The East Carolinian, January 12, 1993






Best of '92
1992 music hip-hops
into the new year with
artistic integrity. See
story page 13.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 68 No. 1
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, January 12,1993
30 Pages
Public safety director resigns amid wiretapping scandal
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
ECU'S director of public safety,
James DePuy, resigned Dec. 14, 1992,
blaming two years of rumors alleging
his involvement in the wiretapping in-
cident.
The department of public safety
said DePuy will not be returning to
work, although his resignation was to
go into effect Jan. 31.
DePuy said he had been consid-
ering resigning for a while.
"To be honest with you, I've had
a rough two years, as you well know
DePuy said in December. "I'm real
proud of what I've accomplished, but
I've been beat up real bad. I'm not
ashamed of anythg I've done. But I
need a break
On Oct. 13,1992, Teddy Roberson,
former director of telecommunications,
and John Burrus, former captain of in-
vestigation for public safety, were ac-
quitted of conspiracy, intentionally in-
tercepting a wire communication, in-
tentionally disclosing contents of a wire
communication and use of contents of
a wire communication.
The wiretapping incident began
in May 1990 when Roberson and Burrus
allegedly recorded telephone conver-
sations of another former telecommu-
nications department employee, Brooks
Mills, whom was suspected of drug
involvement.
DePuy came to ECU in 1989 to
modernize the department.
"I was given the task of
professionalizing the department he
said. "It was 20 years behind, at least,
in its procedures. There were no poli-
cies on deadly force, no controls of
inventory or spending.
"But I'm proud of my people and
what we accomplished. It was just a
handful of malcontents. There is a point
in time when a change agent becomes
worn out. I am tired, but I am proud
Public Safety Capt. Stanley Kirtrell
turned transcripts of the recordings
over to the FBI on Nov. 6,1990. Inves-
tigations were then carried out by ECU,
the State Auditor's Office and the FBI.
According the State Auditor's re-
port, DePuy was notified about the
wiretapping when
Roberson gave the tape
of Mills to Evan
Midgette, assistant di-
rector of Human Re-
sources. Midgette pre-
sented the tape to
DePuy. Midgette says
DePuy told him the in-
formation could be
used in certain circumstances.
DePuy says he said the informa-
tion could not be used in a court of law
and wiretapping was illegal. It is not
clear how many tapes were made after
DePuy was informed.
The Auditor's report stated that
Roberson, Burrus, Midgette, DePuy, Ri-
chard Brown, vice chancellor for busi-
'To be honest with you, I've
had a rough couple of years, as
you well know But I need a
break.
James DePuy
-Former director of public safety
ness affairs and Richard Farris, direc-
tor of human resources, were involved
or had knowledge of the wiretapping.
ECU has handed out $213,687 in
claims to 16 people since the wiretap-
ping incident began.
DePuy has not been charged with
anything andupholds his innocence.
The Waiting Game
Photo byJason Bosch
The beginning of a new semester once again brings frayed nerves and lots of frustration for students waiting
in line for hours to pay their tuition and fees.
Pirates' Announcer
suffers loss of daughter
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
Heather Ann Purtee, thel 9-year-old daugh-
ter of "Voice of the Pirates" sports announcer Jeff
Charles, was killed in a traffic accident on the
afternoon of Dec.10, while making a flower de-
livery in Bethel. Purtee apparently failed to see a
tractor trailer making a left hand turn on High-
way 13 and was killed instantly when her car
slammed into the back of the stopped truck.
Purtee, an ECU freshman, was preparing to
enter the nursing program to fulfill her dream of
working in a health career. According to John
Mann, a close friend, Purtee was always focused
on her occupational goals.
"Heather always thought about everyone
over herself Mann said. "She constantly talked
about being a nurse, we tried to talk her into
being a doctor, but Heather wanted to help people
over anything. She didn't care about money
Mann, who attended two high school proms
with Purtee, said that Heather's independent
way of thinking will be the most memorable
quality about her.
"She was completely independent of ev-
erybody and everything. She always knew ex-
actly what she wanted Mann said. Apparently,
Purtee was not afraid to assert her independence
Student study finds Salmonella �eiateow 5tofk
in social situations.
"Sometimes we'd go out to eat and she'd
refuse to let me pay Mann said. "God, some-
times she'd scratch me just because I'd try to pick
up the check. We had such a good time. Heather
was just a real fun person to be around
Debbie Purtee, Heather's mother, has much
to say about the person her daughter was. In
addition to her independence, Purtee said her
daughter was also idealistic, even to the point of
adopting vegetarianism.
"Heather felt very strongly against the mis-
treatment of animals, and had been a vegetarian
for three years she said.
Purtee also said her daughter had no limits
on her friendship, that she appreciated people
spanning all races, colors and creeds.
She said that if Heather Purtee could be
summed up, it would be as "a caring, bubbly
person Purtee said her daughter's loyalty to her
friends was something that made her loved by
many.
"Heather was friends to everybody, she
was just a polite, caring girl that would do any-
thing for anybody
Purtee and her husband, Jeff Charles, have
decided to honor their daughter's memory by
setting up an annual scholarship fund for stu-
dents in the School of Nursing.
By Karen Hassell
Assistant News Editor
ECU biology and allied
health students conduct exercises
each semester isolating bacteria in
various grocery products such as
chicken, dried fruit and ground
beef. These studies recently found
that Salmonella occurs frequently
in meat sold in local grocery stores.
According to Webster's Col-
lege Dictionary, Salmonella is any
of several rod- shaped bacteria that
enter the digestive tract through
contaminated food, causing food
poisoning.
"They (students) do stan-
dard isolation testing said
Dianne B. Norris, lab manager of
the biology department. "Salmo-
nella is a natural bacteria in
chicken. They will isolate some
bacteria whether it is salmonella
or not.
Dr. Wendall Allen, the faculty
advisor inchargeoftheexperiments,
said that students selected a piece of
chicken that had been prepared for
sale. The chicken was handled in a
normal manner, not sterile labora-
tory conditions. At the lab, stan-
dard isolation procedures are used
to test the microbes present. They
also test dried fruit products and
ground beef for bacteria.
"Salmonella can ocoir in all
animals said Allen. "It is a normal
gut flora which means it is found in
the intestines. It stays there until it is
voided by the feces.
"It is shed during the process
of gutting. If the industry operates
with normal cleanliness, there
should be none present. However,
often industries work in less than
ideal conditions. Therefore, a cer-
tain proportion of meat is going to
have it
Allen said that with refrigera-
tion, washing and proper cooking,
the meat becomes safe.
Salmonella can also be trans-
mitted through the handling of pet
turtles. Small child ren are particularly
susceptible to this.
For this reason, stores such as K-
Mart and Roses which once carried
pets no longer do.
Allen stressed that proper han-
dling of food is important to avoid
risking bacterial infections caused by
misuse.
"In America, food is safe, but
that does not mean its free (of bacte-
ria) he said.
The experiments conducted do
not constitute a complete study and
do not involve specific stores.
However, the stores where the
students received their research speci-
mens are included in their lab reports.
Students death remains unexplained
Richard Louis DeOliveira, a 19-year-
old ECU student, died Dec. 4 after returning
from a night which included going to
Greenville's downtown area. DeOliveira was
walking to a friend's apartment when he
lost consciousness and began having diffi-
culty breathing.
After a friend's call for emergency as-
sistance, medical units arrived on the scene
and transported DeOliveira to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, where doctors pro-
nounced him dead on arrival. Autopsy re-
sults to determine the cause of death are
still pending.
Hard work pays off for college democrats
By Jennifer Wardrep
Suff Writer
The ECU College Democrats will soon reap the
benefits of months of diligent campaigning and hard
work. Thirty members of the group will travel to Wash-
ington, D.C. next week to participate in inaugural activi-
ties.
The students will attend the Jan. 20 inauguration
itself, and some will attend the North Carolina Inaugural
Ball hosted by Gov. Jim Hunt. They have also been
invited to the American Gala at the Capitol Center, an
eventfeaturinginternationally-renowned entertainment,
including the reunion of Fleetwood Mac.
"We're going to have a busv week said Thomas
Blue, president of ECU Democrats. "I think it's going to
bring us closer together, and build group cohesiveness
Some of theCollege Democrats will also participate
in a Youth Forum, in which students will have theoppor-
tunity to question the newly appointed Cabinet mem-
bers.
Several group members will attend Congressman
Martin Lancaster's swearing-in and reception and sev-
eral free inaugural events, including the "Call for Re-
union" event at the Lincoln Memorial Jan. 17, consisting
of band performances and fireworks.
See Democrats page 11
Recommendation
for higher college
tuition criticized
Associated Press
RALEIGH (AP) � North Carolina should
take another look at the size of its bill for public
college education, the Government Performance
Audit Committee recommends.
The state Constitution says the cost to stu-
dents should be as close to free "as practicable
The report suggests that legislators define
"thecontemporary meaning" of theConsti nation's
provisional clause of "as fa; as is practicable The
News & Observer of Raleigh reported.
"It is time to it evaluate the concept of low
cost and to determine what the meaning of that
concept should be for t) next several years said
the report written by the KPMG Peat Marwick
consulting firm.
The draft on higher education, which goes
before a subcommittee Tuesday night, cites pro-
jections that the state budget is expected to remain
tight over the next eight years.
See Tuition page 11
Home improvement
Photo by Biff Ranson
Christmas break brought many changes and
renovations to several campus buildings.





2 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
UNC to participate in HTV vaccine study
Associated Press
Binge drinking plagues students
Binge drinking on campuses is a growing problem, with
students spending more on liquor each year than on text-
books, according to surveys on student drinking habits. A
recent national survey of 56,000 students found that 42 per-
cent of the students had consumed five or more drinks during
one sitting two weeks prior to the survey. The U.S. Office of
Substance Abuse and Prevention also reported that 12 million
college students consume more that 430 million gallons of
alcohol a year, and spend more money on liquor than on
textbooks. Other findings in the survey found that 41 percent
of college students engage in binge drinking on a regular
basis, compared with 34 percent of their non-college peers,
and that 7 percent of freshmen who drop out do so for alcohol-
related reasons.
Athletes to attend hazing classes
All male athletes at the University of Texas must attend
anti-hazing seminars after campus police found 11 freshman
members of the swim team clad only in diapers on the fourth
floor of a university dormitory. The swimmers were taking
part in an initiation supervised by an undetermined number
of upperclassmen. Police said condoms and goldfish were
also involved in the initiation rites. If it is determined that any
of the students violated university rules, they could face a
range of penalties that include a warning probation to perma-
nent expulsion, said Sharon Justice, dean of students.
University recruits top black students
Florida A&M University attracted 73 National Achieve-
ment Scholars this academic year, making the public univer-
sity No. 1 in the nation in the recruitment of academically
talented black freshmen. This year, Harvard came in second
with 49 scholars; Stanford University in Stanford, Calif, was
third with 28; fourth was the University of Oklahoma with 27
scholars. Students enter the National Achievement Scholar-
ship Program for Outstanding Negro Students by requesting
consideration when taking the PSAT, a preliminary college
examination. Most of the achievement scholars ranked in the
top 25 percent of their graduating senior class in high school,
with one-fourth in the top 1 percent and more than half in the
top 5 percent, FAMU officials said.
Compiled by Karen Hassell. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
CHAPEL HILL. (AP)�
A researcher hopes to en-
roll 50 patients at the University
of North Carolina atChapel Hill
� one of 16 U.S. medical centers
that will test a vaccine for HIV-
positive patients with no symp-
toms.
Animal studies and pre-
liminary tests with about 100
people have shown ' .� vaccine
is well-tolerated, said Dr. Joseph
Eron, one of two assistant pro-
fessors who will lead UNC-CH's
participation.
In addition, the vaccineap-
pears to generate an immune re-
sponse in almost all subjects.
Half the 500 patients enroled
nationwide will receive active
vaccine, while the other half will
get a placebo.
Neither the researchers nor
the patients will know who re-
ceived the active vaccine until
the study concludes.
"This study is unusual in
that it involves using a vaccine
as a form of therapy for people
who test positive for HIV � the
virus that causes AIDS � but
whose immune systems are so
far minimally affected Eron
said. "These are people who are
otherwise perfectly healthy, and
the idea is that by treating them
early, we might be able to stimu-
late their immune systems to
control the virus more effec-
tively
Human immunodeficiency
virus attacks lymphocytes, or
white blood cells, known as CD4
cells, he said. Over several years,
the number of CD4 cells in in-
fected people drops lower and
lower until they become increas-
ingly prone to a variety of infec-
tions. Among those are rare tu-
mors and a form of pneumonia
that healthy people easily sup-
press.
"If you thinkof theimmune
system as an army, CD4 cells are
the generals Eron said. "The
cells control many different im-
mune responses, and when
they're knocked out, trouble be-
gins
No recommended treat-
ment now exists for HIV-infected
TATE
EWS
CdRRIS EMMS
BACK-TO-SCH
SALE.
people with CD4 counts greater
than 500 per cubic millimeter,
he said. A normal CD4 count is
800 to 1,500, he said.
Both men and women in-
fected with HIV are eligible for
the free study if their CD4 counts
are 600 per cubic millimeter or
higher, he said. Genentech Inc.
of San Francisco, which devel-
oped the vaccine, is sponsoring
the research.The UNC-CH
School of Medicine and two of
its satellite research units will
participate. The satellite units
are at the Wake County STD
Clinic in Raleigh and Moses
Cone Hospital in Greensboro.
� It
L
SPECIAL KEY SALE �"Inrrn � ' ' � LIGHT BULB SALE
1 10 OFF "
'2
FOR THE
PRICE OF

S B th
� D,
mot
y key and "get the second
W key pope
expires January 31. 1993 ' � �����
Now is the time to get
those extra house keys!
During this special
offer, buy a duplicate
10 off regular
retail price on all
hardware items
(Paint, tools, plumbing,
electrical, locks)
I with coupon only expires January 31,1993 .
AGARRIS
Jk EVANS
Lumber co.
In Hardware & Lumber Business Since 1919
$
100
60 Watt
ACE Hardware
Light Bulb
Standard replacement
expires January 31, 1993 light DUDS. 4 Pack.
Monday - Friday
7:30am - 5:30pm
Saturday
8:00am -1:00pm
701 West 14th Street
752-2106
BELLS
FORK
SQUARE
756-6105
KEGS
TOGO
with FREE CUPS
i.fAt
2510 E. 10th
STREET
757-1880
BAKERY
Greenville's best decorated cakes
Fresh sub rolls, French bread, Rolls
Made from scratch daily:
Donuts, Fritters, Pastries, Pies, Cakes
Gourmet cookies
ECU Specialty Cakes & Cookies
756-6160
STUDENTS
DELI
Complete line of meats & cheeses
Pizzas
Fried chickenChicken drummettes
Hot meatball & Italian sausage subs
Cold subs & Sandwiches
50-item Salad bar
Party trays for tailgating
756-6105
FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES
Call NOW for a CHARGE ACCOUNT
and Plan ahead for your Big Events
Enjoy the convenience of our
Check Cashing Card at all locations
Apply today
NOW YOU CAN
CHARGE YOUR
PURCHASES!
Red Banks Rd.
Greenville Blvd.
E 2.
X
14th Street
10th Street
5th Street
SPRING SEMESTER SAVINGS
MERICO
TEXAS STYLE
BISCUITS
FRESH
GRADE A
FRYER
BREAST
QUARTERS
.BUDWEISER, BUD LIGHT,
or BUD DRY
$349
6 PACK
12 OZ CANS
BEST VARIETY OF THE COLDEST BEER
.
wummmmmmmi mtmmm�-i�n Mm
mmmmmmm'





4�
arolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
Second largest tool plant
housed in Fayetteville
"fS&"
TATE
-NEWS
I HHltll
illewhen she saw a tract
fland beinecleared.Shede idedto
Mrs. Hall
ing to h v si h 1 assemble power Uxils
� ded500employees.Ms. f i.ill
15 people hired,
fhal .go. Ibday,
the plant is 1 mei if the largest power-
tool plants in the world. Itaverages
nakesbetween
liontoolsa year.
John w ho w as
ierland( ounty 5 industrial re-
when Black & Decker built
the plant, said Faj 1 th . tile has been
ate to have the plant around
:ong.
nyoulookatwhat'shap-
Ihe last 15 years marry of
; n ime plants that had put up
nes are no longer there or
� cut their work force back
Irastically Swope said.
William Ford was the plant's
first manager and helped direct the
search for property to build the op-
eration.
Ford, now retired and living in
Morehead Gty, said that in 1966
acker had only rwomanu-
1 short
rt in Man,land.
said die 1 ompany wanted
�ike sure it could
ie making power tools if di-
kat the other locations.
. decided that they had
all of their eggs pretty much in one
ord said in a telephone
I torn his home It a catas-
trophe would happen, it would have
put them out of business. So they
decided to lixik tor another place
Black & Decker chose
er at least 15 other
Ford said the company liked
Black
a tlii
I ayetteville's location on Interstate
'r thecualitvot its schools,housing
,m work force.
"They came in here and liked
the property md the community
Swope said.
Black & Decker was one of
several corporations that opened
manufacturing plants duringa phe-
nomenal period of growth in
Fayetteville.
IKvitv landed plantsof Rohm
& 1 laas, Purolator, Du Pont and
KelK -Springfield 1 ire Coall within
about a five-year period starting in
lcty The plants created thousands
of jobs.
While theBlack&Deckerplant
was being built, the company
opened ir, office on Hay Street to
tike jobapplkation Ms Flail helped
process the applications.
"It didn't tike long to get their
5(H) employees Swope said.
Black & Decker also set up a
miniatu re production lineata ware-
house on Robeson Street to train
workers.
The plantopened in May 1967
with 192,1k11 (square feet of space. By
the end of the year, it had phased in
319 jobs. Of those people, 77 still
work there.
The plant made only jigsaws
at first, and bv the end of 1967 had
produced 115,10) of them, Ms. Hall
sa id. That number soared to 1.3 mil-
lion the next ear as the plant started
making drills � Black & Decker's
most popular tool.
"We thought it was fast-mov-
ing, but we didn't know anything
then said Ms. Hall, who now as-
sists with busing raw materials. "It
is such a fast pace when you walk
through mat door
Black & Decker doubled the
size of the plant in 1979. Today, the
plant has about 381,1X10 square feet.
In 196Stheplant'sannualsales
volume was $22.8 million. Now it's
more man $209 million.
Jim Farrell, like Ms. Flail, was
tme of the first 15 employees hired
by Black & Decker. He joined the
company asamachineoperator,and
now serves as a production supervi-
sor.
Hesaid machines handle much
oi theworkonce performed by ha ml.
For example, motors at one
time weredipped in varnish by hand
and then baked for a few hours so the
varnish could harden. Today, ma-
chines complete the process in about
15 minutes.
"The automation has just re-
ally taken over Farrell said.
When the plant opened, about
on-third of the space was used to
store finished products. Now the
plant has littlestorageand ships most
of its products as soon as they are
assembled.
Larger orders are sent directly
to customers, while other tools are
shipped to a distribution center in
Maryland. The plant's Uxils go to
customers in at least 24 countries.
The plant is divided into two
sections: one that caters to basic con-
sumers and one that makes tools for
professional customers.
Products include drills, Sand-
ers, air compressors, jigsaws, circu-
lar saws, polishers, routers and miter
saws. Toolsaremanufactured under
private labels as well as the Black &
Decker name.
Black&Decker,headquartered
in Townsend, Md has manufactur-
ing plants throughout the
worldWe're the second-largest in
the Black&Deckerworldsaid Mark
Komhauser, the Fayetteville plant's
manager.
Black & Decker is taking steps
to make sure the plant stays open
another 25 years.
Thecompan vis improving the
skills of its employees, giving them
the power to make decisions affect-
ing production and teaching them
how to work together to solve prob-
lems.
Thegoal is to improve thequal-
ity of the power Uxils.
'What we need here is 1,4(X)
people to tike us to the next level of
manufacturing excellence, not just a
handful of managers Komhauser
said.
Rave
IVJ4�lM4a7A'4
CLASSICS NIGHT
$3.00 Members $4.00 Guests
0 DRAFT ALL NIGHT!
1 Teas & Bahama Mamas � 50t Jello Shots � 75� Kamikazes
SWEET 16 NIGHT
02 Tans � $2.50 Pitchers � $2.50 Teas & Bahama Mamas
50C Jcilo Shot, � 75c Kamikazes � 75C 100 M.P.H.
RUSH HOUR
FREE Admission for All 7 til 9:00
imaMamas&Pil hen � 50c Jello Shots � 75c Kamakazes � 75c 100 M.P.H.
�fiUMs1�JiV
WEeKEnd
DHNcE PaRTY
THIS IS YOUR BRAIN
AT NC STATE
USING AN AVERAGE BOOKSTORE
AT ECU
USING AN AVERAGE BOOKSTORE
AT ECU
USING CENTRAL BOOK & NEWS
ANY QUESTIONS?
CENTRAL BOOK & NEWS
Greenville Square Shoppins Center .
757-7177
Mon-Sat 9;30am-9:30pm Sun 3am-9:30pm





niMi .jjimnimmwmmmmmHmmmm
I II-IWIIUMIII" II I III
4
The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
Agency finds fault with
subsidized child care
Associated Press
RALEIGH (AP) � The
state should set minimum stan-
dards for child care for the poor
and set up a one-stop office
where parents can seek child
care assistance, the N.C. Child
Advocacy Institute says.
"This is now a $100 mil-
lion-a-year program and we
need coordination of policies,
higher standards and better en-
forcement and more assistance
to counties in managing the pro-
gram said MicheleRivest, vice
president for programs at the
institute and co-author of a 20-
page report released today.
Under two new federal
child-care initiatives, the state
has more than doubled the num-
ber of children receiving subsi-
dized care, but some 8,000 chil-
dren still await care, the report
said.
Most county social service
departments, which administer
the federal and state funds to
help parents pay for child care,
have several units where par-
ents must apply rather than one
office for all programs, the re-
port said. Inatleastoneinstance,
a single worker serves more than
200 children in 17 counties.
Officials in two-thirds of
the counties said state training
and technical assistance in set-
ting up new programs has been
inadequate.
Although the number of
children served through the sub-
sidy program has more than
doubled since 1990 � from
34,000 to 85,000 � almost half of
the 44,000 children served under
one program, the Family Sup-
port Act, are in unregulated child
care.
Unregulated care has no
minimum health or safety stan-
dards, no screening for immuni-
zations and no background
checks on workers for child
abuse or criminal convictions.
The report was based on a
statewide survey with responses
from 82 counties and field visits to
six counties
Among its recommendations:
�The state should create a
"seamless system" so children don't
have to change from one child care
program to another when their fund-
ing eligibility changes.
�Eligibility for subsidy assis-
tance, no limited to parents below 50
percent of the state median income,
should be expanded so more "work-
ing poor" parents can get help.
�The state should provide
money to help counties serve grow-
ing caseloads of more than 200 chil-
dren in many counties, improving
training and technical aid to coun-
ties and set a minimum statewide
rate for child care.
�Counties should screen pro-
viders for child abuse convictions
and stop payments when abuse or
other danger to children is being in-
vestigated.
The report was sponsored by
the Mary Reynolds Babcock and Z.
Smith Reynolds Foundations, both
in Winston-Salem.
Sale! ; Sale!
Sale!
TGIF WELCOMES BACK STUDENTS
Nothing Is Beneath Us
LOWEST PRICES ON
NAME BRAND CLOTHES
TGIF
DOWNTOWN
210 E. 5th Street � 75S-H6I2
BACK TO CAMPUS SALE
Selected Men's & Women's Items
20-30 OFF
Our Already Low Price
10-6 Monday-Saturday
On Iguanas
Now Only $45 each
Normally a $60 value.
� Full Line of Pet Supplies
� Marine & Tropical Fish
� Reptiles & Small Animals
� Pond Fish & Supplies
� Birds & Supplies
� Live & Frozen Food
� Hills & Science Diet
Pet Foods
�Aquatic Plants & Tank
Decorations
�Aquarium Installation
& Maintenance
Factory Mattress & Waterbed Outlet
SLEEP SALE
MATTRESS SETS
GOOD fcfefr
5YR.
eWARRANTY
BBJTOIP
Twin Full Queen
$49 $59 $79
King
99
Each Piece In Sets Only
MATTRESS SETS
FIRM
RIVERA
10 YR.
WARRANTY
Twin Full Queen King
$69 $79 $99 '149
Each Piece In Sets Only
MATTRESS SETS
EXTRA
FIRM
15 YR.
WARRANTY
Twin Full Queen King
$79 $99 $129 175
Each Piece In Sets Only
BASIC WATERBED
Complete
& Ready To
15Yr.
Warranty
S� $189.00
Any Size! Solid Wood
BOOKCASE WATERBED
Solid
Wood
Sale
Price
Any Size! Blazer Includes HB
$199.00
SOFTSIDE WATERBED
Tube Style
Lifetime
Warranty
Twin Full Queen King
s199$349'449549
Crystal
DAYBEDS
$99.00 $59.00
Wooden $149.00
Sides & Back Only
BUNK BEDS
2x4 Style $79.00
Bookcase $179.00
Iron Red or White $1 99.00
FUTONS
$99.00
Ea. Pc.
COUPONS COUPONS
FREE
BED FRAME
With Purchase
of $199.00
I
I
I
I
I
I
Expires 1-30-93
LIMIT ONE COUPON
FREE
MATTRESS
PAD
With Purchase
of $199.00
Expires 1-30-93
T
i
i
i
i
i
i
FREE
PAIR OF
PILLOWS
With Purchase
of $199.00
I
I
I
I
I
I
hiico iwao . Expires 1-30-93
MUST PRE9ENT COUPON AT TIME OF PURCHASE
COUPONS
free
SHEET �
I
I
I
SET
With Purchase
of $199.00
Expires 1-30-93
FREE
LOCAL
DELIVERY
With Purchase
of $199.00
Expires 1-30-93
LIMIT ONE COUPON
Factory Mattress & Waterbed Outlet
Oder By Phone
355-2626
730 Greenville Blvd.
(Next to The Plaza)
VISA -MC -DISCOVER
90 DAYS � FINANCING
Connection
All Arlington Blvd.
(located behind Animal House)
355-8250
Greenville's Most
UNUSUAL
Gift Selections
BEADS � BEADS � BEADS
Killer Beads and Beading Supplies
Cards � Jewelry � Books
Tapes � CDs0 Posters
Oils � Incense
Gems � Fossils
Native American Items
Vintage & New Clothing
Candles
Jewelry Findings
25�o OFF,
uriththisad
expires 2-12-93
(coupon cannot be used on items marked down or on sale)





Hie East Carolinian

January 12, 1993
Classifieds
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APART-
MENTS : 1 and 2 bedroom
apartments. Energy-effi-
cient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen
appliances, some water
and sewer paid, washer
dryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
R()()MMATE WANTED
Page 5
FOR SALE
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,(,K TITLES
919 Dickinson A ve.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NOJSi USED CD'S
WANTED: Roommate to
share apartment in Tar
River area. 14 of rent
and 1 4 utilities. Call 758-
5207.
MALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Convenient
location to campus with
ECU bus transportation
available- Furnished bed-
room with Private Bath,
Cable, Telephone,
washerdryer, kitchen
privileges- "you tend to
your business and I tend
to mine philosophy
$175.00mo. includes
utilities. Call 321-1848.
HELP WANTED
F( )R SALE
MUST SELL IMMEDI-
ATELY! Ft. Lauderdale
Bahamas Spring Break
vacation for two 6 days
and 5 nights, hotel accom-
modations, and cruise fare
included. Asking $400.00
but will take BEST OF-
FER. Call Brian at 757-
3470 or (704) 869-3485
over X-mas.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
CONDO - One bedroom
unit. Children out of
school, I want to sell fast.
Call (919) 847-1557 Ra-
leigh, NC.
100 IBM COMPAT-
IBLE COMPUTER, 512 k
RAM w monitor and all
software. Perfect for writ-
ing papers and designing
graphs, even spread-
sheets. ONLY $275.00. (3
programs included) Call
355-0426 (Lv Msg) price
neg.
GUARANTEED WORK
AVAILABLE. Excellent
pay for EASY homebased
work. Full part-time.
Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Pub-
lishers (G2) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mail-
ing brochures! Sparefull-
time. Set own hours!
RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Pub-
lishers (Gl) 1821
Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
EARN $1000WEEK at
home stuffing envelops!
For information, send
long self addressed
stamped envelope to CJ
Enterprises, Box 67068L,
Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44222
FREE TRIPS AND
MONEY! Individuals
and Student Organiza-
tions wanted to promote
the Hottest Spring Break
Destinations, call the
nation's leader. Interna-
tional Campus Programs
1-800-327-6013.
THE EAST CAROLIN-
IAN is now accepting ap-
plications for the Spring
Semester for news editor.
Applicants must be famil-
iar with associated press
style, libel laws, and the
Apple Macintosh. Expe-
rience in newswriting is
preferred. Applications
are available at The East
Carolinian office on the
HELP WANTED
second floor of the Publi-
cations Building.
SAVE BIG on Spring
Break '93! Jamaica,
Cancun, Bahamas from
$449 Florida from !119!
Last chance to book early
and save$$$! Organize
group travel free! Sun
Splash Tour 1-800-426-
7710.
ATTENTION STU-
DENT: Earn extra cash
stuffing envelopes at
home. All materials pro-
vided. Send SASE to Na-
tional Distributors PO Box
9643 Springfield, MO
65801. Immediate re-
sponse.
EASY WORK! Excellent
Pay! Assemble Products
at home. Call Toll Free 1-
800467-5566 ext. 5920.
RESPONSIBLE PER-
SON NEEDED to pick
up 2 children at home at
7am and bring to ECLT pre-
school at 7:30 am. Will
pay(negotiable). Call
Randy at home 756-8861
or work 830-2030.
THE CREDIT BUREAU
of Greenville is now ac-
cepting applications for
part-time employment:
Hours available 8am-
12pm, lpm-5pm. Apply
at 1206 Charles Blvd.
MOTHERS HELPER
NEEDED- 5 days a week
M-F 2:30-5:30pm. Own
transportation needed,
two school aged children.
Call 756-3249
WELCOME BACK STU-
DENTS! Brody's and
Brody's for Men are ac-
cepting applications for
part-time sales associates.
Flexible schedules sal-
ary clothing discount.
Apply Brody's The Plaza
Monday - Wednesday 1 -
4 pm.
HELP WANTED
SAVE ON SPRING
BREAK "93! JAMAICA,
CANCUN, BAHAMAS
FROM ONLY $459!
FLORIDA FROM $149!
Organize Group and
travel free! CONTACT
SUSAN m 931-7334 or
Call SUN SPLASH
TOURS TODAY 1-800-
426-7710
BABYSITTERS
NEEDED: Community
Bible Study, a women's
interdenominational
Bible Study, meeting at
Oakmont Baptist Church,
Thursday mornings, 9 am
to 11:30 am needs several
young women to work in
our nursery area to pro-
vide patient loving care
to our youngest partici-
pants. Church nursery
experience preferred, ref-
erences requested. Must
provide own transporta-
tion and be able to make
commitment through
April 30. Call Mrs.
Stansell, Class Coordina-
tor, 756-0842.
CAMPUS REPRESEN-
TATIVE NEEDED by
sportswear company to
sell to fraternities and so-
rorities. Average $50 to
$100 working one night
per week. Call 1-800-242-
8104.
CRUISE SHIPS NOW
HIRING - Earn $2000
month world travel
(Hawaii, Mexico, the Car-
ibbean, et.Holiday,
Summer and Career em-
ployment available. No
experience necessary. For
employment program
call 1-206-634-0468 ext.
C5362.
ECU PROFESSOR
NEEDS BABYSITTER
for seven-year-old two
afternoons, Monday and
Wednesday or Thursday.
Call 756-9394 after 6:00
pm.
HELP WANTED
GREEKS & CLUBS
$1,000 AN HOUR!
Each member of your frat,
sorority, team, club, etc.
pitches in just one hour
and your group can raise
$1,000 in just a few days!
Plus a chance to earn
$1,000 for yourself!
No cost. No obligation.
1-800-932-0528, ext. 65
SERVICES-OFFERED
QUALITY WORD PRO-
CESSING: Specializing
in letters, resumes, busi-
ness and medical tran-
scription term papers, the-
sis, manuscripts. Any-
thing that needs to be
typed. Dictaphone tran-
scription available. Call
321-2522
AWESOME SPRING
BREAK TRIPS! Bahamas
Cruise 6 Days Includes 10
Meals, Great Beaches &
Nightlife! $279! Panama
City Beachfront Rooms
With Kitchens $119, Key
West Oceanfront Hotel
$249, Daytona Beachfront
Rooms With Kitchens
$149, Cancun $459, Ja-
maica $479! Springbreak!
1-800-678-6386
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY!
SPRING BREAK
HOW ABOUT IT IN THE
BAHAMAS OR FLORIDA
KEYS. WHERE THE PARTY
NEVER ENDS. SPEND IT ON
YOUR OWN PRIVATE YACHT.
ONE WEEK ONLY
$385.00 PER PERSON
INCLUDES FOOD AND MUCH
MORE
EASY SAILING YACHT CHARTERS
1-800-780-4001
PERSONALS
ATTRACTIVE, RO-
MANTIC , SINCERE 22.
year old white male is
looking for an attractive;
lonely girl 18-22. Let's,
stop sitting home on
weekends watching TV
and find a friend in each
other. Send letter and
phone to M.T PO Box
20560, Greenville, NC
28590
GRIER - We've come a
long way together. Now
you're finally 21. Happy
Birthday form your best
friends. Now you can do
itlegally! We love you! -
CandMJ
COORS - Here it is our
last semester! Foui
months and then we are;
out of here! So many times
we didn't think we were
ever going to live through;
this but in May You'll bJ
off to New York and I'll be;
in Raleigh running my:
pool hall! I hope this last
semester is the best yet -
of course it couldn't get
too much worse! Mo.
GALE - Hey 'stale Yoti
been out drinking that liqt
uid opium lately? New
Year's Eve was an experi?
ence even though aftej
excessive bar hopping we
went home broke, some!
what sober, and bored out
of our minds. Of course
we didn't know at that
time the excitement of
driving all over Greenville
was yet to come. Any?
way remember January
19th or else! Later, Mo
Brand New Apartments
Available February 1! Great location, close to
campus. One & two bedrooms.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00pm
2 & 3 BEDROOM DUPLEXES
Available immediately!
New & located close to campus.
Call 752-8320 from 8:30 am to 5:00pm
Announcements
FAMILY PRESERVA-
TION PROTECT
The ECU Family Preser-
vation Project invites you
to a conference entitled
"Family Preservation with
Families of Color: Discov-
ering and Nurturing Fam-
ily Strengths with Dr.
Vanessa Hodges. TheCon-
ference is Friday, January
22 from 9:30 - 3:00 at the
Rotary Building on Rotary
Drive in Greenville. Lunch
and refreshments are $6
(pay at the door). Please
register by contacting Dr.
John Powell, School of So-
cial Work, 757-4379 or Fax
note to 757-4196.
COUNSEI INC.
�ENH�
?25 OR OLDER? Join us
for brown bag lunches on
Wednesdays form noon to
1:30 pm. Come for part or
all of the time. This rap (if
you're over 25 you know
what we mean) group is an
informal gathering de-
signed tobe supportive and
help meet the needs of stu-
dents with family respon-
sibilities. Informal discus-
sions and presentations are
the format. Yes, There ate
many students at ECU fac-
ing the same concern as
you! Let's learn form one
another. Every Wednes-
day, noon to 1:30 pm at the
Counseling Center in 313
WrightBuilding. Formore
information,phoneGeorge
Gressman at 757-6661.
EATING nTSOROFpg
GROUPS
The Counseling Center
is offering an on-going
therapy group for female
students who are bulimic.
Issues addressed may in-
clude self-esteem, depres-
sion, relationships, and
stress management. The
group will be Thursdays,
3:30-5:00pm. Please call
757-6661 to schedule an in-
dividual counseling ap-
pointment prior to joining
the group. The group be-
gins January v14, and par-
ticipation is limited.
GAY. LESBIAN. AND
BISEXUAL
This weekly group ex-
perience intends to offer a
safeandacceptingenviron-
ment in which to share feel-
ings and concerns. The
challenges presented be al-
ternative lifestyles in a
homophobic society willbe
discussed. Please call 757-
6661 for an appointment
and more information.
ECU WOMEN'S
soccer cum
Spring Season meeting
to be held this coming
Monday, Jan. 18th form 4
pm to 6 pm in the GCB
building Room 3007. Any-
body interested please at-
tend (or call 752-9251 for
info). We will be partici-
pating in indoor and out-
door games against teams
like UNCW, NCSU, Va
Tech, UNC, and Duke: as
well as several tourna-
ments.
ORIENTATION Tp
CAREER SERVICFS
The Career Services of-
fice invites seniors and
graduate students who will
graduate in MaySummer
or December, 1993 to at-
tend an orientation meet-
ing on Wednesday, Janu-
ary 13 or Thursday, Janu-
ary 14 at 3:00 in Bloxton
House. The staff will give
an overview of career ser-
vices and distribute forms
forstudentsto registerwith
Career Services. They will
also discuss procedures for
establishing a credentials
file and participating in em-
ployment interviews on
campus.
STUDENT I INTCiM
MINORITY A KTS
COMMITTEE
The annual Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Candlelight
March on Monday Janu-
ary 18 begins at 7 pm. The
march will begin at
Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter. Everyone is welcome.
RECREATION AT
SERVICES
The only "down" you'll
have this semester will be
DOWNHILL SKIING!
Outdoor recreation will be
taking a snow skiing trip
Jan. 23-24. Begin register-
ingjan. 13. A pre-trip meet-
ing will be in BD 101, Jan.
20 at 5 pm. For more de-
tails call 757-6387.
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
TIRED OF SITTING
AROUND? JOIN A FIT-
NESS CLASS! Choose
from aerobics, step, low
impact, hi - low, funk, belly
busters, aquaerobics, hi-
low step, power step, su-
per step, and toning. Reg-
istration dates are Jan. 19 -
22. Costs per session are
$10 for students and $20
for facultystaffspouse.
Costs per drop-in class are
$5 for 5 classes for students
and $10 for facultystaff
spouse. Call 757-6387 for
more information.
RECREATTONAT
SERVICES
IT'S BASKETBALL
TIME! To get your bas-
ketball team eligible to
compete with other teams,
mark Tuesday, January 19
on your calender. On this
day at 5 pm there will be a
basketball registration
meeting in BIO 103. Call
757-6387 for more infor-
mation.
SKI TRIP
A ski trip to Winter-
green - sponsored by Rec-
reational Services! The
trip will be on January 23
-24. A pre-trip meeting
will be held on Wed
January 20 at 5 pm in
Brewster D 101. The cost
of the trip is $115 students
-$125 faculty and staff.
Cost includes transporta-
tion, lift tickets, lodging,
lunch Sat. and breakfast
Sun Register now in 117
Christenbury Gym. For
more information call 757-
6911.





�A
The East Carolinian
January 12, 1993
Opinion
Page 6
DePuy resigns, questions still remain
In the continuing saga of ECU's wiretap-
ping scandal, the latest installment sees key
player Jim DePuy, director of public safety,
resigning his position because he "needs a
break
DePuy states that he has been considering
resigning for a while, and that after two years of
rumors circulating about his alleged involve-
tragedy. $213,687 in claims to 16 people has
been doled out by the university, and DePuy's
resignation adds another layer to the cake that is
beginning to smell as if it's been in the sun too
long.
DePuy states that the 24 months before his
announced registration has been tough on both
him and his family. "Two years of that with
ment in the scandal, he has been "beat up real your wife and son listening to this trash on TV
bad and those kinds of things are hard to take
DePuy said. DePuy portrays himself as a per-
sona much maligned by the media, misunder-
stood by the public and just an average guy
who, again, "needs a break
Too many questions remain unanswered,
however, and answers don't seem to be too
forthcoming in the future. The university could
To shortly recap this ongoing embarrass-
ment to the campus, university employees taped
telephone conversations of another ECU em-
ployee in May of 1990. Stanley Kittrell then
turned transcripts of the recordings over to the
F.B.I, in November of 1990. Investigations by
the F.B.I the State Auditor and the ECU admin-
istration itself ensued, culminating in a State be commended on its closed-mouth approach
Auditor's report stating that Evan Midgette pre- to the situation, but with that amount of money
sented the tapes to DePuy.
Midgette states that DePuy told him the
information could be used in certain circum-
stances, while DePuy maintains that he told
Midgette tliat the information could not be used
being thrown around, it's hard not to think that
something illegal took place.
DePuy's resignation heralds an event that
has been a long time coming. Having an indi-
vidual who is constantly under suspicion repre-
in a court of law and that wiretapping was sent a major force such as this campus' police
illegal.
A Federal court acquitted the university
employees of all conspiracy and wiretapping
charges; DePuy himself was never accused or
charged with any wrongdoing and maintains
his innocence in the matter.
This latest development in this serio-comic
soap opera, As The Stomach Churns, has the
makings of turning into (if it hasn't already) a
force only serves to undermine the university's
respectability.
A new clean-air policy needs to be imple-
mented on this campus. This one would take
care of the noxious cloud of rumors that hangs
over the heads of students and administrators
alike. Admitting that wrong-doing occurred, as
it looks to have, may hurt in the short run, but
will clean the horizon ahead.
By Amy E. Wirtz
Reality of Home Alone tragic, not comic
It was discovered in Chi-
cago on December 21,1992, that
two young girls (ages nine and
four) had been left at home de-
liberately by their parents, who
were on vacation in Mexico. Chi-
cago suburbanites David and
Sharon Schoo had been gone nine
days when this was discovered
by police.
In a society where art can
sometimes be completely off the
mark when trying to imitate life,
this case of child neglect read a
little too much like the script of
Home Alone. This real-life drama
proves to be far from the (over-
done) comic antics of darling
little Kevin. This occurrence
landed parents in jail.
The Schoos were charged
with two felonies each: child
abandonment and cruelty to chil-
dren. They were freed on $5,000
cash bail each and the children
were placed in foster care.
What could have possibly
been going through these
people's minds as they boarded
the plane and proceeded to spend
nine days and nights in sunny
Acapulco? It is my firm convic-
tion that there is an enormous
amount of difference between
leaving your child unattended
while you step across the street
to the neighbor's house and cal-
culatingan extended vacation to
another country.
You may be surprised to
know that these two actions are
both, in terms at least, consid-
ered to be child neglect. Most
child experts would agree that it
is perfectly normal to leave chil-
dren home alone at some point,
for a few hours in the afternoon
or evening � though certainly
not for a nine day vacation.
Child welfare agencies re-
ceived around 12 million reports
of neglect nationwide in 1991 and
investigators substantiated ne-
glect in about 40 percent of them.
The other 60 percent were either
abuse or a combined abuse and
neglect occurrence, usually un-
substantiated.
1.2 million reports. What is
this saying about our society?
Do we not care about what hap-
pens to those who will someday
grow up and contribute their tal-
ents to the continuation of life?
Children need supervision,
protection and guidance.
Granted, nine times out of 10,
nothing would happen to a child
left alone for a few hours at a
time. Unfortunately, one doesn't
always get those nine chances
before something occurs.
The Schoo children called
911 on December 21st because a
smoke alarm went off acciden-
tally and this is how the whole
case was discovered. My ques-
tion is: what if there had really
been a fire or if the smoke alarm
had never gone off at all? These
parents would never have been
found out. Do you think they
would have chanced it in the fu-
ture? Most likely, yes. Neglect is
not a one-time instance.
In fact, alcoholic or drug-
addicted parents regularly ne-
glect their children. Also, poor,
working, single parents fre-
quently leave their childrenalone
because they cannot find or af-
ford day care. This amounts to
an astronomical number of chil-
dren being left unattended ev-
ery day.
You may be wondering
what is being done about all of
this. Well, the Schoos' arrest and
conviction is not typical. Some
states have a set minimum age
for leaving a child unattended
and this usually falls between
the ages of 10 and 12. Most states
do not follow the same law, as is
the case with North Carolina.
However, there is a state-wide
fire law that prohibits leaving
children under the age of eight
alone, for the obvious safety rea-
sons.
If that is the case, then why
not stricter child abandonment
laws? The total reported cases in
North Carolina for the fiscal year
of 1991-92 was 48,146.
These are the reported
cases, not even counting those
that go unreported, which ex-
perts estimate at a phenomenal
number. Thousands of children
are left alone and their parents
have to pay for their crime.
I grew up as a latchkey kid.
I was routinely left at home be-
tween the time I got out of school
until my parents got out of work.
That time alone never became
more than three hours. Usually
it was never more than two. And
although some people would beg
to differ, I grew up to be a per-
fectly normal, functioning per-
son in society.
So maybe a certain age
needs to be defined as respon-
sible enough to be alone as a kid.
The parents are usually to blame
for their unrealistic expectations
that they place on their children.
Some just don't know enough
about their children to make a
decision about their ability. And,
sadly, most don't care.
It's time that our throw-
away society learns that they're
ditching their most important
contribution: our children.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Elizabeth Shimmel, News Editor
Karen Hassell, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Matt MacDonald, Systems Manager
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
orreject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications BIdg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
HERE SWR PARKING
A MAP 0? M STUDENT
AND A DAY'S RATION I
I'D START NOV-IT
GETTING BARKS
Quote of
the Day:
Competence,
like truth,
beauty
and a
contact
lens, is in
the eye of
the
beholder.
Laurence. Peter
By Gregory Dickens
Heroes define society through admiration
As long as there have been and encourage. vVe all have felt severe that heroes of legacy are,
that we in some way, to some de
what could be called societies, man
has seen the best and worst of
himself reflected in his environ-
ment. Usually, the worst sticks in
our minds; man is pessimistic in
nature and weaknessesor ills have
a habit of being exaggerated in
our minds and then everything
seems even worse. It is because of
civilizations' wrongs, the over-
whelming number of those
wrongs, that we all need someone
to look up to. Someone to inspire
and bestow initiative. These are
our Heroes.
We have always been pre-
sented, either by our elders or
available media, with images or
memories of superior individu-
als. These heroes have spurred
uson throughouttheages. David,
Beowulf, Gilgamesh, Perseus,
Washington, Mohammed, Jesus,
Siddhartha: persons of significant
achievement or character that
have influenced those around
mem so greatly mat they cannot
be easily regarded only as sub-
jects of literature or fable.
The manner of reverence
varies. Some merely remind us of
how to overcome our own per-
sonality flaws. Others have so radi-
cally presented new mind-sets to
deal with or mold communities,
local or global, that they are not
merely respected, they are wor-
shipped. Whether they actually
existed is a moot point as long as
the ideal they each uphold remains
sound. Thev represent our dreams
of being, our personal best desti-
nies of what we may achieve. Our
personal heroes reveal what we
seek from ourselves or those
around us.
One type of hero is the hu-
man hero. "Human" I am defin-
ing as an actual or realistic charac-
ter who reveals, by word or deed,
the nobility, intelligence or per-
spective we all may hope to
achieve. What we see in these
people is accomplishment. They
are successes because they have
surpassed the mediocrity thatapa-
thy and ignorance so easily create
gree, have a trait that makes us
better than those we see as unde-
sirable in ethic or demeanor. Our
human heroes, then, are the evi-
dence we need to convince our-
selves mat we can be more or go
farther than our present state,
whether socially or politically
without a radical departure from
who we are at the present time.
Our idols of entertainment
or sport are some of our heroes.
They have remained, more or less,
true to themselves and achieved
success, either financially or
through renewn. We see them
Heroes: Whether
they actually
existed is a moot
point as long as
the ideal they
uphold remains
sound.
appearing natural and contented,
things we may wish for or try to
attain without sacrificing too much
of ourselves.
Other heroes are those of
legacy. These people have sur-
passed any comparison to people
who have achieved in the same
field. Also, these people have pre-
sented an ideal so elementary and
yet so mature that those who wish
to follow them must submit them-
selves to strict discipline. These
are the basis of our religions. From
whatever source, however mun-
daneor sublime, these heroes serve
asexamplesof devotion to an idea.
They have not only recognized
mentally how to bring about
change, personally or socially, but
they have acted to bring about
that change and considered any
deviation to be not only counter-
active but destructive to what they
believe.
Unfortunately, there have
been elements of intolerance so
for the most part, martyrs. They
have suffered the wrath of non-
acceptance and if there is what
may be called a "bright side" to
their untimely deaths, it is that the
brutality of killing for disagree-
ment of principle may bring sym-
pathy to the cause the victim
sought to promote. Christ, King,
Kennedy: these may be the first to
spring to mind, but there are oth-
ers too numerous to list and to
leave them out of a list could be
construed as disrespectful to what
they believed.
Another classification is that
of Superhero. These are the myths
matpropel the moralsand ethics
we hold as gospel. These people
have by fate, karma or luck been
granted greatness with the mini-
mum of effort. Simply put, they
have not suffered for their great-
ness. They represent the pipe
dreams wehaveof being granted
something or being famous sim-
ply by being in the right place or
through birthright.
Perseus, Superman, Valen-
tine Micheal Smith, and others
simply were themselves. No dis-
cipline, no necessary strains: su-
perheroes are the golden children.
They can do no wrong and suffer
no questions of conscience. Such
effortless existence may be seen as
heaven or hell, depending on your
comfortability with yourself.
Mainly, we seek the status as a
vessel ofglory. To be seen as supe-
rior, as better not by deed, but by
existence. It is, of course, a selfish
goal by many standards; but who
may say if Stoicism is by defini-
tion more worthy a philosophy
than Hedonism?
We all find definition of our-
selves through who we admire.
We may not do so consciously but
we cannot ignore the importance
of what is revealed by hero-wor-
ship. It is as basic as discovering
what we define as holy by what
we instinctively think of as sin.
Through heroes, not only do we
see what we hope to evade but
what we seek to be.
9
&
o
en
r'U TELL �; S�NC�.7HIS
ELECTION KJU1 RtSWPEP
oue F�mcAL landscape
NCW FACES
A WHOLE NEW
6CKIRAndfti
just iKAjiNt what rru
K like nn the msv-
MAN T (617�
Si
Baby-Boomer" government?
THEY'RE OWR PEER
MORE TMM BEFORE,
YCT.�
THAT &EIM6THE CASE,
ONE WONDERS AT
THEIR EKPERICNCE
WHr SHOULD SAM NUN
heap "akhcp saancaft
MOW HAM �ANES OF
"fH�" has HC Vt
. � � -1
s





� m
7 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
1 JOE OF ALL TRADES
By Joe Horst
Fly the friendly skies: be prepared to wait
Flying is such a wonderful
experience. Who would have
thought that in just over 100 years
thehuman population could cover
immense distances in the matter
of 24 hours? From the invention of
the wheel to the DC-10, what a
country we live in.
For those of you cursed with
the inability to read between the
lines, that noxious smell emanat-
ing from the text is called sarcasm.
I've flown pretty regularly for the
past five or six years now, and the
stories I could tell you. What the
hell, that's what mis column is for,
right? To tell stories. So take your
seat, fasten your seat belt and
please return the flight attendant
(notstewardess, thank you) to his
her upright position. Thank you,
political correctness.
Firstoff, airports. What won-
derful places, from those that are
one building closing at midnight
(if not earlier, like our fair station
here in the Emerald City) to mas-
sive behemoths like La Guard ia or
CHare, mat may doze off and on
in the wee hours but never quite
make it to sleep.
It must be an unwritten law
mat if you have a connecting flight
somewhere in the airport, the gate
you must get to will be the abso-
lute farthest away from your origi-
nal plane mat it can be.
There's no feeling quite like
lugging three pieces (at least) of
baggage down a concourse to a
place mat some smiling airline em-
ployee told you was, "just a little
way down, to your left" Oh, the
joy, the ecstasy � hell, you can't
even pass it off as exercise, much
less ecstasy.
Then there comes the un-
equaled pleasure of waiting for
your plane. Layovers (great word)
of three to four hours are bad
enough, but if you have one at
three in the morning�along with
those most uncomfortable chairs
known to man � hey, it doesn't
get any better than that. Actually,
an Old Milwaukee Light (or two,
or three) might be just the thing
for a situation like that.
The absolute worst airport
I've ever been in has to be the '89
Greenville airport. This place
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
looked like something from a '20s
movie, and not that great a one
either. There was no luggage car-
ousel, no way. Whatyou got wasa
20 x 20 piece of plywood outside
the single building, where the
single member of the one-man
ground crew threw your bags on
to it, and drawled out, "There you
go Also, I start to worry when
the gates at an airport are labeled
"Incoming" and "Outgoing Just
curious.
start to worry
when the gates
at an airpor t
are labeled
"Incoming" and
"Outgoing
The flights that come to Gre-
enville even today have got to be
some of the best for jokes in the
country. Commonly known as
"puddle-jumpers these little
beauties look like they were last
used either to deposit paratroop-
ers in the last world war or a
beefed-up Cessna. Is it just me or
does anybody else worry when
seats IA and IB are reserved for
pilot and co-pilot?
The following story is true, I
swear it. I've been flying (or sit-
ting, as is the case with most pas-
sengers)forabouteighttolOhours
now, so naturally a little more time
in a plane is the first thing 1 want to
do. I'm in one of these "puddle-
jumpers waiting to take off. The
pilot cranks the engine�nothing
happens. He rolls down the win-
dow and yells out, "We're going
to try the battery
Now at this time, the whole
plane has heard this shout. So
you've got about 10 people with
the look on their faces that they
wonder just how they might be
able toget off thisdeath-trap. Jokes
are going around about seeing
someone attach jumper cables to
the plane with a bus standing by
or someone standing next to the
propellers, ready to give them a
starting shove. My personal fa-
vorite (and one I came up with)
was whether or not someone
would push the plane down a hill
so the pilot could pop the clutch.
So we finally get off the
ground and start heading to Gre-
enville. We're about half-way
there when all of a sudden, this
loud BEEEEEPP comes out of the
cockpit (though I hesitate to call it
that, since only a curtain sepa-
rates the crew from the passen-
gers). More jokes and looks run
through the cabin. The major one
was mat the pilot was honking
his horn to move something out
of the way. That "something"
ranged from a flock of birds to a
tractor, because everyone who
lives in eastern North Carolina
has experienced getting stuck
behind a tractor in traffic. Now
that's what I call a flight.
The other thing I find hi-
larious about plane travel are
those safety insti actions they give
you before taking off. Is there any-
body in this country, much less
mis world, that would not be able
to figure out that seat belt? What
high degree of intelligence does it
take to figure out a simple clasp?
Also, it's great to hear such uplift-
ing information about "water
landings" (great name for sea
crash) or "loss of cabin pressure"
(or a hole in the plane). The kicker
comes after all this talk of what to
do if the plane crashes, they smile
atyou and say, "We thank you for
flying with us and have a nice
day
Flying � technology at its
best and human natureatits worst.
From the screaming, running-
down-the-aisle, kicking-the-back-
of-your-seat kid behind you to the
fat guy who inevitably sits in the
aisle seat next to you, there's no
experience to rival mat of an air-
planes. Bad food and even worse
places to sleep in, it's amazing
how many people still take to the
skies every day.
Thank you, Orville and
Wilbur, for allowing us to literally
reach for the skies. Now, if we
could quiet it down some, we
might have something there.
By T. Scott Batchelor
Evolution of X-mas hinges on person's age
Two days before Christmas
1992 I sat in my car in the park-
ing lot of a local mall, waiting
patiently for a woman to back
out of a parking space so 1 could
nab it. People were everywhere.
Vehicle traffic around the shop-
ping centers was frustrating, and
pedestrian traffic wasn't much
better. This Christmas season
shaped up to be a retail sales
boom. As I sat observing shop-
pers flocking through the doors
of the mall, I thought, "Gee, I'm
glad we're experiencing the
worst economy in 50 years, as
president-elect Clinton puts it.
I wonder how busy the stores
would be if the economy were
sound?" What a complex situa-
tion.
When you're a child, how-
ever, the holiday season isn't
quite so complicated. It's a magi-
cal time when patience, not capi-
tal, is the most important asset.
I was a very curious child,
(which is not the same as having
a curious childhood, although
in my case both apply). I remem-
ber clearly the night I went
snooping around our house look-
ing for my Christmas presents
because I suspected Santa Claus
was a hoax. Unfortunately, I
found the presents � and lost
my innocence at the same time.
One of the gifts from (dare
I utter it?) Mom and Dad was an
Emerson receiver-turntable-tape
player. That's an eight-track tape
player. Believe it.
Packing a walloping 13
watts per channel, the system
really kicked, and I was grateful
to have it, but it wasn't from
Santa Claus. Santa was dead.
Still, I bravely carried on
and found new sources of joy
during Christmas. Like partici-
pating in "playing" Santa to my
niece and nephew. I helped put
together toys to be set under the
Christmas tree, and I even
"tested" some of the more inter-
esting items, like my nephew's
remote-controlled dune buggy,
just to make sure everything
worked properly.
The next evolutionary step
came when I started receiving
presents at various times of the
year that were explicitly deemed
Christmas presents. My parents
would hand me a baseball glove
in the middle of June and say,
"Now, this is part of your Christ-
mas this year I thought that
was a bit strange, but I never
Could you have
imagined, at
eight years old,
ever being
thrilled with
getting a
microwave for
Christmas?
complained of course.
One year in April, when I
was about 12 or 13,1 came home
from school to find my father
erecting a brand-new trampoline
in our back yard. I had been whin-
ing about having one for several
months.
"This is your Christmas
present this year, got it?" Dad
yelled, as I tossed down my so-
cial studies book and bolted
across the yard in a delighted
frenzy.
I spent many hours bound-
ingabout on that trampoline, and
many hours recuperating from
fractures, sprains and contusions.
Looking back orvthat time, I am
THE BUCK STOPS HERE
convinced the trampoline is an
invention of a committee of
greedy orthopedic surgeons.
Isn't it a bit suspicious that the
word "trample" is in trampo-
line? Think about it?
The final step in a person's
development vis a vis Christmas
comes wnen, instead of getting
all kinds of purely fun products
to play with, such as a can of
green slime, a trampoline, an air
rifle, cars that change into mon-
sters, etc you become the re-
cipient of things you need. Like
clothes. And, in my case, money
for school. Could you have
imagined, at eight years old,
ever being thrilled with getting
a microwave for Christmas? Of
course not, because you didn't
live in an apartment, subsist-
ing on meals that can be cooked
in five minutes. Or how about,
at 10 years old, a personal com-
puter that doesn't even have a
port for game cartridges in
back? Not on your life, buddy.
But we're tickled pink to come
into these items now because
we want them. We want them
because we need them. A
strange turn of events, isn't it?
Just last week, I was walk-
ing through Wal-Mart or K-Mart
or one of those other places that
corrupt T.V. news magazines
feed on, and I found myself in
the middle of the toys section.
There on the shelf, staring
me in the face, having no practi-
cal value whatsoever, was an
original Slinky. Like an adult, I
weighed my choices carefully
before I decided whether to buy
that toy or not.
Now, if you'll excuse me, I
have to go. You see, the apart-
ments where I live are divided
into two stories connected by a
set of stairs. And in case you've
forgotten, Slinkies just love
stairs. �
By Nike Joseph
New government will try to please everyone
Happy new year. Happy
new era. In just a few days we will
begin to find out what four out of
lOvotersdid totherestof us when
Bill and Hillary Clinton host the
nation to a liberal banquet from
their new address at 1600 Penn-
sylvania Avenue. What a feast it
will be; if there's anything you can
say about liberals, it's that they've
got a little something for just about
everybody.
One group that's really
ready to gorge themselves is law-
yers. Legal Times, the newspaper
of "law and lobbying in the
Nation's Capital recently head-
lined a story "For Lawyers,
Clinton is a Change for the Bet-
ter and q uoted one Washington
lawyer as saying: "we are all ex-
pectingabouta33percentincrease
in fees Let's hope the White
House caterer brings extra nap-
kins.
Powerful Democrats like
New York Governor Mario
Cuomo also contribute to the
feast's diverse offerings. Who
could possibly not find satisfac-
tion in Cuomo's remark to The
New York Times that "If the offer
(to be on the Supreme Court) were
made, I would answer the ques-
tion so swiftly that every one of
you in the media, and especially
talk-show hosts, would write,
This is surely the most decisive
man in America When pressed
for a preview of what his answer
would be, tiV decisive Democrat
decisively declared: "I don't know
what the answer would be
Interest groups, like feminist
organizations, put out a good
spread (no pun intended) as well.
Gloria Steinem admits to seduc-
ing a man by playing down the
person she was and playing up
the person he wanted her to be.
When he did fall in love with her,
she says, "I had to keep on not
being myself Jane Fonda an-
nounced that she has given up
acting for now because her hus-
band, Ted Turner, "is not a man
you leave to go on vacation. He
needs you there all the time
Patricia Ireland, president of the
National Organization for
Women, recently revealed that, in
addition to her husband, she has
had a female "companion" for four
years. How about that! Food for
feminists; food for husbands; food
for gays; and food for adulterers!
Another feminist who chose
not to stay home and bake cookies
and serve tea is Hillary Clinton
(just when and why did she drop
The dish might
look different,
but it tastes
the same.
Let's hope the
White House
caterer brings
extra napkins.
the Rodham?). Hillary frequently
serves up her pro-choice views.
But showing that she doesn't want
anybody to go hungry, Hillary, in
remarks before the Children's
Defense Fund, asked "what,on
earth could be more important
than making sure that every child
has a chance to be born healthy?"
That's the kind of political deli-
cacy even far right pro-lifers glee-
fully chew on.
Bill himself, though, cooks
up the healthiest cornucopia of
political fare. For instance, on one
platter is the military-loathing
string-puller doing anything to
stay out of uniform, and on an-
other platter is a steel-jawed sa-
ber-rattler casting stern warnings
at Saddam Hussein.
The people who will influ-
ence Clinton's administration also
cause hungry diners to salivate
wildly�not knowing whether to
expect sour or sweet. In economic
policy, Clinton will hear the voices
from pro-business types like Lloyd
Bentsen and Goldman Sach's Rob-
ert Rubin, as well as those of so-
cialists like Robert Shearer. Rob-
ert Reich will favor free trade,
while protectionists like Laura
Tyson, Ira Magaziner and the AFL-
CIO will sit on the other end of the
scale. Foreign and military policy
will be subject to an even wider
range of recipes.
Clinton's promise of change
to a government that "looks more
like America" has thus far resulted
in appointments consisting of
about 73 percent Washington old-
timers (or those who look like
Washington old-timers), so the
new spice won't exactly send any-
body rushing for the punch bowl.
Freshman Senator Carol Mosley
Braun may be sterling example of
how much better off we'll be by
trying to make government look
like America. Before being sworn
into office, Braun took the
Concorde and a private jet back
from vacation when her campaign
was still in debt; improperly hired
10 new staffers; moved into a
$3,300-a-month penthouse apart-
ment and bought a new jeep and
expensive clothes while members
of her staff had not been paid; said
she wasn't interested in a position
on the Senate Judiciary Commit-
tee even though she campaigned
on the inept hand ling of the Anita
HillClarence Thomas hearings
by the all-male committee; and
vacationed with an a accused
sexual harasser. The dish might
look different, but it tastes the
same.
So here we sit at the Clintons'
table. Unfortunately, we ha ve 1 i ttle
choice of course or content, but
will be fed at the host's and host-
ess' pleasure. Hopefully, we won't
be poisoned.
At any rate, considering the
unsettling backtracking and re-
evaluating Clinton has already
done on things like capital gains,
the deficit, gays in the military,
and so forth, I'm keeping a four-
year supply of Alka Seltzer in the
medicine cabinet.
F R O'M
MAGAZINE
Some of the Stupidest College Courses in America, Pt.
You don't have to leave America on some fraudulent foreign program to either eat chevre or take
ridiculous courses. Listed below are some actual courses you can take for credit from actual
American universities. So pop open a Grolsch. pick your schedule for the fall semester, and have that
worthless junior-year-abroad experience without waiting in a long line to renew your passport.
Advanced Mime "Emphasis will be given to
such areas as variations in mime styles,
control of weight in space, and creation of solo
mimes Loyola University of Chicago
Stream Fishing "Designed to provide an
understanding of angling as a wholesome
outdoor activity with long-range, carry-over
valueStudent must provide own chest
waders or hip boots Ithaca College
Leisure Education "The recreation
professional is considered a facilitator of
hisher clients' expanded leisure awareness.
Focus is on enabling clients to evaluate the
indiviaual and social dynamics of leisure, and
assess their leisure attitudes, skills, and
options Ithaca College
Rope Jumping (Single Rope) Theory and
techniques progress from basic to fancy,
developing hand-to-foot coordination essential to
all sports University of Nevada at Las Vegas
The Virtues of Vice "We will discuss
competing conceptions of some alleged vices�
among them, lying, lust, cowardice, jealousy
and avarice�in an effort to articulate the
relationship between ethics and ideology
Hampshire College
Driving Range Instruction "Methods and
techniquesincluding tracking, turns, parking
and turnabouts with a special emphasis in
accident avoidance; all in a controlled
environment St. Joseph's College
Science Fiction Film "This course focuses on
post-war American science fiction film as a
cultural and ideological productScreenings
may include: Them The Thing, Invasion of the
Body Snatchers, The Incredible Shrinking
Man, Blade Runner, The Terminator, and La
Jette Hobart and William Smith Colleges
J.R.R. Tolkien "Tolkien's theories of the
fantasy or 'faerie' story are studied in his short
stories, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings
trilogy Alfred University
Camp Counseling "Designed to give
prospective camp counselors an understanding
of the total camp program, duties and
responsibilities of camp counselors.
Techniques of camp leadership will be
considered University of Georgia
t
t





8 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
Montenegro's president is
re-elected, pro-Serbian
political movement loses
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia
(AP) � Montenegrin President
Momir Bulatovic was re-elected
by a wide margin over his
staunchly pro-Serbian opponent,
unofficial results showed today.
Bulatovic, who has indicated
he might reconsider tiny
Montenegro's alliance with Serbia,
won 64 percent of the vote in a
runoff election Sunday, according
to provisional results published
by the Tanjug news agency.
. Branko Kostic, a strong
proponent of close ties to Serbia,
got 36 percent.
Serbia and Montenegro are
Yugoslavia's only remaining
republics after fourothersdeclared
independence.
Serbia's nationalist leaders
are widely blamed for the breakup
and for inciting wars that have
killed tens of thousands inCroatia
and Bosnia-Herzegovina.
Many citizens of
Montenegro believe they are being
unfairly punished by economic
sanctions the United Nations
imposed on what remains of
Yugoslavia.
In other Yugoslavia-related
developments today:
�An emergency summit of
eight Islamic countries opened in
Senegal with calls for international
military intervention to stop the
massacre of Muslim Bosnians and
the lifting of a United Nations ban
on arming the Bosnians.
�Peace talks on Bosnia-
Herzegovina continued with the
arrival in Geneva of hard-line
Serbian President Slobodan
Milosevic.
The second round resumed
Sunday after a six-day recess with
conflicting ind ications whether the
Serbs would be be willing to
compromise on their steadfast
demand for their own state within
a state.
� French Foreign Minister
Roland Dumas met with officials
to discuss his proposal that
detention camps in Bosnia be
forcibly liberated, even if France
had to act alone.
Humanitarian Action
Minister Bernard Kouchner said
Dumas' plan included actions to
free "a certain number of women"
held in the camps.
In Belgrade, the Serbian and
federal capital of Yugoslavia,
Bulatovic was once an ally of
Milosevic.
Nevertheless, the 36-year-
old Bulatovic and his government
recently have expressed serious
reservations about the policies of
Serbian leaders.
There have been no
suggestions that a move for
Montenegrin independence is
imminent, although Bulatovic has
indicated he might reconsider the
nature of Montenegro's alliance
with Serbia if Belgrade's policies
do not change.
About 10 percent of
Montenegro's 600,000 people
consider themselves Serbs, and it
is generally believed that any
attempt to break from Serbia
would spark another civil war.
HAVE A SEAT.
Arm tmitf enough to be neated by 12 noon, MuiuUj tiro Friday
CHOOSE YOUR EATS.
Order any Buffer, Sandwich, Salad or ltca from
our SuopQrccheCombo lection.
$3.99
THE PRICE IS SWEET.
(beverage & dessert not included)
Lmdi � Irea n ul to D noon, Maadcy thru Frtfcy. Wy baft guefe must U Mki
by 12 noon. Sort, rasarvaioB art oupiid. OT� grcitaJt b g Irifajd an any
DARRYL'S.
EARLY LUNCH
Across from East Carolina University in Greenville � 752-1907
Mapr credtt cards welcome
Northwest Airlines, KLM Airways merger
cleared by Department of Transportation
WASHINGTON (AD�The
Department of Transportation
agreed Monday to allow
Northwest Airlines and KLM
Royal Dutch Airlines to merge their
services and operate as if they are
a single carrier.
The department also granted
antitrust immunity to the carriers.
The Transportation Department
had tentatively approved the plan
last Nov. 16.
Theaction was made possible
by an "open skies" accord reached
in September between the United
States and the Netherlands. Under
the pact, the carriers of both
countries have unlimited access to
the others' international market.
Thus, airlines of the two countries
may fly toany city in either country
without restriction.
"This agreement is an
illustration of the benefits of open
skies Transportation Secretary
Andrew H. Card r. said in a
statement. "We hope it will
provide an impetus for open skies
accords with other countries,
moving us further in the direction
of a truly global aviation
environment
KLM owns about 49 percent
of Northwest. The deal apj . oved
today was set up to satisfy U.S.
laws barring foreign ownership of
airlines.
Approval of the deal comes
just weeks after American Airlines'
parent company received a one-
third stake in Canadian Airlines
International in exchange for
investing $195 million in the
struggling carrier. Similar plans
by British Airways and USAir fell
apart last month, although the
British carrier has said it might try
again.
The East Carolinian is
now accepting
applications for the
following positions:
Circulation Manager,
Assistant Lifestyle
Editor, News Writer and
Sports Writer. For an
application, drop by our
office on the second
floor of the Publications
Building on weekdays
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
�:AUTO AMERICA
10 OFF
ALL PARTS
& LABOR
DAYS
TUESDAYS &
WEDNESDAYS
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
OPEN SUNDAY 1-5
WE HAVE ALL YOUR AUTOMOTIVE NEEDS
LOWEST PRICE GARANTEED
OIL
CHANGE
As Low As.
Computer Wheel Alignment
Most mar wtteel drive Most front wheel drive
24" 34"
We measure and adfu&t the alignment angles of oach wheel
to meet manufacturers specifications Every vehicle re-
quires different adjustments, only the proper alignment w
be performed for your vehicle PartsandlaborfDrrearshlme
extra Light trucks and vans extra
15
99
Most 4 cylinder U S cars
Price may vary with automobile
Front Disc or Rear Drum Brake Service.
We use Quality Raybestos Brake Parts.
�Moat U.S. Cars �With Road Test
As
Low As
We'll replace case brake pad or rear shoe Resurface drums and rotors Inspect
cakpers or crtdftrs Repack front wheel bearings Replace grease (non-drive
axle) Inspect master cyttnder Senv-melalk pads and hardware extra
xAUTO AMERICA
119 Red Banks Rd Greenville, NC
355-3466
Store Hours: MON-FRI 8-9. SAT 8-8. SUN 1-6
We Are An
Authorized
N.C.
Inspection
Station
iiiiiiiiiiiiiii
52 Days
and a
Wake Up!
SKI PACKAGES
GALORE!
MYRTLE BEACH
EXTRAVAGANZA
SUPER BOWL
1993
BOOKINGS
NEW YORK
SPECIAL
FROM
$127.00
WBROADWAT SHOW
1-800-8410666
TOUR PACKAGES
SPORTING EVENTS
STUDENT RATES
SPRING BREAK
Best
of
Travel
Call Now!
1-800-
841
-0666





w The East Carolinian January 12. 1993
U.S. Marines target Somali weapons
market, snipers shoot at Congressmen
MOGADISHU, Somalia The U.Sled force is had no indication that Clinton
MOGADISHU, Somalia
(AP) � U.S. forces Sunday
mounted their largest operation
so far in the Somali capital,
sending 900 Marines,
helicopters and armored
vehicles to clean out the
country's biggest weapons
market.
The strong thrust to pacify
the country came on the same
day that 14 warring factions
were to begin a truce.
Because of poor
communications, it could not be
determined if the factions were
observing the cease-fire or even
if they had been informed of the
agreement, reached in Addis
Ababa, Ethiopia.
Sunday saw some of the
heaviest clan fighting in
Mogadishu since the U.Sled
military intervention began Dec.
9.
Three Somalis were killed
by Marines and dozens were
wounded in clashes between
rival clans.
Maj. Ken Roberts, a
military spokesman, said the
Marines cordoned off a large
area around the gun market
Monday, then moved in to seize
all weapons. He said no
resistance had been reported to
"Operation Nutcracker
"We hope to get a big
haul said another command
spokesman, Marine Chief
Warrant Officer Eric Carlson.
The U.Sled force is
working to secureaid distribution
routes and rescue millions of
Somalis from the anarchy, disease
and famine that have killed
350,000 in the past year.
U.S. envoy Robert Oakley
said that Sunday's fighting could
be seen as an anomaly amid a
gradual reduction of clan violence
in Mogadishu.
"A month ago they were in
full-scale civil war. There's been
considerable improvement
Oakley said. "They are still
moving toward agreements
most of their differences will be
solved peacefully
Oakley, a former
ambassador to Somalia, was one
of the main forces behind getting
warring factions to the peace talks
table in Ethiopia.
The cease-fire agreement
that the factions reached Sunday
call for them all to disarm by
March 1.
But the clan warlords do not
have absolute control over their
fighters and the agreement does
not affect the free-lance bandits
who have looted much of the food
aid.
Oakley returned to Somalia
on Sunday from Washington,
where he met with officials of
President-elect Clinton's
administration.
New administrations in
Washington often change
ambassadors but Oakley said he
had no indication that Clinton
would replace him.
Other incidents on Sunday
showed the substantial task that
the forces face in pacifying
Mogadishu, much less the rest of
the country.
Farouk Mawlawi, the U.N.
spokesman in Mogadishu, said
the Irish aid agency GOAL
reported insecurity at three of its
feeding centers in the Mogadishu
area. One Somali worker was
killed Sunday at the center in
Gupta, he said.
Also Sunday, seven U.S.
congressmen briefly came under
sniper fire as they visited a
stadium serving as camp for 1,500
Marines.
There were no injuries in
the group, which included Curt
Weldon, R-Pa John P. Murtha,
D-Pa Bob Livingston, R-La
George Darden, D-Ga Jack Reed,
D-R.l Nick Joe Rahall II, D-
W.Va and Tony Hall, D-Ohio.
Murtha, chairman of the
House defense appropriations
subcommittee, told reporters
he'd like to see the United
Nations take a greater role in
Somalia so U.S. forces could leave
sooner.
He has expressed concern
the United States could become
mired in Somalia.
Nearly 22,000 U.S. soldiers
are in Somalia. Twenty other
countries contributed soldiers to
aid the Americans.
Work with us!
The East Carolinian is
now accepting
applications for News
and Sports Writers.
Call 757-6366 for
details.
"Smndwich Shop"
215 E. 4th Street
Greenville, NC
(919)752-2183
316 S.W.Greenville Blvd.
(919)756-7171
Every Tuesday is
COLLEGE NIGHT
7 PM till Close
990 SUBS
Your Choice
Ham&Cheese HamJ3obgna & Cheese
Bologna & Cheese Tmkey & Cheese
All Provolone HaiaSalarru & Cheese
Ham,Turkey & Cheese
60 oz. Pitchers $1.99
Includes tax
ATTIC
209 E. 5th St
Every
Wednesday
The
CoMedY
ZONE
HEADSTONE CIRCUS
Psycadelic Rock
99J 32oz Draft � 990 Memberships � 990 ADMISSION 9:30-10pm � 990 HiBalls
Undefeated, Undisputed!
Thanks For Voting Us
The "Best Place To Hear
Live Music"
19871988�19891990-1991 -1992
GREENVILLE TIMES READERS' POLL
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13
"Spend the Funniest Night of Your Life.
with
Special
Guest
$1.50 HiBalls and $1.50 Tallboys
JUST JUNE w FLOSSIE
IHDRSDAY, JANUARY 14
FRIDAY, JANUARY 15
POLKE
DOOR PRIZES � PARTY FAVOL
. yr � CHAMPAGNE TOASTS � $2 32oz DRAFTrN
) 1 Party School and the 1 Party Night rSO
)Jy TOGETHER AT LAST!if V)Y
I Ring in the new year with your ECU buddies y (
SATURDAY, JANUARY 16
CHAIRMEN t�hfe BOARD
$2 32oz Draft
THURSDAY, JANUARY 21
THE GONNELLS
Only $10 For Advanced Tickets. Call 752-7303 For More Ticket Information.
COUPONS GOOD ONLY AT COLONY TIRE DOWNTOWN
r "winterize" "
OIL FILTER,
CHASSIS LUBE,
OIL CHANGE
$-�88
�Includes up to 5 quarts Kendall Oil
�Special Diesel Oil and filter type may
result in extra charges
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
GOOD ONLY AT 729 DICKINSON LOCATION
$29
95
�Drain & refill coolant 'Inspect
hjoses & belts 'Refill with new
anli-freeze
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
GOOD ONLY AT 729 DICKINSON LOCATION
MAINTENANCE
ENGINE TUNE UP
$39 $44 $49
4CYL 6CYL 8 CYL
For Most Cars With Electronic Ignition
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
WM
TRANSMISSION
MAINTAINANCE
$48
00
Replace fluid, pan gasket and filter.
Includes road test. Some vehicles slightly
higher.
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
jOOD ONLY AT 729 DICKINSON LOCATION
m
ROTATION &
BALANCE
4 WHEELS
$20
00
Passenger Cars & Light Trucks
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
GOOD ONLY AT 729 DICKINSON LOCATION
FUEL INJECTION SERVICE
$44
oo
MOST CARS
Your car may not need a tune-up. Our leul injection
service cleans clogged fuel injectors to help restore
engine power and performance and improve luel
economy.
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
BRAKE
SPECIAL
$5995
Front or rear, 1 yr. or 12,000 mile warranty.
Includes pad, shoes, turning drums or
rotors, pack bearings, If necessary. Some
metallic pads extra. Price may vary on
some imports.
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
GOOD ONLY AT 729 DICKINSON LOCATION
s21
COMPUTERIZED
WHEEL
ALIGNMENT
Set caster and toe to exact
manufacturer's specifications
$29 $39
FRONT END THRUST ANGLE FOUR WHEEL
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
GOOD ONLY AT 729 DICKINSON LOCATION
USED TIRES
FREE MOUNTING
$10
oo
&UP
Some Sizes Limited - Hurry In!
With Coupon. Expires 4-14-93
GOOD ONLY AT 729 DICKINSON I OCATION
GOODpYEAR
729 Dickinson Ave. DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
CD m DICKINSON READE CIRCLE CO z LU STREET
FICKLEN
COLONY TIRE CORPORATION
752-4417
OTHER LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU:
FREE
PICK-UP &
DELIVERY
�Ahoskie 'Wilson 'Washington �Williamston �Manteo �Edenton 'Plymouth
�Suffolk, Va 'Rocky Mount 'New Bern
WE DO IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME - GUARANTEED!
$19
95
155SR12
BLACKWALL
GOOD&YEAR
T-METRIC
V-
GOODfYEAR
DECATHLON
�All-Season
�Steel Belted
�White Wall
�All season traction with
wraparound shoulder
design
�Two steel belts for
strength and durability
�Smooth ride without
sacrificing handling
response
BLACKWALL SIZE PRICE
155SR1329.95
165SR1332.95
17570R1336.95
18570R1338.95
18570R1439.95
NO TRADE NEEDED
NO TRADE NEEDED
NO TRADE NEEDED
15580R13
WHITEWALL
BUY 4 TIRES & WE ROTATETREE EVERY5,000 MILES
MEDIUM SIZE
PLUS TAX
Pizza! Pizza
Two great pizzasl One low price: Always! Always!
h�i(iwTlnrf�tiki'ha�ialhr��L�hiMka(lp�nknMm kwirmnf, OIHI Life Cma tuMptn. Ik
I






I
10 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
tanker
SUMBURGH, Shetland
Islands (AP) � Infrared images
indicate that the grounded tanker
Braer may still hold most of its
cargo, a government official said,
but stormy weather today
continued to prevent efforts to
salvage the oil.
The weather � including
wind gusts of 95 mph overnight�
also thwarted Prince Charles and
his father, Prince Philip, who
canceled plans to visit the island
today. Buckingham Palace said
they would try again on Tuesday.
The tanker, carrying 24.6
million gallons of Norwegian
crude to Canada, ran aground
last Tuesday after losing power.
Oil has polluted 20 miles of
coastline, killing more than 600
birds and other wildlife.
Chris Harris, chief of
Marine Pollution Control Branch
in London, told Independent
Television News that the infrared
images indicate the 89,700-ton
tanker Braer still holds a
"substantial amount" of its cargo.
Others, however, were more
cautions.
"It is wrong to try to construe
information on the amount of oil
remaining in the vessel from
infrared photography said Kevin
Colcomb, a Marine Pollution
Control Unit scientists working in
the Shetlands.
He said the technique is new
and "we're giving it a try in hopes
that we might learn something from
it
Dan Kaakenben, spokesman
for the Dutch salvage firm Smit
Tak, said the infrared images were
inconclusive.
"The best way to determine
the cargo is to get on board and
take measurements. We haven't
been able to do that Kaakenben
said.
Smit Tak has 10 tons of
equipment, including generators
and p umps, in place near the wreck
to pump out the oil when weather
permits.

But the barge Tak-10, which
would receive the oil, had taken
shelter today in northern England,
more than 400 miles south of the
Shetland Islands, and was not
expected before late Tuesday at
the earliest, Kaakenben said.
By Sunday night, 785 oil-
covered birds had been recovered
from beaches, 612 of them dead.
Three seals and one otter ha ve also
been found dead, according to the
Royal Society for the Protection of
Birds.
The government has banned
fishing in the area.
Fifteen people ventured cf&t
Sunday to pray at Duncrossnes's
Church, an 18th century stom?
building a mile from the beached
tanker in the Bay of Quendaie.
"We thank God no lives wefe
lost on this ship, that life was
preserved. Help us strive to save
our heritage at this time. Help the
members of our creation that have
no voices of their own said the
Rev. Trevor Williams. -
Iraqis continue to dismantle Kuwaiti base
despite warnings from U.N. observers
KUWAIT (AP) � Iraqis in
civilian clothes crossed the border
into Kuwait today for a second time
in as many days and began
emptying and dismantling
warehouses at a disputed naval
base, a U.N. official said.
The border crossings came
amid rising tensions over an
escalation in Iraqi challenges to the
United Nations as well as the
United States and its allies.
Abdel Latif Kabbaj,
spokesman for the U.N.
observation mission in Kuwait, told
The Associated Press that about
120 unarmed Iraqis emptied or
removed "warehouses, water tanks
and electrical wires He said the
men were warned by U.N.
observers that they were violating
Gulf War cease-fire accords.
On Sunday, 200 armed Iraqis
in civilian clothing went to the same
area and seized armaments,
including explosives and four
Chinese-built anti-ship Silkworm
missiles, abandoned by Iraq during
the 1991 war.
The first foray came a day
after the United States said that
Saddam Hussein's government
capitulated to an allied ultimatum
to remove anti-aircraft missiles
from southern Iraq.
Butitcoincidedwithamove
by Iraq to prevent U.N. teams
charged with dismantling
Saddam's weapons of mass
destruction from flying into Iraq
in their own planes.
Iraqi Foreign Minister
Mohammed Saeed el-Sahhaf told
the Egyptian-owned Middle East
News Agency today the men who
crossed the border Sunday were
"workers for a private contracting
company" and were removing
property left behind by Iraqi
forces as they retreated in the
Gulf War.
He said Iraq had permission
from Maj. Gen. Timothy Dibuama
of Ghana, commander of an
unarmed U.N. force mat monitors
the demilitarized zone along the
Kuwait-Iraq border.
Kabbaj denied the Iraqis
had a permit to be in the area.
In Bonn, Germany, U.N.
Secretary-General Boutros
Boutros-Ghali said he hoped the
Security Council would give a
"very stiff answer" to Iraq's
incursions.
The border incidents occurred
about 50 miles north of Kuwait City
near the port town of Umm Qasr,
where Iraq had a naval base before
the war.
Late last year, a U.N
appointed border commission
completed the first formal
demarcation of the Kuwait-Iraq
border and the naval base was
awarded to Kuwait. Iraq retained
Umm Qasr.
Iraq has refused to recognize
the border. In fact, Baghdad still
claims sovereignty over all of
Kuwait, which it invaded in August
1990 and held for seven months.
No shooting or casualties
were reported in Sunday's incident
among the U.N. personnel manning
the bunkers where the weapons
were stored 400 yards inside
Kuwait.
Kabbaj said the unarmed U.N.
personnel tried unsuccessfully to
stop the raiders by blocking their
vehicles with trucks. He said at least
one U.N. vehicle was rammed.
Welcomes
Back All
ECU Students1
and Faculty
Save on our Spring Clearance Sale
All 14 KT Chains
and Bracelets now
40 off
14 KT Gold Bracelets NOW ONLY
7" Herringbone $16.80
7" Herringbone $35.40
8" Herringbone $119.40
7" Solid Rope Diamond Cut $39.00
7" Solid Rope Diamond Cut $55.20
7" Solid Rope Diamond Cut $156.00
8" Solid kope Diamond Cut $159.00
14 KT Adjustable Cuff 159.00
ECU Pirate Jewelry
14 KT Charms $49.95
14 KT Earrings $99.95
14 KT Collar Pins $44.95
Sterling Silver Charms $9.95
Sterling Silver Earrings $24.95
"We Believe in ECU
Getting Engaged?
Large Selection of Loose
Diamonds Now on Sale
.25 CT Round
.33 CT Round
.33 CT Oval
.50 CT Round
.75 CT Round
ALL ECU STUDENTS RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL 10 OFT
Reg.
$895
$1195
$1295
$1195
$4450
SALE
$675
$895
$995
$895
$3450
Revolving charge Arlington Village
90 Days Charge 'i HOf)
Layaways DJJmmsJjsJ
Student
Accounts
Welcome
(Mege survival kit
We have some essential financial aid even' college
student needs � First Union's Collegiate Banking'
Express. Now that you're in college, making the grade
is not your only quest; eliminating the danger of
running out of money is also important to your
survival.
Your Collegiate Banking Kit Includes:
� Your choice of two money saving checking options
No Minimum� or Organized� Checking.
� Fast Money� sen ice for quick transfers
from your parents' First Union account to p
vours.
�Free 24 Hour Banking at all First Union 24 Hour
Banking Machines.
�First Union VISA with no annual foe for the first
year.
� Bounced check protection when you qualify for
Instant Cash Resene.�
To receive a Free Collegiate Banking" Express Kit
mail in the coupon below or stop by any
First Union office
N'
When it comes to service,
everything matters.sw
CUP AND MAIL
EXPRESS RfcPt.Y
Address.
Otv
Zip-
ColleR You Attend �
Social Security Number-
?
Yes! I am interested in
Collegiate Bunking'
ExpKM. Please send me a
complete account opening
package
Mail To
First t'mon Corporation
301 S Trvon St
Charlotte, NC 2828H-0362
Attn Collegiate Banking Manager
I
I
�f&
aar
FITNESS CENTER
WELCOMES BACK
THE PIRATES
featuring an
ALL NEW WOLFF TANNING CENTER
with SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
i
m
AEROBICS
New Padded
Floor
�4 Classes Daily
5 Days Weekly
with
1 Saturday Class
�High & Low
Impact Classes
�Step Classes
�Toning Classes
TANNING
One Month
Unlimited Specials
5 Wolff Beds with
ALL NEW BULBS
We Honor
Any Competitor
Price or Coupon

i
! FIRST VISIT i
FREE
409 South Evans Street
Across from the Elbo
Area's Largest
Selection of
York
Freeweights
and Nautilus
Including over
3500 pounds
of Dumb Bells
Stairmasters
Lifecydes
PADI SCUBA
Diving
Instruction
Available
(call for times)
752-3880
-
V
"





11
The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
Tuition
Continued from page 1
North Carolina undergradu-
ates should pay 20 percent more in
tuition next fall, and graduate stu-
dents should pay 50 percent more,
the report said.
The extra money generated
by tuition increases would go back
into the university system to beef
up flagging library budgets and
professors' salaries.
The consultants didn't limit
their attention to public universi-
ties. They also recommend that the
state stop its 20-year-old tradition
of giving each private college and
university in the state an automatic
subsidy for each Tar Heel enrolled.
North Carolina's 11 "peer"
states�those deemed com pa rable
to North Carolina � charge stu-
dents between 25 percent and 35
percent of the cost of educating
them; UNC charges only 10.9 per-
cent, the report says. In addition,
the report predicts no revenue
booms in the next eight years.
The draft recommends the
Legislature adopt a policy that
would have UNC students paying
about 25 percent of the total educa-
tion cost within five years. UNC
students on average annually pay
about $819 in tuition and academic
fees, the report says, while the av-
erage cost of educating each is
$7,502 annually.
For in-state undergraduates,
this means that over the next four
years, tuition alone would increase
81 percent to an average of $1,350,
an increase that many educators
warn would price many students
right out of the college market.
"I think it's absurd said Dan
Gurley, student body president at
Appalachian State University. "Just
because wehave reasonably priced
education in the state doesn't mean
we should jack the price up. These
people must have forgotten what
the Constitution of the state says
For graduate students, a 50
percent tuition increase could prove
disastrous, said Felix Joyner, UNC
vice president for finance.
Although most graduate stu-
dents receive some kind of finan-
cial assistance that lowers their tu-
ition, their tuition still has to be
paid. The pool of money needed
for such assistance, Joyner said,
would not keep pace with the tu-
ition increase.
Jane Smith Patterson, adviser
to Gov. Jim Hunt and chair of the
committee'seducation subcommit-
tee, said the state could increase the
amount of money it gives UNC for
student financial aid. In addition,
the report notes that because tu-
ition is so low, many Tar Heel stu-
dents do not even qualify for fed-
eral financial aid under the compli-
cated formulas used by the federal
government. Iftuitionwentup, the
logic goes, so might federal aid.
William Little, UNC's vice
president for academics, d isagrees.
"They seem to be operating
under the premise that federal fi-
nancial aid is going to take care of
the problem, and I know that's not
true he said. "The need is not
being met now. Universities have
to scratch really hard to find ways
to supplement financial aid
Ms. Patterson, who just re-
signed as vice chancellor at UNC-
Wilmington to becomeHunt's bud-
get and technology adviser, re-
sponded: "I don't think that just
because you don't have enough fi-
nancial aid to go arour voushouId
not look at new ways of financing
education
Rep. Martin Nesbitt, a Bun-
combe County Democrat who also
sits on the committee, said he
doesn't like changing the 30-year-
old constitutional provision. Sec-
ond, even if tuition were to go up
dramatically, he doesn't agree with
the consultant's recommendation
that the university ought to be able
to keep the extra money.
Under age
rapist faces
court date
WILMINGTON, N.C (AP) �
A 12-year-old New HanoverCounty
boy maybe tried this weekon charges
that he raped a 5-year-old neighbor
girl in thewoodsbehind theirhouses,
officials said.
The boy, whose name has not
been disclosed because of his age,
was charged with second-degree
rape and was taken to the New
Hanover County Juvenile Services
Center on Friday, said Sheriff's De-
tective K.B. Foss.
Foss said the boy had seen some
obscenevideotapes,apparentlywith
the consent of his parents, that may
have contributed to the incident
"1 don't know where it fits in,
butldid doasearchof the home and
confiscated some obscene material
from the parents Foss said. "I think
the videos had a part to play in it. It
stems from the video
The boy's parents, who have
not been charged, axe shocked by the
allegations, Foss said.
Democrats
Continued from page 1
The group has also been
tapped to work as event staff for
the inauguration and the parade,
and will walk in the parade with
other campaign volunteers.
"We received a lot of state-
wide and even nation-wide recog-
nition forourcampaign work said
Bill Gheen, vice president of the
campus organization.
The College Democrats
worked as vol unteers for Vice Presi-
dent-elect Al Gore's visit to ECU
and President-elect Bill Clinton's
visit to Kinston in October. They
also initiated a campus voter regis-
tration drive and planned visits to
campus by North Carolina politi-
cians, including Congressman
Lancaster.
The group received a con-
gratulatory call from the Demo-
cratic National Committee follow-
ing the Gore visit. "They were im-
pressed with how well we did in
producing a crowd and in working
at the event said Scarlette Gardner,
member of the College Democrats
executive committee and chair of
their inaugural committee.
Little Rock, Ark. campaign-
LLEV
COMPACT DISCS AND TAPES
(TsJo SngleAlbumCD over SI 3.98)
IMPORTS
CASSETTES
COMPACT DISCS
SPECIAL ORDERS
USED CDs, TAPES & LPs
RARE & HARD TO FIND MUSIC
EXTENSIVE HARDCORE, ALTERNATIVE & REGGAE
SAVE
5
1�
$100 OFF
SAVE
ANY MERCHANDISE PURCHASE
(excluding sale Kerns)
"WHERE MUSIC AND YOUR MIND ASCEND
INTO THE REALM OF ALTERNATIVE MUSIC
WEDNESDAY
NIGHT
KEG
ARTY
750 KAMIKAZES 50$ JELLO SHOTS
$2.50 ICE TEAS & BAHAMA MAMAS
r-T��1
i
Mm
it
OFF
I
I
1 ADMISSION PRICE UNTIL 10:30pm ;
I
I
I
L
Wednesday, January 13
Present This Coupon At The Door
I
I
J
gfBIMBIBIgJBlgMBlr3MBMBMgr
3
IsMryMeJi
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is taking Applications for
STUDENT UNION
PRESIDENT
for the 1993-1994 Term
Deadline: Thursday January 21
Interested students may pick up a applications at
Mendenhall Student Center's Information Desk and
Room 236 - Student Union.
masffim
1
1
1
i
i
i
1
I
ers also phoned the group to ex-
press appreciation for their efforts,
Gheen said.
"I think we do have some-
what of a positive reputation with
the Democratic Party Gardner
said. "We have begun to build one
with all of our hard work.
Blue said he is proud of the
work the College Democrats have
done this yea r and now, he is "look-
ing forward to that next election
After returning from the in-
auguration, the Democrats will be-
gin a membership drive and would
like to remain active in county poli-
tics, Gardner said. She said they
would like to plan more campus
events this spring, including a re-
turn visit by Congressman
Lancaster.
The College Democrats are
not only service-oriented, Gheen
said.
"We would like to provide an
open forum for students' expres-
sion and continuing need for so-
cial, political and economic reform
he said. "We would also like to
motivate students to express their
ideas and to get involved
I VI I II
� DAN'S
raIizJpItHJfgJzzJfglilal
'i
Vintage Clothing,
Jewelry, Collectables,
Antiques, Furniture
i.
"Where Lost
Memories
Are Found
417 Evans St Mall
Downtown
752-1750
BUY � SELL � TRADE
W H
Greenville Toy
WELCOMES BACK ALL ECU STUDENTS
Get your car ready for '93 with these Coupon Specials
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
WINTERLZATION SPECIAL
�Drain cooling system and replace anti-freeze for
protection to 20-30 degrees below zero
�Check all fluid levels. c a j f
�Check battery and starter. 4 jF3
�Clean and inspect battery terminalscables.
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 1-31-93
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
MINOR TUNE-UP
�Install Toyota-brand spark plugs.
�Check air, fuel and emission filters.
�Inspect ignition wires, distributor cap
and rotor, belts, braces and PVC valve. ma � �
�6-cyIinder or 60,000-mile platinum plugs slightly higher �l
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 1 -31 -93
r
j
NEW SERVICE HOURS
SATURDAY
9 am - 1 pm
r
i
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
! AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION
! � .39-95 1
'Replace pan, gasket and fluid. "Clean screen.
� 'Adjust brands as well as manual and throttle linkage (where applicable).
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 1-31-93
4-95
GENUINE TOYOTA
OIL FILTER
I
�Double-stage filtering element
with anti-drainback valve.
Regular Price $6.13 Limit 2 plus tax.
Not valid with other coupons. Over the counter sales only"
Please present coupon at time of purchase.
TOYOTA QUALITY SERVICE
OIL CHANGE WITH FILTER G �)
�Includes up to 5 quarts Premium grade j
Kendall Motor Oil and Genuine Toyota A ;W
double-filtering oil filter. V
�Complete under-the-hoodcheck 1595
of all belts, hoses and fluid levels.
Please present coupon when repair order is written.
Coupon expires 1-31-93 Coupon expires 1-31-93
Greenville Toyota
"I love what you do for me
�TrWTVTA 1?1 -lOOO 3615 South Memorial E
I J T J I f JA -L "JLFJU Located Across From Carolina Easi
Service Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30am - 6pm Saturday 9am - 1pm
Present Student I.D. For 10 Discount
On All Other Parts & Service Purchases
�fj






WELCOME
STUDENTS!
Come Explore Your College Store!
it

WE HAVE HATS
PIRATE
BOOK BAGS
AND BACKPACKS
CALCULATORS
PIRATE
MUGS
NOTEBOOKS
AND BINDERS
NOT TO
MENTION
BOOKS!
PIRATE
PARAPHERNALIA
PIRATE
T-SHIRTS AND
SWEATSHIRTS
ART SUPPLIES
PIRATE
SHORTS
AND SWEATS
BAND-AIDS
Art Supplies
Check Cashing
VisaMastercard
Gift Wrapping
Room Accessories
Film Developing
Special Ordering of
Books not in stock
Greeting Cards
Pirate Imprinted Items
Class Rings
IBM & Apple Computers
Wide Vairety of Computer Soft-
ware
Typewriter Rental
Caps & Gowns
Graduation Announcements
Gift Tradebooks Department
20 OFF
A SELECT GROUP OF
TRADE ROOKS
11293 - 11693
ZOOFF ISS.OOOFF
SWEATSHIRTS RACK PACKS
SSC??f�: im-$m
One Stop dkoffiftp in tke UartofiCmpcLg.
Wright Building � 757-6731





The East Carolinian
January 12, 1993
Lifestyle
Page 13
Sounds from a year to remember
By Thomas Croft
SUf f Writer
"Wfcesides unruly spotted owls,
�urbanrioting and loot-
M ing, a big dang hurricane and
J the fortunate ousting of an un-
fortunate president, 1992 was a semi-
flowery time for pop music, particularly
forrockand hip-hop. Progress was made
intermsofagraduallyexpansivebreadth
of artistic integrity in pop music, and
oftentimes it seemed artists maderecords
for love of the music instead of the dol-
lar.
There weren't any believe-the-hype,
garage-to-gargantuan Nirvana scams,
Michael Jackson got uglier, oilier and
worse sounding and the industry mus-
tered the gall to sport a winner-take-all
in the mega pathetic excuse for a glam
metalrock band category: Ugly Kid
Joe, whom it's so easy to hate everything
about.
So, down to citing this
critic's top five pop re-
leases of the past year,
noting some exceptional
honorable mentions, and
keeping his ego going with
the who-to-keep-an-eye-
out-for artists in coming
months.
Buffalo Tom
1. Buffalo Tom
Let Me Come Over
Youthful products of Boston's
angst-rock trio factory, these guys tout
thirteen brilliant tracks on their third
LP.
Tighter, coherently textured, and
lyrically elusive though ponderous, Let
Me Come Over hoists Buffalo Tom into
Great Songwriters status, and no one
can dismiss thoroughly (album-long)
excellent songwriting (see Matthew
Sweet).
They still have the grind, though,
often prompting a scratched scalp and
wonderment that three peop le can whip
up such a racket. It's obvious all these
songs were composed on an acoustic
guitar, and Bill Janovitz's words coat
slices of life with slanted quirk.
2. Brand New Heavies
Heavy
Rhyme
Experience,
Vol.1
Three Brits un-
load their lead vo-
calist for 10 differ-
ent rap artists on a
10-track record
that's the most pro-
gressive in hip-
hop's canon: multi-
ethnic rap recorded
Jive in the studio with live bass, guitar,
drums, percussion, minimal keyboards,
no samples, some scratching, and
mounds of groove.
Artists such as Black Sheep (origi-
nally fromSanford,N.C.), The Pharcyde,
Main Source and Grand Puba (formerly
of Brand Nubian) are featured on this
crucial collection of jazzy funk and dope
raps. A must.
3. Polvo
Cor-Crane Secret
What is pop music? Don't ask Polvo,
the four Chapel Hill kids who mimic
then dust the pants off Sonic Youth�to
whom they're incessantly compared�
on their debut LP. After several 7" re-
leases and ample underground hype
around the southeast and particularly
in NYC, Chapel Hill-based (and
Superchunk run) Merge Records has
graced the listeningpublicwith a wicked
guitar-led alchemy of sorts, quite diffi-
cult to tag with labels or comparisons.
The record is indie label magic that'd
probably flop on a major, and all the
better. Cor-Crane Secret is like one big
experiment: songs tend to bleed into
one another, vocals and lyrics swerve
and stumble in the sometimes too-clut-
tered mix, and not since My Bloody
Valentine's Loveless have guitars been
tamed and manipulated so creatively
yet all the while retaining a sense of
melody, rhythm and
reason.
4. U2
Achtung Baby
Maybe it was re-
leased in 1991, but it's a
1992 record. This
Achtung Baby thing just
won't go away, and for good reason.
The Irish quartet'smostambitious LP to
date, Achtung comes off as dehuman-
ized, industrialized rock music, the fact
of which rings true to the extent that an
underpinning yet understated theme
throughout the album incorporates the
corporate, desensitizing (de)evolution
of contemporary art, and perhaps of the
industrial military complex. Quite aware
of entangling military alliances, Bono,
Edge, Mullen and Clayton fuse their
measly guitar bass, drums and ever-
improving, ever-impassioned vocals
with crunchy feedback, asphalt beats
and swirling, twisted synthetic effects
thatmakeeach song sound really, really
BIG. To his credit, Bono plays off the
giant machine effect of Achtung's music
with lyrics about love, divorce and feel-
ings. Futuristic, primitive: superb art.
5. BeastieBoys
Check Your Head
Polvo
Whoo-ee. AdRock, MCA, and Mike
D got more surprises
up their sleeve than a
Food Lion-brand can
of beefliKe stew.
Their third LP, Check
Your Head isn't old
school rap per se (say
Run DMC or even
Paul's Bovtique), but
the music is old
school funk (see Sly
and the Family Stone,
Herbie Hancock,
Funkadelic, Santana,
even Miles Davis).
Actually, the music�this time (mostly)
played by the Beasties themselves on
guitar, bass and drums�is Check Your
Head's greatest strength. With 20 tunes
and at almost an hour, the music flows
sugary smooth and often overshadows
the rapping. Lyrically, Check Your Head
is definitely a lateral move from their
first two albums: same topics, different
words. One cool note is tha t AdRock can
be credited with the Phillies Blunt para-
phernalia craze. All in all, pretty def
stuff, for white kids.
Okay, now to honorable mentions
for excellent 1992 albums. Toad the Wet
Sprocket, Fear: splendid folkrock,
sometimes too bfty lyrics; Pavement,
Slanted and Enchanted: dark humor
bathed in dastardly skanky prrxluction;
R.E.M Automaticor the People: they still
live in Athens; Grand Puba, Reel to Reel:
the second-best voice in rap, but too
much sexism; Juliana Hatfield, Hey Babe:
no more Blake Babies, so expect much
more spirited, edgy rock plus killer lyr-
ics; Public Enemy, Greatest Misses: the
ones that hit on this one keep Chuck D &
Co. way ahead; Tom Waits, Bone Ma-
chine: still raspy, saturated, sidewalk
educated, uncannily poetic; Sugar, Cop-
per Blue: cheesy album title, terrible live
show, but relentless hooks and, as al-
ways, masterful songwriting from hard
trio guru Bob Mould.
A new year means perhaps a more
fortunate president and maybe freer
North American trade and possibly a
new NFL franchise or a McSoy sand-
wich, but also it means music from art-
ists either dormant, touring or asleep in
1992. Save your pennies for new releases
by A Tribe Called Quest, Dinosaur Jr,
Smashing Pumpkins, Ice T, What Peggy
Wants, Queen Sarah Saturday, The
Goats and the as yet unsigned NYC quar-
tet, Faith.
Beast ie Boys
Student Union plans
diverse spring semester
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
This spring the ECU Student
Union Committees are offering per-
haps the most event-packed and cul-
turally diverse lineup in recent his-
tory.
Offering everything from a
Travel-Adventure Film Series to na-
tional and local Performing Arts,
chances are one would not have to be
culturally hungry to enjoy what the
Student Union has to offer.
Perhaps the most popular attrac-
tions the Union sponsors are the mov-
ies at Hendrix Theater. Some upcom-
ingmovies for January and February
include SingleWhiteFemale,HotShots,
Cool World, Patriot Games, Diggstown,
Passenger 57, The Player and Dracula.
Also in Hendrix Theater, the Student
Union will continue the Travel-Ad-
venture Film Series with "Viva
Mexico "Israel "Highways to
Alaska" and "Charmof the South
Jan. 29, the Student Union will
begin theirPerforming Arts series with
theMarthaGraham DanceEnsemble.
Martha Graham is considered one of
the first innovators of modem dance.
The ensemble will present a dance
program showcasing her style.
March 29, the Student U nion will
present "Smoke On The Mountain"
This musical comedy was written by
Connie Ray,a 1977 graduate of ECU.
The story is based on a small religious
town in North Carolina d uring the 1 ast
years of the Great Depression. With
500 performances, this play isnow the
longest running play in the history of
Off-Broadway's Lamb's Theatre.
March 20, "The Dayton Contem-
porary Dance Company will per-
form as part of a first-ever residency
with the University. This group pro-
duces choreography, dance, music,
and design at its most dynamic
Finally, on April 26, "The King's
Singers" will bring their version of
Bach to Rock, a cappela singing to
Wright Auditorium. This six-man
vocal ensemble has performed every-
where from Shea Stadium in New
YorktotheTonightShowwithjohnny
Carson. All of the Performing Arts
series will be held in Wright Audito-
rium, with tickets for students at $7 to
$12.
Another area ofevents scheduled
for the spring include a lecture and
forum series in Hendrix Theater. The
first of these events, held Feb. 2, is
"Songs Of My People a collection of
award winning photos by three Afri-
can American photo journalist This
showisasunbelievableasitishard to
get The tour of photographs is appar-
ently booked for three years straight
Another lecture,perhapsthebesttour-
ing the country now, will be held Feb.
9: "Anarchy or Apathy: An Evening
With Noam Chomsky Noam
Chomsky has been nominated for the
Noble Peace Prize, and is considered
See Union page 18
Reiner ascends to auteur status with latest
Photo courtesy Walt Disney Pictures
When the going gets tough, a resourceful youth named Aladdin discovers that a wisecracking, wish-
granting, lamp-dwelling Genie, posing as "master" of ceremonies, is the best friend to have.
Williams' wit, irony weave
magic carpet in 'Aladdin'
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
AfterwatchingRobReiner's
latest film, A Few Good Men, I
realized that he has quietly be-
come the most consistent direc-
tor working in film today.
When A Few Good Men is
included, Reiner now has seven
films to his credit. Every single
one has been successful, both
artistically and commercially.
Reiner is a director to whom the
term auteur could be applied.
The auteur theory was
crafted in the 1960s by film critic
Andrew Sarris. The theory has
been much maligned, but still
has applicability to cinema.
The auteur theory simply
states that a director is to a film
whatanauthoristoabook.Those
who subscribe to this theory be-
lieve that the single most impor-
tant facet of any film is the person who directs it.
Like most theories, the auteur theory needs to be
loosely applied to many films. Thre are more exceptk ns
to C iis rule than adherents. Not many would argue, for
Photo courtesy ColumDia Pictures
Tom Cruise stars in "A Few Good Men
about a Navy lawyer's quest for justice.
example, thatChrisColumbus, whodirected Home Alone
2, was the most important person working on that film.
Still the auteur theory, if
only applied tohigh quality films
with artistic aspirations, isa solid
statement about cinema. A tal-
ented director is the most impor-
tant part of any film with which
he is associated.
Rob Reiner's films provide
ample support for the auteur
theory. Hehasnowdirected com-
edies (This is Spinal Tap and When
Harry Met Sally ), light drama
(StatulByMe), romance(Th?Sure
Thing), fable (The Princess Bride),
honor Misery) and now intense
drama (A Few Good Men).
Though these films differ,
they have several unifyingquali-
ties. They all involve extremely
well-developed and interesting
characters, they al! tell full, satis-
fying stories with little deviation
from the plot, and they are all
incredibly entertaining.
If there is any doubt about Reiner's many talents, just
See Men page 18
By Gregory Dickens
Staff Writer
In September, Hendrix Theatre
was packed for the Student Union
showing of Beauty and the Beast.
Laughing, singing and applauding
aftersuchnumbersas"BeOurGuest"
and "Gaston's Theme theaudience
enjoyed the film to its fullest This
showing was a full year after the
film's release.
Donotwaitaslongtoseelirtrfdo
Disney's newest animated classic.
Once again revisiting a traditional
tale, theenterprisingMusketeers have
found a way to entertain the young
and old by relying on the formula for
success established by The Little Mer-
maid.
This formula is to make the he-
roes young, the heroinesteadfast and
intelligent, the villain in some way
endearing, to use magic, include the
best songwriters from stage and
screen in the past 10 years and then
trust the audience to be able to keep
up. It works.
Aladdin is a street orphan who
steals onlv to eat and is aided and
abetted by his pet monkey. He is
young, handsome, resourceful and
can sing whi le ba ttling the local police
and outwittingthe market merchants
for his daily bread.
Like Ariel (The Little Mermaid)
and Belle (The Beauty ami the Beast),
Aladdin longs for love.Theview from
hisbedroom window isoftheSultan's
royal palace and he dreams of some-
day being rich enough to live there.
The Sultan's daughter, Jasmine,
is to marry in three days a suitor
chosen by her father. She longs to
leave the palace, something she has
never before done. Parallel to this,
Aladdin wants to bea somebody and
escape his life; she wants to escape
being a somebody and livenormally.
Don't pull a mental muscle try-
ing to see the ou tcome of thi s movie.
It is apparent, but the thrill is in the
magic carpet ride on the way.
The villain in Aladdin is the sor-
cerer Jafar,advisor to the Sultan, who
isaccompanied by lagojafar'sparrot
and partner in crime (Gilbert
Gottfried, a riot of a curmudgeon).
Jafar seeks the magic lamp in which
resides thegeniev. ho will (singalong
folks) grant him three wishes. But
this is no ordinary genie; it is Robin
Williams.
Humor has never been absent
from a Disney film.
InAladdin isfound witandirony
and thephysical manifestation ofWil-
liams' lightning comic mind. Wil-
liams, now able to disregard the fa-
cial expressions that can sometimes
slurhisdiction, becomesa vocal hur-
ricane of punchlines. Since dialogue
is recorded before the art is devel-
oped, the animators were able to
incorporate Williams' inevitable ad-
libs much more fluid ly than wasdone
in Ferngidly last year.
As to be expected, Williams is
hilarious. Impersonating Jack
Nicholson, Robert De Niro, William
F. Buckley, Ed Sullivan, Williams
seems tochange his voice with every
line of script It is that much more
affecting when the genie uses Wil-
liams' true voicewhen lamenting his
own wish in life: tobe free of the lamp
and whoever possesses it
A credit to Disney is that Wil-
See Aladdin page 18
1
�m,
v�
I �





14 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12. 1993
Southern rock vents
(hopeful) last breath
By Thomas Croft
Staff Writer
You're a rowdy
cowboy who
byes on burning up those gritty high-
way miles, tuggin' at a fifth of whis-
key and chasin' down the two wicked
women you met back at Bucky's
Dust)' Grille & Tavern. They'redoin'
95 and you're tearing rubber off your
tires and screaming all over the road
and i ,e all better bet the good Lord's
lookin' after you, you wild, crazed
Southern boy.
You lose the women, so it's time
to pop in some kid music�(bad as in
good). Hmm you think,how about
something rockin but something
new? Why of course�-Copperhead!
Southern Rock, bless it's tired,
whiskey-soaked soul, will rjl die.
And the five tuff (as in tough) fellas in
Southern Rock'snewest tour deforce
�Copperhead � glare in the photo
on the back cover of their debut self-
titled LP (Mercury) like they wanna'
raise hell all over your face.
Oh, in the name of Johnny
Walker, the NRA, too-tight Wran-
glers and sexy lady mudflaps, why
must the Copperheads of this world
limittheirlyrical scope and iconogra-
phy to hard liquor, nailing women,
wielding guns because a man's just
got to, driving a million highway
miles without peeing, and suffering
through this hard, hard life?
Listening to Copperhead, the
question arises time and again be-
cause despite the fact that the boys
project an image of five unrighteous
imps who look mean, mad and bad
for no reason and write bonehead
lyrics, they're music warrants some
smidgen of merit. Unlike their all-
too-blatant musical forefathers �
Lynyrd Skvnyrd, Molly Hatchet,
Blackfoot � Copperhead, on occa-
sion, can lock into a fine groove and
rock out, a la the likes of Drivin' N'
Cryin' and Guns N" Roses. (Maybe
they should change their name to
Copper 1T Head.)
All five band members sing,
though mosttuneshave Neil Carswell
at the helm, belting out vocals with a
scratchy, though versatile and some-
times powerful, voice. Carswell plays
guitar,asdoesJonByrd. Bassist Tony
Hawkins and drummer Eric
Suttlemyre round out a rather flat
rhythm section. Theoxymoronic or-
ganistpianist in Copperhead, Brad
Durden, poses a dilemma for this
critic's review: the keyboards in
Copperhead's musicrank just as high
on the annoyance scale as they do on
the necessary scale.
Without Durden and his cheesy
blips and pstudo anthemic
dawdlings,therewould beabsolutely
nothing differentiating Copperhead
from any five long-haired, mean-
sneering, ex tra-rJght-jeans-espetialJy-
around-their-tiny-crotch-area tout-
ing, brand XXX of comatose, South-
em-obsessed racket regurgitating,
men. Call him (Durden) the albatross
man on organ.
About the record: 12 songs, av-
eraging about four minutes each,
not surprising song titles such as
"Highway "Whiskey "Hard
Livin "Bom Loser and "Busted
Here's a peek at some
copperheadedl)Ticsfrom the album:
"I don't understand it, life is so de-
manding, whiskey, killing and
dope (from "Busted"); "Well he
loved his shareofwomenDrankhis
share of wineDone his shareofkillin'
and He pulled his share of time
Turned seventeen a soldierWhen
he buried his first goldA no good
deserter from a hard fought Civil
War. Yeah, Ohh (from "Brown's
Gold"); "All my lifetravelin' on the
goBarrooms, Bad womenit's all
I've ever knownI'm a gamblera
rambler on the rolltoss the dice
Brother it's timeto hit the road
and "People say that I'm crazy You
know they could be rightAt least
MID-ATLANTIC
INSURANCE SERVICES, INC
Auto Insurance
Low Low Rates
We have the Lowest Rates for drivers
with points on their NC licenses
We cover
Motorcvcles, High Risk Drivers & Young Drivers
6 To 20 Points
DWI
Lowest Rates Available �Low Monthly Payments
Call For A Quote
756-7723
3004 S. Memorial Dr. Greenville, N.C. 27834
f
r
WELCOME BACK
ECUSTUpENTS!
MAD HATTER AUTO CARE CENTER
" jT OIL FILTER & CHANGE
y $16.50
Up to 5 qls. o Penn2oii 10W30 or Castroi 20W50. Other Brands & Weights Slightly Higher.
l
LIFETIME WARRANTY
MUFFLER
$60.50
Most cart and II jM trucks. Otter valid wltfi
coupon thru 2-21-93.
FRONT BRAKE SERVICE
$72.50
Lifetime Warranty Pads
$62.50
1 Year Warranty Including
Semi-Metallic Pads
Moat cara and light truck Offer valid with
coupon thru 2-28-B3
COMPUTER ALIGNMENT
Plus 4 Wheel Balance & Rotation
$38.50 2-Wheel Alignment
$49.50 4-Wheel Alignment
L
Mot cart and light trucks. Offer valid with
coupon thru 2-28-93
H
CV JOINT SERVICE
$50.00
Remove awe. otd outer boot, dean & repack joint &
install new outer boot.
Most cars and light trucks. Otter valid with
coupon thru 2-21-93.
Maintenance Tune-Up
-I
Keep your car or dght truck running right! Carburetor
adjustment (where applicable), new spark plugs
installed, set timing. PVC system serviced
4 Cylinder
6 Cylinder
8 Cylinder
$39.50
$49.50
$59.50
Most cars and light trucks. Otter valid with
coupon thru 2 28-93
J
WINTERIZE CAR
$5.00 OFF
Coolant Change
(Replace antifreeze
up to 1 gallon)
t cart and light Vuckl. Offer vajld with
coupon thru 2-28-93.
J
PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE TAX
MADJT HATTER
AUTO CARE CENTER
Muftler � Brakes
3140 Moseley Dr.
758-2306
(Behind Parker's BBQ.
Greenville Blvd.)
aB
HOURS
MonThur. 8-7
Performance, F ; q c oai o i
Protection, Quality rn- �"� CDdl- �
Four rec tournaments
scheduled this month
, . i , . Photo courtesy Mercury Records
Copperhead, on occasion, can lock into a tine groove and rock out,
a la the likes of Drivin' N' Cryin' and Guns N Roses.
theycan'tsayrmlazyI workallday, tongue are superimposed atop a tat-
tered, half-American, half-confeder-
ate flag.
Sadly, it seems, in the minds of
such (seemingly) undersexed,
meatbrained,rrachisrrK3rockers(and
apparently also to Mercury
Polygra m Records, Inc.), the Warain 't
over. Soallyouvarrnintsbetterwatch
your hide 'cuz here comes Copper-
head, raisin' hael (that's "hell" in
Southern) and leadin' the charge tit
the troops. The South shall (gargle,
spit) rise again!
rock hard every night (from "Haid
Livin).
If people sometimes say you're
crazy, if you work all day and rock
hard all night, perhaps Copperhead's
musical album will please your pal-
ate. Whether it does or not, its cover
art is ridicularity (that's ridiculous
plus hilarity) and slovenly anachro-
nistic.
Crossed daggers and a vicious
looking viper with eight-inch fangs,
demonic eyes and a mega-long
By Rachel Parker
SUff Writer
If you enjoy billiards, table ten-
nis, chess or bowling, then ECU
Recreation Tournaments may be for
you.
The tournaments are headed
by Lynn Jobes and take place dur-
ing the months of January and Feb-
ruary. ECU students will compete
against students from other univer-
sities all over the country if quali-
fied for the regional tournament.
In order for a student to be
eligible for the recreation tourna-
ments, heshe must be enrolled at
ECU at the time of the tournament
competitions. The student must be
enrolled ina minimum of three class-
room credit hours. Also, the stu-
dent must havea cumulative grade
point average of a 2.0.
Three levels of competition
make up the tournament process.
First, campuscompetitionsare used
to select those who wil 1 go on to the
regionalcomperirions.Thisyearthe
regional tournament will be held at
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
coupon
Greenville
Opticians, Inc
FREE FRAMES
I
I
I
I
I Call for details some restrictions apply
j offer expires Jan 31,1993 i -
'Coupon must be presented at time of purchase
S EYE EXAMS AVAILABLE NEXT DOOR
I AT GREENVILLE EYE CLINIC
� eyewear at reasonable prices Wilhelmina Nelson
� Doctor's Park, Bldg. 1 OPTICIAN
Stantonsburg Road ic-i c 7rn tn-io
� Greenville, NC 27834 P I &) Ol-Ul O
UNITED COLORS
OF BENNETTON
OFF
ALL FALL MERCHANDISE
Arlington Village
638 E. Arlington Blvd 355-7473 Mon-Sat 10-6
ere
COtlUCS AND SPORTSCARDS
h-010 ?
We've Got Them All!
All New Comic Releases
Back Issue Marvel, D.C. & Alternates
Comic Bags & Boxes
Marvel Superhero Card Sets, Singles and Holograms
Baseball, Football, Basketball cv Hockey Sets
Price Guides and Publications

9
HEROES
ARE
HERE;
(919)757-0948
116 Filth St.
Greenville, NC
THIS
Tuesday
College Night
The Best Mix
DanceTop 40
& Rock n Roll
Free Cover untii 10:00
Doors open at 8:00
Wednesday
Alive After Five
Live Beach Music at 7:00
Doors open at 5:30
Thursday
Coontemporary Country
Live Country Music
Doors open at 9:00
WMHi'
ZPNe
Friday
Comedy Zone
& Late Night Dancing
Doors open at 8:00
Comedy Show at 9:00
Saturday
i
Super Saturday
Greenville's
Largest Dance Party
Doors open at 9:00 $
Telephone 355-5000
207 SW Greenville Boulevard
Greenville, NC
the University of Tennessee in Knox-
ville. Winners of the regional tour-
nament are eligible for the interna-
tional tournament. The University
of California at Irvine will be host-
ing the international tournament
this year.
There is a $2 entry fee for each
tournament division. Also, a stu-
dent wishing to participate in the
recreation tournaments must fill out
an eligibility form. Eligibility forms
areavailableatMendenhall Billiards
Center.
The ECU recreation tourna-
ments area great way to meet people
and travel the country visiting vari-
ous schools and campuses.
ECU Student Union will pay
all expenses for those who qualify
to participate in the regional and
international tournaments. These
expenses include transportation,
food, entry fees, lodging and tour-
nament costs.
For more information about this
opportunity contact Lynn Jobes at
757-4711, or pick up a flier at
Mendenhall billiards room.
1534 E. 14TH ST.
M-F 10-8pm Sat8-6:30pm
Cherries
.99lb
Egg Plant & Zucchini
2 lbs.
for $1.00
Ph. 757-3311
52 Days
and a
Wake Up!
WASHINGTON D.C.
from
$65.00
NIAGARA FALLS
from
$279.00
DISNEY
WORLD
SPECIALS
CRUISE
SPECIAL
2FOR1
1993 - 41093
1-800-841-0666
TOUR PACKAGES
SPORTING EVENTS
STUDENT RATES
SPRING BREAK
Best
of
Travel
Call Now!
1-800-
841
-0666







4.
JANUARY 12, 1993
The East Carolinian
15
Cinema to remember
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
The end of a year is a thrilling
time for a critic. It is a chance to
reminisce about the many wonder-
ful (and not so wonderful) experi-
encesspentinthedarkened,friendly
confines of a theater.
For someone like myself, who
would rather sit in a thater than be
almost anywhere else in the world,
the chance to reflect upon films is
delightful.
like many critics I must sheep-
ishly confess to having a penchant
BestFihns of the Year
"Unforgiven" Phoo county wam� Bro�.
for lists. I love listing my favorite films
and my least favorite and my
favorite comedies and my favorite
actors and the list is endless.
What I have listed below are a
selection of films that have opened in
Greenvilleduringthepast 12 months.
I have not included certain films
because they have not been shown in
Green vi Ue(althoughseveralgreB tfilms
are being shown in Mendenhall this
term).
Films like "The Player
"Glengarry Glen Ross "Howard's
End "Reservoir Dogs"and "TheCry-
Most Underrated and
Overlooked
1. "Thunder-heart"
2. "Man Trouble"
3. "White Sands"
Most Creative Use of
an Ice Pick
Best Interrogation
Scene
SharcnStoneinBasiclnstinct
lUnforgiven"
2 "A River Runs Through It"
3. "A Few Good Men"
4 "Malcolm X"
5. "Husbands and Wives"
Best Animated Films
1. "Aladdin"
Z"FemGulry"
3. "Muppets'ChristmasCarol"
Worst Animated Film
"Rock A'Doodle"
Nice Surprises
1. "My Cousin Vinny"
2 "Wayne's World"
3. "Honeymoon in Vegas"
Biggest Disappointments
1. "Batman Returns"
2 "Death Becomes Her"
3. "Grand Canyon
Most Plot Holes
(A tie: they are basically the
same movie, anyway)
1. "Passenger 57'
2. "Under Siege"
Funniest Neurotic Scene
(Another tie)
1. Judy Davis' first date
after separating from her
husband,SydneyPollack,
in "Husbandsand Wives
2. Sydney Pollack's first
dateafterseparatingfrom
his wife, Judy Davis, in
"Husbands and Wives
Worst Performance
of the Year
Lorraine Bracco in "Medicine Man.
L1992
HI
ing Game" may be fine films, but I
have yet to see them.
Also, since I do not see every
film that opens in the Emerald Qty
I have omitted some movies that
couldhavebeenonmyworstlistlike
"Dr. Giggles "Encino Man" and
any of the Columbus films.
So, with the above exceptions
noted, I would like to present my
decidedly slanted view of 1992 in
pictures.
Best Use of Elvis Songs
"Honeymoon in Vegas featuring
remakes by Billy Joel, John
Mellencamp and Travis Trirt
Most Exciting Movie
"Patriot Games"
Best Sequel
(Itpains me to think
cinema has come to this)
"Lethal Weapon 3"
Best Influence on the
English Language
"Wayne's World Not!
Worst Films of the Year
ioto courtesy UnlvcruT
"Stop or My Mom Will Shoot"
1. "Stop or My Mom Will Shoot"
2 "Consenting Adults"
3Toys"
4 "Alien 3"
5. "Medicine Man"
The
AMERICAN
MARKETING
ASSOCIATION
it
Setting the Standard for Excellence
f�
Our
"Welcome Back" Meeting
will be held in the
General Classroom Building
Room 1032
on
Wednesday, January 27 at 4 p.m.
Take this opportunity to meet
the officers and advisors of the AMA,
to hear a professional speaker
discuss current marketing topics
and if you have not joined
this is the time to become a member!
Refreshments will be provided
Student Union searching for new president
By Warren Sumner
Staff Writer
The ECU Student Union, one
primary connection between the
University and the student body,
is searching f r someone to serve
as their president.
When Deanna Price gradu-
a ted in December, an opening was
cleared for an enthusiastic stu-
dent to serve as heir to her throne.
Price said she had enjoyed her
term leading the Union and knew
the position would prove to be
rewarding to whoever was se-
lected by Union members.
"It's a wonderful leadership
opportunity Price said. "With
all the contacts I've made with
everyone involved in the Union
I've had the opportunity to work
with IFC, ABLE, the faculty, the
students; just about every group
on campus
Price said she felt her univer-
sity involvement, including past
involvement with the Student
Union, was a factor in her ap-
pointment as president, but is
quick to point out that experience
in the Union was not a require-
ment for the position.
Lynn Jobes, Assistant Pro-
gram Director for the Union,
agreed with Price on this matter.
"I wouldn't want someone
to be discouraged from applying
for the position just because they
weren't involved in the Student
Union. We have several faculty
and executive advisors to assist
the new president in his or her
duties
While experience is not a de-
termining factor in the Union's
search to fill this position, Jobes
said the organization does have a
few qualities in mind when
searching for their student leader.
She went on to say that it will take
a special kind of student to fill the
Union's needs.
"We need someone who is
enthusiastic about the position
and willing to take advice from
someone who's been there. Who-
ever inherits the position must be
able to handle responsibility
Jobes said.
According to Jobes, the
president's primary responsibili-
ties will in-
clude inter-
viewingappli-
cants to chair
t h e
University's
planning com-
mittees, work-
ing with the
next year's
budget, and
helping in the planning of Stu-
dent Union goals for the '9394
year.
Jobes said the president's
workload will consist of at least
20 hours a week, given the broad
'Whoever inherits
the position must
be able to handle
responsibility'
span of Student Union activities.
The Union requires potential
applicants to have at least a 2.5
grade point average and the ap-
pointed presi-
dent must stay
in school dur-
ing the sum-
mer.
The presi-
dent will re-
ceive a $200
monthly sti-
pend and the
University will
pay his or her summer school tu-
ition costs.
Interested applicants should
call contact Lynn Jobes in the
University Student Union office
at Mendenhall.
Lynn jobes,
Assistant Program Director
AMERICA'S
FAVORITE
OIL CHANGE
At Jiffy Lube, your car receives the finest, most
complete, preventive maintenance possible,
performed by a highly-trained team of specialists.
Drive into Jiffy Lube and drive out in minutes
knowing your car is ready for that long road trip.
1. We change your oil with a major brand!
2. We install a new oil filter!
3. We lubricate the whole chassis!
4. We Check and fill transmission fluid'
5. We Check and fill differential fluid!
6. We Check and fill brake fluid!
7. We check and fill power steering fliud!
8. We Check and fill window washer fluid!
9. We check and fill battery!
to. We Check the air filter!
11. We Check the wiper blades!
12. We inflate the tires to proper pressure!
13. We vacuum the interior!
14. We even wash your windows!
We'll Have You Ready in Minutes
With No Appointment.
NC OFFICIAL SAFETY INSPECTION STATION
126 SE Greenville Blvd.756-2579M-F 8-6 Sat 8-5
SAVE $4
oo
ON OUR FULL 14pt SERVICE
Not good with any other ocupon offer. Cash value of l20th of one oent.
Limit one coupon per person per visit. Good only ir. Greenville or Jacksonville.
Expires 2193
"1

mmmm a o mm i
HI STUDENT UNION
HAPPENINGS
MOVIES I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
f Young Frankenstein
WED & SUN, JAN 13 & 17
Single White Female
THUR, FRI, SAT, JAN 14, 15 & 16
SPECIAL I HYPNOTIST
CONCERTS TOMDELUCA
THURJAN 28, 8 PM
HENDRIX THEATRE
$3.00 In Advance
at Central Ticket Office, MSC
$5.00 At The Door
MINORITY ARTS! MARTIN LUTHER KING
CANDLELIGHT MARCH
MON, JAN 18, 7 PM
CHRISTENBURY MEMORIAL GYM
PARKING LOT
COFFEE HOUSEI BRIAN HUSKEY
TUES, NOV10,8- 9:30 PM
m THE UNDERGROUND, MSC
$1 Admission with Student, I.D. �
$2 Admission for General Public
PRODUCTIONS! TOURNAMENTS
MEN'S TABLE TENNIS
TUES, JAN 19, 7-10 PM
MEN'S BILLIARDS
THURSJAN21 7-10 PM
Reaisterstration Fee: $2
Billiards Room, MSC
Winners Represent ECU In
Regional Competition
APPLICATIONARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED FOR
THE 1993-94 STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT.
CALL 757-4715.
o
For More Info Call The
University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004
�"�' mummmmmm. m.
� iJM�i.i:n.ii





16 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
Foreign
film series
underway
Staff Reports
Rims from Hungary, Finland,
Italy and France make up the Sixth
VVinterRxeigrHFilmseriesarttieNortfi
Carolina Museum of Art,andthisyear
they will be screened in 35 millimeter.
"My Twentieth Century" kicked
off the series Jan. 8-9. This Hungarian
movie is a celebration of electricity,
love, movies and the infinite possibili-
ties of man, wcmanarri the chirnpan-
zee It tells the story of twin sisters
separated at birth;onebecomesa jewel
thief, the other a political activist
"Ariel a film from Finland di-
rected by Aki Kaurismaki, will be
screened Jan 15-16. Inspired by Euro-
pean black aomedies, this film is a
satire on Western values. The story
follows an unemployed mine worker
who inherits a Cadillac convertible
with a top mat won't dose in the win-
ter. He sets out on a journey that in-
vorves him in a mugging, jailbreak,
marriage, car theft and bank holdup.
The Italian film, "The Story of
Boys and Girls" will be screened Jan.
22-23. Director Pupi Avati tracks the
dorrBSttadatwnshipsoftwo very dif-
ferent families united by marriage,
against the background of a sumptu-
ous feast
"A Takof Springtime a French
film directed by Eric Rohmer, con-
dudes the series on Jan. 29-30. The
story focuses on a young Parisian phi-
losophyteacher and a precocious teen-
ager whcee lives are complicated by
boyfriends, fathers, mistresses and
other assorted characters.
The series runs Jan. 8-30 in the
Museum's auditorium. The films are
screened at 7 pm and 9 pm on Fri-
days; 4:45 pm and 7 pm on Satur-
days. Series tickets are $9 (Museum
members $8); single tickets atthe door
atthedoor$3($250). Filmsare recent
and shown in the original languages
withsubtirJes-Parentalguidanceisrec-
orrmwndedForrriceinfbrmatianon
thefilmseries,caUfhe.Museurnat(919)
833-1935, ext 143.
MOVIES
thi
in
wee
Buccaneer
$3 children and senior citizens;
$5 adults. Greenville Square
Shopping Center:
Forever Young - PG
The Distinguished
Gentleman - jR
Trespass -R
Park
Theatre
$150 admission
114 W. 5th St.
Passenger 57
Carolina East
Cinema
$3 children;
$5 adults.
Carolina EastCon-
venient Center:
A Few Good
Men-R
Leap of Faith -
PG13
Home Alone -
PG
Leap of Faith -
PG13
Aladdin - G
Park Cinema
$3 children, matinees; $5 adults
The Plaza
Bodyguard -R
Muppet Christmas Carol- G
Compiled by Dana Danlalaon
Toys-PG
Dracula - R
Campus Paperback Bestsellers
1. A Rtvar Runs Through tt, try Norman Maclean (Urw ot
Chcago Press. S9 95) Stones ot western Montana
2. The AutoOtognphy of Malcolm X, rvrtfi Alex Haley
iBaJtantne. $5 99 j The Dtack leader s Site story
3. The Indispensable Catvm tnd Hoboes, by B'i; Waltareon
(Andrews & McMeei $12 9b Latest coiected cartoons
4. Ufa's Little Instruction Book, by H Jackson Brown Jr
(RutledpeHi. $5 96) Advce tor attaining a tud We
5. The Hrm, by John Gnsham (IslandDel. S5.99).
Young lawyer confronts the hidden workings, of hs firm
6. A Time to KM, by John Gnsham (IstanoVDefl, $6 99)
Racial tension runs high during a tnal.
7. Cows of our Planet by Gary Larson (Anc'ews & McMee
$8 95.) Cotectiop of Far Side cartoons
8 Pcmcalh,FsshKneb!y.AerodynsmicaHytncorrfcl. t.
Berkeley Braalheo (Utfle. Brown S9 95) Outland cartoons
9. Putting Peopte First by Bdi Chnton and Al Gore (Times Books
Random House. $7 99) Outlines ptans for "changing America"
to. Hideaway, by Dean Koonu 'Berkley. $5.99) Resuscitated
after he dwd. a man s taynttd by v��ons of ev
Mew G Recommended
The Dufca Unrversrry Medical Canter Book of Okfft and Fitness.
(Fawcett. $12.00 Healthful program that you can taior to your neei
to lose weight graduaJry - and keep n off
Think Uka a Shrink, by Chnst Zo�. MO (Warner. $10 99Proven
program that helps you now to solve your problems yourself with short-
term therapy techniques
Earth in the Balance. Ecology and the Human Spirit by Senator Al
Gore (Plume. $13.00Gore uses The metaphor of the oysfunctjonal
lamrfy to show how human crvikzafcon must heal itself psychologically
and sptfTtuaBy before we can heal our ailing environment.
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmimmmumammmmmaummmam
ers
�ive Center, Inc
Formerly The Rum Runner Dive Shop
Serving the area tor over 15 years
2905 E. 5th Street, Greenville Ph. 758-1444
30 Savings on Wetsuits
?Savings on Mask-Fins-Snorkels
?Selected BCD's reduced dramatically
Classes Beginning: 2 February 1993
"As the new owner, my attention is focused
on meeting the special needs of swimmers,
snorkelers and divers
Order your college ring NOW
JOSTENS
AMERICA S COLLEGE- RING
Date: JAN 11-13 Time: 10-3:00 Deposit Required: $20.00
�vfffifcr
Place: ECU BOOKSTORE Payment Plans Available. :T
Meet with your Jostens representative for full details See our complete ring selection on display in your college bookstore.
SB SSfCn 0? M
Madrigal dinner smashing success
By Karen Greenwell
Staff Writer
The 16th annual Madrigal Din-
ner, held in December, was a tre-
mendous success.
This event was co-sponsored
by the Department of University
Unions, Department of Dining Ser-
vices and the ECU School of Music.
These three powers combined ef-
forts to re-create an Elizabethan-style
feast mat any Lord or Lady would
have been proud to attend.
Everything about the annual
Madrigal dinner was magical and
left little to be desired: complete
with singers, musicians, dancers,
poets, jugglers, minstrelsand much
more.
The most recent dinner incor-
porated talents from the university
community in a marvelous comical
production of Pyramus & Thisbe:
Manny Amaro, David Bailey, David
Emmerling, Frank Salamon, Stuart
Secttor, Jeanie B. Tomkalski, and
Lucy Wright Surprisingly, with the
exception of Manny Amaro, the
entire cast had no previous acting
experience.
Always a favorite of the din-
ners is the music and dancing. The
Madrigal Singers preformed a vari-
ety of Christmas carols throughout
dinner and the trumpeters and harp-
sichordist helped transform the
room into a royal banquet hall.
There wasnever a dull moment.
The Lord and Lady, played by James
and FrandneRees,helped make the
evening run smoothly with amus-
ing comments and their friendly
manner.
An important aspect of the
Madrigal Dinner is, of course, the
food. The menu consisted of
Waldorf salad, prime rib, twice-
baked potatoes and a vegetable
medley. Desert was the excellent
finale to an exceptional meal: Baked
Alaska.
Thedinner wascatered by ARA
Services,combiningtheskillsofGlen
Hamlin, Executive Chef and Jean-
Paul Beaudreau, Executive Pastry
Chef.
, , . . , , . Photo courtesy Stuart Sacttor
Lord and Lady Rees hosted the 1992 Madrigal Dinner, complete with
singers, dancers, poets, jugglers, minstrels and a sumptuous menu.
ECU AMBASSADORS
WELCOME BACK!
Members, don't forget our first meeting
Wednesday, January 13
Roving Adverfso
THE aB�� "eSBBl
EAST
CAROLINIAN
919-757-6366
E:
tfRugasticSanjjs
the Original family Harcutters,
South Park Shopping Center
115 Red Banks Road
355-9515
NEW HOURS 1
Open Sunday 1-6J
Appointment V
� Necessary ,3T
OPEN MON-SUN
Mon-Fri 9-8
Sat 9-6 Sun 1-6
.
Wanted:
Licensed Stylists
f Fantaatlc Sam
j ADULT
SNEED CASHS
THE
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
(COIN & RING MAN)
FORMERLY ESTATE SHOP
COIN & RING MAN
IS NOW BUYING
Furniture
Men's Clothing
Dorm Refrig.
Microwaves
Jewelry(goodbroken)
Stereo Equip.
Video Equip.
Misc. Items
If you are selling you must be 18
with a picture ID(NCDL. ECU)
Ph. 752-3866
Mon 10-12 1-5
Tues-Fri 10-12 1-3
Sat 10-12
Park behind Globe Hardware &
use our new rear entrance
-
Fantutic Sam'
PERMS
i $2Z95 Su"�d j HAIR CUT!
-2.00 Dlacounl ' O gg
I song- $8-00
I VfcU.aJtf (Shampoo MaJM ,
V Long Hair Extra Daalo,n Cuta Eitm
0
0k'r -arU ak5 "Pi5- JR O j� lh
1 THE BEGINNING i
IS HERE
To make keeping your resolution
easier, we have a special offer for you.
10
only
week
program
49
Medical Weight Loss Systems will help you J
reach your ideal weightand stay there!
Call Today 756-2611
We're with you every inch of the way.
"Nothing tastes as good as being thin feels
0
MedjcajWeightT Loss Systems
610 Arlington BlvdArlington Village
Open MonFri. 9 a.m. To 6 p.m
756-2611
Amy; Barr Ward,
Director
This oiler does nol include medical lees. If necessary or product fee. .
3�
i





17 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
Klee, Mike offer 70s retrospect show
By Rachel Parker
Staff Writer
"The Klee and Mike Show" appeared Friday, Jan.
8, at the Fizz.
The show is written and performed by two ECU
music department graduates. Klee Liles graduated
with a degree in music education with a concentration
in percussion in 1989. Mike Robertson also graduated
from the School of Music in 1992.
Liles and Robertson offer a show that one can
simply sit back and enjoy. They play a 70s retrospect
show and perform songs by artists such as James
Taylor, John Mellencamp, Billy Joel, Simon and
Garfunkel,and,of course, Jimmy Buffet. David Wilcox,
John Gorka, Shawn Colvin and Michael Hodges are
among the modern artists the duet performs.
"The Klee and Mike Show" has two goals. The first
is to present cover tunes as close to the original as
possible. The second goal is to introduce new music to
the audience.
Liles stresses the importance for everyone to hear
new bands and singers whether they play original
music or cover tunes. He went on to say mat all new
bands should be given a chance and local talent should
be supported.
Liles sings and plays the acoustic guitar while
Robertson backs him up with various toys, including a
mark tree, which isaninstrumentthatsoundslike wind
chimes. Congo drums, bongo drums, an afuche, a
triangle andatambourinearealsoamong the toys in his
not-so-little bag o' tricks.
Liles started out playing bass guitar in high school.
Through experience with various bands,his guitar-playing
talent improved
Robertson is a natural in the percussion section. In
addition to "The Klee and Mike Show Robertson plays
with Panama Steel which poses the only conflict in sched-
ules for the duo.
Li les and Robertson met in the spring of 1989 when
they both played in the percussion line for ECU'S
Marching Pirates. The two have played various clubs
inGreenville,Raleigh,Wilmington,and Atlantic Beach.
Liles has performed alone in Boone, N.C. and Lexing-
ton, Ky where he currently resides.
Although individually both are outstanding art-
ists, each gives the other what he needs to be truly great.
Liles' stage presence presents him as if he were bom to
sing.
Yet, if performing alone, he would join the masses
in performing solo with only his guitar as accompani-
ment. Robertson gives Liles the sound effects needed to
incorporate a Latin flavor into their show. Robertson
also adds Caribbean flavor to songs by Jimmy Buffet.
'Tobe a well established studio musician in Nash-
ville or wherever it takes me is Liles's goal for his
music. When asked if the two plan to remain together
the answer was yes, as longas they possibly could. They
hope to be in Nashville within six to eight months.
Why do they name their performance "The Klee
and Mike Show rather than come up with a typical
band name? They are a show. They incorporate com-
edy, music and sound effects into a wonderful show-
that is not only appealing to listen to but visually
exciting as well.
For the parrot heads (Jimmy Buffet fans) Liles and
Robertson have invented a fin dance. This is a dance
only to be danced when "Fins"
by Jimmy Buffet is played. This
dance should only be danced at
The Klee and Mike Show" and
should not be tried at home. The
duo also has a new and quite
interesting version of Don
McLean's "American Pie
Periodically, throughout the
show they have "shots for the
band " episodes, which is a soda 1
drink in which everyone must
participate.
They also play requests if they
arefamiliarwith thesong. They do
it all: singing, dancing, comedy
and drinking,allinthenameof
good fun.
If you have not yet experi-
enced "The Klee and Mike Show they will play at
Staccatos, Feb. 19 and 20. Don't miss out
mi
Photo courtesy Scott Harris
Mike Robertson (left) and Klee Liles combine their
many talents to perform and entertain.
LIFESTYLE WRITERS!
Welcome back meeting 4
p.m. Thursday. Please call
Dana if you can not attend.
DOWNTOWN
218 E. 5th St.�752-0022
ALFREDO'S
New York Pizza By The Slice
WELCOME BACK!
ALFREDO'S T" ALFREDO'S
2 Large Pizzas II SUPER "lf mf "�CHY
$6.99 $9.99
with coupon m w m m
ALFREDO'S
"M Pastes Mi, Bm,
with this coupon
Call Vs Delivery 758-7857
Delivery Only after 5:00pm
HOME OF THE KILLER SLICES
r Kodak v
Colorwatch
ksystem
Student Stores
Wright BuiMing
Greenville, NC 27858
Offer Valid from 11193 - 12993
WHEN YOU SEE THIS SEAL, YOU KNOW YOU'LL BE
GETTING THE BEST QUALITY AVAILABLE TODAY!
WHY ARE THESE
STUDENTS
SO HAPPY?
THEY JUST GOT
MONEY BACK FROM
A-l
AUTO BODY
REPAIR SHOP
20DiscxxjntForAII
ECU Students and Faculty
�Free Estimates �Insurance Claims
�Painting � Fiberglass Work
�Frame Straightening �Glass Work
A-1 AUTO BODY REPAIR SHOP
2200 Dickenson Avenue
355-4611
THE CITY OF GREENVILLE
V WELCOMES BACK
) ALL ECU STUDENTS
' AND WISHES YOU A
SUCCESSFUL SPRING SEMESTER!
HELPFUL HINTS
FROM THE CITY OF GRFFNVIII F
Want up-to-date information about
City events and services?
Watch the Government Access
Channel (Cable Channel 9) or call
CITY-24 at 830-INFO (4636).
Did you know that the City
of Greenville has a noise
ordinance? For details,
call 830-4426 or 830-
4331.
All City Council meetings are open to
the public. Call 830-4422 for meeting
dates and times, agenda information,
or to find out the name of your City
Council Representative.
��k BL The City's leash law
requires that dogs be
yMl kept on the owner's
JJ premises at all times
& unless on a leash.
Call 830-4387 to report dogs
running at large.
Share your knowledge and
expertise! All Greenville residents
are invited to apply to serve on one of
the City's Boards or Commissions.
Call 830-4423 for details.
Want to report a junk car, an
overgrown lot, or unsafe housing
conditions? Call the Inspections
Division at 830-4466.
���
Is your organization
looking for a community
service project? Help
keep Greenville clean '
and beautiful by
adopting a City street.
Call 830-4523 for details.
City ordinances prohibit the
posting of handbills, fliers, and
political signs on poles and
City rights-of-way.
Let's recycle today for
cleaner & greener
tomorrow'
For the latest recycling
information,
ERKS
�JLt
The ONLY dealer in Greenville that offers
A LIFETIME GUARANTEE
On Installation
Specializing in
NAME-BRAND CAR STEREOS
ylLPINE
ads
KENWOOD
s '�
call 830-4527.
The City has an ordinance which
limits the number of unrelated
individuals per residence.
Call 830-4507 for information.
City ordinances restrict .�-p
parking in front yards � vrf"
and the length of time"
persons may park on
City streets. For details on parking
regulations,
call 830-4525 or 830-4420.
Copies of the 1993 City Calendar and
the updated Citizen Handbook are
now available. Call 830-4432 to get
yours today!
For additional information about the City of Greenville, call 830-4420 or
refer to the City's Code of Ordinances on file in Joyner Library.
:j3.
Pioneer
CAR SECURITY SYSTEMS
RADAR DETECTORS
CUSTOM BUILT SPEAKER BOXES
PAGERS
CELLULAR PHONES
CELLULARONE Authorized Dealer
j4UDIQNERKS JLJ�"
200 SW Greenville Blvd. fy 25 OFF
across from Furniture Fair next to the railroad tracks i INSTALLATION OF
,rrn�, OUR PRODUCTS
with coupon





18 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
Men
Continued from page 13
Aladdin
Continued from page 13
consider how many other Stephen
King stories have been made into
films. Most every other one has been
rruserablyineffecti'e.Reinerhasmade
two King tales into films and they
rank as the two best adaptations of
King's work.
A Few Good Men adds further
credibility to Reiner's immense talent
as a story teller.
A Fezv Good Men tells the story of
two marines (Wolfgang Bodison �
in a remarkable film debut that is
worthy of Oscar consideration�and
James Marshall) accused of killing
another marine in their company at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
The defendants are represented
in a Washington, D.C court martial
by a young Navy lawyer named
Daniel Kaffee (Tom Cruise). Kaffee is
helped by a lawyer
working for Inter-
nal Affairs (Demi
Moore)andafhend
of Kaffee's (Kevin
Pollack).
Thecaseforthe
government is
handled by an able
prosecuting Ma-
rine attorney
(Kevin Bacon). Kaffeegetswary
early on when the prosecuting attor-
ney seems only too eager to see that
the case never gets to court
One of the conflicts that arises is
from the colonel of the Guantanamo
Bay base (Jack Nicholson)who seems
to be hiding something.
The last half of the film occurs
primarily in thecourt room where the
tension builds to a shattering climax.
One of the most refreshing parts
of this story is that Cruise's character
never fallsin love with Demi Moore's.
The lawyers respect each other as
professionals withoutwanting to fall
into bed together. No hot romance
occurs, no silly games are played:
these two characters work on a case
together as people.
This leaves room to develop the
complexitiesof the plot. The pacing in
the unraveling of the story is perfect.
Although there are some intricacies,
the audience is allowed to under-
stand them.
Another remarka ble facet of this
film , which can probably be attrib-
uted as much to Aaron Sorkin (who
wrote the screenplay based on his
play) as to Reiner, is that every char-
acter interests the viewer. There are
really no clear cut villains or heroes
(although Cruise's character comes
close to the latter).
The story is more about honor
and morals than about a crime. The
finalewill probably leave many view-
ers wondering what crimes actually
were perpetrated and by whom.
This story works on many levels,
but most notably as first-rate enter-
tainment.
Never in the film's two-and-a-
half hours will the viewer be bored.
Boredom is impossible in a film this
perfectly paced.
One of the
other reasons this
film soars into the
cinematic strato-
sphere is that the
, performances are
but mOSt nOtably all powerhouses
Cruise is dyna-
This story works
on many levels
liams' inspiring antics flow into the
animation as well. This is simply a
beautiful film.
The Arabic locale, the seemless
flow in the magiccarpet Aladd in find s
and the rides the carpet gives him are
marvelsof motion. A scene involving
aride-for-your-life escape fromdeath
early in the film is a rollercoaster jour-
ney through computer-aided anima-
tion.
And lest you fear Aladdin to be
too heartwarming, you will be sur-
prised by the adventure. Not since
Raiders of the Lost Ark has a desert
locale been soexcitingand involving.
But, don't worry about scaring
your little brother or niece when you
take them along. The scenes of tur-
moil are helped along by sudden,
humorous pratfalls mat break up pv
tentially fearful moments.
Finally, there is the music. Upon
hearing of the death of Howard
Ashman, many wereconcerned songs
like "Beauty and the Beast "APart of
Your World" and "Kiss the Girl"
would not be lyrically matched.
Fortunately, Ashman had
worked with partner Man Menken
on a majority of the Aladdin
soundtrack. Also, Disnej had the
inspired brainstorm tohireTimRice,
the frequent partner of Andrew
Lloyd Webber Jesus Christ Super
ster,Catsand PhtmtomcftheOpem) to
fill in the lyrics of Menken's musk.
The swings are fa st and fu rious, espe-
cially thegenie's" A Friend Like Me
Trince AH" and the obligatory bal-
lad, "A Whole New World
Afcfcfcfimsagem,a "diamond in
the rough" oi the holiday movie
buffet. While not matching the ma-
turity of Beauty ami tlu Beast" love
story and complex characters, itbet-
ters Tlv Little Mermaid with street
smarts and sharp humor.
By evolving with these prede-
cessors in technology and sensibili-
tiesAIrtifrfiHupholdsthe tradition of
qualiKintheclassicDisney animated
film; a true achievement from an
impressiveaccomplishment.
Union
Continued from page 13
bv many tobe the best ti Hiring politicat
lecturer dealing with current issues
today. Another interesting activity
planned for anuaryisa Martin I uther
KingCandlelightJan. 18th.The inarch
will begin at 7 p.m. at Chnstenbiiry
Memorial Gym and will proceede
through campus.
The Student Union has also
booked someof the top musiciansand
comedians to perform at the Under-
ground, located in the lower level of
the Mendenhal! Student Center. A
partial list of those scheduled include
Brian Huskey, a national touring mu-
sician Jan. 26, and comedians Mike
Svveeney,and Mike Sullivan - Irwin in
February and March. Mike Sullivan
Irwin has performed on the MTV 1 2
Hour Comedy Hour, Evening At The
lmprov, as well as being a 1992 Star
Search winner.
In the way of live music, events
scheduled for the spring include
Jazzfest'93,agroupof ensembles from
the DepartmentofMusic Theconcert
will be held April 17th on the mall.
Another concert so to speak will
beheld on the mall on April 22nd. The
ever famous "Barefoot On The Mall"
will highlighrv-ariousbandsfrom Roily
GrayandSunfireto"1964-Atributeto
the Beatles
Take advantage of what this Uni-
versity has to offer, after all tha t is what
our student activity fee is for.
as first-rate
entertainment
mite. Moore is
solid. Keifer
Sutherland (who
plays a lieutenant
at Guantanamo Bay) continues to
amazeand newcomer Bodison'scon-
tributions have already been men-
tioned.
Special credit should be given to
Jack Nicholson who is solidifying his
place as one of Hollywood's greatest
actors. His performance puts A Few
Good Mai into the pantheon of the
great films of this decade, along with
Unfbrgiven and Silence of the Lambs.
Hopefully, if you only saw one
movie this holiday season, it was A
Few Good Men (1 hope that you had
seen Malcolm X before Christmas
break).
If you have not seen it, then run
out and do so. If you have already
seen it, you might think about seeing
it again. And next time you rent a
video, think about the Rob Reiner
titles 1 have mentioned.
You might even take a few min-
utes to consider your opinion of the
autenr theory.
'tyutn SecneC 7 Sxcciemeat!
arSound
AND
SECURITY
Authorized Agent of U.S. Cellular
Cellular Car Radar Car
Phones Security Detectors Stereos
mDC

Serious about sound
JVC
JVC CONMNT OF AMEMCA
r
�l Slierwood
BaSMEER
iNakamichi
VIPER
AVPWVE
Paul, Deborah & Alan Wittman
(919)355-1100 1-800-432-PHONE FAX (919)355-3154
2208 Dickenson Avenue � Greenville, NC 27834
C c v' Vv -
c
t: &&&
S

V
A
N

c & &�
W
v





Freds Corner
Rich's Nuthouse
BEUTlt:ULUUH? OUR NAU. UT r
EXUL UieoiUGUTS. fSoSstfUAN $700
THEY MUST LIASE BUILT n4AT. �jr
IT OVER THE UOLIPA'r'S. W. MngF
P,500?
by Haselrig
so msts WHAT QUR "
H7�V W�JT IS BEIH&
ON5th STREET.
Campus Confusion
f
DIFffCEWT
I'fA COIN6 TO
GET tTTte 6WtS
by Ben MOOre the newest omIMb to the comics page.
�r iw win

AND IF I DOWT
)
Captain Intent by Kubeai m to�� comic, peg.
Co r$C6f'
1 cX
V
fw
The lstSping'93 -vi-
RTOONISTS'Y
PLANNING PARTY U4
s
4
h THURSDAY January 14, 6:00pm East Carolinian office JT
rf We wanna pack the comics page full of good strips this semester,
so, aspiring comic stripers, get your hair folicles over here! A n
Whether your influences come from comic strips, comic books, political cartoons
animated cartoons, stand up comedians, or spandex manufacturers, we can work
y - 4 with you!
P v Requested Guests: v 5" ,
Chris Kemple , Sean Parnell, Eric Manning, Alex Ferguson, MarkBrett, y k
Kubeai, Mark Hodge, Eric Sullivan, Jeff Grubbs, Tim Cantrell.and
Kevin Chaisson � c .
' Note: You can work on a temporary basis or indefinitely.
Students in sophomore year and higher are preferred. 7
i
Note: You can work on a temporary basis or indefinitely.
Students in sophomore year and higher are preferred.
.and speaking of new talent
There was "The Morrigan" by Angela Raper

LOVE "T'OOH HAi
LOvr iou�. iElT
L�vr �you.
S SMIAT
lovE ou�
Love Nou
H1NV SLACK
MTBNT
LCATMeR
BOW
GO TO H6U.
MAKE ME
'Phoebe" by Stephanie Smit
REAPING
and "Matagot" by Kathleen Ryan.
But that was many a semester ago.
M
W�1E mamcSt
maf'a ao. noun,
rrirU 1 a pvki
uk�rf a.x
VeJUS or wix�i)j
�mn.l.ar
5WU5
We need new FEMALE CARTOONISTS, now!
Look, Ladies! Men are not the only humans who have something to say in the comic strip
medium. If you have the interest and potential talent to excell in the comic strip arts, why not
concider being a part of the PIRATE COMICS page? Sure, it's hard work, but you get
printed and it's fun.
Just pick up a phone and contact the Haselrig Dude at home(758-4545) or work(757-6366).
i
t





All your supplies
for less at UBE
5 1 � South (otanthe Street C i reen ville, Ni
��:i






The East Carolinian
January 12, 1993
Sports
Page 21
Racism rears its head in sports again
Associated Press
(AP) � Leaders of civil rights
groups and the players' associa-
tions of the three major sports
joined together Friday to form an
organization to press for the inte-
gration of team front offices.
The groups, spurred by al-
leged racial remarks attributed to
Cincinnati Reds owner Marge
Schott, said they would call for
teams to consider at least one mi-
nority for each future front-office
opening. They put off a decision
about picketing and boycotting
games but called for current
sports executives to undergo sen-
sitivity training.
Film director Spike Lee
pointed out why many athletes
have not spoken out against rac-
ism in sports.
'Today's African-American
athlete is not going to jeopardize
their contract, not going to jeop-
ardize their sponsorship of
sneaker deals by sticking his neck
out Lee said. "Who's going to
stand up and say something that
thev'regoing to lose millionsand
millions of dollars?"
The Rev. Joseph Lowery,
president of the Southern Chris-
tian Leadership Conference, was
the most forceful speaker during
the 3 1 2-hour meeting.
"I think this is the most sig-
nificant event in racism in sports
in my lifetime he said.
Lowery drafted a statement
against the remarks attributed to
Schott, a statement endorsed by
Benjamin L. Hooks, executive di-
rector of the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Col-
ored People, and John E. Jacob,
president of the National Urban
League. Also joining the state-
ment were Donald Fehr, execu-
tive director of the Major League
Baseball Players Association;
Charles Grantham, executive di-
rector of the National Basketball
Players Association; Clark
Gaines, a regional director of the
NFL Players Association; and
Reggie Williams, who works for
the NFL.
"This body here assembled
joins with citizens around the na-
tion in expressing outrage and
pain at statements and behavior
attributed to Marge Schott, owner
of the Cincinnati Reds the
group said. "Such statementsand
behavior have no place in the
sports world and indeed in the
nation.
Committed to racial justice,
fairness and equality and to the
dignity of every individual, we
urge and expect the owners to
take meaningful and appropri-
ate disciplinary action for justice
delayed is justice denied.
"This unfortunate incident
provides an opportunity for the
owners to not only condemn ra-
cial slurs, but recognize that the
failure of baseball and all sports
to include African-Americans,
Hispanics and other minorities
at every level of the industry �
general management, entrepre-
neurial, professional, etc. � con-
stitute racial slurs.
"We hope that action taken
will precipitate immediateefforts
to remedy inequalities so that
baseball at every level will reflect
thediversity on the playing field
and in thenation. Failuretodoso
will be the biggest racial slur of
all
Isiah Thomas of the Detroit
Pistons joined in by telephone.
Fat Lever of the Dallas Mavericks
attended the meeting, as did
former NBA player Alex English
and former major league baseball
player Tony Bernazard.
Fehr said that the players as-
sociations had difficulty making
racial equality a top issue because
of their roles in collective bar-
gaining.
"To suggest they're all-con-
suming is understating thecase
Fehr said.
He also said the high wages
of professional athletes prevented
players from receiving sympa-
thetic treatement.
"No one will identify a base-
ball player, or should they, as a
victim he said.
Fehr went on to criticize the
delay on dealing with Schott, ac-
cusing owners of "poorly func-
tioning institutions at this mo-
ment
Grantham was harsher, say-
ing: "It only suggests the inept
management of the leagues that
has allowed so much time to
pass
Lowery called the delay
"shameful bahavior on the part
of baseball
Deputy commissioner Steve
Greenberg said later that "it
would not be appropriate for me
to comment or for anyone from
major leaguebaseball to comment
as long as the current investiga-
tion is pending'Grantham said
the sports unions owed the civil
rights leaders "a tremendous
debt" for joining their cause.
"Write a check Lowery
joked.
"A moral debt Grantham
said.
Pirates fall short
against Appalachain St
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The ECU Pirates travelled to Varsity
Gym in Boone, N.C. on Jan. 4 to meet the
Appalachian St. Mountaineers. The Pi-
rates, looking for a win on the road, were
denied, continuing an unfortunate trend
of losing close games. The Pirates fell 76-
74 after falling short in a comeback at-
tempt in the waning seconds of thegame.
The Pirates started to pull away from
the Mountaineers in the first half as a
technical foul provided the Pirates the
opportunity to take an eight point lead
midway through the first half.
But Pirate fouls allowed ASU back
into the contest as they relied on inside
shooting by guard Ricky Nedd and for-
ward Joe Sabato to bring them ahead or
ECU. A Tremayne Rooks 19-ft jumper in
the final second of the half extended the
ASU lead to five.
ASU fired once again at the start of
the second half extending their lead to
14. The Pirates shooting atrociously from
the free throw line, battled back, led by
the perimeter shooting of Ronnell
Peterson.
The inside shooting of Curley Young
Brought the Pirates within two, but they
could not overcome the perimeter shoot-
ing of Billy Ross. The Pirates fell just
short, losing yet another close game. The
Pirate record now stands at 4-5.
vs.A)jalachiaiT;t
ECU (74)
Minfgftrb
m-am-ao-tapftp
Gill 254-94-40-40112
Hunter 213-80-02-6247
Copeland 231-10-01-61
Lyons 262-76-80-32311
Peterfi 318-160-22-35323
Jones 6o-u0-01-1100
James 50-11-20-0001
Richardson 190-70-01-3110
Yauna 194-43-30-40311
Armstrong 80-10-00-0000
Lewis 173-31-43-50-�y
A long, long road
Totals 200 25-5715-23 10-37 12 21 74
Percentages: FG - .439, Ft. 652, 3 pt. Goals: 9-22 -
.357, Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots -1,
Turnovers - 20, Steals - 8.
Appalachian St. (76)
Min fg
m-a
Nedd 29 6-10
Ross 33 7-15
McClendon28 6-10
Cool
Sabato
Richards
Williams
Hege
Carter
Rooks
25
22
5
18
15
17
8
1-7
2-2
1-1
2-5
4-4
0-5
1-2
ft
m-a
0-0
1-3
4-5
1-3
0-0
0-0
3-4
3-3
2-2
0-1
rb
o-t
2-7
2A
4-5
0-1
0-1
0-1
0-3
0-1
0-2
0-1
Pf
1
4
2
3
1
1
2
1
0
3
�P
12
16
16
3
4
2
7
12
2

Totals 200 30-6114-21 8-34 12 18 76
Percentages: FG - .492, Ft 667, 3 pt. Goals: 2-13 -
.154, Team Rebounds - 8, Blocked Shots - 3,
Turnovers - 21, Steals - 14.
1st half 2nd half OT
ECU
T. Tech
35
40
39
36
N.C State
may lose
three players
Associated Press
File Photo
A Payneful trip: The ECU men's basketball team came to the end of an
eight-game road trip last night against the Richmond Spiders.
(AP) � Chuck Kornegay and DonnieSeale
should learn early next week whether they can
return to the North Carolina State basketball
team, coach Les Robinson said.
The school announced Thursday that
Kornegay, a 6-foot-8 freshman, and Seale, a 6-
5 senior, had been declared academically ineli-
gible for the second semester. Senior Jamie
Knox also is ineligible, and his care at NCSU
has ended.
Kornegay and Seale are appealing their
suspensions, and the appeals process should
be completed next week. Laws protecting stu-
dents' academic records prohibit Robinson
fror. discussing the specifics of their situa-
tions. But Seale said Friday he was confident
he could rejoin the team, saying he had fin-
ished work in an incomplete course from the
fall semester.
"The thing that bothers me is that people
will see the headlineThree State players ineli-
gible' and their first thought will be that we
have renegades here who don't go to school
Robinson said.
"But we're solid. Our GPAs have risen
every semester. Unfortunately, that's not the
perception people will get from this
Freshman athletes at NCSU must have at
least a 1.5 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale
after their first semester in school to compete
in the spring semester.
Tenessee Tech finds revenge in Cookeville
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
After handily defeating Tennessee
Tech in Greenville earlier this season, the
ECU Pirates lost their second consecutive
road game to the Golden Eagles on Dec.
30, when they travelled to Cookeville.
The Pirates shot terribly from the field
and, with the exception of Wilbert Hunter,
every member of the team's scoring aver-
ffGUivs.Tennessee Tech
���iSSSSSisi
age dropped in their 95-77 defeat.
The Golden Eagles led the Pirates
throughout the contest, as tenacious
Golden Eagle defense held the Pirates to
26.3 percent field goal shooting in the first
half. Pirate scoring machine Lester Lvons
washeld to just four first-half points while
Golden Eagle guard John Best racked up
11.The Pirateshit the locker room trailing
41-27. The Golden Eagles came out gun-
ning in the second half, with the perim-
eter shooting of John Best and Robert
West. The Pirates, trailing by as much as
22, never cut the lead any closer than 11 at
anv point in the second half. The Pirates
continued their poor shooting perfor-
mance in the second half hittingonly 39.5
percent of their field goal attempts. The
Pirates shot only 26 percent from three-
point range and were out-rebounded by
the Golden Eagles in their crushing road
defeat.
Lewis 14 2-4 1-2 3-4
Copeland 21 1-7 2-2 5-12
Totals 200 27-8117-25 24-49 13 22 77
Percentages. FC - .333, FT. - .680, 3 pt. Coals: 6-23
ECU (77- .261, kTeam rebourds - 7, Blocked shtos-1,
Minfftrb
m-am-ao-taP'tpTennessee Tech(95)
Jones 11A0-00-0113Minfgft rb
Lyons 245-132-20-03313m-am-a o-taPf�P
Richardson i81-51-20-2123Crouch 40-10-0 0-0000
Hunter 318-196-65-71322Houston 362-86-8 4-610210
Young 83-71-31-3117Dykstra 10-00-0 0-0000
Peterson 284-132-22-62214Ingram 10-00-0 (J-0000
Cill 322-82-63-7136West 389-172-4 1-75227
Toliver 60-10-00-1100Best 3313-235-9 3-103332
Mitchell102-50-00-2116
Cupples252-42-20-5446
Bibb50-10-00-1010
Wester302-71-22-10125
Carter72-3221-3006
Navadlevt 101-11-20-3053
Peterson scores eighteen in
vain effort against Hokies
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Totals 200 33-70 19-29 11-49 24 20 95
Percentages: FG - .471, Ft. 655, 3 pt. Goals: 10-28
- .357, Team Rebounds - 2, Blocked Shots - 0,
Turnovers - 15, Steals - 7.
1st half 2nd half
OT
ECU
T.Tech
27
41
50
54-
Pirates capture booty in Toledo tourney
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
AfterdefeatingSoutheastem Louisiana in
the semifinal game, the ECU Pirates claimed a
72-61 championship victory against the To-
ledoRocketsDec. 19, in the Medical Value P Lin
Holiday Qassic Tournament. S phorrK refc r-
ward AnuxiGill carried thebulkof thePirates'
scoring load, gaining 21 points in the antest,
the majority by wayof offensive reboundsand
short-range jumpers.
Gill also added two three-pointers to es-
tablish himself asa double threat to the Rack-
ets' defense, but unfortunately ft r tin- Pirates,
it txx)k Gill and his teammates a full hilt n i
establish much of anything other than a 14
TheRtxrketsdomina ted the first half with
outstanding play from forward Tim Schirra,
whoconnected for 12firsthalfpointsand ruled
the Pirates t n the inside. Guard Archie Fuller
also frustrated the Pirate defense with three
three-pointers from the left side of the court.
Guaal Sam Brown rounded out the Rocket
backcourt attack with seven first half points.
Just before the half ended, a frustrated Pirate
bench wascalled fora technical foul thatforced
a�ch Edd ie Payne to see his team fall behind
theR.Hk-b.22.
nTirates,appartntly inspired bv Payne's
halftime instructs ms,oimeout gunning in the
rtd half, but the Rex kets seemed ready to
match them. Despite Gill waging a su� cessfuJ
inside war and Ronnell Peterson bombing
frnmtFu-Tu'rirrii'tiT rhf�Piratp�ti �ik rich! min-
utes to start solving the problems the Rockets
were giving them. Kareem Richardson, a
freshman Pirate guard, provided a much
needed defensive spark when he converted
two steals intoPirate layups with five minutes
to play. The Pirates, driven by a newfound
intensity, continued to battle until finally, with
209 left in the game, a Lester Lyons three-
pointer gave the Pirates a one-point lead. A
Toledofreethrow with :44 seainds left tied the
ga meat 58 and eventually sent the antest into
overtime. In the extra pt'ricxl, a determined
Iiratedefenseheid I oledotoonly three points
while the Pirates gained 17 with its motion
offense and accurate free throw shooting.
Lyons' layup with 5 seconds remaining in
i rvertime sealed a hard-fought comeback vk-
torvand improved the Pirate record to 4-1.
The Pirates met Virginia Tech in
Blacksburg on Jan. 2 and, despite keep-
ing the game close throughout the first
half and leading a great deal of the
second half, the Pirates fell in over-
time 76-67.
Ronnell Peterson led the Pirates
with 18, followed by the inside pro-
duction of center Ike Copeland with
14.
The Pirates quickly found them-
selves chasing a Hokie lead. The short
range jump shooting of Damon
Watlington and Jay Purcell held the
Pirates at bay for much of the first
half.
A Pirate resurgance led by the Pi-
rates' guards, Ronnell Peterson and
Lester Lyons, brought the Pirates
within one the end of the first half. A
31-30 halftime margin gave the Pirates
hope for the rest of the contest.
The Hokies, led by forward Jay
Purcell, tried to surge at the opening
of the second half, but Lester Lyons
would not cooperate, with two steals,
and five quick points.
The Pirates maintained their nar-
row margin until a Hokie technical
foul allowed them to extend it to five
with 13 minutes remaining in regula-
tion.
The Hokies battled back, with ac-
curate shooting off of Pirate fouls.
Eventually the Hokies brought the
contest within one, and with :41 sec-
onds remaining, Purcell hit one of two
from the line to tie the contest at 60
eventually sending it to overtime.
In the extra period, the Tirates
commited many costly fouls that sent
the Hokies to the line.
Combined with field goals from
guard Jim Jackson the free throw ac-
curacy of the Hokies proved to be the
difference in the contest as they wid-
ened the Pirates' road slump and
handed them another road defeat.
Viminia TecII
J mm
ECU
(67)
Minfsftrb
m-am-ao-taPftP
Hunter 324-120-03-3128
Gill 231-90-20-2002
Copeland 385-60-03-131214
Lyons 303-160-81-52D11
Peterson A76-120-82-42318
Jones 80-00-00r0010
Richardson 141-30-10-1036
Lewis 161-10-01-303D
Young 130-00-00-0200
Armstrong 141-10-00-0133
Totals 22522-6019-3013-3992967
Percentages: FG - .367, Ft652, 3 ptGoals: 4-18 -
.222, Team Rebound - 8, Blocked Shots -3,
Turnovers - 23, Steals - 4.
Virginia Tech(76)
Minftrb
m-am-ao-taPfP
J. Jackson 365-112-31-20113
Elliot 363-82-42-9148
Carruth 281-30-11-6032
Watlington 264-91-20-2259
Purcell 406-1311-121-52125
Jackson 90-24-40-01D4
Good 201-21-20-0103
Cortier 91-10-00-2102
Hall 40-00-00-0'000
Smith 160-1 10-102-60210
T. Jackson 1f00-00-0000
Totals 22521-50 31-38S-34242095
Percentages:rc .40, Ft816, 3 ptGoals. 3to-
300, Team R�bounds-2,Blocked Shots
Turnovers - 19, Steas-6.
1st halind halfol
ECU303067
T.Tech312976





-
0
22 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12. 1993
Colorado St shoots Pirates' eyes out
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Hampered by their inability to defend against the
perimetershot, the ECU Pirates were handed a 78-66road
defeat by Colorado St. on Dec. 22. Ram guard Tyson
Maroney hit three three-point shots in the span of one
minute to lead his team past the Pirates, leading them by
seven at intermissioa Kieth Bonds also stung the Pirates
in the first half, matching Marones three-point produc-
tivity.
he Rams continued their assault from the outside
with a pair of three pointers from guard Ryan Yoder.
Despite a pair of three's from Pirate guards Lester Lyons
and Kareem Richardson, the Dues could not pull any
closer than 11 midway through the second half.
Pirate center Ike Copeland and forward Wilbert
Hunter battled hard on the inside,combiningfor22 points
indl(Srelxuinds,butcouldnotspanthedistance the Rams
hadsetforthathalftime. IkeCopeland's last second three-
pointer was merely a testament to the fact that the Pirates
had lost this game early; it was too little too late.
Lyons dominates lions in Toledo
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Lester Lyons led the ECU Pirates past the South-
eastern Louisiana Lions in the Toledo MVP Classic
tournament semifinal game on December 18. Lyons,
playing like a man
with perimeter shooting arid offensive rebounding
by Marlon Jones and center Ike Copeland. At inter-
mission, the Pirates led the perplexed Lions 34-26.
After two minutes of see-saw battling at the
start of the second half in which the Piratesstretched
their lead to 12, the Lions roared back with a 10-0
run cutting the ECU
Hvs Colorado St
Colorado St. (78)
Min fg
m-a
Molyneaux
Attkinson
ECU (66)
Min
19
23
21
28
Hunter
GUI
Lewis
Lyons
Youngs 19
Jones 16
Richardsonl6
Peterson 22
Toliver 6
Copeland 30
m-a
5-12
3-8
3-7
5-13
1-4
0-1
3-8
2-8
0-1
4-8
ft
m-a
0-2
0-0
1-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
2-3
0-0
0-0
3-4
rb
o-t
2-3
2-5
t-A
0-1
2-3
0-1
2-4
2-5
0-1
5-13
Pf
0
5
5
4
0
0
2
0
1
4
10
7
7
13
2
0
9
6
0
12
Larson
Bonds
Yoder
Conger
Sellers
Laster
Crawford
Maroney
Smith
Vogel
31
25
31
4
y
8
lft
9
7
13
3-fi
3-h
4-11
6-12
3-6
0-1
1-1
0-2
IV1
3-6
1-1
1-3
ft
m-a
0-1
3-4
1-2
4-4
2-2
2-2
2-4
2-4
0-0
0-0
0-0
1-1
rb
o-t
1-3
2-8
6-12
1-2
0-4
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-3
0-0
0-3
0-2
0
1
2
11
1
1
0
3
0
0
0
Pf
1
3
4
1
1
2
1
0
1
0
1
1
'P
6
10
9
20
11
2
4
2
0
9
2
3
possessed, produced
22 points, including
three three-pointers
to help seal a 72-65 vic-
tory that put the Pi-
rates in the champi-
onship game.
The Pirates
started the game
The Pirates' victory insured
them a spot in the champion-
ship game the next night
againstToledo.
lead to two. After
Head Coach Eddie
Payne called a
timeout to calm his
team, the Pirates
settled into an inside
game that extended
their lead back to 11.
The Pirate inside
strong with a 9-2 run set up by Lyons' first two gameandfastbreakcapability proved loo strong for
three-pointers. The Lions battled back with inside the Lions, who never pulled closer than seven. The
production by center Hank Washington, cutting the Pirates'victory insured them a spot in thechampi-
Pirates' lead to one, but the Bucs soon countered onship game the next night against Toledo.
Totals
200 25-56 17-24 12-41
21
16
78
Percentages: FC - .371, Ft 545, 3 pt. Goals: 8-22- .364, Team
Rebounds - 1, Blocked Shots - 2, Turnovers - 17, Steals - 6.
Percentages: FG - .446, Ft. 708, 3 pt. Goals: 11-22 - .500, Team
Rebounds - 4, Blocked Shots - 5, Turnovers - 16, Steals - 8.
1st Half 2nd Half OT
ECU
Colorado ST.
33
41
33
37
Steelers unable to pay Bills; offense shut down
Associated Press
(AP) � Frank Reich is the king
of the comebacks � and he also
showed he's a pretty good quarter-
back with a lead, too.
The Buffalo Bills needed no
magic, nocomebackof a lifetime, no
miracles from Reich to beat rhePitts-
burghSteelers24-3 in the AFC play-
offs Saturday. His two touchdown
passes and adept use of his receiv-
ers and the dock in the second half
were good enough.
Reich, filling in again for in-
jured Jim Kelly, threw a 1 -yard scor-
ing pass to Mitch Frerotte on a line-
man-eligible play �Frerotte's third
touchdown reception thisseason�
and a 19-yarder to James Lofton in
the third quarter as the Bills ad-
vanced to the AFC championship
game for the third straight year.
The Bills are the first team since
thel972-760akland Raiders to reach
the AFC title game at least three
successive vears. By winningin Pitts-
burgh before the biggest crowd in
Steelers' history, they became the
first wild-card team to win a divi-
sional playoff game since the NFL
adopted its current playoff format
three years ago.
Of course, this Bills team is
quickly becoming known for the
historic.
The Bills rallied from 32 points
down � the greatest comeback in
NFL history � to beat Houston 41-
38 in overtime last Sunday, but they
had to come back from only three
points down this time.
That was easy for Reich.
The Steelers, in their first play-
off game in exactly 10 years, treated
the60,407towel-twirling fans toa3-
0 lead on Gary Anderson's 38-yard
field goal in the first quarter. The
Steelers proved no better in holding
a small lead than the Oilers did in
maintaining a huge one.
TheSteelerslooked rusty,espe-
cially quarterback Neil O'Donnell.
He was making his first start in
more than a month due to a broken
right shinbone and he looked it,
throwingtwo interceptions and los-
inga fumblethatled to the first Bills
touchdown.
Defensive end Phil Hansen re-
covered O'Donnell's fumble at the
Bills' 41 with 6:27 remaining in the
first half, and Reich put them in the
end zone nine plays later.
Thurman Thomas gained 11
yards on third-and-1 from the 50,
Kenneth Davis gained 14 to the 19
and Reich hi t Don Beebe for 19 to the
1. Frerotte, lined up on the left side
of theline, popped up free in the end
zone to grab Reich's short flip, his
second TDcatchagainst the Steelers
thisseason. Healsocaughta 1-yarder
in the Bills' 28-20 victory at Buffalo
Nov. 8.
GETREARYFOR THE W
SOW SEASQM
with Ski Jackets
from North Face,
Obermeyer, Columbia & CB
CHECK OUT OUR LARGE
SKI SELECTION
5 lf featuring
jj-� Obermeyer, Nils, K2,
m'i. Dymastar, Rossign$$,
Nordic a & Salomom
We Als$ Have A Large
Assor�tyent Of Hats,
Sweaters & Gloves
GORDON'S GOLF & SKI
M-F SAT
9-7 9-6
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
SUNDAY
1-5
COMING
a special tabloid
sponsored by the division of student life and
produced by the office of the dean of student
development
If you like to
drink Buffalo wing sauce, shop in the
nude, or snap mouse traps to parts of
our body then
invites you to stop by and intrigue them
st outrageous act and
1
EAST COAST MUSIC & VIDEQ
tes you to stc
to your most
GET A FREE CD!
judging is up to the East Coast family of employees
Thursday, January 14, 1993 from 9:30- 11 pm
SALE! 1,500 CDs only $9.99�H
- any questions? call
1UUIUUUIII 758"4251
I mmMwm mmm Mm sn0p East Coast for all
your audio & video needs
1109 Charles Blvd.





23 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
49ers escape 'House of Payne'
p
HHI vs UNC-Charlotte-
ECU (59)
Min fg
m-a
Lyons 36 9-15
Richardson 20 1-5
Hunter 22 1-4
Young 18 1-2
Peterson 25 2-3
Gill 31 4-4
Armstrong 2 0-0
Lewis 26 2-4
Copeland 20 1-6
ft
m-i
rb
o-t
3-i 2-6
4-4 0-3
2-5 1-2
0-2 0-1
0-0 1-3
3-4 1-2
0-0 0-0
2-4 1-2
0-0 1-7
i pf tp
2 5 22
2 3 6
1 4 4
0 0 2
2 3 4
1 3 13
0 0 0
0 4 6
3 3 2
Totals 200 21-43
Percentage hU.488,
7429 Team rebounds
Turnovers - 14, Steals
UNC-Charlotte
Min fg
m-a
Dotrin 13 0-3
Terell U 1-4
Thompson 33 4-8
Lana 28 1-4
Broadhurst 31 0-4
Davis 7 0-2
12
Kummer
Odom
Wilhite
Parker
1-4
35 5-13
25 4-9
5 0-0
14-23 7-27 11 25 59
r iouv, Jpt. goals- J-
- 27, Blocked shots - 2,
-6.
(62)
ft rb
m-a o-t
1-2 0-1
0-0 0-0
6-6 2-5
6-6 3A
2-3 1-4
0-0 0-0
2-3 1-2
6-7 7-14
3-6 4-5
1-2 0-1
a pf rp
0 1 1
1 1 3
1 3 16
3 8
3
0
1
3
3
2
Totals 200 16-53 27-35 18-41 7 19 62
PercentagesrFC - .302. FT - 771, 3pt. goals 3-8 .
375 Team Rebounds - 27, Blocked shots -1,
Turnovers -16, Steals - 7
1st half 2nd half OT
ECU
UNCCH
33
30
26
32
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
The 1-0 ECU Pirate basketball
team squared off Dec. 8 against a
UNC-Charlotte squad that could
prove to be one of their toughest
opponents. After a hard-fought war
that saw them lead by as much as
eight, the Pirates could not stop a
Charlotte second half comeback and
fell to the 49ers 62-59.
The Pirates started the game
strong, pulling away from the 49ers
five minutes into the contest. Pirate
guard Lester Lyons played with his
usual ferocity, racking up 16firsthalf
points. Bershuan Thompson, a na-
tive of nearby Grimesland, N.C. led
the 49er scoring in the first half with
nine points.
With hard-nosed play on de-
fense,and the tremendous scoringof
Lyons, the underdog ECU team hit
the locker room a l halftime nursing a
three-point lead. Unfortunately for
the Pirates,their lead would not last.
The visiting squad from Char-
lotte battled with the Pirates for 14
minutes in the second half before
finally gaining the advantage in the
game. The Pirates could not stop the
inside rampageof 49er center Rodney
Odum, who scored ten points in the
second half, and plagued the Pirates
with fouls. The 49ers also defensed
Lyons much better than in the first
half, holding the Pirate star to just six
points.
The Pirates fell behind by six
points with 1:06 remaining, but
battled back with the help of poor
49er shooting from the line and pe-
rimeter shots by Anton Gill. The Pi-
rates kept hope alive until Lyons
was whistled for an intentional foul
with only seconds remaining. The
subsequent 49er possession iced a
heartbreaking defeat for the Pirates
as time expired on their chance for
an upset.
Saturda"
Sport
Fransactions
BASEBALL
American League
TEXAS
RANGERS�
Signed Jeff
Huson, in-
fielder, to a one-year
contract and Terry Bross and
Bobb Nen, pitchers, and Dan
Peltier, outfielder, to minor-
league contracts.
National League
HOUSTON ASTROS�
Agreed to terms with Chris
I James, outfielder, ona one-year
I contract.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
MIAMI DOLPHINS�
Activated AaronCraver, running
back, from injured reserve.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NEW
YORKIS-
LAND-
ERS � Re-
called Mark
Fitzpatrick,
goaltender,
from
Capital
District of the American
Hockey League.
raj
3
Specializing in Peking Hunan Szechuan Cui&
For Your Dininn Plpasi iro Pninu Hno rrf
Specializing in Peking Hunan Szechuan Cuisine
For Your Dining Pleasure Enjoy One of
Greenville's Most Elegant and Unique Atmospheres
WELCOME STUDENTS
EXPANDED BUFFET including 5 NEW ITEMS!
TAKE
OUT
WELCOME
BUFFET
LUNCH - $4.69
DINNER - $6.49
7 DAYS A WEEK
SUNDAY BRUNCH 12:00-2:30 - $5.99
752-7111
Rivergate Shopping Center
E. 10th St. & Greenville Blvd.
(Next to Winn Dixie)
lUiIBfi
Grilled. Steamed & Haw Bar
Corner or 10th and Charles
Fresh Grilled Seafood, Steab & Chicken
Fresh Steamed & Raw Oysters & Cbms
Fresh Steamed Shrimp, Crabs, Lobster
Homemade Cbm Chowder & Onion Rings
Large Variety of Domestic & Import Beers
FRIDAYS 4:00 - 7:00
25$ EACH
Steamed & Raw Oysfer
Happy Hour
Com CkeclDut Tb FrtdestSeafood! (freettiH'fle
TlfrH
TOUCHDOWN AT
.�
Mexican Restaurant
k
Tues-Thurs 5:00-9:30
Fri-Sat 4:00-10:00
Sun 12-9:30
752-2450
A
1. 2 PRICE
PITCHERS
OF BEER
All Day Mondays
SUNDAY PLAYOFFS
SPECIAL
16 oz DRAFT
in NFL Cup
you keep the cup!
i 2 price
APPETIZERS
Sun-Wed 9:00 PM-CLOSE
Dine-In Only
521 COTANCHE ST
757-1666
ECU Observes
Martin Luther King's Birthday:
A Commitment to Human Rights
and World Peace
The Martin Luther King, Jr. Planning
Committee is proud to announce
a week of activities in observance of
Martin Luther King's birthday,
January 12-18, 1993.
IM"Wish Board" for Human Rights
and World Peace�ECU Student
Stores
ifl Residence Hall Programs
ILl Dr. Claybom Carson, editor of
King Papers
Great Room, Mendenhall Student
Center, 7:30 p.m.
lH Candlelight March to Mendenhall
Student Center
111 Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. Inc.
program honoring Dr. King
WELCOME
BACK
STUDENTS!
THE WORLD'S LARGEST WATER SPORTS DEALER
Water skis
Knee boards
Water toys
Snow skis
Snow ski rentals
Russell sweats
Champion apparel
NC Wildlife agent
Sporting goods
equipment
Fishing tackle
Hunting clothes
Tennis shoes for
every activity ,
Boating supplies
Marine electronics
iW Mon-Fri 8-7
f Sat 8-6
111 Red Banks Road
Greenville, NC
355-5783





�MHHHHNHIHHHHMMNMHHNBHMMIftMlttnri
24 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
GB - om w L
a m e s
Las Vegas Bowl
Bowling Green 35, Nevada 34
John Hancock Bowl Sugar Bowl
At El Paso, Texas At New Orleans
Baylor 20, Arizona 15 Alabama 34, Miami 13
Blue-Gray Classic
Friday, Dec. 25
At Montgomery, Ala.
Gray 27, Blue 17
Aloha Bowl
At Honolulu
Kansas 23, Brigham Young 20
Gator Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida 27, North Carolina State 10
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Term.
Mississippi 13, Air Force 0
Peach Bowl
Saturday, Jan. 2
At Atlanta
North Carolina 21,
Mississippi State 17
Copper Bowl
Tuesday, Dec. 29
At Tucson, Ariz.
Washington State 31, Utah 28
Freedom Bowl
At Anaheim, Calif.
Fresno State 24, Southern Cal 7
Holiday Bowl
Wednesday, Dec. 30
At San Diego
Hawaii 27, Illinois 17
Independence
Bowl
Thursday, Dec. 31
At Shreveport, La.
Wake Forest 39, Oregon 35
Hall of Fame Bowl
Friday, Jan. 1
At Tampa, Fla.
Tennessee 38, Boston College 23
Cotton Bowl
At Dallas
Notre Dame 28, Texas A&M 3
Citrus Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Georgia 21, Ohio State 14
Blockbuster Bowl
At Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Stanford 24, Penn State 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Syracuse 26, Colorado 22
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Michigan 38, Washington 31
Orange Bowl
At Miami
Florida State 27, Nebraska 14
Japan Bowl
Saturday, Jan. 9
Tokyo
East 27, West 13
Senior Bowl
Saturday, Jan. 16
Mobile, Ala.
2 p.m. (ESPN)
Hula Bowl
At Honolulu
3 p.m. (NBC)
East-West Shrine
Classic
Sunday, Jan. 24
At Stanford, Calif.
4 p.m. (ESPN)
Sports Writers meeting Thujas
cUiy � 5:30 m Student Piab 1
r-
i
i
i
i
i
1
i
H
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
r-
i
i
i
i
i
CHAMPIONS
HEALTH & FITNESS
Downtown Greenville
757-0544
FREEWEIGHTS & MACHINES
Aerobics, Step Aerobics
& Abdominal Classes
WOLFF TANNING BEDS
CHAMPIONS Student Coupon Specials
$7500
4 MONTH MEMBERSHIP
Full-time ECU Students Only
expires 21 593
CHAMPIONS Student Coupon Specials
TANNING SPECIAL
s3COO
ONE MONTH UNLIMITED
expires 21 593
CHAMPIONS Student Coupon Specials
TANNING SPECIAL
$9COO
UNLIMITED FOR SEMESTER
expires 21593
DECORATIVE
BANNERS
GARDEN FLAGS
CUSTOM FLAGS
Largest Selection Of
Flags In Greenville
Design Your Own!
Islander
NOW IN THREE
LOCATIONS:
KITTY HAWK, NC
919-261-6266
WILLIAMSBURG.VA
804-565-0651
GREENVILLE, NC
310 E. 12th St.
Intersection of Charles Blvd.
& 12lhSt.
830-3686
FREE Brochure Of
Appliqued House Flags
VISAMASTERCARD
We Ship
10-5 M-S
BOLI'S
Ts
T-OO
AlYDay L�n9
2nd ANNUAL
.TUflUlKII
PARTY
Sunday, January 31
if you missed last year's party, come
experience the BEST Super Bowl Patty!
4 TVs to watch the action!
WE DELIVER
MasterCardVISA 7 52" BO LI
accepted
Limited Delivery Area
No checks
i.HMMMii.i�,m.
�Plwup'





25 jne �ast Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
FUN FOR ALL
SPRING 1993
ALL FOR FUN
�Ej
EIGHT ROOMS
CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM
Mon-Thurs6:45pm-9:00pm
Friday6:45pm-6:00pm
Saturday12noon-5:00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
GARRETT & AYCOCK HALLS
Mon-Thurs1:00pm-8:00pm
Friday1:00pm-5:00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
MINGES COLISEUM
Mori & Wed2:00pm-8:00pm
Tues & Thurs2:30pm-8:00pm
Friday2:00pm-5:00pm
WIMMING POOLS
CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM
MonWedFri6:30am-8:30am
Tues & Thurs6:30am-8:00am
Mon-Fri11:30am-l :30pm
Mon-Thurs3:00pm-6:30pm
Friday3:00pm-6:00pm
Saturday12noon-5:00pm
Sunday1:00pm-5:00pm
MINGES COLISEUM
MonWedFri7:30pm-9:00pm
Tues & Thurs6:00pm-8:00pm
Sunday2:00pm-5:00pm
a
S.V.P.
YMNASIUM
CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM
MonAVedFri12noon-1:00pm
Mon & Wed3:00pm-6:30pm
Tues& Thurs4:00pm-6:30pm
Friday 3:00pm-6:00pm
Saturday12noon-5:00pm
Sunday 1:00pm-5:00pm
Drop-in Volleyball begins at 5pm
QUIPMENT CHECK OUT
115 CHRISTENBURY GYMNASIUM
Mon-Th u rs �1O;0Oam-9:0dprri
Friday 1 G:00am-6:30pm
Saturday 12noon-5:30pm
Sunday 1:00pm-5:30pm
A C Q U E T B ALL COURTS
Reservations can be made in person at 115
Christenbury yir.nastum or by calling
757-6911. Court reservations are made
one day In idvance Monday-Thursday.
Reservations are made on Friday for
Saturday Sunday h Monday. Courts may
be reserved in person from
11:30am�&00pm and from 12 to 3:00pm
by phone.
AIN CHECK HOTLINE
Call 757-6443 for information regarding
game rain-outs and holidayspecial
campus facility closings.
dventure trips
DOWNHILL SKIING
SPRING BREAK ADVENTURE
BEACH HORSEBACK RIDING
CANOEING DAY TRIP
BACKPACKING
CLIMB & CAMP
JANUARY 23-24
MARCH 6-1 3
MARCH 21
MARCH 27
APRIL 2-4
APRIL 16-18
Registration for all spring adventure trips and workshops begin
January 1 3. Pre-registration is required. Call 757-6387 for details.
LIMBING PROGRAM
She's just about to make the crux move, 25 feet of
air below her, balancing her weight delicately so as
not to swinq free from the structure. She slowly
reaches her left foot up to hip height and makes the
foothold. Solid. She thrusts her right hand upward,
grasps the edge of the last hold and
knuckles on to victory A scream of confidence and joy,
"Yahoo reviberates from the tower wall. The climbers
below applaud as she descends.
She made it.
ow to get started
If you have never climbed before, you must
participate in a Climbing I workshop before
eligibility is received to purchase a Drop-In
Supervised Climbing Pass.
Workshops
CLIMBING I WORKSHOP DATES:
FEBRUARY 9 & 18; MARCH 18 & 24; APRIL 7
CLIMBING II WORKSHOP DATES:
MARCH 31; APRIL 15
lrop-in pass prices
Day Pass
$1.00 for students
$2.00 for facultystaffguest
Semester Pass
$25.00 for students
$35.00 for facultystaffguest
Passes may be purchased in 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium Monday-Friday from 8am-5pm
after you receive climber eligibility.
Drop-in climbing hours
Wednesday
Friday
Sunday
3:00pm-5:00pm
3:00pm-5:00pm
1:00pm-4:00pm
Beginning March 16 the Tower will be open
one hour later than above schedule.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
VITALITY PLAN
FITNESS CLASSES
REGISTRATION DATES
JANUARY 19-22
SESSION DATES
JANUARY 25-MARCH 4
COSTS PER SESSION
$10STUDENTS
$20FACULTYSTAFFSPOUSE
COSTS PER DROP-IN
$5 FOR 5 CLASSESSTUDENTS
$10FACULTYSTAFFSPOUSE
FITNESS FIZZICAL
This service is FREE to all ECU
students. The Fitness Fizzicals
Program assesses body
composition, cardiovascular
endurance, muscular strength &
endurance, flexibility and blood
pressure. Results help in
formulating a personalized plan for
improving and maintaining
optimal fitness with testing
conducted by the Human
Performance Lab. (M-T-Th-F from
1-5pm). Appointments and
wellness information may be
obtained during hours of
operation Monday-Thursday from
3:00pm-5:00pm in 107A CG. $15
for facultystaff.
BEGINNING WEIGHT
TRAINING WORKSHOP
Held February 2 & 4 from 8-10pm in
Christenbury Weight Room. Register in 204
Christenbury Gym from January 25-February
3. $3 for students and $5 for
facultystaffdependent. Participants learn
beginning weight training techniques applied
to fixed and free weight equipment.
CLUB PED
Club Ped is a walking club for teams of four.
Individuals passing various 'mileposts' and
accomplish goals established during
registration become eligible for awards.
Residence hail groups, departmental offices,
Greeks and all campus organizations are
encouraged to enter groups. Pick up your
"Walking Papers" when you register
beginning January 11 in 204 Cnristenbury
Gym. Co-Sponsored by Recreational Services
and the Office of Health Promotion &
Weil-Being.
COMMIT-TO-FITNESS
CLUB
Participants receive 3 points for each 1 2 hour
of aerobic activity ana hour of anaerobic
activity. If you climb, walk, swim, lift weights,
play basketball, or are involved in any other
form of fitness routine, you're eligible to sign
up. Members who reach 150 points during
the 14 week program are eligible for t-shirt
awards. Work out on your own and you're a
winner To get more information and sign-up
for the program, drop by 204 Christenbury
Gymnasium.
dventure workshops
WINDSURFING I
ALL TERRAIN BIKING
TAR RIVER CLEAN UP
FEBRUARY 25 AT 7PM
IN CG POOL
MARCH 20 AT
10:30AM AT CG 117
APRIL 23 AT 2PM AT
CG 117
Registration for all spring workshops begin January 1 3.
Pre-registration is required 24 hours before workshop date.
f�





v-
26 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12,1993
Fishermen fear Coast Guard
Associated Press
HARKERS ISLAND, N.C.
(AP) � Fishermen say the U.S.
Coast Guard, which they once
regarded as their prosecutor, has
turned into their persecutor.
As the Coast Guard polices
the waves with a lengthening list
of lawson what fish can be caught
and how boats should be
equipped, they are known more
for handing out tickets than tow
lines.
" Used to be you were glad to
see them said Weldon Davis, a
Carteret County fisherman.
"Now you're scared to see them.
That's the way it'sgotten. There's
so many rules and regulations,
they're going to find something
wrong
So pro-
nounced has the
animosity becorre
in recent months
that U.S. Rep.
Martin Lancaster
arranged a sort of
summit meeting
of commercial
fishermen and the
Coast Guard last
week at Harkers Island. About
100 fishermen came Wednesday
night to talk with the commander
of the Coast Guard's Fifth Dis-
trict that includes North Caro-
lina.
Their gripes were many and
wide-ranging, The News & Ob-
server of Raleigh reported. They
resent the boardings in which
armed Coast Guard patrols look
for everything from illegal drugs
to undersized fish, and check for
contraptions to save sea turtles
from fishing nets.
They chafe that the budget-
minded Coast Guard no longer
comes to the aid of every stranded
vessel, but instead calls commer-
cial tow services if the situation is
not life-threatening.
And they object to new Coast
Guard requirements for expen-
sive safety equipment that can
cost some boat owners several
thousand dollars a year.
It was those safety rules that
largely prompted the Harkers Is-
land gathering.
Milton Styron of Davis has
been fishing for 56 of his 68 years.
He complaned that men like him
used to make their way on the
water with only a compass and
experience to protect them. Now,
boats must carry many costly de-
vices if they venture into the At-
lantic.
"I can't afford to go offshore
this year Styron said. "I can't
afford the equipment
Fishermen said at the meet-
ing that theirs is a precarious way
to make a living anyway. They
operate on small
budgets, and
shrinking profits
as fish become
scarce or off lim-
its due to the Na-
tional Marine
Fisheries Service
conservation
regulation that
the Coast Guard
enforces.
They said the added costs of
new safety equipment or penal-
ties for not having it will drive
many into the red.
"We feel like we're being
regulated out of business said
Rodney Cahoon of South River.
Rear Adm. Ted Leland, com-
mander of the Fifth District, lis-
tened to the complaints. But he
did not promise any lessening in
safety requirements.
"Going to sea is a dangerous
business he said. "It'smoredan-
gerous than coal mining
Every year on the East Coast
between New Jersey and North
Carolina, he said, at least eight
people die and 133 are badly in-
jured on commercial fishing ves-
sels.
"We feel like
we're being
regulated out
ofbusiness
Rodney Cahoon
of South River
Fishermen argue their num-
bers have greatly diminished in
recent years because it's so hard
to make a profit. Leland, how-
ever, said the new safety rules
were developed because there are
more fishermen than ever before.
Foreign fishing vessels essen-
tially were banned from U.S.
shores in 1976. Since then, Leland
said, the number of U.S. fishing
boats has more than tripled. The
fleet stands at 130,000 nationwide.
Many of those are crewed by
strangers to thewaterand itsdan-
gers, making them likely to get
into trouble, Leland said.
"As this industry mush-
roomed, it stopped being a fa-
ther-to-son business Leland
said. "The history of the Coast
Guard has been to help pick up
the pieces, but now our job is more
focused on making the industry
safer
A fishing boat equipped with
safety mechanisms such as locater
devices saves lives�and money,
Leland said. AC-130search plane
flying out of the Coast Guard's
Elizabeth City base costs $2,100
an hour.
Only about half the commer-
cial fishing vessels on the water
comply with the safety regula-
tions, according to Coast Guard
statistics. Most of those found in
violation never get fined if they
agree to fix the problem.
Work with us!
The East Carolinian is
now accepting
applications for News
and Sports Writers.
Any interested
aspiring journalists
may apply at our
office on the second
floor of the
Publications Building
SLAM
U.S.A.
Athletic
World
714 Plaza Mall "W' 157 Carolina
355-0500 & East Mall
Hours: Mon-Sat 10-9 Sun 1-6 756-7550
l.
TMK iJBEr
NewBalance
MADE IN U.S.A. 11
"The Bag With The j
Lifetime Guarantee" J
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
ii
n
ii
ii
n
n
ii
Saucony
asiG
AVIA
$10
� t
OFF
Assorted Styles And Colors j,
II
II
II
II
JL
��������
Any Pair Of
Athletic Shoes
In Stock -
$49.99 Or Above
Coupon must be presented at time of
purchase. Limit 1 per customer. Sale
items excluded. Expires 2-28-93.
ATHLECTIC WORLD COUPON
Coupon must be presented at time of
purchase. Limit 1 per customer. Sale
items excluded. Expires 2-28-93.
ATHLECTIC WORLD COUPON
22-year-old
wins Charlotte
marathon
Associated Press
GRAND SLAM "JS.A.T
Indoor BaseballSoftball Batting Range
Corner of Evans & 14th Streets 830-1759J
�Concessions �Pro Shop "Video Games
STUDENT TOKENS Full Court
Year Round $1.00 Basketball
with ECU I.D. with
20 Pitches On A Token Slam Coals
Bring Coupon In For $4.00 Off One Hour of Slam Ball J
CHARLOTTE (AP) � Jim
NicholsonofOswego,N.Yand Amy
Kattwinkle of Charlotte cruised to
victory in Saturday's Charlotte Ob-
server Marathon.
Nicholson,a 22-year-old gradu-
ate student from the State University
of New York at Oswego, won on a
coursehe had never seen befbre,post-
ing a time of 22158 to defeat Doug
Kurtis of Northville, Mich. (223:08),
who last week won a marathon in
Hanoi, Vietnam.
Kattwinkle, a 25-year-old bank
officer, posted a time of 2:45:16, fol-
lowed by Nancy Beiger of Stockton,
N.J. (25029)and Carol Virga of Boca
Raton, Fla. (255:40).
The 1300 runners faced the hilly
course through Charlotte's streets on
awindsweptand rainy day with tem-
peratures in thelow40s.Thepacewas
well off the course record of 2:142.
"Ididn'tevengetachancetosee
the course before I ran it Nicholson
said. "Ina way Iguessthathelped me.
I didn't make any stupid mistakes. A
few guys went out very strong and I
didn't even catch the leaders until
after 10 miles
TEC Sports
Section is in search
of serious sports
writers. Seize an
opportunity to
develop strong
writing and
reporting skills
while learning
�iiliilaiiiji
the inside.
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
Would like to Welcome
New & Returning Students
and Invite You to Join Us In Worship
SPRING SEMESTER
CAMPUS MASS SCHEDULE
Sundays at 11:30 am and 8:30 pm at the Newman Center
Wednesday 5:30 pm at the Newman Center
followed by a fellowship meal
953 East 10th Street (at the foot of College Hill Drive)
757-0376 757-1991
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
For more information about these and other programs sponsored by the Newman Center,
call or visit the Center daily between 8:30 am & 11 pm.
MONEY FOR
Carolina Fatten Outlet Center. 1-95, Exit 95-97.
(919) 989-6100. ManSat. 9-9, Sun. 1-6.





27 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
Underdogs rule in NCAA hoops
Associated Press
It was a perfectly awful week
to have a perfect record.
Just last Monday there were
seven teams sporting zeroes in
their records: Duke, Kentucky,
Iowa, Purdue, UNLV, Virginia
and Xavier of Ohio.
A week later, the ranks of the
undefeated have been trimmed
to two � Kentucky and Virginia.
No. 1 Duke lost Sunday, 80-
79 to Georgia Tech in Atlanta,
ending its 23-game winning
streak. The Blue Devils hadn't lost
since a 72-68 defeat by Wake For-
est last Feb. 23.
Iowa and Purdue both had
terrible weeks as Big Ten confer-
ence play got under way. The No.
8 Hawkeyes lost 75-67 to No. 5
Indiana on Wednesday and got
crushed on Saturday by unranked
Ohio State 92-81. The ninth-
ranked Boilermakers played even
worse, losing to No. 3 Michigan
80-70 and to unranked Minnesota
81-60 on Saturday.
No. 12 UNLV had its29-game
winning streak snapped Thurs-
day night in a 101-94 loss at Long
Beach State, and unranked Xavier
of Ohio dropped its first to De-
troit Mercy in overtime Saturday.
Top 25 games
over the
weekend:
Georgia Tech 80, No. 1
Duke 79
Georgia Tech wrapped up the
win on Malcolm Mackey's three
free throws in the final 12 sec-
onds. "I wanted to shoot the free
throws. That's why I held the ball
when I got it � so I could get
fouled said Mackey, who scored
19.
No. 2 Kentucky 84,
Tennessee 70
Dale Brown scored a season-
high 23 points and Jamal
Mashburn added 21 as Kentucky
(11-0, 2-0 SEC) overcame a 31-
point performance by Allan Hous-
ton.
No. 3 Michigan 98,
Wisconsin 73
Chris Webber scored 20
points, Jalen Rose and Juwan
Howard each had 18 and Jimmy
King added 16 for Michigan (12-
1,2-0 Big Ten).
No. 4 Kansas 78, Iowa
State 71
At Lawrence, Kan Iowa State
went to a spread offense and stayed
close, but two key runs carried the
Jayhawks(ll-l).
No. 5 Indiana 105, Penn
State 57
At Bloomington, Ind the
Nittany Lions were crushed in
their first Big Ten road game. The
Hoosiers (13-2,2-0) had an early
18-0 run and never trailed.
No. 6 North Carolina 101,
Maryland 73
Eric Montross dominated in-
side is the Tar Heels (12-1, 2-0
ACC) won easily at Chapel Hill.
Carolina reached 100 Doints for
the seventh time this season.
No. 7 Seton Hall 91,
Providence 79
At Providence, R.I Terry
Dehere scored 28 points, includ-
ing 24 in the first half. The Pirates
(13-1,3-0) had their largest lead at
52-20.
Ohio State 92, No. 8 Iowa
81
AtColumbus, Ohio, freshman
Greg Simpson scored a career-
high 23 pointsand lowered Iowa's
Big Ten record to 0-2. The
Hawkeyes are 11-2 overall.
Minnesota 81, No. 9
Purdue 60
At Minneapolis, the Golden
Gophers (10-1, 2-0), off to their
best start since 1989-90, broke a
43-43 tie with a 17-6 run to down
Purdue (9-2,0-2).
No. 13 Arkansas 86,
South Carolina 76
At Columbia, S.C Scotty
Thurman had 24 points to lead
Arkansas (11-1,2-0 Southeastern
Conference) to its third straight
win.
Illinois 52, No. 14 Michi-
gan State 39
At East Lansing, Mich Illi-
nois held Michigan State (8-3,0-2
Big Ten) to its lowest point total
since 1980 and kept them score-
less over the final 2:24.
No. 15 UCLA 89, Arizona
State 85
At Los Angeles, UCLA (10-3,
1-1 Pac-10) withstood a 13-of-34
3-point shooting performance by
ASU. The Bruins did not scorea 3-
point goal.
No. 16 Cincinnati 80, St.
Louis 65
At St. Louis, the Bearcats(9-1,
1-0 Great Midwest) used aggres-
sive defense to eo on a 16-0 spurt
in the first half.
Florida 62, No. 18
Vanderbilt61
At Gainesville, Fla Stacey
Poole's jumper from the foul line
was good at the buzzer to give
Florida (8-3,2-0 SEC) the upset.
No. 19 Connecticut 87,
Villanova 80
At Villanova, Pa Brian Fair
i-3BUSINESS
PRODUCTS
3 �� Resumes
o� Business Cards
in.� Computer Stationery
� Continuous Forms
J1� Announcements
�Labels
Mh� Letterheads
o� Envelopes
M4 11HIS MORGAN � I PRINTERS, Inc
3001 E Evans St Grutnvilie NC
355-5588
FANTASY HAIR DESIGN
formerly REFLECTIONS
New Location! 602-C East 10th Street
Evelyn Wilson StylistOwner
DwayneGreer Stylist
Wanda Dilda StylistManicurist
h dm i � Carol Fulford Stylist w
lO lHaU IX Donnell Evans StylistManicurist H��US
TANNING BED
SPECIALS
� Walk ln IViiv
� Gift Certificate
757-1941
: fa sp id! Pii
Moil Sit
SCULPTRED
NAILS
liJtiimuAU.DH
Now Open
in The Food Court at The Plaza
"J "Buy"an Andy's"1,
Call in orders Welcome
321-0588
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
L
Regular
Cheesesteak.
Regular Fries
& Large Sort
Drink
Only j�39 plus tax
not good with
any other special or offer
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
II
Cheesesteak1
and get a
Regular
Cheesesteak
Only mj plus tax
not good with
any other special or offer
expires 3-15-93 � J L � -� wSSmSL � m�
FRATERNITIES & SORORITIESI
On Tuesday & Wednesday nights wear your letters on any shirt and get
10 OFF any Food Purchase at The Plaza location
Other mall locations in Goldsboro, Washington, New Bern, Kinston and Wilson
scored 27 points, Donyell
Marshall added 21 and Scott
Burrell had 19 for Connecticut (7-
2,2-1 Big East).
No. 20 Arizona 81,
Southern Cal 73
Chris Mills had a season-high
28 points to lead Arizona to its
second win in three days in Los
Angeles. The Wildcats (7-2, 2-0)
beat UCLA on Thursday.
No. 21 Syracuse 89,
Miami 81
At Syracuse, coach Jim
Boeheim won the 400th game of
his career and the Orangemen (9-
3,1-3 Big East) snapped a three-
game losing streak.
Temple 52, No. 22 Mas-
sachusetts 44
At Philadelphia, the Minute-
men (6-4,0-1 Atlantic 10) posted
their lowest point total in six years.
Temple (5-3,1-1) had a late 10-0
run for the win.
No. 23 Florida State 74,
Wake Forest 72, OT
At Winston-Salem, N.C Sam
Cassell converted a three-point
play with one second left in over-
time for the Seminoles (9-5, 1-1
ACC).
St. John's 85, No. 24
Pittsburgh 77
At New York, St. John's,
which never trailed, made 13 of
its last 14 free throws to end Pitt's
seven-game winning streak. Pitt
fell to 9-2,2-2.
No. 25 Virginia 73, N.C.
State 56
At Raleigh, N.C, Virginia (9-
0, 2-0 ACC) got 25 points from
Cory Alexander and now owns
the nation's longest winning
streak �14 games.
Spartans fall to Siena,
lose 2nd in a row
Associated Press
LOUDONVILLE, N.Y. (AP)
� Lee Matthews, Jim Ryder,
Doremus Bennerman and Stu
Downing scored in double fig-
ures to lead Siena to a 102-70 vic-
tory over N.CGreensboro Satur-
day night, spoiling a homecom-
ing for Spartan Yusuf Stewart of
Albany.
The Saints, who had posted
an 80-61 win in Greensboro last
season, ran out to a 24-7 advan-
tage in the first nine minutes of
the contest behind 10 points from
senior forward Lee Matthews.
But Greensboro rallied to
within 27-21 on a three-minute
run in which four players scored.
Stewart had a pair of layups, Greg
Williams and Jonathan Clifton
added buckets and Scott hartzell
had back-to-back three-point
plays.
But Siena hit three-pointers
on its next two possessions, scored
eight straight points, and was off
and running away again. It led
50-35 at the half.
The Spartans could get no
closer in the second period.
Matthews finished with a
game-high 23 points for the Saints,
hitting eight of 11 field-goal tries
and collecting a game-high 15 re-
bounds.
Ryder, starting only his sec-
ond game in four seasons, added
17 as did Bennerman. Downing
added 13.
Freshman center Brian
Bronson led the Spartans with a
season-high 19 points and seven
rebounds.
Siena improved to 7-4 with
its second win in a row, while
N.CGreensboro, in its second
NCAA Division I season, fell to 2-
8 with its second straight loss.
Read The East Carolinian, the finest student
newspaper on the East Carolina University Campus.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
Call ECU alumini and
parents to raise funds for
scholarships. Now
interviewing for
telemarketing positions.
If interested and
available to work
Mon-Thur, 7-9 pm, call
757-4215 and ask for
Cindy or Jeff.
Medium Pizzas
Toppings
Cans Pepsi or
55SI Diet Pepsi
Introducing a great
Domino's Pizza meal deal:
two medium Original
Pizzas smothered with
cheese and healthy portions
of two toppings of your
choice, plus two drinks -
all for $12.22 plus tax,
delivered free!
30 minutes or less, guaranteed!
NOBODY
KNOWS
LIKE
DOMINO'S
How You Like Pizza At Home.
-i r
$2.00
OFF!
Enjoy any delicious large
Domino's Pizza and save
$2.00!
I
One coupon per order. Valid at J
participating stores only. Not valid I
with any other offer. Customer
pays applicable sales tax. Delivery .
areas designed with safety in
mind. Our drivers carry less than
$20.00 and are not penalized for
late deliveries.
$8.99
FEAST!
Enjoy any medium Deluxe,
MeatZZa, Vegi. Pepperoni, or
BAcon Cheeseburger Feast for
only $8.99!
One coupon per order. Valid at par-
ticipating stores only. Not valid
with any other offer. Customer pays
applicable sales tax. Delivery areas
designed with safety in mind. Our
drivers carry less than $20.00 and
are not penalized
for late deliveries. -t
52 Days
and a
Wake Up!
ATLANTIC CITY
from
$61 oo
WEST POINT
from
$92.00
A
M
H
K
H
H

H
M
H
n
M
M
H
H
M
M
M
H
0
M
M
M
t
1

NEW YORK S s
from
$99.00
H
H
BAHAMAS
from
$299
includes
Air & Room
1-800-841-0666
TOUR PACKAGES

M
M
M
n
X
M
M
H
M
M
M
H
K

SPORTING EVENTS
M
STUDENT RATES J
M
SPRING BREAK
M
Best
of
Travel
Call Now!
1-800-
841
-0666
M


M
M

� :
m :
M �
n :
H �
M
. :
v. :
�9t





-
28 The East Carolinian
"Jackets' sting Devils,
Duke streak ends at 23
JANUARY 12, 1993
Associated Press
(AP) � Georgia Tech coach
BobbyCreminsthoughthis Yellow
Jackets had blown it�a chance to
beat No. 1 Duke and end the Blue
Devils' school-record winning
streak at 23 games.
Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski
wasn't concerned with the streak.
He just wanted solid basketball
from the two-time defending na-
tional champions, something he
didn't get Sunday when No. 10
Georgia Tech upset the Blue Devils
80-79 in an Atlantic Coast Confer-
ence game.
Duke (10-1,1-1) shot only 39.1
percent from the field (25-64) for
the game and 36.4 percent (8-22)
while falling behind by 15 points in
the first half beforenearly pulling it
out.
"I thought we were choking
said Cremins when Duke went
ahead 60-59 with 9:20 to play on a
basket by Grant Hill, who led the
Blue Devils with a career-high 29
points.
"I thought we were throwing
it away. I called a timeout and chal-
lenged rhemsaid Cremins, whose
team opened the game with a 12-0
run and led 34-19 with 6:08 left
before halftime.
"I just told them they had
played so hard and now were just
giving them the game Cremins
said. "I could see the look in their
eyes. They got mad, and we really
snowed tremendous guts
Tech (9-1, 2-0) went out and
regained the lead 62-60 on a 3-point
goal by freshman Martice Moore
and never trailed again. The Yel-
low Jackets took the lead for good
at 68-66 with 458 left on a basket by
Malcolm Mackey, who led Tech
with 19 points.
Mackey added three key free
throws in the final 12 seconds as
Duke got within 77-74 with 1:18
left.
"When you beat the best, it
really means something said
Cremins. "I wish we could enjoy it,
butwe have the Tar Heels in Chapel
Hill next
The Yellow Jackets face No. 6
North Carolina Wednesday night
on the road.
The 23 consecutive wins
equaled Duke's school record set
only last year. The Blue Devils' last
loss was 72-68 to Wake Forest on
Feb. 23,1992.
"I'm sure if you ask any of our
kids, they wouldn't even know we
had a streak said Krzyzewski.
"We don't talk about things like
that.Ifyouwanttobecomeacham-
pionship basketball team, your
goals aren't streaks, your goals are
solid basketball for 40 minutes
Tech had four others in double
figures, including Travis Best with
15 points, James Forrest 14 and
Bryan Hill and Drew Barry 11 each.
The Yellow Jackets made 58.8 per-
cent of their shots from the field,
including six of eight3-point shots.
"Their kids really came out at a
high level and played us as hard or
harder than anyone has played us
all year long said Krzyzeski.
Bobby Hurley had 18 points
and eight assists for the Blue Dev-
ils, but made only 6 of 17 from the
field,induding3ofl2from3-point
range. He also missed 4 of 7 free
throws.
Hurley also was knocked flat
on his back late in the first half
when he ran into a pick by Mackey.
He lay on the court for about a
minute, but returned to the game.
Duke trainers said he suffered a
bruised sternum.
Cowboys, 49ers prepare for NFC mudflgrtt
Associated Press
(AP)�George Seifert said all the
right things about the mucky field at
Candlestick Park, where his San Fran-
cisco 49ers will play the Dallas Cow-
boys next Sunday for the right to rep-
resent the NFC in the Super Bowl.
"I'm sure the city and the league
will do everything they can to make it
the best it can be Seifert said Sunday.
"But however it is, it's going to be the
same for both of us, so it's something
we're set to deal with
Still, you can't help but wonder if
Seifert doesn't secretly wish for an-
other day of the slop that contributed
to eight turnovers in the 49ers' 20-13
win over Washington on Saturday. If
nothing else, it might slow down Dal-
las' ultra-quick defense, which shone
Sunday as the Cowboys qualified for
the trip toCandlestickwitha34-10win
over Philadelphia.
There'sasenseof symmetry to the
49ers-Cowboys game, which will be
played llyearsafter their lastmeeting
in the conference title game.
That was when the49ers were on
the way up � an upstart in its first
conference title game against
"America's Team one of the NFL's
ctominantteamsofme'70sTheNiners
wonthatone28- "on"TheCatch"by
Dwight Clark with51 seconds left
That propelled San Francisco to
its first of four Super Bowl victories,
white the Cowboys started a slide that
hittottom when they went3-13andl-
15 in 1988 and 1989. That second sea-
son was the first for Jimmy Johnson,
who has brought them back to the
brink of the Super Bowl in just three
seasons.
So now the 49ers are the old pros
and the Cowboys the upstarts �
loaded with rookies,second-and third-
year men.
Joe Montana, who threw the ball
that Clark caught on one of the most
glorious of his many game-winning
drives, is the only player left on either
team who played in that game and
hell be on the bench behind Steve
Young after missing almost all of the
last two seasons with an elbow
injury.This game may be more enter-
taining than the Super BowLNot only
has the NFC champion won the last
eight league titles, but the 49ers and
Cowboys, 14-2 and 13-3 respectively,
were easily the best teams in the NFL
during the regular season.
TheCowboys demonstrated that
dominance Sunday in their win over
the Eagles.
"Thceeguyslookedhungry'said
jerry Rice, who is sure to cause prob-
lems for a relatively inexperienced
Dallassecondary'Wehavetobehun-
gry also. I'm looking forward to it"
Rice actually could benefit froma
sloppy field�if s easier for receivers
tocutthanfbrdeferKJerstocovertren
because the receivers know where
they're going. In fact, bom teams may
do well through the air�the second-
aries are the softest part of both de-
fenses, although both played well this
weekendSo the NFL is expected to
bringinGeorgeToma, the Montana of
groundskeepers,tohelprepairtheturf.
On Saturday, the grounds crew was
outateverystoppageofplay,fillingin
pieces of turf.
But that may not work.
More rain is forecast for this week
and thestadium is on the banks of San
Francisco Bay, which has had unusu-
ally high tides this winter. As a result
despitea tarpaulinoverthefield, water
hasbeenseepingupfrom underneath.
So .The Cowboys are saying the
right thing, tooI hope it's a good
fieklDallasquarterbackTnAikman
said after Sunday's game. "But both
teams have to play on it"
Welcome Back Special
3026-A East Tenth Street
Greenville, NC
830-6152
4t tyoi 'PiMtnU- outfit,
'pcdt Set 4 z�& $33.00
t7fUUc��ne $t0.50
'?Mr')� $t 6.00
coupon good only with Student I.D.
skf
ask for Tamara or Ann
"If you have
doubts and
questions,
you belong
with us"
Dresses, Blouses, Pants, Skirts,
Lingerie and Much More.
Plus and maternity sizes arriving weekly
2711 E. 10th St Greenville
Next to Mill Cloth Outlet
758-9161
TuesSat. 10-6
Consignment by appointment Only
ri y,� ta? specials good thru January
dkS -�1
Includes a comprehertve eye
exam by our doctor, value line
frame and our best plastic
CR-39 single vision lenses.
Add $30 for ST bifocal lenses.
Choose from our large value
line frame collection or get
$40 off hundreds of other
frames in inventory with a
retail value greater than $100.
This offer includes most
prescriptions.
No-Line Progressive
Bifocal Lenses
Our highest quality no-line
plastic CR-39 bifocal lenses.
100 satisfaction guaranteed.
Also, receive $20 off the frame
of your choice with a no-line
bifocal purchase.

OPTOMCTWC
�Y�CAA�C�MTCRr
Superoplic Service In One Hour'
Eye Exam, Fitting
& Contact Lenses
includes a comprehensive
eye exam by our doctor,
then you will be fitted with
vour choice of spherical
daily wear contact lenses
or a three (31 month
supply of disposable
lenses. Professional fees
for extended wear are
slightly more.
Dr. David L. Fitzgerald, Optometrist
Gary M Harria, Optician
70S E. Crermiile Blvd.
iteBhaThPtaaMl
Open Mr. Fn �t. Sal. 9 I Phone 7W-�204
Xc oiln'1 liu(iinl Apph Ititii'iliinif )�� 1-niM
'�Wiilk-insW'i'lcuHif '('lift F"i Liimhil I in
Siiiilriit(iintti
METHODIST
STUDENT
CENTER
East Fifth & Holly Streets
Across from Garrett dorm
Mid-week Meetings of Wes:
Fellowship and Supper
every Thursday at 5:15 pm (2.00)
Bible Study Group
Wednesday at 7:30 pm
Wesley Foundation of Greenville
Daniel T. Earnhardt, Director
758-2030
9 am-1 pm other hours by appointment
vll
WQlcom Back ECU!
STUDENT SPECIAL
Tuesday - Thursday
9 PM - Midnight
BOWL,�!9
SHOE RENTAL oniy$l50
with valid ECU I.D.
COLD BEER
SNfiCK BAR
GAME ROOM
MIDNIGHT BOWL
12 AM - CLOSE FRI - SAT NIGHTS
A GAME

700 Red Banks Road 355-5510

Tailgating
Homecoming Parties
It's That Time of
Year Again!
Get everything you
need from the
party professionals at
SfOP SHOP! STOP SHOP features
one of Greenville's widest variety and
largest supplies of ice-cold kegs and
STOP SHOP also has all the setups:
Ice, cups, and munchies,
too!
ECU's Party
People connect at
STOP SHOP!
CALL TODAY
752-3633
STOP
SHOP
Corner of 501 and Reade Streets in Downtown Greenville





29 The East Carolinian
JANUARY 12, 1993
TEC Top 25 poll
includes games through Sunday
1. Kentucky (11-0): Better than Duke last year, too.
2. Duke (10-1): Will drop again before year is over.
3. Michigan (12-1): Will beat Hoosiers on Tuesday.
(Tie) North Carolina (11-1): Should have beat Mich
5. Kansas (11-1): Head coach a Dean Smith product.
6. Indiana (12-2): Always over-rated.
7. Georga Tech (9-1): Always under-rated.
8. Oklahoma (11-2): Too soon to tell about Sooners.
9. Seton Hall (13-1): The Big East is falling apart.
10. Cincinnati (9-1): ECU does not stand a chance.
11. Arizona (7-2): Beat UCLA and on the rise.
12. Arkansas (11-1): Will be tough tobeat in March.
13. UNLV (6-1): Always finds trouble h Long
Beach.
14. Connecticut (7-2): Not a Final Four threat.
15. UCLA (10-3): If only Tracy Murray stayed.
16. Virginia (9-0): Proved FSU doesn't belonginTop
25.
17. Iowa (11-2): Do they grow com there?
18. Minnesota (10-1): Beat Purdue and MSU.
19. Purdue (9-2): Wonderful chicken
20. Ohio St (9-2): Roundcntheendsandhiinthe
middle
ZL Vanderbilt (8-3): Billy McCaffiey makinga cMaence
22. Georgetown (8-2): John Thompson coaches
centers, not basketball teams.
23. Nebraska (11-3): Will not be in Top 25 for long.
24. Florida: Best team in the state. FSU is a 9-5 joke.
25. Michigan St. (8-3): Lost to Illinois, 52-39. That's
a joke right? Ohio State will crush them.

PROCTOR BARBER SHOP
222-D Cotonche St.
758-3802
$1.00
OFF
for all ECU Students
'til the end of January
Ron Nichols
, Specializing In Layer Cuts & Clipper Cuts
We Shoot Portraits Of:
Children Groups Families
Adults Babies Pels
Couples Brides
STUDIO PORTRAITS
Welcome Back Special
2-8x10
3-5x7
12 Wallets
$24.95
FREE
2nd Set Of Prints
To All Photo Club
Members All The Time
1 Year Membership 4.95
The Plaza
Redskins show true
colors in playoffs
Associated Press
(AP)�Steve Young was good.
He was bad. He was ugly.
Thenetresult,however,wasthe
same as it used to be with Joe Mon-
tana : Another playoff win for theSan
Francisco 49ers that put them two
steps away from becoming the first
team ever to win five Super Bowls.
With Young throwing for 227
yards, running for 75 more and also
turning the ball over four times, the
Niners dispatched last year's cham-
pion, the Washington Redskins, 20-
13 on Saturday.
That put San Francisco, an NFL
best 14-2 in the regular season, in the
NFC title game next Sunday here
against the winner ofSunday'sPhila-
delphia-Dallas game. It will be Dal-
las, led by Troy Aikman, who
tromped Philadelph ?4-3 on Sun-
day afternoon in Irving, Texas, who
will meet Young to fight for the NFC
rifle. �
Threeof Young'smiscuesled to
all three Washington scores and the
fourth took away a scoring chance.
ButYoungwasnotaloneincom-
mitting mistakes on the muddy
Candlestick turf. Vying with Young
for this particular game's titieof most
mistake-proneplayerwasWashing-
tonquarterbackMarkRypien. Wash-
ington, which finished this post Su-
per Bowl-season at 10-8, also turned
theballoverfourumescnthemuddy
field, the last with 923 left when
Mark Rypien and Brian Mitchell
botched a handoff at the San Fran-
cisco 28 and the Niners recovered.
That allowed the Niners to eat
up seven minutes and led to Mike
Cofer'ssecond field goal,a33-yarder
that made it 20-13 with 222 left.
That came after Young's mis-
cues had helped Washington cut a
17-3halftimedeficittol7-13andwere
threatening to take the lead.
In fact, if there were any heroes
in thissloppy game onasloppy field,
they played for the San Francisco
defense, particularly two maligned
defensive backs � Eric Davis and
David Whitmore, burned all year in
asecondary rhatwas third fromworst
statistically in the NFL The Niners
also sacked Rypien five times, three
by Pierce Holt.
But Young wasn't all bad in this
in this confrontation of teams which
have won four of the last five Super
Bowls and seven of the last 11.
With Montana, who led the
Niners to four Super Bowl titles in
the '80s, on the bench behind him,
Young hit scoring passes of 5 yards
to John Taylor on the game's open-
ing drive and 16 to Brent Jones with
25 seconds left in the half as the
Niners took a 17-3 halftime lead.
HAPPY'S
foOM
752-6728
is Fro
32 oz. BUD DRAFT $2.00
Tuesday $1.00 Domestics All Day
Wednesday Night is LADIES NIGHT
AcToss From U.B.E.
aftn m w
Ladies Play for FREE All Night
Get a job!
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applicaitons for the positions of Circulation
Manager, Assistant Lifestyle Editor,
News Staff Writer,
Sports Staff Writer and Typesetter.
Any East Carolina University students may
apply. For an application, drop by our office on
the second floor of the Publications Building,
which is located across from Joyner Library on
Central Campus.
355-5050 I
GET TAN!
WITHOUT GOING BROKE
I BASKETS BY CHOICE
Carolina East Centre
(beside the PJitt Theatres)
PRICES �Wolff tanning beds
1 MONTH $49.00 �Open 7 days a week
2 MONTH $75.00 ?Always fresh bulbs
3 MONTH $99.00 �Personal service
?Lowest prices around
STUDENT SPECIAL
All Semester $99.00
limited number will be sold
FREE VISIT CALL 321-0709
SHOEOUTLET
Corner of 9th and Washington Street
Walking Distance from Campus (3 blocks)
Men & Women's
Dress and Casual Shoes
Name Brand Athletic Shoes in All Sizes
Bass, Sperry, Topsider (Leather & Canvas)
Timberland (Hiking Boots)
Duck Shoes and Many Others (Factory Returns)
DISCOUNT SHOES SOLD
BELOW WHOLESALE
Ties
$5.99 to $11.99
MensWomens Socks
$1.00 to $2.00
kflVJ4;�
"Greenville's
ONLY
Exotic
Nightclub"
Adult
Entertainment
jf Center
" MONDAYS
Football Sports Night
TUESDAYS
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
WEDNESDAYS
Amateur Night for Female Dancers 11pm-1am
CASH PRIZE 0), -
�Com�t�ntsnenf loMllfrirgislrrinodtBTur. Muitomte by 8 00. rr�l6ljDrt&t'
THURSDAYS - SATURDAYS Sjver Bue, Bartender
Silver Bullet's Female "Exotic" Dancers
We do Birthdays, Bacelor Parties, Bridal Showers,
Corporate Parties & Divorces
Employment Update
The East Carolinian needs a few good
people to fill a few good positions:
Circulation Manager, Assistant Lifestyle
Editor and Staff Writer. Come to our office
for an application.
Get into circulation!
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for the position of Circulation
Manager. Applicants must have good
organizational skills.
Crime doesn't pay, but we do.
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for the positions of Assistant
Lifestyle Editor, News and Sports Staff
Writers. Aspiring journalists are
encouraged to join us and gain valuable
experience. Applications are available at
our office or call 757-6366.
IMPORT SERVICE
L
Established in 1976
We service all foreisn cars: BMW, Mercedes, Toyota,
Honda, Nissan, Saab, VW, Porsche, Volvo, Subaru,
Alfa Romero, Jaguar, and all others
EXPERT WORKMANSHIP
Wk 756-9434
2204 Dickinson Ave.
131

ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
3B Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 Alt
Dickinson Avo.
(behind John's Convenient Man)
ValidN.C. I.D. Required
I feMi
.jnn
Do Your Part for a
Better Environment
SAVE ENERGY
Protecting the environment and conserving our natural
resources benifits us all. Efficient use of energy in our every
day lives can make a real difference. The key is to change
energy-wasting habits into energy-saving ones. Every one
can do their part.
For some low-cost, no-cost energy-saving tips, call GUC's
Energy Services Office at 551-1523.
Greenville �) Utilities
Professor
Eating & Drinking-v Jlrn SaiDon
WELCOME BACK
STUDENTS!
Daily Drink and
Food Specials
including
25C each Buffalo Wings
4-7PM EVERYDAY
Located behind Quincy's on Greenville Blvd.
355-2946
2Sif

!ii.w� mmmm





-�- I III
Go Buy The Book.
758-2616
Texts for less at UBE�
516 South Cotanche Street Cireenville, NCT
MMIi -�i�iMi�n
wm iii i an i' i n i ji n. .l .h. w-ww�. , , ���





Title
The East Carolinian, January 12, 1993
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 12, 1993
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.913
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy