The East Carolinian, November 19, 1992






Hj
Opinion
Mindless xenophobia
The fall of Communism has brought enumerable
problems to former Soviet-block countries. Many
are blaming the their problems on foreigners.
See story pg. 4.
Lifestyle
Lulled by Maniacs
10,000 Maniac fans would have
been better off listening to the
band's new CD than going to see
the concert last Sunday.
See story pg. 8
Back-to-back
The Pirates will attempt to post back-
to-back winning seasons for the first
time in 10 years Saturday.
See Story pg. 10
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 22
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Thursday, November 19,1992
12 Pages
Cancer Society calls
for Smokeout today
By Joseph Horst
Staff Writer
Health officials throughout
the state and country, including
here at ECU, are asking individu-
als to take a special drop day this
third Thursday in November.
"(Today), the day of the
American Cancer Society's
Great American Smokeout,
we're asking students, faculty
and staff to drop out from smok-
ing said Jeanie Tomkalski, di-
rector of Health Promotion and
Weil-Being.
The American Cancer Soci-
ety sponsors the annual event
countrywide to encourage smok-
ers to abstain from cigarettes for
24 hours. The Society also asks
people who dip or chew tobacco
to drop their habits for the day.
"A lot of intelligent people
consider dipping snuff and
chewing tobacco as safe alter-
natives to smoking Tomkalski
said. "But that is just not the
case
A 1986 report by the Advi-
sory Committee to the Surgeon
General concluded that strong
scientific evidence exists prov-
ing a link between snuff use and
cancer. Oral, cheek and gum can-
Future Dali
Lama speaks
on campus
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
A man of wit and wisdom, the Vener-
able Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, a Tibetan
Lama, spoke to a sizable crowd at
Mendenhall Student Center Monday
'ening on the subject of compassionate
ion.
Wearinga traditional burgundyrobe.
Rinpoche entered the room while the audi-
ence stood respectfully. He took his seat
behind a table covered in fine Asian silks
and spoke softly as he explained the Bud-
dhist conception of compassion.
"Compassion isa very important prin-
ciple in the spiritual path of Buddhism he
said. "Compassion in Buddhismarises from
the call of loving kindness
� Rinpoche explained how one could
acquire that compassion.
"The real cause for generating com-
passion is the understanding and experi-
ence of suffering he said. "Suffering, on
theother hand, is the fundamental nature of
being.
"What then is suffering? One word
can describe suffering; suffering is a fear.
Whether we are in our happiest state or we
are in a depressed state, our being is per-
vaded by this fear
Rinpoche said we deal with fear by
denying it. For example, we avoid talking
about death because we are afraid to accept
our mortality.
'This denial becomes another fear,
another suffering. It becomes destructive,
and obstructs us from havinga pure heart
Rinnpoche was bom a t Ru mtek Mon-
astery in Sikkin in 1965 and, when less than
one month of age, was recognized as the
seventh incarnation of the Dzogchen
Ponlops by the Gyalwa Karmapa and the
Dali Lama.
He graduated from Karma Shri
Nalanda Institute as an Acharya, or master
of Buddhist Philosophy. He teaches En-
glish and has traveled and taught widely in
both the West and Asia.
Returning to the subject of compas-
sion, Rinpoche said we must see our pain
clearly in order to develop compassion for
others.
"Compassion is seeing others' suf-
fering and wanting to help that other
being to free himself from that pain and
cer are also more prevalent
among snuff dippers.
In 1991, about 7.4 million
people observed the Great
American Smokeout. Within
three days, more than half of the
people were still not smoking.
"Our main objective is to
create awareness about the haz-
ards of smoking Tomkalski
said. "We're hoping students,
faculty and staff � smokers and
nonsmokers � will participate
Nonsmokers can join in the
observance by signing up to
"Adopt-a-Smoker" for the day.
People who join this pro-
gram, coordinated by the office
of Health Promotion and Well-
Being, can receive survival kits
either at the office of Health Pro-
motion and Well-Being (303
Erwin), the Counseling Center
(316 Wright), residencehalls or in
Room 127 of the Brody Building.
Residence halls on campus
will receive the most promotion
regarding this event. Educational
information, along with buttons,
stickers and other paraphernalia
will be available to students
through their residence hall ad-
visors and coordinators.
See Smokeout page 2
Art school gains exhibition space
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
A 900 square-foot senior
exhibition space partially
funded by Burroughs
Wellcome will be added to
Grey Art Gallery in Jenkins.
The space intended for se-
nior exhibitions, a graduation
requirement, will be separate
from Grey Art Gallery. How-
ever, the gallery and the exhibi-
tion space can be combined to
make one large show if needed.
"Our graduating seniors
will have the unique opportu-
nity of designing, arranging
and executing an exhibition ot
their work in a professional
space said Michael Dorsey,
dean of the School of Art.
Besides the $30,000 given
to the art school by Burroughs
Wellcome, the Art Department
raised $21,000 by way of a ben-
efit auction in April. Two-hun-
dred works were donated by
faculty, students and friends.
"The students before
would extend an inordinate
amount of work and have to
hang (the exhibition) in a hall-
way or a store front Dorsey
said.
The addition will give stu-
dents a professional place to
. rtoto by Jason Bosch
Representatives from Burroughs Wellcome present the School of Art a check for $30,000 for new exhibition
space in the Gray Art Gallery. The new space will be used for senior exhibitions.
work, Dorsey said.
"We do very much de-
pend on the good will, gifts
and cooperation to make this
university work Chancellor
Richard Eakin said.
The extra space, designed
bvjohn Hickman, will be func-
tional by this summer.
"It's always a relationship
between industry and
academia but not always be-
tween industry and art said
Dr. Gabriel Cipau, senior vice
president of production and
engineering at Burroughs
Wellcome.
Burroughs Wellcome, a
major benefactor of the art de-
partment, has sponsored a
number of exhibits and bought
and displayed art from ECU in
an effort to let students share
their work with the public.
Tax meter running for nqfi!ers
During 1990. the IRS estimates about
10 million individuals and businesses
didnt file a tax return, creating a tax
income gap of more than $7 billion. The
IRS has started a program to identify
non-filers and help bring them back into
the tax system. Some are due refunds.
Who are the non-filers?
A recent IRS study identified
non-filers by age and income
over 55 undaMi
more than
60.000
40 to
60.000
41 to 55 " 26 to 40 15IO
By age group By Income rang 'PP0
Estimate of non-filers in the IRS Southeast Region.
Numbers are in thousands.
600
Ga Ala SC Fla NC Miss Ark La TN
How non-filers can get back in the tax system
Assistance and education
I IRS will supply prior
year tax forms, help
reconstruct old records,
prepare forms ana set
up payment arrangements.
Penalty waivers
IRS may waive penalties
due to illness, death in
the family, fires, natural
disasters or other events
that may have destroyed records
InaiTwl Ravanu Sarwc
Waiching TV to earn degree
College Press Service
Instead of living on campus or commut-
ing to school, thousands of students nation-
widearereceivingacollegeeducation through
high-tech means, including two-way five
video and television courses.
With video tapes and textbooks, or two-
way video and audio, students can now re-
ceive an associate of arts degree without ever
stepping on campus. Some colleges are inves-
tigating ways so students can earn four-year
degrees at remote sites.
Leaders in the television education
movement say such delivery makes a college
education available to people who live too far
to commute to school or don't have time to
attend classes out of their area.
"What we are finding is that students at
a distance do not perform any less than if they
were here on campus said Clark Ketchum,
a spokesman at trie University of Maine at
Augusta. "The advantage for these students
is basically access. Distance precluded them
from taking classes
The University of Maine's seven cam-
puses are tied together by an electronic dis-
tance education system. Students at one cam-
pus can hear and see a lecture on another
campus. This system is not interactive, but at
various other sites there is an audio system
that enables students to respond to instruc-
tors and vice versa. Fifty high school sites are
tied into the svstem.
There are 2,641 students enrolled in the
University of Maine's distance programs out
of a total of 32,826 in the university system,
Ketchum said. They pay no extra tuition or
fees for the telecommunications courses.
These students can receive associate of
arts degrees in business administration, gen-
eral studies, liberal arts and social services.
"Hopefully they can transfer to a campus
and get a bachelor's degree he said. "Down
the road they will be able to get a bachelor's
on television
The system, and several like it nation-
wide, are not without detractors who say
students lose out by not being in a classroom
with an in a classroom with an instructor and
fellow students. Ketchum said the Univer-
sity of Maine's system, which began in 1989,
has determined that the students in telecom-
munications courses do no worse or better
than traditional on-campus students .
"The underlying element is the
student's motivation to learn. They are inde-
pendent people who aren't missinganvthing
Ketchum said. "The down side is the tradi-
tional socialization that we are aware of and
participated in. For many students, this is a
minor issue. The major issue is getting an
education. Students are basically more
pleased to have the access than to have lost
that social contact
See TV page 3
ROTC sponsors toy drive
By Tammy Carter
Staff Writer
suffering he said.
"We havea destructive and neurotic
side that we must come to understand. We
must accept completely all sides of a per-
son,goodand bad. Wemustaccepta whole
person
He explained an ancient Buddhist
saying via a very modern analogy.
"Buddhism is like punching your
own keyboard. It tries to teach you the
command keys
Ponlop Rinpoche closed with a com-
parison of compassion and lovingkindness.
"They are like two sides of the
coin. Compassion is creating the
space in your heart for love and for
kindness
Rinpoche answered questions
from the audience beforeending with
a traditional Buddhist farewell.
The visit, Rinpoche's last in
North America before returning to
Tibet, was sponsored by Karma
Thegsum Choling Greenville, and bv
the ECU Buddhist Meditation and
Study Group.
The cadets of ECU's Army ROTC are
sponsoring a Toys for Tots Drive on cam-
pus this week.
The drive began on Monday and will
run through Friday. The toys that are col-
lected will be given to children throughout
the Greenville area who would not other-
wise receive gifts on Christmas morning.
Toys will be collected in front of
Mendenhall and the student book store
during regular school hours as well as in
the ROTC office in Rawl 346. People wish-
ing to donate toys should look for the large
green collection bins in these areas.
.According to ROTC cadet Lisa
Moody, donated toys should be new and
unwrapped. She said gifts do not have to
be expensive.
Moody proposed the drive to her fel-
low cadets after volunteering her time in a
local elementary school system in earlv Janu-
ary. Moody said she saw children returning
from Christmas break who did not receive any
presents.
"They kept to themselves, away from the
other children Moody said. "The looks on
their faces were pathetic
Moody said everyone on campus needs
to take part in the drive to make Toys for Tots
a success.
"We are asking every faculty office to
donate at least one toy"
Moody also asked all students to donate
toys. Students who donate will receive a raffle
ticket on a chance to win prizes or gift certifi-
cates from area merchants.
Prizes include a pair of Rayban sun-
glasses, dinner for two sponsored bv Trader
Kate's, gift certificates from Belk's, Winn
Dixie, UBEand Applebee's, along with many
other prizes.






2
The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 19, 1992
� i
Student makes 10,000 calls
A spumed college student in Austria has admitted to making
morethat 10,000harassingtelephonecalls totaJjng$30,000tO Harvard
University students. The Austrian student, who would dial the
Harvard prefix and then random four-digit numbers, called an
average of 10 students a day over the past three years, and some-
times would threaten to kill women who answered the phone. He
was finally identified when a female student told Harvard police
she suspected the caller might be a student she met in 1989. Officials
doubt any action can be taken because of international red tape.
Search policy irks student leaders
A videotape made by a student government task force shows
that Jacksonville State University students are searched at football
games for alcohol and weapons, but most alumni, faculty and
parents are not. David Nichols, director of public safety, said the
screening policy at student entrances is a safety mechanism to
prevent weapons and alcohol from being carried into the stadium.
However, video footage showed that regulations were strictly
enforced at the two student entrances, while other entrances used
by alumni, faculty, staff and parents, were watched carelessly, if at
all. "My main concern is that students are being discriminated
against Student Government President Sam Witherspoon said.
Suicide attempts rise at UW
Campus security at the University of Wisconsin at River Falls
indicates an increase in the number of suicide attempts reported
over the past three years, although some university officials say the
numbers may not reflect an actual rise on the campus as a whole.
According to campus security's 1991 annual report, there were no
reported suicide attempts in 1989, three in 1990 and two in 1991.
There were no reports of completed suicides during those years.
Failed relationships, dysfunctional families and coping with the
added pressures of school all play a large role in a person's decision
to attempt suicide. "More often than not, there is intoxication or
some level of alcohol said Dan Ficek, a psychologist at the univer-
sity counseling center. "If suicide is already inherent in the mind
alcohol can take it to the next level of actually doing something
about it b 6
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
Correction;
The masthead editorial in the Nov. 17 issue of The East Carolin-
ian incorrectly described the procedure used for proposed changes
to the dropadd policy. A joint committee organized by the chair of
the Faculty Senate and the vice chancellor for academic affairs
proposed changes in the policy. Weapologize for any inconvenience
this error may have caused.
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(919) 758-9359 Call Bob or Sue for directions'
The final news
writers meeting
for
November
will be held
this afternoon
at 3:30.
If you don't
attend, I'll have
to forge your
paysheets.
Please
show up.
J.B.
Smokeout
The survival kit will con-
tain adoption papers, where
both individuals can sign prom-
ising to observe the Great
American Smokeout. The kit also
contains tips on how help a
smoker qui t for the day, changes
that a smoker's body goes
through during the day and
crossword puzzles to pass the
time.
Within 24 hours of quit-
ting, the changes a smoker's
body goes through are marked.
Within 20 minutes, a person's
blood pressure drops to normal,
their pulse rate also drops to
normal and the body tempera-
ture of their hands and feet in-
creases to normal.
Within eight hours, thecar-
bon monoxide level in a person's
blood drops to normal and the
oxygen level in blood increase
to normal. Lastly, after 24 hours,
a person's chances of having a
heart attack decrease. All ben-
efits are lost, though, if the per-
son smokes only one cigarette.
"We wiil provide informa-
tion and some materials to help,
but nonsmokers supply the win-
Continued from page 1
ning ingredient by showing The office of Health Pro-
their friends and co-workers motion and Well-Being will also
who smoke that they're con- startholdingsmoking-cessation
cerned and willing to lend sup- programs on a campus-wide ba-
port Tomkalski said. sis in the spring semester.
f
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3
TV
NOVEMBER 19, 1992
Lou Poirier,assistantdean tor
continuing education at Fort Hays
State University in Kansas, said his
school has a unique mission. The
university is located in western Kan-
sas, a rural area in which students
live up to 250 miles away from the
campus. "Distance is a major factor
that we are hying to bridge. Many
non-traditional studentscan't come
to campus he said.
The school has three pro-
grams. One involves interactive
video, which is just getting off the
ground, and an interactive audio
system at 37 sites in Kansas. The
sites, mostlyat community colleges
or public libraries, provide instruc-
tors and students with a two-way
audio capability.
The other instructional pro-
gram uses audio tapes that are
mailed to students with textbooks
and a syllabus. The student has ev-
ery thing tocompletethecourse and
may never see the professor, who
Continued from page 1
tapes an introduction to each class.
Poirer said tapes .ire used a a rein-
forcement for the books, and ,re
used with a study guide that indi-
cates when the tape should be
watered. Thev can call the instruc-
tor for questions and follow-ups.
The down side? "You do not
have the interaction. You are trad-
ing off for the flexibility and accessi-
bility for the course. The only way
you can get a higher education is
this accessibility Foirier said. "It's
a challenge dealing with such great
distances
There is a $20 charge to rent
each tape; for the interactive audio
and TV courses, there is a $29 fee
above the tuition. For example, a
three-hour undergraduate video
tape course would cost $180, plus what
the textbook costs.
The courses Fort Hays State Uni-
versity use are produced at Coastline
Community College in Orange County,
Calif.
Each tape costs about $1 million to
produce and takes up to two years to be
made, said Lois Havens, a business ser-
vices representative with the school. A
course usually hasabout 26 videos, which
works out to about two videos a week,
and suggested readings and astudy guide
for the student are provided.
Coastline Community College li-
censes its tapes to about 350 schools na-
tionwide. The tapes cover such topics as
psychology, human behavior, humani-
ties and marketing. Most of the courses
are taught by adjunct professors.
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Store Only. We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities. None SoTd To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps.
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TTie East Carolinian
November 19, 1992
Opinion
Page 4
Judicial records should be released
The Student Government Association has
called for ECU's Honor Board to partially re-
lease its judicial records to the general public.
Proponents of the release state that this
change will make the all-student Board more
accountable for its actions than they are pres-
ently. Records would be released in whole, with
the exception of persons' names being changed
to "victim" and "assailant Proponents have
also voiced concerns about the legal experience
of members of the Board and theboard'sbasisas
an isolated judicial system.
Opponents of the change, who include
Dean of Students Ronald Speier, say that the
judicial records of students are protected under
the Buckley Amendment. Under this amend-
ment, the Department of Education can with-
draw federal funding from any schools that
release educational records to the public.
Speier has also said that he would consider
releasing a list of Honor Board decisions, but
would not release any information that could
jeopardize the anonymity of those involved. He
also believes that the current system is open.
Articles Vlland VIII of ECU's Judicial Rules
and Procedures seem to effectively rebut the
Buckley argument. They state that judicial
records are kept separate from educational
records (VII) and that suspension or dismissal
notification is not part of a student's permanent
academic record (VIII).
Honor Board proceedings and records
should be open to the public and press. Cur-
rently, individuals are not allowed into the
meetings unless it is at the bequest of the defen-
dant. Speier has said that people may talk to the
plaintiff and defendant outside the meeting and
ask the defendant if they may enter. This conces-
sion is not enough.
Our country bases its national judicial sys-
tem, on a whole, on the concepts of freedom and
openness. If ECU is to be seen as a microcosm of
society and a precursor to life in the working
world, then steps must be taken to reflect all of
society, not just bits and pieces.
University life and college experiences
should not be a buffet of society. The ECU
administration should not pick and choose what
matters students will have to deal with. It is
understood that college students are of the age
to act maturely and responsibly. This responsi-
bility and freedom may not be deserved by
some few individuals, but the majority of the
public accept it as a norm.
YOU HAVE TO KEEP TEUJNG YOURSELF,
SOMEHOW GERMANY IS BETTER OFF
Quote of
the Day:
This is
a court
oflaw,
young
man, not
a court
of
justice.
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
By Amy E. Wirtz
THE BUCK STOPS HERE
By Mike Joseph pan 0f communism breeds hate, violence
'E Pluribus Unum' defeated by separation
(Editor's Note: This is part 2 in a
three-part series.)
Why do we, as a people, seem
condemned to endure racial strife
and conflict? Any attempt to fully
answer that question would be a
mammoth undertaking, and no
single answer will satisfy every-
one. Even so, we must at least try
to understand itif wehopetoever
get the most from our democracy.
Our nation bears the scars of a
racist past. The Cherokee Trail of
Tears, Chinese "Coolies" laboring
on our railroads, the despised Irish
immigrants of New York and sla-
very are all the most bitter of
memories. Americans who liber-
ated the victims of Nazi concen-
tration camps came face-to-face
with racism at its most profane,
and our heroic, hard-fighting black
soldiers who contributed to the
liberation returned home to seg-
regated drinking fountains and the
back of the bus. But the enlarged
view of the world they gained gave
rise, eventually, to the American
civil rights movement, which
brought us integrated schools, af-
firmative action, the Civil Rights
Act and more.
But one unexpected conse-
quence of improved social equal-
ity was greater individual respon-
sibility, and the shock of it pushed
many Americans into a segrega-
tionist mentality. It is much easier
to blame someone else for one's
problems than it is to accept them
asone's own doing. This failure to
accept individual responsibility is
at the core of the racial conflicts in
America.
Shelby Steele, a black profes-
sor of English at San Jose State
University, describes the use of
race to justify or explain failures
and hardships as "race-holding
He wrote that racism is on the
decline in America, but that hold-
ing to a sense of race-based inferi-
ority "prevents us from exploit-
ing our new freedom to t! - fullest
(and is) as serious a barrier to us as
racism once was
Benjamin Hooks, of the
NAACP, said in 1991 that "the
time for excuses is over Hooks
argued that blacks cannot solve
their problems by continually
blaming whites. Likewise, whites
cannot blame their failures on
affirmative action or the "welfare
minority
An example of the conse-
quences of failing to accept indi-
vidual responsibility is the growth
of a class of poor blacks (about 2-
3 million), who are the product of
what Senator Patrick Moynihan
calls a "post-marital" society
where two-parent families have
disintegrated. This group of
people is partly the product of a
welfare system that shattered the
idea of individual responsibility
by rewarding such irresponsible
behavior as unwed teen mother-
hood . Today, only about 6 percent
of black children can expect to live
with both parents until the age of
17. Over 60 percent of black chil-
dren are born out of wedlock, up
from about 24 percent in 1965.
Their communities are saturated
with crime and drugs, and any
PittCounty MiddleSchool teacher
can tell you that these kids are, to
say the least, dysfunctional.
When we seek to displace re-
sponsibility, we tend to cling to
any argument that supports our
effort. As a result, truth becomes
less important than impact. His-
tory books and the media are all
guilty of a skewed or biased view
of fact. For example, we forget
tha t by 1830, abou 11,556 free black
masters in the deep South owned
7,188 slaves. In the Pointe Coupee
Parish of Louisiana alone, one out
of four free black families in 1830
was a slave holder. We ignore the
fact, that by 1991, two-thirds of
blacks could be characterized as
middle-class, that most black vic-
tims of police shooting fall to black
cops, that a 1991 Urban Institute
study found that blacks on the job
market were treated equally 73
percent of the time and in some
cases (though not as often as
whites) received preferential treat-
ment. Nobody tells us that the
Supreme Court has not permi tted
affirmative action to infringe on
many whites' rights, or that a sur-
vey by the Metropolitan Chicago
Information Center found that a
higher percentage of blacks than
whites thought African-Ameri-
cans have less "inborn ability to
learn than whites
The point here is, that no one
group is all villain or all victim,
and that we are more alike than
we are different. But when we al-
low ourselves to remain ignorant
of the whole story, we become
susceptible to such preposterous
influences as the Bush "Willie
Horton" and Helms "White
Hands, Black Hands" political ads.
We become more motivated by
Sister Souljah (Lisa Williamson)
than by common decency. Whi tes
leave theirneighborhoods when a
black family moves in, and Spike
Lee won't talk to white journal-
ists.
The result is segrega tion, sepa -
ration and even violence. Author
and historian Arthur Schlesinger,
Jr wrote that "group separatism
crystallizes the differences, mag-
nifies tensions, intensifies hostili-
ties if separatist tendencies go
unchecked, the result can only be
the fragmentation, resegregation
and tribalization of American life
This is inappropriate for a nation
bound under the motto, "E
Pluribus Unum" (from many,
one).
If individual freedom is to be
of any value, it must be purchased
with individual responsibility, the
courage to face the truth and the
will to do what is right for all
people. The great experiment of
American democracy must not be
permitted to succumb to the eth-
nic and racial strife that is devour-
ing Russia,Germany, India, Leba-
non, etc.
We Americans are better than
that.
Part 3 of this series will pro-
pose a means through which we
can begin to combat the rising tide
of separatism in this country, and
work, instead, for a united future
for the United States.
The Bed in Wal I has long since
fallen and communism is on the
decline. These events herald free-
dom of expression, newfound
dabblings in capitalism and in-
tensenationalpride;all things that
communism held with a tight grip
and diminished with its power.
But this freedom brings with
it many problems for those who
lived under the rule of commu-
nism, some of which are unem-
ployment, resentment and humili-
ation. If anyone remembers, these
are exactly what gave rise to the
Nazis approximately 65 years ago
and are boiling again among the
16 million people of the eastern
part of Germany. Unfortunately,
the worst is still yet to come.
I find it very in teresting tha t it
is the collapse of the value sys-
tems that the people of Germany
and urban areas in Poland, Hun-
gary and both parts of Czechoslo-
vakia built up to cope with com-
munism that makes these nations
primed for extreme nationalistic
activities. I would think that with
the d i minished communistic hold,
there would be a feeling of relief
and peace, not a need for revenge
or catharsis.
Overall, the young people of
ex-communist countries have a
bleak, unknown future ahead of
themand areconstantly frustrated
with the stagnant nature of soci-
ety at this time. They believe that
their only outlets are depression
and aggression, which, in turn,
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Moniquc Campbell, Assistant Layout Manager
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Karen Greenwell, Systems Manager
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Bobbi Perfetti, Asa. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should be limited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity. The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Bldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
spark many violent attacks.
It seems that all systems in
these countriesare crumbling: the
economy, the schools, family, po-
lice, the legal system. Theseyouths
are now free to voice their con-
temp t for the communist past and
protest against the system that
undeniably brought about this
bleak situation in the wake of its
collapse. They have joined right-
wing ultranationalists who cel-
ebrate their identity as Poles, Hun-
garians or Germans. It is here that
they find their voice that for so
long was kept mute.
But, illogically, they blame
much of the social depression on
"foreigners They expected pros-
perity from unification and instead
found the poverty of strangers all
around them. These asylum-seek-
ers, and in some cases, students,
are accused of stealing jobs from
natives and creating problems in
the reformulation of national
unity. But these refugeesoftenonly
work in menial positions in the
underground economy, in jobs
that Germans don't want.
This all reminds me of the ir-
rational belief some of the people
in this country have that many
Mexican refugees, Asians and
other minority groups are steal-
ing away jobs from "good, decent
American folk Hardly. Too many
Americans would find migrant
farm jobs, assembly line positions
and McDonald'scashier work be-
low them. Yet this is exactly what
the Germans are accusing asylum-
seekers of doing.
Even before any of the violent
outbreaks, the idea of German
nationalism and national pride
was suppressed as a bad idea. But
after the Berlin Wall fell, some
people went looking for the last
German party that seemed to have
openly championed nationalism.
That was the Nazis.
Police estimate that nation-
wide, there are about 6,500 neo-
Nazi skinheads ina German popu-
lation of 80 million. Skins, for the
most part, say they are against
criminal elements. They tout them-
selves as benefactors to their
people and want to let these people
know that they are on their side.
However, one cannot ignore
the many violent acts that have
been committed by the hands of
skinheads. Their mistake is in the
belief that the non-German asy-
lum-seekers are at the crux of ev-
ery German problem. That is sim-
ply absurd. The problems of Ger-
many were set in place long ago.
To put blame on a handful of inno-
cent people is completely misdi-
rected.
Followers of Marxism would
call this a war of the poor against
the poorer, a concept better known
as capitalism. This is where the
real problem lies. We mustallfight
thehate thatbelieves in trampling
the weak. If not, we all, in turn,
become weak.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Student Pirate Club not to blame for football losses
To the Editor:
1 am writing in response to
Mr. Sember's letter to the editor in
the Nov. 3 issue where he blames
the football team's losses on the
Student Pirate Club coverage in
TheEast Carolinian.l feel hisclaims
are so ridiculous that it does not
even requirea response, yet I must
set the record straight.
Let me first say that it is fair-
weather fans such as you rself, Mr.
Sember, that the Pirate program
does not need nor want. I have
been involved with the Student
Pirate Club for the past three years
and i t is one of the finest and most
positive organizations on campus.
To blame us for the Pirates losing
a few more games than you like
shows your true ignorance. What
could our memberships and the
Pira tes losing a few games have in
common? Just because we offer a
chance to all student members to
purchase bowl tickets just like any
other Pirate Club member does
not mean we guarantee a bowl
game. To blame the coverage in
The East Carolinian is even crazier.
That is like blaming Santa Claus
for not getting what you want for
Christmas.
Sure we all want our team to
win, but being a true fan is about
more than just wins and losses. It
is about supporting your school
no matter what happens because
it is your school. In a transition
year such as this, let me remind
you that a winning season is noth-
ing to be ashamed of. Also the
majority of our teamis made upof
freshmen and sophomores. The
future is very bright for Pirate foot-
ball and the best is yet to come.
Before you stick your foot in
your mouth again and cause more
embarrassment to yourself, Mr.
Sember, I encourage you to be-
come a supporter of our fine uni-
versity.
Troy S. Dreyfus
V.P. Student Pirate Club
Political correctness alienates, panders American Indians
To the Editor:
I find Robert Todd to be a
very competent sports editor. I
don't think that he makes a very
good advocate for political
correctness.
How does the removal of an
institution's mascot or nickname
improve the plight of the Ameri-
can Indian? How does bringing
up a dead issue such as the
"tomahawk chop" bring dignity
to a proud Sioux or Seminole?
All it does is provide opportuni-
ties for soapbox spokespersons
to promote pity for a people who
deserve so much more.
Native Americans fought for
their heritage and their home-
'Indian" is
land. The nickname
not meant to
slander anyone.
It'sjust that the Ar-
kansas State Na-
tive Americans
doesn't sound
catchy. Plus, it's
too long. The name
"Indian" carries as
much pride as Pi-
rate does to us.
Where are the
mass protests over
Tennessee's mas-
cot, a Volunteer? Our country is
full of volunteers, but I don't hear
the same outcry.
This is simply silly political
The only way
to make this
world a better
place is to
change
people's
hearts.
correctness' attempt at censor-
ship. The only
way to make this
world a better
place is to change
people's hearts.
Don't alienate a
proud people
with the fragile
politics ofhate.Of
the Native
Americans I
know, they don't
appreciate being
pandered to that
way.
William Howerin
Communications
Junior






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November 19, 1992
Page 5
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
EDITORIAL NOTEBOOK
By Jim Shamlin
Sports teams' names meant to inspire, not degrade Socialism and freedom cannot be reconciled
To the Editor
Indians are not victims of
racism in the sports. The names
of teams were picked for
inspirational purposes � not
racism. Take the GTE commercial
on television for example: "Colts,
Lions, Buccaneers, Sea hawks.
After they chose their
inspirational names and so
on. The reason why teams like
Cleveland, Atlanta, Washington
and others chose to be an Indian
was because of the fighting spirit
of their culture and sense of
loyalty to one another.
Look at the ECU Pirates. Pi-
rates are despicable people who
steal and plunder and then some-
times murder their victims. Is this
what we are? We use the name
because it instills some fear be-
cause of our fighting spirit, not
because of what a pirate really is.
Another prime exampleare
the Fighting Irish of Notre Dame.
Is that not prejudice with a man
running around in a leprechaun
outfit? No. They use the spirit of
Irish people who oppose the En-
glish rule (or whomever the hell
they are fighting) and the lepre-
chaun as an icon for the school.
Another reason for naminga
team wasbecause of the location of
the team and school. We are near
the North Carolina inlets where
many pirates (such as Blackbeard)
anchored their boats and hid from
the law in the 16th, 17th and 18th
centuries. Look where
Washington, D.C Syracuse (to
use your example) and Cleveland
are. Lookatthese teams: Wisconsin
Badgers, Michigan Wolverines and
Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Look at
where they are located. Were there
any native blacks or Hispanics
living in America when the white
man came over? I think not.
Animals rights activists
should be in an uproar also. They
might say, "not all badgers,
wolverines, bears and seahawks
are ferocious. That's not
representing them correctly See
how ridiculous thisgets. If people
were truly racist, then when they
were choosing a name for their
team why would they want to be
called something they are not?
Would a young ball player who
might be a KKK member want to
join the San Antonio Spies or the
North Carolina Tar Babies? Get
real. If I were starting a college
and were racist, I sure as hell
would not want my mascot to be
of another color or race.
So the next time you go
flying off the handle, look at the
facts and then write about it. Be
more journalistic in the future and
putyoureditorialwhereit belongs
� on the editorial page. The
section you used is to discuss the
game and to preview the two
teams in detail. It is not to run
rough-shod over and definitely
not for your personal war on
anything.
Joshua M. Doepke
Media Performance
Junior
Reason behind cultural movement misunderstood
To the Editor:
I have many things I would
like to say to Mike Joseph, but 1
will limit it to just a few. First,
learn geography! Egypt and
Mesopotamia are miles apart.
Mesopotamia is located between
the Tigris and Euphrates rivers in
whatis present-day Iran and Iraq.
Egypt, well Egypt is on the
Mediterranean Sea, not even close
to Mesopotamia. The Fertile
Crescent is an area stretching from
the cradle of civilization in
Mesopotamia to the Nile River
valley, so while Egypt can be
considered part of the Fertile
Crescent, it is a distinctive region
when compared to Mesopotamia.
In ancient Egypt, there were
many black Egyptian nobles since
the entire continent of Africa,
North and South, tended to mix,
mostly through migration and
trade. Perhaps you will recall the
story of the Queen of Sheba who
met with Solomon and had at least
one child with him. The Queen of
Sheba, ruler of a glorious African
empire, was none other than the
Queen of Ethiopia. There are
current theories concerning the
birth of civilization and who the
ancestors of mankind were, so to
make broad generalizations that
African-Americansarenotenritled
to claim Egyptian descent is
incorrect. Also, if African-
Americans cannot claim
descendancy from the "supposed
origins of humankind wheredid
the Africans originate from? Or
better yet, what are they?
It seems that Joseph has
misunderstood, as have many
others, the reasoning behind the
new African-American cultural
movement. In order for a cultural
identity to be established, people
need to recognize their heritage.
This is easier for whites simply
because documents and records
were kept of their migration.
There are few records of the
African migration. Why? Because
Africans were forcibly taken from
their homeland and the people
who did this did not record the
names and addresses of each
person. Inspiteof this, the African
culture is a very rich one and
should not be diminished by
people who do not know
geography or history.
Inotherwords,ifyou intend
to write for an audience, learn
more about your subject and get
your facts straight.
Heather McAllister
Graduate
Maritime History
Return of traditional values would hinder AIDS threat
To the Editor:
If condoms are the answer,
it is only fair to ask if condoms
can really be trusted. The New
EnghmdJoumalofMedicinereports
in vol. 316, no. 21, that "condom
failure for AIDS virus
transmission ranges from 17
percent to 30 percent of
heterosexual couples over a two
yearperiod No would describe
as 'safe flying' an airline which
hadacrash rate of 17to30 percent.
Why the double standard when
it comes to sex? In truth, this
course of action is, at best,
temporarily lesslethal. Doubling
the time (four years), produces
an AIDS seroconversion rate of
from 34 to 60 percent. With time,
even morediligentcondom-using
non-monogamous persons or
those who sex associatesare non-
monogamous will contract AIDS.
Goerdert cites an AIDS
seroconversion rate of 17percent,
or one in six. This is the same
'safety' ratio as Russian roulette
playerswhoload a revolver. With
multiple sex associates, AIDS and
condoms, the achievement of death
is slower, though no less certain
And Dr. Robert Kolodny at
the Masters and Johnson Research
Organization has stated: "Apart
from absolute sexual monogamy
with a seronegative partner, there
is no such thing as safe sex As
early as the 1987 National AIDS
Conference, Dr. Lasse R. Brathen
said in his lecture session that: "The
main issue is that condoms have a
failure rate when it comes to
pregnancies of about 10 percent,
and a woman can get pregnant
only a few days each year, but
probably can be infected by the
virus every day throughout the
year. Safe sex does not exist We
all know that even latex condoms
with spermicide will not always
prevent pregnancy, and a sperm is
500 times larger than the HIV virus.
We have enough trouble stopping
sperm, let us not pretend that this
is an effective means of con trolling
HIV.
As human beings, we have
the unique ability to make moral
choices that affect our lives. I
believe this type of self control is
not only feasible, but it is a matter
of life and death. It is time for a
new sexual revolution�one that
stops buying into the lies our
generation has so easily gobbled
up. Remember � condoms fail,
abstinence never has.
I am not trying to get a kick
out of being the bearer of bad
news. Really, I gain no benefit
from anyone's moral behavior.
Thank you tor reminding us,
(David) Yarbrough, that the event
with (John) Harris was sponsored
by a Christian organization. No
oneartempted to keep this hidden.
Maybe they a re the only ones who
care enough and are bold enough
to talk about truth. Please realize
thatifthisnation would have held
to these traditional values, we
wou Id not have the large number
of people dying of HIV infection
in the first place.
Shane Deike
ECU Staff
American life seen as bleak without imposed order
To the Editor:
This is in response to
Richard Poteat's letter in The East
Carolinian on Nov. 5. Yes, it is
true, we could maximize personal
freedom by eliminating leaders.
The question is, would anyone
really want to? I have never
carefully considered what the
"founding fathers" intended for
this nation, and I do not actually
care to. When this nation was
formed, it was sparsely populated
and agricultural.
It isn't either of these things
anymore, so those plans could
hardly be realistic today. It may
sound odd, but there is a
subversiveelementin this society
(only one in 100, I'm sure) who
feel that there is more to be val-
ued in the world than personal
freedom. They actually make an
interesting point or two.
For instance, whileonedoes
usually have a right or freedom to
better oneself, one does not have
the right to better oneself at
another's expense. If this were not
true, there would be no incentive
to try to better oneself through
work, as it wou Id be easier to better
oneself through stealing, and there
would be no guarantee that one
could hang onto the product of
one's work. We must also value
the freedom of others to better
themselves.
Poteat's claim that America
is based on natural law is rather
interesting. False, but interesting.
Natural law is the lack of an order
imposed by an outside power. If
America were relly based on that,
we wou Id ha ve no need of a consti-
tution. Wild animals have lives
based on natural law, for example,
and they do fine without a consti-
tution. Thomas Hobbes described
that sort of life as, "poor, solitary,
nasty, brutish and short With-
out some kind of imposed order,
or leader, life gets very bleak.
There is no money, no agriculture
and no industry. There is also,
Mr. Poteat, no history.
I am not asking Poteat to
dispense with his tired old argu-
ment. It gives those of us who
know better something to do. All
I'd like him to do is consider the
impJicationsofwhatheproposes,
and see if it creates a world he
thinks anyone would enjoy.
Restrictions on freedom are not
designed to protect some inferior
element in our society, as Mr.
Poteat seems to think. Without
them, there would be no society.
Whether we admit itor not, weall
need the protection these
"leaders" provide.
Dennis Wilhelm
Senior
Philosophy
Response to the two-part
editorial on socialism that ran in
the Nov. 10 and 12 editions of The
East Carolinian has ranged from
obscene phone calls to published
editorials. Regardless of the
medium, the message has been
the same � there is a great deal of
protest, but littleactual refutation.
By and large, proponents of
socialism exalt it on the basis of
the "social goods" it provides. The
evidence, across the board, ispritna
facie. Thorough and conscientious
analysis demonstrates that every
social good necessitates a social
evil; in no case does the end justify
the means.
Proponents of socialized
medicine proclaim its virtues,
regardless of its past failures. In
an argument, they claim that the
crippled state of the Canadian
national medical program is the
result of transition � given time,
things will get better.
This is the same pathetic plea
President Bush used in reference
to the economy four years ago �
"wait and see In the meantime,
the economy steadily declined.
The same has happened and will
continue to happen with socialized
medicine. Conceded, Canada's
medical system is in a state of
transition � thedyingprocessisa
dramatic transition marked by
steady decay.
In the same style of ad
ignoratum argument, socialism's
proponents hail the victories of
European medicine � but what
victories are these? What major
medical advance has any
European, living in Europe, made
since the Curies' discovery of
radium (and that was before
socialism)?If the stateof medicine
in socialist Europe is so advanced,
then why do European researchers
come to America to seek funding?
Why do European medical
students come to America for thei r
training? Why isn't it the other
wayaround?
There is no logical answer to
these questions if one accepts the
premise of socialized medicine. In
fact, medical rrea tmentisshliavail-
ablein socialist countries only be-
cause they can feed, as parasites
do, off the living, growing state of
private sector medicine that exists
in the United States.
Most people are drawn to
socialism in an effort to preserve
human rights, claiming that
socialist programs help the needy
� but the help socialism offers is
only the temporary kind. From
the adage, "Give a man a fish and
he'll eat for a day; teach a man to
fish and he'll eat for a lifetime
socialism is giving away fish, and
this charity cuts both ways.
For society at large, feeding
the needy requires a constant
supply offish�a constant supply
of tax money to pay for their
temporary welfare. The socialists'
response to the problems of
homelessness and hunger is to
create a money pit, an expensive
short-term pa tch. Worse yet, it is a
growing concern, a state of
constant stagnation like the
economic conditions in the Roman
Empire prior to its collapse or in
modern-day Ireland, where the
needy outnumber the working.
For the individuals on the
dole, charity is a hand-out, not a
hand up from economic
stagnation. Those on the dole
remain on the dole. Food and
shelter, while necessary in the
short run, do not provide the skills
or initiative necessary to maintain
life. The ultimate outcome of
socialist "help" is decay � the
poor receiveonly their basic needs
� they are reduced to the level of
mere existence like animals in a
zoo. Civil rights leaders have often
criticized social programsasa form
of slavery�the rich man's way of
keeping the poor man down. How
can anyone call this a public
"good?"
The primary reason that
people fall into poverty in the first
place is a lack of survival skills �
skills a socialized educational
system failed to provide. Public
schools havealways been inferior
to private ones�and the funding
forpublicschoolingisdrawnfrom
taxes, lneffect, the average citizen
is f( ireed to pay for education in a
public school because the
governmenthasextorted payment
in advance.
EachsrudentatECU has paid
or will pay $5,000 per academic year
in taxes in addition to our regular
tuition � were that money under
ourown control, we would be free
to choose the benefit of a good
education,notforced toacceptthe
compromise of a mediocre one.
Even for the economically
disadvantaged, socialisteducation
closes doors � private
organizations, paying taxes for
public education, no longer offer
as many scholarshi ps as they used
to. Instead, the government uses
their money, dispensing it on the
basisofneed,soperformancegoes
unrewarded because funding is
available for the needy, not for the
able. The result is a high drop-out
rate among the needy who aren't
able, and the stagnation of the able
who were unable to find funding
because they didn't meet the
government's criteria for being
needy. This is the "public good"
of socialized education.
In the socialist mindset,
compromise is a necessity � if a
program is to exist as a parasite, it
must have a host. A "mixed"
economy, such as ours, shows the
dangerof that sort of compromise.
The state of the economy has not
been strengthened by the nflux of
socialist elements over the past 20
years � it has been weakened,
bled almost to death � and like a
dark ages alchemist, the peddlers
of socialism think the sickness can
be cured by bleeding society alittle
bit more.
If we are to revitalize our
country, or if we are to rebuild a
stronger nation in its ruins, we
must come to realize that there
can be no compromise between
socialism and freedom, whether
economic or personal. The only
compromise between life and
death is "dying" �and that is the
state of America today.
NEW WofM-p ORDEfc "
WZMB will
be out in front of
the Student Store
from 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. today broad-
eastinglive to sup-
port a petition
against the pro-
posed dropadd
changes.
Take some
time and make
your voice heard.
Sign the petition.
Don't let
changes at ECU go
on without the
students'consent.
L
Some of the Stupidest College Courses in America Ft. Ill
You don't have to leave America on some fraudulent foreign program to either eat chevre or take
ridiculous courses. Listed below are some actual courses you can take for credit from actual
American universities. So pop open a Grolsch, pick your schedule for the fall semester, and have that
worthless jumor-year-ahroad experience without waiting in a long line to renew your passport
Puppetry "Play production for the puppet
stage University of Connecticut
The Threat of Nuclear War�Looking for
Creative Responses "The topic will be
examined from a wide range of perspectives,
including factors generally in the forefront of
attention to nuclear arms and war, as well as
underlying dimensions of human existence that
bear upon them Brown University
What I Want. What I Can. How
individuals adapt to forces�social, political
and religious pressures for conformity,
demands from loved ones�that compel them
to alter their expectations Barnard College
Psychology of Close Relationships The
course will emphasize processes of
understanding, feeling, and communication in
love relationships and friendships Oberlin
College
Intimacy: How to Experience It and How to
Cope With Its Absence Sometimes
relationships end and it's hard to trust one's
self or another again Iona College
Seminar on States of Consciousness "A
consideration of conditions giving rise to
disruptions of awareness Vassar College
Religion and the Paranormal The course
attempts to acquaint the student with the
discoveries the science of psychical research
or parapsychology has made in the area of
ESP-telepathy, clairvoyance, and
precognition, PK-psychokinesis St.
Bonaventure University
Toward a Socialist America: Approaches to
Radical Change in Society "A collectively
taught and student-organized course, TSA
confronts the traditional character of teacher-
student relations by rotating teaching
responsibilities. The course challenges that
hierarchy, oppression and exploitation in
modern American culture with a variety of
critical analyses and alternative
proposals Projects have included guerrilla
theatre, community organizing and campus
activism Wesleyan University

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The East Carolinian
�NOVEMBER 19, 1992
Classifieds

F( )R RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 800 E. Wil-
low Street, 3 BR-1.5 Baths, $600 per
month. 1108 Forbes Street, 4 BR-2
Baths,$600permonth. 2608Tryon
Drive, 3BR-1 Bath, $550 per month.
1 YR lese and security deposit.
Duffus Rental 756-2675.
APARTMENT TO SUBLET: One
bedroom; $280 a month. 4 blocks
from campus. 2 can share. Avail-
able December 18. Lease ends in
May. Apt. 202 Kings Arms. Call
758-4366.
SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT for
mature person. Room, private
entrance, full house privileges. Call
after 4pm 756-5467.
NEED SOMEONE to take over
lease for two bedroom apartment
at Kings Row. Close to campus.
Bus service. $360mo. Call
7571613. Available now.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED spring semester '93 to
share apartment in Tar River pay
$150mo. l3utilitiesprefernon-
smoker who studies but likes to
socialize. For info call 757-1262.
ROOMS FOR RENT: If you are a
Returning Student or a Student 25
or Older: would you like torrent a
room in a two story home in a
lovely sub-division near campus?
Home owner is a professional per-
son who is also a part-time stu-
dent. Rent includes a private room
with bath, use of washer dryer,
kitchen privileges, in a upscale
kitchen with storage space, tele-
phone service, cabevision tv room
use and study room privileges.
This contemporary home setting
is serene and luxurious with sev-
eral fireplaces, and many large
windows overlooking wooded ar-
eas. Only serious minded stu-
dents need apply.250 Monthly
includes everything. Call 355-1830
formore information orinterview.
ROOMS FOR RENT: Furnished
Bed room - Brook Valley home, AC
utilities furnished. Private en-
trance, kitchen, washerdryer,liv-
ing-room privileges. Non-smok-
ing Graduate Student or profes-
sionals only. Available now on.
$195month 756-2027 M-F. "One
of Greenville's be6t mental" said
former tenant.
SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM
APARTMENT ACHeat, basic
cable, hot watersewer. Two
blocks from campus.$450mo. 1
yr. lease. Call 746-4169.
ROOMMATE - Non-smoking fe-
male roommate needed for ,2nd
semester. Large 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Bus avail. Rent 187.501
2 utijfties. Call 758-2549 or 758-
3092.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
3bedroom house. 14 rent ($140
month) 14 utilities. Deposit
negotiable. 5blocks from campus.
Call 758-6810 leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED: For
two bedroom one bath house
with two others. Two blocks from
campus and downtown. $116
month and 13 utilities. Call 758-
9862.
TAR RIVER-3 non-smoking male
roommates needed beginning
January 1st. Rent is $156 a month
plus 14 of the utilities. Located
on the river. Call Kevin France at
758-6701.
R( X )MMAIT WANTED
NEEDED to share one bedroom
apt. Rent $140 mo. 1 2 utilities.
Avail. Dec. 752-4616. Ask for Car-
rie.
FEMALE ROOMMATE N EEDED
by January 1st. Furnished 2 bed-
room apt. 1 mile from campus (on
ECU bus route). Must be a non-
smokerbutsocial drinker. $172.50
mth. 12 utilities. Please call 752-
1782. AliorKerri
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: To share a 2 bedroom
duplex. 1 block from campus.
$170month plus 1 2 utilities. Call
758-5845. Leave message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE N EEDED
to share 2 bedroom apartment for
Spring Semester. 12 rent and utili-
ties with free cable. Please call 321-
0435.
i orsali:
FEMALE
ROOMMATE
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Read
Residency Status and Tuition, the
practical pamphlet written by an
"attorney on the in-state residency
application process. For Sale: Stu-
dent Stores, Wright Building.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,truck?, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext. c-5999.
FOR SALE: SpieceCherryB.room
set. Moving-must sell! $395.00.
Call 946-9653.
FOR SALE: Oneway ticket leaves
Greenville Airport Nov. 25 4:00
pm and arrives at Dulles Airport
Nov. 25 7:23 pm. Change over in
Charlotte. Best Offer Call 321-
2145.
FOR SALE: Prince Graphite ten-
nis racket. Mid size with cover
and new strings, $90. Prince ten-
nis bag, holds 2 rackets and shoes.
Never Used, $30. Call 752-8816.
YARD SALE: Saturday Nov 21 at
7:00 am to 12:00 noon. Methodist
Student Center, 501 E 5th St. DO-
NATIONS WELCOME: Call 758-
2030 for more information.
BIKE FOR SALE: Earth Cruiser
(purple) Good condition. $125 or
best offer, includes lock and war-
ranty. Please call 321-0435.
FOR SALE 6' 3" and 6' 7" Action
surfboards $200 each (Neg.) Bur-
ton Snowboard $100 1989 model
155. RipCurl fullsuit Med.Tall $75
and spring suit Med 50 Pro-Lite
Board Bag fits up to 6' 10" boards
$45.
ELECTRIC GUITAR - 1988
Charvel. Top of the line $1100 gui-
tar. Excellent condition, terrific
sound, beautiful guitar. $450B.O.
AMP - 70 Watt Crate G40CLX.
Huge sound! $350B.O. Call Scott
758-2119.
CANNONDALE BLACK
LIGHTING, includes twoMaviric
wheels, two tublers (Sew ups),
campy peddles, sugino ap cranks
and extra gear. 21" 87 model $550
Must Sell. Call Robert Long 931-
8173.
SPA MEMBERSHIP-6monthsat
The Club women only. A deal that
simply can't be bought elsewhere.
ONLY$132.CallLindaat 757-3681
anytime.
HELP WANTED
GUARANTEED WORK AVAIL-
ABLE. Excellent pay for EASY
home based work. Full part-time.
Rush self-addressed stamped en-
velope: Publishers (G2) 1821
HillandaleRd.lB-295 Durham,NC
27705
S360UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Sparefull-time. Set own
HELP WANTED
hours! RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers (G1)
1821 Hillandnle Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
SAVE ON SPRING BREAK '93!
Jamaica,Cancun,and Florida from
$119.00. Book earl and save $$$!
Organize group and travel free!
Sun Splash Tours 1-800-426-7710.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
COACHES: The Greenville Rec-
reation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time
youth basketball coaches for the
winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the basketball skills
and have the ability and patience
to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people
ages 9-18, in basketball fundamen-
tals. Hours are from' 3:00 pm until
7:00 pm with some night and week-
end coaching. This program will
run from December to mid-Febru-
ary. Salary rates start at $4.25 per
hour, formore information, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at
830-4550.
SPRING BREAKERS - Promote
our FloridaSpring Break packages.
Earn MONEY and FREE trips.
Organize SMALL or LARGE
groups. Call Campus Marketing.
800-423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext.3712.
EARNSlOOOWEEKathomestuff-
ing envelops! For information,
send long self addressed stamped
envelope to CJ Enterprises, Box
67068L,Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44222
WANTED: Student with pickup
or van to travel from Northern
New Jersey to ECU. Need to get
dresser to school. WILL PAY! Call
Wayne at 758-5351.
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY! In-
dividuals and Student Organiza-
tions wanted to promote the Hot-
test Spring Break Destinations, call
the nation's leader. Inter�Cam-
pus Programs 1-800-327-6013.
WAITRESS AND CASHIER
NEEDED part-time,Good pay and
tips. Call 355-0143 after 6 pm leave
message.
EASY WORK! EXCELLENT PAY!
Assemble product at home. Call
toll free 1-800-467-5566 ext.5920.
IMMEDIATE OPENING forTyp-
istSecretarial person. Apply in
person between 9:00-5:00 Monday
thru Frinday at SDF Computers,
Inc 106 E. 5th St, 752-3694.
NOW HIRING Spring Breakers!
Greeks, organization, individuals.
Earn cash, FREE TRIPS and party.
Call Joe ENDLESS SUMMER 1-
800-234-7007.
AFTER SCHOOL SITTER for 2nd
and 3rd grader. Tar River neigh-
borhood. Begin Jan.4th. Hours2:30
- 5:00 M-F. Non-smoker. Own
transportation. Responsibilities
include helping with homework
and transporting to special
activites. REFERNCES RE-
QUIRED. Ca 11830-9458 or 757-1163
after 5.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Alaska Summer
Employment
FISHERIES - Students Needed! Earn $600
per week in canneries or $4,000 per month
on fishing boats, free Transportation! Room
and Board! Over8,000openings. No experience
necessary. Male or Female. Get a head start on
summer! For your employment program call:
1-206-545-4155 Ext. A5362
Student Employment Services
Achievement Through Adventure
StufcnuwittajigtowcrtiiiAUilLtimiMl ��
eighteen or oldtf aid in good pnyucal caidmon "
SERVICES OFFERED
"SPRING BREAK . Bahamas
Cruise (10 meals) $279! Panama
City with kitchen $119! Cancun
$429! Jamaica $479! Daytona
(kitchens) $149! KeyWest $249!
Prices increase 121192! 1-800-
678-63-86
GUARANTIED FREE SPRING
BREAK TRIP to Bahamas or
Panama City! Cancun, Jamaica,
Daytona, Keys! Sign-up before
121192! Springbreak! 1-800-678-
6386.
QUALITY WORD PROCESS-
ING: Specializing in letters, re-
sumes, business and medical tran-
scription term papers, thesis,
manuscripts. Anything that needs
to be typed. Dictaphone transcrip-
tion available. Call 321-2522
MOBILE MUSIC PRODUC-
TIONS jams with ECU Greeks
Top 40, Dance, Alternative, Rap,
Classic Rock, Beach, Country,
we've got it all. Call early for book-
ings. 758-4644. Ask for Lee.
DEPENDABLE, CERTIFIED
BABY-SITTER looking for kids to
baby sit! Very outgoing and ener-
getic, can work most afternoons
and evenings (even weekends)!
Also CPR certified. Call Dana at
931-7825 or at the East Carolinian,
757-6366 any time.
RESUMECOMPOSITION AND
TYPESETTING SERVICES! 10
discount on student packages if
you mention this ad! Laser printed
and stored on disk! The Write
Resume, 105 Oakmont Drive 756-
0697.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subject
Order Catalog Today with VbaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FRIE
HOT LINE
in Calif. (213) 477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to Raaoarch Information
11322 Idaho Aw. iMfrA, Lot Angles, CA 9002S
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY!
SPRING BREAK
HOW ABOUT IT IN THE
BAHAMAS OR FLORIDA
KEYS. WHERE THE PARTY
NEVER ENDS. SPEND IT ON
YOUR OWN PRIVATE YACHT.
ONE WEEK ONLY
$385.00 PER PERSON
INCLUDES FOOD AND MUCH
MORE
EASY SAILING YACHT CHARTERS
1-800-760-4001
Quorum
Opportunity Knocks
Over 93 of homes, vehicles
and people need security. Now it
is simple and affordable. Tech-
nological breakthrough makes
this the opportunity of the 90's.
Person to person sales in a
dynamic network marketing
plan. No inventory requirements.
First class marketing and
training support.
Seiul resume to:
P.O.Box 2393
Hcivelock. NC 28532
or call:
(919)444-1221
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: GOLD CHARM brace-
let on Halloween night, in the
downtown area. Sentimental
value. Reward offered. Call
758-5096.
LOST: BLACK CHOW. 312
months old. Bells Fork area.
Call Laura 355-7375, 757-4650.
PERSONALS
KRISHANMURTI Study Group
beingformed. Areyouinterested?
Evenings, 756-0429 Ask for
ATTENTION ALL NEW AND
tSONALS
OLD ORDER OFOMEGA MEM-
BERS: There will be a meeting for
all members on November 22 in
Mendenhall room 221 at 5:00. This
will be the last meeting at which we
will hold initiations this semester.
Please attend and bring a can good
for a Thanksgiving basket. If you
can not attend or still owe dues call
Jenny at 758-5024.
TALL, GOOD LOOKING SWM
runner in mid 30's looking to meet
attractive SWF runner, same age or
younger, to run with, goto running
races, and maybe even date. Have
great sense of humor, otherwise
would not be running this ad. En-
joy rock'n'roll, going to dinner,
working out, traveling to races, big
events, and staying young. Like to
treat women well. Send name and
photo to Runner, 1968-C Quail
Ridge Rd Greenville, NC 27858.
WRITERPHILOSOPHERMU-
SICIAN and poetic soul seeks
friendship and correspondence
from like-minded lady. Photos and
letters to MV PO Box 8663, Green-
ville, NC 27835.
TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE
star; put a tux on CR! Formal
weekend's almost here Time for
champagne and lots of cheer! Your
Big Sis' Susan.
BOLI'S, IT WAS Sunday night
and everyone was thinking about
class. We should have been study-
ing but that's all right, we'll pass.
The National Executive Director
was down, "Excuse me Miss, an-
other round Everything was go-
ing great, everything was going
swell until Justus told us there was
no more beer in the well. Then it
was 12 and they kicked us out,can't
wait until next weekend,you'll find
out. The Brothers of Kappa Delta
Rho.
SIGMA NU:Westeppedintoyour
really cool place, to find all of you
guys with smiles on your face. The
social was great, we all had a ball.
Let's get togetheragain,just give us
a call! Gamma Sigma Sigma.
ALPHA SIGMA PHI: It all started
out on a cold Friday night; we sat in
front of the TV watching Bowie and
Holyfield fight. Then down to PW
most of us did go. Too bad some of
the fellas turned out to be no shows.
Tail gate was fun, there's not a thing
we did hate. It was nice seeing old
alumni, you guys are really great!
Lovealways,GammaSigmaSigma.
TIM CAMBELL: Thank you for
representing us in Greek God and
Congrats on 2nd runner up. Love,
Alpha Phi.
KAPPA SIGMA, DELTA CHI, and
Alpha Xi Delta: We had and awe-
some time at the socia 1 Frid ay night.
Let's do it again soon! Love, Alpha
Phi.
PI DELTA: Hope everyone's ready
for formal this weekend! Virginia
Beach here we come
PIRATE FOOTBALL TEAM: We
wish you lots of luck this weekend!
Love the Sisters and Pledges of Pi
Delta.
PI DELTA: Whose going to be
Page 7
PERSONALS
your "mister" tonight? Can't wait
to find out!
SIGMA PHI EPSILON: Thanks
for an awesome tailgate party. You
guys are great, Let's do it again
sometime. Love, The Sigmas.
TO ALL FACULTY we'd like to
thank you for all your hard work
in order to help us fulfill our
dreams and goals. Have a great
week. Sigma Sigma Sigma Soror-
ity.
PHI KAPPA PSI soccer: Congratu-
lations on an undefeated regular
season. Kick some ass in the play-
offs. Go Phi Psi
KAPPA SIGMA: We had a great
time Friday night partying with
you. Alpha Phi and Delta Chi!
Thanks for inviting us. Love the
Sisters and Pledges of Alpha Xi
Delta.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: Had a
terrific time last week at the Celeb-
rity Social. Let's do it again real
soon. Love Delta Sig.
WILL RHODES: Thanks fo be-
ing our representative at theGreek
God. Congratulations on getting
the Best Legs award! Love Alpha
Delta Pi.
CONGRATS TO THE Alpha
Omicron Pi A volleyball team on
a great season and to the B team on
a great, Well FUN season, Love,
your Sisters and Pledges.
CHRIS WRIGHT: you'll always
be our Greek God! Thanks for
supporting us Love Alpha Omi-
cron Pi.
DELTA SIGMA PHI pledges:
Thanks for supporting us for the
walkathon. Good luck tonight.
Hope everything goes well. Love,
Delta Zeta Pledges.
ALPHA OMICRON PI: The
weekend is over and we're all still
here, even after all of our good
cheer! The Elbo and Lambda Chi
made sure Fri was no bore, let me
just say -JANA- need I say more.
Then Sat started early, but no one
seemed to mind -Merredith,
where were those tickets Kate just
couldn't seem to find. And a spe-
cial thanks to those certain guys
for all of the pre-game fun, from
the looks of Nancy it was a job
well done. And when the game
was over, the party never stopped,
even Ashley was out and that you
just can't top! And looking back,
the weekend went so fast, another
crazy home football season left to
the past.
CONGRATULATIONS to Brian
Hannon for being crowned Al-
pha Xi Delta's Greek God 1992
Thank you for those who partici-
pated in Greek God and Congratu-
lation to: Chris Wright- 1st Run-
ner up, Tim campbell-2nd Run-
ner up. Will Rhodes- Best legs,
Brian Wood-Best butt, Rob
Scaliese-Best smile, Steve Hawk-
Best Eyes also, thanks to the
judges, Lem Cambell, Mary
Marszalek, Michelle GibbsHey
stage fright) Steve Hawk (Alpha
Xi's Rep) and Julie Vanderburg
(Hey AZD of the week!).
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Good locations. Reasonable renl
Call 752-8320 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX- Brand new and
ready to rent immediately. Great location, close
io campus. Call 752-8320 from 9:00 am to 5:00
pm, or 355-4826 after 6:00 pm.
i' ' :
Announcements
GREENV1LIF ARFA RI.
SEXUAL-GAY-IFSRIAN
GROUP
Group activities and discus-
sion of issues relating to same-
sex orientation. Meetings are
closed. Call 757-6766 11:00-12:15
Tues. and Thurs. or 1:00-4:00 pm
Wed. for information.
NEWMAN CATHOI If
STUDENT CFNTFR
The Newman Catholic Student
Center invites you to worship
with them. Sunday Masses: 11:30
am and 8:30 pm mass at the
Newman Center. 9bJ E. 10th St
two houses from the Fletcher Mu-
sic Building. For further informa-
tion, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth
757-1991.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FFI
LOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in social
and service projects? Need a ref-
uge from time to time? Campus
Christian Fellowship may be what
you are looking for. Our Weekly
meetings are at 7 pm Wednesdays
at our Campus House located at
200 E. 8th St directly across Co-
tanche St. from Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. Eveyone is welcome.
For more information, call Tim
Turner, Campus Minister, at 752-
7199.
ECU EQUESTRIAN n 1IR
TEAM
There will be a meeting on
Thursday November 19 in MSC
Room 14 at 5:00 pm. Anyone in-
terested in joining the Equestrian
club or team should be there. No
riding experience necessary call
Angela 931-8453 or Holly 931-8762
for info.
PERFORMING ART SFRIFS
The Waverly Consort will per-
form theChristmasStorvon Mon-
day, November 30, 1992 at 8:00
pm. In this Christmas play based
on Medieval manuscripts, eight
singers and five instrumentalist
enact the message of the archan-
gel Gabriel, the journey of the
Magi, the scene of the manger in
Bethlehem, the intrigue of Herod
and his court, and celebrate"
Christmas in drama and song
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will be meeting
Thursday, November 19th at 6:30
pm. The meeting will be held at
Chico's Restaurant. All Phi Eta
Sigma members are encouraged
to attend. For more information,
please contact the Vice-President
at 752-5792.
ECU SCHOOL of MUSIC
EVENTS
Tues Nov. 17 � Kurt
Schmiemann, tuba and Alisha
Hudson, trumpet, Senior Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall,7:00pm,Free).
Wed NOV. 18 �- Contemporary
Jazz Ensemble; Paul Tardif, Direc-
tor (Fletcher Recital Hall, 8:00 pm.
Free). THUR NOV. 19 � ECU
Guitar Ensemble;Carroll V Dashiell,
Director (Wright Auditorium, 8:00
pm, Free). SUN NOW. 22 � ECU
Symphony Orchestra; Mark Deal,
Guest Conductor (Wright Audito-
rium, 3:00 pm, Free).
NINPQCLUP
Ninjutsu is made up of the
methods for striking and grap-
pling in unarmed fighting, tum-
bling and breakfalls, condition-
ing the body and maintaining
health. Relying on natural fluid
body movement and scientifi-
cally applied dynamics, allows
this martial art to be adaptable
and effective for all individuals.
The focus of the club will be on
traditional and modern day self-
defense situation. Training times
are Monday - Thursday at 9:30
pm in CHRISTENBURY GYM
Room 108. All who are inter-
ested are welcome to attend.
f I






The East Camlhrim -
November 19, 1992
Lifestyle
Page 8
Maniacs
Cameron to sleep
By Adrienne Jackson
Special to The East Carolinian
Sundaynight 10,000 Maniacs graced
fans at Duke University's Cameron Au-
ditorium with their presence.
Ticket sales were incredibly low,leav-
ing more than half
the auditorium The conceit experience . . . could
Even hiive been better achieved listen-
ing to 10,000 Maniacs CDs at
whole new sound to their music.
The slower songs "My How You've
Crown"and "Jezebel" left the crowdwith
low energy and no excitement. Luckily
they followed these slower, sleep pro-
ducing melodies with,in upbeat tempo in
"Candy Everybody Wants Still, thiswas
enough to
Cultural
Awareness
continues
By Bobbi Perfetti
Assistant lifestyle Editor
though the turn-
out was disap
pointing, 10,000 home and watching 'The Andy
Maniacs treated Griffith Show
the fans to a some- �
not
awaken thedozing
Duke crowd.
By the time the
energy had
reached its meager
apex, the band was
�� Pholo by Dail Reed
Natal.e Merchant, vocalist and lyricist for 10,000 Maniacs, lulled the Cameron
Auditorium audience with her subtle, yet powerful, voice. Cameron
w hat-lively performance.
They opened with "These Are Days"
off of their newest album, Our Time In
Eden, released in earlyOctober. The flash-
ing lights that lit the stage and the back-
ground of flowering tapestries produced
an eye-pleasing effect but not enough to
leave me truly impressed.
The fans had an obvious affinity for
the band's older material. "Campfire
Song' hyped the audience up during the
first part of the concert Older songs Mich
as "You Happy Puppet" and "hat For
Two" went over better than their new,
less-familiar material.
These songs produced an energy in
the crowd, but the energy wassoonlostas
the slower, lulling melodies such as
"Noah's Dove" took over.
One thing unique about the newer
material is the incorporation of string
woodwind, and brass instruments. The"
violin, saxaphones and trombone
;ave ,i
Off the stage wait-
ing for the croud to cheer them on for an
encore performance.
Singer Natalie Merchant came back
on the stage and sang her rendition of
"I'm Looking Over a Four Leaf Clover"
and then started right in to "Rose's Wed-
ding Day" during which she threw roses
to the crowd.
Having toured with, REM, the band
did their rendition of "Don't Go Back to
Rockville The fans loved it. They also
performed a little-known Morrissev
cover. The encore was perhaps moreen-
tertainingthan theiroriginal performance.
10XJOOM iniacsattack issues that are
becoming increasingly important a soci-
ety becomes educated -poverty, politics
and pollution - using elegantly written
lyrics as a medium.
I he concert experience from Sunday
' have been better achieved
sterling to 10,000 Maniacs CD's at home
and watching TheAndyGriffithShow
night c
This week is Cultural Awareness
Week, sponsored by the Student Union
Minority Arts Committee. Dancers,
music, speeches and movies will all be a
part of this program, at no cost to stu-
dents.
Sandra Garcia, chairof the Minority
Arts Committee, hopes to bring a little
hit of each culture seen on campus to the
students. The programs this vear ad-
dress African, Hispanic and' Native
American cultures.
"The programs are for all students
Garcia said. "Wewanttopromoteaware-
ness for all cultures
Monday, an African storyteller,
ObakunleAkinlana,cametoMendenhall
to shed light on his culture. Tuesday
afternoon brought the Spanish band Los
V lajeros to the front of Mendenhall.
Mondayevening there was a showing of
Mississippi Mnsnln, portraying Denzel
Washington in a relationship with a
American Indian woman.
Wednesday, between noon and 1
p.m Native American dancers and one
Costa Ricandancer tripped the light fan-
tastic in frontof Mendenhall. One of the
Native American dancers,Steve Wharton
isa student at ECU. He performed down-
town at the International Festival re-
centlj , where he was discovered for this
week'sprogram.TheCostaRicandancer
See Cultures page 9
Tassenger 'Siege' bear poor similarity
r� o Photo courtesy Stardoq Records
Dave Burns Danny Chavis, Daniel Cha�1Sand Man in Lev, o Z vZ
wH bang h, �,de variety of influences and music .0 .he Attic tonigt.
Chapel Hill-based
Veldt to play the Attic
By John Bui lard"
Staff Writer
Tonight, the Veldt takes the stageat
the Attic in support of their new E.P
Marigolds.
The new release reinforces an al-
ready-strong reputation within the
W( rld i alternative rock.Marigoldsoon-
tinues tlie band's tradition of hip-hop
Brit-pop and has again drawn high
marks for the Veldt.
The band's first national spotlight
camein January of '91,when5pinmaga-
zine gave the Veld t a fuII page write-up
in lieu of the many same ol same ol'
southern influenced rock bands.
Likewise, the article did much to
spawn the recent interest in the Chapel
Hill music scene, which the band helped
to foster before moving north to New-
York City.
Twins Darnel and Danny Chavis,
drummer Marvin Levi, and bassist Joe
Boyle make up the Veldt lineup. They
met and organized in Chapel Hill and
then promptly burst into the local lime-
light The band was, and continues to
be,a refreshing sound to themultitudes
of Southern ra k bands that plague lo
Gil bars
"We're not into that Southern
rock sound like Mitch Easter and
REM said Levi in Spw's article.
That's all very good tor picking
a)ttin, but thr isedays,rv i ver
From the sound of Marigolds,
thJsattitodesuTlprevailsandismore
than apparent. Recent articles and
reviews,alllaudatDry,liken the band
tovariousgroupsincludingSiouxsie
and the Banshees, the (j ctea u Twins
and more. Attributing mostly Brit-
ish and reggae bandsas influences,
the Veldt still gives flashes of simi-
larity of bands within this country's
borders.
Marigolds, with its nine tracks,
encompasses v. ide range of influ-
ences and music This creates .1 dis-
tinctly unique sound.
ThefirsttJ k 1 "( CCPimme-
da hgi tethingsgoingontheE P
whi h has the oherence of a full-
length album he Stoops to Con-
cuer"in, luck h 1 .� anc
thrashing guitai n mind one
of the Washington, D.C,n k 3 ui i i
By Ike Shibley
Staff Writer
It the trailers for Warner
Brothers' latest two movies, "Un-
der Siege" and "Passenger 57
are watched back-ti-back, a strik-
�ngsimilarity willbenoticed. Both
previews sketch the basic plansof
hi jackersinoverly-mekxlrama tic-
tones.
When viewed together, "Un-
der Siege" and "Passenger 57"
look like the si me movie. Onlv
the locations and the names have
been changed to protect the inno-
cent.
Thesimilaritiesbetween these
two films are numerous. Both in-
volve hijacking � "UnderSiege"
ofa battleshipand "Passenger57"
of an airplane. Both have the hero
help a beautiful female who, in
turn, later helps save the hero.
Boil-1 hijackers are demented.Both
the hijacker and the hero in both
films are, according to the press
nots, "essentially the same per-
son Bom heroes have grown
ti red of being heroes and v ant to
retire.
Bom films have credibility
gaps large enough to sail a battle-
ship, or to fly a DC-10, through.
Both filmsaremiJdly entertaining
but formulaic. And neither film
warrants a recommendation.
"Under Siege" is probably the
better of the two films, although
choosing between them isliketn, �-
ing to decide if Andre the Giant is
abetterwrestterthanHuflcHogan.
In "Under Siege Steven
terrorism expert Little does
Cutter know that Charles Rane
(Bruce Payne), an expert terror-
ist, is being transported on the
plane to LA. to stand trial for
two hijackings. Soon the DC-10
is under Rane's control and onlv
Cutter can help to regain control
and save the lives of the passen-
gers
Kane's actions are well-de-
fined: he wants toescape from a
death sentence. Although the
reasonshe hijacked other planes
Seagal playsCasey Ryback,anex
Navy Seal who is now a axk on
the L'SS Missouri. The Miss mri
makes its final voyage from Pearl
Harbor to San Francisco, and is
destined to have its nuclear war-
heads removed. Then it will be-
come a museum in San Francisco
Bay.
William Strannix (Tommy Lee
lones) has different plans for the
Missouri's warheads. Heplans to
hijack the ship and sell the weap-
ons to the highest buhk-r. He has
the akieofConimanderKrill (Gary
Busey), an officer on the Missouri
who betrays and kills his cap-
tain so that the takeover of the
vessel can be completed. When
all the crew is pi,iced in thefore-
castle, only Ryback is free to stop
the hijacking and save the crew.
In "Passenger 57 Wesley
Snipes pla s ohn Cutter, an ex-
anti-terrorist who semi-retired
when he watched his wife get
killed ina robbery. Hisold friend,
SlyDelvecchio(TomSizemore),
Las convinced Cutter to "get
back in the game Cutter de-
ddestoflytoLosAngeleswhere
become an airline anti-
See Passenger page 9
-�l ' �uicrtiiu- seenassenger!
BluegrassJ?and originates on campus
By Claudette Peale Although E.C. Grass Dlavs mostly nri�a� ,iit�, aia � . .
e Veldt page 9
By Claudette Peale
St.i f Writer
ECU has a new sound generated by
fi Kir students who makeup E.C (Irass.
Pheirbluegrass sound isalready gain-
ing a small following on campus as well as
in the local community.
E-CGrass is made upof: David Farrior,
mandolin, fiddle, and dobro-blues guitar-
Scott Joyner, guitar and lead vocals;Travis
I' yner, bass, ,�-�nick Williams 5-strine
1,� t-
anjo.
Itall started just overa year ago, when
Farrior met Scott Joyner in theirdorm.They
soon got Williams and rravis oyner to-
gi ther.
After playing togetreronenight in their
room, Farrior came up with the idea that
they should forma band.
Since then, things have n . n steadih
upwards for E.C Irass.
If we didn't love this, we
wouldn't do it
thoughECGrassplaysmostlyprivate ditionalbluegrasstogospeltoEaeles'covers
funcbons,theyhaveappearedoncampussev- to a few originals g
eral times.
1 . , llu'ir tlr tape, A Decked Out will be
Last vear, they played at Barefoot on the available in a few weeks
U,ll and were rheStudent Union'sOpen Mic ,lljv considered recording
lrussoonFarrior
said. "It was to-
tally fan
prompted
As for the fu-
ture of the band
no one seems to
know where they are headed.
Ifwedidn tlovethij,wewouIdn'tdoit.
We'll be around as tongas we can be Wil-
liams said.
"li we do go our separate ways, we'll
probably end up back together again Scott
(oyner said, optimistically.
� u would likea copy oMZDecforii
vv�te to E.C. Irass al � iummil Si
S58.
winners. They
played at
Mendenhall
on Halloween
night.
E.C. Crass cm also be found playing ev-
ery second Saturday of the month at Lenoir
Community College.
"We're trying to get across to people that
bluegrassisnotred-neckillbillymusic'Scott
oyner said.
i c . Crass describes their sound as 1
gressiveao usri music.
"What we really try to work on is our
harmony. We have a very tighl foui
harmony ! ravis o nersaid.
Their hi sconsi tt if am
� buck Williams,
5-stringbanjo





9 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 19,1992
Cultures
Continued from page 8
is an exchange student studying
English at ECU.
Today the Multicultural
Group Fair will be held in the
Multipurpose Room at
Mendenhall from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. At8 p.m Women on the Verge
of a Neroous Breakdown will be
shown in the Great Room. This
Spanish film was released in 1988
and runs with English subtitles.
The Minority Arts Commit-
tee is a part of the Student Union
here at ECU. Not only does the
Committee hold Cultural Aware-
ness Week, but it is also respon-
sible for the candlelight march
for Martin Luther King's birth-
day and is a sponsor of one of the
bands for Barefoot on the Mall.
Their biggest event this year,
called "Songs of My People will
beheld in February, which is also
Black History Month. This pro-
gram will show slides of African-
Americans in different parts of
our country.
Garcia welcomes the partici-
pation of all students in the pro-
grams held this week and all
events that the Committee will
hold in the future. She encour-
ages students to speak to the
members of the Committee and
offer any of their ideas for cul-
tural programs.
Veldt
Continued from page 8
Amazingly, the E.P. (it's hard
not to call it an album) reaches a
climax with "Pleasure Toy" and
"Tinsel Town These two tracks
show just what The Veldt are ca-
pable of: a tight burst of energy that
leaves nothing to be desired.
"Pleasure Toy" proclaims
asoundthatatonceremindsoneof
the Bad Brains and the controlled
tautness of English rock "Tinsel
Town" furthers the twenty-some-
thingdisillusionment theme, which
runs throughout Mnoife, with the
refrain: "My Tinsel Town so full of
empty headsWheredowego from
here?Baby 1 don't know"
Marigolds, having cata-
pulted us into another surreal at-
mosphere, then ushers the listener
backdown toearth withease. "Wil-
low Tree" and the last of three
instrumentals places us firmly on
the ground and strongly convinced
of the Veldt's talents.
ThisnewEJP.should make
an already great live show even
better. The only comparison that
canbedrawn istothatof the shows
of such bands as Ride and Lush.
It's strong ly recommended
that you get Marigolds.
Sit back, take the trip and then
go get your legs moving to a sound
and a band that are on the brink of
big, big success.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
STUDENTS AND FACULTY
CONCERNED ABOUT YOUR PERSONAL
SAFETY ON & OFF CAMPUS?
A Special Presentation On Personal Safety
Will Be Held at the
Greenville Hilton Inn Ballroom
Monday, November 23, 1992 at 7:30PM
This is a FREE presentation, Everyone is Welcome
LIMITED SEATING - GROUPS CALL FOR RESERVATIONS
Call-(919)444-1221
Nothing Is
Beneath Us.
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WHY A NURSE
ANESTHETIST SHOULD
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INTHEARMYRESERVE.
The reasons are quite clear.
� Leadership. Working with
our professional health care
team affords you many oppor-
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� Continuing Education.
Such opportunities in the Army
Reserve are an important part
of a nurse's career path.
� Professional Exposure.
Greater exposure to top health
care professionals, with oppor-
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and ideas.
There are other reasons, of
course, and our Nurse Recruiter
can discuss them with you. Find
out why Army Reserve Nursing
is for you. Call:
1-8006627473
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
ARMY RESERVE
Passenger
Continued from page 8
are never clarified, his intense de-
sire to successfully complete this
hijacking is understandable.
Neither Rane nor Strannix and
Krill command the attention that
other screen villains have done. In
"Under Siege" and "Passenger57
the heroes only confront the hijack-
ers in several isolated incidents that
lack intensity.
The use of women in both films
is sexist. Erika Eleniak in "Siege"
and Alex Datcher in "Passenger
seem scripted only to providea dis-
traction from the holes in these
movies' plots.
"UnderSiege"and "Passenger
57" are to movies what Harlequin
romancesare to books. Both of these
films providea reasonable amount
of entertainment.
Who's There?
Attic
Thursday
Veldt and Gravity's
Pull
Friday
Billy Clubfest and
Egypt
Saturday
Chairmen of the
Board
New Deli
Thursday
Headstone Circus
Friday
' �Ml
Doolittle
Saturday
Emperors of Ice
Cream
CRocks
Friday
Spawn, Killkids,
Flatsided Buffalo
Saturday
Lucy Brown, What God,
King Pin
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If you're going to any out-of-town
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Memphis State game Nov. 21
in Liberty Bowl Stadium. Make
your plans now. Swing in Friday
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J Square. Eatin milling, listening
and grazing. Crash late Saturday, beat your feet on
Mud Island, see the Pyramid, Graceland, a little
milk and cookies, whatever. Then the game and
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The East Carolinian
November 19, 1992
Sports
Page 10
ECUv. Memphis State
Memphis State University
1991 record: 5-6-0
Primary offense: Pro-set
Primary defense 50
Lettermen returning, lost: 49,12
Head Coach: Chuck Stobart (Ohio Univ
'59)
Record at school: 16-26-1
Career record: 56-74-3
General Information
Location: Memphis, Term.
Enrollment: 21,500
Colors: Blue and Gray
Conference: Independent (Independent
Football Alliance)
Stadium: Liberty Bowl Memorial Rex
Dockery Field (62,380)
Surface: Grass
1992 Schedule (5-5)
Sept. 5 lost to Southern Miss, 21-23
Sept. 12 lost to Louisville, 15-16
Sept. 19 lost to Miss. State, 16-20
Sept. 26 def. Arkansas 22-6
Oct 10 def. Cincinnati, 34-14
Oct. 17 def. Arkansas St 37-7
Oct. 24 def. Tuba, 30-25
Oct. 31 def. Tulane, 62-20
Nov. 7 lost to CHe Miss, 12-17
Nov. 14 lost to Tennessee, 21-26
Nov. 21 EAST CAROLINA
NCAA STATISTICAL RATINGS
INDIVIDUAL STATS
EAST CAROLINA
Michael Anderson: Total Offense-7th,
Morris Letcher: All purpose rushing yard-
age- 23rd
Receptions Game- T47th
Greg Grandison: Interceptions- TISth
JuniorSmith: Rushing Yards Came- 28th
MEMPHIS STATE
Joe Allison: Field Goals Game- 1st Scor-
ing-6th,
Russell Copeland: Receptions Game-
T16th
Punt returns- 31st
Jeff Buffaloe: Punting- 10th
Steve Matthews: Pass Efficiency -24th
(
Rob's Pick
Bucs will have to fight to finish with a winning record
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
M
Coach Chuck
Stobart
CATEGORY
Total offense
Pass offense
Rush Offense
Scoring offense
Total Defense
Rush defense
Pass defense
Scoring defense 98
Net punting 94
Turnover marg. T92
Kickoff returns 27
Punt returns 14
I believe! I believe AstroTurf should be
banned. 1 believe in the sweet spot. 1 believe in
long, slow, deep, wet kisses that last a week
(Thank you, Kevin Costner).
I also believe we will lose. Our air attack will
be shot out of the Memphis sky like a lame duck.
Memphis State boasts one of the best defensive
teams in the country. Their defense is just a little
bit superior than ours (thank you, Church Lady).
Then again, FarmvilleCentral has a better defense
than we do. The only way we will win is with a
little bit of help from oh, I don't know satan!
MSU's core of
power backs, Larry
Porter and John
Martin, should bust
through our defen-
sive line like a fart
throughdenim.The
Buc defense, or lack
there of, has only
held two teams un-
der 20 points this
season.
Okay, enough
about the loss to the
Tigers.
What's up with
the Pirate coaching Do or Die: ECU will try to
staff? Did they for- seasons for the first time in
get last weekend
was wide receiver Clayton Driver's final home
game? He didn't catch a single pass and I find it
hard to believe he wasn't open once. The men on
the sideline were considerate enough to let
McConnell play a the entire game, which could
only have been because he is a senior. There
should have been more of an effort made to put
the ball in Driver's sure hands.
Well, since we are on the brink of a losing
season, let's look at the positive side of things: next
year we will all care a little more about tail-gating.
Our expectations will be lower and sports writers
like myself will not be trying raise your hopes, too
much.
This being the last Rob's Pick of the football
season, I would certainly like to thank all of you
who wrote letters to the editor. Despite the content
of most of those letters, at least I know people are
reading the sports page and people are actually
taking the time to respond.
I have been told the poor football season is my
fault, opinions don't belong on the sports page
(which is stupid) and American Indians are
oversensitive cry-babies who don't deserve any
respect and the whole issue of American Indian
mascots is ridicu-
lous. Okay, what-
ever.
I guess I'm just
a bleeding-heartlib-
eral who is catering
tooversensinvespe-
cial interest groups.
Sue me.
I will pray to-
nightand this is how
it will go: Oh, dear
Father in Heaven,
guide my Pirate ship
t- � through the sea of
u1rtDyasonBo"ch troubles that awaits
post back-to-back wmninq � , .
ioy� . nerw
how shall I ever
atone for the mess I've made of this season. It's all
my fault we didn't go to the Peach Bowl. What
shall be my penance for angering oh, sooooo
many people by trying to empathize with this
country's indigenous people? Forgive me, oh
mighty one. Show me the light.
I certainly hope the sarcasm is apparent.
Warren's
Pick
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
ECU MSU
Robert S. Todd, Sports Editor 21 34
Warren Sumner, Asst. Sports Editor 24 17
Richard Eakin, Chancellor 23 21
Nancy Jenkins, Mayor of Greenville 20 13
Todd Gibson, Sportscaster, Channel 9 13 28
Kevin Hall, WZMB Sports Director 21 20
Courtney Jones, SGA President 28 17
Wayne "Air" Freeman, Senior, Pol. Sci. 28 14
avg: 22 23
Crystal Balls
"Believe this: We aren't that good, but I still hope we win ya know
"The Pirates will dodge a Memphis bullet to go 6-5
"The Pirates may have back-to-back winning seasons
"ECU will rock and roll in Memphis
"The Memphis St. defense is just too tough
"The Pirates must incorporate Clayton Driver into the offense or MSU's 'D' will crush them
"The Pirates will finish strong in their final game
"Morris Letcher has the game of the year, along with 200 more yards from Junior Smith
(This is for entertainment purposes only. Please No wagering or oversensitive special interest groups. Elvis is dead.)
Well, once again the Pirates have proven to
be a team that is impossible to second-guess.
After I predicted that the Pirate offensive unit
would erupt in an explosion of offensive excite-
ment against Arkansas St Steve Logan and his
team came out with a victory that could have
been used as a sleeping aid. The Pirate team, led
by quarterback Sean McConnell, gained only
172 passingyards and had little tooffer a measly
crowd in Ficklen Stadium. It may have been
gratifying to see the Pirate running game revi-
talized by Junior Smith, but I'm sure mat the
25,072 people in the stadium would have been
far better entertained going to see TJracula
But, in the words of the immortal Steve Logan,
"There's no such thing as a bad win
The Pirates must prepare to further that
philosophy Saturday against Memphis State,
because they must take the Tigers to a shootout
to have a chance to win. The stakes, the first pair
of back-to-back winning seasons in nearly a
decade, are higher than in any game all season.
A great deal of ECU's future recruiting success
will rideon their ability to put forth this winning
record.
Make no mistake about it, if Saturday's
game was played on paper, we would lose
badly. The Tigers haveoneof the mostferocious
defenses in the nation, especially against the
run. It is overly stingy, allowing only 17.4 points
a game. It surrenders only 100 yards rushing
and 151 passing yards a game. MSU out-punts
us, out-kicks us, turns the ball over less than we
do, and gets more points off its defense. This
game is probably the toughest for the Pirates
since the opener against Syracuse.
In order to pull off an upset on the road, the
Pirates must have phenomenal contributions
from its passing game. Firstly, Michael Ander-
son must play this week, and must keep the ball
in the Pirates' possession. If he throws the inter-
ceptions he has in previous outings, the Pirates
are doomed; Memphis State will never look
back. He must keep the offense moving, and
conserve the energy of the Pirate defense.
Secondly, the Pirates must have rushing
productivity from Junior Smith. He has the
potential in this game to gain the 72 yards he
needs for a 1,000 yard season, and this may go
hand-in-hand with winning the game. The Pi-
rateoffensive line must open theholes for Junior
to run through, or his hopes of joining the Pirate
record books will vanish, as willhischancetobe
on a winning team.
ECU's defense must keep the team close,
Mitchl says farewell to fans
See Pick page 11
By Chas Mitch1
Staff Writer
To err is human and to forgive is
divine, however in modern day America
we're the rich gets richer and the poorer
has fewer, the time has come for this
assistant editor to join the ranks of pizza
makers and martini shakers.
I, as a journalist, have lived by and
on occasions died by, the philosophy of
writing or reporting the events as I see
them. I've tried not to sugar-coat the
facts or the events surrounding any
story, therefore I have acquired my fair
share of anri-Chas readers.
To these people I simply say: even-
tually, life goes onif the reality of liv-
ing in America proves too much for any
one reader to accept or understand, then
it simply becomes just a matter for the
reader to work through it by him or
herself. As a sports writer, it is my re-
sponsibility to the people that I inter-
view to protect the honesty, faith and
integrity of these people with whom I
associate.
Here at East Carolina, life is merely
a tempest in a tea cup in comparison to
the events which shape our world ev-
eryday. I've tried to use my experiences
of European and Asian cultures to bring a
warm and meaningful perspective to TEC
readership. I feel that I have failed in my
attempts to lessen the effects of cultural
hatred, bigotry and racism here at ECU, so
it's only appropriate that I step down as the
assistant sports editor of The East Carolinian.
My brief stint as assistant sports editor
has been filled with countless memorable
moments as well as encounters which could
have been handled in a more mature and
appropriate manner. So in my final swan
song I would like to thank the people and
agencyies that have made my job a lot easier
and seemingly worth while during these
past months.
First and foremost a special thanks to
former Sports Editor Mike Martin and as
well as current editor Robert S. Todd for
their confidence and respect which they
have shown toward me as a writer and not
as a former employee of Uncle Sam.
While of course, the most single impor-
tant element behind any agency is their
administrative staff. I would like to thank
Mrs. Deborah Daniel for the sharing of her
knowledge of TEC and for just being one of
thebestadministrative personnel that 1 have
had the pleasure of working directly with.
See Chas page 12
Profile
Davis steps to front as defensive force and
leader on the field
the field�sometimes I get into
Charles speaks as The Voice'
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
To Jeff Charles, ECU basketball and foot-
ball are a major part of his livelihood. Charles
has been "the voice of the Pirates" for the past
five years.
He's seen the very best Pirates' football
and he's seen ECU suffer through some diffi-
cult times. But Charles does not let the Pirates'
success effect his approach to the game.
"I prepare for a Pirates' telecast the same
whether the team is going 7-0, or 0-7" Charles
said. "Every time I go out there I try to do the
best job I've ever done. It does not matter
whether I'm covering the Peach Bowl or the
last regular season game I admit it can be a lot
more fun when the Pirates are winning, but it
does not effect my approach to covering a
telecast"
Charles is reluctant to admit that he
patterns his an-
nouncing style af-
ter anybody else. "I
try to do things my
own way for the
mostpart'Charles
sakL'Therearecer-
tain announcers
that played a major
role in influencing
me,suchasJoeTate
Jeff Charles
of theOeveland Cavaliers,andJoeMcConnell
of theChicago Bears and Minnesota Vikings.
See Charles page 11
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
Tony Davis has great responsi-
bility waiting for him next football
season. Next year, he must captain
a defense that will end this year as
one of the worst in Division 1 foot-
ball. He must be the on-fieid leader
the Pirate defense will need to re-
coverfrom thisseason'sdisappoint-
ment. He must show an example of
aggression, tempered with cool-
headed reactions and intelligence.
Davis leads this year's team
with 113 tackles, 73 of those solo.
When Senior outside linebacker
Jerry Dillon was sidelined with a
thumb injury, Davis assumed his
position as vocal leader in practice
and on the field, but he said he is
unsure of how he will handle that
responsibility full-time.
"I've never been in that role
he said. "I don't know how I will
handle it. I will try not to lead with
my mouth, and lead by example.
Hopefully I'll lead by showing what
I can do
Davis said he enjoys the game
of football and the way he plays his
position. He said thatevery time he
takes the field he
tries to bring in-
tensity with him.
"I love to run
around to the ball,
a lot of times I
make plays just by
doingthat Davis
saidOncethatattitjdefiltersdown
to the defense you gel youi Midi i ii
and your Washington
Davis said he expects to dis-
play an aggressive attitude against
the Memphis St. Tigers, as he does
in all his games, but tries to limit this
attitude to the playing field.
"1 don't like to be aggressive off
situations where I have to pull
back and realize I'm not on the
field, because through sports
they say its okay to be aggres-
sive when you're playing, but
not when you aren't he said.
Davis said he does a pretty
good job at keeping aggression
in check. "Monitoring yourself
just comes from growing up.
When I'moff the field I view itas
relaxation, while on the field it
should be aggression and inten-
sity
Davis said the defensive
unit hopes to display this latter
attitude in the final game of the
season, and onlyconcentrateon
helping the Pirates finish with a
winning record against Mem-
phis St. this Saturday.
"The biggest thing is to
winto have a solid game on
defense he said. "I don't want
to say its too late to show people
what I can do, but I don't feel
people believe in us anymore.
Wejusthave to keep within our-
selves the idea that we are as
good as we thought we were at
thebegiriningoftheseason,and
In your face: Linebacker Tony Davis makes a serious
impression on most people he meets while at work.
1 don't want to say its too late to
show people what I can do, hut I
don't feel people believe in us any-
more.

go out and play
as hard as we
can Davis said he will use the
lessons this season has taught
him to improve his play and
lead his defense next year.
"This season has let me
know that it is terribly, terribly
hard to come back from a win-
ning season like we had last
year and to repeat. We all had
highexpecta tions from the fans,
and I feel we may have let the
fans down. The season has let
m e
know
you
have to
work
hard,
there
are no
gifts.
We are
in no way guaranteed a (win-
ning) season, we have to work
for it
Davis said it is very impor-
tantforthefootballcoacheshere
to continue working on the de-
fense. Davis said with the de-
Tony Davis,
Linebacker
fensive staff currently in
place, the unit should flour-
ish next season as they bring
the experience of this year to
the field. "I think we need
moredisciplineon the field
he said. "I think they will
have that, because everyone
is getting to know each other
and learning the new sys-
tem
Davis said he plans to
pursue a career in law en-
forcementpossiblyasahigh-
waypattolman,afterhisfoot-�
ball days are over. He said h
envisions himself some-
where "enforcing law and
order
This Saturday he will be
enforcing in Memphis, Ten-
nessee.
� i





11 'In East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 19, 1992
Charles
Continued from page 10
But I can't say there's anybod) I pattern
mysryleafter C haries looks forward to
establishing and renewing contacts he
makes across thecountry. "Themostex
dting part of my job is seeing thedifferenl
personalities across thecountry he said.
'Tveannouricedatl�'umi.inA iiyiniaTivh,
Dlmras, and of course ECU. It's incredible
how many pecteIcorneincontactwith
With the football season winding
down, Charles liik ahead to making
some predk ti. ms about the Pirate basket-
ball team. "I see a lot of potential on this
year's team" Charles said. TECl hada
great recruiting class, and hopefxiUv
tin- season, we can avoid the injuries
we had lastseason. I trunk that realisti-
cally we can play 500 basketball this
season
Before coming to ECU,haries
spent five years as the "Voice of die
Hookies" at Virginia Tech. Earlier in his
career he spent time in Atlanta at WSB.
He did the play-by-play for the Peach
Bowl and won several awards as tlie
states het announcer.
Pick
Continued from page 10
and shutdown rheMSl passing
came, "ony Davis,Jerry Dillon,
and Bernard Carter must pres-
surequarterbackSteveMatthews
into throvvingincompletions and
hopefully, interceptions. The de-
fensive unitmustalsoslow down
therun,andrelyon their second-
arytostoptheTigers.C reg( Iran-
disonmustproveti ibeanintimi-
datingforceand loyi the liters
from getting the "big play
It this was a contest decided
by statistic, the Pirate team would
lose. There are many who feel that
this will be the ase, and the Pirates
will tail in their chance- for a winning
season, lt'sa tough call,butl will pick
the Urns this Saturday.
It is simply time for the Pirates to
performtotheircapability. They have
yet to win a game this year when
everything was clicking, every as-
pect of the game under their control.
I think the Michael Anderson is gel
ting ready to explode after his ab-
senceagainst Arkansas State. I le has
played the role ot supporting quar-
terback this year, and has learned a
gre.it deal through his successes
and mistake's. I believe that on Sat-
urday, he will apply what he has
learned. He will keep ECU's of-
fense rolling and overcome his in-
terception problems with a banner
day.
I he Puate defense may not be
able to stop Memphis State, but I do
think they can contain the Tigers'
offense enough to keep the game
close. It they do that, there just mav
be enough magic left over from the
Pirates' 1991 season to pull them
through.
A petition against the new
drop policy will be at the
Student Stores today from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
No sports
writers
jmeeting to-
day! H see
I you the
IfirstThurs-
I day after
iIurkeyDay
Break.
AUDITIONS
Paramount Parks, formerly Kings Productions, is holding
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in Richmond, Virginia. A variety of positions are available
including singers, conic actors, instrumentalists, technicians,
character costume performers, and specialty acts of all types!
Come join the fun!
GREENVILLE, NC
Thursday, December 3, 1992
East Carolina University
A.J, Fletcher Music Bldg Recital Hal
5-6 p.m. Singers, Actors
5-7 p.m. Instrumentalists,
Specialty Acts, Technicians
RICHMOND, V
Saturday, December 5, 1992
Kings Dominion
Mason Dixon Music Hall
2-4 p.m. Singers, Actors,
Technicians
3-5 p.m. Instrumentalists,
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For additional information call
Paramount s Kings Dominion I 804 876 51 dl
Paramount Parks 1 800 544 5464
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November 21 & 22 - Intramural Fields
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�� �
$ J
12 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 19, 1992
Chas
Continued from page 10
Also, thank you Janet, Yvonne and
Greg for yourassistanceinmydaily
inter-workings and dealings with
your office.
The Sports Information De-
partment has also proved vital in
my inner workings with the
coaches, athletes and other sports
administrators. Charles, Pam,
Carolyn and the rest of the SID
staff, thank you for consistent stati-
cal information, up-dated listings,
media guides, ideas and sugges-
tions as well as an occasional
doughnut.
Withouttheofficeof Recreation
Services, the intramural sporting
events and announcements for the
campus of East Carolina would be
lost without a care.
So I would like to take this time
to say thank you to J.R. Roth, Kendra
Curtis, Thad Peoples and the entire
Rec Services staff for their undying
efforts to ensure that the student
body is kept well abreast to events
occurring in and around the ECU
campus.
To the many coaches and stu-
dent-athletes that I have met and
forged friendships with, I say thank
you for entrusting me and allow-
ing TEC to use your stories of
academics, athletics as well as per-
sonal events to inform and en-
lighten our readership. Coaches
Choo Justice, Martha McCaskill and
Rick Kobe, thanks. To Tony Davis,
Jenny Parsons, Chip Seymoure,
Jai meson Pierce, Jerry Di lion, Da vid
Batts and the many others, I thank
you and hope that you and your
circle of friends and associates con-
tinue to read and support the sec-
tion that has made "our daily rag"
what it is today.
To the members of the "Crystal
Balls Team thank you for your
valuable time and for lending us
your thoughts, constructive criti-
cisms and quotes to our football
prediction section.
In closing I would like to say
thanks to Jason Bosch and Bi ff Ran-
som of the Photo Department,
Batman (Haselrig) and his staff of
comics, to Andy and Lindsay of
the Advertising Department as
well as Blair, Albie, John,C.J Beth
and Joe for their input and conver-
sations.
To the readers of TEC, the cur-
rentstaff of sports writers anddesk
editors will carry on in a manner
which I'm sure that you'll be
pleased with.
Despite that mentality of cer-
tain desk editors who feel that the
sport pages should be done away
with completely, I hope that you
continue to read the sports section,
submit letters to the editor and call
or come by to voice your thoughts
and opinions of how good or even
how bad the section is. With your
continued input toyourpaper, these
last two papers of the fall '92 cam-
paign should be the best yet
Boleshim, to all my constitu-
ents and friends.
CONSTANTINE VII
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752-7307 I 209 E. 5th St.
EVERY
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Application forms are available at the Information Desk, Mendenhall
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For further information, contact J. Marshall at 757-4711.
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offerings for Spring 1993 include:
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"American Civil War Literature" "Intro to Ethnic Studies"
"The Power of Myth" "Women and Literature"
"Jews and Judaism" "Modern German Drama (in rran)"
"New World Meets Old" (Columbus) "Vietnam War in Film"
"Chemistry & the Environment" "Creativity in Science"
as well as ANTH 1000; EDUC 3200; ENGL 1200,1250, 2000,3420,
3880; FORL 2221; FREN 1002; HLTH 1000 & 4501; HIST 1551 &
1553; INTL1000; LIBS 1000; MATH 2172; PHIL 1110 & 1696;
PSYC 1060; SOCI2110; SPAN 1003; WOST 2000 & 2400.
All ECU students with 3.4 GPA or better qualify to take honors
courses. Register for them in regular registration. Call Dr. David
Sanders (757-6373) in GCB 2026 for more information.
iP�
Solutions from your Apple Campus Reseller
The Apple Computer Loan.
"Why should I wait in line at the
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for$ 15 a month?"
Kevin Campbell
Aerospace Engineering Major
What allowed Kevin to own an Apple Macintosh PowerBook" 145
computer for such a low monthly payment? The Apple Computer Loan!
Kevin knew that owning the power and portability of a Macintosh
PowerBook for his full course load and his work in the Civil Air Patrol
was a smart thing to do. And the Apple Computer Loan was the smart
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Based on Kevin Campbell s Apple Computer Loan of S2.342 -tO, his monthly pastnem was $15 (interest nnh, as of 1012,92 Pnncipal pavments may be deferred upto4vears The interest rate is variable and is based on the
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�W"
H





Title
The East Carolinian, November 19, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 19, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.910
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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