The East Carolinian, December 3, 1992







Opinion
New era
Hillary Clinton, wife, mother and right-hand
woman, represents women of the '90s. She might
even pave the way for a female president.
See story pg. 6.
lifestyle
Soul Asylum
Soul Asylum, touring its new album
Grave Dancers' Union, played at the
Cats Cradle in Chapel Hill Nov. 23.
See story pg. 10.
Lyons share
Lester Lyons scored 21 points to
help the Pirates defeat St.
Andrews in the opening basketball
game Tuesday night.
See Story pg. 13.
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 24
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, December 3,1992
16
University considers plusminus grading system
ByJoeHorst
Staff Writer
The ECU Faculty Senate is consid-
ering a proposal that would change the
current grading policy on this campus
to a plusminus system.
In March 1989, the Faculty Senate
approved a recommendation for a new
grading system based on a similar sys-
tem that North Carolina State Univer-
sity had proposed. The new grading
system would include pluses and mi-
nuses and further distinguish the cur-
rent four-point grading system by in-
crements of .3 points.
At the time Chancellor Richard
Eakin vetoed the proposal, stating his
concern that the proposed changes
would adversely affect the students. He
also stated that little evidence existed to
show that the current system did not
adequately evaluate the students' per-
formances.
Bob Woodside, chair of the Fac-
ulty Senate Credits Committee, said the
chancellor was willing to look at the
matter at a later date.
"In his letter to the Faculty Sen-
ate, he also said he'd be willing to con-
sider another proposal, but didn't want
one immediately Woodside said.
Theonly difference between ECU's
and NCSU's proposed policy is the re-
moval of the A grade if the policy was
to be introduced into ECU's administra-
tion. Individuals opposed to the Agrade
cited the fact that only two colleges in the
country had adopted an A system,
Cornell and Columbia Universities.
After holding various open meet-
ings to discuss the matter, NCSU offi-
cials summarized the major concerns
of both the students and the faculty at
Students with borderline grades may
be assigned different grades on very
minor performance differences; stu-
dents can also be assigned the same
"In the way I awarded grades over the
years, 1 think my students would have come
out just about even. Some people would have
actually passed the course, maybe where they
got an F
that institution.
The faculty at NCSU said the grad-
ing scale would allow for a more precise
and accurate representation in grading.
Bob Woodside,
Faculty Senate
grade though significant differences in
performance exist.
"(With the new system), a student
wouldn't have to sweat out the differ-
named
ECU News Bureau
A state-of-the-art print communications
media laboratory at ECU has been named for a
university alumnus, the late Charles Silas
Edwards, a former official with the North Caro-
lina Department of Justice.
The lab features a Macintosh Ilci teaching
computer, 15 macintosh student computers a CD-
ROM player and other computer-related equip-
ment, along with writing, page design, art and
reference software. The lab is believed to beamong
the best of its type in the nation, according to Dr.
T. Harrell Allen, who is chair of the communica-
tion department, ECU's newest academic depart-
ment.
The original seed money to equip the lab
was contributed by Edwards' daughter, Mary
Edwards Plybon and her husband, Robert, resi-
dents of Greensboro, and Edwards' widow, the
former Eula Sawrey. Additional money came
from ECU's own fund for computing and tech-
nology improvements.
The media lab replaces an older lab com-
prised of computers which will be distributed to
faculty offices, Allen said. With the installation of
the lab, ECU has within one year "from obsoles-
cence to the state of the art Allen said.
"Wonderful things can happen when pri-
vate donations are combined with strong support
from the university Allen said. "Our media lab
is now the best in the state and as good as any in
the nation
The lab was formally dedicated in an Octo-
ber 29 ceremony in the General Classroom Build-
ing. Attending were Edwards' widow, thePlybons
and their children and university officials and
members of the communication department fac-
ulty.
Before unveiling a plaque mounted outside
the lab door, Mary Plybon of her father's student
days at ECU in the '30s, when a primitive campus
"media lab supervised by the late English pro-
fessor Mary Greene, consisted 6f a typewriter, a
lead pencil and a table-model radio.
After the ceremony, members of the com-
munication faculty demonstrated various types
of equipment in the lab, showing how ECU stu-
dents are usingit to write, editand design various
publications for their communication classes.
Chancellor Richard Eakin explained the al-
though the lab is currently housed in Room 2025
of the General Classroom Building, it may be
moved to other quarters on campus along with
Photo by Dail Reed
Titnaie Burwell (foreground) prepares an assignment on a computer in the Charles Edwards Media Lab, which
features state-of-the-art computer equipment,
other classrooms and offices of the communication
department, which now occupy porrionsofthreebuild-
ing on campus.
"We want to emphasize that it is the lab being
named, not the room Eakin said. "The lab will be
known as the Charles S. Edwards Media Lab wher-
ever is it located in the future
The Edwards-Plybon families have a long
record of service and giving to ECU. Both Charles
Edwards and Robert Plybon have been recipients of
Outstanding Alumni Awards.
Charles Edwards was a native of Edgecombe
� .� � ��. �� v�, uuing cuv.iip, wiui cvci is u lutdieu in ine future.
Fall commencement scheduled for Dec. 12
See Lab page 4
ence between one grade as much
Woodside said.
Students at NCSU expressed con-
cerns that grade point averages might
suffer and affect financial aid or schol-
arships. They also said the grading scale
should be equitable to all students and
that all professors would use the scale
in the same way.
Woodside said that in his grad-
ing experience, the change in the sys-
tem would not have had a major effect
overall.
"In the way I awarded grades over
the years, I think my students would
have come out just about even
Woodside said. "Some people would
have actually passed the course, maybe
See PlusMinus page 4
Policy on gays
in military affects
ROTC programs
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
President-elect Bill Clinton's plan to lift the ban on
homosexuals in the U.S. military has sparked controversy
between left and right ideologies.
Clinton plans to issuean executiveorder to repeal the
Department of Defense directive that bans gays and lesbi-
ans from military service.
Military departments at ECU would not comment
on the situation.
"Officially, we do not make comments on specula-
tions said Lt. Col. James M. George of the department of
aerospace studies. "The current DOD standards are what
we operate under
The University of Missouri-Columbia is reacting to
the call for change. Organizations on campus have been
trying to remove the ROTC unit because of its policy of
denying entrance to homosexuals.
"ROTC has its hands tied because of policy said
Scott Murphy, a cadet at the University of Missouri-Co-
lumbia. "It's not fair to take away my ability to pay for
school. It isn't fair for them to blame ROTC for a policy
made in Washington
President Bush said he would not change the current
policy, which states in part that "homosexuality is incom-
patible with military service. The presence of such mem-
bers adversely affects the ability of the Armed Forces to
maintain discipline, good order, and morale
Bob Knight, director of cultural studies with the
Family Research Council, agreed.
"The military is unlikecivilian life. Ihaveno problem
working alongside homosexuals he said. "I have. But I
didn't have to eat with them, sleep with them, be in
intimate circumstances around the clock. And in the mili-
tary that's sometimes demanded of you
Clinton, however, has promised to do away with the
policy and allow openly homosexual individuals to join
and stay in the military.
Neal Snow, a University of Maine senior, was re-
cently dismissed from ROTC when he told officers he is
gay-
Snow was the fourth-highest ranking cadet in the
corps, a student senator and is a member of a honorary
society for service to the school and academic achievement
The current policy conflicts with universities' equal
opportunity policies regarding race, religion, sexual pref-
erence and other factors.
See ROTC page 2
tCU RIN� DAY WAV
�ON SALE mm
Photo be Jason Bosch
Graduating seniors purchase class rings in front of the Student
Store. Commencement is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 12.
ECU News Bureau
Blustery rain and Indian
summer have characterized the
weather for Greenville this win-
ter. Officials hope that Saturday,
Dec. 12, which is scheduled to be
the date for the annual fall com-
mencement at Ficklen Stadium,
is a fair day.
Preceded by a band concert
at 9:15 a.m the actual ceremony
will begin at 10 a.m. Also, the
academic profession will begin
forming at 9:45 a.m.
Officials have prepared for
bad weather by setting up alter-
nate ceremonies held at 10 a.m.
and 2 p.m. These ceremonies will
be held in Minges Coliseum if
weather does not permit an out-
side ceremony.
If for any reason these plans
are changed, officials will notify
participants by announcement
during the afternoon and
evening of Dec. 11. Any persons
concerned about possible
changes should listen for local
broadcasts or call the "com-
mencement hotline" at 757-4884.
(26ec6itOcd
Preceded by a band
concert at 9:15 a.m
the actual ceremony
will begin at 10 a.m.
Students teach second
graders health lessons
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Health education students
at ECU got a preview of their fu-
ture careers Wednesday as the)'
played the part of teacher to a
group of second graders from G.R.
Whitfield Elementary School in
Grimesland.
About 50 students from Dr.
Mary A. Glascoff's health educa-
tion teaching merhtxis class par-
ticipated in the healthfair. The ECU
students prepared their own les-
sons, created their own props and
led thesecond graders in songsand
demons trationsto teach themabout
various health-related topics.
"Both groups of students profit
by thisevent'Glascoff said. "TheECU
students are learning to be teachers
and this is an opportunity for first
hand experience with young children.
The second graders will have the op-
portunity to gain valuable health
knowledge whilehavingagood time
The second graders rotated in
small groups to the 12 teaching sta-
tions set u p in Christenbury Gym. Each
station was led by a team of four or five
health education students.
The health lessons ranged from
fire safety to a model of the digestive
system. In some stations the children
See Fair page 2
i
�'��





2
-
The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 3. 1992
Hacker faces felony charges
The FBI has charged that a University of Washington student
used the campus computer system to break into systems at Boeing,
a U.S. District Court and the Environmental Protection Agency.
According to the FBI complaint, Charles Matthew Anderson, 19a
university student, and Costa George Katsaniotis, 21, of Seattle,
were charged Nov. 10 with conspiracy to defraud the United States'
The two men could face maximum sentences of five years in prison
and a $10,(XX) fine if convicted on the charges. The two reportedly
said they broke into the computer systems as a challenge, rather
than to obtain any vital information.
Hunger awareness week held
Students and faculty at Dickinson College held a Hunger and
Homelessness Awareness Week, slept outdoors in cardboard boxes
and fasted to understand these social problems. The students held
a hunger banquet, where they were randomly divided into First,
Second and Third World people and given a meal traditionally
eaten by those populations. They then spent a night outdoors and
fasted. Theobservance was expanded fromoneday to fourdays this
year due to an increase of student interest, said Marty Willard, the
assistant director of the school's religious affairs office. The office
has organized an annual day of fasting since 1976 to show concern
for the hungry in the United States and abroad.
Examination switch results in charges
Two California men were sentenced to probation after plead-
ing no contest to criminal charges arising from a cheating scheme in
which one student paid a National Merit scholar $400 to take an
economics examination tor him. Tony H. Lee, 20, a student at the
California State University, Northridge, and Parousia Liu, 20, a
National Merit scholar enrolled at the University of California at Los
Angeles, were charged Nov. 19 with falsifying a driver's license.
They faced maximum penalties of a year in jail and a $1,000 fine. On
Nov. 24, both men pleaded no contest to the charges. Liu was fined
$445, while Lee was fined $364. Each was sentenced to two years'
probation. College officials said Lee could be expelled from school.
Christmas comes early to LSU staff
Budget cutbacks in Louisiana brought Santa Claus out early
this year as economics and music professors at Louisiana State
University covered their staffs' pay cuts out of their own pockets.
Professors in the economics department raised $1,200 to distribute
among 21 staff members who took an across-the-board 2 percent
pay cut. The pay cuts were instituted to save the school $1 million,
said Loren Scott, who chairs the department.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
ROTC
Continued from page 1
"Dr. Fulani (of the New Alli-
ance Party) supports the full exten-
sion of rights to lesbian and gay
people, and if lesbian and gay people
want to serve in the military, then
they should be allowed to said
spokeswoman Madeline Chapman.
"I suspect their arguments are
fundamentally homophobic and
anti-gay Chapman said. "There's a
sentiment in this country that there's
something aberrant and abnormal
about people expressing their sexu-
ality in ways that are 'different' I
think that's extremely distasteful
Maj. David Santa Ana and
Capt. John R. Schwart of the depart-
ment of military science would not
commentonthematter,statingregu-
lations would not permit them to
offer opinions.
Fair
Continued from page 1
sang health-related songs, while
in others, they received handouts.
"The fair went wonderful
Glascoff said. "The kids seem to
have a wonderful time
Ms. Elizabeth C. Hollar, As-
sociate Director of the ECU Re-
gional Training Center, said the
heal th fair is held once per semes-
ter as part of a class project.
"It was like a three ring cir-
cus Hollar said. "When the bas-
ketball buzzer rang, all the chil-
dren changed stations. It looked
like great fun
The ECU students seemed
to have fun as well. Jennifer
Seymour, a health education
student, said, "We like this
event and the kids seemed
pretty exited also
The East Carolinian is now accepting applications for
the spring semester for
News Editor.
Distinguishing characteristics necessary for the
position include:
� Being able to handle responsibility, meet deadlines
and work with a team,
� Planning assigning and editing stories,
� Knowledge of Associated Press style,
� Familiarity with libel laws and other rules and
regulations which govern journalistic practices,
� Apple Macintosh experience and programs such as
Aldus PageMaker and Microsoft Word,
� Enrollment as a student at East Carolina University
with at least a 2.0 g.p.a.
Applications are available at The East Carolinian
office located on the second floor of the Student Pubs
building on weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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Solutions from your Apple Campus Reseller
The Apple Computer Loan.
"Why should I wait in line at the
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Aerospace Engineering Major
What allowed Kevin to own an Apple" Macintosh PowerBook 145
computer for such a low monthly payment? The Apple Computer Loan'
Kevin knew that owning the power and portabilitv of a Macintosh
PowerBook for his full course load and his work in the Civil Air Patrol
was a smart thing to do. And the Apple Computer Loan was the smart
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3
DECEMBER 3, 1992
Shuttle deploys secret military payload
Los Angeles Times
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER,
Fla. � The shuttle Discovery put the
mannedorbiter fleet's last major mili-
tary payload in space Wednesday,
opening the United States' eighth
and last manned space mission for
1992.
Because of Pentagon-imposed
secrecy, there was no report on ac-
tual deployment of the secret satel-
lite from the orbiter's cargo bay, but
an announcement from the National
Aeronautics and Space
Administration'sJohnsonSpaceCen-
ter said that the operation had taken
place on time and "exactly as
planned
Published plans called for As-
tronaut Guion S. Bluford, a 50-year-
old Air Force colonel, to release the
Department of Defense payload 200
miles above the far western Pacific 6
hours and 9 minutes after the vehicle
rose from its Florida launch pad.
Completion of the operation was not
announced for more than an hour,
however. When live broadcast of
spacecraftcommunications resumed,
Discovery's five-man crew was at
work deploying a communications
antenna in preparation for the re-
mainder of the seven-day mission.
Given its disclosed weight of
23,215 pounds and the northeasterly
heading of the launch, analysts have
speculated that the cargo listed as
DOD-1 was a Lacrosse all weather
spy satellite, or perhaps a high-alti-
tude sentry to monitor communica-
tions or rocket launches.
For security purposes, officials
not only stopped the broadcast of
communications with theastronauts
while they worked with the secret
payload, but eliminated the usual
television pictures from the control
room of Houston's manned space-
craft center. During the remainder of
the mission, there will be no pictures
showing thespacecraft'sempty cargo
bay, on grounds that conclusions
about the satellite could be drawn
from the structure that held it before
deployment.
Their prime Pentagon assign-
ment behind them, Discovery's five
astronauts turned to a host of scien-
tific and engineering tasks, includ-
ing work with 13 additional experi-
ments for the Department of De-
fense.
The flight had been scheduled
to lift off at sunrise, but officials de-
layed it for nearly an hour and a half
because ice formed at several places
on thevehicle'sl54-f(ot-rall fuel tank.
Although the air temperature at the
launch site got no lower than 48 de-
grees, high humidity and the chill
from the super cold liquid hydrogen
and liquid oxygen combined to cre-
ate frost and patches of ice on the
tank's surface.
Because ice might flake off the
tank and damage the orbiter's deli-
cate surface, NASA rules prohibit a
launch if there is any accumulation
of ice more than one-sixteenth of an
inch. The ice rule and other sharp
cold weather limitations were im-
posed after the January 1986 Chal-
lenger disaster when freezing tem-
peratures were implicated in the
shuttle's destruction.
It was Discovery's first flight
since last January. In the interim the
shuttle was extensively refurbished
and modified. It went through the
preparations forits 15th mission with-
out a hitch, and according to deputy
shuttle program manager Brewster
Shaw "arrived on orbit in great
shape
To deploy the military satellite
in the position required by the Penta-
gon, Wednesday's launch put Dis-
covery on a course that took itsharpry
northward. The angle, inclined 57
degrees from the Equator, means that
before it lands back in Florida next
Wednesday, the spacecraft swings
below the tip of the South American
continent and as far north as
Scandinavia, criss-crossing the en-
tire United States, except Alaska, in
the process.
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4 The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 3, 1992
Russia will
continue to
export arms
The Washington Post
Acting Prime
MOSCOW
Minister Yegor Gaidar, hoping
to win support from the mili-
tary-industrial sector for his em-
battled economic reforms, prom-
ised Wednesday that Russia will
continue exporting arms to
China, Iran, Syria and other
countries.
"Naturally we don't intend
to spark international conflicts
and deliver weapons to conflict
zones Gaidar told a crucial ses-
sion of Russia's Congress of
People's Deputies. "Butwehave
absolutely no grounds to leave
this most important market
He said Russia recently has
signed contracts worth about $1
billion with China, $650 million
with India and $600 million with
Iran. Russia delivered a subma-
rine to Iran last month despite
strong objections by Western na-
tions that the sale would ad-
versely affect the balance of
power in the Persian Gulf re-
gion.
Gaidar's speech, which of-
fered both a spirited defense of
his reforms and a frank acknowl-
edgment of many "mistakes
was greeted coldly by legisla-
tors, many of whom jeered as he
spoke.
The 1,041-member Con-
gress, elected in 1990 under the
old Soviet system, is dominated
by ex-Communists, many of
whom are determined to slow
Russia's move toward a free mar-
ket and possibly force Gaidar
and his reformist team from
power.
While some deputies said
Gaidar's speech had strength-
ened his position and that of his
patron, President Boris Yeltsin,
it was far from clear Wednesday
whether Gaidar could muster
enough votes to survive a pos-
sible test in the Congress.
PlusMinus I Lab
Continued from page 1
where they got an F
After holding meetings to
discuss possible implementa-
tion, NCSU officials have
strongly recommended that the
system should be changed in the
fall semester of 1992.
The Faculty Senate Credits
Committee has currently sent
out proposals to various depart-
ments asking for its opinion on
the new system. Opinions on the
proposals must be turned by
Dec. 4.
"This proposal is going
out to the units, and 1 suppose
we'll get this back in January
from enough units and meet
again Woodside said.
Eakin was unavailable for
comment on the subject.
The Student Government
Association at ECU also invites
students to also bring opinions
or proposals to their office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline for student input is also
Dec. 4.
Continued from page 1
County. For most of his adult The Media Lab gift and
life hewasaresidentofFarmville dedication was arranged by
and served for mx vearsas Mayor Cynthia Kittrell, the director of
of Farmville and judge of the Major Gifts at ECU, who coordi-
Farmville Recorder's Court. Ac- nated the Plybon's desire for a
tive in civic affairs, Edwards be- Charles S. Edwards Memorial
longed to the Rotary Club with ECU's need for money.
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Phone 756-5244 I �r
I Iours:8am-5:30pm Monday-Friday X;un-1:00pm SaturdayJ As Cash
ylxKmimmmn.m�.wnuumi.m
American lxpross. ami Br-(Inch Charge
AN IDEA:
Gift Fruit for the Family
at Christmas!
1 hu. Navels 48 Ct $14.75
1 hu. Grapefruit 36 ct $13.75
and
1 bu. Grapefruit27 ct $17.75
(Limited Supply, Order Now!)
Also In:
CHRISTMAS TREES
WREATHS & GARIAND
M-F lo-8pm Sat8-6:30pm
757-3311
Weekend
Specials!
Cukes & Peppers
5$ 1.00
Broccoli
.99 ea
1534 E. 14th St.
Greenville, NC 27834
CASH FOR
BOOKS
BONANZA
(t
Join us for Refreshments and Great Bargains
at our 1st Annual Open House on Monday,
December 7th from 5:30 until 8:00 pm.
B
-
K p
Save 25
on Regularly Priced
T-Shsrts and
Sweatshirts
Save 20 on
Selected
Gift Items
Be o big winner two ways. First, by selling your books for cash. S�cond by
playing "Cash For Boob Bonanza Get a free game card when you set! your
books back. Then simply scratch off the prize area to see if you' re an instant winner.
Stop by the bookstore for a complete list of prizes, rules and regulations
WIN BONUS PRIZES
GRAND PRIZE
13" REMOTE CONTROL COLOR TV
STUDENT STORES
"WRIGHT PLACE" SODA SHOP
Wednesday, Dec. 9 - Friday, Dec. 11
Monday, Dec. 14 - Wednesday, Dec. 16
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday, Dec. 12
10:00 AM-2:00 PM
ON THE MALL & ON THE HILL
Thursday, Dec. 10 & Friday, Dec. 11
Monday, Dec. 14 & Tuesday, Dec. 15
10:00 AM-4:00 PM
Weather Permitting
$1.00 Off
Tapes & CD's!
20 Off all
Children's
Clothing!
Ho-Ho-Ho! I can do My
Best Holiday Shopping at
The ECU Student Stores!
Save 20
on all Tradebooks
and Children's Books!
ECU Student Stores
Wright Building
757-6731
ECU Student Stores � Your Dollars Support Student Scholars?





The East Carolinian
December 3, 1992
Classifieds
Page 5
F( )R RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
J town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
; ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
: 8915.
- HOUSES FOR RENT: 800E.WU-
� low Street, 3 BR-1.5 Baths, $600 per
j month. 1108 Forbes Street, 4 BR-2
� Baths, $600 per month. 2608Tryon
- Drive,3BR-lBath,$550permonth.
� 1 YR lese and security deposit.
: Duffus Rental 756-2675.
I ROOMS FOR RENT: If you are a
Returning Student or a Student 25
� or Older: would you like to rent a
room in a two story home in a
I lovely sub-division near campus?
; Home owner is a professional per-
J son who is also a part-time stu-
1 dent. Rent includes a private room
J with bath, use of washerdryer,
kitchen privileges, in a upscale
. kitchen with storage space, tele-
phone service, cablevision tv room
use and study room privileges.
This contemporary home setting
is serene and luxurious with sev-
eral fireplaces, and many large
windows overlooking wooded ar-
eas. Only serious minded stu-
dents need apply.250 Monthly
includes everything. Call 355-1830
formore information or interview.
LOOKING FOR TWO PEOPLE
to take over lease at Kingston Place
: for spring semester. If interested
! call 757-3579 ask for Jeff or Chris.
i FURNISHED BEDROOM-
i Brookvalley home, AC, utilities
� furnished. Private entrance,
"� kitchen, washerdryer, living
room privileges. Non-smoking
graduate student or professionals
i only. Available now on. $195
: month 756-2027 M-F. "One of
: Greenville's best rentals said
former tenant.
: MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
Wilson Acres APT. $151month
! plus 13 of utilities and phone.
; Contact 752-1644.
. APARTMENT for rent. Need
j!�omeone to sublease 2 bedroom at
�TXings Row. $360. Bus service.
Available now. Call 757-1613.
-TIREDOFYOURPRESENTUV-
� :iNG ARRANGEMENTS? Need 1
� oommate to share large house
tthree blocks from campus. Large
rooms, fireplace, lots of space
.�$144mo util Call 830-1371 or
830-3882 for more info leave mes-
sage.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED. Preferred non-smoker.
190 month plus 1 2 utilities. Move
in immediately. Oakmount
Square. Swimming pool, tennis
court, laundry facilities. Two-bed-
room. For information ask for
Khristine 321-3464.
SPACIOUS 1-bedroom apartment
off of Hooker Rd. Large living
room kitchen area, with full bath.
Very reasonable utilities with ma-
jor appliances included. Call 756-
7643 or (919) 488-2947.
FOR RENT 300 S Jarvis St. 2 BR
lBth cent H&A $550month & de-
posit Call Richard 756-0390.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Toshare
house near campus, 1 4 utilities,
phone & cable. $150 for private
bedroom with 1 2 bath. Washer
dryerfireplace. Please call Laurie,
Brian, or John at 758-6152.
NOW LEASING
C0LLE6E TOWNE ROW
NEW, spacious, energy
efficient two bedroom
apartments. Conveniently
located on the corners of 13th
and Evans Streets.
Call for an appointment or
visit our office
REMCO EAST, INC.
1807 S. CHARLES BLVD.
355-1313
R()()MMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
3 bedroom house. 14 rent ($140
month) 14 utilities. Deposit
negotiable. 5 blocks from campus.
Call 758-6810 leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE(S)
Wanted: 1 person $191.67 plus 1
3 utilities, 2 People $143.75,3 or 4
bedroom house AC,heat and W
D, Available: Dec 20 or Jan 6 nego-
tiable Call 757-2966.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 2 bedroom apt
near Med. School. $165mo 12
utilities. Must be non-smoker, no
alcohol. 20years preferred, call
830-0616.
ROOMMATE WANTED:Female
to share 3 bedroom house. Com-
pletely furnished own room.
$100 rent & 13 bills. Must be neat
and a non-smoker. Please call
756-1793.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedrooml 12 bath apt 1
mile from campus. Rent $185
month 12 utilities. Mature,
graduate student preferred. Call
757-1510.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share 2 bedroom apt.
in Langston Park for Spring Se-
mester '93. Pay 182.50 rest plus 1
2 utilities and cable. MUST be a
non-smoker. Call 752-8024.
TAR RIVER - 3 non-smoking male
roommates needed beginning
January 1st Rent is $156 a month
plus 1 4 of the utilities. Located
on the river. Call Kevin France at
758-6701.
NEEDED: Roommate and apart-
ment for Spring '93. Apartment
must be wheel-chairaccessible and
roommate (male grad student)
must be willing to help wper-
sonal needs. Willing to pay 1 2 of
expenses and compensate for aid
provided. Only serious and dedi-
cated people need call. Billy T.
Sullivan, Phone (919) 284-5925,
Rt. 1, Box 422, Middlesex, NC.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
12 apt at Eastbrook. 150month
12 utilities. Call 752868.
WANTED LAIDBACK, respon-
sible, yet fun loving Roommate to
live with 2 ECU graduates in 3
bedroom, 2 bath, contemporary
home with cathedral ceilings, fire-
place, deck and wooded lot. This
is the best place in town to live!
Close to campus, no pets,we
have 1 cat already) $200 deposit.
Available Jan 1 MUST BE A MU-
SIC LOVER. Please call 758-7993.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
2 bedroom apt on 3rd St. Spring or
SpringSummer. Non-smoker.
$210month pays Rent, Util, Cable.
Call Chris 758-4400 Leave mes-
sage.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
1108 E 10th St 2 Br apt, 1 bath,
$225mo rent deposit, 12 util;
heat, AC, water, sewage, cable in-
cluded in rent. Avail Jan. Call
Chris (919) 455-3433 or Lori 931-
9807.
EORSALli
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext. c-5999.
MUST SELL - Fisher CD unit
($100.00) obo, Soundesign stereo
and entertainment center ($150)
will consider less, Casio personal
electronic typewriter w 15 char-
acter screen ($100) obo. ALL IN
GREAT SHAPE. Stereo makes
good piece of furniture for apt.
Call Kat 931-9667 leave message.
QUALITY FURNITURE Couch,
winged back chair, corduroy
swivel rocker, large back wicker
chair, 2 dark wood end tables, 2
FOR SAIT
lamps,5 piece dinette, brown wood
wall unit, what-not stand, large
and small area rug, end chair sec-
tional sofa. MUST SELL! $275
"ODDS AND ENDS THROWN
IN FREE" Call 321-1190 or 757-
6012 ask for Veronica.
FOR SALE: Motorscooter (1983)
Yamaha 180 $250 desk and chair
$35. Tel: 919-757-2810 leave mes-
sage.
MUSTSELLIMMEDIATELY! Ft.
LauderdaleBahamas Spring
Break vacation for two 6 days and
5 nights, hotel accommodations,
and cruise fare included. Asking
$400.00 but will take BEST OFFER.
Call Brian at 757-3470 or (704) 869-
3485 over X-mas.
SPA MEMBERSHIP- 6 months at
The Club women only. A deal that
simply can't be bought elsewhere.
ONLY $132.00 Call Linda at 757-
3681 anytime.
AKC REGISTERED LABRA-
DOR Retrievers, sire and dame
proven hunters. Great disposi-
tion, 8 weeks old. Call 758-9617
and leave message.
FOR SALE 1977 Volkswagon
Beetle. Good condition has rebuilt
engine. Gook interior and sunroof.
Needs minor repairs. $600.00
Nego. Call 752-4559.
FOR SALE 1983 Oldsmobile
Fireza. 84k, Auto, AMFM, air
$1500.00.9" Zenith color TV digi-
tal tuning cable ready $120.00. 20"
Zenith color TV, $65.00. Call Leon
752-9125 leave message.
FORSALE: Twin bed,wood frame
headboard wmattress and box
springs included. Great condition
60.00 obo. 830-9442.
FOR SALE: 12 speed World
Schwinn, Exc condition. Keep
inside year round. Gray color.
830-9442. $135.00 New $335.00
ELECTRIC GUITAR 88 Charvel.
MintCond. too much to list. $1100
guitar. Must sell fast. Sacrifice
$375. AMP- 1990 70 watt Crate.
Excellent Cond. many extras. $275.
Call Scott 758-2119.
WANTED
GUARANTEED WORK AVAIL-
ABLE. Excellent pay for EASY
home based work. Full part-
time. Rush self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(G2) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers
(Gl) 1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
SPRING BREAKERS - Promote
our Florida Spring Break pack-
ages. Earn MONEY and FREE
trips. OrganizeSMALLorLARGE
groups. Call Campus Marketing.
800-423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext.3712.
EARN $1000WEEK at home
stuffing envelops! For informa-
tion, send long self addressed
stamped envelope to CJ Enter-
prises, Box 67068L, Cuyahoga
Falls, OH 44222
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY! In-
dividuals and Student Organiza-
tions wanted to promote the Hot-
test Spring Break Destinations, call
the nation's leader. Inter�Cam-
pus Programs 1-800-327-6013.
GREATHOLIDA YJOB OPPOR-
TUNITY: Going home for the
Holidays? Need a fun part-time
job? The HONEY BAKED HAM
CO. is in search of a seasonal help
HELP WANTED
to fill our sales counter and pro-
duction positions. We have stores
located in the following markets:
Charlotte, Wilmington, Raleigh,
Greensboro, Winston-Salem,
Durham, Fayetteville and other
major cities throughoutthe south-
east. Pleasecheckthewhite pages
or information for the store near-
est your home.
ALTERATIONS AND DRESS
maker for sewing Boutique' Exp.
Nee. For appt. Call 355-0354.
NEEDED: Basketball officials for
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department Winter basketball
league. Position pays $10-12 a
game. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials.
However, a basic knowledge and
understanding of the game is nec-
essary. For additional informa-
tion, please contact Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550.
IMMEDIATE OPENING for
TypistSecretarial person. Apply
in person between 9:00-5:00 Mon-
day-Friday at SDF Computers,
Inc 106 E. 5th St, 7523694.
EXTRA MONEY for Christmas.
Banquet help and AM waitress
needed. Ramada Inn. 203 W.
Greenville Blvd. Apply in person.
TH E EAST CAROLINIAN is now
accepting applications for the
Spring Semester for news editor.
Applicants must be familiar with
associated press style, libel laws,
and the Apple Macintosh. Expe-
rience in newswriting is preferred.
Applications are available at The
East Carolinian office on the sec-
ond floor of the Publications
Building.
SAVE BIG on Spring Break '93!
Jamaica, Cancun, Bahamas from
$449 Florida from !119! Last
chance to book early and save$$$!
Organize group travel free! Sun
Splash Tour 1-800-426-7710.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
. Alaska Summer
Employment
FISHERIES - Students Needed! Earn $600
per week in canneries or $4,000 per month
on fishing boats. Free Transportation! Room
and Board! Over8,000openings.Noexperi�nce
necessary. Male or Female. Get a head start on
summer! For your employment program call:
1-206-545-4155 Ext. A5362
Student Employment Services
Achievement Through Adventure
Snidenu
eighteen or
wiihins to wort in AU�U mi
orotw nd iJnood phyMCTi
usthr
condition
SERVICES OEEERED
��SPRING BREAK Bahamas
Cruise (10 meals)$279! Panama
City with kitchen $119! Cancun
$429! Jamaica $479! Daytona
(kitchens) $149! Key West $249!
Prices increase 121192! 1-800-
678-63-86
GUARANTIED FREE SPRING
BREAK TRIP to Bahamas or
Panama City! Cancun, Jamaica,
Daytona, Keys! Sign-up before
121192! Springbreak! 1-800-
678-6386.
QUALITY WORD PROCESS-
ING: Specializing in letters, re-
sumes, business and medical
transcription term papers, the-
sis, manuscripts. Anything that
needs to be typed. Dictaphone
transcription available. Call 321-
2522
DEPENDABLE, CERTIFIED
BABY-SITTER looking for kids
to baby sit! Very outgoing and
energetic, can work most after-
noons and evenings (even week-
ends)! Also CPR certified. Call
Dana at 931-7825 or at the East
Carolinian, 757-6366 any time.
RESUME COMPOSITION
AND TYPESETTING SER-
VICES! 10 discount on stu-
dent packages if you mention
SERVICES OFFERED
this ad! Laser printed and stored
on disk! The Write Resume, 105
Oakmont Drive 756-0697.
GET YOUR TALKING BAL-
LOONS! For more information
send S.A.S.E. to PO Box 1544,
Winterville, NC 28590.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FRfcE
HOTLINE
In C�IH. (213) 477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 lo: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. �206-A, Los Angles, CA 90025
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY!
SPRING BREAK
HOW ABOUT IT IN THE
BAHAMAS OR FLORIDA
KEYS. WHERE THE PARTY
NEVER ENDS. SPEND IT ON
YOUR OWN PRIVATE YACHT.
ONE WEEK ONLY
$385.00 PER PERSON
INCLUDES FOOD AND MUCH
MORE
EASV SAILING VACHT CHARTERS
1-800-780-4001
I'l-RSONAES
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMU-
SICIAN and poetic soul seeks
friendship and correspondence
from like-minded lady. Photos
and letters to MV PO Box 8663,
Greenville, NC 27835.
ALPHA OMICRON PI-
Congrats to our newly elected
officers- Jana Holland- Pres, Kim
Kelly- Vice-pres Stacy Carroll-
Alumnae relations, and Lisa
"giggles" Berting- Panhellenic
exec. Also special thanks to
Myra, Jam ie, and Faye on a great
year! Love, your sister and
pledges.
IF YOU ENJOY war games, splat
ball (paint pellet) fights, etc
contact Karen at 752-1398 to get
up a game.
WARM BODIES WANTED to
travel to Florida, Cancun, Baha-
mas, or Jamaica forSpring Break.
Reply before December 30 and
save $30! Call 931-7334.
CLEM AND BUBBA, Thanks for
the wonderful formal weekend,
Love YOUR TWO FAVORITE
RED HEADS.
TO ALL SORORITY PLEDGE
classes; Thanks for making the
first annual walk-a-thon a huge
success. Raising $2700.00 for
Real Crisis Center, New Direc-
tions and Picaso will really help
�heir great causes, Love the Jun-
ior Panhellenic.
NICOLE FEDERINKO- Thanks
for a job well done with all so-
rority phone directories. Love,
Junior Panhellenic.
RENE SMALLWOOD- Thanks
for all your hard work with the
1st annual walk-a-thon for char-
ity. It was a huge success. Love,
Junior Panhellenic.
TO ALL SORORITY AND FRA-
TERNITY pledge classes; get
psyched about the cookout on
the mall at 6:00 on the 7th of
December. Junior Panhellenic.
AMY DODSON- Thanks for all
the great personals this year -
we love you, Junior Panhellenic.
CONGRADULATIONS to the
new '93 Chi Omega Exec Mem-
bers: Allison Joseph- Pres
Mehryn Galardi-Vice Pres Amy
Powell- Sec, Jennifer Horsley-
Treas Amy Sineath- Pledge
trainer,Jennifer McCain-
Panhellenic, MelanieCarwhile
- Rush Chaairman. We know
you will do a great job
BRIAN HANN AN: Way to strut
your stuff for Chi Omega. You
PERSONALS
made us proud, you GREEK
GOD. Love the Chi Omegas.
WAY TO GO Chi Omega.
You're 1 in volleyball. Your
hard work paid off.
ALPHA PHI: You better watch
out, you better not cry, you bet-
ter not shout I'm telling you why
Santa Clause is coming to the
Alpha Phi house everyone has
been good!
ALPHA PHI'S: Get ready for
Christmas Cocktail Friday
Night! It will be a night to re-
member!
GREAT JOB Delta Zeta in the
soccer and intramural finals -
we're really proud of your hard
work! Love, The Sisters and
Pledges.
DELTA ZETAS and their dates:
Hope everyone had a blast at for-
mal! It ws a night to remember!
CONGRATULATIONS TO
THE 1993 officers of Delta Zeta:
President - Christi Randoll; Vice
President Membership-Melanie
Morris; Vice President Pledge
Education - Ericka Dodge; Trea-
sure - Susan Howell; Corre-
sponding Secretary - Sherry
Zothner; Recording Secretary -
Andrea Parham; House Manager
- Kara Kowalski. Congratula-
tions also to the other chairs!
We know you'll do a wonderful
job! Love, The Sisters and
Pledges of Delta Zeta.
TO B.C. for your man troubles.
Men have two heads. One used
to bed you, the other to wed you.
You must play the game, sex,is
the name, all rules not the same.
You were hitting the bed think-
ing of wed a tear you now shed.
You were in love and dating, the
time right for fine mating. The
words that were said led you to
bed. What happened to us him
you now cuss. A man will wed
when he is stable with bread.
You must learn to relate. Don't
fault your man. As he goes thru
his ages he'll enter new stages.
Jeff Jones.
ATTENTION PIRATE FANS:
Sorry you have to stay in Pitt
County this year while NC State
is loading up their gear we're
going to Florida to ANOTHER
invitational Bowl Ya'll just stay
here and tear down your own
damn goal It was you ECU fans
who gave the team a losing sea-
son at least we're going Bowlin
ain't that enough reason ECU
fans only know how to get drunk
and raise cain at least NC State
fans stay for the whole game so
we'll be in ANOTHER Bowl
game for the rest of our years
while you ECU has one in every
15 years. PS be sure to watch
NCState play with the rest of
your peers and then you can
drink another beer and soak in
your tears SUPPORTIIVE NC
STATE FANS.
TO THE SUPPORTIVE NC
STATE FANS you are so tight.
With fans like you, no wonder
ECU fans get such a bad rap.
You, the "supportinve N.C.
State fans should be proud of
your alma mater � after all you
are going to this fine establish-
ment of ECU and you should
support your school even
through the not-so-glamerous
times. PS If you like NC State so
much why aint't YOU there?
Could not get in? With lots of
love and purple-and-gold
dreams, SUPPORTIVE ECU
FANS.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new brothers of Phi Sigma Pi
National Honor Fraternity: Jim
Devine, Tracy Kell, Karen
McLamb, Troy Powell, Holly
Sefton, and Margit Sylvester.
The future is in your hands.
Announcements
PUBLIC SFRVICF AN.
NQUNCEMENT
The East Carolina University
School of Art announces it's an-
nual Christmas Sale on December
3 and 4 from 8 am till 5 pm. Tex-
tiles, ceramics, metals,
prmtrrairing, and wood design will
make up the majority of the work
to be sold. The items are made by
the students of the art school. The
sale will be held in the Wellington
B. Gray Art Gallery located in the
School of Art. For further informa-
tion call 757-6336.
COUNSELING CFNTFR
?25 or Older? Undergrad or
Grad Student. Join us for brown
bag lunches on Wednesdays from
noon to 130 pm. Come for part of
all of the time. This rap group is an
informal gathering designed to be
supportive and help meet the needs
of students with family responsi-
bilities. Informal discussions and
presentation are the format. Place:
Counseling Center in 313 Wright
Building. For more information
call 757-6661.
ECV COLLEGE
DEMOCRATS
If you are concerned about is-
sues such as theenvironment, abor-
tion rights, civil liberties, health
care reform, or any issue relating to
the Democratic party, you can
make a difference, by joining the
ECU College Democrats. Formore"
information call Bill at 752-6947.
PUBLIC SERVICF AN-
NOUNCEMENT
The East Carolina University
School of Art announces it's an-
nual Christmas Sale on December
3 and 4 from 8am till 5 pm. Tex-
tiles, ceramics, metals,
printmaking,and wood design will
make up the majority of the work
to be sold. The items are made by
the students of the art school. The
sale will be held in the Wellington
B Gray Art Gallery located in the
School of Art. For further informa-
tion call 757-6336.
GREENVn.LFARFA
BISEXUAL-GAY-LESBIAN
GROUP
Group activities and discus-
sion of issues relating to same-sex
orientation. Meeting are closed.
Call 757-676611:00-12:15 Tuesand
Thurs or l-4:00pm Wed for infor-
mation.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The newman Catholic Student
Center invites you to worshipwith
them. Sunday Masses: 11:30 am
and 8:30 pm mass at the Newman
Center. 953, E 10th St two houses
from the Fletcher Music Building.
For further information, please call
Fr. Paul Vaeth, 757-1991.





The East Carolinian
December 3, 1992
Opinion
Page 6
SGA provides checks, balances to ECU
The Student Government Association has
once again shown a backbone in standing up
for students' rights on the ECU campus.
In late November, the SGA passed a reso-
lution denouncing the recent limitations placed
upon the campus radio station
WZMB. The administration at
ECU has placed a ban on WZMB
from broadcasting from any bar
or tavern downtown. They have
cited as their reasons the risk of
liability to the university as a
"deep pocket FCC violations
and ultimate responsibility of
social host events.
This narrow-minded ap-
proach to regulating organiza-
tions on campus desperately
needs to be re-examined and re-evaluated.
Other groups hold regular meetings on cam-
pus serving alcohol and also hold meetings at
bars downtown, such as Chico's. By not con-
demning this action, the university, in effect,
condones it and creates a double-standard.
The question arises as to whether the fact
that WZMB is a media-related organization
had any effect on the amount of restriction
placed upon them. Other organizations do not
have the same amount of view in the public eye
that WZMB has; therefore, the administration
would not hear of them as often as the radio
station.
Media, as a whole, are seen as a micro-
"When SGA
supports
something, it
signifies the
support of the
entire student
hody
Courtney Jones
SGA president
cosm of society- With its specialized knowl-
edge and wide public outreach, the media serve
as the information-getters for the rest of the
world. People watch TV, read the papers and
listen to the radio not only for entertainment,
but to hear what's going on
around them as well. Limit-
ing the media in their rights to
cover events hurts the public
on a greater level by infring-
ing on the right to freedom of
speech.
Along with this First
Amendment breach comes a
concept known as prior re-
straint. Prior restraint is an
unconstitutional practice
where the government re-
stricts action on the basis that it may, in the
future, create unrest. By imposing limitations
on the basis that future litigation may happen,
the administration is guilty of two major faults
against the public's most basic rights.
The SGA has given this university a set of
checks and balances that is most desperately
needed. SGA president Courtney Jones and the
other officers have shown the student body
that they will not stand idly by while the stu-
dents' rights are being run over. They have put
new emphasis and meaning into the word stu-
dent in SGA, creating a body that a person can
go to, without feeling that actual hope is an
out-of-reach, idealistic notion.
By Amy E. Wirtz
Hillary Clinton to lead women into new era
Hillary Clinton, wife-
mother-lawyer. Soon to be First
Lady. Bill Clinton's right-hand
er woman. It was mentioned
many times during the campaign
that a vote for Bill Clinton would
also be a vote for Hillary. Basi-
cally, they come as a set. Hillary is
a strong-willed, incredibly intelli-
gent modern woman. A woman
who (gasp!) speaks her mind and
who juggles a career and a family
with seemingly effortless ease. In
other words, a feminist's dream.
Unfortunately, the word
"feminist"
conjures up
images of radical,
bra-burning
females. The term
"pro-woman"
may be more
appropriate in this
case. Hillary
Clinton is a light
in the ever dark-
ened tunnel of
equality. She rep-
resents hope in an
otherwise non-
representational
government. Let's
face it � with
women making
up more than half
of the entire human population,
our "fair" democratic government
leaves a lot to be desired when it
comes to equality.
The fact of the matter is, if
Hillary Clinton asserts leadership,
many people are going to be re-
sentful. If she doesn't exert it, a
large number of people will be
greatly disappointed. They (the
American people) apparently
want Hillary to be tough, but not
too tough; to speak her mind, but
at the same time, wear fancy
dresses and function as curator
for the White House.
It is my firm belief that
Hillary Clinton is too talented to
settle in as hostess and decorator.
Whata waste it would be forher to
disappear into the shadows be-
cause of pressure from the dull,
grey-suited Washington big-wigs.
I say let her be what she wants to
be. Let her shape the position of
First Lady (First Spouse?) into a
comfortable role as it suits her.
She's been, up to mis point, asser-
tive and successful at all she's ac-
complished.
It seems mat during the last
few months of the campaign she
was quieted because it was be-
lieved that she was "running the
show The result was a strategic
repositioning, reflected by Mrs.
Clinton's comparative silence and
her adoring gaze, which was paro-
died on Saturday Night Live. This
brought about some head-shak-
ing among admirers who won-
dered if respectability would break
her spirit. Doubtful. Bill Clinton
emerged from a meeting held
shortly after the election saying
that Hilary "knew more" than
most of the people in there. That
certainly is not the sign of a bro-
ken spirit. Incidentally, since a
casual reference to Mrs. Clinton's
potential as a Cabinet member
drew fire last spring, both she and
her husband have ruled out the
possibility. People don't seem to
be ready to handle upwardly-mo-
bile women. The question remains:
Then what do they want?
I, for one, being a woman,
don't want Hillary to turn into
fluff. Granted, the present job de-
scription of the
First Lady reads:
Help
Wanted: quiet,
unpretentious
woman to take
care of social
activities, throw
state-house
dinners, be the
eyes and ears of
husband. Must
wear tasteful,
attractive
clothing to
appease the hard-
nosed
conservative
public. Must not,
in any case, draw
unwanted attention to herself.
Feminists need not apply.
Hillary is the first profes-
sional to take on this role, the only
one who represents America in
the '90s. It's a whole new world
out there. Women have choices
for once. Even though little has
been gained in the fight for equal-
ity, some important strides have
been made.
I hope everyone leaves her
alone. If she can weather this last
fight, she might make a terrific
transition for a female President.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Bobbi Perfetti, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel. Secretary
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Karen Greenwell, Systems Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
THE BUCK STOPS HERE
Quote of
the Day:
It is
impossible
for ideas to
compete in
the
marketplace
if no forum
for their
presentation
is provided
or
available.
Thomas Mann
By Mike Joseph
Truth over nationalism sought to end racism
(Editor's Note: This is the third
part in a three-part series.)
The intended message of
this series of articles is that we are
more alike than we are different,
that much of history is debatable
and everyone has ancestors who
did great things as well as bad
things, and that the present and
future are more important than
the past.
It should also be clear that
racism remains a problem. The 27
percent discrimination identified
by the Urban Institute study is
unacceptable. The higher rates of
crime, unemployment and poor
health care suffered by minori-
ties are problems with which ev-
eryone should be concerned. But
we, as a society, have too often
failed to seek solutions to these
problems together. Approaching
problems through things like cul-
tural awareness movements and
multi-cultural education sounds
great in theory, but in practice it
can create alienation and conflict.
The insane response to this by
more radical groups like the KKK
not only causes interracial con-
flict, it also creates conflict be-
tween persons of the same race.
If, as this writer believes,
the ultimate achievement for our
country is a colorblind society, it
seems logical that we tend to
thwart this goal by dividing our-
selves and emphasizing our dif-
ferences. We become less aware
of the good in other people, and it
practically becomes necessary to
seek out racism in order to justify
ourselves.
Interestingly, despite the
rise of separatist sentiment, there
is evidence that racism is declin-
ing in America � the result, not
of separatism, but of integration
and civil rights. Minorities have
made many gains. The highest
ranking military officer in the land
is black, and minorities have won
elective office in unprecedented
numbers � in some cases, in ju-
risdictions with lopsided white
voting majorities. Also, at the
same time that more blacks were
failing into povert), more were
also moving into the middle class.
Whites have experienced a simi-
lar economic shift. All of us, al-
though in different percentages,
suffer from social and economic
adversity. We can only beat these
problems if we work together.
In the end, it becomes an
individual choice. We mustaban-
EDITORIAL NOTEBOOK
don the comfort of "good-old-
boy" networks. We cannot con-
tent ourselves with a race-based
identity. We need to know that
most Americans want harmony,
and that when racism does rear
its hideous head, people of all
colors will join together to sub-
due it.
Perhaps a tool to support
this would be some sort of inte-
grated, diverse institution which
would endeavor to focus our mag-
nificent variety of ideas and per-
ceptions on our most pressing
problems. Call it the "American
Social and Cultural Institute
Staff it with representatives from
all walks of American life who
celebrate each other, who try to
identify real causes and solutions,
who seek truth over nationalism,
who set an example by demon-
strating "E Pluribus Unum
We must be critical of in-
flammatory propaganda. We
must be suspicious of amateur
editorialists who can err (I stand
convicted). Above all, we must
not divide ourselves and try to
work together from a distance.
Despite our best intentions, sepa-
ratism � by any name � cannot
be good for America.
By Gregory Dickens
Mediocrity is the
death of pride. If
you don't strive for
the best, you don't
find the best.
Education should be students' top priority
on and tell 'em what you think.
Hint: wear a tie. They'll listen to
you better. Even women � it
worked for Annie Hall.
Come on, you know the
drill. Petitions, boycotts, protests,
etc. Think Boston Tea Party. Hell,
think Boston marathon first so
you'll get there quicker.
Mediocrity is the death of
pride. If you don't strive for the
best, you don't find the best. But
you have to recognize what an
appropriate goal is. Today, that
means a job. Money in the pocket
and bread on the table. That's
why you're here at college.
You think you need a class
schedule to get drunk three days
a week? You think you need
homework as inspiration for the
chug of your life? U, the College
Magazine ran a study saying if
you have more than 10 drinks a
week, chances are you won't
pass. There goes the school, the
job, the money and there goes
the ale, your raison d'etre. Better
to sober up, graduate, get the job
you majored for and then drink
like a fish if you want. Buthave
your priorities straight or the
only gold you'll see is on the
arches on the sign where you
work.
You get two days a week to
live as you wish, three if you
count Friday night, which you
should. There's the break you
need � three days out of seven
to do with what you will. The
other four days, hunker down
and push the pencil. In four years,
you get a paper from this fine
state and a head start over
Goober at the gas station.
At this, the end of 1992, it
falls on those of us who have
little else to do to try to foresee
how the year will be remem-
bered. Between the riots and the
rhetoric, America was caught in
a lion's den of frustration and
response. The lesson of cause and
effect was retaught to those who
might have for-
gotten it not so
much for what
action results in
but inaction can
herald as well.
The media did a
fine job (thank
you, you're too
kind) showing
the country the concrete and ab-
stract responses of those who
were forgotten and those better
off forgotten.
So we have a new epoch on
our hands. Not simply because
of Clinton's election, come on,
he's not the Second Coming
(wait, maybe that should be used
for Perot). We, as a country and
individuals, have been made
aware of our environs no matter
how far the boundary extends.
We are set to try anew with in-
volvement, instruction and hope-
fully, infallibility. We no longer
have a physical enemy to con-
front as a whole, a stagnant and
failing political policy in control
nor the luxury of claiming igno-
rance or a lack of opinion on any
pressing issue. One way or an-
other, this nation has been given
a challenge to straighten up and
get its act together. We must de-
cide now just how to go about it.
Either by responding to a
feared outcome or by being de-
termined to enact a different
agenda, we took a stand and said
something. Whether the riots in
L.A. enraged you or scared you,
at least you reacted. If the elec-
tion made you want to throw the
bums out or keep the weirdos
out, you wanted something. While
we have the
momentum of
response, we
must use it to
fix the mess of
a society we
are all in. Ef-
fort must be
made. The late
'80s were
bogged by "well, what can you
do?" feelings; apathy and indif-
ference, mixed with inertia. Now,
blame the media, blame the gov-
ernment, whatever, but energy
has built up because of irritation
with the status quo and the de-
cay of the economy. But now the
economy is up, government is in
place and the new year is in the
on-deck circle. Let's get to work.
You think a law is unfair?
Change it. We've been a democ-
racy for a couple of hundred
years now and that means we all
have a say, but you have to turn
off Regis and get out of the dorm
room and do something. Getting
hacked off and then drinking
until you pee in your backpack
doesn't get the laundry done.
Think an ECU policy stinks to
high heaven? Say so. No, not to
your roommate, no to me, to the
SGA and the administration.
They get paid or get snazzy titles
just to hear what you think. Go
. �





7
The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 3, 1992
Somalia so disrupted by clans that
restoring stability may be impossible
Washington Post
WASHINGTON � With at
least 11 separate clan groups laying
claim to a country almost the size of
Texas, Somalia has disintegrated to
thepointthatrestoringstablegovem-
ment may not even be possible, ac-
cording to U.S. intelligence officials.
Indeed, the situation is so cha-
otic that outside of the former capi-
tal of Mogadishu, it is difficult even
to keep track of which clan is in
charge of which region on which
day, said a Pentagon official with
access to classified intelligence re-
ports. Alliances rupture and reform;
sub-clans split from one group and
cut deals with another.
"They're just constantly in
flux the official said Wednesday.
"Frequently some of the sub-
clans make alliances that can be
opposed to their parent clan .It's
so fragmented
The bleak intelligence assess-
ment comes as the United Nations
prepares to vote on a U.S. offer to
supply troops to protect relief work-
ers who so far have been stymied in
efforts to deliver food to starving
Somalis. Bush administration offi-
cials have said the troops would
remain there only a few months,
but the lack of any political center
of gravity in Somalia raises ques-
tions about whether order can be
restored before they leave.
Among the groups laying
claim to various regions are the
Somali National Movement, the So-
mali Patriotic Movement, the So-
mali Democratic Movement, the
Somali Democratic Alliance, the
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United Somali Frontand the United
Somali Party, to name a few.
Mogadishu, the capital, had
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mali Congress, otherwise known
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The East Carolinian
December 3, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 9
Lee's 'Malcolm X'
named work of art
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Malcolm X could be the most important
film released this year.
Spike Lee hascrafteda superbly articu-
late statement about Malcolm X and about
racism.
Lee has toned down his own racial
views and blunt, yetsprawling, style to tell
a uniquely focused, moving saga of one of
the most influential black leaders in Ameri-
can history.
Denzel Washington, the man whose
previous acting work has included Glory
and Mo' Better Blues (also directed by Spike
Lee), had given hints that he had potential
for a performance like Malcolm X in his
future. The raw power he brings to the role
solidifies the film. His portrayal could be
argued to be as important a contribution to
the film as Lee's direction.
Of course, Lee did much more than
direct the film, therefore Malcolm X is his
film. In addition to directing the movie, he
produced it with Marvin Worth. He also
plays a major supporting cast member,
Short who befriends Malcolminhisyouth
and adds a certain amount of humor to the
film.
Though many of Lee's statements and
actions concerning Malcolm X have been
viewed as brash, no one can deny the con-
viction that he has shown.
Lee tirelessly promoted this film from
its inception twoyearsago. He boldly stated
that black Americans needed to see this
film or else something of this magnitude
may never be completed again.
He fought to make exactly the picture
he wanted. He elicited financial aid from
black performers such as Bill Cosby and
Michael Jordan when Warner Brothers (the
company releasing the film) hesitated with
financial support. He claims that, barring
only a few alterations, he got the monev he
needed to make the film he wanted to ma ke.
One of the comparisons made was to
not shoot the climactic finale in the original
Audobon ballroom. The renovation costs
were too prohibitive.
Lee deserves immense credit for not
allowing even minor setbacks like this to
dampen the film's spirits. None of the com-
parisons are evident on screen.
Malcolm X, in addition to telling a re-
markable story, looks magnificent. Theearly
scenes in Harlem, when Malcolm is a small-
timehustler,explodewithcolor.Thestreets
look remarkably realistic. Malcolm X's pil-
grimage to Mecca was shot on location in
Egypt, which complements the film's real-
ism.
ThecomplexityofMalcolmX,theman,
is evidenced by the fact that a three hour, 21
minute film does not do him justice. Lee
hopes the film will serve as an introduction
to Malcolm X and will lead to a more thor-
ough exploration by those who see the
movie.
Malcolm X was bom Malcolm Little in
Omaha, Neb in 1925.
Early in his life he began to learn about
prejudice when, at age 11, a teacher told
him that Malcolm's aspirations to a be a
lawyer were unrealistic. His teacher sug-
gested carpentry. "Jesus was a carpenter
the teacher said somewhat encouragingly.
Malcolm served six and a half years in
prison for robbery. While there he took the
surname X, signifying the rejection of a
"white man's slave name" and his "un-
known" African identity destroyed by sla-
very.
In prison, Malcolm Xeducated himself
so that when he emerged from his cell he
was a learned spokesperson for his new
religion, the Nation of Islam. Eventually,
after a pilgrimage to Mecca, Malcolm X
welcomed white people into his vision of a
better future for mankind.
In 1965, the intelligent, articulate voice
of Malcolm X was forever silenced by gun-
men at the Audobon Ballroom in New
Photo courtesy Warner Bros.
Malcolm X (Denzel Washington) addresses the huge crowd assembled at a
gathering of the Nation of Islam in "Malcolm X Spike Lee's latest film triumph.
York.
Spike Lee has ensured that Malcolm
X's voice will be heard for generations.
This deeply moving, extremely well-
crafted f il m is certainly one of the best of the
year.
Lee has taken a life and crafted it into a
work ofart while still maintaining a strong
historical foothold.
He has managed to convey the love
he feels for Malcolm X while still pre-
senting Malcolm X as a man rather than
an idealized, superhuman icon.
Lee has created his best film.
Malcolm X is a truly magnificent
work of art.
Art to be on
display at
holiday sale
By Bobbi Perfetti
Assistant Lifestyle Editor
For all those that want to get an early
start on their Christmas shoppjng or for
those that just want to purchase a hand-
crafted item for their own use, Thursday,
Dec. 3, and Friday, Dec. 4, will be the perfect
time. From 8 a.m. until 6 p.m the School of
Art will be holding their annual Christmas
Sale in the Wellington B. Gray Art Gallery.
All of the items that will be sold are
made by the students and sold by the stu-
dents. Included in the sale will be pottery,
silk scarfs, kaleidoscopes and hand-made
Christmas cards. Also featured are metal
works, jewlery, prints and weaved rugs.
The prices of the crafts are quite reason-
able, ranging from $1 to $100. The student
pays for the materials used and makes the
craft on his or her own time. The price of the
craft goes to a worthy cause � the student
who created it.
The students belong to guilds in the
School of Art and these guilds have payed
for all of the promotions for the sale. The
guilds that have participated are: Ceramics,
Printing, Craftsman East, Metals Textiles
and Wood, Art td ucation and Design Asso-
ciates. A portion of the profit goes to the
guilds.
Three art students, in the Craftsman
East guild, have co-ordinated the sale and
have been responsible for the advertising of
the Christmas sale. Bess Andrews, Jamie
Lanier and Alice Swart have been working
hard for the art students and expect a big
turnout for the sale. They expect ECU stu-
dents as well as individuals from the com-
munity to attend the sale.
The Gallery will hold a reception and
sale Thursday night for art enthusiasts. For
more information call the School of Art at
757-6336.
This is the biggest sale that the School of
Art will hold this year and is a great oppor-
tunity to find a unique gift that is more than
worth the price.
Mother Nature to embrace Deli audience
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
Classic rock 'n' roll has found a
newourJetinGreenville,and it'sname
is Mother Nature.
Mother Natureisa trueGreenville
band, having its starthere in February
of 1991. Originally named The Hi wav,
the band has gone through some
changes in their line-up, eventually
coming to the present quartet that
started in December of 1991.
Each member of Mother Nature
has had at least six years of playing
experienceundertheircollectivebelts.
They combine their talents to cover
the classic rock 'n' roll hits of '60s, 70s
and '80s. GuitaristMark Williams joins
fellow guitar player Jon Matthews as
vocal isb,witodrummerRobertSwain
adding final touches to the three-man
vocal reperatoire. Bass player Warren
Sumner rounds out the group.
Mother Nature's set selections
range from The Eagles to The Rolling
Stones to The Mamas and the Papas.
The band gears their shows to solely
entertain the crowd.
"We play classics that everyone
"We don't preach anything, we don't adopt any
political views, we're not gonna tell you how to
live your life. We're just gonna help you drink
your beer
Photo courtesy Mother Nature
Classic rock 'n' roll is what Mother Nature thrives on. Check out their
packed musical set at the New Deli Friday night.
has listened to, ones they are familiar Sumner said. "Wetry to party with the
with Matthews said. peopleintheaudienceand,youknow,
"We try to concentrate our show just try to have a good time
on just being part of the crowd Mother Nature has played
throughout eastern N.C "from
Green viUetoWinston-Salemaccord-
ing to Sumner. They have performed
at the New Deli and the Attic in
Greenville, the Trawl Door in Oriental
and the Ramada Inn in New Bern.
Though Mother Nature adver-
tises itself as a classic-rock band, the
members plan on incorporating more
and more original material as they
progress.
"We have one original tune we
play regularly Matthews said. "We
use thatone .asa plugforouroriginal
stuff, to show everyone that we're not
justtheaveragecoverband,andwedo
have original material. Playing our
classic rock cover-tunes is a vehicle to
gamer some attention and geta name
for ourselves
The band plays roughly 30-35
songs to complete a three-hour set on
nights they play. Choosing from a
total of over 60 songs, Mother Nature
canaJrnostguaranteeadifferentshow
any night for any audience.
"Every Mother Nature show's
going to be a completely different ani-
See Nature page 12
DDD emerging as alternative to stagnating music scene
S?S7
�rfEOATH
1992-1993 Sssiscm
Christmas gift arrives
at McGinnis Theater
By Joe Horst
Staff Writer
By Lisa Bauman
Staff Writer
In an ever-increasing sea of trendy
Chili Peppers-style funk bands and
grungy Nirvana wanna-bees, it's refresh-
ing to hear a group with their own unique
style.
Dear Dead Delila is emerging as
Greenville's alternative to a nationally
stagnating college music scene that seems
to be increasingly based on repitition and
less on originality.
The group's new album, Erosion, con-
tains 15 songs that, as a whole, simply
defy categorization. This is no "get down
and party" record, but the album drips
from start to finish with catchy hooks and
punk-rock energy.
"We wanted to be able to move flu-
idly between songs that are really heavy
and those that have more of an acoustic
feel said ECU senior Joey Lawler,
Delila's guitar player. "I rarely see bands
that play something so incredibly heavy
one second, then sound like the Connells
the next
Dear Dead Delila formed in the sum-
mer of 1990 as a hard-core punk band.
"We released this four track tape that
was really horrible said Lawler. "Every-
thing was out of tune and all the songs were
about ridicu lous topics. But it was punk rock,
so who cares?"
As the
band began
playingout,
they rede-
fined their
sound and
started
working
more on
song writ-
ing.
The
band's new,
full-length
cassette clocks in at over 40 minutes and the
production is exceptionally good for local
demo. None of the songs are over four min-
utes, but each is filled with enough catchy
hooks to give a college radio listener wet
dreams.
The tape opens up with "Kickdirt a
crunchy, Helmet-style number, then moves
into the beautiful "Amethyst a song that has
you tapping your feet one second then banging
your head the next.
"Under the Ocean" and "Forp" are jangly-
pop love songs, while "Christine's Dream" and
"Condom Nation" are full-out thrashers that
will peel the
paint off your
walls.
Randall
Rhodes'
flanged out
bass lines re-
mind me of the
Cure, which is
pretty weird
considering
the intensity of
the rest of the
music. The
record's lyrical content remains mostly per-
sonal, rarely delving into the tired arena of
political and social injustice.
"I know that a lot of bands like us use a
political theme for their lyrics, but we're really
not into it said Lawler. "Most of these people
See DDD page 11
Tonight, the ECU playhouse
will celebrate the Christmas sea-
son with the opening perfor-
mance of "Amahl and the Night
V i s i t o r s, " a
touching musi-
cal by Gian
Carlo Menotti.
"Amahl" is
the story of a
crippled shep-
herd boy who is
visited by the
Three Magi on
their way to
honor the birth
of the
Christchild in
Bethlehem.
Amahl receives
the first miracle
byChrist,culmi-
natingoneofthe
most touching
musical theater
pieces to ever
grace the stage.
The three
wise men will be
played by indi-
viduals from the
music depart-
ment at ECU:
Darryl Taylor,
Jay Pierson and
H'DaleSmith.In
order to over-
come possible
problems with
the part of
Amahl, both Kevin Driver and
Nathan Maxwell will trade off
playing the part.
Amahl's mother will be
played by Edyth lsaacson-
Wagstaff,replai ig Donna Dease.
Dease, an associate professor in
the School of Music, passed away
recently in her sleep.
"Amahl and the Night Visi-
tors" could be known best for its
musical score. Simple and clear
tunes dominate this production,
almost guaranteeing that the au-
dience will enjoy the spectacular.
"Amahl" has
been consid-
ered one of the
most popular
modern op-
eras; more than
400 live perfor-
mances annu-
ally have been
performed and
recordings and
video tapes
continue to sell.
"Amahl
and the Night
Visitors" opens
tonight and
will run
through Dec. 8.
Evening perfor-
mances on Dec.
3, 4, 5, 7 and 8
will draw the
curtain at 8
p.m matinees
on Dec. 5 and 6
will begin at 2
p.m.
Tickets for
"Amahl" are
$12.50 for the
general public
and $7.50 for
students with a
valid ECU I.D.
and children
under 12.
Interested persons may pur-
chase tickets at the McGinnis The-
atre box office Mondav through
Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The box office will also re-
main open until 8:15 p.m. on per-
formance nights.
Photo by Garrett Killians
Nathan Maxwell will play Amahl
inthe ECU Playhouse production
of "Amahl and the Night Visitors
. i
�HHMMI "��
"��' ii��1HII.M





ITHi'iOhmiii� mi
10 The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 3, 1992
S
Soul Asylum graces Cradle crowd with mild punk
center. The Lemonheads playtvl a tight
By Mark Brett
Staff Writer
VeteransoftheMinneapolispunk
scene,thebardofgrurrrusfitsknov'n
as Soul Asylum has played music of
urKompromisingqualityinrelativaib-
scurity for over lOyears.
Lead by singer and songwriter
DavePimer,SouJAsylumcreates intel-
ligent rock that refuses to sacrifice the
musical kick that all successful punk
needs. Their latest album, Gnwe Danc-
ers' Union, currently sits on top of the
alternative music charts. One reason
for this success may be the band's blis-
tering live performances. One such
performance was put on at the Caf s
Cradle in Ohapel Hill on Nov. 23.
In what would seem to be a con-
trast to Soul Asylum's grunge, the
Lemonheads opened the show. On
record, the Lemonheads have a slick
sound, an over-produced sheen that
masks the impact of their music. Their
smooth surface, however, dissolved in
theirlh'esrKwtorevealaverycrunchv
set and prepared the crowd for the
main event
Openingwith their current single,
"Somebody to Shove Soul Asylum
took control of the audience. A song
about loneliness, this track was deliv-
ered with a raw honesty that lay the
crowd's feelings open like an exposed
nerve. Pimer groaned and swayed his
way through thissong, his characteristi-
cally unwashed, chaotic hair swinging
inmattedglorywitheach tortured move-
ment
Live, the band filled their tracks
witharawpowerthatmadethemeffec-
tive despite their shortcomings.
See Soul page 12
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DECEMBER 3, 1992
The East Carolinian
11
ODD
Continued from page 9
are preaching the same messages
over and over to an audience that
probably agrees with them any-
way. We thought that it would be
pretty much be a waste of time
singing about racism or inequal-
ity or anything, simply because
so many other bands already do
it. We have one song about ani-
mal rights and not eating meat,
but I don't feel like that topic is as
worn out as some of the others
As for the future, the band's
plans remain vague.
"It's still nothing we're tak-
ing too seriously says ECU
graduate Danny Sparrow, the
band's drummer. "I mean, none
of us want to be rock stars or
anything. We're not looking for
any sort of record deal. It's just
sort of fun to play and put records
out by ourselves
All in all, Erosion packs a pow-
erful punch from start to finish. If
you like it heavy and crunching,
or light and bouncy, it's all in
there.
Dear Dead Delila with King
Pin and Inscape will play the New
Deli tonight.
BREED 13
tonight at O'Rocks!
Check it out � $2 cover,
$1 pitchers.
Happy, happy! Joy, joy!
To students, staff and faculty: Our best
wishes for safe and happy holidays from
all the folks who work at
The East Carolinian.
We will return with our Welcome Back
edition on Jan. 12, 1993.
The FIZZ
December 3 & 4
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with Mike Robertson
original material influenced by
Jinvny Bitffel, James Taylor. Crosby, Stills & Nash
December 5
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O'ROCK'S AFTER SCHOOL SPECIAL
The East Carolina University
HONORS PROGRAM
takes pleasure in congratulating the following
graduating seniors of fall 1992 for completing the requirements to become
GRADUATES OF THE HONORS PROGRAM
Marcy McGregor Hoggard William Clifton Nelson
Craig Stephen Spitz Amber Renee Southerland
Christopher Mark Taylor
SPRING BREAK '93
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For information and reservations contact:
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mOmm.
��m.�mtmm.u-r,mmmm.






12 The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 3, 1992
LIMITED TIME ONLYI
Nature
Soul
Continued from page 10
Continued from page 9
mal from the one before Sumner
said.
In summing up the band's ap-
peal,Sumner attributed ittotheband's
diversesonglistand its lack of political
activism while performing.
"We don't preach anything, we
don't adopt any political views, we're
not gonna tell you how to live your
life Sumner said. "We're just gonna
help you drink your beer
When asked about future tape or
CD releases, the band said thatitprob-
abry wouldn't happen until another
year or so, in order to become better
and closer as a band.
"I feel like a band rtally needs to
mature and come together and learn
about each other and then put out
original material Sumner said.
Futureplansfbrtheband include
the addition of afifth member in Janu-
ary and more concert dates in the
region. Mother Nature will play at the
New Deli Friday night
Benefitting the most from this treat-
ment was "Homesick a song that,
although it benefits from a few nice
ryrical turns, sounds a bit sappy. Live,
when Pimer croons the openingline
want to live wi th you in the fifth dimen-
sion in a dream I never had the an-
guish and longing came through. The
one song that the live treatment didn't
help was "Runaway Train which is
quite possibly the worst song of Soul
Asylum's career.
Older material was pulled out and
dusted off as welL "Gullible's Travels"
and "Brand New Shine both from
1990, were torn through to a warm
reception. "Cartoon from 1988's Hong
Tzme album, received thebestresponse.
Good as the show was, though, I
found myself longing for the true punk
grunge of the band's earliest work. I
missed the bone-crushing insanity of
'Take it to the Root and I kept yelling
"Ouch to get them to play "Broken
Glass
They may not serve up punkquite
the way they used to, but Soul Asylum
still has a bt of power.
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30

First Annual
ECU Gospel Choir
CHRISTMAS WREfiTH SfSLE
Saturday, December 5
&
Saturday, December 12
9 am - 2 pm
fit the following locations:
1801 East Fifth Street
Hardees (corner of 10th & Cotanche Streets)
For farther information call 757-1531
TAPES AND RECORDS BY THE CHOIR ARE ALSO AVAILABLE
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We offer all ECU students
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The Plaza Greenville, NC 355-1133
Golden East Crossing Mall Rockv Mount, NC 972-2100
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December 3, 1992
TJie East Carolinian
Sports
ECU wins season opener by 17 Definition of sport
Page 13
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Lester Lyons' steal 11 seconds into
the game and resulting monster-dunk
made it appear the Pirates would come
out blazing in their first game of the
season. However, poor first half execu-
tion and suspect inside play plagued
East Carolina Tuesday night, in its 65-48
victory against St. Andrews.
The Pirates started strong, with
guard Lester Lyons and forward Wilbert
Hunter leading a 17-6 run that forced
Knight coach Ron Lievense to call a
time-out. Lievense's team came back
strong with six unanswered points, in-
cluding a three-pointer by Knight guard
John Church. At halftime the Pirates
were nursing a seven-point lead as the
Knights had battled back to a 21-14 defi-
cit.
Both offenses started the second half
strong, but a Hunter three-pointer and a
Ronnell Peterson layup off a steal put
the game in the Pirates favor at 29-16 at
17:17 in the half. But once again, after a
St. Andrews timeout, the Knights made
the game competitive with the play of
forward Cedric Brown. After leading by
as much as 11, the Pirates now found
themselves ahead by only six. But, after
Head Coach Eddie Payne called a time-
out, they began an offensive assault of
their own.
The Pirates, frustrated by the
Knights' interior defense, struck from
the perimeter with Lyons hitting four
three-pointers in the second half. With
the penetration of freshman guard "Ice"
Kareem Richardson drawing Knight de-
fenders, the Pirates were given many
open shots from the outside, as they
pummeled the Knights in the final min-
utes of the game. Lyons' last-second
three pointer sealed a Pirate victory that
brought little in the way of confidence
from Payne.
"We didn't play well Payne said.
"We were offensively out of sync and
failed to execute. You can't beat good
teams like that
Next Tuesday the Pirates must meet
UNC-Charlotte, a potential top 25 team.
Happy Hunting Grounds: Wilbert Hunter made his Ming as dutuesday"
night. While he said he did not play his game, he did nail a thr se-pointer (above).
East Carolina (65)
Jones 1-3 0-0 3, Gill 1-4 3-4 5, Lewis 1-3 0-0 2,
Lyons 9-11 4-5 26, Peterson 4-5 0-0 8, James 1-2 0-0
3, Richardson 0-4 3-6 3, Hunter 4-9 0-0 9, Young 0-
1 0-0 0, Toliver 0-0 2-4 2, Copeiand 1-4 2-4 4
St Andrews (48)
Colquiett 3-9 1-2 7, Jeffries 0-5 0-0 0, Scott 1-3
0-0 2, Hamilton 3-9 0-0 6, Church 6-17 2-2 17,
Graham 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 4-7 0-0 8, Haapala 2-4 0-
2 4, Bell 1-1 0-0 2, Whi :e 0-2 0-0 0, Kenon 0-0 0-0 0
Hall 0-0 2-2 2
Halftime St. Andrews 14, ECU 21. Fouled out
� None. Rebounds � St. Andrews 34 (Colquiett
12), ECU 33 (Copeiand 10). Assists � St. Andrews
9 (Hamilton 4), ECU 11 (Lyons, Richardson 3).
Total fouls � St. Andrews 18, ECU 11
(Figuresdenote: Field goals made-attempted,
Free throws made- attempted, Total points.)
'P&kzU S6&et&z�t "Hvte&
In a poll of media and coaches, the ECU men's basketball team
: was predicted to finish fifth in the Colonial Athletic Association this
I season. The Lady Pirates were predicted to finish second. No men's
: players were selected to the pre-season All-CAA squad, but two
I Lady Pirates� Gaynor O'Donnel and Rhonda Smith� made the
I team.
PRE-SEASON ALL-CAA
Jeff Chambers, James Madison
Kenny Wood, Richmond
Brian Gilgeous, American
Thomas Roberts, William & Mary
Bryan Edwards, James Madison
PRE-SEASON ALL-CAA
Celeste Hill, ODU
NickieHilton,George Mason
Gaynor OTtonnell, ECU
Rhonda Smith, ECU
Pam Huntley, ODU
MEN
1. James Madison (26)
2. Richmond
3. Old Dominion (1)
4. American
5. EAST CAROLINA
6. George Mason
7. UNC Wilmington
8. William & Mary
WOMEN
1. Old Dominion (24)
2. EAST CAROLINA (1)
3. James Madison (1)
4. George Mason (1)
5. Richmond
6. William & Mary
7. American
8. UNC Wilmington
Smith
O'Donnell
Nov. 23
Dec. 1
Dec. 5
Dec. 8
Dec. 12
Dec. 18-19
Dec. 22
Dec. 30
Jan. 2
Jan. 4
Jan. 9
Jan. 11
Jan.16
iPtoate 'Zfoo&i, 1992-93 Si
CUBAN JUNIOR NATIONALS
ST. ANDREWS
KENTUCKY CRUSADERS (Exhibition)
UNC CHARLOTTE
TENNESSEE TECH
at Toledo MVP Classic (Toledo, Ohio)
East Carolina vs. Southeastern Louisiana
Toledo vs. Texas-Pan American
at Colorado State
at Tennessee Tech
at Virginia Tech
at Appalachian State
at James Madison
at Richmond
AMERICAN
ea&w,
(Exhibition)7p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
9 p.m.
1 p.m.
730 p.m.
730 p.m.
730 p.m.
7 p.m.
Jan. 18
Jan. 21
Jan. 25
Jan. 27
Jan. 30
Feb.l
Feb. 6
Feb. 8
Feb. 13
Feb. 15
Feb. 18
Feb. 20
Feb. 24
Feb. 27
Mar. 6-8
GEORGE MASON
FLORIDA ATLANTIC
at Old Dominion
WILLIAM & MARY
at UNC Wilmington (HTS-TV)
at Alabama
JAMES MADISON
RICHMOND
at George Mason
at American (HTS-TV)
VIRGINIA TECH
OLD DOMINION
at William and Mary
UNC WILMINGTON
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
735 p.m.
7 p.m.
2 p.m.
830 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
730 p.m.
730 p.m.
7 p.m.
7 p.m.
730 p.m.
7 p.m.
at Richfood-Colonial Toum. (Richmond, Va.)
out-dated and obsolete
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
What constitutes a sport? What re-
quirements does ?.n activity have to fill
for it to be considered a sport?
In the dictionary, a sport is de-
fined as any activity which expends
physical exertion for recreational
purposes.
This interpretation is very
sound, but slightly out-dated. For
this to be taken literally, profes-
sional athletes are not playing a
sport. They are not performing
for recreational purposes, they
are doing a job for financial pur
poses.
Possibly a more accurate definition
today would be: A sport is any game
which exerts physical energy or puts the
body in physical danger.
The obvious sports such as basket-
ball, football and hockey meet both these
requirements. They require physical ex-
ertion and put the body in danger.
Other activities which are a little
more questionable fill only one of these
requirements. For example, auto racing
does not require incredible physical ex-
ertion, just physical endurance. But, the
sport does leave the body vulnerable to
serious physical danger.
Then there are games which are
generally considered sports but
should not be. Games like golf,
1JC P��'anc bowing-
lfok These games have nothing
to do with the physical exer-
tion of energy. They deal with
skills, and techniques. And they
definitely don't put the body in
pnysical danger.
There is a difference between sport
and games. Any recreational activity can
be considered a game, but physical re-
quirements are necessary for it to be
categorized as a sport. Tic-Tac-Toe will
never be an Olympic event.
I know! I know! The 1992 Pirate fo-ball squad may not have rSen" thermos?1
memorable in ECU history, but the season did have a few highlights.
If the Pirates learn their
ABCs, watch out in '93
By Robert Todd
Sports Editor
1992 ECU football ABCs:
A is for Andersen. Michael thatis Next
year he will gamer Heisman votes if he can
threw thefbotrMintotheerdzorernorethan
hethrowsft totheopponents. Hepossessesall
the tools to be one of the country's best quar-
terbacks�ever.And,yes,evenbetterthanJeff
Blake.
BisfbrhdiIclm'tkrK)w.Ycxithinkof
something.
CC isforCariesterOtrmpler.Hopefully
hewillbeabletohandJerroreofArderson's
passesafteranoff-seascnofhardsoftening.If
he can he will eclipse anything Luke Fisher
ever did on the football field.
D is for Davis. Tony will be one of the
ratkii'sbestlinebackersifhecanstayfocused.
Robert Jones who? Davis is blazing his own
trails�toward the opposition
E is for Exception The only game we
should nothavelostwasagainstDuke. Itwas
the only exception allowable for this season.
The 1992 Pirates were no better than 7-4 or 6-
5,butshouldnothavfinishedtheseasonwith
a losing record. Or should E stand for ESPN
(the station that will never put us on the air
again).
F is for the defense. They have Flunked
every test and even the pop quiz against
Arkansas State, who scored 18 points. The
Bucshawsev'eralcHJtslarclingctefensK'eplay-
ers. However, this is not tennis � football
takesateameffortThatisnottosay they did
not try. However if they gave 100 percent
rheymustnot be very good.They can play
better�they have more talent than they
realize.
G is for Grandison and the way the
ccachirstaffnekihimbadcthisseascrLGreg
isoneof the best defensive backs in the coun-
try,despite the rumor ofriisbadattitude. Are
defensive backs supposed to be nice? Should
Greg help players up after te knocks their
helrnetsoff?Theccachingstaffcuthisplayirg
time by about a third ard he still picked off
morepasses than lastseascn He will succeed
withcutECU'shdp.
HisforHdp.Wedesperateryreedsome
on special teams and defense
I is for 'In the dog house That is where
The East Carolinian may be after the athletic
department reads this.
J - Dog (Jerry Dillon) did not have the
opportunity to showcase his talent at defen-
sive end as he was hampered by a broken
thumb nearly the whole season. He will be
missed next year.
K is for Kicking. It is surprising Head
Coach Steve Logan did not try to find a few
soccer players to put the pigskin through the
goalpcstCharlieBrownhad almost asmuch
success kicking the football with Lucy hold-
ing as we did in'92.
See ABC page 16
Pittsburgh Steelers getting help from a higher source
Los Angeles Times column
St. Peter'sChurch in Pittsburgh, proximate to Three
Rivers Stadium, offers its parking lot (and a Mass) to
Steelers fans heading to the game. It must be having
someeffect because theplace is packed and the team has
won five straight at home.
One might question why ex-Navy great Joe Bellino
is being inducted into the Orange Bowl Hall of Honor in
a big ceremony in Miami at the end of the month. While
the recently retired Navy reserve captain was brilliant
and won the Heisman Trophy as a Mid, he was held to
just 4 yards in eight carries while losing to Missouri 21-
14, in the 1961 game.
So far, at least, Shaquille O'Neal is doing a good job
for the NBA, speaking from a television perspective. His
Orlando Magic gameson TNT are matching the ratings
the Celtics were accustomed to getting with Larry Bird.
Considering Manon Rheaume was inducted into
the Women's Sports Hall of Fame last week, what
happens if the aspiring hockey goaltender ever climbs
above third string for the minor-league Atlanta Knights?
Football lost one of its most solid citizens last week
when Pete McCulley passed onduetoan apparentheart
attack.PetewasatirelessworkerasanassistantatNavy
and with the Baltimore Colts. He didn't appear quite
ready for the head coaching job when he was thrust into
the position by Joe Thomaswith the SanFrancisco49ers.
He maintained a home in Annapolis, Md for about 30
years and son Kit, a defensive back, was an Academy
grad.
I don't know about you, but I sort of enjoyed David
Klingler catching his lumps (10 sacks) during
Cincinnati's 21-9 crunching by the Steelers Sunday.
Recall some of the things Dave and Houston did to
some of their opponents while in college: 95 points
against SMU, seven touchdowns and 750 yards pass-
ing vs. Eastern Washington.
Chances are, the best fight on the HBO card out of
Atlantic City (Taj Mahal) Saturday will be Percy Harris
(15-3) testingformer Olympian Roy Jones (19-0) Jones is
all but conceded a world title soon, but classy Harris is
not just an "opponent" on the way up. Iran Barkley (29-
7) vs. Robert Folley (22-5) and James Toney (32-0) vs.
Doug DeWitt (33-7) head the show.
Good li ne from the ma ster of ceremonies a t a recent
luncheon celebrating the 25th anniversary of Atlanta
Ha wks basketbal I. "When he played for the Hawks, they
called Tom McMillen 'Senator said radioman Steve
Holman. "As a matter of fact, in Washington they used
to call him 'Congressman
TheleaseforCandlestickParktheGiantsare getting
to remain in the
Bay area reminds one of the Memorial Stadium
situation in Baltimore years ago. Whenever the Colts or
Orioles would work themselves a sweetheart deal, the
other would be hollering bloody murder for similar
treatment. Same with the 49ers at present.
When the players broke off from the tennis estab-
lishment to form the ATP Tour a few years ago, more
than a few people assumed the operation would floun-
der. Wrong. The ATP will conduct 87 events in 34
See Steelers page 15





�-4
15 The East C arolinian
DECEMBER 3, 1992
Steelers
Continued from page 13
countries next wwv after sfch:
tourneys in 24 countries with prize
money totaling $43 million this year.
Here's one vou probablv didn't
know: One ofevery 700 Americans is
a graduate of what Big Ten univer-
sity? Hint: There's a slv trick in the
question. Answer later.
After ending the preseason
wiruess, New England PatriotsCoach
Dick
MacTherson pleaded, "It's very
fair to judge the players because
they're individuals. But it's very un-
fair to judge the team We won't be
where we want to be, team-wise
until the middle of the season
! nving a 34-0 shelling by Atlanta
Sunday, the team stands at 2-11), so
it's no rush to judgment referring to
them as the Pat-hetics.
Terhaps it's best that Greg
Maddux oftheCubs was named the
Cy Young Award winner in the Na-
tional League. Hischief competition,
TomGlaine, happened to be out of
the country and incommunicadoon
his honevmoon the day the an-
n. m noement was made. Glavine, in-
dkientaDy, was a heck of a htxrkey
pi -ier. hut chose baseball after com-
paring himself toa couple of hishigh
school rivals, NHL all-stars Brian
Leetch (Rangers) and Tom Barrasso
(Penguins).
Steffi Graf just purchased an
apartment in Manhattan, explaining
shevvanted a place where she would
be "out of the spotlight Oh.
Trivia answer: Penn State.
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TWF
Ski Wintergreen, VA
January '93
Who: All ECU Students, Faculty, & Staff
What: Wintergreen Ski Trip
When: January 23 & 24; Pre-Trip Meeting
January 20, 5:00pm, BD-101
Cost: $115Students, $125Faculty &
Staff (includes transportation, lodging, 2
day lift ticket, 2 meals)
Registration begins
December 1 in 117
Christenbury Gym and a
$50.00 deposit is
required. For more
information call
757-6911.





16 The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 3, 1992
ABC
I. is far Lee C i rsa We all inw the
commentator anapokigv.
M l- tor Mistake. Adding more
fats to fidden won't help �nobodv
will be interested in sitting in them if
there is a return to the Art Baker davs.
N is for Next year. Logan may be
able tii turn a few things around. ECU
should be ower SOQ But then again, we
should have been a winner this season.
Oh, well. Hopes were high � too
bail, so sad.
Pis for Pachyderm. Tom Scott, the
AlkAmericanoffensive tackle, will take
is enormous talent to the Professional
ranks. Joining him will be defensive
back Greg Grandison. Grandison will
beofmoreusetotheLARaidersthanhe
ever was in Greenville. Logan and de-
fensive coordinator Chris Thurmond
wasted his talent in the Emerald Gty.
'The Enforcer" makes The East Carolbi-
im All-American Team.
Q is for Quit while I'm ahead.
The sports page has been rrore contro-
versial than Geraldo this season. Conser-
-atives, English majors and adminis-
trators have not been too pleased.
RisfcyRunnirigManJuniorSrnith,
wr�becameonlythefifttipIaeririECU
history tototal 1 Aarcisontheground
� in an offense designed around the
pass. Image what Smith could do on a
team thatmakes him theoenterofatten-
tion.
See,ya! if coach Logandoesn'thave
a winning season next year. He could
(and maybe should) get the boot if he
doesn'tpaxluce.
T is for broken Thumb. The four
casts on the hands of ECU's defensive
unit was the most exciting tiling ESPN
trrrtmenta tors had totalkaboutduring
the Southern Miss rout
U is for Uh, oh. We play Washing-
ton next season. What were they think-
ing when they scheduled that game?
Chalk up one loss for next season.
V is for the Victory over Virginia
Tech. Wide Receiver Clayton Driver's
surehandssaved theday,again. He will
be missed.
W is for What's up with �ta?Pirate
football fans were asking that question
throughout the season. What's up with
Sean McCorrieUstarringatcruartHrback
over Andersen? What's up with Gran-
dison not getting any playing time?
What's up with all the broken thumbs?
What'supwithlasingtoE)uke?What's
up with Well �ya know.
X-amining this season will reveal
threekevveaknessestheECUcoaohing
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stalf must address. Opponents field po-
sition was ridiculously ck�e to the end
zone. Special teams(the punting unit to
be specific) must shoulder some re-
sponsibility for the lack of defense this
season. It is hard to shut down an of-
fense when the only need togo40 or 50
yards fbrascore. However, thedefense
often seemed confused, almost as if
they were thinking of something other
than football. They must become more
focused and come together as a unit If
ECU car i win every game they score 30
or more points in, we may be heading
to another bowl next year, but don't
hold your breath. If Anderson can cut
cbwncTihisturmnrs,scoring3C)points
will almost be a given.
Ynot recruit a place kicker and a
Continued from page 13
punter? They might come in handy
one day.
Z is for Zero � you know who
you are.
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Title
The East Carolinian, December 3, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 03, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.912
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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