tunity employer. This includes left-
handed people as well as blondes.
I YOUR
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Travel Company
call now
SPRING
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Gnnville, NC 27834
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Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrigerators
Microwaves
Jewelry(goodbroken)
Stereo Equipuipment
Video Equipment
Miscellaneous Items
TOURNAMENTS
MEN'S TABLE TENNIS
Tuesday, January 19, 1993
7 PM-10 PM
MEN'S BILLIARDS
Thursday, January 21, 1993
7 PM-10 PM
Resistration in the Billiards Room, MSC
Fee: $2.00 G.P.A 2.0
Come Explore Your
College Store!
Art Supplies
Check Cashing
VisaMastercard
Gift Wrapping
Room Accessories
Film Developing
Special Ordering of
Books not in stock
Greeting Cards
Pirate Imprinted Items
Class Rings
IBM & Apple Computers
Wide Vairety of Computer Software
Typewriter Rental
Caps & Gowns
Graduation Announcements
Gift Tradebooks Department
We can meet all your book needs,
both USED and NEW, for all
classes-both Undergraduate
and Graduate!
20 OFF
SWEATSHIRTS
EXPIRES II6M
$5.00 OFF
BACK PACKS
EXPIRES II693

Isi
f
V 'nners will receive an all expense paid trip to
represent East Carolina University in the Reqional
Competition at the University of Knoxville in Tennessee
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Sponsored by the Student Union Productions Committee
(Jne S top Shopping, in tke, heart of' CatKpae,
Wright Building � 757-6731
ECU Student Stores: More than just books�your dollars support student scholars





May I help you?
Who prices these books? The Maffia?
How many days have we been standing in this
line?
All right, who farted?!
Maybe I can borrow it from somebody.
Do you take checks?
May I see your I.D?
Leave your booksack here,please.
I'm only working here during the rush.
Words people say during the
U.B.E.Student Store Rush.
WSKD
Fratboy. Hey, Barbie, how was your
Christmas?
Fratgirl: Oh, it was killer, Ken!
This class better be worth this much
money.
Highway robbery!
Thank God for credit cards.
I like to get used books that already have the
important parts hi-lighted so I don't have to do
it.
Oh,&$@$, there ain't no more used
books
Fred s Corner
I
By Sean Parnell Rich's Nuthouse
by Haselrig
TWI5 15 GOING
TO B�TVV ,
SEMESTER!
I CAN FE�L. IT,
IN MY CrUTS!
PEAN'S LIST, &US.
i sec my name da
TUE PEWS LIST-
THAT'S
INDIGES-
TION,
EARVG
WON'T PROCKASTWATE,
EITUER. T'LL IVOCK
'EINSTEIN
Will. BE
on OPRAU,
TOMORROW.
HARf
t WIU-
&E AN
HEY THE SIMPSONS
The World of Ghannon and Elvis
By Whiteley and Brown
Fred's Corner
By Sean Parnell
tot U)WE LeSTTi LOCKS'
Pc oi USE Foovtfi. K
�fcuX 5i�vr e. -saNNE
VCV'� BETTER WATCH YCVfi
rtWE OF VCTCST TTH THAT
GVVHEXS HTCHLy-
1 jZeCOPATEP OFFICER
Rich's Nuthouse
STUPENT STORE- P
A1UY ARE ALL THESE
POOPLS. ON TUEFLOOR
pON'KNOW.
uey, tuis one
has a book. i
neep to buy.
-CUIS 15 A NEW ONE �
-rwev must ae: OUT
OE TUE USEC- X
WONPEfZ LONMUCU.
tf�
by Haselrig
S.
�&
Just case you didn't catch it the first time
The lstSping'93
Campus Confusion
NO,iHf DOESN'T KNOW
HOW TO U5� A GUN.
v r
Wit TL J?
Y
by Ben Moore
I riOPf BEN liiONT
1AKE fE TO-SfSiCX,
A&uT T G-RftOtS.
L:b�
WANG TV
By Ferguson and Manning
WANG TV
-�
Look, Ladies! Men are not the only humans who have something to say
in the comic strip medium. If you have the interest and potential talent to
excel in the comic strip arts, why not consider being a part of the
PIRATE COMICS page? Sure, it's hard work, but you get printed and
it's fun.
Just pick up a phone and contact the Haselrig Dude at home(758-4545)
or work(757-6366) or come to today's meeting.
PLANNING PARTY �
THURSDAY January 14, 6:00pm East Carolinian
We wanna pack the comics page full of good strips this
semester, so, aspiring comic strippers,
get your hair folicles over here!
Whether your influences come from comic strips, comic books, political
cartoons, animated cartoons, stand up comedians, or spandex
manufacturers, we can work with you!
fflfl!
Ghannon WhiteleyTchnslopnerlrown, Chris Kemple,
Sean Parnell, Eric Manning, Alex Ferguson, MarkBrett, Kubeai,
Mark Hodge, Eric Sullivan, Jeff Grubbs, Tim Cantrell,
and Kevin Chaisson
Note: You can work on a temporary basis or indefinitely.
Students in sophomore year and higher are preferred.
I
I





All your supplies
lor less at UBfcu
5 1 C South 'otanelie Street 1 reen v illc, NC





Title
The East Carolinian, January 14, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 14, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.914
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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