The East Carolinian, December 1, 1992






Opinion
Religion of life
Organized religions tell us how to live for the after
life. A religion that helps us with our present -day
problems may prove more beneficial.
See story pg. 4
u
Lifestyle
Bad life, bad music
Mark Curry's first album. It's Only 1
Time, relates the miseries of life. His
album only adds to the pain.
See story pg. 7
Sports
Payne strikes again
Pirate basketball coach Eddie Payne will
lead the Bucs into a tough CAA confer-
ence once again. He says the team is
ready for the challenge.
See Story pg. 10
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 23
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday December 1,1992
12 Pages
SGA supports WZMB's downtown activities
By Joseph Horst
Staff Writer
The Student Government Associa-
tion passed a resolution expressing full
support to the campus radio station,
WZMB, in their fight to broadcast from
the downtown area.
The university attorneys have previ-
ously stated thata high risk of liability to the
university exists when campus organiza-
tions associate with events that serve alco-
hol. They have also voiced concerns about
FCC violations and the responsibility of
parties involved in functions where alcohol
is served.
The university attorneys concluded
that since neither the Media Board nor
WZMB is insured, the university could be
held liableasa "deep pocket" in any injurv
cases that could occur during an event.
TheSGA resolution statedinpartth.it
WZMB is ECU's only radio station, has
unfairly been singled out more man any
other campus organization, and has been
banned from sponsoring events in local
taverns.
"(T)hisformof restriction with WZMB
could lead to the start of allcampus organi-
zations being regulated in some way the
resolution stated.
Troy Dreyfus, chair of the Student
Welfare Committee and SGA chief of staff,
voiced concerns about this a rbitrarv I imita-
tion imposed by the university.
"I feel that WZMB was being unfairly
singled out by some university officials
Dreyfus said I think that everyone should
be allowed to hold their meetings where
they deem appropriate
Other non-media organizations on
this campus appear to be exempt from the
limitation placed on the campus radio sta-
tion. Wine and cheese socials are held on
campus by the American Marketing Asso-
ciation and both the ECU Philosophy Club
and Psi Chi, the national honor society in
Psychology,holdmeetingsatChico'sdown-
town.
I lie restriction on WZMB as a media
organization has raised questions and con-
cerns from various members in the SGA
and the Media Board. Courtney Jones, SGA
president, said the university needs to ap-
proach other alcohol-related functions.
"1 think before we single out WZMB
we need to look at other organizations
Jones said. "We also need to look at the
functions the organizations sponsor that
are alcohol related
Tim Johnson, general manager of
WZMB, also said risk to the university is
presentalready becauseof thecurrentmeet-
ingsheldon-campuswherealcoholisserved
or the off-campus meetings at bars down-
town.
"WZMB don't want to put anybody
at risk � it seems the university is doing it
already he said.
ECU currently follows a Risk Man-
agement Polio initiated by the Fraternitv
Insurance Purchasing Group when han-
dling matters pertaining to fraternities, so-
rorities and alcohol. The policy states that
"no chapter may co-sponsor an event with
an alcohol distributor, charitableorganiza-
tion or tavern wherealcohol isgivenaway,
sold or otherwise provided to those
present
The policy further clarifies this state-
ment by defining a tavern as an "establish-
ment generating more than half of annual
gross sales from alcohol
The policy addresses the liability is-
sue by suggesting that members hold their
parties at establishments thathavea liquor
license. The liability then rests with the
establishment, and its bartenders are held
See WZMB page 2
School of music
teacher dies at age 45
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
On Nov. 17, ECU faculty
member Donna B. Dease died in her
home. The cause of her death is still
under investigation.
Ms. Dease was an associate pro-
fessor and chairperson of the Voice
Department. She became a member
of ECU School of
Music in the fall of
1984 where she
taught classes in
vocal methods, vo-
cal pedagogy, and
diction.
Ms. Dease
earned her masters
in music in vocal
performance from
the University of Il-
linois and her bach-
elor of arts in mu-
sic from Campbell
University.
Before com-
ing to ECU, Ms.
Dease served as a
professor at the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Central Missouri State
University, State University ii New-
York at Plattsburgh, University of
Maryland, and the European Divi-
sion, Bitburg, Germanv.
Ms. Dease won several awards
including the Young Artist Award,
National Association of Teachers of
Singing; Who's Who of American
Women, honorary membership; In-
ternational Thespian Society,
Bitburg, Germany; Metropolitan
Donna Dease
Opera Auditions, District Winner,
and at ECL was the School of Mu-
sic nominee and university-wide
finalist for the ECU Teacher Excel-
lence Award.
Ms. Dease's role in the uni-
versity and the School of Music
included service as an elected
member of the School of Music
Policies Committee, Self-Evalua-
tion Committee,
Governance Com-
mittee, and she
also sang the Star
Spangled Banner ,t
the ECU home
football games.
"The School
of Music has lost
one of its most
loved and revered
teachers and per-
formers said
School of Music
Dean Dr. Malcolm
J. Tait. "Ms.
Dease's knowl-
edge of the human
voice was
matched only bv
her insight as a teacher. Countless
students speak of her caring and
supportive manner both in and out
of the studio
On Nov. 23, a memorial ser-
vice was held at First Presbyterian
Church of Greenville where Ms.
Deaseserved as choir director. The
service was directed bv Pastor
Daniel C. Wilkersand manv musi-
Cians participated in the service as
See Dease page 4
Cheeze wiz
Photo by Dail Reed
The Pirates face off against St. Andrews tonight in Minges Coliseum with hopes of
improving on last year's 10-18 season.
Exchange students
face housing
shortage at ECU
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
Incoming international students no
longer have a home.
The ECU International House has
closed as a haven to international students
upon their arrival in Greenville. After trav-
eling long distances from their homeland
students intending to live off-campus have
a couple days delay in which they need a
temporary residence.
The International House was taken
over by Academic Affairs in the summer of
1992 for the International Programs offices.
In the November - December 1992 edi-
tion of the International Spectrum, the inter-
national student newsletter, a notice was
posted requestingassistance in temporarily
housing new students upon their arrival in
January.
"We have had some response from
people interested in housing someone from
their own country said Dr. Lucy Wright,
assistant dean of student development and
director of special populations. "We think it
is better to place students with other stu-
dents than with a family. After a long trip it
is easier to feel more relaxed with a stu-
dent
The International House had been
open since 1974. It served as a dorm and a
multicultural center to students from around
the world.
International students will now have
the options of living in the dormitories or
finding off-campus housing.
Wright said they have never had to
place a student in a hotel during the time
See Housing page 1
Doggone happy
With less than a week of classes remaining, more than just students, staff
about heading home for the holidays.
Photo by Jason Bosch
and faculty are excited
Blood mobile to roll on campus today
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
Whether due to a decreas-
ing number of donors this year
or to the popularity of the new
Dracula movie, the American
Red Cross is in need of blood
once again.
As a result, the Bloodmo-
bile will make its annual fall
semester stop at ECU today in
Mendenhall from 12-6 p.m.
The blood drive is spon-
sored by the ECU Student Vol-
unteers Program and funded
by Z. Smith Reynolds.
The Assistant Director to
the program, Debra Tavasso,
saul the group recruited vol-
unteers from Health 1000
( lasses to help with the drive.
"We're hoping for a large
turnout in part because the
number of students donating
this semester has been down
ravasso said. She attributed
tlif low numbers to the colds
anil flu that have been going
around.
Giving blood is easv ac-
cording to the Red Cross. The
only requirements are that an
individual is in good health,
weighs at least 110 pounds, and
is 17 years of age or older.
You can go about your
normal activity shortly after
donating. All you need to do is
have something to drink to re-
place the fluid lost and avoid
heavy lifting for 24 hours fol-
lowing your donation.
It takes about 10 minutes
to donate a unit of blood, al-
though the entire process, from
registration to refreshments,
will take about an hour.
Tavasso said that no ap-
pointment is necessary, but the
waiting time is generally less
in the morning.
This blood drive will be
conducted by the Mid-Atlan-
tic Regional Blood Services di-
vision o( the American Red
Cross.
I his regional office pro-
vides blood for3.3 million resi-
dents in central and southeast
Virginia and eastern North
Carolina.
The Red Cross reports
that to meet our region's daily
blood requirements, some 605
units of blood must be col-
lected and processed each day.
Pete Dixon, an ECU jun-
ior, said he felt a duty to do-
nate blood.
"1 usually try to give
blood a couple of times per
year Dixon said. I know if
my family or friends needed
blood, I would hope the Red
Cross would have enough. You
never know when you might
need some blood too
Red Cross workers said
there is no substitute for hu-
man blood and would much
appreciate your donation.
"1 would like to encour-
age as many students as pos-
sible to donate blood to make
up for the low numbers who
donated previously 1 a
said
She said that you can give
blood every 56 days.





iJW
2 The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 1, 1992
WZMB
Continued from page 1
School celebrates 300th anniversary
The College of William and Mary will mark its 300th anniver-
sary with a year-long series of events in 1993. The college was
chartered in 1693 by King William III and Queen Mary II of England
to bring education to colonists and Christianity to Native Ameri-
cans. William and Mary, a private, four-year university, will focus
its celebrations on two periods: Charter Week, Feb. 8-13, and home-
coming, Oct. 20-24. "In human terms, there are very few things that
reach the age of 300 said Henry Rosovsky, a member of the class
of 1949. "That, alone, is something to celebrate
Dartmouth offers substance-free dorm
Dartmouth University officials designated a substance-free
dormitory this year, and applications to live in the building were
nearly double the number of available rooms. University officials
said the request for a substance-free dorm was made by students las t
spring. Students who live in Butterfield Hall have to sign an agree-
ment that states they will adopt "the goals and community stan-
dards established for a substance-free dorm "I wanted a dorm I
could come home to said Laura Sewell, a freshman resident. "I
definitely like it here
Nude scene cut from play at MSU
A scene from the play "Sleeping Beauty or Coma" was cut
from the student production at Minot State University because the
script calls for an actress to remove her bra with her back to the
audience. The decision was made by Minot State University Presi-
dent H. Erik Shaar, who said he was responding to public pressure
about the scene. He told the Red & Green newspaper that he had not
read the play. "I consider it good judgment Shaar said. "Censor-
ship would have been to close the play down without having seen
it or read it Shaar received many called to object to the scene.
Student Association President Scott Carlson disagreed with Shaar,
saying Shaar censored the play because he restricted artistic expres-
sion. "How do we decide who is to judge what is or isn't immoral?"
he said I would guess that most of the calls weren't from students.
And this is a student issue
Forty percent of instructors work part time
Nearly 40 percent of college and university instructors work
part time, creating academic and professional problems for the
instructors and their students, the American Association of Univer-
sity Professors said in a recent study. Problems with part-time faculty
will continue until two-and four-year institutions are willing to cut
back on the use of adjuncts and treat the part-time faculty more fairly
and equally, said Iris Molotsky, a spokeswoman for the AAUP.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmei. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
responsible for anyintoxicated guests.
Thepolicy also sta tes thatmem-
bers "have a written contract stating
that responsibility for all service of
alcoholic beverages rests entirelywith
the establishment
Though the policy does admit
that members "assume responsibil-
ity for the safety and welfare of
members and guests itoffersaplau-
sible alternative to reduce or effec-
tively abolish any liability risk. With
this alternative offered to fraternities
and the condoning of other campus
organizations, the resolution shows
the narrow vision the university cur-
rently has.
Jones said she was pleased
that the SGA played a crucial role in
the student body at ECU.
"I'm pleased that the resolu-
tion was passed Jones said. "I hope
that it will have an effect on the deci-
sion that is made. "When SGA sup-
ports something, it signifies the sup-
port of the entire student body. This
issue is important enough for the
student government to take a stand
on it
Terri Avery, Media Board
dhairperson,echoed Jones' sentiment,
but voiced reservations about the
resolution's effectiveness.
"I think it was a good thing
Avery said in reference to the resolu-
tion. "I'm glad that the SGA took a
stand, but I wonder what effects the
resolution will have, if any
Currently, Avery is working
together with the university attor-
neys in presenting a proposal to the
Media Board that would hopefully
close the issue. Avery said that she
hopes the proposal will be placed in
front of the Board by early in the
spring semester.
Jones supported Avery's work
with the attorneys, saying that she
fhoughtasolutioncanbeworked out
"Although liability is a major
concern, I strongly believe we can
work out a solution that will benefit
all those involved she said.
University officialseirher could
not be reached for comment or re-
fused to comment on the matter at
press time.
Housing
Continued from page 1
that the International House was
open. However, if necessary that
could be an option.
"(Housing) will be covered
somehow Wright said.
Umesh Gulati, chairman of
the university's committee on
international students expressed
his opinion in the June 3 edition
of The East Carolinian
"It is a ary inappropriate
and short-sighted policy to abol-
ish a common residential house
for international students
Gulati said.
"I believe international stu-
dents are a catalyst for interna-
tionalizing the campus
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The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for the spring semester for
News Editor.
Distinguishing characteristics necessary for
the position include:
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deadlines and work with a team,
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� Enrollment as a student at East Carolina
University with at least a 2.0 g.p.a.
Applications are available at The East Carolinian office
located on the second floor of.the Student Pubs building.
Jennifer Minaya
Nursing Major
Solutions from your Apple Campus
The Apple Computer Loan.
"I expected to pay a lot more than
$35 a month for a new Macintosh Ilsi
and a printer
Jennifer obtained an Apple Computer Loan that allowed her to
buy her Apple Macintosh Ilsi and an Apple Personal LaserWriter LS
printer. She knew that owning a powerful Macintosh computer for
her full course load and her work as a doctor's assistant was a smart
thing to do. And the Apple Computer Loan was the smart way to do
it: easy application, fast turnaround and low, flexible payment terms.
So Jennifer went to the only place that offers the Apple Computer
Loan, her Apple Campus Reseller.
Macintosh. It's more than a present, it's a future.
ECU Student Stores: More than just books - your dollars support student scholars!
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Store Hours: Monday - Thursday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
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based on the average of the higher of the 30-day or 90-dav commercial paper rates as reported in the Wall Smrt Journal, plus a spread of 5.35 (not to exceed 5.6 i The term of the loan is b vears with no
pre-payment penalty The total finance charge on even $1.000 borrowed will be J543 38 Each applicant pays a 135 00 non-refundable application fee Approved borrowers will be charged a 4 loan
origination fee. The loan ongmation fee will he added to the requested loan amount and repaid over the iifc of the loan For the month of October 1992. the interest rate was 7 6 with an .APS of 8.85






3
DECEMBER 1, 1992
Kappa Delta Rho fraternity
receives chapter at ECU
By Shay Pierce
Staff Writer
ECU will soonhaveanother
, national fraternity on its campus.
On Nov. 22, Kappa Delta Rho
was officially colonized by its na-
tional executive. The group began
less than a year ago by "word of
mouth" among students and help
� from founder, Jeff Miles.
KDR's Executive Vice Presi-
dent Donald Stohl said their nation-
als were encouraged three years ago
- to open up a chapter on the ECU
campus.
"Our goals here at ECU are the
promotebrotherhood and leadership
among our brothers Stohl said.
Sunday night, Kappa Delta
Rho inducted 35 members into the
colony of East Carolina. Two broth-
ers from a KDR chapter at Old Do-
minion University joined in the cer-
emony as well as a Virginia Tech
alumnae Joey Roark.
Roark lives in the area and will
be working as an advisor to the ECU
KDRs.
"Considering their core group
effort up until now, thegroup should
prove to be nothing less than a very
credible fraternity Roark said.
The Kappa Delta Rho fraternity
wil 1 ha ve up to two years to grow and
formintoa national fratemity,butcan
receive their charter before 1994 if all
of their goals are met.
The In tra-Fraternity Council of
ECU will, however, recognize them
by the Fall of 1993. KDR plans to
have their first formal rush in the
Spring of 1993.
KDR's President David
Lamascus and Vice President Shane
Smith expressed pride in their new
fraternity.
Smith spoke for the group
when he said, "We want to make a
positivecontributiontotheECUcam-
pus and the Greek system
One newly inducted member
said their hopes and goals include
becominga traditionatEastCaro-
lina and eventually one of the best, if
not the best, fraternity on campus
Open
Hearings:
On Proposed changes
in the Undergraduate
Academic Regula-
tions.
Time: 3:30 P.m.
until 5:00 p.m.
1 ICtCCl General
Classroom -1400.
Purpose: To allow
the ad hoc committee
to garner additional
input from students
and faculty.
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n
4 The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 1, 1992
� i
Dease
Continued from page 1
well as the ECU Chamber Singers.
Some of Ms. Dease's col-
leagues and friends spoke at
" the service and spoke of her
friendship and of her love of
life and music.
"Donna's life was spent
reaching out to others and we
honor her memory by caring
for one another said Dr.
Janette Fishell.
"Donna Dease was a sen-
sitive musician and was always
a pleasure to work with said
colleague Dr. Brett T. Watson.
"A fine person and a true pro-
fessional, she possessed a beau-
tiful voice and was master in
communicating with her audi-
ence. She will be missed
As Pastor of First Presby-
terian Church, Wilkers felt he
had a special relationship with
Ms. Dease.
"I counted her of more a
friend than anything else, we
had a mutual respect for one
another" he said. "Donna's
music made people feel good,
we will miss her a lot
"Her contributions to the
School of Music and to the com-
munity will long be remem-
bered Tait said. "The voice is
still, the song is sung, but
Donna's gifts to all of us will
live on forever
The vocal studies depart-
ment in the School of Music
wishes to establish a scholar-
ship in memory of Donna
Dease.
Contributions may be sent
to The Donna Dease Scholar-
ship Fund, School of Music,
East Carolina University, Gre-
enville, N.C. 27858-4353.
The East Carolina University Performing Arts Series
proudly presents
pianist
Dmitri Ratser
- i
I
I
I
l
l
I
Chopin
Program
Polonaise in C Sharp Minor,
Op. 26, No. 1
Two Mazurkas
C Sharp Minor, Op. 50, No. 3
B Flat Major, Op. 7, No. 1
Nocturne in C Sharp Minor,
Op. 27, No. 1
Scherzo in B Minor,
Op. 20, No. 1
Liszt
Sonetto del Petrarca,
No. 104 in E Major
Transcendental Etude
No. 10 in f minor
Rachmaninoff
Variations on a Theme of Corelli,
Op. 42
Two Preludes, Op. 3, No. 2 and
Op. 32, No. 12
Wednesday, Dec. 2,1992 Wright Auditorium
Tickets: Public $15 ECU FacultyStaff $10 ECU StudentsYouth $7
All tickets $15 at the door.
For tickets contact:
The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone: 919-757-4788 or, toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
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Corporate Parties & Divorces
ECU STUDENT SPECIAL
$2.00 OFF Admission Any Night with this coupon
Doors Open 7:30pm Stage Time 9:00pm
Call 756-6278
5 miles west of Greenville on 264 AIL
Dlokln�on Jvm.
(behind John's Convenient Mart)
Valid N.C. I.D. Required
I to I I
School of Business
Graduate
Recognition
Ceremony
Honoring the forthcoming
graduation of December '92
Graduates and Undergraduates
Friday, December 11
6:00 p.m.
McGinnis Auditorium
Reception following program
First Floor
General Classroom Building
Celebrating:
�� Individual Graduate Recognition
�S� Masters Hooding Ceremony
Sponsored by the Commerce Club
in recognition and appreciation
of graduating Business students
and their families
RSVP 7576377
DON'T MISS THE
STUDENT UNION
SPRING BREAK TRIP!
in
GO FOR THE MAGIC-
GO FOR THE MEMORIES-
GO FOR MICKEY AND MINNIE!
WHATEVER THE REASON,
JUST GO
ON THE ECU STUDENT UNION
SPRING BREAK TRIP TO CENTRAL FLORIDA
Several trip options are available
Prices range from
$239
TO
$539
(transportation and eight night's
accommodation in quad occupancy)
(transportation and eight
night's accommodation in
twin occupancy, and one
day's admission to each of
the following: the Magic
Kingdom, EPCOT, MGM
Studios, Sea World, and
Busch Gardens)
Walt T'lisneu, World
SeaWrld
9
V
For more information contact the
Central Ticket Office, 757-4788, 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m
Monday-Friday, Mendenhall Student Center
j
( Golden-fried in cornmeal breading. )
99
Farm-raised Catfish Dinner �jj A
Crispy golden catfish filets, trench Jl
fries, cole slaw and hushpuppies.
Limited
Time
SUPER SENIOR WEDNESDAY
ANY DINNER t29
TAHwPKb
(Af 60 Owr)
KIDS EAT FREE
ON THURSDAY
Kids 12 yre. & younger.
Limit 2 with each Adult Dinner.
Dininy Room Only.
$2.00 Off Value or Thrift Pack
THIS WEEK AT THE
mm
RQVeui
"0" CCNT DRAFT
WEDNESDAY
CLASSICS NIGHT
"0" CENT DRAFT
$2.50 Teas & Bahama Mamas
504 Jelio Shots � 754 Kamikazes
mis
Value Pack includes: 12 fish filets, fries, cole
slaw and 8 hush puppies. Serves 4 or more.
Thrift Pack includes: 8 fish filets, fries, cole
slaw and 8 hush puppies. Serves 3-4.
Limit 2 Per Coupon. Not good with any other coupon
or dtacount. Ofer orpins 1-3-93.
626 South
Memorial Drive
758-6761
I
I
I
I
I
I
00 NIGHT
$1.00 Domestics � $2.50 Pitchers
50! Jello Shots � 75t Kamikazes
U:1I�7A'
BUSH HOUR
ICOUNTRTNIIE
$2.50 Teas, Bahama Mamas & Pitchers
50c Jello Shots � 750 Kamakazes
"0" CENT DRAFT Die Best in Country
$1.25 Domestics AUNitc"





J���w�

r?e �as� Carolinian
December 1, 1992
Classifieds
Page 5
R )R RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances,some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 800 E. Wil-
low Street, 3 BR-13 Baths, $600 per
month. 1108 Forbes Street, 4 BR-2
Baths, $600 per month. 2608Tryon
Drive, 3BR-1 Bath, $550 per month.
1 YR lese and security deposit.
Duffus Rental 756-2675.
APARTMENTTOSUBLET: One
bedroom; $280 a month. 4 blocks
from campus. 2 can share. Avail-
able December 18. Lease ends in
May. Apt. 202 Kings Arms. Call
758-4366.
SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT for
mature person. Room, private
entrance, full house privileges. Call
after 4pm 756-5467.
NEED SOMEONE to take over
lease for two bedroom apartment
at Kings Row. Close to campus.
Bus service. $360mo. Call
7571613. Available now.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED spring semester '93 to
share apartment in Tar River pay
$150mo. l3utilitiesprefernon-
smoker who studies but likes to
socialize. For info call 757-1262.
ROOMS FOR RENT: If you are a
Returning Student or a Student 25
or Older: would you like to rent a
room in a two story home in a
lovely sub-division near campus?
Home owner is a professional per-
son who is also a part-time stu-
dent. Rent includesa private room
with bath, use of washerdryer,
kitchen privileges, in a upscale
kitchen with storage space, tele-
phone service, cablevision tv room
use and study room privileges.
This contemporary home setting
is serene and luxurious with sev-
eral fireplaces, and many large
windows overlooking wooded ar-
eas. Only serious minded stu-
dents need apply.250 Monthly
includes everything. Call 355-1830
formore information or interview.
LOOKING FOR TWO PEOPLE
to take over lease at Kingston Place
for spring semester. If interested
call 757-3579 ask for Jeff or Chris.
FURNISHED BEDROOM-
Brookvalley home, AC, utilities
furnished. Private entrance,
kitchen, washerdryer, living
room privileges. Non-smoking
graduate student or professionals
only. Available now on. $195
month 756-2027 M-F. "One of
Greenville's best rentals said
former tenant.
KO()1l,TI WAMKD
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
3 bedroom house. 14 rent ($140
month) 14 utilities. Deposit
negotiable. 5 blocks from campus.
Call 758-6810 leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share one bedroom
apt. Rent $140 mo. 12 utilities.
Avail Dec. 752-46-16. Ask for
R()()MMATE WANTED
Carrie.
FEMALE ROOMMATE(S)
Wanted: 1 person $191.67 plus 1
3 utilities, 2 People $143.75, 3 or 4
bedroom house AC,heat and W
D, Available: Dec 20 or Jan 6 nego-
tiable Call 757-2966.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 2 bedroom apt
near Med. School. $165mo 12
utilities. Must be non-smoker, no
alcohol. 20years preferred, call
S30-0616.
ROOMMATE WANTED:Female
to share 3 bedroom house. Com-
pletely furnished own room.
$100 rent & 13 bills. Must be neat
and a non-smoker. Please cal;l
756-1793.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
share 2 bedroom112 bath apt 1
mile from campus. Rent $185
month 12 utilities. Mature,
graduate student preferred. Call
757-1510.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share 2 bedroom apt.
in Langston Pard for Spring Se-
mester '93. Pay 182.50 rest plus 1
2 utilities and cable. MUST be a
non-smoker. Call 752-8024.
TAR RIVER-3non-smokingmale
roommates needed beginning
January 1st Rent is $156 a month
plus 14 of the utilities. Located
on the river. Call Kevin France at
758-6701.
NEEDED: Roommate and apart-
ment for Spring '93. Apartment
must be wheel-chair accessible and
roommate (male grad student)
must be willing to help wper-
sonal needs. Willing to pay 1 2 of
expenses and compensate for aid
provided. Only serious and dedi-
cated people need call. Billy T.
Sullivan, Phone (919) 284-5925,
Rt. 1, Box 422, Middlesex, NC.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
12 apt atEastbrook. 150month
12 utilities. Call 752-1868.
NEEDED 1 or 2 female roommates
for apartment in Wilson Acres 1 3
rent and utilities. Available Dec or
Jan. Please Call Emily or Rhonda
at 830-9066.
!OR SALE
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext. c-5999.
FOR SALE 6' 3" and 6' 7" Action
surfboards $200 each (Neg.) Bur-
ton Snowboard $100 1989 model
155. Rip Curl fullsuitMed.Tall $75
and spring suit Med 50 Pro-Lite
Board Bag fits up to 6' 10" boards
$45. Call 758-8331.
MUST SELL - Fisher CD unit
($100.00) obo, Soundesign stereo
and entertainment center ($150)
will consider less, Casio personal
electronic typewriter w 15 char-
acter screen ($100) obo. ALL IN
GREAT SHAPE. Stereo makes
good piece of furniture for apt.
Call Kat 931-9667 leave message.
FOR SALE
COPIER - Used Sharp SF 3700,
new drum, in good condition
$550.00 call 752-2400 8:30-5:00 M-
F.
FOR SALE : SOLOFLEX - used,
good cond ition, newband s, $525.00
obo call 919-752-29018:30-5:00 M-
F.
QUALITY FURNITURE Couch,
winged back chair, corduroy
swivel rocker, large back wicker
chair, 2 dark wood end tables, 2
lamps, 5 piece d inette, brown wood
wall unit, what-not stand, large
and small area rug, end chair sec-
tional sofa. MUST SELL! $275
ODDS AND ENDS THROWN
IN FREE Call 321-1190 or 757-
6012 ask for Veronica.
FOR SALE: Motorscooter (1983)
Yamaha 180 $250 desk and chair
$35. Tel: 919-757-2810 leave mes-
sage.
MUSTSELLIMMEDIATELY! Ft.
LauderdaleBahamas Spring
Break vacation for two 6 days and
5 nights, hotel accommodations,
and cruise fare included. Asking
$400.00 but will take BEST OFFER.
Call Brian at 757-3470 or (704) 869-
3485 over X-mas.
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
NJiWi USED CDS
HELP WANTED
GUARANTEED WORK AVAIL-
ABLE. Excellent pay for EASY
home based work. Full part-time.
Rush self-addressed stamped en-
velope: Publishers (G2) 1821
HillandaleRd.lB-295 Durham,NC
27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own
hours! RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers (Gl)
1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
SPRING BREAKERS - Promote
ourFloridaSpringBreakpackages.
Earn MONEY and FREE trips.
Organize SMALL or LARGE
groups. Call Campus Marketing.
800-423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext.3712.
EARN S1000AVEEK at homestuff-
ing envelops! For information,
send long self addressed stamped
envelope to CJ Enterprises, Box
67068L,Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44222
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY! In-
dividuals and Student Organiza-
tions wanted to promote the Hot-
test Spring Break Destinations, call
HELP WANTED
the nation's leader. Inter�Cam-
pus Programs 1-800-327-6013.
WAITRESS AND CASHIER
NEEDED part-time,Good pay and
tips, Call 355-0143 after 6 pm leave
message.
NOW HIRING Spring Breakers!
Greeks, organization, individuals.
Earn cash, REE TRIPS and party.
Call Joe ENDLESS SUMMER 1-
800-234-7007.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER for2nd
and 3rd grader. Tar River neigh-
borhood. Begin Jan. 4th. Hours2:30
- 5:00 M-F. Non-smoker. Own
transportation. Responsibilities
include helping with homework
and transporting to special
activites. REFERENCES RE-
QUIRED. Call 830-9458 or 757-1163
after 5.
GREAT HOLIDAY JOB OPPOR-
TUNITY: Going home for the Holi-
days? Need a fun part-time job?
The HONEY BAKED HAM CO. is
in search of a seasonal help to fill
our sales counter and production
positions. We have stores located
in the following markets: Char-
lotte, Wilmington, Raleigh,
Greensboro, Winston-Salem,
Durham, Fayetteville and other
major cities throughout the south-
east. Please check the white pages
or information for the store near-
est your home.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACA-
TION: Organize a group earn com-
missions and Free Trips! Call 1 800
826 9100.
ALTERATIONS AND DRESS
maker for sewing Boutique' Exp.
Nee. For appt. Call 355-0354.
NEEDED: Basketball officials for
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department Winter basketball
league. Position pays $10-12 a
game. Clinics will be held to train
new and experienced officials.
However, a basic knowledge and
understanding of the game is nec-
essary. For additional informa-
tion, please contact Ben James or
Michael Daly at 830-4550.
IMMEDIATE OPPENING for
TypistSecretarial person. Apply
in person between 9:00-5:00 Mon-
day-Friday atSDFComputers, Inc
106 E. 5th St, 7523694.
EXTRA MONEY for Christmas.
Banquet help and AM waitress
needed. RamadaInn.203W.Gre-
enville Blvd. Apply in person.
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
HELP WANTED
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Alaska Summer
Employment
FISHERIES - Students Needed! Earn $600
per week in canneries or $4,000 per month
on fishing boats. Free Transportation! Room
and Board! Over g.OOOopcnings. No experience
necessary. Male or Female. Get a head start on
summer! For your employment program call:
1-206-545-4155 Ext A5362
Student Employment Services
Achievement Through Adventure
Studenu wishing to woric in AUek most be
eighteen or older end in good phyi.cel condi oon
SERVICES OFFERED
��SPRING BREAK : Bahamas
Cruise (10 meals) $279! Panama
City with kitchen $119! Cancun
$429! Jamaica $479! Daytona
(kitchens) $149! KeyWest $249!
Prices increase 121192! 1-800-
678-63-86
GUARANTIED FREE SPRING
BREAK TRIP to Bahamas or
Panama City! Cancun, Jamaica,
Daytona, Keys! Sign-up before
121192! Springbreak! 1-800-
678-6386.
QUALITY WORD PROCESS-
ING: Specializing in letters, re-
sumes, business and medical tran-
scription term papers, thesis,
manuscripts. Anything that needs
to be typed. Dictaphone transcrip-
tion available. Call 321-2522
DEPENDABLE, CERTIFIED
BABY-SITTER looking for kids to
babysit! Very outgoing and ener-
getic, can work most afternoons
and evenings (even weekends)!
Also CPR certified. Call Dana at
931 -7825 or at the East Carolinian,
757-6366 any time.
RESUME COMPOSITION AND
TYPESETTING SERVICES! 10
discount on student packages if
you mention this ad! Laser printed
and stored on disk! The Write
Resume, 105Oakmont Drive 756-
0697.
GET YOUR TALKING BAL-
LOONS! For more information
send S.A.S.E. to PO Box 1544,
Winterville, NC 28590.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VisaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
in Celrt. (213) 477-8
Or, rush $2.00 to: RMMrch Information
11322 Idaho Ave. f?06-A. LwAnolBS,CA9002S
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY?
SPRING BREAK
HOW ABOUT IT IN THE
BAHAMAS OR FLORIDA
KEYS. WHERE THE PARTY
NEVER ENDS. SPEND IT ON
YOUR OWN PRIVATE YACHT.
ONE WEEK ONLY
$385.00 PER PERSON
INCLUDES FOOD AND MUCH
MORE
EASY SAILING YACHT CHARTERS
1-800-780-4001
PERSONALS
ALPHA OMICRON Pl-congrats
to the soccer team on a great sea-
son and to the "sisters" kickball
team on their overwhelming vic-
tory over the pledges! Sorry guys,
PERSONALS
better luck next time.
SIGMA PLEDGES, Hang in there
and keep up the good work! Were
all behind you. Love the Sisters.
THETA CHI- We may have the
big daddy; but way to pack the
stackers in Purple. You know who
you are Stackers next year go for
the gold. Signed , "true" V-Ball
Fan.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new brothers of Delta Chi: Mike
Amazon, Richard Chambers, Tim
Flory, Brian Godwin, David
Gorlesky, Doug Johnson, Robbie
Leon, Frank Rygiel, Joey
Shimkonis, Tom Thornton, and
Jeremy Troy.
BROTHERS OF KAPPA DELTA
RHO: Twas the night after
Thanksgiving and all through the
hall not a creature was stirring -
not even Bob. When along came a
troop so silent and deadly. They
unscrewed some showers and
spilled water on two pledges.
Plus, what to their surprised
hands did they feel? Gel on the
door knobs which really pissed
them off. The troop left a smilin
never so satisfied. Cheezy a sit
may be "been deep sea fishin'
lately?"
TALL, GOOD LOOKING SWM
runner in mid 30's looking to meet
attractive SWF runner, same age
or younger, to run with, go to
running races, and maybe even
date. Have great sense of humor,
otherwise would not be running
this ad. Enjoy rock'n roll, going to
dinner, working out, traveling to
races, big events, and staying
young. Like to treat women well.
send name and photo to Runner,
1968-C Quail Ridge Rd Green-
ville, NC 27858.
KAPPA DELTA RHO Congratu-
lations guys on achieving Colony
status. The Brotherhood has only
begun, and ECU will NEVER be
the same.
ATTENTION PIRATE FANS:
Sorry you have to stay in Pitt
County this year while NC state is
loading up their gear we're going
to Florida to ANOTHER invita-
tional Bowl Ya'll just say here and
tear down your own damn goal it
was you ECU fans who gave the
team a losing season at least we're
going Bowlin ain't that enough
reason ECU fans only know how
to get drunk and raise cain at least
NC State fans stay for the whole
game so we'll be in ANOTHER
Bowl game for the rest of our years
while you ECU has one in every
15 years PS be sure to watch NC
State play with the rest of your
peers and then you can drink an-
other beer and soak in your
tears supportive nc state fans.
HUGH H A WLEY- Thank you for
all your support these past few
months. You have been a true
friend when 1 really needed one
and there weren't many to be
found. Thanks again! Mo.
MOM: Behind every successful
daughter there's an even more
successful Mother. Coors.
L�
Announcements
GREENVILLE AREA Bl-
SEXUAL-GAY-LFSBIAN
GROUP
Group activities and discus-
sion of issues relating to same-
sex orientation. Meetings are
closed. Call 757-676611:00-12:15
Tues. and Thurs. or 1:00-4:00 pm
Wed. for information.
NEWMAN CATHOIir
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Student
Center invites you to worship
with them. Sunday Masses: 11:30
am and 8:30 pm mass at the
Newman Center. 953 E. 10th St
two houses from the Fletcher
Music Building. For further in-
formation, please call Fr. Paul
Vaeth, 757-1991.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FEI -
LOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in so-
cial and service projects? Need a
refuge from time to time? Cam-
pus Christian Fellowship may be
what you are looking for. Our
Weekly meetings are at 7 pm
Wednesdays at our Campus
House located at 200 E. 8th St
directly across Cotanche St. from
Merdenhall Student Center.
Everyone is welcome. For more
information, call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister, at 752-7199.
ECU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
TEAM
There will be a meeting on
Thursday November 19 in MSC
Room 14 at 5:00 pm. Anyone
interested in joining the Eques-
trian club or team should be there.
No riding experience necessary
call Angela 931-8453 or Holly 931-
8762 for info.
PERFORMING ART SERIFS
The Waverly Consort will per-
form the Christmas Story on
Monday, November 30, 1992 at
8:00 pm. In this Christmas play
based on Medieval manuscripts,
eight singers and five instrumen-
talist enact the message of the
archangel Gabriel, the journey of
the Magi, the scene of the manger
in Bethlehem, the intrigue of
Herod and his court, and cel-
ebrate" Christmas in drama
and song
ECU SCHOOl of MUSIC
EVENTS
Tues Nov. 17 � Kurt
Schmiemann, tuba and Alisha
Hudson, trumpet, Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall. 7:00 om.
Free). Wed NOV. 18 � Con-
temporary Jazz Ensemble; Paul
Tardif, Director (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:00 pm, Free). ThurNOV.
19 � ECU Guitar Ensemble;
Carroll V Dashiell, Director
(Wright Auditorium, 8:00 pm.
Free). SUN NOV. 22 � ECU
Sym phony Orchestra; Mark Deal,
Guest Conductor (Wright Audi-
torium, 3:00 pm. Free).
NINPOCLUB
Ninjutsu is made up of the
methods for striking and grap-
pling in unarmed fighting, tum-
bling and breakfalls, condition-
ing the body and maintaining
health. Relying on natural fluid
body movement and scientifi-
cally applied dynamics, allows
this martial art to be adaptable
and effective for all individuals.
The focus of the club will be on
traditional and modern day self-
defense situation. Training times
are Monday - Thursday at 9:30
pm in CHRISTENBURY GYM,
Room 108. All who are inter-
ested are welcome to attend.
PUBLIC SERVICE AN-
The East Carolina University
School of Art announces it's an-
nual Christmas Sale on Decem-
ber 3 and 4 from 8 am till 5 pm.
Textiles, ceramics, metals,
printmaking, and wood design
will make up the majority of the
work to be sold. The items are
made by the students of the art
school. The sale will be held in
the Wellington B. Gray Art Gal-
lery located in the School of Art.
For further information call 757-
6336.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
Recreational Services needs a
few good people to help assist us
in the delivery of our Adapted
Recreation Program. If you have
a desire to work with individuals
having disabilities then we have
a place for you. Applications are
now being taken in room 204,
Christenbury Gym or contact Jen-
nifer Chapman at 757-6387.
COUNSELING CENTER
?25 or Older? Undergrad or
Grad Student. Join us for brown
bag lunches on Wednesdays from
noon to 1:30 pm. Come for part
of all of the time. This rap group
is an informal gathering designed
to be supportive and help meet
the needs of students with family
responsibilities. Informal discus-
sions and presentation are the
format. Place: Counseling Cen-
ter in 313 Wright Building. For
more information call 757-6661.
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
RecreationalServices needs a
few good people to help assist us
in the delivery of our Adapted
Recreation Program. If you have
adesiretoworkwith individuals
having disabilities then we have
a place for you. Applications are
now being taken in room 204,
Christenbury Gym or contact Jen-
nifer Chapman at 757-6387.
ECU AMATEUR RADIO CLUB
To all amateur radio opera-
tors that have a license. I, Michael
Harrelson (KD4BSX), am trying
to start the Amateur Radio Club
back up at ECU. If you have a
license or are interested please
call and leave name, call sign,
and level, and phone number at
757-1273 ask for Michael. Call
after 3:00 MWF and after 2:00 on
Tuesday and 5:00 on Thursday
any time on weekends.
HONORS PROGRAM
Interested faculty members
are reminded of the opprtunity
to propose honors seminars to be
taught fall or spring semester
1993-94. All proposals should be
submitted to Dafjd Sanders co
Honors Program, GCB 2026, by
Wednesday, January 20, 1993.
The Honors Program, Commit-
tee of the Faculty Senate makes
the final selection. Call 757-6373
for more information.
OPEN HEARINGS
The Ad Hoc Committee on Aca-
demic Regulations is announcing
two open hearings to address the
proposed changes in the academic
regulations in section 5 of the un-
dergraduate catalog.
HEARING DATES: Wednesday,
December 2, 1992 and Thursday,
December 3,1992.
TIME: 3:30 pm until 5:00 pm
PLACE: General Classroom Build-
ing � Room 1400.
PURPOSE: The purpose of the
hearings is to allow the ad hoc
committee to garner additional
input from students and faculty
regarding the proposed changes
in the academic regulations of the
undergraduate bulletin.
ANIMAL RIGHTS
ECU students for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals will hold a
meeting on Thurs. Dec. 3 at 6:30
pm in GC Rm 2014. A presenta-
tion of the arguments against ani-
mal research will follow at
approx.7 om.





MMj �
The East Carolinian
December 1, 1992
Opinion
Parking comes before other projects
The current plan for renovations here at
ECU direly needs improvement and some re-
thinking.
Currently, plans for a new recreation cen-
ter next to Mendennall Student Center and a
too far from campus an existing solution can
solve this massive outcry.
Simply put, expand and improve the cur-
rent shuttle service here at ECU. Offer more
buses that will run to well-travelled points on
�, �� " uiura u"� vvm run iu weu-traveuea ooints on
newdmmghall that would be built over College campus. Also offer more times so thatTdents
Hill s tennis courts are in the planning and won't have to wait as long as an hour for another
working stages. t,us t0 appear
- �Jfailedtonotice Secondly, leave the field at the bottom of
J eIack �fg sPaces �hat are so College Hill open for Ultimate practice or for
desperately needed on this campus. anyone whojust wants to throw the ole'pigskm
�v7cTh J631? a��; ue.ld6a �f Puttog a WtheuruversityrastobuUdsomeming
ThptTn f P� mta;amural field at mthatarea,thenbuildyetanotherparkingdeck
the bottom of the Hill was considered. But indi- in the current parking lot across the street
viduals raised arguments against the change, With two parking decks, the parking prob-
ating the use of the field for band and intramu- lem on this campus rrught very well Sd
deaKtn?!6 S IT8 ft3 l0n6ly HfflpdedculdlookSSS;
tnexTfw vtrl t0 h6ard f�r bKaWe �f � f0rest su"ounds e
tne next tew years. present lot A tWQ Qr
n�c vadableand7ementparkin80nCam- fo)lot would lessen the early morning traffic
pus has now reached epic - - and tragic - at the College Hill-Tenth Street intersectL and
proportions. Most parking lots on campus are
filled by 9 a.m. at the latest and latecomers can
be seen patrolling the lots or walking to campus
from some far-off side street. No alternative
currently exists to solve this ever-increasing
problem.
Possibly, this suggestion may alleviate
some of these concerns that students have.
accommodate most of the commuters on cam-
pus.
If that much building and beautification
isn't enough, then go ahead and build the recre-
ational center near Mendenhall. With two new
parking decks, the loss of 250 spaces from
Mendenhall wouldn't make that much of a dif-
ference. But don't build one without the other.
Page 6
il
ECU FAftjqKlfe . qq4
Quote of
the Day:
What we
call
"progress"
is the ex- I
change of
one nui-
sance for
another Z,
nuisance. ?
Havelock Ellis.
Scott Batchelor
w . . . - �� uuiuun i vuua one witnout the other
First, build a parking deck at Minges that Especially not just the rec center and conve
Id replace the current n�rkino w if �� �J . . -clucI tu,u -onve
would replace the current parking lot it now
has. Four or five tiers of parking spaces would
accommodate the constantly rising number of
students coming to ECU.
For those who will cry, "Minges? But that's
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
� j h ����� unu LU11VC
niently forget about the parking problem. Park-
ing is just too important to this university.
If renovations are to be made on this cam-
pus, then make them with students as the bot-
tom line � not money.
'Deep Thoughts' rise from conservatives
AIDS issue about life and death, not values
To the Editor
First of all, let me say that I am
a Christian. Christians forma fairly
large group of people in mis uni-
versity. As Christians, we try to
live our lives to show others the
values and morals that we have,
hoping to instill these same mor-
als and values into other people.
But nobody is perfect. Everyone,
including Christians, will do
things in their lives that aren't ex-
actly the best things to do. So it is
time mat some Christians stop
being so idealistic about sex.
We all know thatabstinence is
the only safe sex. It would be nice
if we could preach abstinence and
know that everyone would ab-
stain. But not everyone will. It's
time to get real about the situa
The purpose of condom edu-
cation is to promote safer sex. True,
the only fool-proof method is ab-
stinence and it's only right that
abstinence should be a part of the
education process, but mere has
to be a back-up plan for those who
choose not to abstain. The pur-
pose of abstinence and condoms
is essentially the same: to protect
people from contracting the HTV
virus, not to mention to prevent
STDs and pregnancy. If we don't
quitbuttmgheads,theseproblems
will continue to get worse.
Some Christians will argue
that abstinence is not idealistic,
but personally, as a Christian who
I.
last column on mis subject, but I
urgeeveryone to really thinkabout
the controversy. The goal for the
two sides is the same � so why
not support each other? Why not
promote the two together?
Some groups, such as Peer
Health Educators, are trying to do
this. Rather than saying, "Sex is
wrong. Don't do it which of
course makes people want to do it,
they say "abstinence is best, but if
you aren't going to abstain, use a
condom and be safer
We need to quit bickering
about the methods and work on
the problem. Come on, people, it's
time to realize thatifsnotall about
A few lighter notes as we en-
ter the home stretch this semester.
I've just finished reading a
delightful little book put out by
Berkley Books called Deep
Thoughts by Jack Handey. For
those of you not familiar with his
work from Saturday Night Live,
here are some examples of what
Handey terms Deep Thoughts:
� "You know what would
make a good story? Something
about a clown who makes people
happy, but inside he's real sad.
Also, he has severe diarrhea
� "When you go for a job in-
terview, I think a good thingtoask
is if they ever press charges (Keep
that in mind, soon-to-be gradu-
ates.)
� Here's one that f choes the
sentiments of some of you today.
"I bet for an Indian, snooting an
old pioneer woman in the back
with an arrow, and she fires her
shotgun into the ground as she
falls over, is like the top thing you
can do
Or, "I bet the main reason
think sudden, uncontrolled uri-
nation should automatically dis-
qualify you
As I read this book, I mar-
velled at the simplicity of Jack
Handey's style, and at the $6.95
price tag.
"Heck, I can do that I said,
which is exactly the same thing I
said when I was 12, right after I
saw a stuntman ram his motor-
cycle into the fender of a car, flip in
mid-air and land unscathed on
a good laugh and then we could
get down to studying
� Finally � and this is apro-
pos of this time of year in college
� "Sometimes when the teacher
is handing out an exam I didn't
study for, I'll concentrate on his
head exploding, like that guy's in
the movie Scanners, but usually it
doesn't work and I just flunk the
test
Well, are you impressed or
simply on the phone with Berkley
bothfeet.Idid$100damagetomy Books discussing copyright in-
mother s Buick and totalled my fringements? If you would like to
hasn't always made the right nralsandvaTues'anre1 thepolTcekpplewaytom
listic. lt's about life and death. a plane crash is they don't want
nnlu -�.i tuti.� � J
choices, I know mat it is idealistic
I'm sure that I'm not the only
aUowustoberfeahsacanylong also sure .ha. ,his �UI L be U,e EL Admin
T?,hLZ, 10n of mari)�ana will define true freedom
To the Editor: What to� h�� .k� c wul
To the Editor
Marijuana should be
legalized immediately. The
hypocrisy within the laws of this
"great country of ours" amazes
me.
The blind acceptance of the
people of America amazes me
even more. How is it that alcohol,
which kills a person every 7
minutes in a drunk driving
accident, is legal and pot is not?
Alcohol not only kills people
in drunk-driving accidents, it
kills millions every year as a
result of the various health
problems it inflicts on the human
body.
How many people have died
as a result of pot smoking? You
tell me.
And why is alcohol legal?
What term does the Supreme
Court use as an excuse? Social
drinking! It's time to stop fooling
ourselves. "Social drinking" is a
lie.
No, I'm not saying that the
drug problem is going to be
solved through legalization. The
drug problem is not the issue
here, freedom is.
I'm sick and tired of my tax
money going to George Bush's
"war on drugs And I'm sick of
seeing old people getting
mugged on the streets by some
addict who needs money for
dope.
Everyday innocent people
die as a result of drug-related
violence, whether it's a middle-
aged man being stabbed to death
for his wallet or a three year old
child being shot in the head on a
playground as a result of cross-
fire.
The drug dealers aren't the
ones killing these people, though.
Maybe this is Uncle Sam's way
of eliminating minorities in this
country. If the government can't
legally kill people, why not pass
laws that make them kill each
other?
It's time to wake up America.
It's time to put aside your blind
patriotism, your stupid pride,
and your worthless, meaningless
flag. It's time to discover the true
meaning of freedom. Wake up
and smell the truth people!
Jason Tilley
Freshman
Communications
somebody walking in and lying
down in the crash stuff, then when
somebody comes up act like they
just woke up and go, 'What was
that?
� But here's my favorite Deep
Thought. "In weightlifting, I don't
brand new Huffy trying to dupli
cate the maneuver.
But here I am again, attempt-
ing another death-defying feat,
mis time with my own version of
Deep Thoughts, which, for the
purpose of avoiding costly litiga-
tion, I have titled "Abstruse Ru-
minations
Here is just a sample of my
work so far:
� "I think if a guy stood up
and shouted 'Fire in a crowded
movie theater and started a panic,
that guy wouldn't be taken to jail
if the movie was Backdraft
� "To break that tension of
mat first day of class, I think a
funny thing would be to walk into
the classroom waving around a
gun and yell, 'All you college
pukes get down or 111 blow your
stinking heads off We'd all have
see some more Abstruse Rumina-
tions, drop me a line here at The:
East Carolinian. If not, keep quiet
about it.
One last note for mis column.
I've recently come across a few
tidbits of political humor on
bumper stickers, buttons and T-
shirts. There is a shirt that was
recently printed which quotes
Clarence Darrow. It reads: "When
I was kid, I was told anyone could
be President; I'm beginning to be-
lieve it
A bumper sticker you might
be seeing soon proclaims: "Don't
blame me I didn't vote for
Clinton And another one sports
the Presidential Seal and says in
big letters, "INHALE TO THE
CHIEF Hail, yes.
You see, even conservatives
have a sense of humor.
N HIGH
IN THE
The
JOE OF ALL TRADES
GAS
in -rac
MiDT�Y
(oKSERvKTTYES
By Joe Horst
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Bobbi Perfetti, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary-
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Bullard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Karen Greenwell, Systems Manager
Dail Reed, Photo Editor
Religious orientation should focus on life
STSS! T? S EaSt Car�lina CampUS COmmUmty SmCe 925' �� 1 info� that affects
ureenviue, INC, 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
When I was growing up, I was
taught that there were two things
that people either didn't or just
shouldn't talk about in public.
Politics and religion.
Well, this column will just go
to show how much I listened when
I was growing up. Since the
elections are over, mat leaves me
with the lesser of two evils (pun
definitely intended).
I grew up raised as a Catholic.
Going to a Catholic grade school
and high school, I spent a lot of
time in contact with the teachings
of the Catholic faith. Up until I
came to Greenville to go to college,
I never really had any exposure to
other religions. Sure, some classes
on religions of the world, but no
first-hand, hands-on experience.
Through my four years here
in the Emerald City, I have seen a
lot of different approaches to
religion than those I saw back in
my home town. Baptists and
Catholics have many similarities,
but also many major differences.
But one thing remains the same
throughout any religion I've ever
seen: its orientation.
Almost every religion
preaches that if you follow its
advice and teachings you will find
yourself in a better place after you
die. Buddhism preaches that if a
person lives a good life then they
will move to a higher plane of
consciousness, eventually
reaching the ultimate state of
nirvana;Catholicism preaches that
following the teachings of Jesus
Christ will allow a person to go to
heaven; the list goes on and on.
The question that comes to
my mind is this: Why isn't there a
major religion that is life-oriented,
instead of death-oriented?
Give mea religion that teaches
me how to cope with the everyday
problems that I might encounter
and I'll follow it forever. Show me
how to deal with the stress and
fear in my life and make me
complete; don't tell me that when
Idie, I will end up in a better place.
When I die, it'll be too late for me
to do anything about where I am.
That's got to be my biggest
complaint about the heaven-hell
concept: by the time I find out
whether there is a heaven or hell,
what can I do to change it?
Check out When H.A.R.L.I.E.
Was One by David Gerrold if
you're interested. If you can't find
it at a used bookstore, use a book
search service. It will be well worth
your time and effort.





-
The East Carolinian
December 1. 1992
Lifestyle
Page 7
REAL Crisis Center
rocks benefit concert
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
So, you want to join an organiza-
tion, but you just don't have time. You
want to help others, but you feel that you
lack the necessary skills. Recently there
wasanopportunityforeveryonetohelp.
Nov. 20, O'Rocks hosted a benefit
concert for the REAL Crisis Center in
Greenville. The bands that performed
were The Killkids, Skullbuckie and Rat
Sided Buffalo. According to Kim
Lingwood,a representative for theREAL
Crisis Center, the proceeds from show
willbeused forpaintingand renovating
anew location forthecenterdowntown.
The center is presently located at 312 E.
10th St. The money will also be used to
add an extra phone line.
The REAL Crisis Center is a non-
profit organization that deals with
crisis intervention and has been a cor-
ner stone of the Greenville commu-
nity for 20 years. REAL offers hotline
and walk-in counseling for suicide,
domestic violence and drug abuse.
The center also offers referrals for 430
agencies such as Alcoholics Anony-
mous. Accord ing to Lingwood, 90per-
centof the center's present volunteers
are ECU students. Training classes to
become a volunteer are offered three
times a year.
Sponsors of the benefit included
theHelioesand theIrates,twofrisbee
teams that are participating in the
upcoming Ultimax Tournament.
Other sponsors were Papa Oliver's
pizzeria, Student Volunteers for REAL
and WZMB, the campus radio station
who broadcasted live from the show.
The bands that offered their tal-
ent for the benefit displayed genuine
diversity and entertained the packed
house for a little over three hours.
The first band to perform was
Flat Sided Buffalo, new comers to the
Greenville scene. Their show was the
debut performance and judging from
their response they will most likely be
back at O'Rocks again in the near fu-
ture. Flat Sided Buffalo have a strong
pop sound with a sort of punk-rat
Benatar vocalist.
The next band was Skullbuckie, a
colorfully dark band that threw up an
hour set that only lacked Vaselineand
flour.
The last band to play were Green-
ville veterans The Killkids. This band,
for lack of a better comparison, is a
cross between the la ter two band s wi th
very smooth dual-guitar melodies,
and a semi-harsh rhythm section. Ac-
cording to Dave Mason, lead vocalist
for The Killkids, this show was the
band's way of helping a cause that
they really stand behind and support.
Milkmen gratify
Cradle crowd with
comical insanity
By Julie Totten
Staff Writer
On Wednesday, Nov. 18, the
journey began.
The two hour plus drive to the
Cat's Cradle in Chapel Hill was
guaranteed to bring instant comi-
cal gratification.
The Dead Milkmen, a veteran
underground ensemble from Phila-
delphia, began playing around 11
p.m.
One of the most interesting
MTV, highlighted the show.
But, "Veteransof.i Fucked Up
World "Big Lizard In My Back
Yard "MethodistColoringBook"
and "Do the Brownose were
equally unforgettable.
The Dead Milkmen love their
underground image. Since begin-
ning in 1983 in Philadelphia, they
have entered the underground cir-
cuit withan enthusiasm that keeps
the band alive today.
Being the breath of life for the
underground scene obviously
mmsmBW
Photos by Jason Bosch
Skullbuckie (top) and Flat Sided Buffalo (bottom) performed with The Killkids at the smashing REAL
Crisis benefit concert at O'Rocks. The Center has been a cornerstone in Greenville for 20 years now.
things about the show was the over-
all eagerness for it to begin. The
crowd of about 200 in general didn't
visit the bar or scatter socially
around the club.
Before the show, almost every-
one stood straight forward, ready
to be hypnotized by the Milkmen'?
comical lyrics and style.
Guitarist Joe Jack Talcum ex-
plained the motives of the band as
"a totally insane attempt tobe witty
Insane is the key word. No mat-
ter what you-political viewsare on
homosexuality, corporate musicor
the presidency, there is a common
hysterical element that the Milk-
men explore in every song.
"Bitchin' Camaro the third
song of the evening, brought the
crowd together.
Even some of the wallflowers
jumped in and began slamming.
Only at a Dead Milkmen show
will you witness intense moshing
and people smiling and laughing
all at the same time.
"Punk Rock Girl a goofy love
ballad and the band's only song on
pleases these guys because of their
cracks on Lollapallooza. "Rodney
Anonymous vocalist and
keyboardist,comically lectured the
audience on being "sooooo alter-
native at Lollapallooza.
The members of The Dead
Milkmen are: HP Hovercraft (aka
Rodney Anonymous), vocals and
keyboards; Butterfly Fair Weather
(aka"JoeJackTalcum"),vocalsand
guitar; Dave Blood, bass; Dean
Clean, drums; and Dan the Sound
Man.
Hopefully this band will con-
tinue to write, record and most
importantly, perform for many
more years.
Socially concerned individu-
als will leave the show with proof
that comedy is the best medicine
to heal and help our uptight hu-
man natures.
So, if you ever get a chance to
see The Dead Milkmen, go and
watch Joe Jack'l alcum down a few
Genessee beers, laugh about our
government, and laugh about you,
too.
Tuesday, Dec. 1
Bloodmobile: Mendenhall multi-purpose room
starting at 12 noon.
Christmas Tree Trimming party:
Mendenhall Gallery Lobby at 4 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 2
Performing Arts: Virtuoso pianist Dmitri Ratser
from the Soviet Union and winner of many music competi-
tions in Eastern Europe will perform at Wright Auditorium
at 8 p.m. He specializes in the music of such composers as
Liszt and Rachmaninoff. For ticket info call 757788.
Thursday - Tuesday, Dec.
3-8
ECU PlayhouseSchool of Music:
"Amahl and the Night Visitors 8 p.m McGinnis
Theatre. Sunday performance at 2 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 6
Concert: Friends of the School of Music Holiday
Concert, 4 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
All Natural Band blends musical categories
By Claudette Peale
Staff Writer
�21
Friday, Nov. 21, the Fizz hosted a few
frolicking folksdancing to the sound of The
All Natural Band.
The Band started 3 years ago while
they were attending college in Virginia
Beach.
After a couple of changes in personnel
and a few relocations,The All Natural Band
has come together to form the perfect 'eclec-
tic groove ensemble
The All Natural Band consistsof Keller
Williams, electric and acoustic guitar and
lead vocals; Damian Siford, guitar and vo-
cals; Brian Durrett, bass and background
vocals; and Will Blair, drums.
"Our music is rockblues based wi tha
heavy jazz influence and some funk and
reggae withalittlecoun try pop said Siford.
"We usually change our set to suit the
croudsaid Siford,regarding the Fizz per-
formance. "Like tonight we'll do a more
'electric'set butsomewhereelsewe'd prob-
ably do a more acoustic sound
Their sets usually include a 40 to 60
ratiooforiginalstocovers,withonlyasmall
percentage of the covers being ones famil-
iar to most people.
"When it comes to writing songs ev-
eryone is involved said Williams. "One of
us might write the lyrics then they bring it
Photo courtesy All Natural Band
The five member All Natural Band brought their blend of rock, blues, jazz, funk, reggae
and country to a rollicking crowd at the Fizz Nov. 21.
10 the whole group and we write the music
together
Williams, who sings lead vocals on
mostofThe All-Natural Band songs,hasa
Willie Nelsonesque voice.
Friday's show included a truly unique
sounding reggae version of T Shot the Sher-
iff.
As for a future for The All Natural
Band, they hope to play more in the Tri-
angle Area.
"We'd like to get a lot more shows and
make a lot more money said Durrett,
laughing.
"Wewanttomakethemusicasgoodas
possibleand to travel a round playing where
people come to see us said Williams.
The group travels tine East Coast regu-
larly with Greenville being the furthest stop
south.
'Dracula' emphasizes sexuality over Gothic horror
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
Photo courtesy Columbia Pictures
Mina (Winona Ryder) is seduced by Dracula's (Gary
Oldman) eternal charms in "Bram Stoker's Dracula
Bram Stoker wrote his now famous novel
about vampires in 1897.
One hundred years has not yet passed since
its completion yet there seems to be more than a
hundred illegitimate offspring of this classic.
"Bram Stoker's Dracula directed by Francis
Ford Coppola, checks in as the latest entry in the
vampire saga.
A survey of films in the past ten years show
just how fertile the vampire genre is. "The Lost
Boys "Fright Night" and "Buffy the Vampire
Slayer" are just a few of the grotesque mutations
that have been wrought on the vampire legend.
Coppola claims that his interest in filming
this vampire story is because a filmic treatment
of Stoker's original story has never been written.
What Coppola has created is his own visu-
ally stunning, sensually erotic and ultimately
unsatisfying vampire yarn using Stoker's story
as the framework around which to construct his
vision.
The story itself proves interesting, although in
Coppola's hands the emotional impact becomes
muted. Jonathan Harker (Keanu Reeves) travels to
Transylvania to transact a business deal wi th Count
Dracula (Gary Oldman).
During the visit he is kept as a prisoner in the
Count's castle while the Count himself races to
England to seduce Harker's fiance, Mina (Winona
Ryder).
Mina bears a remarkable resemblance to
Dracula's deceased wife, Elisabetha (also played
by Ryder). Dracula's wife killed herself after re-
ceiving false word that her husband had been slain
in battle.
Upon learning of the death of his beloved wife,
Dracula renounced God and began his reign as a
vampire.
The story itself has too many supporting char-
acters.
Coppola needed to concentrate on the rela-
tionship of Dracula and Mina if he wanted to
explore the emotional depths of this tale.
Instead, Coppola chose to create a showy,
cinematic story that relies more on MTV than
Victorian literature.
He emphasizes the -?xual over the emo-
tional and the grotesqueness over the Gothic
horror.
Some of the supporting characters whocould
have been eliminated, or at least scaled down,
are Lucy Westenra (Sadie Frost), Lucy's three
suitors (Richard E. Grant, Cary Ewles and Bill
Campbell) and R. M. Renfield (Tom Waits).
Obviously Coppola wanted to tell a tale of
visual splendor to titillate the audience's eyes
and ears.
In the process he leaves that same audience
emotionally bankrupt because he exhibits no
real affection for his characters.
When Mina is torn between remaining with
Jonathan in the real world or living forever with
Dracula in the Netherworld, theaudience should
be on the edge of their seats.

'SCw
M
See Dracula page 8





8 The East Carolinian
Dracula
DECEMBER 1, 1992
Continued from page 7
Instead an emotional detach-
ment occurs and Mina's choice
makes no impression on the
viewer.
She could just as easily be
deciding whether to renew an
option on stock she owns.
The acting in the film is fine
but not sensational. Only Gary
Oldman deserves special men-
tion, if only for his make-up.
Oldman plays the young Count
Dracula in the 15th century, the
young Count Dracula when he
woos Mina (as a distinguished
gentleman), the old Count, the
werewolf who rapes Lucy and
the grotesque bat that appears
near the end of the film.
Oldman actually brings life
to each if these incarnations. His
accentsoundswonderfulandhis
expressions, even beneath the
make-up, are quite powerful.
The setsare remarkable. They
evoke the gloom of the Castle
Dracula as well as the splendor of
turn-of-the-century London.
Most remarkable of all is the
cinematography. The shadows
that move independent of their
owner ass an eerie touch. The
camera speeding to different lo-
cations accentuates the sense of
urgency in much of the pic'ure.
Coppola seems to have
achieved what he set out to do,
that is to create an eye-catching
treatment of a horror classic.
Unfortunately, a treatment
such as this requires more depth.
Watching this film is like eat-
ing ice cream as a main course.
While experiencing the film
you feel great but afterwards you
wonder why you did such a silly
thing. The mind, like the stomach,
reeds sustenance.
Too much junk will rot the
brain and leave an empty feeling
where emotions should be.
Films like "Dracula" rot the
brain. Therefore, "Dracula"
should ultimately be dismissed.
K'Jtel.imilM.U.hklBhWl
a book reviewer with a regular column in the Lifestyle section!
MZL
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Dead dogs, mud puddles describe 'Time'
� ,Ui u i - ii . .
DECEMBER 1, 1992
By Rachel Parker
Staff Writer
"Getting hurt and growing
up�it's a constant thing' Mark
Curry said about his new album
ft's Only Time.
"Itneverstops. Lifehurtsand
you write about it. Maybe it's go-
ing to make someone else smile,
you never know.
"When you're 14 years old,
life looks pretty grim. Every-
body is in a bad mood. I was just
a little dummy on a skateboard
riding around Curry said.
To understand Curry's mu-
sic, one must understand the life
that Curry has lived.
Although reluctant to talk
If you are concerned about
issues such as the environ-
ment, abortion rights, civil
liberties, health care
reform, or any issue relat-
ing to the Democratic
party, you can make a
difference.by joining the
ECU College Democrats.
For more info call Bill at
752 6947.
about his past, Curry did say he
was kicked out of his home at the
age of 14. He moved to Reno,
Nev. and spent his time watching
older people gamble.
After he move from Reno,
Curry jumped backand forth from
Sacramento to Los Angeles, play-
ing music with various bands.
These bands' styles ranged
from "deathcore metal" to "gut-
ter funk
His favorite bands and influ-
ences were Metallica, Motorhead,
Seven Seconds, Kiss, ACDC and
The Beatles.
Curry now resides in Sacra-
mento, Caafter yea rsof roaming
the southwest looking for noth-
ing in particular.
After all he has been through,
Curry's music leaves much to be
desired. He sings odd, depress-
ing songs about dead dogs and
mudpuddles with a voice that
sounds like a cheap imitation of
Bob Dylan. If his lyrics were any
good, it might be a redeeming
quality and his music may be
worth listening to.
Instead, he writes his lyrics
about how he sees everyday life.
The lyrics of "It Musta Been
Jo" describe the decomposition of
a puppy in graphic detail.
"It must have been Jo that
dug up the dog and tore it apart
all over the lawnIt smelled like
death so I took a deep breath
picked up the stick, put the dog in
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the streetand all the cars rolled
on and onand we all watched
the little pieces of the rotting
puppy corpse flyand no one
asked why, they don't care
"I imagine people will think
what they want to think about it,
you know what I mean?" Curry
said about his music.
"Everybody perceives it in
The East Carolinian
9
their own way. They can jack off
to it, I don't care
It is good that Curry's atti-
tude towards his music reflects
that he really does not care what
people think about his style.
Unless someone suffers from
a severe case of manic-depression
or has had a fifth of Jack Daniels,
they probably will not appreci-
ate, or even like, Curry's off-beat
lyrics or his poorly planned mu-
sic composition.
In fact, Curry's music would
be hard for anyone to relate to or
appreciate.
Overall,Curry'sdebutalbum
"It's Only Time" is a waste of
tape.
Don't waste your money.
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The East Carolinian
December 1. 1992
Sports
Page 10
Profile
The 'House of Payne' will make you jump around
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Photo by Dad Reed
He who breaks the law: Head Coach Eddie Payne will be running a tight ship as
they sail intothe Colonial Athletic Association. The season begins tonight in Minges.
ECU's Wendy Schultz named
to All-CAA volleyball team
Pirate basketball coach Eddie Payne faces
a difficult season this year, as he will try to lead
East Carolina intoatoughCAA conference and
improve on last year's 10-18 season. In his
second year of coachingat EastCarolina,Payne
faces the difficult task of building a winning
basketball program, a luxury ECU has not
enjoyed forovera decade. But Payneisoptimis-
tic despite the poor tradition and said, with the
new offense the Pirates have adopted, he ex-
pects this year's unit to be exciting to watch in
conference action
"We're running a motion offense that is
geared towards the jump shot he said. "It
encourages and rewards team play. I believe it
is conducive to the personnel we have here.
What that will translate into as far as wins and
losses, I'm not sure, but I believe well be able to
compete Payne said he is extremely pleased
with the effort he has seen his players put forth
in early practices, and has already seen an
upgrade in player intensity from last year.
"Some of the new players have tremen-
dous drive and ambition he said. "I have
noticed increased consistency from our veter-
ans and we have made great improvements in
conditioning and strength gains Payne said
that the Pirates' talent level had increased this
year, and that the return of seven experienced
players will provide the team with tremendous
opportunity. Payne said he will rely on these
veterans for on-court leadership.
"In practiceLester(Lyons)and James Lewis
have provided consistent, error-free play that
will be needed as the year goes on"
Payne said he is enthusiastic about the
progress center Ike Copeland is making from
last season's knee injury on Jan. 15. Copeland
was out for the last 16 games of the season.
"As Ike gets moreconfident, 1 hope to see
more production from him Payne said. "He
is starting to get back to his rhythm While
Payne is encouraged by the attitudes of his
veterans, he will rely on his new players to
make immediate contributions to the team.
Payne mentions newcomer Simpson
Toli ver, who could play as forward or center,
as the team's most athletic player. The 6-foot-
8-inch freshman will back up Copeland or
Gill. The Pirates are also fortunate to have
recruited Don Douglas, who at 6-feet-10-
inches, 220 lbs. is the Pirates' largest player.
Douglas will likely see action in the middle
this year. Payne said the improvements that
lured Douglas to ECU produced the recruit-
ing success the school enjoyed mis year.
"There isa strongphilosophical commit-
ment at this university to allow student-ath-
letes anopportunitytograduate'Payne said.
"At ECU, there is a sense of caring for them as
people, wewantthemtoachieve. Graduating
players is simply the right thing to do, it's the
good business thing to do for the commu-
nity Payne said that this commitment is
what drew him towards ECU, along with the
commitment to develop first-class athletic fa-
cilities. "We now have one of the finest sports
medicine facilities in thecountry. This helps to
raise the perception of our program
Payne said tha t the team and administra-
tion at ECU is working hard to take steps to
become a championship-caliber program. By
projecting enthusiasm with the team and
through the program, Payne hopes he can
speed up the process and motivate everyone
involved with ECU basketball.
Payne hasacatch phrase thatsymbolizes
this motivational philosophy, "Enthusiasm is
caught, not taught"
Scott named
All-American
Sports Information Department
EastCarolinasenioroffensivetackleTom
Scott has been named first-team All-America
by Football News magazine, announced by
the publication on Wednesday.
Scott, 6-feet-7-inches, 338, has been the
foundation for the Pirate offensive line all
season. The senior has 51 knockdown blocks
in 10 games. The Pirates are among the NCAA
statistical leaders all season in total and pass-
ing offense.
The Rose Hill, N.C. native, has already
been accepted to play in the Senior Bowl and
the East-West Shrine All-Star Classic.
The All-American team will appear in
the Nov. 25 edition of Football News along
with its listing of second- and third-team All-
Americas, Almost All-Americas, all-confer-
ence and sophomore and freshman All-
America teams.
Below is the 1992 Football News First-
Team All-America Team:
Offense Defense
QB- Gino Torretta, Miami, Fla� Sr.
DL- John Copeland, Alabama, Sr.
RB- Marshall Faulk, San Diego State, So.
DL- Chris Slade, Virginia, Sr.
RB- Garrison Hearst, Georgia, Jr.
DL- Chris Hutchinson, Michigan, Sr.
WR-Lloyd Hill, Texas Tech, Jr.
LB- Michael Barrow, Miami, Fla Sr
WR-O.J. McDuffie, Perm State, Sr. �'�
LB-Marvin Jones, Florida State, Jr. ��'
TE- Chris Gedney, Syracuse, Sr.
LB- Marcus Buckley, Texas A&M, Sry
OT- Lincoln Kennedy, Washington, Sr.
LB- Ron George, Stanford. Sr.
OT- TOM SCOTT, EAST CAROLINA, SR.
DB- Deon Figures, Colorado. Sr.
OG- Will Shields, Nebraska, Sr.
DB- Carlton Gray, UCLA, Sr.
OG- Aaron Taylor, Notre Dame, Jr.
DB- Ryan McNeil, Miami, Fla Sr.
C- Mike Compton, West Virginia, Sr.
DB- Lance Gunn, Texas, Sr.
PK- Joe Allison, Memphis State, Jr.
P- Ed Bunn, UTEP. Sr.
Sports Information
The Colo-
GREENVILLE, N.C. �
nial Athletic Association announced the
1992 All-CAA volleyball selections on
Friday night. East Carolina's senior out-
side-hitter, Wendy Schultz, was named
to the first team All-CAA.
In 1992 Schultz led the Lady Pirates
in kills (504), hitting percentage (.285)
and digs (373).
The Gibsonia, Pa. native had her best
match of the 1992 season against the
College of Charleston. Schultz finished
the match with 29 kills and 22 digs.
On Nov. 13 Schultz was recog-
nized as the school record holder in
kills with 1,242, hitting percentage
(1.066) and digs (1035).
The conference named Schultz
Player of the Week once during the
1992 season.
This honor came after Schultz
helped the Lady Pirates win their first
two conference matches of the season.
Schultz's totals for the two matches
were 47 kills and 32 digs.
Schultz and the ECU volleyball
team begin play in the CAA Champi-
onship on Saturday Nov. 21.
Women's soccer ties to finish season
By Jaimeson Pierce
Staff Writer
The East Carolina Women's Soccer
Team finished its most successful season
ever on November 22 as they tied the
UNC Chapel Hill Club 1-1.
ECU trudged through the rain-
soaked field and took an early 1-0 lead
as forward Amy Warren scored her
sixth goal of the season.
The Pirates continued to pound at
the Tar Heel goal but many shots sailed
just wide of the net. Fullbacks Court-
ney Bucka and Missy Cone, as well as
forward Toni DeRose, struck near
misses. ECU kept the pressure on,
led by halfbacks Peg Rustand and
Heather Seanor. Time after time,
UNC's attack was shut down by the
Pirate defense led by goalkeeper
Jaime Pierce and fullback Katy
McNiff. With just two min-
utes left in the game, a
UNC forward broke
through and tied the score
ECU was scheduled to
finish out their fall season at home
on December 6, but N.C. State can
celled due to their exam schedule. The
Pirates' final record was 6-4-2, with
early season losses to Virginia Tech
and Raleigh.
"I can't express how proud I am of this
team Coach Chip Hudson said. "They,
vorked extremely hard all season, and
became a cohesive unit as the season
progressed
The Women's Soccer Team
will play a spring schedule
starting in February, and they
will look to improve on their
record and win their division
in the North Carolina Women's Soc-
cer League.
Interested players should look for no-
tices on participating at the beginning of
the spring semester.
Pump Up Your Fitness
Recreational Ser-
vices Turkey Trot
The annual Turkey Trot co-
sponsored by Recreational Ser-
vices and ARA Dining Services
was held on Nov .18. There were
59 runners in the two mile race.
The women's overall winner
was Ashley Riggs with a time of
10:42, while the men's overall
winner was Ronnie Rarbro wi th
a time of 10:02. The overall team
winner was Pat Daughrrey's
team with a time of 42:29. Winners
were awarded an assortment of tur-
keys and pumpkin pies. It was a
gobblin' good time by all and hope
to see everyone again next year for
this festive event.
Kickball Tournament
Thefirstannual Kickball Tour-
nament was held by Recreational
Services from Nov. 10 to Nov. 19.
There were eight sorority teams
entered in the tournament with
Alpha Omicron Pi enteringtwo
teams. Each team played three
games in a modified winlose
bracket tournament. Zeta Tau
Alpha took third place by de-
feating Alpha Xi Delta by a score
of 5-2. The championship game
went to Alpha Phi for defeat-
ing Tri Sigma 8-4. Alpha Phi,
led by Alicia Potter, played awe-
some defense and made sev-
eral "plays of the day Con-
gratulations to Alpha Phi for
winning this year's Kickball
Tournament.
Bad Tequila upends Pirates
By Kevin Raymer
Staff Writer
ECU teams fared well in the
ECU Ultimate FrisbeeTournament
held November 22-23. Sixteen
teams from across the Eastern
United States par-
ticipated in this ex-
citing event. East
Carolina had two
teams in the
pools. After playing each of the
three teams in their pools, teams
were placed in one of two divi-
sions. Teams that lost two or more
of their games in pool play were
placed in Pool B. Teams that one
two or more pool games were
No other game produces the
amount of respect and enjoyment
Srdturfof for tne sP�rt m Ultimate Frisbee.
-Kevin Raymer
current East Caro-
lina students, lost in
the quarterfinals 11-13 to Bad Te-
quila of Columbia, S.C. The X-
Rates, a team made up of former
Irates, made it all the way to the
championship after defeating
Camel City of Winston-Salem in
the quarterfinals and Bad Tequila
15-9 in the semifinals.
The tournament started out
with 16 teams divided into four
placed in Pool A.
Pool B was won by Rutgers
Hot Animal Machinefrom Rutgers
University. They were knockedout
of Pool A after an 11-13 loss to the
X-Rates. On their way to the Pool B
championship, the Rutgers team
outscored opponents 264. This in-
cludeda 13-3victory over William
& Mary in the semifinals. In the
Pool B championship, Rutgers
faced a very talented University of
Penn team that they consider to be
big rivals. It seems that these two
teams face each other in each tour-
nament that they participate in.
Rutgers came out
on top 13-9 to con-
clude their suc-
cessful weekend.
The game be-
tween Rutgers
and University of
Penn was a game
that seemed to last
In Pool A, one
quarterfinal game and part of the
semifinals were played during this
game. The Pool A championship
between the X-Rates and Marco
Polo was said to be the best cham-
pionship of the season by the well-
traveled Bad Tequila team. The X-
See Frisbee page 12
an eternity.
Schaefbauer
signs with
Pirate
hoopsters
Sports Information
GREENVILLE, N.CSkipp
Schaefbauer, a 6-foot-4-inch guard
from Elk River, Minn has signed a
national letter of intent to play men's
basketball at East Carolina Univer-
sity, school officials announced
Wednesday.
Schaefbauer becomes the first
signee of the 1992 early signing pe-
riod for Coach Eddie Payne's Pi-
rates.
Schaefbauer capsule informa-
tion:
-Guard, 6'4 200, Elk River,
Minn. (Elk River Area High
School)
- Has earned three letters in bas-
ketball for Coach Wally Trochlil at
Elk River (Minn.) Area High School.
- As a junior in 1991-92, aver-
aged 18 points, 7 rebounds and 3
assists per game for the Elks. Was
also named All-North Suburban
Conference, All-Metropolitanby the
Minneapolis Star-Tribune and the St
Paul Pioneer Press, second team all-
state by Associated Press.
- Member of the St. Paul Pioneer
Press Defensive Team of the Year as
a junior.
- As a sophomore in 1990-91,
averaged 16.8 points, 4.6 rebounds
and 2.9 assists per game. Was also
named All-North Suburban Confer-
ence, All-Metropolitan by the Min-
neapolis Star Tribune and the St.
Paul Pioneer Press. Also earned hon-
orable mention all-state honors.
- As a freshman in 1989-90, aver-
aged 13.4 points, 63 rebounds and
2.6assists per ga me. Wasalso named
Thank God we don't play the Devils
File photo
Not again: last season marked the end of the annual beatings at
the hands of Satan's spawn.
All-North Suburban Conference.
- Has shot over 50 percent from
the field and 70 percent from the free
throw line in all three seasons of high
school basketball.
-Has beennamed theMost Valu-
able Player on his high school team
for the last three seasons.
- Was an All-North Suburban
Conference and All-Metropolitan
(Minneapolis Star Tribune and St
Paul Pion0erPress)selectionasawide
receiverin football during juniorand
senior seasons. Named WCCOPrep
Parade All-State during junior sea-
son.
- Also was an All-North Subur-
ban Conference choice in tennis as a
sophomore and was all-conference
honorable mention in the freshman
and 8th grade years.
- During junior season, was
named Star Tribune Athlete of the
Week (basketball), KARE11 Athlete
See Schaefbauer page 11
�?�
:





11 The East Carolinian
DECEMBER 1, 1992
Ouch!
Fito photo
Snap, crackle and Pop: last season, three pirates suffered anterior
cruciate ligament tears. Ike Copeland is hoping to come back strong in '92,
Schaefbauer
Continued from page 10
of the Week (football) and KMOM
Athlete of the Week (football).
- Duringsophomore season, was
named Star-Tribune Athlete of the
Week (basketball), KMOM Athlete
of the Week (basketball) and KARE
1 Athlete of the Week (basketball).
-His name ispronouncedShavf-
bovver.
- Has a 3.8 grade point average
in his studies.
- Also visited Washington State
Carolina
and Wvoming.
- Son of Joe and Diane
Schaefbauer.
"Skipp is a very versatile, all-
around player Head Coach Eddie
PaynesaidHecan play thepointor
the two guard. He can shoot and is a
competitor.
"To sum it up, Skipp's a tough
kid. I'm very pleased to have some-
one of his character and quality in
our program
1992J993
presents OCaSOd
The School of Music
(Jtmaltl avid
ike Tlijltt Visftote
"A Holiday Miracle"
December 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8 at 8:00 p.m.
December 5 and 6 at 2:00 p.m.
General Public: $12,50 � ECU Students: $7.50
GORDON'S GOLF & SKI
FOR FINE
APPAREL and EQUIPMENT
200 E. Greenville Blvd.
756-1003
Monday-Friday Open Sunday 1-5
Any sports writers hoping to keep their job in the Spring
need to show up for the meeting, Thurs. @ 5:30. OR ELSE.
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
NOW SERVING OYSTERS AT OUR OYSTER BAR
TuFeTTpcani" .
$1.00 OFF Any Mcol except Specials"
coipon(QrJTruJ2lJ9j�Sjudent I.D
Shrimp Plate $3.95
Trout & Shrimp Plate $4.95
Ocean Perch $4.95
Offer Good Mon-Thurs
Washington Highway
(NC33�xt) (10thSt.�xt)
Greenville, NC
ABC Permits
Take-outs Welcome
752-3172
ECONOLODGE
"SUPPORTING THE ECU STUDENT"
"Oldproperty, but cleanliness is the Priority"
Enjoy the hospitality, clean rooms, and free local calls.
-Member of the NC Sheriffs Association
-1992 Sanitation grade "A" (96)
-Member of the Greenville Chamber of Commerce
-Special rates for hospital patients and thier families
f "econo Lonr.K "
I 10 OFF ROOM BOOK RATE f
j Coupon valid from 111592 to 123092
Student ID required
�� � �� �� im mm ib mm BM MB MB mm I
(919) 752-0214
Hospital verification needed from admitting office
AUDITIONS
Paramount Parks, formerly Kings Productions, is holding
auditions for our 1993 season at Paramount's Kings Dominion
in Richmond, Virginia A variety of positions are available
including singers, comic actors, instrumentalists, technicians,
character costume performers, and specialty acts of all types'
Come join the fun!
GREENVILLE, NC
Thursday, December 3, 1992
East Carolina University
A.J. Fletcher Music Bldg Recital Hall
5-6 p.m. Singers, Actors
5-7 p.m. Instrumentalists,
Specialty Acts, Technicians
RICHMOND, VA
Saturday, December 5, 1992
Kings Dominion
Mason Dixon Music Hall
2-4 p.m Singers, Actors,
Technicians
3-5 p.m. Instrumentalists,
Specialty Acts
For additional information call
"aromounts Kingi Dominion I 804 876 5141
Paramount Porlu 1 -800 544 5464
PARAMOUNT'S CAROWINDS � PA
pies doming
OUNT'S KINGS ISLAND
WHO COULDN'T
USE SOME
U.S. GOV'T INSPECTED
Genuine
Ground Round
lb.
$99
GOLDEN RIPE
Dole
Bananas
J� 1
IN THE DAIRY CASE" CHILLED
Kroger
Orange Juice
Gal.
t99
"IN THE DELI-PASTRY SHOPPE"
Wisconsin Mild
Cheddar Cheese
lb.
$f99
SOFT SENSE OR E �S � WHY SH0P ANYWHERE ELSE?
Edge Gel
Shave Cream
2
7-OZ.
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE, DIET COKE OR
Coca Cola
Classic
12-Pak
12-oz.
Cans
$2?9
COPYRIGHT 1992 - THE KROGER CO ITEMS AND
PRICES GOOD SUNDAY. NOV 29 THROUGH SATUR-
S?E$5' 1992 1N GREENVILLE WE RESERVE THE
RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES NONE SOLD TO
L)t ALcHS
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY-Each of these advertised items
is required to De readily available for sale in each Kroger
Store, except as specifically noted in this ad. If we do run
out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice of
a comparable item, when available, reflecting the same
savings or a raincheck which will entitle you to purchase
the advertised item at the advertised price within 30 days
Only one vendor coupon will be accepted oer item
purchased





DECEMBER L. 1992
Frisbee
Crime doesn't pay,
but we do.
I
n sptine
I V.
applications for the
spring semester for
Staff Writers
Any interested students !
can obtain applications
at our office on the
zond floor of the
Student Pubs building.
7
c us of thousand
ifitrinx - holhla) s Mill nomh
.
(five blMhi again. Of hi'im it wih
In fell Joru Hfctinw. Air Red Cross
PROCTOR BARBER SHOP
WetDry Cuts $7.00
S Shampoo & Cut 10.00
No Appointment Necessary
S 222-D Cotanche St. r-
758-3802 Corner of 3rd & Cotanche
15 iih St.
M l0-8pm Sat 8-6:30pm
757-3311
AN IfI :
Gifl ! mil For llic Kamih
ai (. hrisimas!
1 bu. Navels 48 ct SI4.75
1 bu. Grapefruit 36 ct Si3.75
and
1 bu. Grapefruit 27 ct S 17.75
(Limited Supply, Order Now !)
Also In:
CHRISTMAS TREi
WREATHS & GARLAND
set
it of the
U Many
be-
� �
run and
i toun
allvcon-
12-15
und
ihout the
: the
rjt be-
NEED CASH
The Cstote Shop Is Now Buying
find Paying Cash
for Men's Nice Winter Clothing
SKIi. Par.ti. Su�oti and UJint�f Jatk�u
ESTATE SHOP
Coin & Ring Man
752-3866
Quorum
pportunit) Kncx k





Title
The East Carolinian, December 1, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 01, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.911
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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