The East Carolinian, November 17, 1992







Opinion
Bad idea
With the Faculty Senate's proposal to shorten the
drop period to one week, students once again pay
the price for administrative problems.
See story pg. 6
The Beastie Boys and The Rollins Band
delivered a funky, hard-driven show to the
Civic Center crowd on Nov. 10.
See story pg. 7
Running Man
Sophomore sensation Junior Smith
ran for 232 yards Saturday against
Arkansas State, 13 yards shy of an
ECU record.
See Story pg. 9
The East Carolinian
Vol. 67 No. 21
Circulation 12,000
Greenville, North Carolina
Tuesday, November 17,1992
Resolution calls
for open records
By Jeff Becker
News Editor
A resolution calling for the
partial opening of ECU's Honor
Board records has been brought
to the SGA.
The Honor Board, com-
posed of seven students, decides
the fate of any student caught
violating the university's judi-
cial rules and procedures.
Karen Greenwell, author of
the resolution, said opening the
records would help regulate the
Honor Board's decisions.
"The students of ECU
could be made more aware and
potentially made safer by their
knowledge of the cases and de-
cisions which face the Honor
Board Greenwell's resolution
stated.
"Recording the cases in
full, supplementing the names
of those parties involved by
words such as 'assailant' and
"victim along with the final
decision of the Honor Board,
would enable students to moni-
tor the judgments of the judicial
system
The resolution currently
rests in the SGA's Student Wel-
fare committee. If the commit-
tee passes the resolution, the
General Assembly will vote on
final passage next Monday.
Greenwell said she was
concerned because students on
the Honor Board have no law
experience and no records exist
to see how those students per-
form.
"I have to be concerned
when cases like rape come be-
fore a board of students who
have no legal experience and are
subject to make decisions as im-
portant as this Greenwell said.
"Right now it's an isolated sys-
tem. You cannot know whether
justice is being served or not.
(The board members) do not
have to be concerned because
their opinions are not open
According to Dean of Stu-
dents Ronald Speier, the Honor
Board's records are protected
under the Family Educational
Rights and Privacy Act, com-
monly known as the Buckley
Amendment. Under Buckley,
the Department of Education
can withdraw federal funding
from schools that release edu-
cation records to the public.
Speier said he would con-
sider releasing a list that in-
cluded all decisions made by
the Honor Board, but would
not release any information
that could jeopardize the ano-
nymity of those involved.
Speier said the Honor
Board was well equipped to
handle any cases that arise. He
said board members not only
go through several training ses-
sions to prepare them, but must
also pass a test to enable them
to serve.
"I think this is the closest
a person gets to a board of their
peers, which extensively is
what our system stands for in
our legal system as you de-
scribe it Speier said.
According to Catherine
White, a lawyer for the N.C.
Press Association, ECU seems
to treat judicial records differ-
ently than academic records
and, therefore, the Honor
Board's records may not be
protected under the Buckley
Amendment.
Article Vll of ECU's Judi-
cial Rules and Procedures
states that judicial records are
kept separate from education
records. Article VIII states that
notification of suspension or
dismissal does not become part
of a student's permanent aca-
demic record.
In February 1992, the Uni-
versity of Georgia's student
newspaper, The Red & Black,
won access the school's judicial
board records. A Georgia supe-
rior court judge ruled that the
university's judicial records
were not protected under
10 Pages
Photo by Biff Ranson
hood Lion supports march down 10th Street to denounce reports of illegal practices by America's fifth largest
grocery store chain. More than 150 marched to show their support on Nov. 15.
Food Lion supporters march
By Tracy Ford
Staff Writer
See Honor page 4
More than 150 employees,
family members and supporters of
Food Lion stores across the region
participated in a support march Sun-
day to protest the allegations of
unsanitary practices by ABC's
'Trime Time Live
Participants marched down
10th Street and Greenville Boule-
vard with signs in hand to show
citizens that employees are in sup-
port of Food Lion. Onlookers
cheered in sup port of the march and
Food Lion.
The march organized entirely
by emploveesof Eastern North Caro-
lina stores was a success according
to Sue Foell, a customer service rep-
resentative and five-year emplovee
of Food Lion. She said the companv
has not ordered anyone to partici-
pate in the march or show support
for Food Lion.
"We hope to prove to every-
bodythatthe things that'Prime Time'
said aren't true and that we truly
stand behind our customers said
Cindy Briley, a sophomore at ECU
who has worked at Food Lion for
more than two years.
After a producer of Trime
Time Live' got a job as a meat wrap-
per, the show portrayed with a hid-
den camera workers re-wrapping
and re-datingold mea t, poul try, ham
and fish. One former employee of
Food Lion told 'Prime Time' of
bleachingspoiled fishtoremovedis-
coloration and smell.
According to Foell, the United
Food and Commercial Workers
Union made up the allegations after
unsuccessfully trying to unionize
Food Lion.
"They're tryingto get into Food
Lion again because they stand a
chancetoearn$10millionfrom60,000
employees Foell said.
Food Lion President Tom
Smith denies all allegations and has
launched an advertising campaign
to reassurecustomers that Food Lion
stores are clean and sanitary. Healso
blames the United Food and Com-
mercial Workers Union for prompt-
ing employees to make allegations
since they have not joined the union.
"1 think the march was very
successful Foell said. "Wehavehad
a lotof customers thatare very happy
wegotout there. Businesshaspicked
up
Food Lion has filed a lawsuit
against ABC's 'PrimeTime Live'af-
ter stock prices dropped rapidlv
Nov. 13.
Admissions
cut short
for spring
semester
By Karen Hassell
Staff Writer
Spring semester admissions
stopped two weeks short of the
original Nov. 1 deadline.
"We were limited to 300
transfer and 100 freshmen said
Jerry Clayton, assistant director
of undergraduate admissions-
Robert Thompson, chair of
the political science department,
said there are 1,070 more students
this fall than last spring, a 6.4
percent increase. He said the in-
crease can be attributed to re-
cruitment practices, enhanced
academic image, retention and
advising programs and Peach
Bowlathletic program.
The increases in the fall lead
to cut backs for the spring semes-
ter. However, there is some good
news.
"For the first time since
1973, entering freshmen have an
SAT that is slightly larger than
the national average Thomp-
son said.
Thompson said enrollment
wi II continue to rise in the follow-
ing years.
"We will be aiming for a
student body of 18,000 next fall
he said. "We will continue im-
provement of SATs and close the
gap with the other North Caro-
lina institutions. Others have in-
creased their standards by cut-
ting admissions, unlike us
To offset the abundance of
out-of-state students in the fall of
1992, the fall of 1993 out-of-state
enrollment admissions will be
decreased by 100. In 1994, they
will be decreased by 25.
Clayton said, theoverabun-
dance of out-of-students did not
have any effects on the admis-
sions for spring.
An editorial in The Daily
Reflector outlined the negative
effects of spring enrollment limits.
See Admissions page 3
Prospective
students enjoy
open house
By Jason Williams
Staff Writer
If the Fall Open House for pro-
spective student was any indication,
the future bodes well for ECU's enroll-
ment.
Admissions counselor Ellen Scott
said, "We were well pleased with the
turnout of prospective students
Though she did not have exact
figures, Scott said the number of stu-
dents was comparable to that in years
past. "We filled the most of the audito-
rium with prospective students to hear
the speeches
The Open House, held Nov. 13,
gave high school seniors a chance to
visit the campus and preview college
life at ECU.
Students who have applied to
ECU, as well as transfer and adult
students, were sent invitations to the
Open House.
Greenville Mayor Nancy Jenkins
welcomed the participants to Green-
ville and to the university in an open-
ing session in Wright Auditorium.
David Watkins, associate vice chancel-
lor for Academic Affairs and Al
Mathews, vice chancellor for Student
Life, addressed the students as well.
Exchange program holds expo
By Marjorie Pitts
Staff Writer
n . �� ii-ii � , Photo by Biff Ranson
Potential ECU students get information on life in the Emerald City. ECU's Annual Fall
Open House, held Nov. 13, introduced prospective students to the ECU campus.
After the opening remarks, stu- "As always, the financial aid
dents at-
tended ca-
reer coun-
seling ses-
sions, fi-
nancialaid
work-
shops, and
student life seminars.
"We had a wonderful turnout of
faculty members to trilk with parents
and students Scott said. "All depart-
ments were represented in the career
counseling seminars.
"We filled the most of the
auditorium with prospec-
tive students to hear the
speeches' EUcnScotu
Admissions counselor
w orkshops
were very
popular with
students as
well as par-
ents. Students
were also ex-
ited about the
seminars en
student life
Several residence halls and the
student bookstore were also open for
visitors throughout the .idw The pro-
gram concluded at noon.
ECU students can travel to Austra-
lia, Netherlands, Sweden, France, Italy,
Mexico and many other countries and
receive credit while paying ECU tuition.
On Nov. 18 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in
the lobby of the General Classroom Build-
ing, students can learn about the Study
AbroadExchange Programs hereatECU.
The International Student Exchange
Program (ISEP) is based on balanced one-
to-one exchanges of students between
institutions in the United States and those
in other countries. Applicants must be
full-time students, have studied at ECU
at least one year and have a 2.75 grade-
point average.
"Don't think you can't study abroad,
the opportunity isavailable hereatECU
said Stephanie Evancho of International
Programs. "If you really want to go some-
where, we'll find somewhere for you to
go
The ISEP program has more than
100 universities to chose from and stu-
dents usually stay for one academic year.
Summer, semester and longer exchanges
are also available.
Aside from travel costs, books and
personal spending money, the cost of the
ISET program is generally no more ex-
pensive than ECU.
"Financial aid students are eligible
for exchanges Evancho said. "ECU
money will transfer and the amount over
goes with you toward housing
Melissa Coughlin, a senior at ECU,
traveled to Sunderland, England and at-
tended the Universi ty of Sunderland from
September 1991 to June 1992.
"I had no responsibilities hereas far
as a car payment, a boyfriend, etcetera, so
1 decided to travel and learn before I
graduated and hit reality'Coughlinsaid.
Coughlin stayed in a dormitory with
13 other exchange students from the
United States and England. She took four
classes that lasted one academic year, and
receiving 24 credit hours.
"ECU was very corporative in trans-
ferring the credits there toward my de-
gree here Coughlin said.
Sunderland is about one hour from
Scotland, so Coughlin was able to travel
to Scotland as well. She also traveled to
Italy and Ireland.
"Northern England is known for
their friendliness and Sunderland is also
known for having 11 pubs to everv mile
Coughlin said. "1 had a wonderful expe-
rience, made good friends, and if I went
again 1 would go somewhere with even
more cultural diversity
Besides the ISEr program, there is
also a National Student Exchange pro-
gram (NSE) where a full-time student
with an overall 2.5 GPA can travel to any
of the 107 schools in the program.
�1
-
r
See Travel page 3





2 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 17, 1992
Clinton maps legislative
strategy for economic revival
Los Angeles Times
Aid offered to victims
The U.S. Department of Education made available $56.7
million in student aid for victims of 1 iurricane Andrew, I lurri-
cane lniki and Typhoon Omar. The aid will be available to an
estimated 33,000 students currently enrolled in undergraduate,
graduate and professional programs. "We're pleased that we
were able to make this aid available quickly, and with minimal
disruption to students said Lamar Alexander, U.S. secretary of
education. About $40 million of the aid was for emergency Tell
Grants, and $16.7 million will be awarded for campus-based
programs which are administered by school financial aid offices.
Law student arrested for robbery
A 41-year-old law school student, dubbed the "Bordertown
Bandit has been charged with robbing banks in towns along the
Minnesota-Wisconsin border, officials said. Susan P. Robinson
was charged in the robbery of a bank in Cornell, Wis and is
suspected of being involved in five other bank robberies in
Wisconsin towns thatborder Minnesota. Bank tellers were maced
in two robberies, said a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's
Office in Minneapolis, and in another robbery, another teller was
handcuffed. Robinson, who attends William Mitchell college of
Law, was scheduled to graduate in January.
Officials consider banning club
A hazing incident that injured two varsity -port- letter
winners at the University oi Mississippi has caused officials to
consider disbanding the club until further notice. Junior John
Gourlv of Philadelphia and sophomore Donovan Bassett of Jack-
son, Mis were treated at a local emergency room after being
blindfolded with tape while an unidentified liquid was poured
over their head s.Gourley suffered bums on his left ear and cheek,
and Bassett suffered second-degree burns on 80 percent of his
face. Under investigation is the M Club, a social group of 100
varsity letter winners in the eight male sports offered at the
university. Officials said the M Club has been repeatedly told that
hazing is against school policy and Mississippi law.
Compiled by Elizabeth Shimmel. Taken from CPS
and other campus newspapers.
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. �
President-elect Bill Clinton Sun-
da' began mapping a hit-the-
ground-running legislative strat-
egy to revive the economy, and
Senate Majority Leader George J.
Mitchell, D-Maine, predicted that
Congress will move quickly on
such a job stimulus plan and enact
health care reform later in 1993.
"We've got a big job to do
and we've got to do it together
Clinton said as he prepared to host
a working dinner here with
Mitchell, House Speaker Thomas
S. Foley, D-Wash and House
Majority Leader Richard A.
Gephardt, D-Mo.
Clinton said his first post-
election meeting with the Demo-
cratic congressional leadership
was intended to "kind of renew
our acquaintance, talk about our
obligations, look to the future a
little bit, talk a little bit about next
week when 1 go to Washington for
the first time
Clinton told reporters at the
end of his customary morning jog
that he was "very much" looking
forward to meeting President Bush
at the White House Wednesday.
"1 think it's time we met and
talked he said. "His people so
far have been quite ccoperative
and I think it's time for us to get
together
George Stephanopoulos,
Clinton's assistant transition di-
rector for communications, said
the congressional dinner session
was "an important way to break
theiceand talk about what is com-
ing ahead on the legislative calen-
dar and talk about how they are
going to work together for the next
years
Clinton also planned to dis-
cuss with the congressional lead-
ers health care and political cam-
paign reforms, Stephanopoulos
told reporters upon arriving at the
r.e.m.
madonna
red hot chili peppers
"greatest hits"
sugarcubes
bon jovi
jeff healy
sx
sinead o'connor
neil young
queen
public enemy
extreme
prince
bobby brown
west
acdc "live"
marky mark
mudhoney
mother love bone
cure
dillon fence
"rosemary"
Governor's Mansion Sunday af-
ternoon.
Various legislative strategies
areunderdiscussion,butonethatis
particularly favored by top Clinton
transition planners is the formation
of a high-level legislative strategy
group to take charge of driving the
new president's agenda through
Congress, sources said.
Under such an arrangement,
top White House aides would as-
sume hands-on control of the com-
plicated process� beginning with
the drafting of legislation itself �
in hopes of seizing the opportuni-
ties available to Clinton in the early
days of his administration.
Althoughsuchtasksoftenare
delegated to lower-level officials,
Clinton advisers said they hope to
model their plan upon the suc-
cesses won in the early days of the
Reagan administration by a simi-
lar team headed byjames A. Baker
111 and Richard Darman, then top
White House officials.
Clinton advisers said they
expect that the as-yet-unnamed
new director of the Office of Man-
agement and Budget also would
become a major participant in the
strategy group.
Appearing on NBC's "Meet
the Press Mitchell said he was
encouraged by the pace and direc-
tion of Clinton's transition.
"My hope is that there will be
good bipartisan cooperation on the
important agenda that the presi-
dent-elect will place before the
Congress he said. "I think he's
right on track
Although Clinton cam-
paigned as a Washington outsider
� and kept congressional Demo-
cratic leaders at arm's length � the
Sunday night strategy session
clearly demonstrates that Clinton
is intently focused on breaking the
stalemate that has become a hall-
mark of relations between Con-
gress and the outgoing Bush ad-
ministration.
Medical schooltobegin
in vitro fertilization program
By Shay Pierce
Staff Writer
As a new member of the
Department of Obstetrics and Cv-
necology, Dr. Clifford C. Hayslip
Jr. will open new doors to East
Carolina's Medical School as di-
rector of the new Division of Re-
productive Endocrinology and
Infertility.
Dr. Hayslip will be introduc-
ing the process of in vitro fertiliza-
tion, among other things.
Hayslip received his under-
graduate degree from The Citadel
in Charleston, S.C and his medi-
cal degree from Emory University
in Atlanta, Ga. He worked on his
residency at Fitzsimons Army
Medical College in Denver, Colo
and a fellowship at Wilter Reed
Army Medical Center and the Na-
tional Institutes of Health in
Bethesda, Md.
His 20 years in the medical
field, including six months in Saudi
Arabia during Operation Desert
Storm, has left Hayslip with experi-
ence and know ledge to share.
Currently, Hayslip is evalu-
ating patients on infertility prob-
lems, gynecological endocrine
problems (abnormal menstrua-
tions) and developmental prob-
lems. Hayslip and the department
hope to have laboratories and
equipment ready by the Spring or
Summer of 1993 to start the in vitro
fertilization.
In vitro fertilization is a tech-
nique that unites the woman's egg
and the man's sperm outside the
womb. The egg is held "in vitro" or
outside of me bodyuntUitis time to
be implanted within the woman's
uterus. Tlits service will be offered
to couples experiencing infertility
problems.
Cha i r of the EC U Depa rtment
of Obstetrics and Cynecology, Dr.
D.E. Darnell Jones, said he believes
Hayslips arrival to the university
will provide important and sophis-
ticated medical service as the refer-
ral base for Eastern North Carolina.
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SIUDENT UNION
HAPPENINGS
MOVIES I 8 PM HENDRIX THEATRE
Who Framed Roger Rabbit?
WED & SUN, NOV 18 & 22
Guess Who's Coming To Dinner?
THURS&SAT, NOV 19&21
Eating Raoul
FRI & SAT, NOV 20 & 21
SATURDAY NIGHT DOUBLE FEATURE Films begin at 7pm
John Shearin (who makes a comeo appearance in "Eating Raoul")
is an ECU Theatre Arts Chair and will be at the MSC Coffeehouse
to discuss his work in Hollywood after the movie on Friday night
A
SPECIAL EVENTS I ROCK A BOWL
FRI, NOV 20, 8-1 1 PM
1 DJ-ALL REQUEST MUSIC
p BOWLING ALLEY, MSC
MINORITY ARTS I LOSVIAJEROS
MARIACHI BAND
TODAY, NOON-1PM
IN FRONT OF MENDENHALL
MOVIE: MISSISSIPPI MASALA
TONIGHT, 8 PM
MSC GREAT ROOM
NATIVE AMERICAN DANCERS &
COSTA RICAN DANCER
WED, NOV 1 8, NOON-1 PM
IN FRONT OF MENDENHALL
MULTI-CULTURAL GROUP FAIR
CAMPUS & OFF CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS
THUR, NOV 19, 11-1 PM
MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM, MSC
CO-SPONSORED BY S.U. PRODUCTIONS
MOVIE: WOMEN ON THE VERGE
OF A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN
SPANISH WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES
THUR, NOV 19, 8 PM
j GREAT ROOM, MSC
For More Info Call The
! University Unions Program Hotline
at 757-6004





r
3f The East Carolinian
Travel
NOVEMBER 17, 1992
Continued from page 1
Tonya Boykin, a Spanish
major and senior, participated in
the NSE program. Boykin at-
tended the University of Puerto
Rico in Humacao from January to
May of 1992.
"I went because I'm a Span-
ish major so I wanted to learn more
Spanish Boykin said. "It's the
hardest semester I've had thus far,
but by far the most beneficial
Boykin took poetry, psychol-
ogy, business and Spanish classes,
as well as tutoring Spanish people
English.
"The learning was intense,
and I learned things there I could
have never learned here Boykin
said.
Boykin firstlived witha host
family then decided she wanted to
speak and learn more Spanish, so
she moved in with 15 Spanish girls.
"I matured a lot during my
time in Puerto Rico and also made
some really good friends that I still
keep in touch with Boykin said.
"We write letters, call and send
each other tapes
For more information on
summer or semester study pro-
grams, stop by the International
House , located at 306 E. 9th St.
(Behind McDonalds), or call 757-
6769.
Clinton
Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON � Two
weeks before Bi'l Clinton's elec-
tion, his top foreign policy ad-
viser, Anthony Lake, quietJy or-
dered up two dozen "option pa-
pers" from Democratic experts to
guide the president-elect's first
steps in his sodden transforma-
tion from candidate to world
leader.
Lake posed three questions,
according to some who received
the request: What international
crises, deadlines and demands for
early action will face President
Clinton when he takes office Jan.
20? What should Clinton do first
to put his stamp on America's
foreign policy? And how should
he conduct himself during the 77-
day transition?
"The effort was to identify
hot issues � issues on which he
might be called upon to make a
statement or send a signal one
adviser said. "The idea was to
enableClinton to move quickly in
the transition
Clinton's aides swore every-
one involved to secrecy. The Ar-
kansas governor was insistent that
he not appear overconfident with
election day still weeks away.
But the afternoon after his
victory, when Clinton emerged
from the Arkansas governor's
mansion, his first words were a
carefully crafted foreign policy
statementintended to send a sig-
nal of calm. "Today I want to
reaffirm the essential continuity
of American foreign policy he
said gravely. "I urge America's
friends and foes alike to recog-
nize that even as America's
administrations change,
America's fundamental interests
do not
Then the candidate who ran
as a champion of domestic issues
plunged in to a round of interna-
tional telephone calls that would
have done George Bush proud:
Russian President Boris N.
Yeltsin, German Chancellor
Helmut Kohl, Japanese Prime
Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, Saudi
Arabia's King Fahd, and more.
Admissions
Continued from page 1
"The tight admissions situa-
tion for the spring semester could
mean that some very qualified
students who wish to transfer
ties won't make it to ECU at this
point.
They might be admitted for
the fall of 1993, but there will be
( . � ����" ui �77o, out tnere will b
rom community colleges, other valuable time lost in individuals
tour-year colleges and universi- lives in the meantime
IN THE ARMY,
NURSES AREN'T JUST IN DEMAND.
THEY'RE IN COMMAND.
Any nurse who just wants a job can
find one. But if you're a nurs
ing student who wants to be in
command of your own career, consider
the Army Nurse Corps. You'll be treated as
a competent professional, given your own
patients and responsibilities commensurate
with your level of experience. As
an Army officer, you'll command the
respect you deserve. And with the added
benefits only the Army can offer-a $5000
signing bonus, housing allowances and 4
weeks paid vacation-you'll be well in com-
mand of your life. Call I-800-USA ARMY
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
TRAVEL SEE THE WORLD
STUDY ABROAD,
RECEIVE CREDIT
AND PAY ECU TUITION!
Contact:
STEPHANIE EVflNCHO
International Programs
757-6769
Visit Our New Location!
International House
(behind McDonalds & across from Mendenhall
See our display in GCB Lobby on
Wed, Nov. 18 from 8:30-2:00
Seafood House & Oyster Bar
WWSERimG OYSTERS tt OUR OYSTER BAR
51.00 OFF Any Meal �xcept Specials
Shrimp Plate $3.95
Trout & Shrimp Plate $4.95
Ocean Perch $4.95
Offer Good Mon-Thurs
Washington Highway TnUl n Permits
(NC 33 �) (10th St. �xt) UJ,komc
Greenville, NC
WHO COULDN'T
USE SOME
752-3172,
The East Carolinian is currently
accepting applications for
SYSTEMS MANAGER
The candidate's responsibilities and
qualifications would include:
�Ensuring that computer hardware
���jand software are working correctly
being responsible for troubleshooting minor software
problems, or resolve problems by calling the appropriate
service personnel vv u"Iue
�Managing The East Carolinian's network server
�Developing training and orientation sessions about
computer software for new staff members
�Be enrolled as a student at East Carolina University
�Have and maintain a minimum of a 2.0 grade point average
while employed at The East Carolinian 8
SnJiMn letH?ine thC newWer's Production needs and
Keep an up-to-date inventory of
equipment, parts, and supplies
�Have extensive knowledge of
Apple Macintosh hardware (CPUs,
LaserWriters, modems, scanners
monitors, wiring, etc.) and software (networking, desktop
publishing & word processing applications, graphic &
telecommunications software)
Applications are available at The East Carolinian office
located on the second floor of the Students PubsbiMfg
Navel Oranges Each
Interested in a
Career
as a Paralegal?
Legal Assistants Program
� A certificate program open to qualified women
who have a baccalaureate degree
� Approved by the American Bar Association
� Intensive summer schedule May-August; part-time
evening schedules beginning January or September
� Placement service for graduates is without fee to
employer or graduate.
Applications Deadline for the 1993 Summer Program: March 1,1993 For details
��!� AfrU PW C�n,inuin� MerediU, Cor
fuPERsiziS UKE �IS -WHY SH0P YWHERE ELSE?
Colgate
Toothpaste
Tube
fJ89
IN THE DAIRY CASE" RECULAR OR HOMESTYLE
Kroger
Orange Juice
it
64-OZ.
ASSORTED FLAVORS
I Country Club
I icecream
12-Gal.

Enjoy
em
CLASSIC
CAFFEINE FREE DIET COKE
Diet Coke or
Coca cola Classic
12-Pak
12-OZ.
Cans
$2J9
COPYRIGHT 1992 - THE KROGER CO ITFM5 Awn
PRICES GOOD SUNDAY NOV?!THROUGH SATUR
DAY. NOV. 21, 1992 IN GREENVILLE WE RESERVE
DEALERS T� UMIT QUANT,TIES NOnI SOLD TO
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY-Each of these advertised .terns
is required to be readily available for sale ,n each Kroger
Store except as specifically noted in this ad If we do run
out of an advertised item, we will offer you your choice ol
a comparable tern when available, reflechng the same
Srr$S �� 3 fincheck "hich will entitle you to purchase
toe advertised item at the advertised price withm 30 days
purcha�sneed ' C�UP�n be acceP� P�' item






4
NOVEMBER 17, 1992
Study examines cancer
among black females
By Shay Pierce
Staff Writer
Breast cancer stil 1 has a high
death rate in North Carolina, but
more so for black females.
The East Carolina Univer-
sity Center on Aging will
mortality rate and this is, more
than likely, a significant reason
why.
The researchers will take
random samples of areas where
black women live in 10 North
Carolina communities.
Leaders apprehensive
about gays in military
be working with Univer-
sity of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill's Medical
School on a major can-
cer research study.
The National Cancer
Institute is funding the Uni-
versity of North Carolina
Lineberger Comprehensive Can-
cer Center with the money to
perform the project. Lineberger
is one of four cancer centers in
the United States.
The study will target black
women, 50 years old or more, in
Eastern North Carolina to find
out why they don't have
mammograms on a regular ba-
sis or at all.
Black women havea higher
TATE
EWS
In these areas, researchers
will go door to door for inter-
views in the first year and hope-
fully use those same addresses
again over the next two years
to determine reasons for those
women not having
mammograms done.
Faculty from Chapel Hill
will also come down this year
to start programs to inform
women of the needs to have
mammograms and emphasize
its importance.
Los Angeles Times
Congressional leaders ex-
pressed apprehension Sunday
about President-elect Bill Clinton's
plans to lift the military's ban on
homosexuals, urging him to move
slowly or risk creating an uproar
in Congress and the armed ser-
vices.
"I think we ought to proceed
verycautiously said Democratic
Sen. Sam Nunn of Georgia, chair-
man of the Senate Armed Services
Committee, appearing on CBS's
"Face the Nation
"If you did it overnight, I'd
fear for the lives of people in the
military themselves Nunn said,
warning of possible violence
against gays and lesbians in the
service. "I think there could be
some very emotional feelings. So I
would prefer that it be stretched
out over a period of time.
"We've got to consider not
only the rights of homosexuals,
but also the rights of those who are
not homosexual and who give up
a great deal of their privacy when
FREE PREGNANCY TEST
while you wait
Free & Confidential
Services & Counseling
Carolina Pregnancy Center
111 E. 3rd Street
The Lee Building
Greenville NC
757-0003
Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:30-3:30
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Serving Vegetarian Carry-out Meals, Sandwiches
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11:30 - 2:00. Mon thru Fri
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WHAT IS ALL THIS? Come find out!
Some items available after Cafe hours.
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APPROVED $200 WESTERN AUTO
V CHARGE TIRE PURCHASE.
Tread design may vary from illustrated Limited tire warranties for miles specified We reserve the right
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these prices Some tre sizes may be back-ordered from the manufacturer. Tire sizes other than those
advertised may be avaBable for special order at additional cost Credit provided by NationsBank. N A
Complete details in store.
Computer Wheel Alignment
Most rear wheel drive Most front wheel drive
24" 34"
We measure and adjust the alignment angles of each
wheel to meet manufacturer's specifications. Every
vehicle requires different adjustments, only the proper
alignment will be performed for your vehicle. Parts and
labor for rear shims extra. Light trucks and vans extra.
Front Disc or Rear Drum Brake Service.
We use Quality Raybestos Brake Parts.
�Most U.S. Cars �With Road Test
As CQ99
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We'll replace disc brake pad or rear shoe. Resurface drums and rotors.
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AUTO AMERICA
119 Red Banks Rd Greenville, N.C.
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Store Hours: MonFri. 8-9, Sat. 8-8, Sun. 1 -6
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Your Auto America Dealer can order from his distribution center If he is temporarily out of
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you want at the sale price when it becomes available Right reserved to limit quantities
Prices, terms and merchandise assortment optional with Dealer
Open
Sunday
1-6
they goin the military said Nunn,
who added that he agrees with the
military's prohibition against ho-
mosexuals, which has been in ef-
fect in one form or another since
World War II.
Speakingon NBC's "Meet the
Press Senate Republican Leader
Bob Doleof Kansas also expressed
concern about Clinton's intentions.
"I'd advise him to appoint a
commission and study it. Mind
you, he's going to get in more
trouble than he can add up right
now if he starts with an executive
order on that issue. It will cause
real problems in the military and it
seems to me that he'd be making a
big mistake
"He ought to put it on the
back burner Dole suggested. "Let
somebody else take a hard look at i t
first, then make recommendations.
There are other things you can do
by executive order that wouldn't
blow the lid off the Capitol. I think
this one might come close
Last week, Clinton indicated
that hedoes plan to appoint a panel
to study the situation.
Honor
Continued from page 1
Buckley.
White, who worked on
the Red & Black case, said the
secrecy that surrounds college
judicial hearings has drawn
concern around the country.
"Our country had been
founded on openness she
said. "In our court system, we
make judges accountable for
their decisions. If you don't
know what is going on, there
is the potential for abuse
Speier said he believed
ECU's judicial system was
open because a review board,
composed of seven students
and four faculty members,
oversees the board's activities.
He also said anyone could gain
access to the meeting by get-
ting the approval of the ac-
cused.
"I don't think that this is
closed system Speier said.
"There is nothing to preclude
you from sitting outside the
hearing board every single
Thursday night at 6 o'clock,
and even if you are watching
The East Carolina University
Performing Arts Series
proudly presents a special added attraction
The Waverly Consort
in
The CbRlSTAUS STOKV
This production is based on some of the most important medieval manuscripts
detailing the story of Christmas. In the timeless tradition of the medieval
church dramas and mystery plays, eight singers and five instrumentalists,
beautifully costumed and playing reproductions of medieval instruments,
enact the message of the archangel Gabriel, the journey of the Magi, the scene
at the manger in Bethlehem, the intrigue of Herod and his court, and celebrate
the glorious tradition of Christmas in drama and in song.
This progriirj is made possible in p�it by � grant from the Nitionsl Endowment for the Aits
through the Southern Arts Federation, of which the North Csrolins Arts Council is a member.
Monday, Nov. 30,1992 Wright Auditorium 8:00 p.m.
Public $15 ECU FacultyStaff-$10 ECU StudentYouth. $7
Group rates are available. All tickets $15 at the door.
For tickets contact:
The Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Phone. 919-757-4788 or, toll free, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
them going in, waiting for tKg
person to come out, and talking
to the victim. Nothing to pre-
clude you from asking the ac-
cused if you can go in there
Complaints about ECU's
Honor Board have arisen in the
past.
In September 1991, a stu-
dent filed a rape charge against
an ECU football player. The'
woman said the Honor Board,
specifically her attorney
handled the case poorly.
"I was not told I could have
witnesses in the hearing,
whereas the other person
brought in witnesses and was
better prepared she said. "(My
attorney) didn't even ask many,
of thequestjons,Iaskedmostof
them. I felt if he was going to
defend me, he could have been
better prepared. I would
never recommend anyone in
this situation going to the
school's board
The victim also filed rape
charges against the football
player with the Pitt County Si�.
periorCourt. However, she later
withdrew the charges with the1"
agreement that the player af-
tend counseling sessions with,
her.
Dan Backer, a senior ma:
joring in sociology, has served
on the Honor Board for two
years. Backer said students on �
the Honor Board could some
times be too sympathetic to-
ward a defendant, resulting in
a lenient decision.
Backer said although the -
system has flaws, he had confi- ;
dence in the fairness of the hear-
ings.
"In a guilty plea, all fac- -
tors for each case are discussed
in a private meeting he said
"Factors such as a desire to re-
main in school, whether they
are the first member of their,
family to go to college, whether ;
they are freshmen, things like
that.
At the same time, if a per-�
son is a threat to the student'
body, there is no way they will
be found innocent
FINANCIAL
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756-7256
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The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 17, 1992
Classifieds

Page 5
FOR RENT
KINGS ARMS APARTMENTS
:1 and 2 bedroom apartments. En-
ergy-efficient, several locations in
town. Carpeted, kitchen appli-
ances, some water and sewer paid,
washerdryer hookups. Call 752-
8915.
FOR RENT- One bedroom apart-
ment walking distance to class.
Avail, now call 758-3092.
HOUSES FOR RENT: 800 E. Wil-
low Street, 3 BR-1.5 Baths, $600 per
month. 1108 Forbes Street, 4 BR-2
Baths, $600 permonth. 2608Tryon
Drive, 3BR-1 Bath, $550 permonth.
1 YR lese and security deposit.
Duf fus Rental 756-2675.
APARTMENTTO SUBLET: One
bedroom; $280 a month. 4 blocks
from campus. 2 can share. Avail-
able December 18. Lease ends in
May. Apt. 202 Kings Arms. Call
758-4366.
SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT for
mature person. Room, private
entrance, full house privileges. Call
after 4pm 756-5467.
ROOMMA I E WANTED
ROOMMATE - Non-smoking fe-
male roommate needed for 2nd
semester. Large 2 bedroom apart-
ment. Bus avail. Rent 187501
2 utilities. Call 758-2549 or 758-
3092.
NEEDED 1 OR 2 FEMALE
ROOMMATES for apartment in
Wilson Acres. 13 rent and utili-
ties. Available Dec. or Jan. Please
call 830-9066.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
3 bedroom house. 14 rent ($140
month) 14 utilities. Deposit
negotiable. 5 blocks from campus.
Call 758-6810 leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Male
non-smoking roommate wanted
to share 2 bedroom apt. beginning
Jan. 1st. FREE AC, HEAT, and
HOT WATER. $182.50month
12 utilities. 2 blocks from cam-
pus. Call 758-6924.
ROOMMATE WANTED: For
two bedroom one bath house
with two others. Two blocks from
campus and downtown. $116
month and 13 utilities. Call 758-
9862.
TAR RIVER - 3 non-sm oking male
roommates needed beginning
January 1st. Rent is $156 a month
plus 14 of the utilities. Located
on the river. Call Kevin France at
75$-6701.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED to share one bedroom
apt?. Rent $140 mo. 12 utilities.
Ava. Dec. 752-46-16. Ask for Car-
.rie.
I ;
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED by January 1st. Fur-
nished 2 bedroom apt. 1 mile from
campus (on ECU bus route). Must
be a nonsmoker but social drinker.
$172.50mth12 utilities. Please
call 752-1782. AH or Kerri
FEMALE ROOMMATE
NEEDED: To share a 2 bedtroom
R()()MMATE WANTED
duplex. 1 block from campus.
$170month plus 12 utilities. Call
758-5845. Leave message.
F( )R SALE
PAY IN-STATE TUITION? Read
Residency Status and Tuition, the
practical pamphlet written by an
attorney on the in-state residency
application process. For Sale: Stu-
dent Stores, Wright Building.
GOVERNMENT SEIZED
CARS,trucks, boats, 4 wheelers,
motorhomes, by FBI, IRS, DEA.
Available your area now. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext. c-5999.
FOR SALE: 5 piece Cherry B.room
set. Moving - must sell! $395.00.
Call 946-9653.
FOR SALE: One way ticket leaves
Greenville Airport Nov. 25 4:00
pm and arrives at Dulles Airport
Nov. 25 7:23 pm. Change over in
Charlotte. Best Offer Call 321-
2145.
FOR SALE: Prince Graphite ten-
nis racket. Mid size with cover
and new strings, $90. Prince ten-
nis bag, holds 2 rackets and shoes,
Never Used, $30. Call 752-8816.
FERRET FOR SALE: Cage, food,
and supplies included. To good
home only. $70. Call 758-4298
Days, 752-6666 after 6.
63 VW BUG converted to 12 volt,
new heat exchange, clutch trans-
mission, rebuilt engine, AMFM
cassette, classic for $2000. Call
Cris 757-3446.
BOOKTRADER
BUY AND TRADE
PAPERBACK BOOKS
OVER
50,000 TITLES
919 Dickinson Ave.
Greenville, NC
758-6909
COMICS OLD & NEW
EiOVVi USED CD'S
WANTED
GUARANTEED WORK AVAIL-
ABLE. Excellent pay for EASY
home based work. Full part-time.
Rush self-addressed stamped en-
velope: Publishers (G2) 1821
HillandaleRd. lB-295Durham,NC
27705
$360UP WEEKLY. Mailing bro-
chures! Spare full-time. Set own
hours! RUSH self-addressed
stamped envelope: Publishers (G1)
1821 Hillandale Rd. 1B-295
Durham, NC 27705
SAVE ON SPRING BREAK '93!
Jamaica, Cancun, and Florida from
$119.00. Book earl and save $$$!
Organize group and travel free!
Sun Splash Tours 1-800-426-7710.
YOUTH BASKETBALL
COACHES: The Greenville Rec-
reation and Parks Department is
recruiting for 12 to 16 part-time
youth basketball coaches for the
winter youth basketball program.
Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the basketball skills
HELP WANTED
and have the ability and patience
to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young people
ages 9-18, in basketball fundamen-
tals. Hours are from 3:00 pm until
7:00 pm with some night and week-
end coaching. This program will
run from December to mid-Febru-
ary. Salary rates start at $4.25 per
hour, formoreinformation, please
call Ben James or Michael Daly at
830-4550.
SPRING BREAKERS - Promote
our Florida Spring Breakpackages.
Earn MONEY and FREE trips.
Organize SMALL or LARGE
groups. Call Campus Marketing.
800-423-5264
POSTAL JOBS available! Many
positions. Great benefits. Call 1-
800-333-3737 ext.3712.
NOW HIRING SPRING BREAK
REPS for Panama City Beach:
Greeks, Organizations, Individu-
als earn cash, free trips & experi-
ence. Call Joe (ENDLESS SUM-
MER 1-800-234-7007)
EARN COMMISSIONS & SKI
FREE by becoming a group sales
representative for southeast ski
area. Must be active & sales ori-
ented. Send resumes to Paul Ma-
son, Director of Marketing, New
Winterplace Inc PO Box 1, Flat
Top, WV 25841
EARN $1000WEEK at home stuff-
ing envelops! For information,
send long self addressed stamped
envelope to CJ Enterprises, Box
67068L, Cuyahoga Falls, OH 44222
WE ARE GETTING READY FOR
CHRISTMAS Are you? Brody's
is accepting applications for part
time sales and customer service
associates. Flexible hoursmer-
chandise discounts. Apply Brody's
The Plaza Mon. - Wed. 1-4 pm.
WANTED: Student with pickup
or van to travel from Northern
New Jersey to ECU. Need to get
dresser to school. WILL PAY! Call
Wayne at 758-5351.
FREE SPRING BREAK VACA-
TION - Organize a group, earn
commissions and Free Trips! Call
800-826-9100.
FREE TRIPS AND MONEY! In-
dividuals and Student Organiza-
tions wanted to promote the Hot-
test Spring Break Destinations, call
the nation's leader. Inter�Cam-
pus Programs 1-800-327-6013.
WAITRESS AND CASHIER
NEEDED part-time, Good pay and
tips. Call 355-0143 after 6 pm leave
message.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Alaska Summer
Employment
FISHERIES - Students Needed! Earn $600
per week in canneries or $4,000 per month
on fishing boats. Free Transportation! Room
and Board! OverS.OOO openings. Noexperience
necessary. Male or Female. Get a head start on
summer! For your employment program call:
1-206-545-4155 Ext A5362
Student Employment Services
Achievement Through Adventure
Student wishing to work in Alaska matt be
eighteen or older r,d in good physical condition
Announcements
GREENVILLE AREA B1.
SEXUAL-GAY-LESBIAN
GROUP
Group activities and discussion
of issues relating to same-sex ori-
entation. Meetings are closed.
Call 757-6766 11:00-12:15 Tues.
and Thurs. or 1:00-4:00 pm Wed.
for information.
TRAVELSTUDY OPPORTU-
NITIES
Are you interested in visiting
another region of the world?
Would you like to live and learn
another culture with other ECU
students? Learn about the op-
portunities available for summer
or semester study abroad through
the Study AbroadExchange
Expo to be held in the lobby of
the General Classroom Building
from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm on
Wednesday, November 18. We
can find the right program for
you! Remember to stop by the
General Classroom Building on
Wednesday -youmightdiscover
an opportunity you wouldn't
want to miss! If unable to be
there, contact Ms. Stephanie
Evancho, 757-6769, for more in-
formation on summer or semes-
ter Mudy programs.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC
STUDENT CENTER
The Newman Catholic Stu-
dent Center invites you to wor-
ship with them. Sunday Masses:
11:30 am and 8:30 pm mass at the
Newman Center. 953 E. 10th St
two houses from the Fletcher Mu-
sic Building. For further infor-
mation, please call Fr. Paul Vaeth,
757-1991.
CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FFI-
LOWSHIP
Looking for a fellowship of
Christians, a place to pray, study
God's word, be involved in so-
cial and service projects? Need a
refuge from time to time? Cam-
pus Christian Fellowship may be
what you are looking for. Our
Weekly meetings are at 7 pm
Wednesdays at our Campus
House located at 200 E. 8th St
directly across CotancheSt. from
Mendenhall Student Center. Ev-
eryone is welcome. For more
information, call Tim Turner,
Campus Minister, at 752-7199.
EAST CAROLINA HONORS
ORGANIZATION
ECHO - will be meeting Tues
Nov. 17, in the GCB Rm 2017 at
5:00 pm. We're planning to have
teachers from o mo of the honors
classes nex1 semester to come and
tell a little about them. Come
and ask quests.is. A.11 honors
students welcome regardless of
prior attendance.
ECU EQUESTRIAN CLUB
TEAM
There will be a meeting on
Thursday November 19 in MSC
Room 14 at 5:00 pm. Anyone
interested in joining the Eques-
trian club or team should be there.
No riding experience necessary
call Angela 931-8453 or Holly 931-
8762 for info. Hope to see you
there!
GAMMA BETA PHI
Attention all of you Gamma
Beta Phi members; our next meet-
ing will be held on November 17
at 4:00 in Mendenhall Student
Center rm 244. Look forward to
seeing you there.
AMERICAN MARKETINC.
ASSOCIATION
The American Marketing As-
sociation will hold a general
meeting today at 4 pm in room
1022 of the General Classroom
Building. Dr. Edward Wheatley,
chair of the marketing depart-
ment, will be the guest speaker,
and refreshments will be served
following the meeting. A11A.M.A
members and their guests are in-
vited to attend.
HELP WANTED
GREEKS & CLUBS
RAISE A COOL
$1000
IN JUST ONE WEEK!
PLUS $1000 FOR THE
MEMBER WHO CALLS!
No obligation. No cost.
You also get a FREE
HEADPHONE RADIO
just for calling
1-800-932-0528, Ext. 65
SERVICES OFFERED
"SPRING BREAK! : Baha-
mas Cruise (10 meals) $279!
Panama City with kitchen $119!
Cancun $429! Jamaica $479!
Daytona (kitchens) $149!
KeyWest $249! Prices increase
121192! 1-800-678-63-86
GUARANTIED FREE SPRING
BREAK TRIP to Bahamas or
Panama City! Cancun, Jamaica,
Daytona, Keys! Sign-up before
121192! Springbreak! 1-800-
678-6386.
QUALITY WORD PROCESS-
ING: Specializing in letters, re-
sumes, business and medical
transcription term papers, the-
sis, manuscripts. Anything that
needs to be typed. Dictaphone
transcription available. Call 321-
2522
MOBILE MUSIC PRODUC-
TIONS jams with ECU Greeks
Top 40, Dance, Alternative, Rap,
Classic Rock, Beach, Country,
we've got it all. Call early for
bookings. 758-4644. Ask for Lee.
DEPENDABLE, CERTIFIED
BABY-SITTER looking for kids
to baby sit! Very outgoing and
energetic, can work most after-
noons and evenings (even week-
ends)! Also CPR certified. Call
Dana at 931-7825 or at the East
Carolinian, 757-6366 any time.
RESUME COMPOSITION
AND TYPESETTING SER-
VICES! 10 discount on stu-
dent packages if you mention
this ad! Laserprinted and stored
on disk! The Write Resume, 105
Oakmont Drive 756-0697.
RESEARCH INFORMATION
Largest Library of Information In U.S.
all subjects
Order Catalog Today with VIsaMC or COD
800-351-0222
TOLL FREE
HOT LINE
In C�llt. (213)477-8226
Or, rush $2.00 to: Research Information
11322 Idaho Ave. J206-A. Los Angles, CA 90025
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: GOLD CHARM bracelet
on Halloween night, in the down-
town area. Sentimental value. Re-
ward offered. Call 758-5096.
LOST: WATCH in the biol. build-
ing or outside. Citizen elegance
with initials CJP 1990 on the back.
REWARD call Chris 757-0641.
RING FOUND IN VICINITY OF
COTTON residence hall. Please
call with description and size of
ring to claim.
LOST: BLACK CHOW. 3 12
months old. Bells Fork area. Call
Laura 355-7375, 757-4650.
KRISHANMURTI Study Group
being formed. Are you interested?
Evenings, 756-0429 Ask for
SHAUN NGUYEN - My wonder-
ful Health Instructor. I want to
spend the rest of my life with you.
Secret Admirer (Section 47).
ATTENTION ALL NEW AND
OLD ORDER OF OMEGA MEM-
BERS: There will be a meeting for
all members on November 22 in
Mendenhall room 221 at 5:00. This
will be the last meeting at which we
will hold initiations this semester.
Please attend and bring a can good
for a Thanksgiving basket. If you
can not attend or still owe dues call
Jenny at 758-5024.
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA: Thanks
for a great time at the game Satur-
day. Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
TALL, GOOD LOOKING SWM
runner in mid 30's looking to meet
attractive SWF runner, same age or
younger, to run with, go to running
races, and maybe even date. Have
great sense of humor, otherwise
would not be running this ad. En-
joy rock'n'roll, going to dinner,
working out, traveling to races, big
events, and staying young. Like to
treat women well. Send name and
photo to Runner, 1968-C Quail
Ridge Rd Greenville, NC 27858.
CONGRATULATIONS to the
new 1993 officers of Sigma Sigma
Sigma: KimberlyLadd (President),
Jennifer Wright (Vice President),
Missie Griffen (Secretary), Brandy
Nixon (Treasurer), Carmella
Phillips (Education), and Ann
Selden (Rush). We know you guys
will do a super job We love you!
Your Tri Sigma Sisters
TAU KAPPA EPSILON, We had a
great time partying with you guys
again. Lets get together again soon.
PERSONALS
Thanks for everything. Love, the
Sigmas.
HEY GALS! The new Mary Kay
consultant is here! Get a couple of
Friends Together and give me a call
for a Free Facial - Mrs. E 758-4040.
DELTA SIGMA PHI - The stars
were out Thus. Night! From the
Blues Brothers to Shirley Temple,
everyone had a great time! Thanks!
Love, Alpha Omicron Pi
ALPHA PHI WOULD LIKE TO
THANK all the faculty for all they
do. Happy Faculty Appreciation
Week.
CONGRATULATIONS! ToBruce,
Melissa, Rob, and Kathy on your
becoming officers of the Science Fic-
tion and Fantasy Organization! I
know you will do a fantastic job! -
Karen.
WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM
- WOST2000 OR 2400 (3) Introduc-
tion to Women's Studies Tues. 01-
6:30 9:30 - Taylor and Wolfe.
WOST3910,3920,3930 (3) Directed
Readings in Women's Studies.
WOST 4500 (3) Internship in
Women's Studies. ANTH 4 S2 (3)
Anthropology of Aging. W. 01 -
18:30 21:30 - Mathews. �ASES
2001 (3) Intro to Ethnic Stud ies. T TH
01 -11:00 12:15 - Wilentz. ENGL
3100 (3) World Literature T TH 01 -
9:30 10:45 - Wilentz. ENGL 3260
(3) Black Literature in America MWF
01 -12:00 1KX) - Congleton; 02 -1 ��
2:00 - Watson; 03 - 1:00 2:00 -
Congleton; 04 - 3:00 4:00 - Watson.
ENGL 3300 (3) Women and Litera-
ture. MWF 01 - 9:00 10:00 - Farr; 03
- 2:00 3:00 - Farr; TTH 02 - 9:30
10:45-Fay. HONORS299-12:30
13:45 - Fay. ENGL 6390 (3) Special
Studies Seminar: World Literature
in English: The Women's Voice. M
01-6:309:30-Wilentz. FORL2221
(3)Literature inTranslation:TheHo-
locaust. T 01 - 6:30 9:30 - Bassmart.
HIST 2140 (3) Women in American
History. TTH 01 - 9:30 10:45 -
Levine; 02 - 12:30 1:45 - Levine.
HIST 3110 (3) History of Black
Americans. TTH 01 - 9:30 10:45 -
Dennard. HIST 5005 (3) Selected
topicWomen's History. W03 -18:00
2100 - Levine. HIST 5230 (3)
Themes in African America. TH 01 -
12:30 1:45 - Dennard. PHIL 3690
(3) Women and Religion. T 01 -18:30
21:30 - Mercer. PSYC 5350 (3)
Psychology of Sexual Behavoir.TTH
01 - 14:00 15:15 - McCammon.
SOCW 5007 (3) Women as Clients.
T01 -8:00 11KX)-Causby. Formore
information on the undergraduate
minor or graduate minor in
Women's Studies call the Women's
Studies office at 757-6268.
PARTY! PARTY! PARTY!
SPRING BREAK
HOW ABOUT IT IN THE
BAHAMAS OR FLORIDA
KEYS. WHERE THE PARTY
NEVER ENDS. SPEND IT ON
YOUR OWN PRIVATE YACHT.
ONE WEEK ONLY
$385.00 PER PERSON
INCLUDES FOOD AND MUCH
MORE
EASV SAILING VACHT CHARTERS
1-800-780-4001
3 BEDROOM DUPLEX - Brand new and
ready tc rent immediately. Great location, close
io campus. Call 752-8320 from 9:00 am to 5:00
pm, or 355-4826 after 6:00 pm.
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY
Good locations. Reasonable rent
Call 752-8320 from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.
PERFORMING ARTS SERIFS
The Waverly Consort will per-
form the Christmas storyon Mon-
day, November 30, 1992 at 8:00
pm. In this Christams play based
on Medieval manuscripts, eight
singers and five instrumentalists
enact the message of the archan-
gel Gabriel, the journey of the
Magi, the scene of the manger in
Bethlehem, the intrigue of Herod
and his court, and celebrate
Christmas in drama and song
NINPO CLUB
Ninjutsu is made up of meth-
ods for striking and grappling in
unarmed fighting, tumbling and
breakfalls, conditioning the body
and maintaining health. Relying
on matural fluid body movement
and scientifically applied dynam-
ics, allows this martial art to be
adaptable and effectivve for all
individuals. The focus of the club
will be on traditional and mod-
ern day self-defense situations.
Training times are Monday -
Thursday at 9:30 pm in
Christenbury Gym, Room 108.
All who are interested are wel-
come to attend.
PUBLIC SERVICE AN-
NOUNCEMENT
The East Carolina University
School of Art announces it's an-
nual Christmas Sale on Decem-
ber 3 and 4 from 8 am till 5 pm.
Textiles, ceramics, metals,
printmaking, and wood design
will make up the majority of the
work to be sold. The items are
made by the students of the art
school. The sale will be held in
the Wellington B. Gray Art Gal-
lery located in the School of Art.
For further information call 757-
6336.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will be meeting
Thursday, November 19th at 6:30
pm. The meeting will be held at
Chico's Restaurant. All Phi Eta
Sigma members are encouraged
to attend. If there are any ques-
tions, please contact the Vice-
President at 752-5792.
EQUESTRIAN CLUB AND
TEAM
The team is competing and
the club is planning fun activi-
ties. No riding experience is
needed for either the team orclub.
All interested persons please at-
tend the November 19 meeting
in Mendenhall room 14 at 5 pm.
Any questions? Please contact
Angela High at 931-8453 or
Adrienne Jones at 931-7722.
ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EVENTS
TUES NOV. 17 - - Kurt
Schmiemann, tuba and Alisha
Hudson, trumpet, Senoir Recital
(Fletcher Recital Hall, 7:00 pm,
Free). WED NOV. 18 - - Con-
temporary Jazz Ensemble; Paul
Tardif, Director (Fletcher Recital
Hall, 8:00 pm, Free). THURS
NOV. 19 - - ECU Guitar Ensemble;
Elliot Frank, Director (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00 pm, Free). FRL,
NOV. 20 - - Jenny Smith, voice,
Senior Recital and Renee Rice,
voice, Junior Recital (Fletcher
Recital Hall, 7:00 pm, Free) and
the ECU Jazz Ensemble; Carroll
V. Dashiell, Director (Wright
Auditorium, 8:00 pm, Free).
SUN NOV. 22 - - ECU
Symphoiony Orchestra; Mark
Deal, Guest Conductor (Wright
Auditorium, 3:00 pm, Free).
RECREATIONAL SERVICES
PsstWanna Learn How To
Climb? Recreational Services will
be offering a climbing I work-
shop on Tuesday, November 17
at 3:00 pm at the Climb Tower.
The cost is $8.00 students, $10.00
faculty, staff, and guest. Register
now at the Outdoor Recreation
Center or call 757-6387 for more
information. Climb passes are
now available - for one day $1,00,
for a semester $25.00.
a
MMl





I t - i-a.
77ie East Carolinian
November 17, 1992
Opinion
Page 6
Dropadd change will hurt students
The ECU Faculty Senate has proposed an
ultimatum to the Student Government Associa-
tion regarding changes in the dropadd sched-
ule.
The Faculty Senate has proposed that the
current drop schedule be shortened to seven
calender days after the first day of classes be-
gins, or five class days after the start of classes.
On the sixth day, a student may add classes on
to his or her schedule, but may not drop a class
unless it accommodates the addition of a class.
For summer session classes, the dropadd
period would be changed to the first two days of
each session. After the two days, a student can
make the same changes as they would be able to
make in the fall or spring semesters.
If the SGA can not propose a better plan to
counteract the problems with the current drop
add schedule, the Faculty Senate will arbitrarily
implement their schedule. The SGA has to meet
this ultimatum by January 1993 in order to
insure that the dropadd period properly re-
flects the students' concerns.
Changing the dropadd schedule alone
(not to mention shortening it) is an idea whose
time hasn't � and should never � come. The
current schedule allows students the much-
A SIDEWARD GLANCE
needed opportunity to drop a class that has
proved too difficult for them. Most instructors
have alsobased their exam schedule to allow the
students to take one exam right before the drop
period ends.
Giving students (and instructors) the op-
portunity to evaluate their future performance
in a class with the first exam is a necessary
stepping-stone in the education process here at
ECU. A student can now drop a class that he or
she has found, after the first exam, to be too
difficult. Instructors can also weed out students
who really don't have the drive to learn the
information being imparted and eventually end
up with livelier, more interested classes.
If the dropadd schedule is changed, then
the total length of time that a student stays at
ECU will increase dramatically (as if people
aren't here long enough already). Limiting stu-
dents in this way will only increase low grades
or incompietes. That does not meet this
university's educational goals.
Forcing students to stay in a class that is too
difficult or has no appeal to them abounds with
the stink of bureaucracy. It seems that this uni-
versity just wants to make things easier on them-
selves, even if it's at the expense of the students.
THE FIVE DAY RETURN POLICY AS
APPLIED TO OTHER AREAS OF LIFE.
Quote of
the Day
For every
person
wishing
to teach
there are 30
not wanting
to be
taught.
W. C. Sellarand
R. J. Yeatman
A VIEW FROM ABOVE
By T. Scott Batcheloi
Silent animals unable to speak on torture
By pavid Jones NFL needs to become politically correct
In late 1991, the Los Angeles
Times reported that General Mo-
tors Corporation uses animals in
their crash test simulations. Each
year, 20,000 dogs, pigs, rabbits,
ferrets, mice and rats are torn,
shredded, mutilated and broken
in a grisly death all in the name of
discovery and science. Why does
GM choose to use animals in their
test while every other car com-
pany on the face of the earth uses
crash test dummies and computer
simulations?
The answer, according to GM,
lies in the fact that they claim the
animal tests give them the edge
in designing cars for the maxi-
mum safety of its passengers. This
being the case, why does the Na-
tional Insurance Institute, who
ranks the safety of cars, report
thatthe top four cars on a list of 10
with the highest "death rate" are
General Motors' cars? It is be-
cause Dr. Frankenstein is alive
and well in 1992 and he is work-
ing at GM.
According to the Animal Wel-
fare Act of 1966 (revised in 1976),
the number of animals that were
tested on in 1991 was 1,635,288.
But did anyone out there realize
that this does not include rats,
mice, birds or any kind of live-
stock? Taking this information
into account the Investor Respon-
sibility Research Center puts the
number at approximately
70,000,000. Folks, this is a trav-
esty that cannot be allowed to
continue.
Now then, before everyone
starts tuning up, let me state that
I do not want to halt scientific
progress. For example, The Can-
cer Research Center uses animals
in its humanitarian quest to find
cures for cancer, but even they
have no restrictions or guidelines
to speak of.
There are four main groups
that, in one way or another try to
influence and or change the cur-
rent status quo regarding animal
testing. The Humane Society, The
American Society for the Preven-
tion of Cruelty to Animals and
the People for the Ethical Treat-
ment of Animals (PETA) are the
first three. They all have similar
goals of introducing legislation
that will not only limit animal
testing, but will try to help find
alternative testing means.
The fourth group is the Ani-
mal Liberation Front, which has
adopted a type of civil disobedi-
ence in their ideals. They are ob-
viously more radical than the first
three groups. They follow three
main ideals: 1) They will not be-
tray each other; 2) They are not
afraid to go to jail; and 3) They
will not harm any animal or hu-
man. Their means are extreme,
but sometimes in today's world
you have to be to get your point
across. The point is they are mak-
ing headway. Just as an example,
a couple of years ago the ALF
broke into the laboratory area at
the University of Pennsylvania.
They stole 40 or so hours of vid-
eotape that had many of the
university's animal experiments
on it. When this tape was pre-
sented to a Congressional com-
mittee and the terrible carnage
was shown, hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars to be given to the
university were immediately
halted. They got the job done.
Membership in these organi-
zations has skyrocketed. The Hu-
mane Society is over 1.5 million
members strong. PETA's mem-
bership has quadrupled in the
past 10 years since its inception.
Public opinion is changing. Re-
cently Parent's magazine did a
survey that showed that 80 per-
cent of those surveyed were in
favor of the Humane Society's
and most of PETA's standards. A
recent Gallup Poll said that 90
percent of those surveyed would
use only cruelty-free products if
those products were labeled as
such.
Why then, are they not la-
beled, and why are 70,000,000
animals slaughtered each year in
the name of hygiene, vanity and
science? The answer lies in the
Cosmetics, Toiletries and Fra-
grance Association (CTFA). They,
along with monster corporations
like Gillette and L'Oreal, exist
solely for the purpose of oppos-
ing any legislation that PET A or
the Humane Society tries to pro-
pose. It's amazing what money
will buy, don't you think?
A large majority of America
wants one thing and a couple of
corporation owners wants some-
thing else. Remember, people, I'm
talking about corporate labs that
force feed deodorant to dogs,
saturate cats in dangerous chemi-
cal solutions and drip cosmetics
into rabbits' eyes. These are not
experiments that will further the
progress of any science except the
science of torture.
The real travesty here is that
there is already in existence vi-
able alternatives to testing. The
Draize Test, for example, consists
of placing any substance into the
eyes of albino rabbits over and
over again for three to f o u r weeks.
An alternative to this mind-
less torture was invented by Dr.
Virginia Gordon. She developed
a toxicity test that uses isolated
cells in a test tube to determine
chemical effects. Over 120 orga-
nizations world-wide � includ-
ing Revlon, Avon, Estee Lauder
(who, by the way, now have cru-
elty free products) � agree tha'
the Dr. Gordon's test is every bit
as good as the Draize Test.
People, the bottom line here
is this � just think first. It doesn't
take that long to check ingredi-
ents in things. Going without fur
(if you can even afford it) is not
that big a sacrifice.
There is a ton of literature out
there telling more about the
groups that 1 have mentioned here
as well as ways you can help the
cause. Go find it. Read it, and
decide for yourself who is more
justified in what they do.
Think first � you just might
be lessening the amount of sense-
less terror that is inflicted on the
silentanimals, who neverdid any-
thing to deserve it and who can't
speak up for themselves.
The East Carolinian
James R. Knisely, General Manager
Blair Skinner, Managing Editor
Arthur A. Sutorius, Director of Advertising
Jeff Becker, News Editor
Elizabeth Shimmel, Asst. News Editor
Dana Danielson, Lifestyle Editor
Bobbi Perfetti, Asst. Lifestyle Editor
Robert Todd, Sports Editor
Sean Herring, Copy Editor
Gregory Dickens, Copy Editor
Deborah Daniel, Secretary
Joe Horst, Opinion Page Editor
Richard Haselrig, Staff Illustrator
Michael Albuquerque, Business Manager
John Billiard, Circulation Manager
Cori Daniels, Layout Manager
Monique Campbell, Classified Advertising Tech.
Woody Barnes, Advertising Production Manager
Karen Greenwell, System Manager
The East Carolinian has served the East Carolina campus community since 1925, emphasizing information that affects
ECU students. The East Carolinian publishes 12,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday. The masthead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the Editorial Board. The East Carolinian welcomes letters expressing all points of view. Letters
should Delimited to 250 words or less. For purposes of decency and brevity, The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit
or reject letters for publication. Letters should be addressed to The Editor, The East Carolinian, Publications Dldg ECU,
Greenville, N.C 27858-4353. For more information, call (919) 757-6366.
In reviewing my columns of
the last several weeks, I noticed
that most of them had been about
Bill Clinton. I think it's time for a
change.
So let's talk about the evils of
sports and how team names serve
to degenerate and deride whole
groups of people.
Take the NFL's New England
Patriots forinstance. New England
Patriots! Thegall, the unmitigated
bigotry! Imagine being one of the
descendants of a minuteman in
the Revolutionary War and see-
ing the disgusting portrayal on
football helmets of a patriot
crouched in a three-point stance.
Oh, the indignity!
Or how about the San Fran-
cisco '49ers? To have a football
team named after a hearty and
adventuresome groupof men who
risked their lives and fortunes in
search of gold in the California
Gold Rush of 1849 is despicable.
Don't be surprised if the great-
great-grandchildren of these men
file a class action suit against the
NFL to stop this senseless trag-
edy.
Ditto the Houston Oilers and
the New Orleans Saints. (How the
Vatican tolerates the latter is be-
yond me.)
And how could a proper ac-
counting of this travesty be made
without mentioning major league
baseball's Pittsburgh Pirates? One
gets the impression that the early
owners of this team, (probably �
dare I write it? � white men of
European descent) sat around and
said, "Hey, I know, let's belittle a
whole group of human beings.
Let's pick Pirates as our team
name Pirates, indeed. Perhaps
no other single group of people
has withstood more pernicious
stereotyping than pirates. The
dreadful image promulgated by
American history books of pirates
as men who sail the seas to plun-
der and rob other ships is repre-
hensible. I say take the word "Pi-
rates" off the ball caps and restore
some dignity to this once proud
group of people.
The list, unfortunately, goes
on. There are the Boston Celtics of
the NBA, for instance, and the New
York Knickerbockers (a slam on
either Dutch descendants in New
York or a style of pants, I'm not
sure which).
One insensitive football team
even uses (gulp!) Cowboys as its
moniker.
I'm not sure if there are any
true Vikings anymore, but if there
are, they should be rioting in the
streets of Minnesota. Why,calling
a team the Vikings is like calling
them the Caucasians! Imagine!
EDITORIAL NOTEBOOK
While I have this forum, why
stop with team names that put
down only' umans? I mean, what
right do we have to plaster on a T
shirt the picture of a dolphin wear-
ing a helmet and sell it down in
Miami for $20 a pop? Or to
trivialize the beauty of the cardi-
nal by slapping its image on a
football helmet in St. Louis? The
noble eagle is vandalized in Phila-
delphia; the defenseless Oriole is
exploited in Baltimore; and the
unsuspecting falcon is ravaged in
Atlanta (not to mention that other
team down there).
It's time we sports fans spoke
out against the indignities com
mitted by these thoughtless baH-
clubs. Whole groups of people and
species of fauna shouldn't ha ve to
be degenerated just so we canhavfe-
our fun. Alternative names could
be used without any loss in effect;
what's more important, our col-
lective conscience would be clear.
The following are a few sug-
gestions: the St. Louis Plastic-
things-on-the-tips-of-your-shoe-
strings; the Denver Morning
Dews; the Washington Monu-
ments; the Green Bay Icicles; the
Dallas Sparkly-things-you-see-
when-you-get-hit-in-the-eye; and
the Charlotte Concrete Slabs. Now;
get busy and pick your own inof-
fensive names.
By John Bullard
Socialism not cause of all misery in America
Last week, in both issues of
The East Carolinian, some opin-
ions were expressed about social-
ism. In a two-part attack, it was
obvious that Americans are fed
up with the present political sys-
tem. Three cheers for us on that
point.
However, the argument
voiced seems to point toward so-
cialism as the cause for all our
misery. In the great "crafty rheto-
ric" style which was attacked in
part two, it was stressed that in
no way is socialism tolerable in
any amount. Rhetorically we were
asked, "What is an acceptable
amount of HIV in one's blood-
stream?" Well, that's enough to
scare me away from socialism,
except for one small trifling mat-
ter: the facts.
Can the author of the edito-
rial be afraid of the unknown? It
is doubtful. Surely he enjoys and
has enjoyed the benefits of the
public school system. A great in-
stitution of socialism, public
school provides education to
many that can and cannot afford
it. All Americans believe it is a
necessity, so we collectively pay
for it. This alone throws out the
"acceptable amount" theory, but
there are more reasons than just
the public school system.
Law enforcement and social
services serve to protect and shel-
ter our fellow citizens and r eigh-
bors. What would we do without
these? The National Endowment
for the Arts is another publicly
funded institution. The NEA
seems to be the exact opposite of
the argument made about the So-
viet artist. American artists try-
ing to express themselves with
public money are being censored
here in the USA.
What are we to do? Purge
ourselves completely of the so-
cialist threat?
Let's hope not.
It is agreed that
socialism
should stay out
of some blood-
streams, like
business, but
this does not
mean that so-
cialist institu-
tions are cancer-
ous. If we be-
lieve that sys-
tems such as
public school,
law enforce-
ment and social
services are necessities, then why
not health care? What are we so
scared of?
People need medical atten-
tion, and many of those that do
cannot afford it. The example of
the Canadian medical system was
used to refute socialized medi-
cine, but it is young and has not
had the time to blossom like those
systems of our European neigh-
bors. The Canadians are at least
trying; in generations to come
they will benefit from their tran-
sition.
Those who are scared of so-
cialized medicine put an end to
Oregon's Health Plan. If it had
been permitted a chance, we all
might have benefited from its
successesand learned from it fail-
ures. Some of us think that the
HIV-like institution should be.
stamped out regardless.
We could reflect on the
editorial's
"unifying
philosophy
we must
adopt but
it simply
was not de-
fined. No
matter,
Americans
in this past
election de-
fined it
pretty well
themselves.
People of
the '90s are
ready to do
somethingdifferent. We are ready
to take a shot of another "accept-
able amount" of socialism into
our presently clogged, medical
bloodstream.
Through a social health care
system, costs will be made fair
and just. As Americans, we must
care for our own and sacrifice a
little. If taking care of ourselves
means allowing contaminationof
a bad system with a working one,
so be it. We should remember
those institutions where social-
ism has been beneficial and detri-
mental and realize that there ex-
ists an acceptable dose.
We (people of the
'90s) are ready to
take a shot of an-
other "acceptable
amount" of social-
ism into our pres-
ently clogged,
medical blood-
stream.





The East Carolinian
November 17, 1992
Henry Rollins
storms Raleigh
Opening for the Beastie Boys, The Rollins
Band raged through an intense performance
��
Lifestyl
Page 7
By Philip Woodworth
Special to The East Carolinian
Nov. 10, the Raleigh Gvic Center har-
boredaragingstDnm in theformofThe Rollins
Band and the Beastie Boys.
If you like a show thaf s personal and
intense as hell, then take my advice and find
another concert date. You must see this show.
If it wasn't Henry Rollins seizing my soul
with his highly powerful vocals and his can't-
be-ignored lyrics, it was the Beastie's constant
groove not letting me sit still for a second.
Fact, and most importantly, remember
this; The Rollins Band does not tour to pro-
mote albums, they just love to play. As Rollins
himself said inapress release, "Doesn'tmatter
where you put us on the bill, or who you put
�usonthebill with, theresultis always thesame.
When we do work, you get destroyed. That's
just the way it is
�And what an understatement from
'Bumble Hank" that is. With a mix of people
who enjoyed everything from the now-leg-
endary hard-core sound ofBlackFlag, Rollins'
first band, to a hip-hop crowd intent on a
10,000-person dance party with the Beastie
Bpjfs, no one could ignore thecompletedomi-
nance of the live Rollins Band.
At one point there was a pause between
songs, and Henry suddenly screamed at us,
'You must think you're gonna live forever
. The band then kicked it, in their usual
energetic fashion, as Rollins continued ex-
pressing his societal concerns. You couldn't
help but to want to get off your seat and
scream "Hell yeah, this is a live show
Rollinsstartedhisself-titledbandinApril
of1987. After 12 days of practice, they wen ton
a. 16-week tour covering 15 countries. He
started outwith Andrew Weiss on bass, Chris
Haskett onguitar and Sim Cain on drums and
percussion. On their first tour, they met Theo
Van Rock in Europe and incorporated him
into the band as the soundman. The lineup
hasn't changed from day one, and, from the
way Rollins speaks of his fellow band mem-
bers, it never will.
'The band has fierce work ethic on the
road and off. The band writes all songs to-
gether. Dedication and excellence has always
been our reputation, when you see the band,
ifs always tight and on the attack mode
Rollins said.
Don't expect to see a visual trip full of
carnival lightsandobscurestageprops.Rollins
doesn't need any dramatics to get your atten-
tion. A basic, white-lighted stage is all the
band used; the magic is in the music, not tine
scenery.
The Rollins Band took the crowd on a
mind excursion that started as a low rolling
tide that built and built until a tidal wave
drowned the audience in a maelstrom of
music.
When The Rollins Band finished, one
thought plagued my stunned brain; To greet
another band in the post-holocaustal flood of
Henry Rollins is staggering!
I must admit, I shot down the Beastie
Boys before they ever walked on stage. This is
a band immortalized by the commercialism
of music television. In my mind they had a lot
to prove to even think they could be on the
same bill as The Rollins Band. Yet Adrock,
MCA and Mike D, the obnoxious Beastie
Boys, turned theCivicCenter intoacarnivalof
nowhere to sit and everywhere to dance.
It was hard to sit still with a percussion
flow that bordered on the feeling that you
were exposed to some primitive tribal ritual.
You had to move to the beat.
The band did two shows in my eyes.
They performed a rap act, and they played a
live show.
They performed three different sets of
songs that were nothing more than three
dancing, screaming guys who love their in-
Henry Rollins captured the diverse audience's attention and held it while delivering powerful words with force The Beastie Bovs
took over where The Rollins Band left, and finished off a night worth remembering. V
Kuralt brings N.C 'Home'
L
ner-city accents. An entire band set-up was
behind them, including guitars, basses,
dm msets, kevboardsandcongos. Even tho ugh
Hie music was pumping and the band was
singing, no one played the instalments. In
other words, half of die show consisted of the
"Boys" singing along to some recorded mate-
rial. Now, in my txxik, that is something weall
do at home when we listen to a favorite song
and dance in front of the mirror.
The Beastie Boys saved themselves in a
most impressive fashion. Though they are
indeed touring to support their third album,
Oicck Yoi tr Head, those of you who may have
looked into the entire career of these three
know that they used to be called The
Poilywoggs,andwereashard-coreasyoucan
get
Much to my satisfaction, they playal a
couple setsthat proved their roots still matter
to them. No tnie musician could dance for a
living,notwhenyouplayaswellastheseguys
play. As a performing band, they kicked holy
ass.
That part of the show, believe it or not,
madeupforallthattherestoftheshow lacked.
I guess tliat there is just something about
seeing a band perform, and seeing an empty
set-up of in-
struments
while music
pumps out
ofthespeak-
ers that turns
some of us
concert lov-
ers off. Sorry.
At one time the Beastie Boys went into a
percussion jam that rivaled anything I'veever
heard from any otherband. 11 was reminiscent
of a Santana dnim jam, truly tliat funky.
If they had used that talent the whole
this concert as a whole
was a heavy, funky, hard-
core, soul-snatching show.
show through I would have walked out of the
CivicCenterasa newly-remiited Beastie Bovs
fan.
Instead, I left with mixed emotions, be-
cause when they came out todo the traditional
encore, both songs were performed to some
recorded crap. Wegottosingalongand watch
them dance � a real
letdown after seeing
them play as well as
they are capable of.
But all in all, re-
member this; thiscon-
cert as a whole was a
heavy, funky, hard-
core, soul-snatching show. I left happy and
satisfied with my evening's undertaking.
Just heed my warning; seeing Henry
Rollins live rivals a religious experience.
It's hard not to love him once you've seen
him.
.i
By Claudette Peale
Staff Writer
9 ECU was the proud host to
Charles Kuralt and Loonis
McGlohon's encore presentation
ofNorth Carolina Is My Home
Wednesday, Nov. 11, in Wright
Auditorium.
� ��, Kuralt and McGlohon pre-
sented their musical tribute for
the second time at ECU since they
fijrst wrote it in 1984. Governor
Jim Hunt asked them to write
something commerating the
Roanoke Island colony's 400th
Srfrti versa ry.
jp. Their first performance was
in April 1987 as part of a celebra-
tion of the reopening of the reno-
vated Wright Auditorium. That
performance was filmed by the
North Carolina Public TV net-
work and it is still one of the
networks most popular shows.
"North Carolina Is My Home
was never intended to become a
career for us; it was actually in-
tended to be only a small gift to
the schools and libraries of our
state Kuralt said. "We never ac-
tually thought of performing un-
til people started asking us to
Since their first performance,
they have travelled across the na-
tion and as far away as London
and Vancouver telling the stories
of North Carolina.
McGlohon, along with the
Loonis McGlohon Trio, opened
the evening with a few pieces
followed by a short introduction
to Kuralt.
Jim Campbell and Marlene
VerPlank, both nationally ac-
claimed artists, got the evening
rolling with their rendition of the
song "North Carolina Is My
Home
Kuralt continued entertain-
ing the audience with some of
North Carolina's most famous
legends and a few that are not as
well known.
Campbell and VerPlank's
songs were sprinkled through-
out the show as well as the Loonis
McGlohon Trio's instrumentals.
The night ended with a final
verse of "North Carolina Is My
Home" by Campbell and
VerPlank. The group left Wright
Auditorium as the audience rose
to a standing ovation.
Kuralt, who was born in
Wilmington, lived in Onslow
County on hisgrandfather's farm.
Because his father was a social
worker for the state, the family
moved around quite a bit.
A400thBirthdavGift1b
The Tar Heel State
by CharksKuraH and Loonis McGk
Showcase high!
Chapel Hill talent
By Stacy Peterson
Staff Writer
�� Charles Kuralt and Loonis McGlohan brought their encore presentation
See Kuralt page 8 to Wright Auditorium Wednesday.
Nwapa displaces myth of 'typical' African woman
"If you like our shoes, you'll love
oursockssaJdj.KellyCox,co-owner
ofMoistRutedBreathRecordsabout
this weekend's showcase at O'Rocks.
MoistBaited Breathrecordsand
productions is an independent record
label located in Chapel Hill, the new
industry stomping ground. From the
looks and sounds of the five bands
highlighted FridayandSaturdaynight,
MoistBaited Bream will have a se-
cure futu re. The ba nd s tha t performed
over the course of this two night look-
into-the-futxire were: Well Nigh For-
gotten, Archer's Of Loaf, Bicycle Face,
Chew Toy and What Peggy Wants.
MoistBaited Breath records was
formed two years ago by J. Kelly Cox
and Andrew Peterson. According to
Cox, both he and Peterson have al-
wavs shared common goals for the
company. Perhaps the backbone of
these common goa Is is the d iversi ty of
the bands who represent the com-
pany.
The showcase opened Friday
nig. .twithtlTeGreensbonvbasedband,
WellNighForgotten.Thisbandsetthe
mocKl for the entire showcase by de-
manding the lights be turned down.
The crowd sixin learned that the at-
mosphere of the music is much more
important than who is playing and
what they look like. To describe Well
Nigh Forgotten, you must picture a
frantic, fluid-sounding death march
interrupted by brief explosions and
fast note-bending melodies. Now if
you can imagine this, top it all off with
a high, cracking nasal chant. If you
would like to hear more, the band's
first CD will be out in about a month.
Perhaps the most impressiveband
featured Friday night was Archer's of
Loaf. Dynamics would have to be the
key word for this band. The majority
of their songs begin with childish
whines and jingle-jangle guitar and
lead straightinto the screamsofsatan's
mother accompanied by d. uihle gui-
tar feedback. This band has a definite
Sonic Youth influence, but the band
alsohasasenseolcharmand original-
ity. For example, the chorus of one of
their songs echoes "All I ever wanted
was to be your spine
The final band to perform Friday
night was Bicycle Face. It this band
made music and if music was meat,
See Showcase page 8
By Marjorie McKinstry
Staff Writer
"People have an image of the African
woman as one who is homeless, and who
breeds too many sick, hungry and naked chil-
dren said Flora Nwapa, "but this is not true
�we are the descendants of the bravest, most
independent women in the world
Starting with this mythical concept of
African women,Nwapacontinued toenlighten
an audienceof eager, ear-straining listeners on
Monday Nov. 9. As the foremost African
woman writer, and the first African female to
write a novel in English (Efiint, 1966), Nwapa
deftly explored American Misconceptions of
African women.
According to Nwapa, Cleopatra is an ex-
ample of an intelligent and independent Afri-
can woman, but as a European, Shakespeare
"dismisses her as a strumpet"
Shakespeare is only one of many British
subjects to underestimatethepowerof African
women. At one point, die British, trying to
develop a taxation level in Nigeria, decided to
count all the African subjects. The African
women were gravely offended, because only
sheep and such other animal are counted, not
people. And so, the women s teamed the town,
brandishing kitchen utensils, casavas (a root
similar toyams)andmortars.The military had
to be brought in to contain The Women's War,
but eventually, the offending statute was re-
moved.
Nwapa also explained to the audience
how the African woman was economically
independent
"Though she may not seek money as a
reward, she does work as a trader and mer-
chant, " Nwapa said. "And now, mere is a
rebirth of independence � the women are
tryingtofix what they consider personal inad-
equacies in their lives. If a woman does not see
herself aseducatal enough,shewill go back to
school. I have seen it happen
When questioned about the new motiva-
tion toward independence, Nwapa quickly
countered with an explanation thatall women
are finding the power within to assert them-
selves in life.
"It is a world-wide movement. Women
right here in the United States are demanding
their economic and social rights she said.
Nwapa also talked about her many adult
andchildren'sbcxiks,whichreflecttheoraland
folk tradition of her culture When asked why
women writers do not address more impor-
tant subjects, instead of domestic issues, etc
Nwapa reminded theaudiencethatmale writ-
ers are not asked to validate their reasons for
writing about men.
Although she mostly spike about the
African woman, and her personal efforts to
define her through the oral use of "proverbs,
parables, songs and tales Nwapa'scomment
on mile and female writers shows tliat social
misconceptions regarding relevant topics for
literature are far from being just and African
controversy.
Greenwich Folk Fest producer
performs at Coffeehouse
By Mike Harrison
Staff Writer
Folk singer and songwriter Rod
MacDonald played to a scant but responsive
audience Tuesday night in Mendenliall'sCof-
feehouse. His voice carried a wide range of
inflectionalreso- a
nance His in A JOUtnallSt ClirOniClCS
� 71 the times and a met tells
!�??�; �ab '� We
played simultaneously. Rod mdoimU,
'I he sound of his music is usually mellow,
sometimes serious-minded, sometimes not.
His lighter tunes amusingly would include
Such topics a Bill Clinton's ("Wild Bill")
younger days with marijuana or an offbeat
rendition of the movie "Psvcho told from
Norman Bates' point of view.
MacDonaldisa well-known performer in
New York's Greenwich Village and has re-
corded three albums in the U.S. ,t two in
Europe.
No Commercial Traffic was his first album
and featured "American Jerusalem" and
"Soilor'sPrayer'hvoof his best known songs.
MacDonald
told Craig I arris in
"I tirt I
�'
�i was mj pro-
ductionalltheway. 1
picked rainy of the
musicians that I was
playing with. I picked the songs. It got a
rawness. I'm not a fan of homngeni2ed music.
Myfavoritesong was "Sornething Beautiful"
It was recorded with a group thai had never
foiksinger
See Coffeehouse page 8





i
. - �- -i
8 The East Carolinian
NOVEMBER 17. 1992
Coffeehouse
Continued from page 7
heard it before. They were the jam band at Folk City. We did it
without charts
A reviewer wrote, "MacDonald's songs combine poetic
vision and journalistic insight"
"A journalist chronicles the times and a poet tells us about
his life MacDonald said. "1 try todoboth.Someof my best songs
are beautiful poetry. But I didn't think I could be much of a poet
as a journalist There are times when I want to write a song
without my opinions in it 1 just want to tell people what's going
on
MacDonald was bom into a musical family in Connecticut
Tvealwaysloved musichesaid. "Mysisterplayed piano. My
mother listened to jazz records all the time. My father played the
harmonica
He performed for the first time at the age of five. In fourth
grade, an Elvis Presley-inspired MacDonald sang "Don't Be
CrueL"
He la ter played a slide trombone in the school band, bu t the
guitar remained his favorite instrument
"When I went to the University of Virginia, 1 played with a
few bands MacDonald said. "By my last year of college, 1 was
travelingall around Virginia withafive-piecefolkgroup.Wedid
all the folk classics -things like Peter, Paul and Mary. Wedida
couple of tunes by The Byrds. They were real uplifting songs
MacDonald was once a reporter for Newsweek magazine,
but he said, "It became harder to write objectively. There were
things that really bothered me, like Kent State. How do you write
objectively about Kent State? I wanted to be on the front lines. I
was crossing the line
The desire to perform continued after he moved to New
York where he attended Columbia law school. "Slowly, I began
to apply at the student coffeehouses at Columbia he said.
Toward the end of school, a close friend encouraged
MacDonald to continue to pursue a musical career even though
success in the field had yet to strike.
"In San Francisco, I audiboned every night on the streets in
Chinatown MacDonald said. "The whores would give me
money as they came walking out of the hotel. It was a bizarre
scene
BackiivNewYork,MacDonaldbecameinvolved withaclub
called The Speakeasy. He was eventually hired to book acts for
the club but left in 1987.
MacDonald spends a lot of time in northern Italy. "The
feelings that I've experienced have surfaced in some of my
songs he said. "Sometimes, I believe in reincarnation. When I
first went to this part of Italy, I felt like I had been there before. I
hadsuchaneasyrelatjonshipwithpeoplelt'sasifwehadalways
known each other. I've even learned to speak the language.
MacDonald also co-produces the Greenwich Village Folk
Festival each year.
'It started as a lark he said. "I told oneof my co-producers
to get a permit for the softball field and we'll do a concert. To my
amazement, he actually got the permit I booked a sound crew
and we were all set to do a festival
Tenth Street BP
J. Faulkner - location manager
2704 E 10th Street 752-0418
Shop Hours:
Monday - Saturday 7:30 - 5:30
We feature BP Gas & Oil
and Atlas Products
10th Street BP
TIRE ROTATION
& BALANCE
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Gas is the same low price with cash or credit at BP
Strummin' out tunes
Photo by Oail Read
Gibb Droll brought once again his guitar-playing talent to the Attic Thursday.
Kuralt
Continued from page 7
Showcase
Continued from page 7
this trio would be Spam Luncheon music.
Bicycle Face is very humorous; just take for
instance their remake of "Sweet Home Ala-
bama" � "Sweet Home Ayden-Grifton
What a perfect way to end the night
The show continued Saturday night
withOewToy,themostrecentband to find
it's way to the graspof MoistBaited Breath.
This band is a female trio that shined with
honesty and dignity through their set and
punk poetry forum.
Thefinal band toperformduringtheshow-
case was What Peggy Wants. This band has
been a part of MoistBaited Breath for quite
some time now. The band's debut release,
Death Of A Sailor, has received outstanding
reviews and considerablesuccess.WhatPeggy
Wants put on an outstanding set involving
mostly new material from their upcoming re-
lease. One thing the cnnvd learned from this
band was that 'Tandem bikes and espadrilles
are back in style
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"I think I actually grew up in
Charlotte because that's where 1
went to high school Kuralt said.
"After graduating from UNC-
CH, I returned there to work at
the now -defunct Charlotte Nezvs
Kuralt soon joined CBS and
in 1967 began his own series "On
the Road
"Iliketodostoriesaboutout-
rageous things and people like
the farmer who hated farming
Kuralt said.
"He spent his spare time
buildingayachtandwhenitcame
time for him to retire, he went
sailing
Kuralt is now doing a weekly
show "CBSSunday Morning" but
hopes to get back to doing more
"On the Road" stories.
McGlohon, who appeared
with Kuralt Wednesday night, is
a native of Ayden and attended
ECU in his earlier years.
"I remember in 1939, we used
to dance to Big Band music here
in the Wright building
McGlohon said in welcoming the
audience.
He is now an internationally
acclaimed songwriter and jazz
pianist. Travelling around the
world, he has performed songs
from his 30 albums and has
recieved the "Stereo Review"
award for his 1984 recording,
Loonis In London.
McGlohon also wrote the
theme song for Kuralt's "On the
Road" show, to which Campbell
sang.
jf w. Presents
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9:00 pm until 2:00 am
$1-50 Domestics $175 Hiballs
Dr. Doug spins the best
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THE ECU HONORS PROGRAM
offerings for Spring 1993 include:
"The Don Juan Legend" "Wetland Ecology" (Biology)
"American Civil War Literature" "Intro to Ethnic Studies"
"The Power of Myth" "Women and Literature"
"Jews and Judaism" "Modem German Drama (in tran)"
"New World Meets Old" (Columbus) "Vietnam War in Film"
"Chemistry & the Environment" "Creativity in Science"
as well as ANTH 1000; EDUC 3200; ENGL1200,1250, 2000,3420,
3880; FORL 2221; FREN 1002; HLTH 1000 & 4501; HIST 1551 &
1553; INTL 1000; LIBS 1000; MATH 2172; PHIL 1110 & 1696;
PSYC 1060; SOCI2110; SPAN 1003; WOST 2000 & 2400.
All ECU students with 3.4 GPA or better qualify to take honors
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Tilf
The East CgroHman
November 17, 1992
Arkansas St 0
East Carolina 7
Sports
7
14
IB
35
FIRST QUARTER
ECU - junior Smith 1 yd touchdown run, (Owens kirk
good) 3 plays, 30 yards, 1:18
SECOND QUARTER
ASU - Ryan lose, 37 yard field goal, (ASLfi lirM held
goal of the season) (7 plays, 71 yards, 32)
SCl-CharlesMilesl7yard pass from Sean McConn ell
(Owens kick good) (6 plays, 50 yards. 2:03)
THIRD QUARTER"
Pirates on cruise control versus ASU
Page 9
By Warren Sumner
Assistant,Sports Editor
. ECU -Smith. 1 yard run (Owens kickgood) (6plays, 52
yards, 131)
A'SU -Jack Dollarhide, 10 yard pass from Tom Sears,
Cose kick good) (12 plays, 95 yards, 5:08)
ECU-MorrisLetcher,30yardpassfromSeanMcConneH
-(Owens kick good) (6 plays, 68 yards, 3:20)
FOURTH QUARTER
ASU -Savastin Henry, 8 yard run, (Cnxkel 2 pi. conver-
sion good) (12 plays, 66 yards, 5:16)
ECU - Dwight Linville. 2yard pass fromSean McConnell
(Owens kick good) (7 plays, 61 yards, 3:03)
TEAM STATISTICS
FIRST DOWNS
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
3RD EFF
TOT YARDS
Total plays
Average gain
NET RUSHING
Rushes
Avg. per rush
NET PASSING
Comp-tt
Yards per pass
Sacked-yards lost
Had intercepted
PUNT-AVG 23.8
RETURN YARDS
Punts-retums
Kickofts-retums
Interceptions 252
PENALTIES- YRDS
FliMBLES-LOST
TOT
ECU
23
14
8
1
6-11
456
63
7.2
284
41
6.9
172
1222
14J
00
2
41.0
15
315
242
216
965
2-0
25:06
ASU
19
9
8
2
8-18
345
70
4.9
166
45
3.7
179
1525
11.9
215
2
0
00
677
977
2-0
3454
PLAYER STATISTICS
Misied field goals: ECU 0 ASU 1
ECU rushing: J. Smtlh 31-232 . 2 TO, C. Miles 7-13 S
McConnell 2-4 , M. Letcher 1-5 .
ECO passing: S. McConnell 12- 22-172 .
Reviving:
C Grumpier 3-22. M. Letcher 2-59,1 TO, P. Zophv 2-45
D. tinviUe 3-17,1 TD, C. Miles 2-29,1 TO
Tackles: UT-AT-TOT
Gnuidison 2-2-4, Render 4-0-4, Walker 1-1-2.
Floyd 2-0-2, Cunmulaj 2-1-3, Davis 2-5-7, Dillon 7-5-12.
Scott 1-1-2, Taylor 2-0-2, Lewis 6-3-9, Cooper 4-5-9
TateO-1-1, Carter5-2-7, Ubiano 1-0-1, Boothe3-0-3
Crumble 1-0-1, Foreman 1-2-3, Blake 1-0-1 Cotton 1-0-1
The East Carolina Pirates, re-
boundingfroma losstoWest Virginia,
outclassed Arkansas State University
Saturday in a game that showed the
unpredictability of Head Coach Steve
Logan.
Logan, surprising many in the
small Ficklen stadium crowd, left se-
nior quarterback Sean McConnell in
the lineup for the entire game.
McConnell, who has spen t most of the
seasonbackinguphissophomorecoun-
terpart, Michael Anderson, turned in a
solid performance to help his team to a
35-18 Senior Day victory. After throw-
ing three touchdown passes,
McConnell was overshadowed only
by the rushing performance of
runningback Junior Smith, who fin-
ished the contest with 232 rushing
yards, only 13 short of an ECU single-
game record.
After stalling on their first two
drives, the Pirate offense began click-
ing late in the first quarter, with
McConnell hitting Morris Letcher at
the 1 yard line, setting up the first of
junior Smith's two touchdown runs.
The Pirate defense held ASU scoreless
until a three-minute drive set up a 37-
yard ASU field goal early in thesecond
period. The Pirates attempted to an-
swer the score, but an ASU intercep-
tion kept them off the scoreboard until,
with 706 remaining in the half, McCo
nnell connected with Charles Miles for
a 17 yard touchdown reception. The
Pirates left the fieldathalftimeholding
a 14-3 lead, which they widened soon
after play resumed.
Profile
Running Man blazes a
trail of his own
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
On thetr second half return, the yardsina fiveminutetouchdowndrive Pirates who would laugh last as
to tighten the contest at 21-10, but his
defensive unitcould nothandleSmirh's
rushingattackas the Pirates droveto the
ASU30-yard line. A30-yard touchdown
reception by Morris Letcher was the last
in the third quarter, but the ASU offense
was not yet finishai
In the final period, Arkansas State � IJlt. milil,r
SuThHn 8W,thaSaVaStinHenry 'eltrealJygtod.I.thesecorld
touchdownandatwopomtconversion quarterljustgotWrrdrrfsetthat
off a tnck play that completely fooled I wasn't coming out This is some-
the Pirate defense. But it would be the thing 1'U never forget
ECU defense stopped Arkansas State
deep in their own territory, and forced
a punt which gave the Pirates excellent
field position,attheirown48yard line.
Junior Smith quickly went to work,
driving his team to the ASU 12, and
after Carlester Crumpler's 11 yard re-
ception, Smith pounded through the
ASU defense for his second goal line
score.
After an ECU kickoff, ASU quar-
terback Tom Sears drove his team 95
they scored with 37 remaining in
the game, capping their victory.
After the game, McConnell
said he was thrilled to have playai
an entire game. "I wasn'texpecting
to play as much as I did he said.
"When rheoffense keptrollingand
we kept running the ball like we
Carlester Crumpler Sr Dave
Alexander, Anthony Collins,
Butch Colson� all of these names
are important to Pirate fans, as
they represent a rarity in East Caro-
lina football history. These four
men, and only these four, have
achieved 1,000 yard rushing sea-
sons during their Pirate football
careers.
Now there is a player who,
for the first time in seven years, is
close to joining these Pirate leg-
ends in ECU's record books. He
has been a high-point on a team
intent on building for future suc-
cess. He has helped Head Coach
Steve Logan balance his offense
by providing a chaser for quarter-
back Michael Anderson's high
octane passing attack. He is excit-
ing to watch, difficult to stop and
impossible to tame. He has run
wild this year for over 900 yards,
and has
proven that
on this Pi-
rate team
led by se-
niors, that
there is
room for a
Junior. Es-
pecially if
his name is
Smith.
Sophomore runningback Jun-
See Smith page 10
Junior Smith
Women's soccer makes dent
By Chip Hudson
Staff Writer
r.nstin MMls. Susan vmce M: Tracie Newsome. Nickie Coats, Nicole Harrell Lori BmZ rw
UnrgF: Ttftany Seaman. Seiko Obayashi, Kathy Parren.UTmSS'le
fclU dancers seeking 'Pure Gold'
The ECU Women's Soccer Team
competed this past weekend in a
tournament held in Boone, N.C.
The tournament included 12
teams including Appalachian State,
UNC-C, Wake Forest, Georgia
Southern, South Carolina and Ten-
nessee among others.
The Pirates' first game was
against South Carolina and al-
though they dominated play, they
only managed a 1-0 win.
The only goal was scored by
left wing Alison Russell on a left-
footer from 20-yards out. The Pi-
rates pressured the Gamecock goal
often, but could not score any more
goals.
East Carolina's next game was
against Georgia Southern. Earlier
this season, ECU beat the Eagles, 2-
0. A much stronger GSU team held
the Pirates scoreless in the first half,
but could not keep ECU down in
the second half.
Center halfback Eileen Moore
broke the scoreless tie with 15:30
left in the game, and junior stopper
Stephanie Aicher iced the win with
her first goal of the year eight min-
utes later. Sweeper Joelle Pierce led
the defense as the Pirates won, 2-0.
Game three pitted the Pirates
against the University of Tennessee
at Chattanooga. ECU fell behind
early and had trouble getting on
track in the first half. They put it in
gear in thesecond half, as almost all
of the play was in the UT-C third of
the field.
Unfortunately, the Pirates were
unable to penetrate the goal and
they fell 1-0.
ECU still held hopes of draw-
ing the wildcard bid to the semifi-
By Warren Sumner
Assistant Sports Editor
For an athlete, sweat is a small price to pay. It is
simply part of the job. A necessary rigor for success.
ECU has many athletes who are willing to pay this
price, to give all they have to achieve their absolute
best. However, unless they play a high profile sport,
much of their dedication goes unnoticed.
ECUriasrrianyofmeseathIetes,rnanyteamsof
unnoticed heroes. One such team is a collection of
women who are willing to work just as hard as any
other team on campus. They practice long, hard
hours perfectingevery motion, synchronizing three
minutes of their life to a tape of high energy dance
music. Uke many of ECU's high-profile athletic
programs, they serve an entertainment purpose at
the university. Unlike these teams, the Pure Gold
Dancers may be in line for a national championship.
AJto Gary has been a Pure Gold Dancer for
three years. A 19-year veteran of dance, she has
dedicated much of her life toward fulfilling her
Pirates take j
dance dream, and now captains the ECU team.
C?ry said she has experienced much of the rigors
lre dancers must go through to improve their
positionof fourth placeatlastyear'snationaJ cham-
pionships.
"Dancing is incredibly demanding she said
We'veseentwistedankles,badbacks,kneesoutof
joint�every thingany other team on campus goes
through Gary said the girls on the squad are
extremely dedicated to the team, practicing an
average of 12-15 hours a week since the beginning
of August. Gary said this load is quickly intensify-
ing as the year progresses, as the team is preparing
routines for the national championship in San
Antonio, Texas this April. "We are now up to
around 36 hours a week Gary said.
To help them "bring home the gold" in April,
the dancers have enlisted the help of Washington
N.C, native Mark Evans, a world renowned chore-
ographer. Evans, who now resides in Atlanta is
more widely known as "Whatizit?" the Olympic
nals, but fell just one point short to
UNC-Charlotte.
ASU went on to win the tour-
nament, but East Carolina made
an impression on the entire field.
Tournament Director Bob
Goddard said, "ECU was definitely
the strongest team in this tourna-
ment, but that's the nature of tour-
nament play; the best team doesn't
always win
Two Pirates won All-Tourna-
ment Honors: wing Alison Russell
and sweeper Joelle Pierce. No team
in the field placed more than two
players on the All-Tournament
team.
The team will look to continue
its progress this weekend as they
go to Chapel Hill to take on the
UNC Club.
The Pirates will finish out the
season at home on Dec. 6, when
they play N.C. State.
Richards could not ask for more at ECU
By Daniel Willis
Staff Writer
See Gold page 10
Freshman Melanie Richards wel-
comes her new surroundings which
the Lady Pirates volleyball team offers.
She is originally from Rochester,
New York. She admits that many dif-
ferences are presented when compar-
ingherhomewithGreenvilleAthome
when you walk or bump into someone
walking down the street, they usually
get really offended and start yelling at
you Richards said. "But here, things
aredifferent. Ifyou bump intosomeone
here, they apologize and introduce
themselves. Things are a lot more laid
back
Richards realizes the challenges
which are presented. Shesaid, "I'm the
first person from my family to go to
college, my parents are really proud of
me. It's really nice, but it still puts a lot of
pressureon me. Most of the people from
my hometown go to local schools. People
are quick to pass a judgement upon you
whenyougooff
to a distant
school. It's kind
of unusual
There wasa
lot of tension
among this vol-
leyball team last
season. A lot of
theplayerswere
getting very
frustrated be-
causecertain individuals weren't playing
team oriented volleyball. But Richards
contends that this isn't tlie case this sea-
son. "I've heard about the conflicts which
surrounded the team last season. But this
season that just doesn't exist. Everybody
Melanie Richards
does all they can togetalongand work
for the good of the team
Kicnarcls teels comfortable with
her role on the volleyball team. "The
hardest part is proving yourself
Richardssaid. "When Ifirstcamehere
tilings were kind of rough. I didn't
play very well, but coach McCaskill
still gave me a chance to play. Now
things are corning together and I'm
very happy. I can't believe how much
playing time I'm getting
She feels very content about the
situation she's presently in.
"Icouldn'task foranythingelse
Richards said. "I'm getting a lot of
playing time. I get along with my
teammates and my coach. People in
this area are extremely friendly. My
grades are okay. Things are going
good. I really couldn't ask for any-
thing else
By Kevin Raymer
Staff Writer
Almost a month ago, ECU's Irate
FrisbeeTeam traveled to Annapolis, Ma.
to participate in Navy's Invitational Ul-
timate Frisbee Tournament. They left
there with a 6-0 mark and new respect to
accompany their tournament champi-
onship. Thelratesarenow undefeated in
collegiate games this fall, after a success-
ful spring season in which they finished
23rd in the nation.
The tournament began in the morn-
ing with the temperature around 45 de-
grees with a stiff 15 m.p.h. wind. Rutgers
University was the first to fall in a game
that took the Irates the first half to wake
up.
Nextcamethealways-in-shapeNavy
Demon Seamen who proved to be the
Irates only formidable opponents of the
weekend.
In an early seesaw battle, the Irates
eventually pulled out a 13-11 win.
The last two opponents of the day,
Lehigh University and the University of
Pennsylvania, were no match for the
Irates. They were crushed by scores of
13-2 and 13-4 respectively.
"This is the best Ultimate I have seen
the Irates play in a while said Nat Tay-
lor, the Irates captain.
"Once we got the momentum going
day
was a
beauti-
ful day
for Ul-
timate
our way, we never let up, on offense or
defense. But we needed to focus on our
mistakes, to make sure we kept the 'tide
rolling' into Sunday's games "
Srv
"ln the end, we just had too much
talent for them, butlgive them a lot
of credit. They always play uswell'
Bill Romberger,
as the Irates had a first- round-bye in the
championship bracket.
The first game pitted the Irates
against Penn in a rematch of a vocal
game played the day before.
Again, the Irate offensive flow could
storm in Annapolis
not be stopped as the Irates cruised to a
15-5 victory.
The win put the Irates in a champi-
onship game for the first time in almost
a year.
The
team
had a
victory
in its
sights
Ira tes
bate co-captain
sive effort proved to be too much for the
Demon Seamen as the Irates took the
victory and championship bya 17-6 score.
"Navy played us tough, as they al-
ways do Bill Romberger, Irate co-cap-
tain, said. "They tried to run us into the
ground, but we hung with them. In the
end, we just had too much talent for
them, but I give them a lot of credit. They
always play us well
as the
again played in a rematch, this time with
Navy.
Determined not to lose, Navy came
out running as usual, but some impres-
sive offensive plays and a great defen-
ECU basketball tickets can be
picked up one working day prior to the
game at the ECU Athletic Ticket Office
between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Only one
half-price ticket is available to each
student. Additional ones are $7 dollars.
�i





10 The East Carolinian
Gold
NOVEMBER 17, 1992
Cont'd from p. 9
mascot for Atlanta's 19 ceremo-
nies. Besides dancing at this Evans
has worked with much of the danc-
ing world, including pop-superstar
Paula Abdul. Evanssaid heseesgreat
potential in the Pure Gold Dancers,
and said they are legitimate con-
tenders for the championship.
"These dancers have incredible
moldabletalent'hesaidThey defi-
nitely have the potential to be a na-
tional champion dance team Evans
said the team at East Carolina was
"one of the most energetic and en-
thusiastic"hehad everworked with.
Evans said a sore point wi th him and
the dancers was the fact they were
not considered athletes by much of
the university population.
"This is a very legitimate ath-
letic activity' he said. "There is a
misconception about (the dancers)
not being athletes. It takes tremen-
dousdisciplineinnutritiorurining,
physical conditioning, as well as a
great deal of academic discipline to
do this. They are definitely worthy
of more attention Evans said he is
worried about the current practice
spacethe dancers are provided with,
as the floor in the Sports Medicine
building could cause injuries.
TerrieHarris,a three-year mem-
ber of the squad, is a victim of the
injuries the dance style can per-
petuate. Harris, who suffered a
pulled knee tendon during a prac-
tice routine last Monday, said the
"spinning and twisting style of the
dance" was extremely hard on the
dancers' knees.
Gary said her dancers are ex-
pecting a shootout with the dance
squad from UNC for the national
title, and felt that this squad was
their principal competition.
Gary said she feels that while
the Chapel Hill squad may havean
edge in speed, the superior chore-
ography of the ECU squad will
help them triumph over their in-
state rivals.
"They'll doenoughofthequick
movements to score well, but I feel
we'll beat them on technique
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Holyfield
bows out to
Bowe in bout
By Robert S. Todd
Sports Editor
Riddick Bowe lost 37 pounds
in 44 days. He went the distance
for the first time in his career. He
also destroyed perhaps the worst
champion to hold the belt since
the man he beat, Buster Douglas.
But Evander Holyfield did
show up and fight to the bloody
end. The outcome of the contest
was sealed by the eighth round,
yet Holyfield continued to go toe-
to-toe with Bowe. He also went
chin-to-fist and almost went face-
to-mat.
"He has the heart of a lion
Bowe said. "He's a great guy
However, Bowe's words of-
fered little relief for the swollen
eyes and battered pride Holyfield
had to contend with.
Bowe was the better man.
"I told everybody Bowe
said. "It was time for a change.
George Bush had to go. Evander
Holyfield had to go. Evander was
surprised more than anybody
Another surprise will come
from Bowe's corner, soon. The
next title fight may be the last for
Bowe, whether he wins or not.
There has been serious talk of a
Bowe-(George) Foreman fight to
be held in China; In which case
the governing bodies in boxing
would strip Bowe of his title. The
rumored $20 million dollar purse
may be enough for Bowe not to
care.
What about Lenox Lewis, you
say?
"He's a big, ugly bum Bowe
said. "I can tell you right now, he
ain't takin' nothin' back to En-
gland
Probably not anytime soon,
with the potential Bowe may
forego any fight with Lewis for
the big money.
Smith
ior Smith h.i two personal goals set
for this foothill season, both directly
related to each other. One of these is
a team goal, and to Junior, the most
important.
"At the beginning of the vear,
the team set the goal to have a win-
ning season Smith said. "That
means a lot to me. I'm not used to
being on a losing team
Also on Smith's mind is gaining
the coveted 1,000 yards to enshrine
his name in the record books, a goal
that recent performances have
brought into his reach.
Smith has turned in outstand-
ing mshing games in his last three
outings, including a career high 232
yardsagainst ArkansasSt. This near-
record-breakingperformancehas pu t
Smith at 928 yards for the season.
"I oweitto myself to havea good
game, but I'm not worried about the
1,0(K) yards. I'm just going to go out
Continued from page 9
there and do what they ask me to,
and if the 1,000 yards come, they
a me Smith said that if he ends the
season against MemphisSt. with999
yards, and the Pirates win the game,
he will still feelgood.
Carlester Cnimpler Sr ECU's
all-time leading rusher, said he feels
Smith has a reasonable chance to
gain the 72 yards he needs to join him
in the record books, even though the
team is playing one of the top de-
fenses in the nation.
"This season is a tribute to
Junior's athletic ability he said. "In
the last part of the season, he's made
tremendous improvements and he's
nmning with more confidence. Jun-
ior isdefinitely in reach of l,000yards,
but he'll have to establish himself
early
Crump ler sa id he believes Smi th
will break his record as ECU's great-
est runningback, and has already
thought about the day that will hap-
pen.
"1 envision myself handingjun-
ior the game ball, as the tallest run-
ningback ever to play at ECU, to the
shortest
Smith said he has appreciated
the support and instruction that he
has received from the Pirate coach-
ing staff, particularly from
Runningbacks Coach Todd Berry.
Smith said that Berry is a great moti-
vator and he has no trouble under-
standing when Berry expects some-
thing from him.
"You can see it in his eyes he
said. "He's my father away from
home Apparently, Berry is similar
to Smith's real fatheras,accordingto
Smith, his father is also a strong mo-
tivator.
"(My father) is my strength
Smith said. "He reminds me to pray
and keeps me pumped up. He told
me in high school that 1 may be able
to play at any level. He's my motiva-
tor and my role model Smith said
the religious background his parents
instilled him with has been essential
to his athleticand personal success
I pray a lot for my strength he said.
"If I relate everything to that, I know
I'll succeed
Junior said he is not thrown by
all the attention he has received of
late, but it has changed things for
him. "I feel a little different in the
spotlight, but I just want to show
people what Jean do
Smith said he hopes he can con-
tinue to improve his performances in
the future and, 1,000-yard season or
not, he knows how he would like to
be remembered by Pirate fans three
years from now, after his ECU career
has ended.
"I just want them to say Junior
was a short guy with a lot of heart
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TRACK THE
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If you're going to any out-of-town
game this season get to the
E Memphis State game Nov. 21
in Liberty Bowl Stadium. Make
your plans now. Swing in Friday
night and hang out at Overton
- Square. Eatin milling, listening
and grazing. Crash late Saturday, beat your feet on
Mud Island, see the Pyramid, Graceland, a little
milk and cookies, whatever. Then the game and
wind up on Beale Street, where red, hot and blues
are guaranteed. Crawl home Sunday with enough
stories to last your 50th class reunion. Call today
for all the stuff you need, 1-800-873-6282. it's our
quarter. Make your reservations and all that jazz.
GET OUT OF TOWN
GET TO MEMPHIS
The East Carolinian is now accepting
applications for the spring semester for
News Editor.
Distinguishing characteristics necessary for
the position include:
� Bemg able to handle responsibility, meet
deadlines and work with a team,
� Planning, assigning and editing staff-
written stories,
� Knowledge of news writing style in
accordance with guidelines listed in The
Associated Press Stylebook,
� Familiarity with libel laws and other rules
and regulations which govern journalistic
practices,
� Experience with the Apple Macintosh and
applicable programs such as Aldus
PageMaker and Microsoft Word,
� Working as a Staff Writer for The East
Carolinian for at least one semester,
� Enrollment as a student at East Carolina
University with at least a 2.0 g.p.a.
Applications are available at The East Carolinian office
located on the second floor of the Student Pubs building.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 17, 1992
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 17, 1992
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.909
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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